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Sample records for molecular genetic markers

  1. Molecular Marker Systems for Oenothera Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Rauwolf, Uwe; Golczyk, Hieronim; Meurer, Jörg; Herrmann, Reinhold G.; Greiner, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The genus Oenothera has an outstanding scientific tradition. It has been a model for studying aspects of chromosome evolution and speciation, including the impact of plastid nuclear co-evolution. A large collection of strains analyzed during a century of experimental work and unique genetic possibilities allow the exchange of genetically definable plastids, individual or multiple chromosomes, and/or entire haploid genomes (Renner complexes) between species. However, molecular genetic approaches for the genus are largely lacking. In this study, we describe the development of efficient PCR-based marker systems for both the nuclear genome and the plastome. They allow distinguishing individual chromosomes, Renner complexes, plastomes, and subplastomes. We demonstrate their application by monitoring interspecific exchanges of genomes, chromosome pairs, and/or plastids during crossing programs, e.g., to produce plastome–genome incompatible hybrids. Using an appropriate partial permanent translocation heterozygous hybrid, linkage group 7 of the molecular map could be assigned to chromosome 9·8 of the classical Oenothera map. Finally, we provide the first direct molecular evidence that homologous recombination and free segregation of chromosomes in permanent translocation heterozygous strains is suppressed. PMID:18791241

  2. Molecular markers: a potential resource for ginger genetic diversity studies.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nor Asiah; Rafii, M Y; Mahmud, T M M; Hanafi, M M; Miah, Gous

    2016-12-01

    Ginger is an economically important and valuable plant around the world. Ginger is used as a food, spice, condiment, medicine and ornament. There is available information on biochemical aspects of ginger, but few studies have been reported on its molecular aspects. The main objective of this review is to accumulate the available molecular marker information and its application in diverse ginger studies. This review article was prepared by combing material from published articles and our own research. Molecular markers allow the identification and characterization of plant genotypes through direct access to hereditary material. In crop species, molecular markers are applied in different aspects and are useful in breeding programs. In ginger, molecular markers are commonly used to identify genetic variation and classify the relatedness among varieties, accessions, and species. Consequently, it provides important input in determining resourceful management strategies for ginger improvement programs. Alternatively, a molecular marker could function as a harmonizing tool for documenting species. This review highlights the application of molecular markers (isozyme, RAPD, AFLP, SSR, ISSR and others such as RFLP, SCAR, NBS and SNP) in genetic diversity studies of ginger species. Some insights on the advantages of the markers are discussed. The detection of genetic variation among promising cultivars of ginger has significance for ginger improvement programs. This update of recent literature will help researchers and students select the appropriate molecular markers for ginger-related research.

  3. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  4. Use of molecular genetic markers in forest management

    Treesearch

    Craig S. Echt

    1997-01-01

    When managing forests for biodiversity or sustainability, attention must be given to how silvicultural practices affect genetic diversity. A new generation of DNA-based markers affords a greater detail of genetic analysis than previously possible. These new markers, SSRs or microsatellites, have been used to demonstrate genetic diversity and infer evolutionary history...

  5. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R.; Muruaga-Martínez, José S.; Vargas-Vázquez, M.L. Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-01-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  6. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  7. Genetic characterization of fig tree mutants with molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M G F; Martins, A B G; Desidério, J A; Bertoni, B W; Alves, M C

    2012-08-06

    The fig (Ficus carica L.) is a fruit tree of great world importance and, therefore, the genetic improvement becomes an important field of research for better crops, being necessary to gather information on this species, mainly regarding its genetic variability so that appropriate propagation projects and management are made. The improvement programs of fig trees using conventional procedures in order to obtain new cultivars are rare in many countries, such as Brazil, especially due to the little genetic variability and to the difficulties in obtaining plants from gamete fusion once the wasp Blastophaga psenes, responsible for the natural pollinating, is not found in Brazil. In this way, the mutagenic genetic improvement becomes a solution of it. For this reason, in an experiment conducted earlier, fig plants formed by cuttings treated with gamma ray were selected based on their agronomic characteristics of interest. We determined the genetic variability in these fig tree selections, using RAPD and AFLP molecular markers, comparing them to each other and to the Roxo-de-Valinhos, used as the standard. For the reactions of DNA amplification, 140 RAPD primers and 12 primer combinations for AFLP analysis were used. The selections did not differ genetically between themselves and between them and the Roxo-de-Valinhos cultivar. Techniques that can detect polymorphism between treatments, such as DNA sequencing, must be tested. The phenotypic variation of plants may be due to epigenetic variation, necessitating the use of techniques with methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes.

  8. Genetic diversity assessment of summer squash landraces using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Mady, Emad A; Helaly, Alaa Al-Din; Abu El-Hamd, Abdel Naem; Abdou, Arafa; Shanan, Shamel A; Craker, Lyle E

    2013-07-01

    Plant identification, classification, and genotyping within a germplasm collection are essential elements for establishing a breeding program that enhances the probability of plants with desirable characteristics in the market place. In this study, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used as a molecular tool to assess the diversity and relationship among 20 summer squash (Curcubita pepo L.) landraces traditionally used to treat hypertension and prostate hyperplasia. A total of 10 RAPD primers produced 65 reproducible bands of which 46 (70.77 %) were polymorphic, indicating a large number of genotypes within the summer squash lines. Cluster analysis divided the summer squash germplasm into two groups, one including one landrace and a second containing 19 landraces that could be divided into five sub-groups. Results of this study indicate the potential of RAPD markers for the identification and assessment of genetic variations among squash landraces and provide a number of choices for developing a successful breeding program to improve summer squash.

  9. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) Molecular Genetic Markers1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Burkart-Waco, Diana; Kuppu, Sundaram; Britt, Anne; Chetelat, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Genetic markers are essential when developing or working with genetically variable populations. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) markers are primer pairs that amplify single-locus sequences that differ in size for two or more alleles. They are attractive for their ease of use for rapid genotyping and their codominant nature. Here, we describe a heuristic algorithm that uses a k-mer-based approach to search two or more genome sequences to locate polymorphic regions suitable for designing candidate IGG marker primers. As input to the IGG pipeline software, the user provides genome sequences and the desired amplicon sizes and size differences. Primer sequences flanking polymorphic insertions/deletions are produced as output. IGG marker files for three sets of genomes, Solanum lycopersicum/Solanum pennellii, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Columbia-0/Landsberg erecta-0 accessions, and S. lycopersicum/S. pennellii/Solanum tuberosum (three-way polymorphic) are included. PMID:27436831

  10. Molecular genetic variation in cultivated peanut cultivars and breeding lines revealed by highly informative SSR markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Groundnut or peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an economically important crop worldwide as a source of protein and cooking oil, particularly in developing countries. Because of its narrow genetic background and shortage of polymorphic genetic markers, molecular characterization of cultivated peanuts e...

  11. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  12. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops.

  13. Choosing the right molecular genetic markers for studying biodiversity: from molecular evolution to practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Chenuil, Anne; Anne, Chenuil

    2006-05-01

    The use of molecular genetic markers (MGMs) has become widespread among evolutionary biologists, and the methods of analysis of genetic data improve rapidly, yet an organized framework in which scientists can work is lacking. Elements of molecular evolution are summarized to explain the origin of variation at the DNA level, its measures, and the relationships linking genetic variability to the biological parameters of the studied organisms. MGM are defined by two components: the DNA region(s) screened, and the technique used to reveal its variation. Criteria of choice belong to three categories: (1) the level of variability, (2) the nature of the information (e.g. dominance vs. codominance, ploidy, ... ) which must be determined according to the biological question and (3) some practical criteria which mainly depend on the equipment of the laboratory and experience of the scientist. A three-step procedure is proposed for drawing up MGMs suitable to answer given biological questions, and compiled data are organized to guide the choice at each step: (1) choice, determined by the biological question, of the level of variability and of the criteria of the nature of information, (2) choice of the DNA region and (3) choice of the technique.

  14. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    PubMed Central

    Küpper Cardoso Perseguini, Juliana Morini; Chioratto, Alisson Fernando; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Moraes; Costa Mondego, Jorge Mauricio; Gazaffi, Rodrigo; Franco Garcia, Antonio Augusto; de Campos, Tatiana; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Rubiano, Luciana Benchimol

    2011-01-01

    A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats – SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms – AFLPs) for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger’s modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively) than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm. PMID:21637550

  15. Genetic diversity of spineless Cereus jamacaru accessions using morphological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, F I C; Bordallo, P N; Castro, A C R; Correia, D

    2013-10-17

    This is the first study to examine the genetic diversity of mandacaru cactus (Cereus jamacaru P. DC.). Plants of spineless mandacaru are commonly found in gardens and parks of urban areas in northeastern Brazil. In addition to exploring their ornamental potential, morphological, and genetic characterization may contribute to the development of plant materials that can be used as a source of macromolecules of potential economic interest. The goal of this study was to estimate the genetic variability of spineless mandacaru accessions using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers, and to characterize their morphology. Ten samples of newly emitted shoots with differentiated areolas and ribs were collected from each accession from the Cactaceous Germplasm Collection of Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical, in Fortaleza, CE. Shoot shape and aspects of spine primordia (presence, location, grouping, and size of spines) were evaluated. The morphological analysis showed that the spineless mandacaru presented spine primordia. Twenty-six RAPD and 15 ISSR primers were polymorphic. A total of 262 markers were obtained, 129 of which were polymorphic. The average polymorphism of ISSR markers was higher than that of RAPD markers. The dendrograms for both analyses showed differentiation between accessions. Nevertheless, the molecular markers detected higher levels of diversity and a different pattern of diversity than those found using morphological markers. The molecular results revealed significant genetic variability both within and between groups.

  16. [Determining mitochondrial molecular markers suitable for genetic diversity analysis of Cordyceps militaris].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjie; Guo, Lihong; Zhang, Shu; Liu, Xingzhong

    2015-07-04

    To screen efficient molecular markers suitable for genetic diversity analysis of Cordyceps militaris from mitochondrial DNA. We amplified 12 mitochondrial DNA fragments and 3 nuclear DNA fragments from each of 20 C. militaris isolates and analyzed nucleotide variations on these DNA fragments. We revealed a greatly higher genetic variation in mitochondrial DNA fragments than in nuclear DNA fragments. Specifically, C. militaris isolates exhibited intron presence/absence diversity in some mitochondrial fragments, and more variable sites were found in mitochondrial fragments than in nuclear fragments. The extent of nucleotide variations also varied by mitochondrial fragment, and intronic proteins seemed to be more vulnerable to amino acid changes than exonic proteins. Genetic diversity increased with the number of molecular markers used. We recommended using (in order) nad3-cox2. cox2-nad5, cox2, cox3, cob, and cox1 for future genetic diversity and population genetic studies of C. militaris.

  17. Genetic variability of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus isolates revealed by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Tigano-Milani, M S; Honeycutt, R J; Lacey, L A; Assis, R; McClelland, M; Sobral, B W

    1995-05-01

    Paecilomyces fumosoroseus (Deuteromycotina:Hyphomycetes) is a fungus that is potentially useful for the bio-control of economically important agricultural pests, such as whitefly (Bemisia tabaci). Arbitrarily primed PCR and PCR with tRNA consensus primers were used to analyze genetic variability among 27 P. fumosoroseus isolates, 15 of which came from the same host, B. tabaci, one P. lilacinus isolate, used as an outgroup, 9 previously unidentified Paecilomyces isolates. Fifteen 10-mer oligonucleotide primers of arbitrary sequence revealed 322 scorable binary characters. Principal coordinates and cluster analysis of characters showed that most of the P. fumosoroseus and Paecilomyces sp. isolates were in three phenetic groups with > 65% internal similarity. Two of the three arbitrary phenetic groups were closely related (76% similarity) with the third group quite different (only 14% similarity) from the first two. The phenetic groups did not correlate with geographical origin or host species. Genetic variability of isolates infecting whitefly in Florida was detected. Isolates from B. tabaci were represented in two of the three groups, and different genotypes were identified even when they were isolated from an epizootic population in India and Pakistan. There was no evidence of host-specific selection of genotypes, as has been shown in other entomopathogenic fungi. Three isolates morphologically classified as P. fumosoroseus were clustered in a phenetic group which displayed only 14% similarity to the other isolates of this species. Seven isolated that presented problems for morphological classification were found to be similar or, in three cases, identical to other P. fumosoroseus isolates that dit not present problems for morphological classification.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Molecular marker development and genetic diversity exploration by RNA-seq in Platycodon grandiflorum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Jung, Jungsu; Kim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Je Min; Choi, Doil; Yeam, Inhwa

    2015-10-01

    Platycodon grandiflorum, generally known as the bellflower or balloon flower, is the only species in the genus Platycodon of the family Campanulaceae. Platycodon plants have been traditionally used as a medicinal crop in East Asia for their antiphlogistic, antitussive, and expectorant properties. Despite these practical uses, marker-assisted selection and molecular breeding in platycodons have lagged due to the lack of genetic information on this genus. In this study, we performed RNA-seq analysis of three platycodon accessions to develop molecular markers and explore genetic diversity. First, genic simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were retrieved and compared; dinucleotide motifs were the most abundant repeats (39%-40%) followed by trinucleotide (25%-31%), tetranucleotide (1.5%-1.9%), and pentanucleotide (0.3%-1.0%) repeats. The result of in silico SSR analysis, three SSR markers were detected and showed possibility to distinguish three platycodon accessions. After several filtering procedures, 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to design 40 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers. Twelve of these PCR-based markers were validated as highly polymorphic and utilized to investigate genetic diversity in 21 platycodon accessions collected from various regions of South Korea. Collectively, the 12 markers yielded 35 alleles, with an average of 3 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.087 to 0.693, averaging 0.373 per locus. Since platycodon genetics have not been actively studied, the sequence information and the DNA markers generated from our research have the potential to contribute to further genetic improvements, genomic studies, and gene discovery in this genus.

  19. Molecular Markers and Cotton Genetic Improvement: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Waqas; Iqbal, Muhammad Zaffar; Ali Khan, Asif; Qayyum, Abdul; Ali Abid, Muhammad; Noor, Etrat; Qadir Ahmad, Muhammad; Hasan Abbasi, Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    Narrow genetic base and complex allotetraploid genome of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is stimulating efforts to avail required polymorphism for marker based breeding. The availability of draft genome sequence of G. raimondii and G. arboreum and next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies facilitated the development of high-throughput marker technologies in cotton. The concepts of genetic diversity, QTL mapping, and marker assisted selection (MAS) are evolving into more efficient concepts of linkage disequilibrium, association mapping, and genomic selection, respectively. The objective of the current review is to analyze the pace of evolution in the molecular marker technologies in cotton during the last ten years into the following four areas: (i) comparative analysis of low- and high-throughput marker technologies available in cotton, (ii) genetic diversity in the available wild and improved gene pools of cotton, (iii) identification of the genomic regions within cotton genome underlying economic traits, and (iv) marker based selection methodologies. Moreover, the applications of marker technologies to enhance the breeding efficiency in cotton are also summarized. Aforementioned genomic technologies and the integration of several other omics resources are expected to enhance the cotton productivity and meet the global fiber quantity and quality demands. PMID:25401149

  20. Molecular Analysis of Genetic Markers for Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sholl, Lynette M; Longtine, Janina; Kuo, Frank C

    2017-04-06

    Molecular analysis complements the clinical and histopathologic tools used to diagnose and subclassify hematologic malignancies. The presence of clonal antigen-receptor gene rearrangements can help to confirm the diagnosis of a B or T cell lymphoma and can serve as a fingerprint of that neoplasm to be used in identifying concurrent disease at disparate sites or recurrence at future time points. Certain lymphoid malignancies harbor a characteristic chromosomal translocation, a finding that may have significant implications for an individual's prognosis or response to therapy. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is typically used to detect antigen-receptor gene rearrangements as well as specific translocations that can be supplemented by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and karyotype analysis. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers (SSR).

    PubMed

    Hasnaoui, Nejib; Buonamici, Anna; Sebastiani, Federico; Mars, Messaoud; Zhang, Dapeng; Vendramin, Giovanni G

    2012-02-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In the present study, we report the development of 4 new polymorphic SSR markers. They have been used in addition to 11 SSRs previously published to investigate molecular diversity of 33 P. granatum ecotypes. Based on the multi-locus profiles, twenty-two distinctive genotypes were identified. Globally, quite low genetic diversity has been revealed, as measured by allele richness (2.83 per locus) and heterozygosity (He=0.245; Ho=0.243), reflecting the narrow genetic background of the plant material. Four synonymous groups could be detected involving 15 accessions. Results of ordination and cluster analysis suggested that almost all the Tunisian cultivars share similar genetic background, and are likely derived from a small number of introductions in ancient times. Results issued from this study provide essential information to project a pomegranate core-collection without plant material duplication and for sustainable management of pomegranate landraces at national and international level. Furthermore, these SSR markers are powerful tool for marker assisted selection (MAS) program and for QTL studies.

  2. [Genetic singularity coefficients of common vetch Vicia sativa L. accessions determined with molecular markers].

    PubMed

    Potokina, E K; Aleksandrova, T G

    2008-11-01

    Organization and practical application of ex situ collections require estimation of genetic differences between numerous accessions of local cultivars and field weed forms collected from the same ecological and geographical region and similar in their morphophysiological characteristics. A mathematical algorithm for estimating the degree of genetic singularity of a specimen in the system of local gene pool determined with the help of molecular markers is described. The utility of this algorithm is demonstrated by the example of classification of 677 common vetch accessions from the collection of the Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry from 11 ecological-geographic regions of Russia analyzed using AFLP. The proposed classification of accessions is the result of processing the AFLP data by weighting the marker traits based on their frequency in particular regions. This allowed each accession to be characterized according to the ratio of rare and frequent alleles as a genetic singularity coefficient. The proposed method is appropriate for any types of molecular markers. A practical result of its application is the classification of accessions using a five-point score scale, which can be added to descriptors of certificate databases and used for optimization of the work with collections.

  3. Microevolutionary Patterns and Molecular Markers: The Genetics of Geographic Variation in Ascaris suum

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, S. A.

    1996-01-01

    Molecular markers have been used only rarely to characterize the population genetic structure of nematodes. Published studies have suggested that different taxa may show distinct genetic architectures. Isoenzyme and RAPD markers have been used to investigate geographic variation of Ascaris suum at the level of infrapopulations (nematodes within individual hosts), within localities, and among geographic regions. Independent estimates of genetic differentiation among population samples based on isoenzyme and RAPD data showed similar patterns and substantial correlation. Heterozygote deficiencies within infrapopulations and large values for inbreeding coefficients among infrapopulations suggested that the composition of these populations was not consistent with a model of random recruitment from a large panmictic pool of life-cycle stages. Both isoenzyme and RAPD markers revealed moderate levels of genetic differentiation among samples representing infrapopulations and localities. Of total gene diversity, 9.4% (isoenzyme) and 9.2% (RAPD) was partitioned among infrapopulations. Geographic localities accounted for 7.8% (isoenzyme) and 6.2% (RAPD) of total diversity. Only infrapopulations from the same farm had low levels of differentiation. PMID:19277145

  4. Evaluation of genetically modified sugarcane lines carrying Cry 1AC gene using molecular marker techniques.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Roba M

    2013-01-01

    Five genetically modified insect resistant sugarcane lines harboring the Bt Cry 1AC gene to produce insecticidal proteins were compared with non-transgenic control by using three types of molecular marker techniques namely, RAPD, ISSR and AFLP. These techniques were applied on transgenic and non-transgenic plants to investigate the genetic variations, which may appear in sugarcane clones. This variation might demonstrate the genomic changes associated with the transformation process, which could change important molecular basis of various biological phenomena. Genetic variations were screened using 22 different RAPD primers, 10 ISSR primers and 13 AFLP primer combinations. Analysis of RAPD and ISSR banding patterns gave no exclusive evidence for genetic variations. Meanwhile, the percentage of polymorphic bands was 0.45% in each of RAPD and ISSR, while the polymorphism generated by AFLP analysis was 1.8%. The maximum percentage of polymorphic bands was 1.4%, 1.1% and 5.5% in RAPD, ISSR and AFLP, respectively. These results demonstrate that most transgenic lines showed genomic homogeneity and verified minor genomic changes. Dendrograms revealing the relationships among the transgenic and control plants were developed from the data of each of the three marker types.

  5. Assessment of genetic diversity among faba bean genotypes using agro-morphological and molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Megahed H.; Alghamdi, Salem S.; Migdadi, Hussein M.; Khan, Muhammad A.; El-Harty, Ehab H.; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A.

    2015-01-01

    Forty faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes were evaluated for their agro-morphological performance and molecular diversity under Central Region of Saudi Arabia conditions during 2010–11 and 2011–12 seasons. Field performance results showed that faba genotypes exhibited a significant amount of variation for their agro-morphological studied parameters. Giza40 recorded the tallest genotype (139.5 cm), highest number of seeds per plants (100.8), and the highest seed yield per plant (70.8 g). The best performing genotypes were Giza40, FLIP03-014FB, Gazira1 and Goff1. Genetic variability among genotypes was determined using Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 183 amplified fragments (alleles) and 1758 polymorphic fragments (bands) in SRAP and 202 alleles and 716 bands in AFLP were obtained using six SRAP and four AFLP primer combinations respectively. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for AFLP and SRAP markers were higher than 0.8, indicating the existence of a considerable amount of genetic diversity among faba tested genotypes. The UPGMA based clustering of faba genotypes was largely based on origin and/or genetic background. Result of cluster analysis based on SRAP showed weak and not significant correlation while, it was highly significant based on AFLP analysis with agro-morphological characters (r = 0.01, p > 0.54 and r = 0.26, p < 0.004 respectively). Combined SRAP and AFLP markers proved to be significantly useful for genetic diversity assessment at molecular level. They exhibited high discrimination power, and were able to distinguish the faba bean genotypes with high efficiency and accuracy levels. PMID:25972757

  6. Novel molecular markers of Chlamydia pecorum genetic diversity in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chlamydia pecorum is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of reproductive and ocular disease in several animal hosts including koalas, sheep, cattle and goats. C. pecorum strains detected in koalas are genetically diverse, raising interesting questions about the origin and transmission of this species within koala hosts. While the ompA gene remains the most widely-used target in C. pecorum typing studies, it is generally recognised that surface protein encoding genes are not suited for phylogenetic analysis and it is becoming increasingly apparent that the ompA gene locus is not congruent with the phylogeny of the C. pecorum genome. Using the recently sequenced C. pecorum genome sequence (E58), we analysed 10 genes, including ompA, to evaluate the use of ompA as a molecular marker in the study of koala C. pecorum genetic diversity. Results Three genes (incA, ORF663, tarP) were found to contain sufficient nucleotide diversity and discriminatory power for detailed analysis and were used, with ompA, to genotype 24 C. pecorum PCR-positive koala samples from four populations. The most robust representation of the phylogeny of these samples was achieved through concatenation of all four gene sequences, enabling the recreation of a "true" phylogenetic signal. OmpA and incA were of limited value as fine-detailed genetic markers as they were unable to confer accurate phylogenetic distinctions between samples. On the other hand, the tarP and ORF663 genes were identified as useful "neutral" and "contingency" markers respectively, to represent the broad evolutionary history and intra-species genetic diversity of koala C. pecorum. Furthermore, the concatenation of ompA, incA and ORF663 sequences highlighted the monophyletic nature of koala C. pecorum infections by demonstrating a single evolutionary trajectory for koala hosts that is distinct from that seen in non-koala hosts. Conclusions While the continued use of ompA as a fine

  7. Novel molecular markers of Chlamydia pecorum genetic diversity in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Marsh, James; Kollipara, Avinash; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2011-04-18

    Chlamydia pecorum is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of reproductive and ocular disease in several animal hosts including koalas, sheep, cattle and goats. C. pecorum strains detected in koalas are genetically diverse, raising interesting questions about the origin and transmission of this species within koala hosts. While the ompA gene remains the most widely-used target in C. pecorum typing studies, it is generally recognised that surface protein encoding genes are not suited for phylogenetic analysis and it is becoming increasingly apparent that the ompA gene locus is not congruent with the phylogeny of the C. pecorum genome. Using the recently sequenced C. pecorum genome sequence (E58), we analysed 10 genes, including ompA, to evaluate the use of ompA as a molecular marker in the study of koala C. pecorum genetic diversity. Three genes (incA, ORF663, tarP) were found to contain sufficient nucleotide diversity and discriminatory power for detailed analysis and were used, with ompA, to genotype 24 C. pecorum PCR-positive koala samples from four populations. The most robust representation of the phylogeny of these samples was achieved through concatenation of all four gene sequences, enabling the recreation of a "true" phylogenetic signal. OmpA and incA were of limited value as fine-detailed genetic markers as they were unable to confer accurate phylogenetic distinctions between samples. On the other hand, the tarP and ORF663 genes were identified as useful "neutral" and "contingency" markers respectively, to represent the broad evolutionary history and intra-species genetic diversity of koala C. pecorum. Furthermore, the concatenation of ompA, incA and ORF663 sequences highlighted the monophyletic nature of koala C. pecorum infections by demonstrating a single evolutionary trajectory for koala hosts that is distinct from that seen in non-koala hosts. While the continued use of ompA as a fine-detailed molecular marker for epidemiological

  8. Comparison of algorithms to infer genetic population structure from unlinked molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Peña-Malavera, Andrea; Bruno, Cecilia; Fernandez, Elmer; Balzarini, Monica

    2014-08-01

    Identifying population genetic structure (PGS) is crucial for breeding and conservation. Several clustering algorithms are available to identify the underlying PGS to be used with genetic data of maize genotypes. In this work, six methods to identify PGS from unlinked molecular marker data were compared using simulated and experimental data consisting of multilocus-biallelic genotypes. Datasets were delineated under different biological scenarios characterized by three levels of genetic divergence among populations (low, medium, and high FST) and two numbers of sub-populations (K=3 and K=5). The relative performance of hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering, as well as model-based clustering (STRUCTURE) and clustering from neural networks (SOM-RP-Q). We use the clustering error rate of genotypes into discrete sub-populations as comparison criterion. In scenarios with great level of divergence among genotype groups all methods performed well. With moderate level of genetic divergence (FST=0.2), the algorithms SOM-RP-Q and STRUCTURE performed better than hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering. In all simulated scenarios with low genetic divergence and in the experimental SNP maize panel (largely unlinked), SOM-RP-Q achieved the lowest clustering error rate. The SOM algorithm used here is more effective than other evaluated methods for sparse unlinked genetic data.

  9. Molecular Markers Allow to Remove Introgressed Genetic Background: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carmen; Toro, Miguel Ángel; Fernández, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    The maintenance of genetically differentiated populations can be important for several reasons (whether for wild species or domestic breeds of economic interest). When those populations are introgressed by foreign individuals, methods to eliminate the exogenous alleles can be implemented to recover the native genetic background. This study used computer simulations to explore the usefulness of several molecular based diagnostic approaches to recover of a native population after suffering an introgression event where some exogenous alleles were admixed for a few generations. To remove the exogenous alleles, different types of molecular markers were used in order to decide which of the available individuals contributed descendants to next generation and their number of offspring. Recovery was most efficient using diagnostic markers (i.e., with private alleles) and least efficient when using alleles present in both native and exogenous populations at different frequencies. The increased inbreeding was a side-effect of the management strategy. Both values (% of native alleles and inbreeding) were largely dependent on the amount of exogenous individuals entering the population and the number of generations of admixture that occurred prior to management. PMID:23152901

  10. Prediction of Genetic Values of Quantitative Traits in Plant Breeding Using Pedigree and Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Crossa, José; Campos, Gustavo de los; Pérez, Paulino; Gianola, Daniel; Burgueño, Juan; Araus, José Luis; Makumbi, Dan; Singh, Ravi P.; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Yan, Jianbing; Arief, Vivi; Banziger, Marianne; Braun, Hans-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    The availability of dense molecular markers has made possible the use of genomic selection (GS) for plant breeding. However, the evaluation of models for GS in real plant populations is very limited. This article evaluates the performance of parametric and semiparametric models for GS using wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays) data in which different traits were measured in several environmental conditions. The findings, based on extensive cross-validations, indicate that models including marker information had higher predictive ability than pedigree-based models. In the wheat data set, and relative to a pedigree model, gains in predictive ability due to inclusion of markers ranged from 7.7 to 35.7%. Correlation between observed and predictive values in the maize data set achieved values up to 0.79. Estimates of marker effects were different across environmental conditions, indicating that genotype × environment interaction is an important component of genetic variability. These results indicate that GS in plant breeding can be an effective strategy for selecting among lines whose phenotypes have yet to be observed. PMID:20813882

  11. Three Molecular Markers Show No Evidence of Population Genetic Structure in the Gouldian Finch (Erythrura gouldiae)

    PubMed Central

    West, Andrea J.; Cardilini, Adam P. A.; Clark, Jennalee A.; Maute, Kimberley L.; Legge, Sarah; Brazill-Boast, James; Griffith, Simon C.; Rollins, Lee A.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of genetic diversity and connectivity between regions can inform conservation managers about risk of inbreeding, potential for adaptation and where population boundaries lie. The Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae) is a threatened species in northern Australia, occupying the savannah woodlands of the biogeographically complex monsoon tropics. We present the most comprehensive population genetic analysis of diversity and structure the Gouldian finch using 16 microsatellite markers, mitochondrial control region and 3,389 SNPs from genotyping-by-sequencing. Mitochondrial diversity is compared across three related, co-distributed finches with different conservation threat-statuses. There was no evidence of genetic differentiation across the western part of the range in any of the molecular markers, and haplotype diversity but not richness was lower than a common co-distributed species. Individuals within the panmictic population in the west may be highly dispersive within this wide area, and we urge caution when interpreting anecdotal observations of changes to the distribution and/or flock sizes of Gouldian finch populations as evidence of overall changes to the population size of this species. PMID:27936082

  12. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity among vine accessions using DNA markers.

    PubMed

    da Costa, A F; Teodoro, P E; Bhering, L L; Tardin, F D; Daher, R F; Campos, W F; Viana, A P; Pereira, M G

    2017-04-13

    Viticulture presents a number of economic and social advantages, such as increasing employment levels and fixing the labor force in rural areas. With the aim of initiating a program of genetic improvement in grapevine from the State University of the state of Rio de Janeiro North Darcy Ribeiro, genetic diversity between 40 genotypes (varieties, rootstock, and species of different subgenera) was evaluated using Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers. We built a matrix of binary data, whereby the presence of a band was assigned as "1" and the absence of a band was assigned as "0." The genetic distance was calculated between pairs of genotypes based on the arithmetic complement from the Jaccard Index. The results revealed the presence of considerable variability in the collection. Analysis of the genetic dissimilarity matrix revealed that the most dissimilar genotypes were Rupestris du Lot and Vitis rotundifolia because they were the most genetically distant (0.5972). The most similar were genotypes 31 (unidentified) and Rupestris du lot, which showed zero distance, confirming the results of field observations. A duplicate was confirmed, consistent with field observations, and a short distance was found between the variety 'Italy' and its mutation, 'Ruby'. The grouping methods used were somewhat concordant.

  13. Population genetic structure of rare and endangered plants using molecular markers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raji, Jennifer; Atkinson, Carter T.

    2013-01-01

    This study was initiated to assess the levels of genetic diversity and differentiation in the remaining populations of Phyllostegia stachyoides and Melicope zahlbruckneri in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and determine the extent of gene flow to identify genetically distinct individuals or groups for conservation purposes. Thirty-six Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphic (AFLP) primer combinations generated a total of 3,242 polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments in the P. stachyoides population with a percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB) ranging from 39.3 to 65.7% and 2,780 for the M. zahlbruckneri population with a PPB of 18.8 to 64.6%. Population differentiation (Fst) of AFLP loci between subpopulations of P. stachyoides was low (0.043) across populations. Analysis of molecular variance of P. stachyoides showed that 4% of the observed genetic differentiation occurred between populations in different kīpuka and 96% when individuals were pooled from all kīpuka. Moderate genetic diversity was detected within the M. zahlbruckneri population. Bayesian and multivariate analyses both classified the P. stachyoides and M. zahlbruckneri populations into genetic groups with considerable sub-structuring detected in the P. stachyoides population. The proportion of genetic differentiation among populations explained by geographical distance was estimated by Mantel tests. No spatial correlation was found between genetic and geographic distances in both populations. Finally, a moderate but significant gene flow that could be attributed to insect or bird-mediated dispersal of pollen across the different kīpuka was observed. The results of this study highlight the utility of a multi-allelic DNA-based marker in screening a large number of polymorphic loci in small and closely related endangered populations and revealed the presence of genetically unique groups of individuals in both M. zahlbruckneri and P. stachyoides populations. Based on these findings

  14. Genetic variation in a wild population of the 'sleep' passion fruit (Passiflora setacea) based on molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira-Silva, C B M; Santos, E S L; Conceição, L D H C S; Cardoso-Silva, C B; Pereira, A S; Oliveira, A C; Corrêa, R X

    2012-03-22

    Little is known about the molecular genetic diversity of most Passiflora species. We used RAPD markers to evaluate the genetic diversity of 24 genotypes of the 'sleep' passion fruit (Passiflora setacea). Twelve primers generated 95 markers, 88% of which were polymorphic. The genetic distance estimated by the complement of the Dice index ranged from 0.29 (among accessions Ps-G1 and Ps-G13) to 0.69 (among accessions Ps-G21 and Ps-G23). Genotype grouping based on the UPGMA algorithm showed considerable variability among genotypes. We conclude that P. setacea has a broad genetic base that could be exploited in breeding programs.

  15. Candidate gene molecular markers as tools for analyzing genetic susceptibility to Morbillivirus infection in stranded Cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Stejskalova, Karla; Bayerova, Zuzana; Futas, Jan; Hrazdilova, Kristyna; Klumplerova, Marie; Oppelt, Jan; Splichalova, Petra; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Terracciano, Giuliana; Paiu, Romulus-Marian; Ursache, Teodor Dan; Modry, David; Horin, Petr

    2017-09-11

    Morbilliviruses, such as Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) or Phocine distemper virus (PDV), represent a growing threat for marine mammals on both hemispheres. Since free-ranging animal populations strongly rely on natural resistance mechanisms, innate immunity related genes and virus cell entry receptor genes may represent key factors involved in susceptibility to CeMV in Cetaceans. Using the next generation sequencing technology, we have sequenced eleven candidate genes in two model species, Stenella coeruleoalba and Phocoena phocoena. Suitable single nucleotide polymorphism markers of potential functional importance, located in genes coding for basigin (BSG, CD147), the signaling lymphocyte activating molecule (SLAMF1), the poliovirus related receptor-4 (NECTIN4, PVRL4), toll-like receptors 3,7,8 (TLR3, TLR7, TLR8), natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (SLC11A1) and natural cytotoxicity triggering receptor 1 (NCR1), were identified in each model species, along with MHC-DQB haplotypes unique for each species. This set of molecular markers represents a potentially useful tool for studying host genetic variation and susceptibility to Morbillivirus infection in Cetaceans as well as for studying functionally important genetic diversity of selected Cetacean populations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic approaches for studying myiasis-causing flies: molecular markers and mitochondrial genomics.

    PubMed

    de Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria Lima; Lessinger, Ana Cláudia

    2006-01-01

    "Myiasis-causing flies" is a generic term that includes species from numerous dipteran families, mainly Calliphoridae and Oestridae, of which blowflies, screwworm flies and botflies are among the most important. This group of flies is characterized by the ability of their larvae to develop in animal flesh. When the host is a live vertebrate, such parasitism by dipterous larvae is known as primary myiasis. Myiasis-causing flies can be classified as saprophagous (free-living species), facultative or obligate parasites. Many of these flies are of great medical and veterinary importance in Brazil because of their role as key livestock insect-pests and vectors of pathogens, in addition to being considered important legal evidence in forensic entomology. The characterization of myiasis-causing flies using molecular markers to study mtDNA (by RFLP) and nuclear DNA (by RAPD and microsatellite) has been used to identify the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for specific patterns of genetic variability. These approaches have been successfully used to analyze the population structures of the New World screwworm fly Cochliomyia hominivorax and the botfly Dermatobia hominis. In this review, various aspects of the organization, evolution and potential applications of the mitochondrial genome of myiasis-causing flies in Brazil, and the analysis of nuclear markers in genetic studies of populations, are discussed.

  17. [Markers for non-invasive molecular genetic diagnosis of oncourological diseases].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlenko, D S; Perepechin, D V; Apolikhin, O I; Efremov, G D; Sivkov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is accumulated mass of data on the molecular-genetic disorders in prostate cancer (PCa), bladder cancer (BC) and renal cancer (RC). Tumor cells in these diseases are present in the urine sediment; their number is sufficient for molecular genetic analysis that makes possible the development of noninvasive diagnosis of oncourological diseases. A characteristic feature of PCa includes the overexpression of the PCA3 gene; assay kit Progensa™ to quantify such overexpression has been developed; approximately 50% of tumors express a TMPRSS2-ERG chimeric oncogene. Combined analysis of PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG allows to detect PCa with a diagnostic accuracy of 84%, which is significantly higher than that of prostate specific antigen test. As a potential markers of BC, there are somatic mutations in FGFR3, PIK3CA, TERT genes in urine sediment, which are found in this disease with a frequency of about 60, 30 and 50%, respectively. The basis of the test system for DNA diagnosis of BC in urine sediment may include a definition of a combination of mutations in these genes with microsatellite instability. Aberrant methylation of the 5'-regulatory regions of tumor suppressor genes, integrated in the panel, also is considered as a tool in the diagnosis of RC (VHL, RASSF1, RARB2, CDH1), PCa (GSTP1, PTGS2, LGALS3) and BC (RASSF1, APC, SFRP2) after standardization of panels of loci investigated, sample preparation methods, bisulfite conversion, and the design of primers and probes. Thus, a test systems for molecular genetic diagnosis of oncourological diseases in urine sediment are currently available or may be developed in the near future.

  18. Genetic diversity analysis of Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. using AFLP molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Pereira, A M S; Coppede, J S; França, S C; Ming, L C; Bertoni, B W

    2016-02-19

    Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. is a medicinal plant native to Cerrado vegetation in Brazil, and it is popularly used to treat urogenital tract infections. The objective of the present study was to assess the genetic variability of natural C. antisyphiliticus populations using AFLP molecular markers. Accessions were collected in the states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo, and Goiás. The genotyping of individuals was performed using a LI-COR® DNA Analyzer 4300. The variability within populations was found to be greater than the variability between them. The F(ST) value was 0.3830, which indicated that the populations were highly structured. A higher percentage of polymorphic loci (92.16%) and greater genetic diversity were found in the population accessions from Pratinha-MG. Gene flow was considered restricted (N(m) = 1.18), and there was no correlation between genetic and geographic distances. The populations of C. antisyphiliticus exhibited an island-model structure, which demonstrates the vulnerability of the species.

  19. Comparative analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers for the molecular identification of Rhipicephalus spp.

    PubMed

    Latrofa, Maria S; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Annoscia, Giada; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-12-01

    The genus Rhipicephalus (Acari: Ixodidae) comprises a large number of vectors of pathogens of substantial medical and veterinary concern; however, species identification based solely on morphological features is often challenging. In the present study, genetic distance within selected Rhipicephalus species (i.e., Rhipicephalus bursa, Rhipicephalus guilhoni, Rhipicephalus muhsamae, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and Rhipicephalus turanicus), were investigated based on molecular and phylogenetic analyses of fragments of the mitochondrial 16S, 12S and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) genes, as well as of the whole sequences of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS-2) region. Mean values of inter-specific genetic distance (e.g., up to 12.6%, 11.1% and 15.2%), as well as of intra-specific genetic distance (e.g., 0.9%, 0.9% and 1%), calculated using the Kimura-2 parameter substitution model with uniform rates among sites for 16S, 12S and cox1 genes, respectively, confirmed the differentiation of the rhipicephaline species herein examined. The molecular identification was also supported by the distinct separation of species-specific clades inferred from the phylogenetic analyses of all mitochondrial sequences. Conversely, little interspecific divergence was detected amongst ribosomal ITS-2 sequences (i.e., up to 2.8%) for species belonging to the R. sanguineus complex, which resulted in the ambiguous placement of selected R. sanguineus s.l. and R. turanicus sequences in the corresponding phylogenetic tree. Results from this study confirm the suitability of mtDNA markers for the reliable identification of ticks within the Rhipicephalus genus and provide a framework for future studies of taxonomy, speciation history and evolution of this group of ticks.

  20. Comparison of the utility of barley retrotransposon families for genetic analysis by molecular marker techniques.

    PubMed

    Leigh, F; Kalendar, R; Lea, V; Lee, D; Donini, P; Schulman, A H

    2003-07-01

    The Sequence-Specific Amplification Polymorphism (S-SAP) method, and the related molecular marker techniques IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism), are based on retrotransposon activity, and are increasingly widely used. However, there have been no systematic analyses of the parameters of these methods or of the utility of different retrotransposon families in producing polymorphic, scorable fingerprints. We have generated S-SAP, IRAP, and REMAP data for three barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) varieties using primers based on sequences from six retrotransposon families (BARE-1, BAGY-1, BAGY-2, Sabrina, Nikita and Sukkula). The effect of the number of selective bases on the S-SAP profiles has been examined and the profiles obtained with eight MseI+3 selective primers compared for all the elements. Polymorphisms detected in the insertion pattern of all the families show that each can be used for S-SAP. The uniqueness of each transposition event and differences in the historic activity of each family suggest that the use of multiple retrotransposon families for genetic analysis will find applications in mapping, fingerprinting, and marker-assisted selection and evolutionary studies, not only in barley and other Hordeum species and related taxa, but also more generally.

  1. Genetic diversity in wild species of passion fruit (Passiflora trintae) based on molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira-Silva, C B M; Cardoso-Silva, C B; Santos, E S L; Conceição, L D H C S; Pereira, A S; Oliveira, A C; Corrêa, R X

    2010-10-26

    In spite of the importance of and the considerable variability observed in Passiflora (Passifloraceae), little is known about the genetic diversity of most of the species of this genus. We evaluated the genetic diversity by RAPD markers in 18 genotypes of Passiflora trintae. The 15 primers generated 112 markers, 84% of which were polymorphic. The genetic distance estimated by the complement of the Dice index (average dissimilarity = 0.30) and genotype grouping based on the UPGMA algorithm showed low variability among genotypes. More attention should be given to the study and conservation of the biodiversity of this economically important genus.

  2. Analysis of genetic diversity of certain species of Piper using RAPD-based molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Utpal; Tanti, Bhaben; Rethy, Parakkal; Gajurel, Padma Raj

    2014-09-01

    The utility of RAPD markers in assessing genetic diversity and phenetic relationships of six different species of Piper from Northeast India was investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with four arbitrary 10-mer oligonucleotide primers applied to the six species produced a total of 195 marker bands, of which, 159 were polymorphic. On average, six RAPD fragments were amplified per reaction. In the UPGMA phenetic dendrogram based on Jaccard's coefficient, the different accessions of Piper showed a high level of genetic variation. This study may be useful in identifying diverse genetic stocks of Piper, which may then be conserved on a priority basis.

  3. [Follicular cell (papillary and follicular) thyroid carcinoma, genetic inheritance, and molecular diagnostic markers].

    PubMed

    Kazubskaia, T P; Kozlova, V M; Kondrat'eva, T T; Pavlovskaia, A I; Marakhonov, A V; Baranova, A V; Ivanova, N I; Stepanova, A A; Poliakov, A V; Belev, N F; Brzhezovskiĭ, V Zh

    2014-01-01

    To determine the genetic forms of follicular cell thyroid carcinoma (FCTC) (papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma (PTC and FTC)), to identify criteria to individually predict the development of the same disease for relatives, and to assess the role of molecular markers in the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of this disease. One hundred and ninety adult patients aged 20 to 84 years with histologically verified PTC and FTC and 20 children (12 patients with PTC and 8 with benign thyroid tumors) aged 2 to 16 years were examined. To assess the role of the BRAF gene as a molecular marker for thyroid carcinoma, DNA was isolated from the thyroid tumor tissue of 29 patients, which had been obtained by fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) and scraping and swabbing the cytological specimen previously showing an area containing tumor cells. A BRAF c.1799T>A (p.V600E) mutation in the FNAB specimens was tested by allele-specific ligation, followed by PCR amplification. The examinees' families were found to have a segregation of benign thyroid tumor and nontumor diseases (13.6%). Neoplasias of different sites were observed in 15% of the patients' relatives. Multiple primary tumors were detected in 6.1% of the patients and in 25% of the examined children (3/12). PTC was ascertained to accumulate as two clinical forms in the families. One form belongs to familial PTC (FPTC) in which two or three generations of relatives in the family are afflicted by only PTC and have a more severe phenotype of the disease. The other includes an association of FPTC with papillary kidney cancer. Furthermore, FPTC and PTC may be a component of multitumor syndromes, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Cowden syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis. The familial hereditary forms of FCTC were generally revealed in 4.2% of the patients. BRAF v600E mutations were found in only 3 patients with Stages II and III PTC and were not in all the 12 children with PTC. The found clinical

  4. Molecular markers for genetic diversity, gene flow and genetic population structure of freshwater mussel species.

    PubMed

    Choupina, A B; Martins, I M

    2014-08-01

    Freshwater mussel species are in global decline. Anthropogenic changes of river channels and the decrease of autochthonous fish population, the natural hosts of mussels larval stages (glochidia), are the main causes. Therefore, the conservation of mussel species depends not only on habitat conservation, but also on the availability of the fish host. In Portugal, information concerning most of the mussel species is remarkably scarce. One of the most known species, Unio pictorum is also in decline however, in the basins of the rivers Tua and Sabor (Northeast of Portugal), there is some indication of relatively large populations. The aforementioned rivers can be extremely important for this species conservation not only in Portugal, but also in the remaining Iberian Peninsula. Thus, it is important to obtain data concerning Unio pictorum bioecology (distribution, habitat requirements, population structure, genetic variability, reproductive cycle and recruitment rates), as well as the genetic variability and structure of the population. Concomitantly, information concerning fish population structure, the importance of the different fish species as "glochidia" hosts and their appropriate density to allow effective mussel recruitment, will also be assessed. The achieved data is crucial to obtain information to develop effective management measures in order to promote the conservation of this bivalve species, the conservation of autochthonous fish populations, and consequently the integrity of the river habitats.

  5. DOMINO: development of informative molecular markers for phylogenetic and genome-wide population genetic studies in non-model organisms.

    PubMed

    Frías-López, Cristina; Sánchez-Herrero, José F; Guirao-Rico, Sara; Mora, Elisa; Arnedo, Miquel A; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio

    2016-12-15

    The development of molecular markers is one of the most important challenges in phylogenetic and genome wide population genetics studies, especially in studies with non-model organisms. A highly promising approach for obtaining suitable markers is the utilization of genomic partitioning strategies for the simultaneous discovery and genotyping of a large number of markers. Unfortunately, not all markers obtained from these strategies provide enough information for solving multiple evolutionary questions at a reasonable taxonomic resolution. We have developed Development Of Molecular markers In Non-model Organisms (DOMINO), a bioinformatics tool for informative marker development from both next generation sequencing (NGS) data and pre-computed sequence alignments. The application implements popular NGS tools with new utilities in a highly versatile pipeline specifically designed to discover or select personalized markers at different levels of taxonomic resolution. These markers can be directly used to study the taxa surveyed for their design, utilized for further downstream PCR amplification in a broader set taxonomic scope, or exploited as suitable templates to bait design for target DNA enrichment techniques. We conducted an exhaustive evaluation of the performance of DOMINO via computer simulations and illustrate its utility to find informative markers in an empirical dataset. DOMINO is freely available from www.ub.edu/softevol/domino CONTACT: elsanchez@ub.edu or jrozas@ub.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Population Structure, Genetic Diversity and Molecular Marker-Trait Association Analysis for High Temperature Stress Tolerance in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Saumya Ranjan; Sahoo, Ambika; Mohapatra, Sudipti; Nayak, Deepak Kumar; Mahender, Anumalla; Meher, Jitandriya; Anandan, Annamalai

    2016-01-01

    Rice exhibits enormous genetic diversity, population structure and molecular marker-traits associated with abiotic stress tolerance to high temperature stress. A set of breeding lines and landraces representing 240 germplasm lines were studied. Based on spikelet fertility percent under high temperature, tolerant genotypes were broadly classified into four classes. Genetic diversity indicated a moderate level of genetic base of the population for the trait studied. Wright’s F statistic estimates showed a deviation of Hardy-Weinberg expectation in the population. The analysis of molecular variance revealed 25 percent variation between population, 61 percent among individuals and 14 percent within individuals in the set. The STRUCTURE analysis categorized the entire population into three sub-populations and suggested that most of the landraces in each sub-population had a common primary ancestor with few admix individuals. The composition of materials in the panel showed the presence of many QTLs representing the entire genome for the expression of tolerance. The strongly associated marker RM547 tagged with spikelet fertility under stress and the markers like RM228, RM205, RM247, RM242, INDEL3 and RM314 indirectly controlling the high temperature stress tolerance were detected through both mixed linear model and general linear model TASSEL analysis. These markers can be deployed as a resource for marker-assisted breeding program of high temperature stress tolerance. PMID:27494320

  7. Population Structure, Genetic Diversity and Molecular Marker-Trait Association Analysis for High Temperature Stress Tolerance in Rice.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sharat Kumar; Barik, Saumya Ranjan; Sahoo, Ambika; Mohapatra, Sudipti; Nayak, Deepak Kumar; Mahender, Anumalla; Meher, Jitandriya; Anandan, Annamalai; Pandit, Elssa

    2016-01-01

    Rice exhibits enormous genetic diversity, population structure and molecular marker-traits associated with abiotic stress tolerance to high temperature stress. A set of breeding lines and landraces representing 240 germplasm lines were studied. Based on spikelet fertility percent under high temperature, tolerant genotypes were broadly classified into four classes. Genetic diversity indicated a moderate level of genetic base of the population for the trait studied. Wright's F statistic estimates showed a deviation of Hardy-Weinberg expectation in the population. The analysis of molecular variance revealed 25 percent variation between population, 61 percent among individuals and 14 percent within individuals in the set. The STRUCTURE analysis categorized the entire population into three sub-populations and suggested that most of the landraces in each sub-population had a common primary ancestor with few admix individuals. The composition of materials in the panel showed the presence of many QTLs representing the entire genome for the expression of tolerance. The strongly associated marker RM547 tagged with spikelet fertility under stress and the markers like RM228, RM205, RM247, RM242, INDEL3 and RM314 indirectly controlling the high temperature stress tolerance were detected through both mixed linear model and general linear model TASSEL analysis. These markers can be deployed as a resource for marker-assisted breeding program of high temperature stress tolerance.

  8. Assessment of genetic diversity in indigenous turmeric (Curcuma longa) germplasm from India using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sushma; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Suresh; Tewari, S K; Roy, R K; Goel, A K; Rana, T S

    2015-04-01

    Curcuma longa L., commonly known as turmeric, is one of the economically and medicinally important plant species. It is predominantly cultivated in the tropical and sub tropical countries. India is the largest producer, and exporter of turmeric in the world, followed by China, Indonesia, Bangladesh and Thailand. In the present study, Directed Amplification of Minisatellite DNA (DAMD) and Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR), methods were used to estimate the genetic variability in indigenous turmeric germplasm. Cumulative data analysis for DAMD (15) and ISSR (13) markers resulted into 478 fragments, out of which 392 fragments were polymorphic, revealing 82 % polymorphism across the turmeric genotypes. Wide range of pairwise genetic distances (0.03-0.59) across the genotypes revealed that these genotypes are genetically quite diverse. The UPGMA dendrogram generated using cumulative data showed significant relationships amongst the genotypes. All 29 genotypes studied grouped into two clusters irrespective of their geographical affiliations with 100 % bootstrap value except few genotypes, suggesting considerable diversity amongst the genotypes. These results suggested that the current collection of turmeric genotypes preserve the vast majority of natural variations. The results further demonstrate the efficiency and reliability of DAMD and ISSR markers in determining the genetic diversity and relationships among the indigenous turmeric germplasm. DAMD and ISSR profiling have identified diverse turmeric genotypes, which could be further utilized in various genetic improvement programmes including conventional as well as marker assisted breeding towards development of new and desirable turmeric genotypes.

  9. Analysis of genetic diversity of Persea bombycina "Som" using RAPD-based molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Bhau, Brijmohan Singh; Medhi, Kalyani; Das, Ambrish P; Saikia, Siddhartha P; Neog, Kartik; Choudhury, S N

    2009-08-01

    The utility of RAPD markers in assessing genetic diversity and phenetic relationships in Persea bombycina, a major tree species for golden silk (muga) production, was investigated using 48 genotypes from northeast India. Thirteen RAPD primer combinations generated 93 bands. On average, seven RAPD fragments were amplified per reaction. In a UPGMA phenetic dendrogram based on Jaccard's coefficient, the P. bombycina accessions showed a high level of genetic variation, as indicated by genetic similarity. The grouping in the phenogram was highly consistent, as indicated by high values of cophenetic correlation and high bootstrap values at the key nodes. The accessions were scattered on a plot derived from principal correspondence analysis. The study concluded that the high level of genetic diversity in the P. bombycina accessions may be attributed to the species' outcrossing nature. This study may be useful in identifying diverse genetic stocks of P. bombycina, which may then be conserved on a priority basis.

  10. Construction of intersubspecific molecular genetic map of lentil based on ISSR, RAPD and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mamta; Verma, Bhawna; Kumar, Naresh; Chahota, Rakesh K; Rathour, Rajeev; Sharma, Shyam K; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Sharma, Tilak R

    2012-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris), is a self-pollinating diploid (2n = 2x = 14), cool-season legume crop and is consumed worldwide as a rich source of protein (~24.0%), largely in vegetarian diets. Here we report development of a genetic linkage map of Lens using 114 F(2) plants derived from the intersubspecific cross between L 830 and ILWL 77. RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) primers revealed more polymorphism than ISSR (intersimple sequence repeat) and SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers. The highest proportion (30.72%) of segregation distortion was observed in RAPD markers. Of the 235 markers (34 SSR, 9 ISSR and 192 RAPD) used in the mapping study, 199 (28 SSRs, 9 ISSRs and 162 RAPDs) were mapped into 11 linkage groups (LGs), varying between 17.3 and 433.8 cM and covering 3843.4 cM, with an average marker spacing of 19.3 cM. Linkage analysis revealed nine major groups with 15 or more markers each and two small LGs with two markers each, and 36 unlinked markers. The study reported assigning of 11 new SSRs on the linkage map. Of the 66 markers with aberrant segregation, 14 were unlinked and the remaining 52 were mapped. ISSR and RAPD markers were found to be useful in map construction and saturation. The current map represents maximum coverage of lentil genome and could be used for identification of QTL regions linked to agronomic traits, and for marker-assisted selection in lentil.

  11. New STS molecular markers for assessment of genetic diversity and DNA fingerprinting in hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Patzak, Josef; Vrba, Lukás; Matousek, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Molecular markers have been increasingly used in genetic studies of crop species for their applicability in breeding programs. In this work, we report on the development of new sequence-tagged site (STS) markers based on sequence information from several identified hop (Humulus lupulus L.) genes. We demonstrate the usefulness of these STS markers and compare them to SSRs for identifying hop genotypes and estimating genetic diversity in a collection of 68 hop cultivars from around the world. We found 3 individual gene variants (A, B, C) of the chs_H1 gene in this collection. The most frequent gene variant, B (AJ304877), was not detected in Mt. Hood, Glacier, and Horizon (US) cultivars. Gene variant A came from an American germplasm through wild hops. We found length polymorphism in intron 1 of the chs2 gene, and 4 different amplified markers were detected in PCRs. The chs3 gene was found in only one third of the cultivars. None of the variants of the studied CHS genes were found in Humulus japonicus. We detected 5 major gene variants of DNA-binding protein in the collection of H. lupulus cultivars and 2 others in H. japonicus. We also found 3 individual gene variants of an endochitinase gene. The distribution of gene variants did not correlate with any resistance. We proved that developed STS markers can be successfully used for the analysis of genetic diversity and can substitute and supplement SSR markers in hop.

  12. Molecular Genetic Markers of Intra- and Interspecific Divergence within Starfish and Sea Urchins (Echinodermata).

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Vladychenskaya, I P; Drozdov, A L; Kedrova, O S

    2016-09-01

    A fragment of the mitochondrial COI gene from isolates of several echinoderm species was sequenced. The isolates were from three species of starfish from the Asteriidae family (Asterias amurensis and Aphelasterias japonica collected in the Sea of Japan and Asterias rubens collected in the White Sea) and from the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum (family Loveniidae) collected in the Sea of Japan. Additionally, regions including internal transcribed spacers and 5.8S rRNA (ITS1 - 5.8S rDNA - ITS2) were sequenced for the three studied starfish species. Phylogenetic analysis of the obtained COI sequences together with earlier determined homologous COI sequences from Ast. forbesii, Ast. rubens, and Echinocardium laevigaster from the North Atlantic and E. cordatum from the Yellow and North Seas (GenBank) placed them into strictly conspecific clusters with high bootstrap support (99% in all cases). Only two exceptions - Ast. rubens DQ077915 sequence placed with the Ast. forbesii cluster and Aph. japonica DQ992560 sequence placed with the Ast. amurensis cluster - were likely results of species misidentification. The intraspecific polymorphism for the COI gene within the Asteriidae family varied within a range of 0.2-0.9% as estimated from the genetic distances. The corresponding intrageneric and intergeneric values were 10.4-12.1 and 21.8-29.8%, respectively. The interspecific divergence for the COI gene in the sea urchin of Echinocardium genus (family Loveniidae) was significantly higher (17.1-17.7%) than in the starfish, while intergeneric divergence (14.6-25.7%) was similar to that in asteroids. The interspecific genetic distances for the nuclear transcribed sequences (ITS1 - 5.8S rDNA - ITS2) within the Asteriidae family were lower (3.1-4.5%), and the intergeneric distances were significantly higher (32.8-35.0%), compared to the corresponding distances for the COI gene. These results suggest that the investigated molecular-genetic markers could be used for segregation

  13. Acrocomia emensis (Arecaceae) genetic structure and diversity using SSR molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Neiva, D S; Melo Júnior, A F; Oliveira, D A; Royo, V A; Brandão, M M; Menezes, E V

    2016-03-24

    Acrocomia emensis, popularly known as the creeping tucum, belongs to the family Arecaceae, and is an oilseed specie of the Brazilian Savannah. The expansion of agricultural activity has rapidly destroyed its natural habitat, leading to a decrease in its population size. Genetic studies can be used to investigate the genetic variability, and may assist with the charting future conservation strategies. In this study the genetic diversity and structure of 150 individuals sampled in three locations in Minas Gerais were analysed, based on the transferability of six microsatellite markers, previously developed for A. aculeata. The results indicate that the populations studied have low levels of genetic variability (Ho = 0.148) and high, positive and significant inbreeding coefficient, indicating an excess of homozygotes. The average heterozygosity within the population (Hs = 0.700) accounted for 95.03% of the total genetic diversity, indicating that there is greater variability within population than between them, consistent with low genetic differentiation between population (GST = 0.046). Bayesian analysis identified three distinct groups; however, populations shared large numbers of alleles, which can be explained by the reduced distance between populations. These results reveal the need to implement genetic conservation programs for the maintenance of this species and to prioritize population from Bonito and Brasília, which showed the lowest values of genetic diversity.

  14. The estimation of genetic relationships using molecular markers and their efficiency in estimating heritability in natural populations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Stuart C

    2005-01-01

    Molecular marker data collected from natural populations allows information on genetic relationships to be established without referencing an exact pedigree. Numerous methods have been developed to exploit the marker data. These fall into two main categories: method of moment estimators and likelihood estimators. Method of moment estimators are essentially unbiased, but utilise weighting schemes that are only optimal if the analysed pair is unrelated. Thus, they differ in their efficiency at estimating parameters for different relationship categories. Likelihood estimators show smaller mean squared errors but are much more biased. Both types of estimator have been used in variance component analysis to estimate heritability. All marker-based heritability estimators require that adequate levels of the true relationship be present in the population of interest and that adequate amounts of informative marker data are available. I review the different approaches to relationship estimation, with particular attention to optimizing the use of this relationship information in subsequent variance component estimation. PMID:16048788

  15. Ricebase: a breeding and genetics platform for rice, integrating individual molecular markers, pedigrees and whole-genome-based data

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. D.; Baldo, A. M.; Mueller, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Ricebase (http://ricebase.org) is an integrative genomic database for rice (Oryza sativa) with an emphasis on combining datasets in a way that maintains the key links between past and current genetic studies. Ricebase includes DNA sequence data, gene annotations, nucleotide variation data and molecular marker fragment size data. Rice research has benefited from early adoption and extensive use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers; however, the majority of rice SSR markers were developed prior to the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. Interpretation of new research using SNPs in the context of literature citing SSRs requires a common coordinate system. A new pipeline, using a stepwise relaxation of stringency, was used to map SSR primers onto the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. The SSR markers and experimentally assayed amplicon sizes are presented in a relational database with a web-based front end, and are available as a track loaded in a genome browser with links connecting the browser and database. The combined capabilities of Ricebase link genetic markers, genome context, allele states across rice germplasm and potentially user curated phenotypic interpretations as a community resource for genetic discovery and breeding in rice. PMID:27515824

  16. Ricebase: a breeding and genetics platform for rice, integrating individual molecular markers, pedigrees and whole-genome-based data.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J D; Baldo, A M; Mueller, L A

    2016-01-01

    Ricebase (http://ricebase.org) is an integrative genomic database for rice (Oryza sativa) with an emphasis on combining datasets in a way that maintains the key links between past and current genetic studies. Ricebase includes DNA sequence data, gene annotations, nucleotide variation data and molecular marker fragment size data. Rice research has benefited from early adoption and extensive use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers; however, the majority of rice SSR markers were developed prior to the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. Interpretation of new research using SNPs in the context of literature citing SSRs requires a common coordinate system. A new pipeline, using a stepwise relaxation of stringency, was used to map SSR primers onto the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. The SSR markers and experimentally assayed amplicon sizes are presented in a relational database with a web-based front end, and are available as a track loaded in a genome browser with links connecting the browser and database. The combined capabilities of Ricebase link genetic markers, genome context, allele states across rice germplasm and potentially user curated phenotypic interpretations as a community resource for genetic discovery and breeding in rice. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  17. Investigation and Analysis of Genetic Diversity of Diospyros Germplasms Using SCoT Molecular Markers in Guangxi.

    PubMed

    Deng, Libao; Liang, Qingzhi; He, Xinhua; Luo, Cong; Chen, Hu; Qin, Zhenshi

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about genetic diversity and relationships among germplasms could be an invaluable aid in diospyros improvement strategies. This study was designed to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship of local and natural varieties in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China using start codon targeted polymorphism (SCoT) markers. The accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms belonging to four species Diospyros kaki Thunb, D. oleifera Cheng, D. kaki var. silverstris Mak, and D. lotus Linn were collected from different eco-climatic zones in Guangxi and were analyzed using SCoT markers. Results indicated that the accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms could be distinguished using SCoT markers, and were divided into three groups at similarity coefficient of 0.608; these germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together; of these, the degree of genetic diversity of the natural D. kaki var. silverstris Mak population was richest among the four species; the geographical distance showed that the 12 natural populations of D. kaki var. silverstris Mak were divided into two groups at similarity coefficient of 0.19. Meanwhile, in order to further verify the stable and useful of SCoT markers in diospyros germplasms, SSR markers were also used in current research to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship in the same diospyros germplasms. Once again, majority of germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together. Thus SCoT markers were stable and especially useful for analysis of the genetic diversity and relationship in diospyros germplasms. The molecular characterization and diversity assessment of diospyros were very important for conservation of diospyros germplasm resources, meanwhile for diospyros improvement.

  18. Investigation and Analysis of Genetic Diversity of Diospyros Germplasms Using SCoT Molecular Markers in Guangxi

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinhua; Luo, Cong; Chen, Hu; Qin, Zhenshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Knowledge about genetic diversity and relationships among germplasms could be an invaluable aid in diospyros improvement strategies. Methods This study was designed to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship of local and natural varieties in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China using start codon targeted polymorphism (SCoT) markers. The accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms belonging to four species Diospyros kaki Thunb, D. oleifera Cheng, D. kaki var. silverstris Mak, and D. lotus Linn were collected from different eco-climatic zones in Guangxi and were analyzed using SCoT markers. Results Results indicated that the accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms could be distinguished using SCoT markers, and were divided into three groups at similarity coefficient of 0.608; these germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together; of these, the degree of genetic diversity of the natural D. kaki var. silverstris Mak population was richest among the four species; the geographical distance showed that the 12 natural populations of D. kaki var. silverstris Mak were divided into two groups at similarity coefficient of 0.19. Meanwhile, in order to further verify the stable and useful of SCoT markers in diospyros germplasms, SSR markers were also used in current research to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship in the same diospyros germplasms. Once again, majority of germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together. Thus SCoT markers were stable and especially useful for analysis of the genetic diversity and relationship in diospyros germplasms. Discussion The molecular characterization and diversity assessment of diospyros were very important for conservation of diospyros germplasm resources, meanwhile for diospyros improvement. PMID:26317414

  19. Mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 at amniocentesis: prenatal diagnosis, molecular genetic analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chen, Ming; Su, Yi-Ning; Huang, Jian-Pei; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chen-Chi; Chen, Li-Feng; Pan, Chen-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-10-15

    We present prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic analysis of mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 [sSMC(1)]. We review the literature of sSMC(1) at amniocentesis and chromosome 1p21.1-p12 duplication syndrome. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation of the involved genes of ALX3, RBM15, NTNG1, SLC25A24, GPSM2, TBX15 and NOTCH2 in this case.

  20. The use of genetic markers in the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, L S; Leitão, T M J S; Taylor, M L; Muniz, M M; Zancopé-Oliveira, R M

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum, a dimorphic fungal pathogen that can infect both humans and animals. This disease has worldwide distribution and affects mainly immunocompromised individuals. In the environment, H. capsulatum grows as mold but undergoes a morphologic transition to the yeast morphotype under special conditions. Molecular techniques are important tools to conduct epidemiologic investigations for fungal detection, identification of infection sources, and determination of different fungal genotypes associated to a particular disease symptom. In this study, we performed a systematic review in the PubMed database to improve the understanding about the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis. This search was restricted to English and Spanish articles. We included a combination of specific keywords: molecular typing [OR] genetic diversity [OR] polymorphism [AND] H. capsulatum; molecular epidemiology [AND] histoplasmosis; and molecular epidemiology [AND] Histoplasma. In addition, we used the specific terms: histoplasmosis [AND] outbreaks. Non-English or non-Spanish articles, dead links, and duplicate results were excluded from the review. The results reached show that the main methods used for molecular typing of H. capsulatum were: restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, microsatellites polymorphism, sequencing of internal transcribed spacers region, and multilocus sequence typing. Different genetic profiles were identified among H. capsulatum isolates, which can be grouped according to their source, geographical origin, and clinical manifestations.

  1. Genetic diversity of Capsicum chinensis (Solanaceae) accessions based on molecular markers and morphological and agronomic traits.

    PubMed

    Finger, F L; Lannes, S D; Schuelter, A R; Doege, J; Comerlato, A P; Gonçalves, L S A; Ferreira, F R A; Clovis, L R; Scapim, C A

    2010-09-21

    We estimated the genetic diversity of 49 accessions of the hot pepper species Capsicum chinensis through analyses of 12 physicochemical traits of the fruit, eight multi-categorical variables, and with 32 RAPD primers. Data from the physicochemical traits were submitted to analysis of variance to estimate the genetic parameters, and their means were clustered by the Scott-Knott test. The matrices from the individual and combined distance were estimated by multivariate analyses before applying Tocher's optimization method. All physicochemical traits were examined for genetic variability by analysis of variance. The responses of these traits showed more contribution from genetic than from environmental factors, except the percentage of dry biomass, content of soluble solids and vitamin C level. Total capsaicin had the greatest genetic divergence. Nine clusters were formed from the quantitative data based on the generalized distance of Mahalanobis, using Tocher's method; four were formed from the multi-categorical data using the Cole-Rodgers coefficient, and eight were formed from the molecular data using the Nei and Li coefficient. The accessions were distributed into 14 groups using Tocher's method, and no significant correlation between pungency and origin was detected. Uni- and multivariate analyses permitted the identification of marked genetic diversity and fruit attributes capable of being improved through breeding programs.

  2. Study Of Genetic Diversity Between Grasspea Landraces Using Morphological And Molecular Marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedehi, Abbasali Vahabi; Lotfi, Asefeh; Solooki, Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    Grass pea is a beneficial crop to Iran since it has some major advantageous such as high grain and forage quality, high drought tolerance and medium level of salinity tolerance and a good native germplasm variation which accessible for breeding programs. This study was carried out to evaluate morphological traits of the grass pea landraces using a randomized complete block design with 3 replications at Research Farm of Isfahan University of Technology. To evaluate genetic diversity of 14 grass pea landraces from various locations in Iran were investigated using 32 RAPD & ISJ primers at Biocenter of University of Zabol. Analysis of variance indicated a highly significant differences among 14 grass pea landrace for the morphological traits. Average of polymorphism percentage of RAPD primer was 73.9%. Among used primer, 12 random primers showed polymorphism and a total of 56 different bands were observed in the genotypes. Jafar-abad and Sar-chahan genotypes with similarity coefficient of 66% and Khoram-abad 2 and Khoram-abad 7 genotypes with similarity coefficient of 3% were the most related and the most distinct genotypes, respectively. Fourteen primers out of 17 semi random primers produced 70 polymorphic bands which included 56% of the total 126 produced bands. Genetic relatedness among population was investigated using Jacard coefficient and unweighted pair group mean analysis (UPGMA) algorithm. The result of this research verified possibility of use of RAPD & ISJ markers for estimation of genetic diversity, management of genetic resources and determination of repetitive accessions in grass pea.

  3. Genetic variability and geographic typicality of Italian former Prosecco grape variety using PCR-derived molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Stefano; Costacurta, Angelo; Bavaresco, Luigi; Calo', Antonio

    2014-05-01

    This study uses PCR-derived marker systems to investigate the extent and distribution of genetic variability of 80 Italian Prosecco accessions coming from Prosecco DOC area (north-east area of Italy). The studied samples include genotypes from Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia region. In order to verify the varietal identity of the samples, analyses based on 22 SSR loci were performed, and two grape varieties were found: Prosecco tondo and Prosecco lungo. In addition to microsatellite analysis, intra-varietal variability study was performed using AFLP, SAMPL, ISSR, and M-AFLP molecular markers. This molecular approach could discriminate different Prosecco tondo accessions coming from Treviso hills, from Veneto plain, from Friuli Venezia Giulia region, and from Padua hills (Serprina samples). As concerning Prosecco lungo variety, it was possible to discriminate molecularly the accessions from Veneto region and those from Friuli Venezia Giulia region. The molecular analysis allowed a distinction of the Prosecco genotypes on the basis of their geographic origins with plant-specific markers able to differentiate all Prosecco accessions. In this paper, the studied grape variety is termed Prosecco and not Glera (which is the present name) because the sampled vineyards were established many years ago when the name of the variety was Prosecco.

  4. A genetic map of the lettuce downy mildew pathogen, Bremia lactucae, constructed from molecular markers and avirulence genes.

    PubMed

    Sicard, Delphine; Legg, Erik; Brown, Sarah; Babu, Nirmal K; Ochoa, Oswaldo; Sudarshana, Padma; Michelmore, Richard W

    2003-06-01

    The genetic map of Bremia lactucae was expanded utilizing 97 F(1) progeny derived from a cross between Finnish and Californian isolates (SF5xC82P24). Genetic maps were constructed for each parent utilizing 7 avirulence genes, 83 RFLP markers, and 347 AFLP markers, and a consensus map was constructed from the complete data set. The framework map for SF5 contained 24 linkage groups distributed over 835cM; the map for C82P24 contained 21 linkage groups distributed over 606cM. The consensus map contained 12 linkage groups with markers from both parents and 24 parent-specific groups. Six avirulence genes mapped to different linkage groups; four were located at the ends of linkage groups. The closest linkages between molecular markers and avirulence genes were 3cM to Avr4 and 1cM to Avr7. Mating type seemed to be determined by a single locus, where the heterozygote determined the B(2) type and the homozygous recessive genotype determined the B(1) type.

  5. Genetic diversity in Tunisian populations of faba bean (Vicia faba L.) based on morphological traits and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Backouchi, I Z; Aouida, M; Khemiri, N; Jebara, M

    2015-07-13

    Genetic diversity within Vicia faba L. is key to the genetic improvement of this important species. In this study, morphological traits and RAPD molecular markers were used to assess the levels of polymorphism across 12 Tunisian populations, three major and nine minor from different locations. Analysis of morphological traits indicated that the three major populations showed significant differences and the nine minor populations exhibited considerable variation for most traits. The grain yield of the Alia population could be increased by inoculation. Of the seven primers tested, it was clear that the Cs12 primer would be recommend for genetic diversity analysis of V. faba.Within population genetic diversity exhibited 94% of total diversity. Intra-population genetic diversity (HS) was 0.16, which was clearly higher than between population genetic diversity (DST = 0.06) UPG-MA showed a high level of genetic variation between major and minor populations of V. faba L. Particularly the minor populations showed a high level of diversity and was divided into two subclusters. Ltaifia was separated from the other populations. In addition to a high grain yield, these populations showed the lowest Nei and Shannon indices (H = 0.08 and I = 0.13) justifying their homogeneity. For these reasons, these cultivars can be considered a selected population. However, the Takelsa population showed the highest Nei and Shannon indices (H = 0.13 and I = 0.21), indicating that this population was the most heterogeneous, which is interesting for breeding programs.

  6. Molecular markers for genetics and plant breeding: the MFLP marker system and its application in narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius).

    PubMed

    Shahidul, Islam; Yang, Huaan; Yan, Guijun

    2013-01-01

    Since the development of molecular markers to tag genes of agronomic traits of interests, molecular markers have played an increasingly significant role in breeding programs. Molecular markers have been implemented for large-scale marker-assisted selection in the breeding program of many important crops including lupin. So far, more than a dozen molecular markers for disease resistance genes and for other agronomic traits of interest have been developed in lupin. The DNA fingerprinting method, "MFLP" has played a pivotal role in the success of lupin breeding program in Australia. Here, we describe the MFLP technique used in lupin breeding which could be easily transferable to other crop species.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterisation of the RESA gene, a marker of genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Eva M; González, Luis Miguel; Cuevas, Laureano; Perez-Pastrana, Esperanza; Santa-Maria, Ysmael; Benito, Agustín

    2010-07-01

    To identity immunodiagnostic antigen genes, a Plasmodium falciparum (Dd2 clone) expression library was screened using human immune sera. The ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA) was isolated: this antigen of the resistant clone presents repeat tandem sequences like the 3D7 clone, albeit in different numbers. RESA has been studied as a marker of genetic diversity, with different sizes being observed in different isolates and clones of Plasmodium falciparum. The native protein was localised in cultures by western-blot and immuno-transmission electron microscopy. The antigenicity of RESA was evaluated by ELISA, using the carboxy-terminal repeat region as antigen. The assay's sensitivity and specificity were 78.2 and 94% respectively.

  8. Species-specific markers provide molecular genetic evidence for natural introgression of bullhead catfishes in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Béres, Beatrix; Kánainé Sipos, Dóra; Müller, Tamás; Staszny, Ádám; Farkas, Milán; Bakos, Katalin; Urbányi, Béla

    2017-01-01

    Since three bullhead catfish species were introduced to Europe in the late 19th century, they have spread to most European countries. In Hungary, the brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) was more widespread in the 1970s–1980s, but the black bullhead (Ameiurus melas) has gradually supplanted since their second introduction in 1980. The introgressive hybridization of the two species has been presumed based on morphological examinations, but it has not previously been supported by genetic evidence. In this study, 11 different Hungarian habitats were screened with a new species-specific nuclear genetic, duplex PCR based, marker system to distinguish the introduced catfish species, Ameiurus nebulosus, Ameiurus melas, and Ameiurus natalis, as well as the hybrids of the first two. More than 460 specimens were analyzed using the above markers and additional mitochondrial sequence analyses were also conducted on >25% of the individuals from each habitat sampled. The results showed that only 7.9% of the specimens from two habitats belonged to Ameiurus nebulosus, and 92.1% were classified as Ameiurus melas of all habitats, whereas the presence of Ameiurus natalis was not detected. Two specimens (>0.4%) showed the presence of both nuclear genomes and they were identified as hybrids of Ameiurus melas and Ameiurus nebulosus. An additional two individuals showed contradicting results from the nuclear and mitochondrial assays as a sign of a possible footprint of introgressive hybridization that might have happened two or more generations before. Surprisingly, the level of hybridization was much smaller than expected based on the analyses of the North American continent’s indigenous stock from the hybrid zones. This phenomenon has been observed in several invasive fish species and it is regarded as an added level of complexity in the management of their rapid adaptation. PMID:28265489

  9. Species-specific markers provide molecular genetic evidence for natural introgression of bullhead catfishes in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Béres, Beatrix; Kánainé Sipos, Dóra; Müller, Tamás; Staszny, Ádám; Farkas, Milán; Bakos, Katalin; Orbán, László; Urbányi, Béla; Kovács, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Since three bullhead catfish species were introduced to Europe in the late 19th century, they have spread to most European countries. In Hungary, the brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) was more widespread in the 1970s-1980s, but the black bullhead (Ameiurus melas) has gradually supplanted since their second introduction in 1980. The introgressive hybridization of the two species has been presumed based on morphological examinations, but it has not previously been supported by genetic evidence. In this study, 11 different Hungarian habitats were screened with a new species-specific nuclear genetic, duplex PCR based, marker system to distinguish the introduced catfish species, Ameiurus nebulosus, Ameiurus melas, and Ameiurus natalis, as well as the hybrids of the first two. More than 460 specimens were analyzed using the above markers and additional mitochondrial sequence analyses were also conducted on >25% of the individuals from each habitat sampled. The results showed that only 7.9% of the specimens from two habitats belonged to Ameiurus nebulosus, and 92.1% were classified as Ameiurus melas of all habitats, whereas the presence of Ameiurus natalis was not detected. Two specimens (>0.4%) showed the presence of both nuclear genomes and they were identified as hybrids of Ameiurus melas and Ameiurus nebulosus. An additional two individuals showed contradicting results from the nuclear and mitochondrial assays as a sign of a possible footprint of introgressive hybridization that might have happened two or more generations before. Surprisingly, the level of hybridization was much smaller than expected based on the analyses of the North American continent's indigenous stock from the hybrid zones. This phenomenon has been observed in several invasive fish species and it is regarded as an added level of complexity in the management of their rapid adaptation.

  10. A reference consensus genetic map for molecular markers and economically important traits in faba bean (Vicia faba L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is among the earliest domesticated crops from the Near East. Today this legume is a key protein feed and food worldwide and continues to serve an important role in culinary traditions throughout Middle East, Mediterranean region, China and Ethiopia. Adapted to a wide range of soil types, the main faba bean breeding objectives are to improve yield, resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, seed quality and other agronomic traits. Genomic approaches aimed at enhancing faba bean breeding programs require high-quality genetic linkage maps to facilitate quantitative trait locus analysis and gene tagging for use in a marker-assisted selection. The objective of this study was to construct a reference consensus map in faba bean by joining the information from the most relevant maps reported so far in this crop. Results A combination of two approaches, increasing the number of anchor loci in diverse mapping populations and joining the corresponding genetic maps, was used to develop a reference consensus map in faba bean. The map was constructed from three main recombinant inbreed populations derived from four parental lines, incorporates 729 markers and is based on 69 common loci. It spans 4,602 cM with a range from 323 to 1041 loci in six main linkage groups or chromosomes, and an average marker density of one locus every 6 cM. Locus order is generally well maintained between the consensus map and the individual maps. Conclusion We have constructed a reliable and fairly dense consensus genetic linkage map that will serve as a basis for genomic approaches in faba bean research and breeding. The core map contains a larger number of markers than any previous individual map, covers existing gaps and achieves a wider coverage of the large faba bean genome as a whole. This tool can be used as a reference resource for studies in different genetic backgrounds, and provides a framework for transferring genetic information when using different

  11. Retrotransposon-Based Molecular Markers for Analysis of Genetic Diversity within the Genus Linum

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Kudryavtseva, Anna V.; Zelenin, Alexander V.; Lakunina, Valentina A.; Yurkevich, Olga Yu.; Speranskaya, Anna S.; Dmitriev, Alexey A.; Krinitsina, Anastasia A.; Belenikin, Maxim S.; Uroshlev, Leonid A.; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.; Koroban, Nadezda V.; Amosova, Alexandra V.; Samatadze, Tatiana E.; Guzenko, Elena V.; Lemesh, Valentina A.; Savilova, Anastasya M.; Rachinskaia, Olga A.; Kishlyan, Natalya V.; Rozhmina, Tatiana A.; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L.; Muravenko, Olga V.

    2014-01-01

    SSAP method was used to study the genetic diversity of 22 Linum species from sections Linum, Adenolinum, Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, and 46 flax cultivars. All the studied flax varieties were distinguished using SSAP for retrotransposons FL9 and FL11. Thus, the validity of SSAP method was demonstrated for flax marking, identification of accessions in genebank collections, and control during propagation of flax varieties. Polymorphism of Fl1a, Fl1b, and Cassandra insertions were very low in flax varieties, but these retrotransposons were successfully used for the investigation of Linum species. Species clusterization based on SSAP markers was in concordance with their taxonomic division into sections Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, Adenolinum, and Linum. All species of sect. Adenolinum clustered apart from species of sect. Linum. The data confirmed the accuracy of the separation in these sections. Members of section Linum are not as closely related as members of other sections, so taxonomic revision of this section is desirable. L. usitatissimum accessions genetically distant from modern flax cultivars were revealed in our work. These accessions are of utmost interest for flax breeding and introduction of new useful traits into flax cultivars. The chromosome localization of Cassandra retrotransposon in Linum species was determined. PMID:25243121

  12. Molecular study of Trypanosoma caninum isolates based on different genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Barros, Juliana H S; Toma, Helena K; de Fatima Madeira, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Trypanosoma caninum is a parasite recently described in dogs, whose life cycle is rather unknown. Here, we performed a genetic study with T. caninum samples obtained in different Brazilian regions. The study was based on PCR assays target to small and large subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) (18S rDNA and 24Sα rDNA), cytochrome B (Cyt b), and internal transcribed spacer 1 rDNA (ITS1 rDNA) following by the sequence analysis. Additionally, we used primers for the variable regions of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircles and endonucleases restriction in the ITS1 rDNA amplification product. T. caninum samples displayed the same patterns. Tree construction confirmed the close relationship between T. caninum samples, regardless of the molecular target used and endonuclease restriction digestion revealed that all samples have the same restriction profile. Therefore, T. caninum seems to be a genetically homogeneous specie. In the kDNA assay, T. caninum possessed a different molecular size profile with respect to others trypanosomes, 330 and 350 bp. This study provides nucleotide sequences from different regions of the genome of T. caninum that certainly facilitate future studies.

  13. Analysis of genetic variability of commercial melon cultivars using SSR molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, N; Canela, F M; Leite, P H S; Ferreira, M A; Oliveira, V R; Santos, M F; Souza, N O S; Buso, G S C

    2017-08-31

    Taking into account the scenario of melon production (Cucumis melo L.) in Brazil, it is notable the importance of the culture in the fruit market. The preference of the national market is concentrated in the fruits of the yellow type. Therefore, it is possible that the genetic base of the commercial cultivars is relatively narrow due to the loss of important genes in the breeding process, and it is possible to introgress external genes for increasing recombination possibilities that generate sources of resistance to the main diseases and superior genotypes. This study evaluated the genetic variability of 87 melon accessions composed of 72 commercial cultivars belonging to the Inodorus and Cantaloupensis groups and 15 plant introductions (PIs). Forty-four polymorphic SSR primers were used to amplify a total of 202 alleles. The expected heterozygosity presented an average of 0.519 and the PIC index of 0.458, being moderately informative. The dendrogram generated for the 72 cultivars grouped the genotypes into 2 main groups, and there was no association with the classification of groups of the genotypes in the grouping. The number of SSR markers was sufficient to predict wide genetic variability among the cultivars studied, with the similarity between 0.35 and 0.98. The dendrogram presented for the 72 cultivars and the 15 PI genotypes was not associated with the classification of the genotypes in the grouping, and the 15 PIs were well dispersed with similarity indexes that resemble the two groups studied. A set of 25 primers was identified that were useful in distinguishing the 72 cultivars. These primers can be used in later research with the cultivars, as well as in crop protection situations, being an important tool in the useful and rapid distinction of genotypes, and in commercial disputes regarding the certification of the main melon cultivars used in the country.

  14. Identification of Single-Copy Orthologous Genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and Analysis of Genetic Diversity in Physalis Using Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jingli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yang, Jingjing; Yang, Wencai

    2012-01-01

    The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG) Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40) discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2%) of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei’s genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis. PMID:23166835

  15. Identification of single-copy orthologous genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and analysis of genetic diversity in Physalis using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yang, Jingjing; Yang, Wencai

    2012-01-01

    The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG) Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40) discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2%) of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei's genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis.

  16. Genetic variation assessment of acid lime accessions collected from south of Iran using SSR and ISSR molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Sharafi, Ata Allah; Abkenar, Asad Asadi; Sharafi, Ali; Masaeli, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Iran has a long history of acid lime cultivation and propagation. In this study, genetic variation in 28 acid lime accessions from five regions of south of Iran, and their relatedness with other 19 citrus cultivars were analyzed using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. Nine primers for SSR and nine ISSR primers were used for allele scoring. In total, 49 SSR and 131 ISSR polymorphic alleles were detected. Cluster analysis of SSR and ISSR data showed that most of the acid lime accessions (19 genotypes) have hybrid origin and genetically distance with nucellar of Mexican lime (9 genotypes). As nucellar of Mexican lime are susceptible to phytoplasma, these acid lime genotypes can be used to evaluate their tolerance against biotic constricts like lime "witches' broom disease".

  17. Comparison of different genetic markers for molecular epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Romano, M I; Alito, A; Fisanotti, J C; Bigi, F; Kantor, I; Cicuta, M E; Cataldi, A

    1996-05-01

    In the present study three different genetic markers were used in an RFLP study to differentiate Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) isolated in Argentina. The markers were: the insertion sequence IS6110, the direct repeat (DR) sequence flanking IS6110, and a polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence (PGRS), called pMBA2. Two restriction enzymes were used, PvuII for IS6110 and DR (DR/PvuII) and AluI for DR (DR/AluI) and pMBA2. DNA from 85 of M. bovis isolates was digested with PvuII and hybridized with IS6110 and Dr. IS6110 was not useful to differentiate M. bovis because most of the isolates contain a single monomorphic copy. The use of DR allowed a limited degree of differentiation. DNA from 44 of these isolates was also digested with AluI and hybridized with DR and pMBA2. In this condition these probes differentiated the isolates in many different RFLP types. By combining the patterns generated with DR/AluI and pMBA2 it was possible to increase the differentiation up to obtain 30 different RFLP types and 54% of the isolates were differentiated because they showed a unique pattern. Six isolates of M. bovis involved in two different outbreaks of bovine tuberculosis were correctly identified. Thus, DR and pMBA2 could be, at the moment, the probes of choice for comparisons of M. bovis isolates in different regions and for epidemiological surveillance of bovine tuberculosis.

  18. [Evaluation of Molecular Genetic Diversity of Wild Apple Malus sieversii Populations from Zailiysky Alatau by Microsatellite Markers].

    PubMed

    Omasheva, M E; Chekalin, S V; Galiakparov, N N

    2015-07-01

    The territory of Kazakhstan is part of the distribution range of Malus sieversii, which is one of the ancestors of cultivated apple tree varieties. The collected samples of Sievers apple leaves from five populations growing in the Zailiysky Alatau region served as a source not only for the creation of a bank of genomic DNA but also for determination ofthe wild apple genetic polymorphism. The seven microsatellite markers used in this study revealed 86 alleles with different frequencies, as well as the characteristic pools of rare alleles for each of the populations. Molecular genetic analysis showed a high level of genetic diversity (H(o) = 0.704; PIC = 0.752; I = 1.617). Moreover, interpopulation variability accounted only for 7.5% of total variability, confirming the genetic closeness of the populations examined. Based on phylogenetic analysis, it was demonstrated that the Bel'bulak and Almaty Reserve populations were closest to each other, while the most distant were the Ketmen and Great Almaty gorge populations, which suggests the dependence of genetic distance on the geographical.

  19. Molecular Assay for Detection of Genetic Markers Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, S. W.; Martin, I.; Demczuk, W.; Bharat, A.; Hoang, L.; Wylie, J.; Allen, V.; Lefebvre, B.; Tyrrell, G.; Horsman, G.; Haldane, D.; Garceau, R.; Wong, T.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to rise in Canada; however, antimicrobial resistance data are lacking for approximately 70% of gonorrhea infections that are diagnosed directly from clinical specimens by nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). We developed a molecular assay for surveillance use to detect mutations in genes associated with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins that can be applied to both culture isolates and clinical samples. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ponA, mtrR, penA, porB, and one N. gonorrhoeae-specific marker (porA). We tested the real-time PCR assay with 252 gonococcal isolates, 50 nongonococcal isolates, 24 N. gonorrhoeae-negative NAAT specimens, and 34 N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens. Twenty-four of the N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens had matched culture isolates. Assay results were confirmed by comparison with whole-genome sequencing data. For 252 N. gonorrhoeae strains, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porA, ponA, and penA, 99.6% for mtrR, and 95.2% for porB. The presence of ≥2 SNPs correlated with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (sensitivities of >98%) and cefixime (sensitivities of >96%). Of 24 NAAT specimens with matched cultures, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porB, 95.8% for ponA and mtrR, and 91.7% for penA. We demonstrated the utility of a real-time PCR assay for sensitive detection of known markers for the decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins in N. gonorrhoeae. Preliminary results with clinical NAAT specimens were also promising, as they correlated well with bacterial culture results. PMID:25878350

  20. Congruence between morphological and molecular markers inferred from the analysis of the intra-morphotype genetic diversity and the spatial structure of Oxalis tuberosa Mol.

    PubMed

    Pissard, Audrey; Arbizu, Carlos; Ghislain, Marc; Faux, Anne-Michèle; Paulet, Sébastien; Bertin, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Oxalis tuberosa is an important crop cultivated in the highest Andean zones. A germplasm collection is maintained ex situ by CIP, which has developed a morphological markers system to classify the accessions into morphotypes, i.e. groups of morphologically identical accessions. However, their genetic uniformity is currently unknown. The ISSR technique was used in two experiments to determine the relationships between both morphological and molecular markers systems. The intra-morphotype genetic diversity, the spatial structures of the diversity and the congruence between both markers systems were determined. In the first experience, 44 accessions representing five morphotypes, clearly distinct from each other, were analyzed. At the molecular level, the accessions exactly clustered according to their morphotypes. However, a genetic variability was observed inside each morphotype. In the second experiment, 34 accessions gradually differing from each other on morphological base were analyzed. The morphological clustering showed no geographical structure. On the opposite, the molecular analysis showed that the genetic structure was slightly related to the collection site. The correlation between both markers systems was weak but significant. The lack of perfect congruence between morphological and molecular data suggests that the morphological system may be useful for the morphotypes management but is not appropriate to study the genetic structure of the oca. The spatial structure of the genetic diversity can be related to the evolution of the species and the discordance between the morphological and molecular structures may result from similar selection pressures at different places leading to similar forms with a different genetic background.

  1. Genetic identification of bucktooth parrotfish Sparisoma radians (Valenciennes, 1840) (Labridae, Scarinae) by chromosomal and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Paim, Fabilene Gomes; Brandão, José Henrique Souza Galdino; Sampaio, Iracilda; de Mello Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes; Diniz, Débora

    2014-10-01

    Parrotfishes (Labridae, Scarinae) comprise a large marine fish group of difficult identification, particularly during juvenile phase when the typical morphology and coloration of adults are absent. Therefore, the goal of this study was to test cytogenetic markers and DNA barcoding in the identification of bucktooth parrtotfish Sparisoma radians from the northeastern coast of Brazil. Sequencing of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) confirmed all studied samples as S. radians, and all showed high similarity (99-100%) with Caribbean populations. The karyotype of this species was divergent from most marine Perciformes, being composed of 2n = 46 chromosomes. These consisted of a large number of metacentric and submetacentric pairs with small amounts of heterochromatin and GC-rich single nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) not syntenic to 5S rDNA clusters. These are the first data about DNA barcoding in parrotfish from the Brazilian province and the first refined chromosomal analysis in Scarinae, providing useful data to a reliable genetic identification of S. radians.

  2. Genetic identification of bucktooth parrotfish Sparisoma radians (Valenciennes, 1840) (Labridae, Scarinae) by chromosomal and molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Paim, Fabilene Gomes; Brandão, José Henrique Souza Galdino; Sampaio, Iracilda; de Mello Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes; Diniz, Débora

    2014-01-01

    Parrotfishes (Labridae, Scarinae) comprise a large marine fish group of difficult identification, particularly during juvenile phase when the typical morphology and coloration of adults are absent. Therefore, the goal of this study was to test cytogenetic markers and DNA barcoding in the identification of bucktooth parrtotfish Sparisoma radians from the northeastern coast of Brazil. Sequencing of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) confirmed all studied samples as S. radians, and all showed high similarity (99–100%) with Caribbean populations. The karyotype of this species was divergent from most marine Perciformes, being composed of 2n = 46 chromosomes. These consisted of a large number of metacentric and submetacentric pairs with small amounts of heterochromatin and GC-rich single nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) not syntenic to 5S rDNA clusters. These are the first data about DNA barcoding in parrotfish from the Brazilian province and the first refined chromosomal analysis in Scarinae, providing useful data to a reliable genetic identification of S. radians. PMID:25505839

  3. Characterization and genetic variability of feed-borne and clinical animal/human Aspergillus fumigatus strains using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Pena, Gabriela A; Coelho, Irene; Reynoso, María M; Soleiro, Carla; Cavaglieri, Lilia R

    2015-09-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, the major etiological agent of human and animal aspergillosis, is a toxigenic fungus largely regarded as a single species by macroscopic and microscopic features. However, molecular studies have demonstrated that several morphologically identified A. fumigatus strains might be genetically distinct. This work was aimed to apply PCR-restriction length fragment polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP) and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers to characterize a set of feed-borne and clinical A. fumigatus sensu lato strains isolated from Argentina and Brazil and to determine and compare their genetic variability. All A. fumigatus strains had the same band profile and those typical of A. fumigatus sensu stricto positive controls by PCR-RFLP. Moreover, all Argentinian and Brazilian strains typified by RAPD showed similar band patterns to each other and to A. fumigatus sensu stricto reference strains regardless of their isolation source (animal feeds or human/animal clinical cases) and geographic origin. Genetic similarity coefficients ranged from 0.61 to 1.00, but almost all isolates showed 78% of genetic similarly suggesting that genetic variability was found at intraspecific level. Finally, benA sequencing confirmed its identification as A. fumigatus sensu stricto species. These results suggest that A. fumigatus sensu stricto is a predominant species into Aspergillus section Fumigati found in animal environments as well as in human/animal clinical cases, while other species may be rarely isolated. The strains involved in human and animal aspergillosis could come from the environment where this fungus is frequently found. Rural workers and animals would be constantly exposed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Genetic diversity of Cercospora kikuchii isolates from soybean cultured in Argentina as revealed by molecular markers and cercosporin production.

    PubMed

    Lurá, María Cristina; Latorre Rapela, María Gabriela; Vaccari, María Celia; Maumary, Roxana; Soldano, Anabel; Mattio, Mónica; González, Ana María

    2011-05-01

    Leaf blight and purple seed, caused by the fungal pathogen Cercospora kikuchii (Matsumoto & Tomoyasu) M. W. Gardner are very important diseases of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in Argentina. The aims of this work were: (a) to confirm and to assess the genetic variability among C. kikuchii isolates collected from different soybean growing areas in Santa Fe province using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers and sequence information from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA and (b) to analyze the cercosporin production of the regional C. kikuchi isolates in order to assess whether there was any relationship between the molecular profiles and the toxin production. Isolates from different regions in Santa Fe province were studied. The sequence of the ITS regions showed high similarity (99-100%) to the GenBank sequences of C. kikuchii BRCK179 (accession number AY633838). The ISSR markers clustered all the isolates into many groups and cercosporin content was highly variable among isolates. No relationship was observed between ITS region, ISSR groups and origin or cercosporin content. The high degree of genetic variability and cercosporin production among isolates compared in this study characterizes a diverse population of C. kikuchii in the region.

  5. Assessment of genetic relationship in Persea spp by traditional molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Alemán, J C; Valadez-Moctezuma, E; Barrientos-Priego, A F

    2016-04-04

    Currently, the reclassification of the genus Persea is under discussion with molecular techniques for DNA analysis representing an alternative for inter- and intra-specific differentiation. In the present study, the traditional random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and the inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to determine the genomic relationship of different species and hybrids representative of the subgenera Eriodaphne and Persea in a population conserved in a germplasm bank. The data were analyzed statistically using multivariate methods. In the RAPD analysis, a total of 190 polymorphic bands were produced, with an average of 23.7 bands per primer, the percentage contribution of each primer was from 7.66 to 19.63; the polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.23 to 0.45, with an average of 0.35. In the ISSR analysis, a total of 111 polymorphic bands were considered, with an average of 18.5 bands per primer, the percentage contribution of each was from 11.83 to 19.57; the PIC ranged from 0.35 to 0.48, with an average of 0.42. The phenograms obtained in each technique showed the relationship among the accessions through the clusters formed. In general, both the techniques grouped representatives of the Persea americana races (P. americana var. drymifolia, P. americana var. guatemalensis, and P. americana var. americana). However, it was not possible to separate the species of Persea used as reference into independent clades. In addition, they tended to separate the representatives of subgenera Eriodaphne and Persea.

  6. A high density consensus genetic map of tetraploid cotton that integrates multiple component maps through molecular marker redundancy check

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An ultra-dense consensus (UDC) genetic map of tetraploid cotton was constructed using six high-density component maps and after the integration of a sequence-based marker redundancy check. Public cotton SSR libraries (17,343 markers) were curated for sequence redundancy using 90% as a similarity cut...

  7. Assessing genetic structure with multiple classes of molecular markers: a case study involving the introduced fire ant Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Ross, K G; Shoemaker, D D; Krieger, M J; DeHeer, C J; Keller, L

    1999-04-01

    We used 30 genetic markers of 6 different classes to describe hierarchical genetic structure in introduced populations of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta. These included four classes of presumably neutral nuclear loci (allozymes, codominant random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs), microsatellites, and dominant RAPDs), a class comprising two linked protein-coding nuclear loci under selection, and a marker of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Patterns of structure revealed by F statistics and exact tests of differentiation were highly concordant among the four classes of neutral nuclear markers, although the microsatellites were the most effective markers for detecting structure. The results from the mtDNA complemented those from the neutral nuclear markers by revealing that strong limitations to female-mediated gene flow were the cause of the local structure registered by the nuclear markers. The pattern of structure inferred from the selected nuclear loci was markedly different from the patterns derived from the other sets of markers but was predictable on the basis of the presumed mode of selection acting on these loci. In general, the results for all six classes of markers can be explained by known features of the social and reproductive biology of fire ants. Thus, the results from these diverse sets of markers, combined with detailed natural history data, provide an unusually complete picture of how the fundamental evolutionary forces of gene flow, drift, and selection govern the distribution of genetic variation within and between fire ant populations.

  8. Genetic analysis of molecular markers for propamocarb residue in Cucumis sativus using quantitative trait locus mapping.

    PubMed

    Xin, M; Wang, L; Ma, B H; Qin, Z W; Zhou, X Y

    2016-11-03

    The use of pesticides to protect plants against harmful organisms, such as pathogenic microorganisms, is one of the most effective ways to improve agricultural production. However, the continuous use of pesticides might present a risk to human health, animals, and the environment. In this study, two cucumber (Cucumis sativus) varieties containing different levels of pesticide residues, D9320 and D0351, were selected to establish an F2 population. A genetic model and genetic linkage map were constructed. The results showed that the heredity of pesticide residues was dominated by an additive effect and was significantly influenced by non-additive factors in cucumber. QCp1 was detected as a quantitative trait locus (QTL) that might be involved in regulating the levels of pesticide residue in cucumber. Moreover, the cucumber genetic map was compared with the LG6 map, and the results indicated that this QTL was closely related to the level of pesticide residue in cucumber.

  9. A multi-farm assessment of Greek black pig genetic diversity using microsatellite molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, S; Kalivas, A; Ganopoulos, I; Stea, E; Michailidis, G; Tsaftaris, A; Argiriou, A

    2014-04-14

    Local breeds are important for the maintenance of genetic diversity and future food security. Nowadays, the worldwide distribution of pigs is dominated by a few breeds, tending towards a severe loss of pig biodiversity. Thus, it is critical to maintain distinct populations of pig breeds. The Greek black pig, a breed raised locally and known for the high quality of its meat for cured products, is the only traditional indigenous pig breed reared in Greece. We investigated the genetic diversity, based on microsatellite analysis, of the Greek black pig and evaluated its genetic uniqueness. One hundred and three pigs from 12 Greek farms were analyzed using 11 microsatellites. The total number of alleles amounted to 135, with a mean number of alleles per locus of 12.27, ranging between 10 and 16 alleles. The observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.363 to 0.825 per locus. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.471 to 0.707. The inbreeding coefficient ranged from -0.329 to 0.229. We conclude that the Greek black pig, despite its low population size, has a high degree of genetic variability, which will be useful for breeding programs aimed at maintaining long-term survival of this ancient breed.

  10. Classical and molecular genetic mapping

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A brief history of classical genetic mapping in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is described. Detailed descriptions are given of the development of molecular genetic linkage maps based upon various types of DNA markers Like many plant and animal species, the first molecular map of soybean was bas...

  11. A High Density Consensus Genetic Map of Tetraploid Cotton That Integrates Multiple Component Maps through Molecular Marker Redundancy Check

    PubMed Central

    Blenda, Anna; Fang, David D.; Rami, Jean-François; Garsmeur, Olivier; Luo, Feng; Lacape, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    A consensus genetic map of tetraploid cotton was constructed using six high-density maps and after the integration of a sequence-based marker redundancy check. Public cotton SSR libraries (17,343 markers) were curated for sequence redundancy using 90% as a similarity cutoff. As a result, 20% of the markers (3,410) could be considered as redundant with some other markers. The marker redundancy information had been a crucial part of the map integration process, in which the six most informative interspecific Gossypium hirsutum×G. barbadense genetic maps were used for assembling a high density consensus (HDC) map for tetraploid cotton. With redundant markers being removed, the HDC map could be constructed thanks to the sufficient number of collinear non-redundant markers in common between the component maps. The HDC map consists of 8,254 loci, originating from 6,669 markers, and spans 4,070 cM, with an average of 2 loci per cM. The HDC map presents a high rate of locus duplications, as 1,292 markers among the 6,669 were mapped in more than one locus. Two thirds of the duplications are bridging homoeologous AT and DT chromosomes constitutive of allopolyploid cotton genome, with an average of 64 duplications per AT/DT chromosome pair. Sequences of 4,744 mapped markers were used for a mutual blast alignment (BBMH) with the 13 major scaffolds of the recently released Gossypium raimondii genome indicating high level of homology between the diploid D genome and the tetraploid cotton genetic map, with only a few minor possible structural rearrangements. Overall, the HDC map will serve as a valuable resource for trait QTL comparative mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and better understanding of the genome structure and evolution of tetraploid cotton. PMID:23029214

  12. Reviewe: Genetics and genomics in equine exercise physiology: an overview of the new applications of molecular biology as positive and negative markers of performance and health.

    PubMed

    Barrey, E

    2010-11-01

    Equine breeding selection has been developed by applying quantitative genetic methods for calculating the heritability of the complex traits such as performance in racing or sport competitions. With the great development of biotechnologies, equine molecular genetics has come of age. The recent sequencing of the equine genome by an international consortium was a major advance that will impact equine genomics in the near future. With the rapid progress in equine genetics, new applications in early performance evaluation and the detection of disease markers become available. Many new biomolecular tools will change management of horse selection, disease diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this review is to present new developments in equine genetics and genomics for performance evaluation and health markers after a short summary of the previous knowledge about the genetic components of the exercise performance traits.

  13. Comparative analysis of genetic diversity of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) from Vietnam and Cambodia using agro-morphological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Pham, Toan Duc; Geleta, Mulatu; Bui, Tri Minh; Bui, Tuyen Cach; Merker, Arnulf; Carlsson, Anders S

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to comparatively analyze the genetic diversity of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) using agro-morphological and molecular markers. Twelve sesame populations collected from three regions in Cambodia and Vietnam were used in this study. A high genetic variation was revealed both by agro-morphological and RAPD markers within and among the 12 sesame populations. The range of agro-morphological trait based average taxonomic distance among populations (0.02 to 0.47) was wider than that of RAPD based genetic distance (0.06 to 0.27). The mean distance revealed by agro-morphological markers (0.23) and RAPD markers (0.22) was similar. RAPD based analysis revealed a relatively higher genetic diversity in populations from South Vietnam as compared to the other two regions. Interestingly, populations from this region also had higher values for yield related traits such as number of capsules per plant, number of seeds per capsule, and seed yield per plant suggesting positive correlation between the extent of genetic variation within population and yield related traits in sesame. A highly significant positive correlation (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) was found between agro-morphological and RAPD markers in estimating the genetic distance between populations. Both methods suggested the existence of a substantial amount of genetic diversity both in the Vietnamese and Cambodian populations. Although both agro-morphological and RAPD markers were found to be useful in genetic diversity analysis in sesame, their combined use would give superior results.

  14. Studies on the genetic variation of the green unicellular alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae) obtained from different geographical locations using ISSR and RAPD molecular marker.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Noroozi; Omar, Hishamuddin; Tan, Soon Guan; Napis, Suhaimi

    2011-03-22

    Haematococcus pluvialis (Flotow) is a unicellular green alga, which is considered to be the best astaxanthin-producing organism. Molecular markers are suitable tools for the purpose of finding out genetic variations in organisms; however there have been no studies conducted on ISSR or RAPD molecular markers for this organism. The DNA of 10 different strains of H. pluvialis (four strains from Iran, two strains from Finland, one strain from Switzerland and three strains from the USA) was extracted. A genetic similarity study was carried out using 14 ISSR and 12 RAPD primers. Moreover, the molecular weights of the bands produced ranged from 0.14 to 3.4 Kb. The PCA and dendrogram clustered the H. pluvialis strains into various groups according to their geographical origin. The lowest genetic similarity was between the Iran2 and USA2 strains (0.08) and the highest genetic similarity was between Finland1 and Finland2 (0.64). The maximum numbers of bands produced by the ISSR and RAPD primers were 35 and 6 bands, respectively. The results showed that ISSR and RAPD markers are useful for genetic diversity studies of Haematococcus as they showed geographical discrimination.

  15. A molecular marker for in situ genetic resource conservation of Capsicum annuum var. acuminatum (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Kaewdoungdee, N; Tanee, T

    2013-02-28

    The Thailand cultivar pepper 'phrik man bangchang' (Capsicum annuum var. acuminatum, Solanaceae) was originally cultivated in the Bangchang Subdistrict, Amphawa District in Samut Songkhram Province. The cultivated areas are limited; we verified its distribution in Thailand for in situ 'phrik man bangchang' genetic resource conservation. Samples were collected from the original cultivation area of Bangchang Subdistrict (Or) and were randomly explored in Ratchaburi Province (RB), Khon Kaen Province (KK), and Sakon Nakhon Province (SN). A pure line from The Tropical Vegetable Research Center at Kasetsart University was used as the standard indicator. Two more Capsicum species, C. chinensis and C. frutescens, and a species from another genus in the family, Solanum melongena, were included. A dendrogram constructed from random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints indicated that the Or, RB, KK, and SN samples were C. annuum var. acuminatum with supportive similarity coefficients of 0.79 to 0.98. Finally, DNA barcodes, from psbA-trnH spacer region, were provided for the 3 wild species, C. annuum var. acuminatum, C. chinensis, and C. frutescens under GenBank accession Nos. JQ087869-JQ087871. The nucleotide variations between species were 0.23 to 0.26. In summary, 'phrik man bangchang' is still being planted in Bangchang Subdistrict, but only in small areas. The distribution of planting areas is expected to be throughout Thailand.

  16. Generation and release of molecular markers for Poa Arachnifera Torr

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA based molecular markers can be utilized in a wide array of plant genetic studies, marker-trait associations, seed purity evaluations and cultivar protection. However, for the genus Poa, the use of molecular markers is limited by the current lack of informative DNA based markers. This report r...

  17. Genetic analysis and molecular characterization of Chinese sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) cultivars using Insertion-Deletion (InDel) and Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sesame is an important and ancient oil crop in tropical and subtropical areas. China is one of the most important sesame producing countries with many germplasm accessions and excellent cultivars. Domestication and modern plant breeding have presumably narrowed the genetic basis of cultivated sesame. Several modern sesame cultivars were bred with a limited number of landrace cultivars in their pedigree. The genetic variation was subsequently reduced by genetic drift and selection. Characterization of genetic diversity of these cultivars by molecular markers is of great value to assist parental line selection and breeding strategy design. Results Three hundred and forty nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 79 insertion-deletion (InDel) markers were developed from cDNA library and reduced-representation sequencing of a sesame cultivar Zhongzhi 14, respectively. Combined with previously published SSR markers, 88 polymorphic markers were used to assess the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships, population structure, and allele distribution among 130 Chinese sesame accessions including 82 cultivars, 44 landraces and 4 wild germplasm accessions. A total of 325 alleles were detected, with the average gene diversity of 0.432. Model-based structure analysis revealed the presence of five subgroups belonging to two main groups, which were consistent with the results from principal coordinate analysis (PCA), phylogenetic clustering and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Several missing or unique alleles were identified from particular types, subgroups or families, even though they share one or both parental/progenitor lines. Conclusions This report presented a by far most comprehensive characterization of the molecular and genetic diversity of sesame cultivars in China. InDels are more polymorphic than SSRs, but their ability for deciphering genetic diversity compared to the later. Improved sesame cultivars have narrower genetic basis than landraces

  18. Genetic analysis and molecular characterization of Chinese sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) cultivars using insertion-deletion (InDel) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kun; Yang, Minmin; Liu, Hongyan; Tao, Ye; Mei, Ju; Zhao, Yingzhong

    2014-03-19

    Sesame is an important and ancient oil crop in tropical and subtropical areas. China is one of the most important sesame producing countries with many germplasm accessions and excellent cultivars. Domestication and modern plant breeding have presumably narrowed the genetic basis of cultivated sesame. Several modern sesame cultivars were bred with a limited number of landrace cultivars in their pedigree. The genetic variation was subsequently reduced by genetic drift and selection. Characterization of genetic diversity of these cultivars by molecular markers is of great value to assist parental line selection and breeding strategy design. Three hundred and forty nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 79 insertion-deletion (InDel) markers were developed from cDNA library and reduced-representation sequencing of a sesame cultivar Zhongzhi 14, respectively. Combined with previously published SSR markers, 88 polymorphic markers were used to assess the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships, population structure, and allele distribution among 130 Chinese sesame accessions including 82 cultivars, 44 landraces and 4 wild germplasm accessions. A total of 325 alleles were detected, with the average gene diversity of 0.432. Model-based structure analysis revealed the presence of five subgroups belonging to two main groups, which were consistent with the results from principal coordinate analysis (PCA), phylogenetic clustering and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Several missing or unique alleles were identified from particular types, subgroups or families, even though they share one or both parental/progenitor lines. This report presented a by far most comprehensive characterization of the molecular and genetic diversity of sesame cultivars in China. InDels are more polymorphic than SSRs, but their ability for deciphering genetic diversity compared to the later. Improved sesame cultivars have narrower genetic basis than landraces, reflecting the effect of genetic

  19. Population genetic structure of the cleistogamous plant species Viola pubescens Aiton (Violaceae), as indicated by allozyme and ISSR molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Culley, T M; Wolfe, A D

    2001-05-01

    Few studies of genetic variation have focused on species that reproduce through both showy, chasmogamous (CH) flowers and self-pollinated, cleistogamous (CL) flowers. Using two different techniques, genetic variation was measured in six populations of Viola pubescens Aiton, a yellow-flowered violet found in the temperate forests of eastern North America. Results from eight allozyme loci showed that there was considerable genetic variation in the species, and population structuring was indicated by the presence of unique alleles and a theta (F(ST)) value of 0.29. High genetic variation was also found using ISSR (inter-simple sequence repeat) markers, and population structuring was again evident with unique bands. Viola pubescens appears to have a true mixed-mating system in which selfing through CL and CH flowers contributes to population differentiation, and outcrossing through CH flowers increases genetic variation and gene flow among populations. Overall, allozyme and ISSR techniques yielded similar results, indicating that ISSR markers show potential for use in population genetic studies.

  20. Genetic diversity in a Poincianella pyramidalis (Tul.) L.P. Queiroz population assessed by RAPD molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Belarmino, K S; Rêgo, M M; Bruno, R L A; Medeiros, G D A; Andrade, A P; Rêgo, E R

    2017-08-31

    Poincianella pyramidalis (Tul.) L.P. Queiroz is an endemic Caatinga (Brazilian savannah biome) species that has been exploited for different purposes, although information is necessary about still existing natural populations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity among 20 P. pyramidalis individuals occurring in a population localized in the Caatinga biome of Paraíba State, aiming at seed collection, using RAPD markers. For the DNA extraction, young shoots of the individuals were used, and amplification was carried out using 20 primers. The obtained markers were converted to a binary matrix, from which a genetic dissimilarity matrix was built using the arithmetic complement of Jaccard's coefficient, and the dendrogram was built by the UPGMA analysis. No amplified fragment was monomorphic, resulting in 100% polymorphism of the analyzed population. The mean genetic diversity among the matrices was 63.28%, ranging from 30.9 to 97.7%. Individuals 09 and 17 showed relevant genetic proximity, and thus planting their seedlings at close sites would not be indicated. The population evaluated in this study showed high genetic diversity, originating twelve groups from the UPGMA hierarchical cluster analysis. Based on the results, individuals 09 and 17 can provide plant material for the evaluation of the physiological performance of P. pyramidalis seeds, and the set of individuals of this population has a high genetic diversity that characterizes them as adequate matrices for projects of restoration and conservation of the seed species.

  1. Genetic distances between popcorn populations based on molecular markers and correlations with heterosis estimates made by diallel analysis of hybrids.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, R E F; Prioli, A J; Amaral, A T; Scapim, C A; Simon, G A

    2009-08-11

    Diallel analysis was used to obtain information on combining ability, heterosis, estimates of genetic distances by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and on their correlations with heterosis, for the popcorn varieties RS 20, UNB2, CMS 43, CMS 42, Zélia, UEM J1, UEM M2, Beija-Flor, and Viçosa, which were crossed to obtain all possible combinations, without reciprocals. The genitors and the 36 F(1) hybrids were evaluated in field trials in Maringá during two growing seasons in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Based on the results, strategies for further studies were developed, including the construction of composites by joining varieties with high general combining ability for grain yield (UNB2 and CMS 42) with those with high general combining ability for popping expansion (Zélia, RS 20 and UEM M2). Based on the RAPD markers, UEM J1 and Zélia were the most genetically distant and RS 20 and UNB2 were the most similar. The low correlation between heterosis and genetic distances may be explained by the random dispersion of the RAPD markers, which were insufficient for the exploitation of the popcorn genome. We concluded that an association between genetic dissimilarity and heterosis based only on genetic distance is not expected without considering the effect of dominant loci.

  2. [Genetic diversity revealed by ISSR molecular marker in common wheat, spelt, compactum and progeny of recurrent selection].

    PubMed

    Du, Jin-Kun; Yao, Ying-Yin; Ni, Zhong-Fu; Peng, Hui-Ru; Sun, Qi-Xin

    2002-05-01

    It is important to estimate the genetic diversity between the parents for improving the heterosis of hybrid wheat. In this study, ISSR(inter-simple sequence repeat) marker was used to measure the genetic diversity within and among common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), spelt (Triticum spelta L.), compactum (Triticum compactum Host.) and progeny of foreign wheat-based recurrent selection, and the possibility of establishing the new heterotic group was also assessed. Forty seven genotypes were used for ISSR analysis, which included 14 common wheat, 10 spelt wheat, 11 compactum and 12 progeny of recurrent selection. Eleven of 33 ISSR primers that can produce distinguishable bands were selected for PCR amplification. A total of 238 bands were amplified, among which 207 (87%) bands were polymorphic. The polymorphic bands amplified by each primer ranged from 11 to 38, with an averaged of 18.8. The percentage of polymorphic band (80.3%) in common wheat was higher than that in progeny of recurrent selection (78.7%), spelt (75.0%) and compactum (74.9%). The 238 polymorphic products were used to calculate Nei's similarity index (GS) and the genetic distance (GD). It was found that the mean genetic distance between different wheat types (0.3115-0.3442) was obviously higher than that within common wheat (0.2743), spelt (0.2351), compactum (0.2622). In addition, progeny of recurrent selection also showed much higher genetic distance with other three wheat types (0.3217, 0.3256, 0.3198). The cluster analysis was performed based on the genetic distance (GD) matrix by using UPGMA method. Common wheat, spelt, compactum and progeny of recurrent selection were classified into four different groups. In this study, ISSR marker was firstly used to assess genetic diversity among common wheat, spelt, compactum and progeny of recurrent selection, and can differentiate the wheat cultivars (lines) that selected from the same cross combination. It was concluded that spelt, compactum and progeny

  3. Identification of Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine-strain genetic markers: Towards understanding the molecular mechanism behind virulence attenuation.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mohammad Nouh; Ashhab, Yaqoub

    2016-09-22

    Brucella melitensis Rev.1 is an avirulent strain that is widely used as a live vaccine to control brucellosis in small ruminants. Although an assembled draft version of Rev.1 genome has been available since 2009, this genome has not been investigated to characterize this important vaccine. In the present work, we used the draft genome of Rev.1 to perform a thorough genomic comparison and sequence analysis to identify and characterize the panel of its unique genetic markers. The draft genome of Rev.1 was compared with genome sequences of 36 different Brucella melitensis strains from the Brucella project of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. The comparative analyses revealed 32 genetic alterations (30 SNPs, 1 single-bp insertion and 1 single-bp deletion) that are exclusively present in the Rev.1 genome. In silico analyses showed that 9 out of the 17 non-synonymous mutations are deleterious. Three ABC transporters are among the disrupted genes that can be linked to virulence attenuation. Out of the 32 mutations, 11 Rev.1 specific markers were selected to test their potential to discriminate Rev.1 using a bi-directional allele-specific PCR assay. Six markers were able to distinguish between Rev.1 and a set of control strains. We succeeded in identifying a panel of 32 genome-specific markers of the B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine strain. Extensive in silico analysis showed that a considerable number of these mutations could severely affect the function of the associated genes. In addition, some of the discovered markers were able to discriminate Rev.1 strain from a group of control strains using practical PCR tests that can be applied in resource-limited settings.

  4. Genetic diversity assessment of sesame core collection in China by phenotype and molecular markers and extraction of a mini-core collection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanxin; Zhang, Xiurong; Che, Zhuo; Wang, Linhai; Wei, Wenliang; Li, Donghua

    2012-11-15

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the four major oil crops in China. A sesame core collection (CC) was established in China in 2000, but no complete study on its genetic diversity has been carried out at either the phenotypic or molecular level. To provide technical guidance, a theoretical basis for further collection, effective protection, reasonable application, and a complete analysis of sesame genetic resources, a genetic diversity assessment of the sesame CC in China was conducted using phenotypic and molecular data and by extracting a sesame mini-core collection (MC). Results from a genetic diversity assessment of sesame CC in China were significantly inconsistent at the phenotypic and molecular levels. A Mantel test revealed the insignificant correlation between phenotype and molecular marker information (r = 0.0043, t = 0.1320, P = 0.5525). The Shannon-Weaver diversity index (I) and Nei genetic diversity index (h) were higher (I = 0.9537, h = 0.5490) when calculated using phenotypic data from the CC than when using molecular data (I = 0.3467, h = 0.2218). A mini-core collection (MC) containing 184 accessions was extracted based on both phenotypic and molecular data, with a low mean difference percentage (MD, 1.64%), low variance difference percentage (VD, 22.58%), large variable rate of coefficient of variance (VR, 114.86%), and large coincidence rate of range (CR, 95.76%). For molecular data, the diversity indices and the polymorphism information content (PIC) for the MC were significantly higher than for the CC. Compared to an alternative random sampling strategy, the advantages of capturing genetic diversity and validation by extracting a MC using an advanced maximization strategy were proven. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the phenotypic and molecular genetic diversities of the sesame CC in China. A MC was extracted using both phenotypic and molecular data. Low MD% and VD%, and large VR% and CR% suggested that the MC

  5. Genetic diversity assessment of sesame core collection in China by phenotype and molecular markers and extraction of a mini-core collection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the four major oil crops in China. A sesame core collection (CC) was established in China in 2000, but no complete study on its genetic diversity has been carried out at either the phenotypic or molecular level. To provide technical guidance, a theoretical basis for further collection, effective protection, reasonable application, and a complete analysis of sesame genetic resources, a genetic diversity assessment of the sesame CC in China was conducted using phenotypic and molecular data and by extracting a sesame mini-core collection (MC). Results Results from a genetic diversity assessment of sesame CC in China were significantly inconsistent at the phenotypic and molecular levels. A Mantel test revealed the insignificant correlation between phenotype and molecular marker information (r = 0.0043, t = 0.1320, P = 0.5525). The Shannon-Weaver diversity index (I) and Nei genetic diversity index (h) were higher (I = 0.9537, h = 0.5490) when calculated using phenotypic data from the CC than when using molecular data (I = 0.3467, h = 0.2218). A mini-core collection (MC) containing 184 accessions was extracted based on both phenotypic and molecular data, with a low mean difference percentage (MD, 1.64%), low variance difference percentage (VD, 22.58%), large variable rate of coefficient of variance (VR, 114.86%), and large coincidence rate of range (CR, 95.76%). For molecular data, the diversity indices and the polymorphism information content (PIC) for the MC were significantly higher than for the CC. Compared to an alternative random sampling strategy, the advantages of capturing genetic diversity and validation by extracting a MC using an advanced maximization strategy were proven. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the phenotypic and molecular genetic diversities of the sesame CC in China. A MC was extracted using both phenotypic and molecular data. Low MD% and VD%, and large VR% and CR

  6. Hierarchical analysis of genetic structure in native fire ant populations: results from three classes of molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Ross, K G; Krieger, M J; Shoemaker, D D; Vargo, E L; Keller, L

    1997-10-01

    We describe genetic structure at various scales in native populations of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta using two classes of nuclear markers, allozymes and microsatellites, and markers of the mitochondrial genome. Strong structure was found at the nest level in both the monogyne (single queen) and polygyne (multiple queen) social forms using allozymes. Weak but significant microgeographic structure was detected above the nest level in polygyne populations but not in monogyne populations using both classes of nuclear markers. Pronounced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) differentiation was evident also at this level in the polygyne form only. These microgeographic patterns are expected because polygyny in ants is associated with restricted local gene flow due mainly to limited vagility of queens. Weak but significant nuclear differentiation was detected between sympatric social forms, and strong mtDNA differentiation also was found at this level. Thus, queens of each form seem unable to establish themselves in nests of the alternate type, and some degree of assortative mating by form may exist as well. Strong differentiation was found between the two study regions using all three sets of markers. Phylogeographic analyses of the mtDNA suggest that recent limitations on gene flow rather than longstanding barriers to dispersal are responsible for this large-scale structure.

  7. Molecular marker-based genetic diversity analysis of scantly studied Brazilian accessions of a medicinal plant, Morinda citrifolia L. (noni).

    PubMed

    Bordallo, P N; Monteiro, A M R; Sousa, J A; Aragão, F A S

    2017-02-23

    Morinda citrifolia L., commonly known as noni, has been used for the treatment of various diseases for over two centuries. It was introduced and widely disseminated in Brazil because of its high market value and ease of adaptation to the soil and climatic conditions of the country. The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic variability of noni accessions from the collection of Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical in Brazil. We evaluated 36 plants of the 13 accessions of noni from the germplasm collection of M. citrifolia. Several methods of DNA extraction were tested. After definition of the method, the DNA of each sample was subjected to polymerase chain reactions using 20 random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. The band patterns on agarose gel were converted into a binary data matrix, which was used to estimate the genetic distances between the plants and to perform the cluster analyses. Of the total number of markers used in this study, 125 (81.1%) were polymorphic. The genetic distances between the genotypes ranged from 0.04 to 0.49. Regardless of the high number of polymorphic bands, the genetic variability of the noni plants evaluated was low since most of the genotypes belonged to the same cluster as shown by the dendrogram and Tocher's cluster analysis. The low genetic diversity among the studied noni individuals indicates that additional variability should be introduced in the germplasm collection of noni by gathering new individuals and/or by hybridizing contrasting individuals.

  8. Application of Molecular Genetics and Transformation to Barley Improvement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter of the new barley monograph summarizes current applications of molecular genetics and transformation to barley improvement. The chapter describes recent applications of molecular markers including association genetics, QTL mapping and marker assisted selection in barley programs, and in...

  9. Genetic markers as instrumental variables

    PubMed Central

    von Hinke, Stephanie; Davey Smith, George; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Propper, Carol; Windmeijer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The use of genetic markers as instrumental variables (IV) is receiving increasing attention from economists, statisticians, epidemiologists and social scientists. Although IV is commonly used in economics, the appropriate conditions for the use of genetic variants as instruments have not been well defined. The increasing availability of biomedical data, however, makes understanding of these conditions crucial to the successful use of genotypes as instruments. We combine the econometric IV literature with that from genetic epidemiology, and discuss the biological conditions and IV assumptions within the statistical potential outcomes framework. We review this in the context of two illustrative applications. PMID:26614692

  10. Isolation of female-specific AFLP markers and molecular identification of genetic sex in half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Chen, Song-Lin; Li, Jing; Deng, Si-Ping; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Qing-Yin; Zhuang, Zhi-Meng; Sha, Zhen-Xia; Xu, Jian-Yong

    2007-01-01

    The sex-specific molecular marker is a useful gene resource for studying sex- determining mechanisms and controlling fish sex. Artificially produced male and female half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) were used to screen sex-specific amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLPs) molecular markers. The phenotypic sex of 28 tongue soles was determined by histological sectioning of gonads. The AFLP analysis of 15 females and 13 males via 64 primer combinations produced a total of 4681 scorable bands, of which 42.11% and 43.39% of bands were polymorphic in females and males, respectively. Seven female-specific AFLP markers were identified and designated as CseF382, CseF575, CseF783, CseF464, CseF136, CseF618, and CseF305, respectively. One female-specific AFLP marker (CseF382) was amplified, recovered from the gels, cloned, and sequenced (accession no. DQ487760). This female-specific AFLP marker was converted into a single-locus polymerase-chain reaction (PCR) marker of a sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR). A simple PCR method of using the specific primers was developed for identifying genetic sex of half-smooth tongue sole. PCR products demonstrated that the initial 15 females produced the female-specific band of about 350 bp, but the initial 13 male individuals failed to produce the band. We also investigated the applicability of the PCR primers in other tongue sole individuals. The same female-specific fragment of about 350 bp was found in the additional 59 female individuals, but not in the additional 58 male individuals. This AFLP-based molecular sexing technique may have great application potential in elucidation of sex determination mechanisms and sex control in half-smooth tongue sole.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis, genetic diversity and relationships between the recently segregated species of Corynandra and Cleoserrata from the genus Cleome using DNA barcoding and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Asif Shabodin; Patil, Swapnil Mahadeo; Gholave, Avinash Ramchandra; Kadam, Suhas Kishor; Kotibhaskar, Shreya Vijaykumar; Yadav, Shrirang Ramchandra; Govindwar, Sanjay Prabhu

    2016-01-01

    Cleome is the largest genus in the family Cleomaceae and it is known for its various medicinal properties. Recently, some species from the Cleome genus (Cleome viscosa, Cleome chelidonii, Cleome felina and Cleome speciosa) are split into genera Corynandra (Corynandra viscosa, Corynandra chelidonii, Corynandra felina), and Cleoserrata (Cleoserrata speciosa). The objective of this study was to obtain DNA barcodes for these species for their accurate identification and determining phylogenetic relationships. Out of 10 screened barcoding regions, rbcL, matK and ITS1 regions showed higher PCR efficiency and sequencing success. This study added matK, rbcL and ITS1 barcodes for the identification of Corynandra chelidonii, Corynandra felina, Cleome simplicifolia and Cleome aspera species in existing barcode data. Corynandra chelidonii and Corynandra felina species belong to the Corynandra genus, but they are not grouped with the Corynandra viscosa species, however clustered with the Cleome species. Molecular marker analysis showed 100% polymorphism among the studied plant samples. Diversity indices for molecular markers were ranged from He=0.1115-0.1714 and I=0.2268-0.2700, which indicates a significant amount of genetic diversity among studied species. Discrimination of the Cleome and Corynandra species from Cleoserrata speciosa was obtained by two RAPD primers (OPA-4 and RAPD-17) and two ISSR primers (ISSR-1 and ISSR-2). RAPD and ISSR markers are useful for the genetic characterization of these studied species. The present investigation will be helpful to understand the relationships of Cleome lineages with Corynandra and Cleoserrata species.

  12. Genetic Dissection of Sympatric Populations of Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), Using DALP-PCR Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Latif, M. A.; Rafii, M. Y.; Mazid, M. S.; Ali, M. E.; Ahmed, F.; Omar, M. Y.; Tan, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    Direct amplified length polymorphism (DALP) combines the advantages of a high-resolution fingerprint method and also characterizing the genetic polymorphisms. This molecular method was also found to be useful in brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens species complex for the analysis of genetic polymorphisms. A total of 11 populations of Nilaparvata spp. were collected from 6 locations from Malaysia. Two sympatric populations of brown planthopper, N. lugens, one from rice and the other from a weed grass (Leersia hexandra), were collected from each of five locations. N. bakeri was used as an out group. Three oligonucleotide primer pairs, DALP231/DALPR′5, DALP234/DALPR′5, and DALP235/DALPR′5 were applied in this study. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) dendrogram based on genetic distances for the 11 populations of Nilaparvata spp. revealed that populations belonging to the same species and the same host type clustered together irrespective of their geographical localities of capture. The populations of N. lugens formed into two distinct clusters, one was insects with high esterase activities usually captured from rice and the other was with low esterase activities usually captured from L. hexandra. N. bakeri, an out group, was the most isolated group. Analyses of principal components, molecular variance, and robustness also supported greatly to the findings of cluster analysis. PMID:22593700

  13. High gene flow and genetic diversity in three economically important Zanthoxylum Spp. of Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of NE India using molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Medhi, K.; Sarmah, D.K.; Deka, M.; Bhau, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity in Zanthoxylum species viz.  Zanthoxylum nitidum, Zanthoxylum oxyphyllum and Zanthoxylum rhesta collected from the Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of Assam (NE India) was amplified using 13 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and 9 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. RAPD markers were able to detect 81.82% polymorphism whereas ISSR detected 98.02% polymorphism. The genetic similarities were analyzed from the dendrogram constructed by RAPD and ISSR fingerprinting methods which divided the 3 species of Zanthoxylum into 3 clear different clusters. The principle component analysis (PCA) was carried out to confirm the clustering pattern of RAPD and ISSR analysis. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed the presence of significant variability between different Zanthoxylum species and within the species by both RAPD and ISSR markers. Z. nitidum was found to be sharing a high degree of variation with the other two Zanthoxylum species under study. The Nei's gene diversity (h), Shannon's information index (I), observed number of alleles (na) and effective number of alleles (ne) were also found to be higher in ISSR markers (0.3526, 0.5230, 1.9802 and 1.6145) than in RAPD markers (0.3144, 0.4610, 1.8182 and 1.5571). The values for total genotype diversity for among population (HT), within population diversity (Hs) and gene flow (Nm) were more in ISSR (0.3491, 0.2644 and 1.5610) than RAPD (0.3128, 0.2264 and 1.3087) but the mean coefficient of gene differentiation (GST) was more in RAPD (0.2764) than ISSR (0.2426). A comparison of this two finger printing methods was done by calculating MR, EMI and MI. The correlation coefficient between data matrices of RAPD and ISSR based on Mantel test was found to be significant (r = 0.65612). PMID:25606454

  14. Searching for non-genetic molecular and imaging PTSD risk and resilience markers: Systematic review of literature and design of the German Armed Forces PTSD biomarker study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulrike; Willmund, Gerd-Dieter; Holsboer, Florian; Wotjak, Carsten T; Gallinat, Jürgen; Kowalski, Jens T; Zimmermann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers allowing the identification of individuals with an above average vulnerability or resilience for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) would especially serve populations at high risk for trauma exposure like firefighters, police officers and combat soldiers. Aiming to identify the most promising putative PTSD vulnerability markers, we conducted the first systematic review on potential imaging and non-genetic molecular markers for PTSD risk and resilience. Following the PRISMA guidelines, we systematically screened the PubMed database for prospective longitudinal clinical studies and twin studies reporting on pre-trauma and post-trauma PTSD risk and resilience biomarkers. Using 25 different combinations of search terms, we retrieved 8151 articles of which we finally included and evaluated 9 imaging and 27 molecular studies. In addition, we briefly illustrate the design of the ongoing prospective German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) PTSD biomarker study (Bw-BioPTSD) which not only aims to validate these previous findings but also to identify novel and clinically applicable molecular, psychological and imaging risk, resilience and disease markers for deployment-related psychopathology in a cohort of German soldiers who served in Afghanistan.

  15. Molecular Typing and Presence of Genetic Markers Among Strains of Banana Finger-Tip Rot Pathogen, Burkholderia cenocepacia, in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-An; Chan, Chih-Wen

    2007-02-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia cenocepacia (genomovar III of B. cepacia complex), the causal agent of banana finger-tip rot, is a common plant-associated bacterium but also an important opportunistic pathogen of humans. To better understand the nature of B. cenocepacia from banana, the genetic variation among B. cenocepacia isolates from various banana-growing regions in southern Taiwan was examined. Forty-four serial isolates recovered from diseased banana stigmata from three banana-growing regions during the periods ranging from 2002 to 2004 were investigated. All B. cenocepacia isolates picked from quinate-yeast extract tetracycline-polymyxin semiselective medium could cause onion maceration and were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for bcscV, which is a type III secretion gene present in all members of the B. cepacia complex except B. cepacia (formerly genomovar I). Genetic diversity was assessed using recA PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism, recA nucleotide sequence analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assays. The assays revealed the genetic variability among the isolates and also allowed us to trace the relationship among isolates. The isolates all were assigned to genomovar III and consisted of two groups, A and B, which corresponded to recA lineage IIIA and IIIB. The group B strains were separated into B1 and B2 subgroups and the B1 strains were further divided into distinct lineages. The B1 strains were the most frequently detected and occurred in all regions tested. There was no significant difference between strains from each subgroup in the virulence on banana fingers of cv. Cavendish. PCR assays were further used to determine whether B. cenocepacia from banana contained the cable pilus subunit gene (cblA), IS1356, and B. cepacia epidemic strain marker (BCESM), which are DNA markers associated with epidemic B. cepacia clinic strains. The results indicated that cblA and IS1356 were absent but the BCESM was found in all isolates. The

  16. Accurate determination of genetic identity for a single cacao bean, using molecular markers with a nanofluidic system, ensures cocoa authentication.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wanping; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Bellato, Cláudia M; Motilal, Lambert; Zhang, Dapeng

    2014-01-15

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.), the source of cocoa, is an economically important tropical crop. One problem with the premium cacao market is contamination with off-types adulterating raw premium material. Accurate determination of the genetic identity of single cacao beans is essential for ensuring cocoa authentication. Using nanofluidic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping with 48 SNP markers, we generated SNP fingerprints for small quantities of DNA extracted from the seed coat of single cacao beans. On the basis of the SNP profiles, we identified an assumed adulterant variety, which was unambiguously distinguished from the authentic beans by multilocus matching. Assignment tests based on both Bayesian clustering analysis and allele frequency clearly separated all 30 authentic samples from the non-authentic samples. Distance-based principle coordinate analysis further supported these results. The nanofluidic SNP protocol, together with forensic statistical tools, is sufficiently robust to establish authentication and to verify gourmet cacao varieties. This method shows significant potential for practical application.

  17. Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers (2010) Fungal Genetics and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Murat, Claude; Riccioni, C; Belfiori, B; Cichocki, N; Labbe, Jessy L; Morin, Emmanuelle; Tisserant, Emilie; Paolocci, F; Rubini, A; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.

  18. No Genetic Diversity at Molecular Markers and Strong Phenotypic Plasticity in Populations of Ranunculus nodiflorus, an Endangered Plant Species in France

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Florence; Machon, Nathalie; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Although conservation biology has long focused on population dynamics and genetics, phenotypic plasticity is likely to play a significant role in population viability. Here, an investigation is made into the relative contribution of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity to the phenotypic variation in natural populations of Ranunculus nodiflorus, a rare annual plant inhabiting temporary puddles in the Fontainebleau forest (Paris region, France) and exhibiting metapopulation dynamics. Methods The genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity of quantitative traits (morphological and fitness components) were measured in five populations, using a combination of field measurements, common garden experiments and genotyping at microsatellite loci. Key Results It is shown that populations exhibit almost undetectable genetic diversity at molecular markers, and that the variation in quantitative traits observed among populations is due to a high level of phenotypic plasticity. Despite the lack of genetic diversity, the natural population of R. nodiflorus exhibits large population sizes and does not appear threatened by extinction; this may be attributable to large phenotypic plasticity, enabling the production of numerous seeds under a wide range of environmental conditions. Conclusions Efficient conservation of the populations can only be based on habitat management, to favour the maintenance of microenvironmental variation and the resulting strong phenotypic plasticity. In contrast, classical actions aiming to improve genetic diversity are useless in the present case. PMID:17468109

  19. No genetic diversity at molecular markers and strong phenotypic plasticity in populations of Ranunculus nodiflorus, an endangered plant species in France.

    PubMed

    Noel, Florence; Machon, Nathalie; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2007-06-01

    Although conservation biology has long focused on population dynamics and genetics, phenotypic plasticity is likely to play a significant role in population viability. Here, an investigation is made into the relative contribution of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity to the phenotypic variation in natural populations of Ranunculus nodiflorus, a rare annual plant inhabiting temporary puddles in the Fontainebleau forest (Paris region, France) and exhibiting metapopulation dynamics. The genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity of quantitative traits (morphological and fitness components) were measured in five populations, using a combination of field measurements, common garden experiments and genotyping at microsatellite loci. It is shown that populations exhibit almost undetectable genetic diversity at molecular markers, and that the variation in quantitative traits observed among populations is due to a high level of phenotypic plasticity. Despite the lack of genetic diversity, the natural population of R. nodiflorus exhibits large population sizes and does not appear threatened by extinction; this may be attributable to large phenotypic plasticity, enabling the production of numerous seeds under a wide range of environmental conditions. Efficient conservation of the populations can only be based on habitat management, to favour the maintenance of microenvironmental variation and the resulting strong phenotypic plasticity. In contrast, classical actions aiming to improve genetic diversity are useless in the present case.

  20. Medline search engine for finding genetic markers with biological significance.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Weijian; Wang, Pinglang; Watson, Stanley J; Meng, Fan

    2007-09-15

    Genome-wide high density SNP association studies are expected to identify various SNP alleles associated with different complex disorders. Understanding the biological significance of these SNP alleles in the context of existing literature is a major challenge since existing search engines are not designed to search literature for SNPs or other genetic markers. The literature mining of gene and protein functions has received significant attention and effort while similar work on genetic markers and their related diseases is still in its infancy. Our goal is to develop a web-based tool that facilitates the mining of Medline literature related to genetic studies and gene/protein function studies. Our solution consists of four main function modules for (1) identification of different types of genetic markers or genetic variations in Medline records (2) distinguishing positive versus negative linkage or association between genetic markers and diseases (3) integrating marker genomic location data from different databases to enable the retrieval of Medline records related to markers in the same linkage disequilibrium region (4) and a web interface called MarkerInfoFinder to search, display, sort and download Medline citation results. Tests using published data suggest MarkerInfoFinder can significantly increase the efficiency of finding genetic disorders and their underlying molecular mechanisms. The functions we developed will also be used to build a knowledge base for genetic markers and diseases. The MarkerInfoFinder is publicly available at: http://brainarray.mbni.med.umich.edu/brainarray/datamining/MarkerInfoFinder.

  1. Introgression Threatens the Genetic Diversity of Quercus austrocochinchinensis (Fagaceae), an Endangered Oak: A Case Inferred by Molecular Markers.

    PubMed

    An, Miao; Deng, Min; Zheng, Si-Si; Jiang, Xiao-Long; Song, Yi-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Natural introgression can cause negative effects where rare species experience genetic assimilation and invade by their abundant congeners. Quercus austrocochinchinensis and Q. kerrii (subgenus Cyclobalanopsis) are a pair of closely related species in the Indo-China area. Morphological intermediates of the two species have been reported in this region. In this study, we used AFLP, SSR and two key leaf morphological diagnostic traits to study the two Q. austrocochinchinensis populations, two pure Q. kerrii and two putative hybrid populations in China. Rates of individual admixture were examined using the Bayesian clustering programs STRUCTURE and NewHybrids, with no a priori species assignment. In total, we obtained 151 SSR alleles and 781 polymorphic loci of AFLP markers. Population differentiation inferred by SSR and AFLP was incoherent with recognized species boundaries. Bayesian admixture analyses and principal coordinate analysis identified more hybrids and backcrossed individuals than morphological intermediates in the populations. SSR inferred a wide genetic assimilation in Q. austrocochinchinensis, except for subpopulation D2 in the core area of Xi-Shuang-Ban-Na Nature Reserve (XSBN). However, AFLP recognized more Q. austrocochinchinensis purebreds than SSR. Analysis using NewHybrids on AFLP data indicated that these hybridized individuals were few F2 and predominantly backcrosses with both parental species. All these evidences indicate the formation of a hybrid swarm at XSBN where the two species co-exist. Both AFLP and SSR recognized that the core protected area of XSBN (D2) has a high percentage of Q. austrocochinchinensis purebreds and a unique germplasm. The Hainan population and the other subpopulations of XSBN of the species might have lost their genetic integrity. Our results revealed a clear genetic differentiation in the populations and subpopulations of Q. austrocochinchinensis and ongoing introgression between Q. austrocochinchinensis and Q

  2. Introgression Threatens the Genetic Diversity of Quercus austrocochinchinensis (Fagaceae), an Endangered Oak: A Case Inferred by Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    An, Miao; Deng, Min; Zheng, Si-Si; Jiang, Xiao-Long; Song, Yi-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Natural introgression can cause negative effects where rare species experience genetic assimilation and invade by their abundant congeners. Quercus austrocochinchinensis and Q. kerrii (subgenus Cyclobalanopsis) are a pair of closely related species in the Indo-China area. Morphological intermediates of the two species have been reported in this region. In this study, we used AFLP, SSR and two key leaf morphological diagnostic traits to study the two Q. austrocochinchinensis populations, two pure Q. kerrii and two putative hybrid populations in China. Rates of individual admixture were examined using the Bayesian clustering programs STRUCTURE and NewHybrids, with no a priori species assignment. In total, we obtained 151 SSR alleles and 781 polymorphic loci of AFLP markers. Population differentiation inferred by SSR and AFLP was incoherent with recognized species boundaries. Bayesian admixture analyses and principal coordinate analysis identified more hybrids and backcrossed individuals than morphological intermediates in the populations. SSR inferred a wide genetic assimilation in Q. austrocochinchinensis, except for subpopulation D2 in the core area of Xi-Shuang-Ban-Na Nature Reserve (XSBN). However, AFLP recognized more Q. austrocochinchinensis purebreds than SSR. Analysis using NewHybrids on AFLP data indicated that these hybridized individuals were few F2 and predominantly backcrosses with both parental species. All these evidences indicate the formation of a hybrid swarm at XSBN where the two species co-exist. Both AFLP and SSR recognized that the core protected area of XSBN (D2) has a high percentage of Q. austrocochinchinensis purebreds and a unique germplasm. The Hainan population and the other subpopulations of XSBN of the species might have lost their genetic integrity. Our results revealed a clear genetic differentiation in the populations and subpopulations of Q. austrocochinchinensis and ongoing introgression between Q. austrocochinchinensis and Q

  3. [Molecular markers associated with prostate cancer: 3-nitrotyrosine and genetic and proteic expression of Mn-superoxide dismutasa (Mn-SOD)].

    PubMed

    Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Castro-Marín, Melchor; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí

    2009-11-01

    Recent reports place prostate cancer (PCa) as third cause of death in the World among males, in Mexico it is the leading cause of male death. In this study, we studied molecular markers and one genetic marker related in tissues with PCa and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): The Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) gen and protein, prostate specific antigen (PSA) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT). It was evaluated if various markers of oxidative stress show altered expression in prostate cancer and BPH. 80 biopsies were obtained. The conditions to amplify and evaluate the immunoreactivity of the genes of interest (Mn-SOD and 3-NT) and the correlation between PSA and Mn-SOD immunoreactivity in prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia were standardized. Gene overexpression and Mn-SOD and 3-NT immunoreactivity were greater in prostate cancer with respect to the BPH group. Correlation between levels of PSA and the Mn-SOD immunoreactivity was not observed. The above results suggest that the parameters evaluated can be used as tumor markers making the determinations in biopsies of patients suspected of prostate cancer.

  4. Introductory molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Moulds, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book begins with an overview of the current principles of genetics and molecular genetics. Over this foundation, it adds detailed and specialized information: a description of the translation, transcription, expression and regulation of DNA and RNA; a description of the manipulation of genetic material via promoters, enhancers, and gene splicing; and a description of cloning techniques, especially those for blood group genes. The last chapter looks to the impact of molecular genetics on transfusion medicine.

  5. Biological identification systems: genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, E P; Meghen, C M

    2001-08-01

    Individual animals differ from each other on a number of biological levels. At the most basic level, the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of each animal is different, and transcription of the DNA code yields variations at the protein level, which in turn give rise to individual diversity at the physical level. In recent years, accessing the primary genetic code of individual animals has become straightforward. The authors briefly review the development of biological identification technologies and then consider in more detail the application of current DNA testing technologies to issues of traceability of live animals and derived products. Although largely focused on cattle and beef traceability, the principles described are relevant to ovine, porcine and equine traceability. The accelerating pace of innovation and development within the field of molecular genetics suggests that the technologies described may soon be superseded. However, the principles of genetic identification will remain unchanged.

  6. A Preliminary Study of Genetic Variation in Populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae) from North-East Brazil, Estimated with AFLP Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, I. M.; Mayo, S. J.; van den Berg, C.; Fay, M. F.; Chester, M.; Lexer, C.; Kirkup, D.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims This study sought genetic evidence of long-term isolation in populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae), a herbaceous, probably outbreeding, humid forest hemi-epiphyte, in the brejo forests of Ceará (north-east Brazil), and clarification of their relationships with populations in Amazonia and the Atlantic forest of Brazil. Methods Within-population genetic diversity and between-population dissimilarity were estimated using AFLP molecular markers in 75 individuals from eight populations located in Ceará, the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and Amazonia. Key Results The populations showed a clinal pattern of weak genetic differentiation over a large geographical region (FST = 0·1896). A strong correlation between genetic and geographical distance (Mantel test: r = 0·6903, P = 0·002) suggests a historical pattern of isolation by distance. Genetic structure analysis revealed at least two distinct gene pools in the data. The two isolated Ceará populations are significantly different from each other (pairwise ΦPT = 0·137, P = 0·003) and as diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·1832, 0·1706) as those in the Atlantic and Amazon forest regions. The population in southern Brazil is less diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·127) than the rest. The Ceará populations are related to those of the Atlantic forest rather than those from Amazonia (AMOVA, among-groups variation = 11·95 %, P = 0·037). Conclusions The gene pools detected within an overall pattern of clinal variation suggest distinct episodes of gene flow, possibly correlated with past humid forest expansions. The Ceará populations show no evidence of erosion of genetic diversity, although this was expected because of their isolation. Their genetic differentiation and relatively high diversity reinforce the importance of conserving the endangered brejo forests. PMID:17823112

  7. Molecular Population Genetics.

    PubMed

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. Copyright © 2017 Casillas and Barbadilla.

  8. Molecular Population Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. PMID:28270526

  9. Molecular genetic survey of European mistletoe (Viscum album) subspecies with allele-specific and dCAPS type markers specific for chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Ochocka, J Renata; Stefanowicz, Justyna; ŁUczkiewicz, Maria

    2003-10-01

    The qualitative and quantitative content of mistletoe metabolites, and bioactivity of extracts is related to the subspecies of Viscum album L. These were indicated to be genetically distinct and host specific. We aimed to check (i) whether the specificity is strict and (ii) how frequently hybridization occurs among the subspecies. We designed two sets of allele-specific and dCAPS molecular genetic markers that would facilitate identification of Viscum album L. subspecies and their hybrid derivatives on the basis of chloroplast trnH(GUG)- trnK(UUU) and nuclear rDNA ITS1&2 sequences. Out of 118 plants surveyed, 103 displayed characteristics that confirmed strict host specificity of the subspecies, in addition, the results were compliant between nuclear and chloroplast markers showing no indication of hybridization among subspecies. From 15 samples that showed deviations from this model 13 came from the Mediterranean Sea basin, and only two originated from Central and Western Europe. Abbreviations. dCAPS:derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence ITS1&2:Internal Transcribed Spacers 1&2 MAMA:Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay

  10. Ex situ conservation of Phyllanthus fraternus Webster and evaluation of genetic fidelity in regenerates using DNA-based molecular marker.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Richa; Kashyap, Sarvesh Pratap; Singh, Chandra Shekhar; Tiwari, Kavindra Nath; Singh, Karuna; Singh, Major

    2014-11-01

    Germplasm storage of Phyllanthus fraternus by using synseed technology has been optimized. Synseeds were prepared from nodal segments taken from in vitro-grown plantlets. An encapsulation matrix of 3 % sodium alginate and 100 mM calcium chloride with polymerization duration up to 15 min was found most suitable for synseed formation. Maximum plantlet conversion (92.5 ± 2.5 %) was obtained on a growth regulator-free ½-strength solid Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium. Multiple shoot proliferation was optimum on a ½ MS medium containing 0.5 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). Shoots were subjected to rooting on MS media containing 1 mg/l α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and acclimatized successfully. Encapsulated nodal segments can be stored for up to 90 days with a survival frequency of 47.33 %. The clonal fidelity of synseed-derived plantlets was also assessed and compared with that of the mother plant using rapid amplified polymorphic DNA and inter-simple sequence repeat analysis. No changes in molecular profiles were observed among the synseed-derived plantlets and mother plant, which confirms the genetic stability of regenerates. This synseed production protocol could be useful for in vitro multiplication, short-term storage, and exchange of germplasm of this important antiviral and hepatoprotective plant.

  11. Genetic diversity of the sunflower caterpillar (Chlosyne lacinia saundersii Doubleday and Hewitson) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) populations determined by molecular RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Fabiane; Gómez, Daniel R Sosa; da Silva, Jose J; Alexandre, Talita M; Moscardi, Flávio

    2010-12-01

    Chlosyne lacinia saundersii is one of the most important pests of sunflower and it is the main target of insecticides applications. Larvae were collected in Londrina (PR), Santa Maria (RS), Dourados (MS), Ribeirão Preto (SP), Brasília (DF), Barreiras (BA), Uberaba (MG) and Vilhena (RO). Genomic DNA was extracted and amplified with ten-mer primers, which produced 101 loci. The size of the RAPD amplicons ranged from 180 to 2564 bp. Polymorphism among populations ranged from 31% to 67%, with the highest polymorphisms of 57% and 67% being detected in Uberaba and Vilhena populations, respectively. Populations with the highest similarity determined with Dice coefficient were from Ribeirão Preto and Barreiras, while insects from Londrina showed the highest similarity among them. Gene flow of C. lacinia saundersii 1.1 was lower than those previously observed for the noctuid Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner, suggesting that C. lacinia saundersii populations are more isolated than the ones of this noctuid. Through the Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA), RAPD variance was 33.64% among geographical populations and 66.36% within populations. These results suggest that populations of C. lacinia saundersii are genetically structured.

  12. Construction of a genetic linkage map and identification of molecular markers associated with resistance to TSWV, leaf spot, and other important traits.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The limited DNA polymorphisms have impeded the application of marker assisted breeding in peanut. A high-density genetic linkage map for all chromosomes is necessary for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) analysis and efficient marker-assisted breeding. Peanut is vulnerable to a range of diseases, such ...

  13. Estimation of genetic diversity and evaluation of relatedness through molecular markers among medicinally important trees: Terminalia arjuna, T. chebula and T. bellerica.

    PubMed

    Sarwat, Maryam; Das, Sandip; Srivastava, Prem S

    2011-11-01

    Terminalia trees are being over-exploited because of their medicinal and economical importance leading to loss of valuable genetic resources. For sustainable utilization and conservation, assessment of genetic diversity therefore becomes imperative. We report a comprehensive first study on estimation and analysis of genetic variation through Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), inter simple sequence repeat polymorphism (ISSR) and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) across three species of Terminalia. The study included (i) characterization of genetic diversity at interspecific level, and (ii) comparison of efficiency of the marker systems. That the three species are genetically distinct was revealed by all the three marker systems as unique DNA fingerprints were obtained. This led to identification of several species-specific amplification products. Further analysis helped in species-wise clustering. The species specific bands obtained from the present investigation can be used as diagnostic markers to identify the raw materials for herbal drug preparations for authentication purposes.

  14. Study of intra-varietal genetic variability in grapevine cultivars by PCR-derived molecular markers and correlations with the geographic origins.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Stefano; Costacurta, Angelo; Morreale, Giacomo; Calò, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The genetic grapevine intravarietal variability will be analyzed by PCR-derived marker systems. In particular, the object of the investigation will be the clonal variations of Malvasia nera di Brindisi/Lecce, Negroamaro and Primitivo, also known as Zinfandel, which are three grapevine varieties cultivated in Apulia region (Italy). In order to assess varietal identity of the samples, 132 DNA tests were performed by amplifying 16 SSR loci. The study of the intravarietal variability was performed using AFLPs, SAMPLs, ISSRs, and M-AFLPs. The application of the above-mentioned techniques allowed both to discriminate all genotypes of the three cultivars and to distinguish the accessions of each cultivar sampled from different geographic cultivation areas. Furthermore, the study of biotypes cultivated in different geographical environments of Salento (i.e., Apulia region) allowed important correlations between molecular marker variability and phenotypic traits. These results are suggesting both to focus our attention on the effects of the environment on the genotype and to consider, as a practical consequence, the importance of preserving autochthon grapevine biotypes found in different areas to truly preserve the richness of the germplasm. Thus, more accurate DNA studies give new information that can be extremely useful to the vine nurseries for the correct choice (i.e., supported by more accurate intravarietal variability analysis) of the grape multiplication materials.

  15. Estimation of genetic diversity using SSR markers in sunflower

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sunflower is a major oilseed crop in central Asia, but little is known of the molecular diversity among collections of sunflower from Pakistan region. This paper described inherent genetic relationships among sunflower collections using Simple Sequence Repeat molecular markers. Results should help...

  16. Use of AFLP and RAPD molecular genetic markers and cytogenetic analysis to explore relationships among taxa of the Patagonian Bromus setifolius complex

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Bromus setifolius var. pictus (Hook) Skottsb., B. setifolius var. setifolius Presl. and B.setifolius var. brevifolius Ness are three native Patagonian taxa in the section Pnigma Dumort of the genus Bromus L. AFLP and RAPD analysis, in conjunction with genetic distance measurements and statistical techniques, revealed variation within this group and indicated that B. setifolius var. brevifolius was closely related to B. setifolius var. pictus, with both taxa being more distantly related to B. setifolius var. setifolius. Cytogenetic analysis confirmed the chromosomal number of B. setifolius var. pictus (2n = 70) and B. setifolius var. setifolius (2n = 28) and showed for the first time that B. setifolius var. brevifolius had 2n = 70. The combination of molecular genetic and cytogenetic evidence supported a species status for two of the three taxa and suggested hypotheses for the evolutionary origin of these complex taxa. Species status was also indicated for B. setifolius var. setifolius. Based on these findings, we suggest that B. setifolius var. pictus be referred to as B. pictus Hook var. pictus, and B. setifolius var brevifolius as B. pictus Hook var brevifolius. The correlation between AFLP diversity and variation in ecological parameters suggested that this marker system could be used to assess breeding progress and to monitor the domestication of Patagonian Bromus species for agronomic use. PMID:21637686

  17. Biochemical genetic markers in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Glaszmann, J C; Fautret, A; Noyer, J L; Feldmann, P; Lanaud, C

    1989-10-01

    Isozyme variation was used to identify biochemical markers of potential utility in sugarcane genetics and breeding. Electrophoretic polymorphism was surveyed for nine enzymes among 39 wild and noble sugarcane clones, belonging to the species most closely related to modern varieties. Up to 114 distinct bands showing presence versus absence type of variation were revealed and used for qualitative characterization of the materials. Multivariate analysis of the data isolated the Erianthus clone sampled and separated the Saccharum spontaneum clones from the S. robustum and S. officinarum clones; the latter two were not differentiated from one another. The analysis of self-progenies of a 2n=112 S. spontaneum and of a commercial variety showed examples of mono- and polyfactorial segregations. Within the progeny of the variety, co-segregation of two isozymes frequent in S. spontaneum led to them being assigned to a single chromosome initially contributed by a S. spontaneum donor. This illustrates how combined survey of ancestral species and segregation analysis in modern breeding materials should permit using the lack of interspecific cross-over to establish linkage groups in a sugarcane genome.

  18. Molecular markers for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Brandon T.; Kisiel, John; Ahlquist, David A.; Grady, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has seen a declining incidence and mortality in countries with programmatic screening. Fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and endoscopic approaches are the predominant screening methods currently. The discovery of the adenoma→carcinoma sequence and a greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive the formation of CRC have contributed to innovative research to identify molecular markers for highly accurate, non-invasive screening tests for CRC. DNA, proteins, messenger RNA, and micro-RNA have all been evaluated. The observation of tumor cell exfoliation into the mucocellular layer of the colonic epithelium and proven stability of DNA in a harsh stool environment make stool DNA a particularly promising marker. The development of a clinically useful stool DNA test has required numerous technical advances, including optimization in DNA stabilization, the development of assays with high analytical sensitivity, and the identification of specific and broadly informative molecular markers. A multi-target stool DNA (MT-sDNA) test, which combines both mutant and methylated DNA markers and a fecal immunochemical test (FIT), recently performed favorably in a large cross-sectional validation study and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the screening of asymptomatic, average risk individuals. The ultimate way in which molecular marker screening assays will be used in clinical practice will require additional studies to determine optimal screening intervals, factors affecting compliance, management of false positive results, and the use of these assays in high-risk populations, as well as other considerations. PMID:25994221

  19. Molecular markers for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brandon T; Kisiel, John; Ahlquist, David A; Grady, William M

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has seen a declining incidence and mortality in countries with programmatic screening. Faecal occult blood testing and endoscopic approaches are the predominant screening methods currently. The discovery of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and a greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive the formation of CRC have contributed to innovative research to identify molecular markers for highly accurate, non-invasive screening tests for CRC. DNA, proteins, messenger RNA and micro-RNA have all been evaluated. The observation of tumour cell exfoliation into the mucocellular layer of the colonic epithelium and proven stability of DNA in a harsh stool environment make stool DNA a particularly promising marker. The development of a clinically useful stool DNA test has required numerous technical advances, including optimisation in DNA stabilisation, the development of assays with high analytical sensitivity, and the identification of specific and broadly informative molecular markers. A multitarget stool DNA test, which combines mutant and methylated DNA markers and a faecal immunochemical test, recently performed favourably in a large cross-sectional validation study and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the screening of asymptomatic, average-risk individuals. The ultimate way in which molecular marker screening assays will be used in clinical practice will require additional studies to determine optimal screening intervals, factors affecting compliance, management of false-positive results, and the use of these assays in high-risk populations, as well as other considerations.

  20. Genetic identity and parentage in farmer selections of cacao from Southern Sulawesi, Indonesia revealed by molecular markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Indonesia is the 3rd largest cocoa producing countries in the world and 71% of its production is from Sulawesi Island. Knowledge about the genetic background of farmer selections is highly important for effective identification and rational deployment of superior cacao clones in farmers’ fields. Mor...

  1. Ricebase: a breeding and genetics platform for rice, integrating individual molecular markers, pedigrees, and whole-genome-based data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ricebase (http://ricebase.org) is an integrative genomic database for rice (Oryza sativa) with an emphasis on combining data sets in a way that maintains the key links between past and current genetic studies. Ricebase includes DNA sequence data, gene annotations, nucleotide variation data, and mol...

  2. Use of molecular markers to improve relationship information in the genetic evaluation of beef cattle tick resistance under pedigree-based models.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, V S; Cardoso, F F; Oliveira, M M; Sollero, B P; Silva, F F; Lopes, P S

    2017-02-01

    The selection of genetically superior individuals is conditional upon accurate breeding value predictions which, in turn, are highly depend on how precisely relationship is represented by pedigree. For that purpose, the numerator relationship matrix is essential as a priori information in mixed model equations. The presence of pedigree errors and/or the lack of relationship information affect the genetic gain because it reduces the correlation between the true and estimated breeding values. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of correcting the pedigree relationships using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers on genetic evaluation accuracies for resistance of beef cattle to ticks. Tick count data from Hereford and Braford cattle breeds were used as phenotype. Genotyping was carried out using a high-density panel (BovineHD - Illumina(®) bead chip with 777 962 SNPs) for sires and the Illumina BovineSNP50 panel (54 609 SNPs) for their progenies. The relationship between the parents and progenies of genotyped animals was evaluated, and mismatches were based on the Mendelian conflicts counts. Variance components and genetic parameters estimates were obtained using a Bayesian approach via Gibbs sampling, and the breeding values were predicted assuming a repeatability model. A total of 460 corrections in relationship definitions were made (Table 1) corresponding to 1018 (9.5%) tick count records. Among these changes, 97.17% (447) were related to the sire's information, and 2.8% (13) were related to the dam's information. We observed 27.2% (236/868) of Mendelian conflicts for sire-progeny genotyped pairs and 14.3% (13/91) for dam-progeny genotyped pairs. We performed 2174 new definitions of half-siblings according to the correlation coefficient between the coancestry and molecular coancestry matrices. It was observed that higher-quality genetic relationships did not result in significant differences of variance components estimates; however, they

  3. Molecular genetic evidence for the human settlement of the Pacific: analysis of mitochondrial DNA, Y chromosome and HLA markers.

    PubMed Central

    Hagelberg, E; Kayser, M; Nagy, M; Roewer, L; Zimdahl, H; Krawczak, M; Lió, P; Schiefenhövel, W

    1999-01-01

    Present-day Pacific islanders are thought to be the descendants of Neolithic agriculturalists who expanded from island South-east Asia several thousand years ago. They speak languages belonging to the Austronesian language family, spoken today in an area spanning half of the circumference of the world, from Madagascar to Easter Island, and from Taiwan to New Zealand. To investigate the genetic affinities of the Austronesian-speaking peoples, we analysed mitochondrial DNA, HLA and Y-chromosome polymorphisms in individuals from eight geographical locations in Asia and the Pacific (China, Taiwan, Java, New Guinea highlands, New Guinea coast, Trobriand Islands, New Britain and Western Samoa). Our results show that the demographic expansion of the Austronesians has left a genetic footprint. However, there is no simple correlation between languages and genes in the Pacific. PMID:10091254

  4. Genetic markers for schizophrenic subgroups.

    PubMed

    Lange, V

    1982-01-01

    By the study of hereditary serum protein markers in psychotic patients and normal controls, a surplus of Gc 1-1 (p less than 0.01) and transferrin B variants (p less than 0.0027) has been established in schizophrenias. Affective psychoses are characterized by an excess of the haptoglobin (Hp) serum type 2-2 (p less than 0.001). These general statements have to be modified in regard to the clinical and psychopathological subdivision beyond the traditional classification into two major groups of endogenous mental disease. Using Leonhard's criteria, the prevalence of Gc 1-1 is restricted to the systematic schizophrenias reaching its highest value in hebephrenias, which are followed by paraphrenic and catatonic forms in this trait. In contrast to this, periodical catatonia and affective paraphrenia, classified as subgroups of the unsystematic schizophrenias, have Gc 1-1 frequencies like healthy controls. On the other hand, the Hp 2-2 value is not increased in the systematic schizophrenias, but it displays a relative overplus in the unsystematic forms. Concerning the Hp 2-2 and Gc 1-1 frequencies a certain similarity can be observed between affective paraphrenia and the paranoid psychoses with late onset, it they are characterized by a cyclic axis syndrome as described by the Vienna school. The cycloid psychoses are marked by an extreme surplus of Hp 2-2 (p less than 0.001) and an overweight of Gc 1-1 (p less than 0.05). Probably the Gc and Hp alleles play a role as risk factors or accidental effectors in the multifactorial genetic systems responsible for the biological background of psychoses. For both serum systems a selective interaction is discussed considering the vitamin D transport by the Gc proteins with the relation to neuronal consolidation and the possible influence of Hp 2-2 on transport and receptor functions.

  5. Molecular Markers Reveal Limited Population Genetic Structure in a North American Corvid, Clark’s Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana)

    PubMed Central

    Dohms, Kimberly M.; Burg, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic impact of barriers and Pleistocene glaciations on high latitude resident species has not been widely investigated. The Clark’s nutcracker is an endemic North American corvid closely associated with Pinus-dominated forests. The nutcracker’s encompasses known barriers to dispersal for other species, and glaciated and unglaciated areas. Clark’s nutcrackers also irruptively disperse long distances in search of pine seed crops, creating the potential for gene flow among populations. Using the highly variable mitochondrial DNA control region, seven microsatellite loci, and species distribution modeling, we examined the effects of glaciations and dispersal barriers on population genetic patterns and population structure of nutcrackers. We sequenced 900 bp of mitochondrial control region for 169 individuals from 15 populations and analysed seven polymorphic microsatellite loci for 13 populations across the Clark’s nutcracker range. We used species distribution modeling and a range of phylogeographic analyses to examine evolutionary history. Clark’s nutcracker populations are not highly differentiated throughout their range, suggesting high levels of gene flow among populations, though we did find some evidence of isolation by distance and peripheral isolation. Our analyses suggested expansion from a single refugium after the last glacial maximum, but patterns of genetic diversity and paleodistribution modeling of suitable habitat were inconclusive as to the location of this refugium. Potential barriers to dispersal (e.g. mountain ranges) do not appear to restrict gene flow in Clark’s nutcracker, and postglacial expansion likely occurred quickly from a single refugium located south of the ice sheets. PMID:24223982

  6. Genetic variability of Triatoma rubrovaria (Reduviidae: Triatominae) from Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay as revealed by two different molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, R S; Almeida, C E; Klisiowicz, D R; Costa, J; Pires, M Q; Panzera, F; Bar, M E; Mas-Coma, S; Bargues, M E

    2007-09-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence analyses were used to assess the genetic population structure of the South American triatomine species Triatomo rubrovario throughout its geographical distribution. To investigate the genetic variability at both intraspecific and intrapopulational levels the RAPD profiles and the nucleotide sequences of the rDNA intergenic spacers, ITS-1 and ITS-2, were analysed and compared. The phenetic analysis based on RAPD profiles show three distinct clusters diverging by similarity coefficients ranging from 0.62 to 0.96. The ITS-1 and ITS-2 sequence variability detected may be considered very high, suggesting reproductive isolation between populations. A total of seven composite haplotypes (CH) were found, among which three are specific for Brazil, other three for Uruguay, and the last one common for the three countries studied. The population studied in Argentina does not represent an independent CH. Sequence analyses proved that the five populations studied are easily differentiable and that there is heterogeneity within each one. True mutations and indels are the responsible of sequence differences between haplotypes and populations, suggesting that divergence processes may presently go on within this species. The large intraspecific variability detected may underlie the known plasticity of T. rubrovaria, making it a potential intradomiciliary invader and consequently an appropriate vector for Chagas disease transmission. Therefore, this triatomine species must be continuously monitored throughout.

  7. Molecular genetic analysis of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Eastern and Central Sudan using pvcsp and pvmsp-3α genes as molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Talha, Albadawi Abdelbagi; Pirahmadi, Sekineh; Mehrizi, Akram Abouie; Djadid, Navid Dinparast; Nour, Bakri Y M; Zakeri, Sedigheh

    2015-06-01

    In Sudan, Plasmodium vivax accounts for approximately 5-10% of malaria cases. This study was carried out to determine the genetic diversity of P. vivax population from Sudan by analyzing the polymorphism of P. vivax csp (pvcsp) and pvmsp-3α genes. Blood samples (n=76) were taken from suspected malaria cases from 2012-2013 in three health centers of Eastern and Central Sudan. Parasite detection was performed by microscopy and molecular techniques, and genotyping of both genes was performed by PCR-RFLP followed by DNA sequence for only pvcsp gene (n=30). Based on microscopy analysis, 76 (%100) patients were infected with P. vivax, whereas nested-PCR results showed that 86.8% (n=66), 3.9% (n=3), and 3.9% (n=3) of tested samples had P. vivax as well as Plasmodium falciparum mono- and mixed infections, respectively. Four out of 76 samples had no results in molecular diagnosis. All sequenced samples were found to be of VK210 (100%) genotype with six distinct amino acid haplotypes, and 210A (66.7%) was the most prevalent haplotype. The Sudanese isolates displayed variations in the peptide repeat motifs (PRMs) ranging from 17 to 19 with GDRADGQPA (PRM1), GDRAAGQPA (PRM2) and DDRAAGQPA (PRM3). Also, 54 polymorphic sites with 56 mutations were found in repeat and post-repeat regions of the pvcsp and the overall nucleotide diversity (π) was 0.02149±0.00539. A negative value of dN-dS (-0.0344) was found that suggested a significant purifying selection of Sudanese pvcsp, (Z test, P<0.05). Regarding pvmsp-3α, three types were detected: types A (94.6%, 52/55), type C (3.6%, 2/55), and type B (1.8%, 1/55). No multiclonal infections were detected, and RFLP analysis identified 13 (Hha I, A1-A11, B1, and C1) and 16 (Alu I, A1-A14, B1, and C1) distinct allelic forms. In conclusion, genetic investigation among Sudanese P. vivax isolates indicated that this antigen showed limited antigenic diversity.

  8. Genetic Structure of Earthworm Populations at a Regional Scale: Inferences from Mitochondrial and Microsatellite Molecular Markers in Aporrectodea icterica (Savigny 1826)

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Leguizamon, Magally; Mathieu, Jérôme; Decaëns, Thibaud; Dupont, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fundamental role that soil invertebrates (e.g. earthworms) play in soil ecosystems, the magnitude of their spatial genetic variation is still largely unknown and only a few studies have investigated the population genetic structure of these organisms. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of seven populations of a common endogeic earthworm (Aporrectodea icterica) sampled in northern France to explore how historical species range changes, microevolutionary processes and human activities interact in shaping genetic variation at a regional scale. Because combining markers with distinct modes of inheritance can provide extra, complementary information on gene flow, we compared the patterns of genetic structure revealed using nuclear (7 microsatellite loci) and mitochondrial markers (COI). Both types of markers indicated low genetic polymorphism compared to other earthworm species, a result that can be attributed to ancient bottlenecks, for instance due to species isolation in southern refugia during the ice ages with subsequent expansion toward northern Europe. Historical events can also be responsible for the existence of two divergent, but randomly interbreeding mitochondrial lineages within all study populations. In addition, the comparison of observed heterozygosity among microsatellite loci and heterozygosity expected under mutation-drift equilibrium suggested a recent decrease in effective size in some populations that could be due to contemporary events such as habitat fragmentation. The absence of relationship between geographic and genetic distances estimated from microsatellite allele frequency data also suggested that dispersal is haphazard and that human activities favour passive dispersal among geographically distant populations. PMID:25003795

  9. Genetic structure of earthworm populations at a regional scale: inferences from mitochondrial and microsatellite molecular markers in Aporrectodea icterica (Savigny 1826).

    PubMed

    Torres-Leguizamon, Magally; Mathieu, Jérôme; Decaëns, Thibaud; Dupont, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fundamental role that soil invertebrates (e.g. earthworms) play in soil ecosystems, the magnitude of their spatial genetic variation is still largely unknown and only a few studies have investigated the population genetic structure of these organisms. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of seven populations of a common endogeic earthworm (Aporrectodea icterica) sampled in northern France to explore how historical species range changes, microevolutionary processes and human activities interact in shaping genetic variation at a regional scale. Because combining markers with distinct modes of inheritance can provide extra, complementary information on gene flow, we compared the patterns of genetic structure revealed using nuclear (7 microsatellite loci) and mitochondrial markers (COI). Both types of markers indicated low genetic polymorphism compared to other earthworm species, a result that can be attributed to ancient bottlenecks, for instance due to species isolation in southern refugia during the ice ages with subsequent expansion toward northern Europe. Historical events can also be responsible for the existence of two divergent, but randomly interbreeding mitochondrial lineages within all study populations. In addition, the comparison of observed heterozygosity among microsatellite loci and heterozygosity expected under mutation-drift equilibrium suggested a recent decrease in effective size in some populations that could be due to contemporary events such as habitat fragmentation. The absence of relationship between geographic and genetic distances estimated from microsatellite allele frequency data also suggested that dispersal is haphazard and that human activities favour passive dispersal among geographically distant populations.

  10. Genetic diversity of the Arctic fox using SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Bai, X J

    2013-12-04

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) is a recently developed molecular marker technique that is stable, simple, reliable, and achieves moderate to high numbers of codominant markers. This study is the first to apply SRAP markers in a mammal, namely the Arctic fox. In order to investigate the genetic diversity of the Arctic fox and to provide a reference for use of its germplasm, we analyzed 7 populations of Arctic fox by SRAP. The genetic similarity coefficient, genetic distance, proportion of polymorphic loci, total genetic diversity (Ht), genetic diversity within populations (Hs), and genetic differentiation (Gst) were calculated using the Popgene software package. The results indicated abundant genetic diversity among the different populations of Arctic fox studied in China. The genetic similarity coefficient ranged from 0.1694 to 0.0417, genetic distance ranged from 0.8442 to 0.9592, and the proportion of polymorphic loci was smallest in the TS group. Genetic diversity ranged from 0.2535 to 0.3791, Ht was 0.3770, Hs was 0.3158, Gst was 0.1624, and gene flow (Nm) was estimated at 2.5790. Thus, a high level of genetic diversity and many genetic relationships were found in the populations of Arctic fox evaluated in this study.

  11. Primer on molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  12. The development of genetic and molecular markers to register and commercialize Penicillium rubens (formerly Penicillium oxalicum) strain 212 as a biocontrol agent.

    PubMed

    Villarino, Maria; De Cal, Antonieta; Melgarejo, Paloma; Larena, Inmaculada; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium oxalicum strain 212 (PO212) is an effective biocontrol agent (BCA) against a large number of economically important fungal plant pathogens. For successful registration as a BCA in Europe, PO212 must be accurately identified. In this report, we describe the use of classical genetic and molecular markers to characterize and identify PO212 in order to understand its ecological role in the environment or host. We successfully generated pyrimidine (pyr-) auxotrophic mutants. In addition we also designed specific oligonucleotides for the pyrF gene at their untranslated regions for rapid and reliable identification and classification of strains of P. oxalicum and P. rubens, formerly P. chrysogenum. Using these DNA-based technologies, we found that PO212 is a strain of P. rubens, and is not a strain of P. oxalicum. This work presents PO212 as the unique P. rubens strain to be described as a BCA and the information contained here serves for its registration and commercialization in Europe. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Molecular identification of Azospirillum spp.: Limitations of 16S rRNA and qualities of rpoD as genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Maroniche, Guillermo A; García, Julia E; Salcedo, Florencia; Creus, Cecilia M

    2017-01-01

    Since their discovery, plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria from the genus Azospirillum have been subjected to intensive research due to their biotechnological potential as crop inoculants. Phylogenetic analysis of Azospirillum spp. is carried out by 16S rRNA sequencing almost exclusively, but inconsistencies and low confidence often arise when working with close species. In this work, it was observed that these difficulties might be explained by a high number of rRNA operons with considerable inter-genic variability within Azospirillum genomes. To search for alternative genetic markers from a list of housekeeping genes, the correlation between pairwise gene and whole-genome similarities was examined. Due to its good performance, rpoD was selected for further analyses. Genus-specific primers for the PCR-amplification and sequencing of rpoD from Azospirillum spp. were designed and tested on 16 type strains of different species. The sequences obtained were used for inferring a phylogenetic tree of the genus, which was in turn used as a reference to successfully identify a collection of 31 azospirilla isolated from many different locations of Argentine. In addition, several strains that might represent novel species were detected. The results indicate that the sequencing of rpoD is a suitable alternative method for a confident molecular identification in Azospirillum spp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular identification of blood meal sources of ticks (Acari, Ixodidae) using cytochrome b gene as a genetic marker

    PubMed Central

    Che Lah, Ernieenor Faraliana; Yaakop, Salmah; Ahamad, Mariana; Md Nor, Shukor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood meal analysis (BMA) from ticks allows for the identification of natural hosts of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). The aim of this study is to identify the blood meal sources of field collected on-host ticks using PCR analysis. DNA of four genera of ticks was isolated and their cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene was amplified to identify host blood meals. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on data of Cyt b sequences using Neighbor Joining (NJ) and Maximum Parsimony (MP) analysis using MEGA 5.05 for the clustering of hosts of tick species. Twenty out of 27 samples showed maximum similarity (99%) with GenBank sequences through a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) while 7 samples only showed a similarity range of between 91–98%. The phylogenetic trees showed that the blood meal samples were derived from small rodents (Leopoldamys sabanus, Rattus tiomanicus and Sundamys muelleri), shrews (Tupaia glis) and mammals (Tapirus indicus and Prionailurus bengalensis), supported by 82–88% bootstrap values. In this study, Cyt b gene as a molecular target produced reliable results and was very significant for the effective identification of ticks’ blood meal. The assay can be used as a tool for identifying unknown blood meals of field collected on-host ticks. PMID:25685009

  15. Estimates of Spatial Genetic Structure within and among Clones of Wild Lowbush Blueberry in Maine using EST-PCR Molecular Markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using recently developed EST-PCR markers, several levels of spatial genetic structure of wild lowbush blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium Ait., were investigated. Knowledge of this structure (or lack of it) is a prerequisite to testing hypotheses regarding the dramatic yield variation among individu...

  16. Molecular marker systems in insects: current trends and future avenues.

    PubMed

    Behura, Susanta K

    2006-10-01

    Insects comprise the largest species composition in the entire animal kingdom and possess a vast undiscovered genetic diversity and gene pool that can be better explored using molecular marker techniques. Current trends of application of DNA marker techniques in diverse domains of insect ecological studies show that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), microsatellites, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), expressed sequence tags (EST) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers have contributed significantly for progresses towards understanding genetic basis of insect diversity and for mapping medically and agriculturally important genes and quantitative trait loci in insect pests. Apart from these popular marker systems, other novel approaches including transposon display, sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (S-SAP), repeat-associated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) markers have been identified as alternate marker systems in insect studies. Besides, whole genome microarray and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays are becoming more popular to screen genome-wide polymorphisms in fast and cost effective manner. However, use of such methodologies has not gained widespread popularity in entomological studies. The current study highlights the recent trends of applications of molecular markers in insect studies and explores the technological advancements in molecular marker tools and modern high throughput genotyping methodologies that may be applied in entomological researches for better understanding of insect ecology at molecular level.

  17. Genetics and biological markers of risk for alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Tabakoff, B; Hoffman, P L

    1988-01-01

    Substantial scientific evidence has accumulated that both genetic and environmental factors predispose the development of alcoholism in certain individuals. Evidence has accumulated to indicate that alcoholism is a heterogeneous entity arising from multiple etiologies. The demonstrated role of genetics in increasing the risk of alcoholism has promoted the search for biological markers that could objectively identify individuals who are genetically predisposed to alcoholism. Identifying such markers could allow for early diagnosis, focused prevention, and differential and type-specific treatment of alcoholism. Promising markers have been provided by research in electrophysiology, endocrinology, and biochemistry. Recent advances in molecular genetics are offering prospects for direct analysis of the human genome to determine elements that provide predisposition to, and protection from, alcoholism. Recent advances in research and new knowledge gained by the alcoholism treatment community and the lay public are helping to diminish the societal damage caused by alcohol abuse and alcoholism and to change prevailing attitudes about them. PMID:3141966

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism markers for genetic mapping in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Phan, Alexander C.; Naeemuddin, Mohammed; Mapa, Felipa A.; Ruddy, David A.; Ryan, Jessica J.; Young, Lynn M.; Wells, Trent; Kopczynski, Casey; Ellis, Michael C.

    2001-04-16

    For nearly a century, genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful tool for analyzing gene function, yet Drosophila lacks the molecular genetic mapping tools that have recently revolutionized human, mouse and plant genetics. Here, we describe the systematic characterization of a dense set of molecular markers in Drosophila using an STS-based physical map of the genome. We identify 474 biallelic markers in standard laboratory strains of Drosophila that the genome. The majority of these markers are single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and sequences for these variants are provided in an accessible format. The average density of the new markers is 1 marker per 225 kb on the autosomes and 1 marker per 1 Mb on the X chromosome. We include in this survey a set of P-element strains that provide additional utility for high-resolution mapping. We demonstrate one application of the new markers in a simple set of crosses to map a mutation in the hedgehog gene to an interval of <1 Mb. This new map resource significantly increases the efficiency and resolution of recombination mapping and will be of immediate value to the Drosophila research community.

  19. Impact of marker ascertainment bias on genomic selection accuracy and estimates of genetic diversity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome-wide molecular markers are readily being applied to evaluate genetic diversity in germplasm collections and for making genomic selections in breeding programs. To accurately predict phenotypes and assay genetic diversity, molecular markers should assay a representative sample of the polymorp...

  20. Genetic diversity analysis among male and female Jojoba genotypes employing gene targeted molecular markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) markers

    PubMed Central

    Heikrujam, Monika; Kumar, Jatin; Agrawal, Veena

    2015-01-01

    To detect genetic variations among different Simmondsia chinensis genotypes, two gene targeted markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) were employed in terms of their informativeness and efficiency in analyzing genetic relationships among different genotypes. A total of 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP primers detected genetic polymorphism among 39 Jojoba genotypes (22 females and 17 males). Comparatively, CBDP markers proved to be more effective than SCoT markers in terms of percentage polymorphism as the former detecting an average of 53.4% and the latter as 49.4%. The Polymorphic information content (PIC) value and marker index (MI) of CBPD were 0.43 and 1.10, respectively which were higher than those of SCoT where the respective values of PIC and MI were 0.38 and 1.09. While comparing male and female genotype populations, the former showed higher variation in respect of polymorphic percentage and PIC, MI and Rp values over female populations. Nei's diversity (h) and Shannon index (I) were calculated for each genotype and found that the genotype “MS F” (in both markers) was highly diverse and genotypes “Q104 F” (SCoT) and “82–18 F” (CBDP) were least diverse among the female genotype populations. Among male genotypes, “32 M” (CBDP) and “MS M” (SCoT) revealed highest h and I values while “58-5 M” (both markers) was the least diverse. Jaccard's similarity co-efficient of SCoT markers ranged from 0.733 to 0.922 in female genotypes and 0.941 to 0.746 in male genotype population. Likewise, CBDP data analysis also revealed similarity ranging from 0.751 to 0.958 within female genotypes and 0.754 to 0.976 within male genotype populations thereby, indicating genetically diverse Jojoba population. Employing the NTSYS (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system) Version 2.1 software, both the markers generated dendrograms which revealed that all the Jojoba genotypes were clustered into two major groups

  1. [Hereditary deafness: molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Denoyelle, Françoise; Levilliers, Jacqueline; Simmler, Marie-Christine; Petit, Christine

    2004-03-01

    This article outlines recent advances in explaining hereditary deafness in molecular terms, focusing on isolated (i.e. nonsyndromic) hearing loss. The number of genes identified (36 to date) is growing rapidly. However, difficulties inherent in genetic linkage analysis, coupled with the possible involvement of environmental causes, have so far prevented the characterization of the main genes causative or predisposing to the late-onset forms of deafness.

  2. Molecular markers in medicinal plant biotechnology: past and present.

    PubMed

    Sarwat, Maryam; Nabi, Gowher; Das, Sandip; Srivastava, Prem Shankar

    2012-03-01

    Plant based medicines have gained popularity worldwide due to their almost negligible side effects. In India, the three traditional medicinal systems, namely homeopathy, Ayurveda and Siddha rely heavily on plants for medicinal formulations. To prevent the indiscriminate collection of these valuable medicinal plants and for their proper authentication and conservation, it is imperative to go for sustained efforts towards proper germplasm cataloguing and devising conservation strategies. For this purpose, molecular markers have a significant role, as they provide information ranging from diversity at nucleotide level (single nucleotide polymorphisms) to gene and allele frequencies (genotype information), the extent and distribution of genetic diversity, and population structure. Over the past twenty years, the molecular marker field has completely transformed the meaning of conservation genetics which has emerged from a theory-based field of population biology to a full-fledged pragmatic discipline. In this review, we have explored the transition and transformation of molecular marker technologies throughout these years.

  3. Molecular genetic analysis of the V kappa Ser group associated with two mouse light chain genetic markers. Complementary DNA cloning and southern hybridization analysis

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies (21) have shown that two mouse kappa light (L) chain variable (V) region polymorphisms, the IB-peptide and Efla markers, reflect expression of a characteristic group of V kappa regions, called V kappa Ser, by some inbred strains and not others. Expression of V kappa Ser is controlled by a locus on chromosome 6, the chromosome that contains the kappa locus. To further characterize this V kappa group and begin to analyze the basis for its strain-specific expression, full- length complementary DNA (cDNA) copies were produced of L chain mRNA from the M75 myeloma that had been induced in the C.C58 strain of mice, and which produces a V kappa Ser L chain. The C.C58 strain is congenic with BALB/cAn, differing in the region of chromosome 6 that controls expression of the V kappa polymorphisms and the Lyt-2 and Lyt-3 T cell alloantigens. The complete nucleotide sequence of this cloned cDNA was determined and compared with the nucleotide sequences the most closely related BALB/c myeloma L chains known. Results indicated significant differences throughout the variable region, but particularly toward the 5' portion of the sequence. A probe corresponding to 200 bp of the 5' end of the cloned V kappa Ser cDNA was used in Southern hybridizations of restriction digests of liver DNA from a number of inbred, recombinant, and recombinant inbred strains. Under stringent hybridization conditions, one strongly-hybridizing fragment was observed in Bam HI, Hind III, and Eco RI digests, and based on the size of the fragments, strains could be organized into two groups. The presence of strongly hybridizing Bam HI, Hind III, and Eco RI fragments of 3.2, 2.8, and 2.1 kb, respectively, was found to correlate completely with expression by the strain of the IB-peptide and Efla markers. All nonexpressor strains yielded hybridizing fragments of 7.8, 8.4, and 2.8 kb, respectively. Possible explanations for strain- specific expression of V kappa Ser-associated phenotypic markers are

  4. Construction of a genetic linkage map for identification of molecular markers associated with resistance to Xanthomonas arboriciola pv. pruni in peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial spot, caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni, is a serious disease that can affect peach fruit quality and production. The molecular basis of its tolerance and susceptibility is yet to be understood. To study the genetics of the peach in response to bacterial spot, an F2 population of ...

  5. Applying antibiotic selection markers for nematode genetics.

    PubMed

    Cornes, Eric; Quéré, Cécile A L; Giordano-Santini, Rosina; Dupuy, Denis

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotic selection markers have been recently developed in the multicellular model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and other related nematode species, opening great opportunities in the field of nematode transgenesis. Here we describe how these antibiotic selection systems can be easily combined with many well-established genetic approaches to study gene function, improving time- and cost-effectiveness of the nematode genetic toolbox. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Genetic Mapping in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Phan, Alexander C.; Naeemuddin, Mohammed; Mapa, Felipa A.; Ruddy, David A.; Ryan, Jessica J.; Young, Lynn M.; Wells, Trent; Kopczynski, Casey; Ellis, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    For nearly a century, genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful tool for analyzing gene function, yet Drosophila lacks the molecular genetic mapping tools that recently have revolutionized human, mouse, and plant genetics. Here, we describe the systematic characterization of a dense set of molecular markers in Drosophila by using a sequence tagged site-based physical map of the genome. We identify 474 biallelic markers in standard laboratory strains of Drosophila that span the genome. Most of these markers are single nucleotide polymorphisms and sequences for these variants are provided in an accessible format. The average density of the new markers is one per 225 kb on the autosomes and one per megabase on the X chromosome. We include in this survey a set of P-element strains that provide additional use for high-resolution mapping. We show one application of the new markers in a simple set of crosses to map a mutation in the hedgehog gene to an interval of <1 Mb. This new map resource significantly increases the efficiency and resolution of recombination mapping and will be of immediate value to the Drosophila research community. PMID:11381036

  7. (ISEA) MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  8. MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  9. MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  10. (ISEA) MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  11. Genetics and biology of human ovarian teratomas. II. Molecular analysis of origin of nondisjunction and gene-centromere mapping of chromosome I markers.

    PubMed Central

    Deka, R; Chakravarti, A; Surti, U; Hauselman, E; Reefer, J; Majumder, P P; Ferrell, R E

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal heteromorphisms and DNA polymorphisms have been utilized to identify the mechanisms that lead to formation of human ovarian teratomas and to construct a gene-centromere map of chromosome 1 by using those teratomas that arise by meiotic nondisjunction. Of 61 genetically informative ovarian teratomas, 21.3% arose by nondisjunction at meiosis I, and 39.3% arose by meiosis II nondisjunction. Eight polymorphic marker loci on chromosome 1p and one marker on 1q were used to estimate a gene-centromere map. The results show clear linkage of the most proximal 1p marker (NRAS) and the most proximal 1q marker (D1S61) to the centromere at a distance of 14 cM and 20 cM, respectively. Estimated gene-centromere distances suggest that, while recombination occurs normally in ovarian teratomas arising by meiosis II errors, ovarian teratomas arising by meiosis I nondisjunction have altered patterns of recombination. Furthermore, the estimated map demonstrates clear evidence of chiasma interference. Our results suggest that ovarian teratomas can provide a rapid method for mapping genes relative to the centromere. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1977308

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of some mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene in Moldova: Characterization of molecular markers and their linkage to various mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Gimbovskaya, S.D.; Kalinin, V.N.; Ivashchenko, T.E.; Baranov, V.S.

    1994-12-01

    Sixty-one patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) from Moldova were tested for mutations {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Frequencies of various alleles of the repeated GATT sequence in intron 6B of the GFTR gene, their linkage to other polymorphic markers, and various mutations were determined. The frequency of occurrence of mutation {Delta}F508 was only 25%. An absolute majority of CF patients (80%) had pancreatic insufficiency. Mutations G551D and R553X were not found in our sample. Each of 31 chromosomes with mutation {Delta}F508 carry the 6-GATT allele. Most {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} (78%) and normal (80%) chromosomes were marked by the 7-GATT allele. Twenty-seven {Delta}F508 chromosomes (96.4%) belong to haplotype B6, and only one to D6. Most chromosomes with {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} mutations are associated with haplotypes D7 (26.3%) and C7 (21%). In addition, a significant portion of chromosomes from this subgroup were associated with haplotypes A7 (23.7%), A6 (10.5%), and C6 (2.7%), which are not yet described for mutant chromosomes. The results obtained demonstrate that CF in Moldova is mainly associated with mutations other than {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Severe forms of the disease, with pancreatic insufficiency, are more frequently caused by these mutations; moreover, our data provides strong evidence for the presence of at least seven additional CF mutations in Moldova, apart from {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Some of these are probably not described.

  13. Genetics and biological markers in urachal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Rhijn, Bas W. G.

    2016-01-01

    Urachal cancer (UraC) is a rare tumor entity that usually develops at the basis of the remnant embryologic urachus. Consisting of mostly adenocarcinomas, most patients present with secondary symptoms due to an advanced stage with urinary bladder infiltration. One third of patients are already metastasized at presentation rendering them unsuitable for curative surgical treatment. In order to improve staging, treatment and follow-up, adequate knowledge about the genetic origin and potential markers is necessary. This paper reviews the English literature until December 2015. Pathologists argue for and against metaplasia or remnant enteric cells as origin for the adenomatous tissue found in UraC. Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, GNAS and Her2 have been associated with UraC. Immunohistochemical (IHC) markers like CEA, 34βE12, Claudin-18 and RegIV are indicative for mucous producing UraC. So far, IHC markers fail as prognosticators when matched to clinical data. Little is known about serum markers for UraC. CEA, CA19-9, CA125 and CA724 are mentioned as being elevated in UraC by some reports. Regarding the literature for biological markers in UraC, knowledge is mostly derived from case reports or cohort studies mentioning markers or predictors. More genetic research is needed to show whether UraC stems from progenitor cells of the cloaca or is due to metaplasia of transitional cells. Few IHC markers have shown indicative potential for UraC. A useful panel for differential diagnostics and clinicopathologic prognostication needs to be developed. Serum markers show very little potential for neither diagnosis nor follow-up in UraC. Further research on larger cohorts is necessary. PMID:27785422

  14. Molecular markers in the epidemiology and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Frías-De-León, María Guadalupe; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Martínez-Herrera, Erick; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of coccidioidomycosis in endemic areas has been observed to increase daily. To understand the causes of the spread of the disease and design strategies for fungal detection in clinical and environmental samples, scientists have resorted to molecular tools that allow fungal detection in a natural environment, reliable identification in clinical cases and the study of biological characteristics, such as reproductive and genetic structure, demographic history and diversification. We conducted a review of the most important molecular markers in the epidemiology of Coccidioides spp. and the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. A literature search was performed for scientific publications concerning the application of molecular tools for the epidemiology and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. The use of molecular markers in the epidemiological study and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis has allowed for the typing of Coccidioides spp. isolates, improved understanding of their mode of reproduction, genetic variation and speciation and resulted in the development specific, rapid and sensitive strategies for detecting the fungus in environmental and clinical samples. Molecular markers have revealed genetic variability in Coccidioides spp. This finding influences changes in the epidemiology of coccidioidomycosis, such as the emergence of more virulent or antifungal resistant genotypes. Furthermore, the molecular markers currently used to identify Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are specific and sensitive. However, they must be validated to determine their application in diagnosis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic and metal analyses of fragmented populations of Betula papyrifera (Marsh) in a mining reclaimed region: identification of population–diagnostic molecular marker

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Gabriel; Nkongolo, Kabwe K; Michael, Paul

    2014-01-01

    White birch (Betula papyrifera) is an open pollinate species that is, dominant in the Northern Ontario after land reclamation. In fact, this species represents 65% of all trees in the region. We hypothesized that the exchange of genetic information between fragmented populations by range-wide paternal introgression is possible in wind-pollinated species such as B. papyrifera. On the other hand, the effects of heavy metal contamination from the mining activities on plant growth and population dynamics are well documented. The main objectives of this study were (1) to assess the level of genetic variation, gene flow, and population sustainability of B. papyrifera after land reclamation; and (2) to determine the level of phytoavailable metals in soil and their accumulation in trees. We found that B. papyrifera is a Ni and Zn accumulator with a translocation factor of 6.4 and 81, respectively, and an indicator of Cu and Pb. The level of polymorphic loci, Shannon index, Nei's genetic diversity, observed number of alleles, and gene flow were determined for the fragmented populations within the targeted region. The percent of polymorphic loci ranged from 28% to 56%; the gene flow was also low with a value of 0.89, and the population differentiation was very high with a value of 0.36. Two population–diagnostic ISSR markers were identified. They were cloned, sequenced, and converted to SCAR markers. Overall, the fragmented populations of B. papyrifera in Northern Ontario are genetically sustainable based on the moderate level of intrapopulation variability. PMID:25535559

  16. Glioblastoma: pathology, molecular mechanisms and markers.

    PubMed

    Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh; Mansouri, Sheila; Reifenberger, Guido; von Deimling, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology have led to a better understanding of key molecular alterations that underlie glioblastoma (GBM). The current WHO-based classification of GBM is mainly based on histologic features of the tumor, which frequently do not reflect the molecular differences that describe the diversity in the biology of these lesions. The current WHO definition of GBM relies on the presence of high-grade astrocytic neoplasm with the presence of either microvascular proliferation and/or tumor necrosis. High-throughput analyses have identified molecular subtypes and have led to progress in more accurate classification of GBM. These findings, in turn, would result in development of more effective patient stratification, targeted therapeutics, and prediction of patient outcome. While consensus has not been reached on the precise nature and means to sub-classify GBM, it is clear that IDH-mutant GBMs are clearly distinct from GBMs without IDH1/2 mutation with respect to molecular and clinical features, including prognosis. In addition, recent findings in pediatric GBMs regarding mutations in the histone H3F3A gene suggest that these tumors may represent a 3rd major category of GBM, separate from adult primary (IDH1/2 wt), and secondary (IDH1/2 mut) GBMs. In this review, we describe major clinically relevant genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in GBM-such as mutations in IDH1/2, EGFR, PDGFRA, and NF1 genes-altered methylation of MGMT gene promoter, and mutations in hTERT promoter. These markers may be incorporated into a more refined classification system and applied in more accurate clinical decision-making process. In addition, we focus on current understanding of the biologic heterogeneity and classification of GBM and highlight some of the molecular signatures and alterations that characterize GBMs as histologically defined. We raise the question whether IDH-wild type high grade astrocytomas without microvascular proliferation or necrosis might best be

  17. Comparison of genetic diversity and population structure of Pacific Coast whitebark pine across multiple markers

    Treesearch

    Andrew D. Bower; Bryce A. Richardson; Valerie Hipkins; Regina Rochefort; Carol Aubry

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of "neutral" molecular markers and "adaptive" quantitative traits are common methods of assessing genetic diversity and population structure. Molecular markers typically reflect the effects of demographic and stochastic processes but are generally assumed to not reflect natural selection. Conversely, quantitative (or "adaptive")...

  18. Genetic markers in alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lareu, M V; Alvarez-Prechous, A; Pardiñas, C; Concheiro, L; Carracedo, A

    1992-01-01

    11 genetic markers were typed in 157 individuals suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis, and compared with a random sample of healthy individuals. No significant differences were found for transferrin, specific group component, orosomucoid, esterase D, phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and adenylate kinase. Strong associations between alcoholic cirrhosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin PI*Z allele, haptoglobin HP*1 allele and acid phosphatase ACP AC phenotype were observed. The biological significance of these associations and their relationships with the development of alcoholic cirrhosis are also discussed.

  19. Molecular genetics of human chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P C; Tanzi, R E; Cheng, S V; Gusella, J F

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome 21 is the smallest autosome, comprising only about 1.9% of human DNA, but represents one of the most intensively studied regions of the genome. Much of the interest in chromosome 21 can be attributed to its association with Down's syndrome, a genetic disorder that afflicts one in every 700 to 1000 newborns. Although only 17 genes have been assigned to chromosome 21, a very large number of cloned DNA segments of unknown function have been isolated and regionally mapped. The majority of these segments detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and therefore represent useful genetic markers. Continued molecular genetic investigation of chromosome 21 will be central to elucidating molecular events leading to meiotic non-disjunction and consequent trisomy, the contribution of specific genes to the pathology of Down's syndrome, and the possible role of chromosome 21 in Alzheimer's disease and other as yet unmapped genetic defects. PMID:2884319

  20. Biological (Molecular and Cellular) Markers of Toxicity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-15

    other mammals (Farber, 1987). Therefore, if we are to understand in any depth the processes by which environnental chemicals exhibit genotoxicity ... effectiveness to detect and quantitate biological responses at the molecular level to the action of genotoxic agenst. Particular emphasis was placed on the...Task 3. The short-term responses of the molecular markers as suitable biomarkers to estimate exposure and predict cellular effects to genotoxic

  1. [Cytogenetic, molecular cytogenetic, clinical and genealogical study of mothers of children with autism: a search for family genetic markers of autistic disorders].

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Voinova, V Iu; Iurov, I Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Demidova, I A; Iurov, Iu B

    2009-01-01

    Using modern cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic techniques towards the study of human chromosomes, an analysis of chromosomal abnormalities/chromosomal variations as well as clinical and genealogical data in mothers of children with autism has been performed. It has been shown that mothers of autistic children exhibit an increased incidence of chromosomal abnormalities (mainly mosaic forms involving chromosome X) and an increased occurrence of chromosomal variations compared to controls. The analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations revealed the increase in the frequency of cognitive disturbances and spontaneous abortions in mothers of children with autism as well as the higher frequency of mental retardation, early death and reproductive problems in the pedigrees. The high frequency of congenital malformations in the pedigrees of mothers with chromosomal variations was observed as well. Taking into account the data obtained, we have concluded that cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic studies of mothers of children with autism are obligatory for detection of possible genetic causes of autism and genetic counseling of families with children affected with autistic disorders.

  2. Cytogenetic, molecular-cytogenetic, and clinical-genealogical studies of the mothers of children with autism: a search for familial genetic markers for autistic disorders.

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Voinova, V Yu; Yurov, I Yu; Kurinnaya, O S; Demidova, I A; Yurov, Yu B

    2010-09-01

    State-of-the-art cytogenetic and molecular-cytogenetic methods for studying human chromosomes were used to analyze chromosomal anomalies and variants in mothers of children with autistic disorders and the results were compared with clinical-genealogical data. These investigations showed that these mothers, as compared with a control group, showed increases in the frequencies of chromosomal anomalies (mainly mosaic forms involving chromosome X) and chromosomal heteromorphisms. Analysis of correlations of genotypes and phenotypes revealed increases in the frequencies of cognitive impairments and spontaneous abortions in the mothers of children with autism with chromosomal anomalies, as well as increases in the frequencies of mental retardation, death in childhood, and impairments to reproductive function in the pedigrees of these women. There was a high incidence of developmental anomalies in the pedigrees of mothers with chromosomal variants. These results lead to the conclusion that cytogenetic and molecular-cytogenetic studies of mothers and children with autism should be regarded as obligatory in terms of detecting possible genetic causes of autism and for genetic counseling of families with autistic children.

  3. Micropropagation of Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth-a multipurpose leguminous tree and assessment of genetic fidelity of micropropagated plants using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Pooja; Kachhwaha, Sumita; Kothari, S L

    2012-04-01

    An efficient and reproducible protocol has been developed for in vitro propagation of Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth (a multipurpose leguminous tree) from field grown nodal segments (axillary bud). Shoot bud induction occurred from nodal explants of 15-years-old tree on Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium supplemented with 4.4 μM 6-benzyladenine (BA) and multiplication was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 4.4 μM BA + 0.73 μM phenylacetic acid (PAA) i.e. up to 7 shoot buds in the period of 5-6 weeks. Addition of adenine sulphate (AdS) to this medium further enhanced the number of shoot buds up to 10. Proliferating shoot cultures were established by repeatedly subculturing primary culture on fresh medium (MS + 4.4 μM BA + 0.73 μM PAA) after every 25 days. In vitro rooting was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 2.46 μM Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) + 41.63 μM activated charcoal (AC). The micropropagated shoots with well developed roots were acclimatized in green house in pots containing sand, soil and manure (1:1:1). Genetic stability of micropropagated clones was evaluated using Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. The amplification products were monomorphic in micropropagated plants and similar to those of mother plant. No polymorphism was detected revealing the genetic uniformity of micropropagated plants. This is the first report of an efficient protocol for regeneration of P. dulce through organogenesis, which can be used for further genetic transformation and pharmaceutical purposes.

  4. Neutral Genetic Markers and Conservation Genetics: Simulated Germplasm Collections

    PubMed Central

    Bataillon, T. M.; David, J. L.; Schoen, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the use of neutral genetic markers to guide sampling from a large germplasm collection with the objective of establishing from it a smaller, but genetically representative sample. We simulated evolutionary change and germplasm sampling in a subdivided population of a diploid hermaphrodite annual plant to create an initially large collection. Several strategies of sampling from this collection were then compared. Our results show that a strategy based on information obtained from marker genes led to retention of the maximum number of neutral and nonneutral alleles in the smaller sample. This occurred when demes were composed of self-fertilizing individuals or when no migration occurred among demes, but not when demes of an outcrossing population were connected by high levels of migration. PMID:8878704

  5. Using Molecular Genetic Markers to Resolve a Subspecies Boundary: The Northern Boundary of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher in the Four-Corner States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Sogge, Mark K.; Theimer, Tad C.; Girard, Jessica; Keim, Paul

    2008-01-01

    *Executive Summary* The northern boundary of the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is currently approximated as running through southern Colorado and Utah, but the exact placement is uncertain because this subspecies shares a border with the more northern and non-endangered E. t. adastus. To help resolve this issue, we evaluated the geographic distribution of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by sampling breeding sites across the four-corner states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). We found that breeding sites clustered into two major groups generally consistent with the currently designated boundary, with the exception of three sites situated along the current boundary. However, delineating a precise boundary that would separate the two subspecies is made difficult because (1) we found evidence for a region of intergradation along the boundary area, suggesting the boundary is not discreet, and (2) the boundary region is sparsely populated, with too few extant breeding populations to precisely locate a boundary. The boundary region encompasses an area where elevation changes markedly over relatively short distances, with low elevation deserts to the south and more mesic, higher elevation habitats to the north. We hypothesized that latitudinal and elevational differences and their concomitant ecological effects could form an ecological barrier that inhibited gene flow between the subspecies, forming the basis for the subspecies boundary. We modeled changes in geographic patterns of genetic markers as a function of latitude and elevation finding significant support for this relationship. The model was brought into a GIS environment to create multiple subspecies boundaries, with the strength of each predicted boundary evaluated on the basis of how much genetic variation it explained. The candidate boundary that accounted for the most genetic variation was situated generally near the currently recognized subspecies boundary

  6. Molecular markers and conservation of plant species in Latin America: the case of Phaedranassa viridflora (Amaryllidaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microsatellites are molecular markers with great potential for investigating genetic structure of populations. This information is valuable for generating effective conservation plans. We studied the endemic and endangered Phaedranassa viridiflora (Amaryllidaceae) to show the utility of microsatelli...

  7. Genetic diversity of Saccharum complex using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, L A R; Machado, C A; Cardoso, M N; Oliveira, A C A; Amaral, A L; Rabbani, A R C; Silva, A V C; Ledo, A S

    2017-09-21

    Sugarcane (Saccharum sp, Poaceae) is native to Southeast Asia, and due to growing demand as raw material, its cultivation recently expanded to new frontiers. The genetic diversity analysis is essential for targeting strategies in the formation and maintenance of a germplasm. This study aimed to assess the genetic diversity of 26 accessions of sugarcane from the Active Germplasm Bank of Embrapa Coastal Tablelands, using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. Sixteen primers were used, resulting in 87 fragments with 91.13% of polymorphism. The similarity of the individuals ranged between 0.22 and 0.87. Individuals RB867515 and RB92579 were closer genetically, and the most distant ones were PI240785 and NSL 291970. Four distinct clusters were formed, using UPGMA. This information can be used to prioritize the selection of accessions for the conduction of hybridization in breeding and germplasm exchange actions.

  8. Genetic and biological markers in drug abuse and alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Braude, M.C.; Chao, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. Some of the titles are: Polymorphic Gene Marker Studies; Pharmacogenetic Approaches to the Prediction of Drug Response; Genetic Markers of Drug Abuse in Mouse Models; Genetics as a Tool for Identifying Biological Markers of Drug Abuse; and Studies of an Animal Model of Alcoholism.

  9. Pedigree and marker information requirements to monitor genetic variability

    PubMed Central

    Roswitha, Baumung; Johann, Sölkner

    2003-01-01

    There are several measures available to describe the genetic variability of populations. The average inbreeding coefficient of a population based on pedigree information is a frequently chosen option. Due to the developments in molecular genetics it is also possible to calculate inbreeding coefficients based on genetic marker information. A simulation study was carried out involving ten sires and 50 dams. The animals were mated over a period of 20 discrete generations. The population size was kept constant. Different situations with regard to the level of polymorphism and initial allele frequencies and mating scheme (random mating, avoidance of full sib mating, avoidance of full sib and half sib mating) were considered. Pedigree inbreeding coefficients of the last generation using full pedigree or 10, 5 and 2 generations of the pedigree were calculated. Marker inbreeding coefficients based on different sets of microsatellite loci were also investigated. Under random mating, pedigree-inbreeding coefficients are clearly more closely related to true autozygosity (i.e., the actual proportion of loci with alleles identical by descent) than marker-inbreeding coefficients. If mating is not random, the demands on the quality and quantity of pedigree records increase. Greater attention must be paid to the correct parentage of the animals. PMID:12927072

  10. The genetic and molecular origin of natural variation for the fragrance trait in an elite Malaysian aromatic rice through quantitative trait loci mapping using SSR and gene-based markers.

    PubMed

    Golestan Hashemi, Farahnaz Sadat; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Mohamed, Mahmud Tengku Muda; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad Abdul; Aslani, Farzad

    2015-01-25

    MRQ74, a popular aromatic Malaysian landrace, allows for charging considerably higher prices than non-aromatic landraces. Thus, breeding this profitable trait has become a priority for Malaysian rice breeding. Despite many studies on aroma genetics, ambiguities considering its genetic basis remain. It has been observed that identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) based on anchor markers, particularly candidate genes controlling a trait of interest, can increase the power of QTL detection. Hence, this study aimed to locate QTLs that influence natural variations in rice scent using microsatellites and candidate gene-based sequence polymorphisms. For this purpose, an F2 mapping population including 189 individual plants was developed by MRQ74 crosses with 'MR84', a non-scented Malaysian accession. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative approaches were applied to obtain a phenotype data framework. Consequently, we identified two QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 8. These QTLs explained from 3.2% to 39.3% of the total fragrance phenotypic variance. In addition, we could resolve linkage group 8 by adding six gene-based primers in the interval harboring the most robust QTL. Hence, we could locate a putative fgr allele in the QTL found on chromosome 8 in the interval RM223-SCU015RM (1.63cM). The identified QTLs represent an important step toward recognition of the rice flavor genetic control mechanism. In addition, this identification will likely accelerate the progress of the use of molecular markers for gene isolation, gene-based cloning, and marker-assisted selection breeding programs aimed at improving rice cultivars.

  11. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Two Seahorse Species (Hippocampus erectus and H. mohnikei) and the Development of Molecular Markers for Population Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiang; Luo, Wei; Wan, Shiming; Gao, Zexia

    2016-01-01

    Seahorse conservation has been performed utilizing various strategies for many decades, and the deeper understanding of genomic information is necessary to more efficiently protect the germplasm resources of seahorse species. However, little genetic information about seahorses currently exists in the public databases. In this study, high-throughput RNA sequencing for two seahorse species, Hippocampus erectus and H. mohnikei, was carried out, and de novo assembly generated 37,506 unigenes for H. erectus and 36,113 unigenes for H. mohnikei. Among them, 17,338 (46.23%) unigenes for H. erectus and 17,900 (49.57%) for H. mohnikei were successfully annotated based on the information available from the public databases. Through comparing the unigenes of two seahorse species, 7,802 candidate orthologous genes were identified and 5,268 genes among them could be annotated. In addition, gene ontology analysis of two species was similarly performed on biological processes, cellular components, and molecular functions. Twenty-four and twenty-one unigenes in H. erectus and H. mohnikei were annotated in the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids pathways, and both seahorses lacked the Δ12 and Δ15 desaturases. Total of 8,992 and 9,116 SSR loci were obtained from H. erectus and H. mohnikei unigenes, respectively. Dozens of SSR were developed and then applied to assess the population genetic diversity, as well as cross-amplified in a related species, H. trimaculatus. The HO and HE values of the tested populations for H. erectus, H. mohnikei, and H. trimaculatus were medium. These resources would facilitate the conservation of the species through a better understanding of the genomics and comparative genome analysis within the Hippocampus genus. PMID:27128031

  12. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Two Seahorse Species (Hippocampus erectus and H. mohnikei) and the Development of Molecular Markers for Population Genetics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; Luo, Wei; Wan, Shiming; Gao, Zexia

    2016-01-01

    Seahorse conservation has been performed utilizing various strategies for many decades, and the deeper understanding of genomic information is necessary to more efficiently protect the germplasm resources of seahorse species. However, little genetic information about seahorses currently exists in the public databases. In this study, high-throughput RNA sequencing for two seahorse species, Hippocampus erectus and H. mohnikei, was carried out, and de novo assembly generated 37,506 unigenes for H. erectus and 36,113 unigenes for H. mohnikei. Among them, 17,338 (46.23%) unigenes for H. erectus and 17,900 (49.57%) for H. mohnikei were successfully annotated based on the information available from the public databases. Through comparing the unigenes of two seahorse species, 7,802 candidate orthologous genes were identified and 5,268 genes among them could be annotated. In addition, gene ontology analysis of two species was similarly performed on biological processes, cellular components, and molecular functions. Twenty-four and twenty-one unigenes in H. erectus and H. mohnikei were annotated in the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids pathways, and both seahorses lacked the Δ12 and Δ15 desaturases. Total of 8,992 and 9,116 SSR loci were obtained from H. erectus and H. mohnikei unigenes, respectively. Dozens of SSR were developed and then applied to assess the population genetic diversity, as well as cross-amplified in a related species, H. trimaculatus. The HO and HE values of the tested populations for H. erectus, H. mohnikei, and H. trimaculatus were medium. These resources would facilitate the conservation of the species through a better understanding of the genomics and comparative genome analysis within the Hippocampus genus.

  13. Genetic diversity of sweet sorghum germplasm in Mexico using AFLP and SSR markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the diversity and genetic relationships between lines and varieties of the sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) germplasm bank of the National Institute for Forestry, Agriculture and Livestock Research, Mexico, using AFLP and SSR markers. The molecular markers ...

  14. Teaching molecular genetics: chapter 4-positional cloning of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Puliti, Aldamaria; Caridi, Gianluca; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2007-12-01

    Positional cloning is the approach of choice for the identification of genetic mutations underlying the pathological development of diseases with simple Mendelian inheritance. It consists of different consecutive steps, starting with recruitment of patients and DNA collection, that are critical to the overall process. A genetic analysis of the enrolled patients and their families is performed, based on genetic recombination frequencies generated by meiotic cross-overs and on genome-wide molecular studies, to define a critical DNA region of interest. This analysis culminates in a statistical estimate of the probability that disease features may segregate in the families independently or in association with specific molecular markers located in known regions. In this latter case, a marker can be defined as being linked to the disease manifestations. The genetic markers define an interval that is a function of their recombination frequencies with the disease, in which the disease gene is localised. The identification and characterisation of chromosome abnormalities as translocations, deletions and duplications by classical cytogenetic methods or by the newly developed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) technique may define extensions and borders of the genomic regions involved. The step following the definition of a critical genomic region is the identification of candidate genes that is based on the analysis of available databases from genome browsers. Positional cloning culminates in the identification of the causative gene mutation, and the definition of its functional role in the pathogenesis of the disorder, by the use of cell-based or animal-based experiments. More often, positional cloning ends with the generation of mice with homologous mutations reproducing the human clinical phenotype. Altogether, positional cloning has represented a fundamental step in the research on genetic renal disorders, leading to the definition of several

  15. Molecular markers of serine protease evolution

    PubMed Central

    Krem, Maxwell M.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2001-01-01

    The evolutionary history of serine proteases can be accounted for by highly conserved amino acids that form crucial structural and chemical elements of the catalytic apparatus. These residues display non- random dichotomies in either amino acid choice or serine codon usage and serve as discrete markers for tracking changes in the active site environment and supporting structures. These markers categorize serine proteases of the chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like and α/β-hydrolase fold clans according to phylogenetic lineages, and indicate the relative ages and order of appearance of those lineages. A common theme among these three unrelated clans of serine proteases is the development or maintenance of a catalytic tetrad, the fourth member of which is a Ser or Cys whose side chain helps stabilize other residues of the standard catalytic triad. A genetic mechanism for mutation of conserved markers, domain duplication followed by gene splitting, is suggested by analysis of evolutionary markers from newly sequenced genes with multiple protease domains. PMID:11406580

  16. Functional molecular markers for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Kage, Udaykumar; Kumar, Arun; Dhokane, Dhananjay; Karre, Shailesh; Kushalappa, Ajjamada C

    2016-10-01

    A tremendous decline in cultivable land and resources and a huge increase in food demand calls for immediate attention to crop improvement. Though molecular plant breeding serves as a viable solution and is considered as "foundation for twenty-first century crop improvement", a major stumbling block for crop improvement is the availability of a limited functional gene pool for cereal crops. Advancement in the next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies integrated with tools like metabolomics, proteomics and association mapping studies have facilitated the identification of candidate genes, their allelic variants and opened new avenues to accelerate crop improvement through development and use of functional molecular markers (FMMs). The FMMs are developed from the sequence polymorphisms present within functional gene(s) which are associated with phenotypic trait variations. Since FMMs obviate the problems associated with random DNA markers, these are considered as "the holy grail" of plant breeders who employ targeted marker assisted selections (MAS) for crop improvement. This review article attempts to consider the current resources and novel methods such as metabolomics, proteomics and association studies for the identification of candidate genes and their validation through virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) for the development of FMMs. A number of examples where the FMMs have been developed and used for the improvement of cereal crops for agronomic, food quality, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance traits have been considered.

  17. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiations and Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Howard B.

    2000-06-01

    The major objective of this project is to understand the genetic basis for resistance of humans to radiations and chemicals. In the fission yeast S. pombe, a gene called rad9 plays a key role in promoting resistance to DNA damaging agents and controlling cell cycle progression after radiation or chemical exposure. This investigation focuses on the characterization of a human homologue of this yeast gene, called HRAD9, with the longterm goal of developing the gene as a genetic marker to predict inherent susceptibility to the deleterious health effects caused by DNA damage. The aims concern a molecular characterization of HRAD9 and determination of its role in mediating the cellular response to radiations and chemicals, as well as its potential role in carcinogenesis.

  18. Developing AFLP Markers to study genetic differentiation of the Cotton Fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic comparisons of fleahopper populations in cotton and weed hosts may be useful for identifying the weed sources contributing the majority of fleahoppers in cotton. Molecular markers such as amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) are useful to identify genetic similarities and differen...

  19. Development of new candidate gene and EST-based molecular markers for Gossypium species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New source of molecular markers accelerates the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences, and validated them through amplification, ge...

  20. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of Pummelo and Molecular Marker Development

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mei; Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Hang; Su, Shiying; Yi, Hualin; Chai, Lijun; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    Pummelo (Citrus grandis) is an important fruit crop worldwide because of its nutritional value. To accelerate the pummelo breeding program, it is essential to obtain extensive genetic information and develop relative molecular markers. Here, we obtained a 12-Gb transcriptome dataset of pummelo through a mixture of RNA from seven tissues using Illumina pair-end sequencing, assembled into 57,212 unigenes with an average length of 1010 bp. The annotation and classification results showed that a total of 39,584 unigenes had similar hits to the known proteins of four public databases, and 31,501 were classified into 55 Gene Ontology (GO) functional sub-categories. The search for putative molecular markers among 57,212 unigenes identified 10,276 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 64,720 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). High-quality primers of 1174 SSR loci were designed, of which 88.16% were localized to nine chromosomes of sweet orange. Of 100 SSR primers that were randomly selected for testing, 87 successfully amplified clear banding patterns. Of these primers, 29 with a mean PIC (polymorphic information content) value of 0.52 were effectively applied for phylogenetic analysis. Of the 20 SNP primers, 14 primers, including 54 potential SNPs, yielded target amplifications, and 46 loci were verified via Sanger sequencing. This new dataset will be a valuable resource for molecular biology studies of pummelo and provides reliable information regarding SNP and SSR marker development, thus expediting the breeding program of pummelo. PMID:25799271

  1. Oral cancer risk and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; Font-Costa, Imma; López-López, José

    2004-01-01

    The clinical appearance and, especially, the degree of dysplasia that may be shown by pre-cancerous lesions in the oral cavity suggest a potential for malignisation. An increasing number of studies are seeking new, more specific markers that would help to determine the degree of cell alteration and enable a better understanding of the degree of malignant degeneration of these cells. The present review considers the most recent findings for these markers, grouping them into families: tumour growth markers; markers of tumour suppression and anti-tumour response; angiogenesis markers; markers of tumour invasion and metastatic potential; cell surface markers; intracellular markers; markers derived from arachidonic acid; and enzymatic markers.

  2. Establishment of apoptotic regulatory network for genetic markers of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yibin; Shan, Guoyong; Nan, Kejun

    2017-03-01

    Our purpose is to screen out genetic markers applicable to early diagnosis for colorectal cancer and to establish apoptotic regulatory network model for colorectal cancer, thereby providing theoretical evidence and targeted therapy for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Taking databases including CNKI, VIP, Wanfang data, Pub Med, and MEDLINE as main sources of literature retrieval, literatures associated with genetic markers applied to early diagnosis of colorectal cancer were searched to perform comprehensive and quantitative analysis by Meta analysis, hence screening genetic markers used in early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were employed to establish apoptotic regulatory network model based on screened genetic markers, and then verification experiment was conducted. Through Meta analysis, seven genetic markers were screened out, including WWOX, K-ras, COX-2, p53, APC, DCC and PTEN, among which DCC shows highest diagnostic efficiency. GO analysis of genetic markers found that six genetic markers played role in biological process, molecular function and cellular component. It was indicated in apoptotic regulatory network built by KEGG analysis and verification experiment that WWOX could promote tumor cell apoptotic in colorectal cancer and elevate expression level of p53. The apoptotic regulatory model of colorectal cancer established in this study provides clinically theoretical evidence and targeted therapy for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  3. Genetic assessment of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) collection with microsatellite markers acquired via pyrosequencing method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-An; Sung, Jung-Sook; Lee, Sok-Young; Chung, Jong-Wook; Yi, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Gyu; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2014-01-01

    A genetic evaluation of safflower germplasm collections derived from different geographical regions and countries will provide useful information for sustainable conservation and the utilization of genetic diversity. However, the molecular marker information is limited for evaluation of genetic diversity of safflower germplasm. In this study, we acquired 509 putative genomic SSR markers for sufficient genome coverage using next-generation sequencing methods and characterized thirty polymorphic SSRs in safflower collection composed of 100 diverse accessions. The average allele number and expected heterozygosity were 2.8 and 0.386, respectively. Analysis of population structure and phylogeny based on thirty SSR profiles revealed genetic admixture between geographical regions contrary to genetic clustering. However, the accessions from Korea were genetically conserved in distinctive groups in contrast to other safflower gene pool. In conclusion, these new genomic SSRs will facilitate valuable studies to clarify genetic relationships as well as conduct population structure analyses, genetic map construction and association analysis for safflower.

  4. Developmnent of molecular markers for powdery mildew resistance in grapevines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Molecular markers have been used as a tool for plant breeding for two decades. Markers linked to disease resistance can be used to pyramid resistance genes for improved durability and to improve the efficiency of evaluation. To develop molecular markers linked to resistance to grape powdery mildew ...

  5. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of a new fertility restorer gene Rf8 for Triticum timopheevi cytoplasm in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pallavi; Tomar, S M S; Vinod; Singh, Vikas K; Balyan, H S

    2013-12-01

    A study on mode of inheritance and mapping of fertility restorer (Rf) gene(s) using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers was conducted in a cross of male sterile line 2041A having Triticum timopheevi cytoplasm and a restorer line PWR4099 of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The F1 hybrid was completely fertile indicating that fertility restoration is a dominant trait. Based on the pollen fertility and seed set of bagged spikes in F2 generation, the individual plants were classified into fertile and sterile groups. Out of 120 F2 plants, 97 were fertile and 23 sterile (based on pollen fertility) while 98 plants set ≥ 5 seeds/spike and 22 produced ≤ 4 or no seed. The observed frequency fits well into Mendelian ratio of 3 fertile: 1 sterile with χ(2) value of 2.84 for pollen fertility and 2.17 for seed setting indicating that the fertility restoration is governed by a single dominant gene in PWR4099. The three linked SSR markers, Xwmc503, Xgwm296 and Xwmc112 located on the chromosome 2DS were placed at a distance of 3.3, 5.8 and 6.7 cM, respectively, from the Rf gene. Since, no known Rf gene is located on the chromosome arm 2DS, the Rf gene in PWR4099 is a new gene and proposed as Rf8. The closest SSR marker, Xwmc503, linked to the Rf8 was validated in a set of Rf, maintainer and cytoplasmic male sterile lines. The closely linked SSR marker Xwmc503 may be used in marker-assisted backcross breeding facilitating the transfer of fertility restoration gene Rf8 into elite backgrounds with ease.

  6. The chloroplast psbK-psbI intergenic region, a potential genetic marker for broad sectional relationships in Anthurium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nuclear and chloroplast genetic markers have been extensively used for plant identification and molecular taxonomy studies. The efficacy of genetic markers to be used as DNA barcodes is under constant evaluation and improvement, with identification of new barcodes that provide greater resolution an...

  7. Genetic diversity in three natural populations of Pitcairnia flammea (l.) John (Bromeliaceae) estimated by ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Souza-Sobreira, F B; Souza, G B; Rosado, C C G; Miranda, F D; Soares, T C B; Gontijo, A B P L

    2015-12-03

    Bromeliads are greatly represented in the Atlantic Forest, although many species are threatened with extinction owing to habitat fragmentation and intense extraction for ornamental purposes. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct studies generating knowledge about genetic diversity and the distribution of this diversity among and within natural populations to establish conservation strategies. These studies can be performed with the use of molecular markers. Molecular markers are advantageous for studies of natural populations, for conservation programs, and to aid in properly classifying plant species. This study aimed to evaluate the genetic diversity among and within natural populations of Pitcairnia flammea, occurring in three fragments of the Atlantic Forest in the southern State of Espírito Santo through the use of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. DNA samples from 55 individuals were amplified with 18 ISSR primers, generating 180 bands, 159 of which were polymorphic. The Shannon genetic diversity index ranged from 0.348 to 0.465, with an average of 0.412. The Bayesian approach for the molecular data indicated the existence of two genetic groups. Analysis of molecular variance indicated the existence of 90.3% diversity within the population and 9.74% among populations. The amount of genetic differentiation of populations was moderate (0.0974), indicating that gene flow rates may be enough to counteract the effects of genetic drift. Greater genetic variability found in population B indicates that this area is an important source of genetic variability.

  8. Cry1A(b)16 toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis: Theoretical refinement of three-dimensional structure and prediction of peptides as molecular markers for detection of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Plácido, Alexandra; Coelho, Andreia; Abreu Nascimento, Lucas; Gomes Vasconcelos, Andreanne; Fátima Barroso, Maria; Ramos-Jesus, Joilson; Costa, Vladimir; das Chagas Alves Lima, Francisco; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Martins Ramos, Ricardo; Marani, Mariela M; Roberto de Souza de Almeida Leite, José

    2017-07-01

    Transgenic maize produced by the insertion of the Cry transgene into its genome became the second most cultivated crop worldwide. Cry gene from Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki expresses protein derivatives of crystalline endotoxins which confer insect resistance onto the maize crop. Mandatory labeling of processed food containing or made by genetically modified organisms is in force in many countries, so, it is very urgent to develop fast and practical methods for GMO identification, for example, biosensors. In the absence of an available empirical structure of Cry1A(b)16 protein, a theoretical model was effectively generated, in this work, by homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations based on two available homologous protein structures. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to refine the selected model, and an analysis of its global structure was performed. The refined models of Cry1A(b)16 showed a standard fold and structural characteristics similar to those seen in Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A(a) insecticidal toxin and Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki Cry1A(c) toxin. After in silico analysis of Cry1A(b)16, two immunoreactive candidate peptides were selected and specific polyclonal antibodies were produced resulting in antibody-peptide interaction. Biosensing devices are expected to be developed for detection of the Cry1A(b) protein as a marker of transgenic maize in food. Proteins 2017; 85:1248-1257. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Genetic divergence in elite castor bean lineages based on TRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Simões, K S; Silva, S A; Machado, E L; Silva, M S

    2017-09-27

    Castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) is a tropical plant of great commercial interest and a potential source of biodiesel. The development of genetically improved cultivars with high amounts of oil in the seeds and low ricin toxicity is crucial to increase the productivity of this crop. The use of TRAP (target region amplification polymorphism) markers to develop elite lineages and study genetic divergence is fundamental to advance the genetic improvement of this species. The goal of this study was to evaluate the genetic divergence among 40 elite lineages of R. communis, which belong to the NBIO-UFRB Genetic Improvement Program, using TRAP markers involved in the biosynthesis of oil and ricin. Total DNA was extracted and quantified from the leaf tissue of the castor bean plants, and 70 TRAP combinations (fixed and arbitrary primers) were used to genotype the 40 lineages. Of the 580 fragments amplified, 335 were polymorphic (58%). The genetic dissimilarity among the lineages was calculated by the Jaccard dissimilarity index using the UPGMA grouping method. A dendrogram was generated, and four groups formed, showing divergence among the elite lineages that favors selection. The TRAP molecular markers were efficient at characterizing the genetic variability among the lineages and, because TRAP markers are functional markers involved in the biosynthesis of oil and ricin, they are important when studying the association between a marker and a candidate gene.

  10. Genetic markers and the coregonid problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stott, W.; Todd, T.N.; ,

    2007-01-01

    Coregonid fishes are the forage base in many ecosystems in the northern hemisphere and they have traditionally been part of commercial and native fisheries. Coregonids display extreme variability in morphology, life history, and behavior. Defining boundaries among coregonid taxa has been (and continues to be) the focus of many studies. Cytogenetic, biochemical, and molecular methods have been used to study the 'coregonid problem'. A survey of the literature reveals that questions of taxonomy, followed by phylogeography are most often studied. Sample collections have occurred throughout a representative portion of the coregonid range. The whitefish species Coregonus clupeaformis and C. lavaretus are most often studied. This was expected however because they are the most widely distributed, display the most variation, and are the most commercially important. However, species with restricted ranges such as the Irish pollan (C. pollan) or omul (C. migratorius) have also been studied intensively. Genetic methods have provided insights into several issues, including the placement of Stenodus and the status of C. clupeaformis and C. lavaretus. More recently, studies of sympatric forms over broad geographic scales shed light on processes involved in the evolution of the group and suggest different approaches for management and designation of taxa. ?? 2007 E. Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung.

  11. Novel Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of molecular biomarkers assures that breast cancer (BC) patients receive optimal treatment. Established biomarkers, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2, and Ki67, have been playing significant roles in the subcategorization of BC to predict the prognosis and decide the specific therapy to each patient. Antihormonal therapy using 4-hydroxytamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors have been employed in patients whose tumor cells express hormone receptors, while monoclonal antibody to HER2 has been administered to HER2-positive BCs. Although new therapeutic agents have been developed in the past few decades, many patients still die of the disease due to relapse; thus, novel molecular markers that predict therapeutic failure and those that can be targets for specific therapy are expected. We have chosen four of such molecules by reviewing recent publications, which are cyclin E, B-Myb, Twist, and DMP1β. The oncogenicity of these molecules has been demonstrated in vivo and/or in vitro through studies using transgenic mice or siRNAs, and their expressions have been shown to be associated with shortened overall or disease-free survival of BC patients. The former three molecules have been shown to accelerate epithelial–mesenchymal transition that is often associated with cancer stem cell-ness and metastasis; all these four can be novel therapeutic targets as well. Thus, large prospective studies employing immunohistochemistry will be needed to establish the predictive values of these molecules in patients with BC. PMID:26997872

  12. Molecular genetics of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ichihara, Sahoko; Nishida, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial infarction (MI) is an important clinical problem because of its large contribution to mortality. The main causal and treatable risk factors for MI include hypertension, hypercholesterolemia or dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. In addition to these risk factors, recent studies have shown the importance of genetic factors and interactions between multiple genes and environmental factors. Disease prevention is an important strategy for reducing the overall burden of MI, with the identification of markers for disease risk being key both for risk prediction and for potential intervention to lower the chance of future events. Although genetic linkage analyses of families and sib-pairs as well as candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have implicated several loci and candidate genes in predisposition to coronary heart disease (CHD) or MI, the genes that contribute to genetic susceptibility to these conditions remain to be identified definitively. In this review, we summarize both candidate loci for CHD or MI identified by linkage analyses and candidate genes examined by association studies. We also review in more detail studies that have revealed the association with MI or CHD of polymorphisms in MTHFR, LPL, and APOE by the candidate gene approach and those in LTA and at chromosomal region 9p21.3 by genome-wide scans. Such studies may provide insight into the function of implicated genes as well as into the role of genetic factors in the development of CHD and MI. PMID:18704761

  13. Molecular genetic markers provide no evidence for reproductive isolation among retreat building phenotypes of the net-spinning caddisfly Macrostemum carolina.

    PubMed

    Plague, G R; Mulvey, M; Glenn, T C; McArthur, J V

    2001-01-01

    Larvae of the stream-dwelling, filter-feeding caddisfly Macrostemum carolina construct silken catchnets within protective retreats. In the Savannah River, M. carolina individuals make three different retreats, each with a distinct water entrance hole: (i) at the end of a silken tube; (ii) with a approximately 180 degrees silken backstop; and (iii) flush with the top of the retreat. To resolve whether these different retreats represent alternative behavioural phenotypes within a single panmictic population or fixed phenotypes within three genetically distinct populations or species, we compared the allele frequencies at three polymorphic nuclear loci (allozyme electrophoresis for Gpi, Mpi and Pgm) and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype frequencies among individuals displaying the three retreat morphs. We also calculated pairwise exact tests of population differentiation using the allozyme and mtDNA allele frequencies. No significant genetic differentiation was detected among caddisflies exhibiting the different retreat morphs. Therefore, these morphs apparently represent a single panmictic population in the Savannah River. Consequently, additional study is required to assess whether this retreat polymorphism is a phenotypically plastic trait under conditional control, or is mediated by alternative alleles at a Mendelian gene or genes (or a combination of the two).

  14. New models and molecular markers in evaluation of developmental toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huuskonen, Hannele . E-mail: hannele.huuskonen@sttv.fi

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian and non-mammalian embryos and embryonic stem cells may be used as models in mechanistic studies and in testing embryotoxicity of compounds. In addition to conventional culture methods, genetic modifications and use of molecular markers offer significant advantages in mechanistic studies as well as in developing new test methods for embryotoxicity. Zebrafish model has been used for a long time and at present several applications are available. It is an easy vertebral non-mammalian model, whose genome is largely known and several genetic modifications are easily constructed to study gene expression or knocked down genes. Fluorescent marker proteins can be used also in zebrafish to indicate gene activation in transgenic models. Chemical genetics approach has been developed using zebrafish model. This is a new approach to screen small molecules that regulate signaling pathways. Embryonic stem cells have been used in mechanistic studies and mouse embryonic stem cell test has been validated to study embryotoxicity in vitro. This method has been improved using quantitative measurements of molecular endpoints by real-time RT-PCR or fluorescent activated cell sorting methods (FACS). Methods facilitating differentiation to several different cell types are available. We have studied preimplantation mouse embryos as a possible model for in vitro testing. In this method, superovulated and in vivo fertilized preimplantation embryos were collected at morula stage and cultured up to blastocysts. The mouse preimplantation culture test was improved by quantitative gene expression measurement using two-step real-time RT-PCR methods. New endpoints improve the tests of in vitro embryotoxicity because subjective assessments are replaced by objective measurements. In addition, automation is possible and less time is needed for analysis. Thus, high throughput screening will come possible to test large numbers of compounds.

  15. Genetic diversity of Poa pratensis L. depending on geographical origin and compared with genetic markers

    PubMed Central

    Śmietana, Przemysław; Stępień, Edyta

    2016-01-01

    Background Poa pratensis is one of the most common species of meadow grass in Europe. Most cultivars of the species found in Poland were originally derived from its ecotypes. We compared the effectiveness of the RAPD and ISSR methods in assessing the genetic diversity of the selected populations of P. pratensis. We examined whether these methods could be useful for detecting a possible link between the geographical origin of a given population and its assessed genetic variation. Methods The molecular markers RAPD and ISSR were used and their efficiency compared using, inter alia, statistical multivariate methods (UPGMA and PCA). Results The low value of Dice’s coefficient (0.369) along with the significantly high percentage of polymorphic products indicates a substantial degree of genetic diversity among the studied populations. Our results found a correlation between the geographical origin of the studied populations and their genetic variations. For ISSR, which proved to be the more effective method in that respect, we selected primers with the greatest differentiating powers correlating to geographical origin. Discussion The populations evaluated in this study were characterized by a high genetic diversity. This seems to confirm the hypothesis that ecotypes of P. pratensis originating from different regions of Central Europe with different terrain structures and habitat conditions can be a source of great genetic variability. PMID:27703847

  16. Validation of genetic markers associated with chalkbrood resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chalkbrood is one of the major fungal diseases of honey bee brood. Systemic mycoses caused by the fungus, Ascosphaera apis, may significantly reduce brood population, and consequently, colony strength and productivity. Developing genetic marker(s) associated with the enhanced brood survival will be ...

  17. Loblolly pine SSR markers for shortleaf pine genetics

    Treesearch

    C. Dana Nelson; Sedley Josserand; Craig S. Echt; Jeff Koppelman

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR) are highly informative DNA-based markers widely used in population genetic and linkage mapping studies. We have been developing PCR primer pairs for amplifying SSR markers for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) using loblolly pine DNA and EST sequence data as starting materials. Fifty primer pairs known to reliably amplify...

  18. Molecular genetics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, D E; Kusano, T

    1994-01-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is a gram-negative, highly acidophilic (pH 1.5 to 2.0), autotrophic bacterium that obtains its energy through the oxidation of ferrous iron or reduced inorganic sulfur compounds. It is usually dominant in the mixed bacterial populations that are used industrially for the extraction of metals such as copper and uranium from their ores. More recently, these bacterial consortia have been used for the biooxidation of refractory gold-bearing arsenopyrite ores prior to the recovery of gold by cyanidation. The commercial use of T. ferrooxidans has led to an increasing interest in the genetics and molecular biology of the bacterium. Initial investigations were aimed at determining whether the unique physiology and specialized habitat of T. ferrooxidans had been accompanied by a high degree of genetic drift from other gram-negative bacteria. Early genetic studies were comparative in nature and concerned the isolation of genes such as nifHDK, glnA, and recA, which are widespread among bacteria. From a molecular biology viewpoint, T. ferrooxidans appears to be a typical member of the proteobacteria. In most instances, cloned gene promoters and protein products have been functional in Escherichia coli. Although T. ferrooxidans has proved difficult to transform with DNA, research on indigenous plasmids and the isolation of the T. ferrooxidans merA gene have resulted in the development of a low-efficiency electroporation system for one strain of T. ferrooxidans. The most recent studies have focused on the molecular genetics of the pathways associated with nitrogen metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation, and components of the energy-producing mechanisms. PMID:8177170

  19. Selection of RAPD markers for investigation of genetic population structure in fusiform rust fungus infecting loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    James H. Roberds; Thomas L. Kubisiak; Pauline C. Spaine; S.F. Covert; R.L. Doudrick

    1997-01-01

    research to determine patterns of genetic differentiation among and within field populations of Cronartium quercuum f. sp. fusiforme using RAPD markers is currently underway in the molecular genetics laboratory at the Southern Institute of Forest Genetics. Fungal tissue was collected as a drop of spermatia or scrapings of a...

  20. Genetic Breeding and Diversity of the Genus Passiflora: Progress and Perspectives in Molecular and Genetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos Bernard M.; Jesus, Onildo N.; Santos, Elisa S. L.; Corrêa, Ronan X.; Souza, Anete P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of passion fruit (Passiflora spp.), molecular markers have only recently been utilized in genetic studies of this genus. In addition, both basic genetic researches related to population studies and pre-breeding programs of passion fruit remain scarce for most Passiflora species. Considering the number of Passiflora species and the increasing use of these species as a resource for ornamental, medicinal, and food purposes, the aims of this review are the following: (i) to present the current condition of the passion fruit crop; (ii) to quantify the applications and effects of using molecular markers in studies of Passiflora; (iii) to present the contributions of genetic engineering for passion fruit culture; and (iv) to discuss the progress and perspectives of this research. Thus, the present review aims to summarize and discuss the relationship between historical and current progress on the culture, breeding, and molecular genetics of passion fruit. PMID:25196515

  1. Genetic relationships among Heliconia (Heliconiaceae) species based on RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Marouelli, L P; Inglis, P W; Ferreira, M A; Buso, G S C

    2010-07-13

    The family Heliconiaceae contains a single genus, Heliconia, with approximately 180 species of Neotropical origin. This genus was formerly allocated to the family Musaceae, but today forms its own family, in the order Zingiberales. The combination of inverted flowers, a single staminode and drupe fruits is an exclusive characteristic of Heliconia. Heliconias are cultivated as ornamental garden plants, and are of increasing importance as cut flowers. However, there are taxonomic confusions and uncertainties about the number of species and the relationships among them. Molecular studies are therefore necessary for better understanding of the species boundaries of these plants. We examined the genetic variability and the phylogenetic relationships of 124 accessions of the genus Heliconia based on RAPD markers. Phenetic and cladistic analyses, using 231 polymorphic RAPD markers, demonstrated that the genus Heliconia is monophyletic. Groupings corresponding to currently recognized species and some subgenera were found, and cultivars and hybrids were found to cluster with their parents. RAPD analysis generally agreed with morphological species classification, except for the position of the subgenus Stenochlamys, which was found to be polyphyletic.

  2. Applications and Implications of Neutral versus Non-neutral Markers in Molecular Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Heather; Freeland, Joanna R.

    2011-01-01

    The field of molecular ecology has expanded enormously in the past two decades, largely because of the growing ease with which neutral molecular genetic data can be obtained from virtually any taxonomic group. However, there is also a growing awareness that neutral molecular data can provide only partial insight into parameters such as genetic diversity, local adaptation, evolutionary potential, effective population size, and taxonomic designations. Here we review some of the applications of neutral versus adaptive markers in molecular ecology, discuss some of the advantages that can be obtained by supplementing studies of molecular ecology with data from non-neutral molecular markers, and summarize new methods that are enabling researchers to generate data from genes that are under selection. PMID:21747718

  3. Allozyme markers in forest genetic conservation

    Treesearch

    Constance I. Millar; R. D. Westfall

    1992-01-01

    Genetic diversity is important in tree-breeding, in managing rare and endangered tree species, and in maintaining healthy populations of widespread native tree species. Allozymes are useful in determining genetic relationships among species, where they can be used to assess affiliations of rare taxa and predict relative endangerment among species. Because allozymes...

  4. Molecular evidence of host-associated genetic divergence in the holly leafminer Phytomyza glabricola (Diptera: Agromyzidae): apparent discordance among marker systems.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Sonja J; Hawthorne, David J

    2007-07-01

    Host races play a central part in understanding the role of host plant mediated divergence and speciation of phytophagous insects. Of greatest interest are host-associated populations that have recently diverged; however, finding genetic evidence for very recent divergences is difficult because initially only a few loci are expected to evolve diagnostic differences. The holly leafminer Phytomyza glabricola feeds on two hollies, Ilex glabra and I. coriacea, that are broadly sympatric throughout most of their ranges. The leafminer is often present on both host plants and exhibits a dramatic life history difference on the two hosts, suggesting that host races may be present. We collected 1393 bp of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequence and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) data (45 polymorphic bands) from sympatric populations of flies reared from the two hosts. Phylogenetic and frequency analysis of mitochondrial COI sequence data uncovered considerable variation but no structuring by the host plant, and only limited differentiation among geographical locations. In contrast, analysis of AFLP frequency data found a significant effect with host plant, and a much smaller effect with geographical location. Likewise, neighbour-joining analysis of AFLP data resulted in clustering by host plant. The AFLP data indicate that P. glabricola is most likely comprised of two host races. Because there were no fixed differences in mitochondrial or AFLP data, this host-associated divergence is likely to have occurred very recently. P. glabricola therefore provides a new sympatric system for exploring the role of geography and ecological specialization in the speciation of phytophagous insects.

  5. Genetic diversity of functional food species Spinacia oleracea L. by protein markers.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M; Yousaf, Z; Haider, M S; Khalid, S; Rehman, H A; Younas, A; Arif, A

    2014-01-01

    Exploration of genetic diversity contributes primarily towards crop improvement. Spinaciaoleracea L. is a functional food species but unfortunately the genetic diversity of this vegetable is still unexplored. Therefore, this research was planned to explore the genetic diversity of S. oleracea by using morphological and protein markers. Protein profile of 25 accessions was generated on sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel. Total allelic variation of 27 bands was found. Out of these, 20 were polymorphic and the rest of the bands were monomorphic. Molecular weights of the bands ranged from 12.6 to 91.2 kDa. Major genetic differences were observed in accession 20541 (Peshawar) followed by 20180 (Lahore) and 19902 (AVRDC). Significant differences exist in the protein banding pattern. This variation can further be studied by advanced molecular techniques, including two-dimensional electrophoresis and DNA markers.

  6. [Study of genetic markers of duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Onosova, E A; Tsimmerman, I Ia

    1989-05-01

    The results of determination of various hereditary predisposition markers in peptic ulcer are given: in the population, in patients with duodenal ulcer and in their siblings (risk group). Of importance for revealing subjects with hereditary predisposition to duodenal ulcer are the clinico-genealogical analysis, determination of the blood group, especially in simultaneous determination of a "secretory status" ("status of non-secretion" of the ABH blood system agglutinogen in the saliva), increase in the mass of parietal cells and, to some extent, of the distinguishing features of dermatoglyphics (in combination with the above markers). Determination of taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide is non-informative.

  7. Toward Diagnostic and Phenotype Markers for Genetically Transmitted Speech Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Lewis, Barbara A.; Tomblin, J. Bruce; McSweeny, Jane L.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Scheer, Alison R.

    2005-01-01

    Converging evidence supports the hypothesis that the most common subtype of childhood speech sound disorder (SSD) of currently unknown origin is genetically transmitted. We report the first findings toward a set of diagnostic markers to differentiate this proposed etiological subtype (provisionally termed "speech delay-genetic") from other…

  8. Baseline genetic associations in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI).

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Keller, Margaux F; Hernandez, Dena G; Chen, Lan; Stone, David J; Singleton, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    The Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative is an international multicenter study whose main goal is investigating markers for Parkinson's disease (PD) progression as part of a path to a treatment for the disease. This manuscript describes the baseline genetic architecture of this study, providing not only a catalog of disease-linked variants and mutations, but also quantitative measures with which to adjust for population structure. Three hundred eighty-three newly diagnosed typical PD cases, 65 atypical PD and 178 healthy controls, from the Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative study have been genotyped on the NeuroX or Immunochip arrays. These data are freely available to all researchers interested in pursuing PD research within the Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative. The Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative represents a study population with low genetic heterogeneity. We recapitulate known PD associations from large-scale genome-wide association studies and refine genetic risk score models for PD predictability (area under the curve, ∼0.74). We show the presence of six LRRK2 p.G2019S and nine GBA p.N370S mutation carriers. The Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative study and its genetic data are useful in studies of PD biomarkers. The genetic architecture described here will be useful in the analysis of myriad biological and clinical traits within this study. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Beyond STRs: The Role of Diallelic Markers in Forensic Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms have been firmly established as standard DNA marker systems since more than 15 years both in forensic stain typing as well as in paternity and kinship testing. However, when analyzing genetic relationships in deficiency cases, STRs have a couple of disadvantages due to the sometimes poor biostatistical efficiency as well as the possibility to observe one or more genetic inconsistencies that could also be explained by mutational events. In such situations, additional robust markers with negligible mutations rates such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion/deletion markers (indels) can be used as adjuncts to provide decisive genetic information in favor for or against the assumed relationship. Both SNPs and indels can now be typed more easily using multiplexes of up to 50 loci based on fragment length analysis on instruments available in all routine forensic and paternity testing laboratories, thus making it possible to extend the range of markers beyond the currently used STRs. PMID:22851932

  10. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs) are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD) was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop. PMID:22305491

  11. Molecular genetics in affective illness

    SciTech Connect

    Mendlewicz, J.; Sevy, S.; Mendelbaum, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Genetic transmission in manic depressive illness (MDI) has been explored in twins, adoption, association, and linkage studies. The X-linked transmission hypothesis has been tested by using several markers on chromosome X: Xg blood group, color blindness, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), factor IX (hemophilia B), and DNA probes such as DXS15, DXS52, F8C, ST14. The hypothesis of autosomal transmission has been tested by association studies with the O blood group located on chromosome 9, as well as linkage studies on chromosome 6 with the Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA) haplotypes and on Chromosome 11 with DNA markers for the following genes: D2 dopamine receptor, tyrosinase, C-Harvey-Ras-A (HRAS) oncogene, insuline (ins), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Although linkage studies support the hypothesis of a major locus for the transmission of MDI in the Xq27-28 region, several factors are limiting the results, and are discussed in the present review. 105 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Analysis of Variance Components for Genetic Markers with Unphased Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    An ANOVA type general multi-allele (GMA) model was proposed in Wang (2014) on analysis of variance components for quantitative trait loci or genetic markers with phased or unphased genotypes. In this study, by applying the GMA model, we further examine estimation of the genetic variance components for genetic markers with unphased genotypes based on a random sample from a study population. In one locus and two loci cases, we first derive the least square estimates (LSE) of model parameters in fitting the GMA model. Then we construct estimators of the genetic variance components for one marker locus in a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium population and two marker loci in an equilibrium population. Meanwhile, we explore the difference between the classical general linear model (GLM) and GMA based approaches in association analysis of genetic markers with quantitative traits. We show that the GMA model can retain the same partition on the genetic variance components as the traditional Fisher's ANOVA model, while the GLM cannot. We clarify that the standard F-statistics based on the partial reductions in sums of squares from GLM for testing the fixed allelic effects could be inadequate for testing the existence of the variance component when allelic interactions are present. We point out that the GMA model can reduce the confounding between the allelic effects and allelic interactions at least for independent alleles. As a result, the GMA model could be more beneficial than GLM for detecting allelic interactions.

  13. Alport syndrome. Molecular genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    2009-08-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a progressive renal disease that is characterised by hematuria and progressive renal failure, and often accompanied by progressive high-tone sensorineural hearing loss and ocular changes in form of macular flecks and lenticonus. AS is a genetic heterogenous disease, and X-linked dominant in about 85% of the families. The autosomal recessive and dominant forms constitute about 15% of the cases. In the first part of the study is a multipoint linkage analysis of 12 families suspected of X-linked AS. The aim of that part of the study was to map a number of X-chromosomal polymorphic markers in relation to the locus for AS, in order to be able to perform carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis in the families. In addition, a more precise map of the region could form the basis for positional cloning of the gene for X-linked AS. In 1990 it was found that the X-linked form of AS is caused by mutation in the COL4A5 gene located at Xq22, and encoding the alpha 5-chain of type IV-collagen. The COL4A5 gene is a very large gene spanning 257 kb with a transcript of 6.5 kb distributed on 51 exons. In addition, two alternatively transcribed exons have been identified. In the second part of the study methods were set up for detection and characterisation of mutations in the COL4A5 gene in 135 patients suspected of AS. The aims of that part of the study were to develop an efficient and reliable approach for mutation detection, and to implement the results of the mutation analysis in clinical practice for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis, in order to be able to offer a better genetic counselling to the families. Knowledge of a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype can be of help in predicting the prognosis. Samples from 135 probands suspected of AS and 359 of their relatives were collected, together with available clinical information. Southern blotting analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were used to

  14. Genetic diversity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis in Brazil analyzed using an ERIC-PCR marker.

    PubMed

    Silva, G F; Paixão, R D V; Queiroz, C B; Santana, M F; Souza, A; Sousa, N R; Hanada, R E; Gasparotto, L

    2014-09-26

    The Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) marker was used to analyze the genetic variability of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causative agent of Black Sigatoka disease in banana plants. A total of 123 isolates were used, which were divided into populations based on their original hosts and collection sites in Brazil. A total of 9 loci were amplified, 77.8% of which were found to be polymorphic. The genetic diversity found in the population was 0.20. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) demonstrated that the highest level of genetic variation is within populations. Cluster analysis revealed three main groups in Brazil, with no correlation between geographic and genetic distance.

  15. [Matrix metalloproteases as molecular markers in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara L; León-Córdoba, Kenneth

    2010-02-06

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in the world. Prognosis in patients with gastric cancer is difficult to establish because it is commonly diagnosed when gastric wall invasion and metastasis have occurred. Currently, some members of the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases have been identified, whose expression in gastric tumor tissue is significantly elevated compared to healthy gastric tissue. Matrix metalloproteinases are 24 zinc-dependent endopeptidases that catalyze the proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. This degradation allows the cancer cells invade the surrounding stroma and trigger metastasis. Upregulation of certain matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer has been associated with a poor prognosis and elevated invasive capacity. This review compiles evidence about the genetic expression of matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer and their role in tumour invasion and metastasis, emphasizing their potential as molecular markers of prognosis.

  16. Genetic and epigenetic markers in the evaluation of pancreatic masses.

    PubMed

    Ginestà, Mireia M; Mora, Josefina; Mayor, Regina; Farré, Antoni; Peinado, Miquel Angel; Busquets, Juli; Serrano, Teresa; Capellá, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2013-03-01

    Methylation markers have shown promise in the early diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic utility of hypermethylation status of candidate genes in combination with KRAS mutation detection in the evaluation of pancreatic masses. Sixty-one fine needle aspirates of pancreatic masses (43 pancreatic adenocarcinomas and 18 chronic pancreatitis) were studied. Methylation status of HRH2, EN1, SPARC, CDH13 and APC were analysed using melting curve analysis after DNA bisulfite treatment. KRAS mutations were also analysed. The methylation panel had a sensitivity of 73% (27 of 37, CI 95% 56 to 86%) and a specificity of 100% whenever two or more promoters were found hypermethylated. KRAS mutations showed a sensitivity of 77% (33 of 43, CI 95% 62 to 88%) and a specificity of 100%. Both molecular analyses added useful information to cytology by increasing the number of informative cases. When genetic and epigenetic analyses were combined sensitivity was 84% (36 of 43 CI 95% 69 to 93%) maintaining a 100% specificity. Analysis of hypermethylation status of a panel of genes and KRAS mutation detection offer a similar diagnostic yield in the evaluation of pancreatic masses. The combined molecular analysis increases the number of informative cases without diminishing specificity.

  17. [Recent progress in plant molecular population genetics].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Sheng; Huang, Hong-Wen; Wang, Ying

    2007-10-01

    Molecular population genetics is not only one of the most important subjects of evolutionary biology, but also the basics subject of breeding, association mapping, and linkage analysis. Molecular population genetics has been developed from the classical population genetics aiming at studying population genetic structure and the factors that affect the population genetic structure by investigating the variation of DNA sequences. Therefore, population evolving history can be deduced accurately and quantitatively for evaluating the former conclusions about long-term evolution and the stability of genetic systems. Thus, molecular population genetics can avoid the shortcomings of classical population genetics, i.e. limiting to deduce the short evolving history of a population. Moreover, understanding of molecular variation patterns leads to further evaluation of the evolution theory, which is based on "Natural Selection" and introduced by Darwin. Molecular population genetics has made great progress and revealed many important scientific issues, such as the pattern of DNA polymorphism, the level of linkage disequilibrium, demographical history, and the genetic forces affecting gene evolvement. Furthermore, new research areas have been developed from molecular population genetics and become the hot fields, such as molecular phylogeography. In this review, we summarized studies and progresses of plant molecular population genetics.

  18. Chondrosarcoma: with updates on molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Jung; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2011-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma (CHS) is a malignant cartilage-forming tumor and usually occurs within the medullary canal of long bones and pelvic bones. Based on the morphologic feature alone, a correct diangosis of CHS may be difficult, Therefore, correlation of radiological and clinicopathological features is mandatory in the diagnosis of CHS. The prognosis of CHS is closely related to histologic grading, however, histologic grading may be subjective with high inter-observer variability. In this paper, we present histologic grading system and clinicopathological and radiological findings of conventional CHS. Subtypes of CHSs, such as dedifferentiated, mesenchymal, and clear cell CHSs are also presented. In addition, we introduce updated cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings to expand our understanding of CHS biology. New markers of cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell signaling might offer important therapeutic and prognostic information in near future.

  19. Genetic markers in atherosclerosis: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, N E

    1976-01-01

    There is a growing number of lipoprotein markers recognized by immunological, electrophoretic, and other biochemical methods, and a beginning has been made on studying their modes of inheritance and linkage relations. Suggestive but inconclusive evidence of a relation between the cerumen polymorphism and arteriosclerosis has been published. Associations of the ABO blood groups with cardiovascular disease and serum lipid levels have been established, but the exact relation to lipoproteins and atherosclerosis remains to be determined. PMID:180292

  20. Markers of Psychological Differences and Social and Health Inequalities: Possible Genetic and Phenotypic Overlaps.

    PubMed

    Mõttus, René; Marioni, Riccardo; Deary, Ian J

    2017-02-01

    Associations between markers of ostensible psychological characteristics and social and health inequalities are pervasive but difficult to explain. In some cases, there may be causal influence flowing from social and health inequalities to psychological differences, whereas sometimes it may be the other way around. Here, we focus on the possibility that some markers that we often consider as indexing different domains of individual differences may in fact reflect at least partially overlapping genetic and/or phenotypic bases. For example, individual differences in cognitive abilities and educational attainment appear to reflect largely overlapping genetic influences, whereas cognitive abilities and health literacy may be almost identical phenomena at the phenotypic, never mind genetic, level. We make the case for employing molecular genetic data and quantitative genetic techniques to better understand the associations of psychological individual differences with social and health inequalities. We illustrate these arguments by using published findings from the Lothian Birth Cohort and the Generation Scotland studies. We also present novel findings pertaining to longitudinal stability and change in older age personality traits and some correlates of the change, molecular genetic data-based heritability estimates of Neuroticism and Extraversion, and the genetic correlations of these personality traits with markers of social and health inequalities.

  1. Molecular Analyses Reveal Unexpected Genetic Structure in Iberian Ibex Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Jesús M.; Soriguer, Ramón C.; Granados, José E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Genetic differentiation in historically connected populations could be the result of genetic drift or adaptation, two processes that imply a need for differing strategies in population management. The aim of our study was to use neutral genetic markers to characterize C. pyrenaica populations genetically and examine results in terms of (i) demographic history, (ii) subspecific classification and (iii) the implications for the management of Iberian ibex. Methodology/Principal Findings We used 30 neutral microsatellite markers from 333 Iberian ibex to explore genetic diversity in the three main Iberian ibex populations in Spain corresponding to the two persisting subspecies (victoria and hispanica). Our molecular analyses detected recent genetic bottlenecks in all the studied populations, a finding that coincides with the documented demographic decline in C. pyrenaica in recent decades. Genetic divergence between the two C. pyrenaica subspecies (hispanica and victoriae) was substantial (FST between 0.39 and 0.47). Unexpectedly, we found similarly high genetic differentiation between two populations (Sierra Nevada and Maestrazgo) belonging to the subspecies hispanica. The genetic pattern identified in our study could be the result of strong genetic drift due to the severe genetic bottlenecks in the studied populations, caused in turn by the progressive destruction of natural habitat, disease epidemics and/or uncontrolled hunting. Conclusions Previous Capra pyrenaica conservation decision-making was based on the clear distinction between the two subspecies (victoriae and hispanica); yet our paper raises questions about the usefulness for conservation plans of the distinction between these subspecies. PMID:28135293

  2. Molecular Analyses Reveal Unexpected Genetic Structure in Iberian Ibex Populations.

    PubMed

    Angelone-Alasaad, Samer; Biebach, Iris; Pérez, Jesús M; Soriguer, Ramón C; Granados, José E

    2017-01-01

    Genetic differentiation in historically connected populations could be the result of genetic drift or adaptation, two processes that imply a need for differing strategies in population management. The aim of our study was to use neutral genetic markers to characterize C. pyrenaica populations genetically and examine results in terms of (i) demographic history, (ii) subspecific classification and (iii) the implications for the management of Iberian ibex. We used 30 neutral microsatellite markers from 333 Iberian ibex to explore genetic diversity in the three main Iberian ibex populations in Spain corresponding to the two persisting subspecies (victoria and hispanica). Our molecular analyses detected recent genetic bottlenecks in all the studied populations, a finding that coincides with the documented demographic decline in C. pyrenaica in recent decades. Genetic divergence between the two C. pyrenaica subspecies (hispanica and victoriae) was substantial (FST between 0.39 and 0.47). Unexpectedly, we found similarly high genetic differentiation between two populations (Sierra Nevada and Maestrazgo) belonging to the subspecies hispanica. The genetic pattern identified in our study could be the result of strong genetic drift due to the severe genetic bottlenecks in the studied populations, caused in turn by the progressive destruction of natural habitat, disease epidemics and/or uncontrolled hunting. Previous Capra pyrenaica conservation decision-making was based on the clear distinction between the two subspecies (victoriae and hispanica); yet our paper raises questions about the usefulness for conservation plans of the distinction between these subspecies.

  3. Genetic mapping and marker development for resistance of wheat against the root lesion nematode Pratylenchus neglectus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Rlnn1 locus, which resides on chromosome 7A of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) confers moderate resistance against the root lesion nematode Pratylenchus neglectus. Prior to this research, the exact linkage relationships of Rlnn1 with other loci on chromosome 7A were not clear and there were no simple codominant markers available for selection of Rlnn1 in wheat breeding. The objectives of the research reported here were to (1) develop an improved genetic map of the Rlnn1 region of chromosome 7A and (2) develop molecular markers that could be used in marker-assisted selection to improve resistance of wheat against P. neglectus. Results A large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) for resistance against P. neglectus was genetically mapped using a population of Excalibur/Kukri doubled haploid lines. This QTL coincides in position with the rust resistance gene(s) Lr20/Sr15, the phytoene synthase gene Psy-A1 and 10 molecular markers, including five new markers designed using wheat-rice comparative genomics and wheat expressed sequence tags. Two of the new markers are suitable for use as molecular diagnostic tools to distinguish plants that carry Rlnn1 and Lr20/Sr15 from those that do not carry these resistance genes. Conclusions The genomic location of Rlnn1 was confirmed to be in the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 7A. Molecular markers were developed that provide simple alternatives to costly phenotypic assessment of resistance against P. neglectus in wheat breeding. In Excalibur, genetic recombination seems to be completely suppressed in the Rlnn1 region. PMID:24377498

  4. Uniparental genetic markers in South Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco Mauro

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive review of uniparental systems in South Amerindians was undertaken. Variability in the Y-chromosome haplogroups were assessed in 68 populations and 1,814 individuals whereas that of Y-STR markers was assessed in 29 populations and 590 subjects. Variability in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup was examined in 108 populations and 6,697 persons, and sequencing studies used either the complete mtDNA genome or the highly variable segments 1 and 2. The diversity of the markers made it difficult to establish a general picture of Y-chromosome variability in the populations studied. However, haplogroup Q1a3a* was almost always the most prevalent whereas Q1a3* occurred equally in all regions, which suggested its prevalence among the early colonizers. The STR allele frequencies were used to derive a possible ancient Native American Q-clade chromosome haplotype and five of six STR loci showed significant geographic variation. Geographic and linguistic factors moderately influenced the mtDNA distributions (6% and 7%, respectively) and mtDNA haplogroups A and D correlated positively and negatively, respectively, with latitude. The data analyzed here provide rich material for understanding the biological history of South Amerindians and can serve as a basis for comparative studies involving other types of data, such as cultural data. PMID:22888284

  5. Genetic markers cannot determine Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Humans differentiate, classify, and discriminate: social interaction is a basic property of human Darwinian evolution. Presumably inherent differential physical as well as behavioral properties have always been criteria for identifying friend or foe. Yet, biological determinism is a relatively modern term, and scientific racism is, oddly enough, largely a consequence or a product of the Age of Enlightenment and the establishment of the notion of human equality. In recent decades ever-increasing efforts and ingenuity were invested in identifying Biblical Israelite genotypic common denominators by analysing an assortment of phenotypes, like facial patterns, blood types, diseases, DNA-sequences, and more. It becomes overwhelmingly clear that although Jews maintained detectable vertical genetic continuity along generations of socio-religious-cultural relationship, also intensive horizontal genetic relations were maintained both between Jewish communities and with the gentile surrounding. Thus, in spite of considerable consanguinity, there is no Jewish genotype to identify. PMID:25653666

  6. Analysis of the genetic relationships among Thai gibbon species using AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Tanee, Tawatchai; Chaveerach, Arunrat; Sattayasai, Nison; Tanomtong, Alongkoad; Suarez, Scott A; Nuchadomrong, Suporn

    2007-05-01

    Cytogenetic studies of three gibbon species using conventional banding patterns were investigated showing an identical number of 44 diploid chromosomes. They are assumed to have common evolutionary relationships. For in depth study, molecular markers were assessed using the Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) method. With seven successful primer combinations, a total of 1669 scorable bands were generated. The resulting bands were used for dendrogram construction. From the dendrogram, the individuals of Hylobates lar are closely related to H. agilis more than H. pileatus with a bootstrap value of 78%. Averages of inter-specific genetic similarity values among all gibbon species studied are 67.15% (between H. lar and H. pileatus) to 71.03% (between H. lar and H. agilis). In summary three gibbon species show genetic stability within a species. The development of specific molecular markers of a species is beneficial for genetic differentiation of this group of primates.

  7. Genetic diversity and structure of Brazilian ginger germplasm (Zingiber officinale) revealed by AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Eleonora Zambrano; Bajay, Miklos Maximiliano; Siqueira, Marcos Vinícius Bohrer Monteiro; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Pinheiro, José Baldin

    2016-12-01

    Ginger is a vegetable with medicinal and culinary properties widely cultivated in the Southern and Southeastern Brazil. The knowledge of ginger species' genetic variability is essential to direct correctly future studies of conservation and genetic improvement, but in Brazil, little is known about this species' genetic variability. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity and structure of 55 Brazilian accessions and 6 Colombian accessions of ginger, using AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) molecular markers. The molecular characterization was based on 13 primers combinations, which generated an average of 113.5 polymorphic loci. The genetic diversity estimates of Nei (Hj), Shannon-Weiner index (I) and an effective number of alleles (n e ) were greater in the Colombian accessions in relation to the Brazilian accessions. The analysis of molecular variance showed that most of the genetic variation occurred between the two countries while in the Brazilian populations there is no genetic structure and probably each region harbors 100 % of genetic variation found in the samples. The bayesian model-based clustering and the dendrogram using the dissimilarity's coefficient of Jaccard were congruent with each other and showed that the Brazilian accessions are highly similar between themselves, regardless of the geographic region of origin. We suggested that the exploration of the interspecific variability and the introduction of new varieties of Z.officinale are viable alternatives for generating diversity in breeding programs in Brazil. The introduction of new genetic materials will certainly contribute to a higher genetic basis of such crop.

  8. Molecular genetic medicine. Vol. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, T.

    1992-01-01

    Theodore Friedmann has put together an interesting spectrum of articles for volume 2 of Molecular Genetic Medicine. Perhaps related to his own interest in the X chromosome, three articles deal with X-chromosomal topics, while two deal with autosomal disorders and two treat viral disorders. The fragile-X syndrome is thoroughly covered by Brown and Jenkins with an article that is heavily weighted to clinical aspects and now out-of-date RFLP approaches. The timeliness of the volume is insured by the coverage (albeit brief) that they give to the cloning of FMR-1. Gartler et al. present a balanced review of X inactivation - the oft-surveyed subject was comprehensively covered in a manner that provided new perspectives. Lambert et al. provide an exhaustive review of natural and induced mutation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. For autosomal disorders, an excellent review of the molecular genetics of hemoglobin syntheses and their alterations in disease is provided by Berg and Schecter. The level of detail presented seemed just right to this reviewer. A concise review of recent advances in the study of Down syndrome and its animal model, trisomy 16 mice, is provided by Holtzman and Epstein. With regard to viral topics, Chisari thoughtfully reviews hepatitis B virus structure and function and the possible pathogenic mechanisms involved in its induction of hepatocellular carcinoma. Wong-Staal and Haseltine's up-to-date review of the increasingly complex regulatory genes of HIV is marred by a mix-up in figure legends - an exception to an otherwise well-proofread book. In summary, this is a good volume of its type and is recommended for those who might benefit from reading such review articles.

  9. Genetic fidelity and variability of micropropagated cassava plants (Manihot esculenta Crantz) evaluated using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Á M; Vieira, L J; Ferreira, C F; Souza, F V D; Souza, A S; Ledo, C A S

    2015-07-14

    Molecular markers are efficient for assessing the genetic fidelity of various species of plants after in vitro culture. In this study, we evaluated the genetic fidelity and variability of micropropagated cassava plants (Manihot esculenta Crantz) using inter-simple sequence repeat markers. Twenty-two cassava accessions from the Embrapa Cassava & Fruits Germplasm Bank were used. For each accession, DNA was extracted from a plant maintained in the field and from 3 plants grown in vitro. For DNA amplification, 27 inter-simple sequence repeat primers were used, of which 24 generated 175 bands; 100 of those bands were polymorphic and were used to study genetic variability among accessions of cassava plants maintained in the field. Based on the genetic distance matrix calculated using the arithmetic complement of the Jaccard's index, genotypes were clustered using the unweighted pair group method using arithmetic averages. The number of bands per primer was 2-13, with an average of 7.3. For most micropropagated accessions, the fidelity study showed no genetic variation between plants of the same accessions maintained in the field and those maintained in vitro, confirming the high genetic fidelity of the micropropagated plants. However, genetic variability was observed among different accessions grown in the field, and clustering based on the dissimilarity matrix revealed 7 groups. Inter-simple sequence repeat markers were efficient for detecting the genetic homogeneity of cassava plants derived from meristem culture, demonstrating the reliability of this propagation system.

  10. Genetic Markers and Quantitative Genetic Variation in Medicago Truncatula (Leguminosae): A Comparative Analysis of Population Structure

    PubMed Central

    Bonnin, I.; Prosperi, J. M.; Olivieri, I.

    1996-01-01

    Two populations of the selfing annual Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (Leguminoseae), each subdivided into three subpopulations, were studied for both metric traits (quantitative characters) and genetic markers (random amplified polymorphic DNA and one morphological, single-locus marker). Hierarchical analyses of variance components show that (1) populations are more differentiated for quantitative characters than for marker loci, (2) the contribution of both within and among subpopulations components of variance to overall genetic variance of these characters is reduced as compared to markers, and (3) at the population level, within population structure is slightly but not significantly larger for markers than for quantitative traits. Under the hypothesis that most markers are neutral, such comparisons may be used to make hypotheses about the strength and heterogeneity of natural selection in the face of genetic drift and gene flow. We thus suggest that in these populations, quantitative characters are under strong divergent selection among populations, and that gene flow is restricted among populations and subpopulations. PMID:8844165

  11. RAPD-SCAR marker and genetic relationship analysis of three Demodex species (Acari: Demodicidae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping

    2012-06-01

    For a long time, classification of Demodex mites has been mainly based on their hosts and phenotype characteristics. The study was the first to conduct molecular identification and genetic relationship analysis for six isolates of three Demodex species by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. Totally, 239 DNA fragments were amplified from six Demodex isolates with 10 random primers in RAPD, of which 165 were polymorphic. Using a single primer, at least five fragments and at most 40 in the six isolates were amplified, whereas within a single isolate, a range of 35-49 fragments were amplified. DNA fingerprints of primers CZ 1-9 revealed intra- and interspecies difference in six Demodex isolates, whereas primer CZ 10 only revealed interspecies difference. The genetic distance and dendrogram showed the intraspecific genetic distances were closer than the interspecific genetic distances. The interspecific genetic distances of Demodex folliculorum and Demodex canis (0.7931-0.8140) were shorter than that of Demodex brevis and D. canis (0.8182-0.8987). The RAPD-SCAR marker displayed primer CZ 10 could be applied to identify the three Demodex species. The 479-bp fragment was specific for D. brevis, and the 261-bp fragment was specific for D. canis. The conclusion was that the RAPD-SCAR multi-marker was effective in molecular identification of three Demodex species. The genetic relationship between D. folliculorum and D. canis was nearer than that between D. folliculorum and D. brevis.

  12. Development of New Candidate Gene and EST-Based Molecular Markers for Gossypium Species

    PubMed Central

    Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kantety, Ramesh V.; Yu, John Z.; Saha, Sukumar; Sharma, Govind C.

    2011-01-01

    New source of molecular markers accelerate the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum EST sequences that were used for polymorphism detection followed by genetic and physical mapping. Nineteen gene-based markers were surveyed for polymorphism detection in 26 Gossypium species. Cluster analysis generated a phylogenetic tree with four major sub-clusters for 23 species while three species branched out individually. CAP method enhanced the rate of polymorphism of candidate gene-based markers between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. Two hundred A-genome based SSR markers were designed after datamining of G. arboreum EST sequences (Mississippi Gossypium arboreum   EST-SSR: MGAES). Over 70% of MGAES markers successfully produced amplicons while 65 of them demonstrated polymorphism between the parents of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense RIL population and formed 14 linkage groups. Chromosomal localization of both candidate gene-based and MGAES markers was assisted by euploid and hypoaneuploid CS-B analysis. Gene-based and MGAES markers were highly informative as they were designed from candidate genes and fiber transcriptome with a potential to be integrated into the existing cotton genetic and physical maps. PMID:22315588

  13. Development of New Candidate Gene and EST-Based Molecular Markers for Gossypium Species.

    PubMed

    Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kantety, Ramesh V; Yu, John Z; Saha, Sukumar; Sharma, Govind C

    2011-01-01

    New source of molecular markers accelerate the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum EST sequences that were used for polymorphism detection followed by genetic and physical mapping. Nineteen gene-based markers were surveyed for polymorphism detection in 26 Gossypium species. Cluster analysis generated a phylogenetic tree with four major sub-clusters for 23 species while three species branched out individually. CAP method enhanced the rate of polymorphism of candidate gene-based markers between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. Two hundred A-genome based SSR markers were designed after datamining of G. arboreum EST sequences (Mississippi Gossypium arboreum  EST-SSR: MGAES). Over 70% of MGAES markers successfully produced amplicons while 65 of them demonstrated polymorphism between the parents of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense RIL population and formed 14 linkage groups. Chromosomal localization of both candidate gene-based and MGAES markers was assisted by euploid and hypoaneuploid CS-B analysis. Gene-based and MGAES markers were highly informative as they were designed from candidate genes and fiber transcriptome with a potential to be integrated into the existing cotton genetic and physical maps.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Cultivated Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) Using RAPD Markers

    Treesearch

    Hongwen Huang; Desmond R. Layne; Thomas L. Kubisiak

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-four extant pawpaw [Asimina triloba (L.) Dunal] cultivars and advanced selections representing a large portion of the gene pool of cultivated pawpaws were investigated using 71 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers to establish genetic identities and evaluate genetic relatedness. All 34 cultivated pawpaws were uniquely...

  15. c-GAMMA:Comparative Genome Analysis of Molecular Markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterlongo, Pierre; Nicolas, Jacques; Lavenier, Dominique; Vorc'h, Raoul; Querellou, Joël

    Discovery of molecular markers for efficient identification of living organisms remains a challenge of high interest. The diversity of species can now be observed in details with low cost genomic sequences produced by new generation of sequencers. A method, called c-GAMMA, is proposed. It formalizes the design of new markers for such data. It is based on a series of filters on forbidden pairs of words, followed by an optimization step on the discriminative power of candidate markers.

  16. The role of molecular genetic analysis within the diagnostic haemato-oncology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Bench, A J

    2012-02-01

    The identification of the molecular genetic basis to many haematological malignancies along with the increased use of molecularly targeted therapy has heralded an increasing role for molecular genetic-based techniques. Demonstration of acquired changes such as the JAK2 V617F mutation within myeloproliferative neoplasms has quickly moved from a research setting to the diagnostic laboratory. Disease-specific genetic markers, such as the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene in chronic myeloid leukaemia, enable sensitive molecular genetic methods to be applied for the detection and quantification of low-level residual disease, allowing early identification of relapse. Consequently, molecular genetics now plays a crucial role in diagnosis, the identification of prognostic markers and monitoring of haematological malignancies. The development of high-throughput whole-genome approaches offers the potential to rapidly screen newly diagnosed patients for all disease-associated molecular genetic changes.

  17. Blood groups as genetic markers in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A M; Gillies, W E

    1988-04-01

    A series of 474 mixed cases of glaucoma was assessed to determine whether there were any genetic differences between different types of glaucoma. A careful distinction was made between chronic open angle glaucoma (COAG), acute and chronic angle closure glaucoma, ocular hypertension, low tension glaucoma, patients with large cup disc ratios, and various types of secondary glaucoma including pseudoexfoliation of the lens capsule, uveitic and traumatic glaucoma. Using ABO blood groups, Rhesus groups, ABH secretion or non-secretion, and phenylthiourea tasting we identified certain differences. The differences from normal were significant decrease in Rh-negative patients in chronic closed angle glaucoma (p less than 0.05), a decrease in ABH secretors in ocular hypertension (p less than 0.01), and fewer HB secretors in patients with COAG (p less than 0.02). There was a significant decrease in AH secretors and increase in HB secretors in both pseudoexfoliation with raised intraocular pressure compared with COAG (p less than 0.01) and in secondary glaucomas as a group compared with COAG (p less than 0.01). Tasters of phenylthiourea were more common in traumatic and uveitic glaucoma than in normal controls (p less than 0.05). These results suggest that secondary glaucoma develops in different subjects from COAG, while patients who develop a rise in intraocular pressure proceed to cupping and field loss if they have a certain genetic constitution. The groups of patients are too small for the differences to be of great prognostic value.

  18. Commonly used molecular epidemiology markers of Streptococcus agalactiae do not appear to predict virulence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Frank; Sintchenko, Vitali; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Coiera, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Several virulent clones of group B streptococcus (GBS) are known to be associated with certain serotypes and molecular epidemiological markers. It is unclear, however, whether the clinical significance of GBS can be predicted based solely on such molecular markers. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that GBS virulence can be predicted by using the molecular epidemiology markers. We examined 912 human GBS isolates in which 18 distinct molecular markers (including virulence-associated mobile genetic elements, polysaccharide capsule determinants, variants of a surface antigen and invasin, and antibiotic resistance-related genes) were characterised using multiplex PCR based reverse line blot assay. All strains were classified in clinically relevant invasive and colonising categories. Relationships between molecular markers and clinical phenotypes were tested using statistical and machine learning analyses. Classifier performance was evaluated by the area under receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). The distribution of serotypes was comparable with those in previous reports (Ia, 22.1%; III, 34.7%; V, 17.7%). From single marker analyses, only alp3 (which encodes a surface protein antigen, commonly associated with serotype V) showed an increased association with invasive diseases (OR = 2.93, p = 0.0003). Molecular serotype (MS) II (OR = 10.0, p = 0.0007) had a significant association with early-onset neonatal disease when compared with late-onset diseases. Predictive analysis with logistic regression and machine learning classifiers, however, only yielded weak predictive power (AUC 0.56-0.71, stratified 10-fold cross-validation) across all the subgroups. While some molecular epidemiological markers are important in defining GBS clusters, a definitive predictive relationship between the molecular markers and clinical outcomes may be lacking.

  19. Molecular markers and strategies to control aflatoxin in peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methods of isolation of molecular markers and software developed in ARS for finding the most informative markers will be presented. Also, two different approaches being used at the NPRL to reduce aflatoxin in peanut will be discussed. One is the development of phytoalexin-detoxification enzyme inh...

  20. Genetic marker anchoring by six-dimensional pools for development of a soybean physical map

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Zhong, Guohua; Findley, Seth D; Cregan, Perry; Stacey, Gary; Nguyen, Henry T

    2008-01-01

    Background Integrated genetic and physical maps are extremely valuable for genomic studies and as important references for assembling whole genome shotgun sequences. Screening of a BAC library using molecular markers is an indispensable procedure for integration of both physical and genetic maps of a genome. Molecular markers provide anchor points for integration of genetic and physical maps and also validate BAC contigs assembled based solely on BAC fingerprints. We employed a six-dimensional BAC pooling strategy and an in silico approach to anchor molecular markers onto the soybean physical map. Results A total of 1,470 markers (580 SSRs and 890 STSs) were anchored by PCR on a subset of a Williams 82 BstY I BAC library pooled into 208 pools in six dimensions. This resulted in 7,463 clones (~1× genome equivalent) associated with 1470 markers, of which the majority of clones (6,157, 82.5%) were anchored by one marker and 1106 (17.5%) individual clones contained two or more markers. This contributed to 1184 contigs having anchor points through this 6-D pool screening effort. In parallel, the 21,700 soybean Unigene set from NCBI was used to perform in silico mapping on 80,700 Williams 82 BAC end sequences (BES). This in silico analysis yielded 9,835 positive results anchored by 4152 unigenes that contributed to 1305 contigs and 1624 singletons. Among the 1305 contigs, 305 have not been previously anchored by PCR. Therefore, 1489 (78.8%) of 1893 contigs are anchored with molecular markers. These results are being integrated with BAC fingerprints to assemble the BAC contigs. Ultimately, these efforts will lead to an integrated physical and genetic map resource. Conclusion We demonstrated that the six-dimensional soybean BAC pools can be efficiently used to anchor markers to soybean BACs despite the complexity of the soybean genome. In addition to anchoring markers, the 6-D pooling method was also effective for targeting BAC clones for investigating gene families and

  1. Genetic marker anchoring by six-dimensional pools for development of a soybean physical map.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolei; Zhong, Guohua; Findley, Seth D; Cregan, Perry; Stacey, Gary; Nguyen, Henry T

    2008-01-22

    Integrated genetic and physical maps are extremely valuable for genomic studies and as important references for assembling whole genome shotgun sequences. Screening of a BAC library using molecular markers is an indispensable procedure for integration of both physical and genetic maps of a genome. Molecular markers provide anchor points for integration of genetic and physical maps and also validate BAC contigs assembled based solely on BAC fingerprints. We employed a six-dimensional BAC pooling strategy and an in silico approach to anchor molecular markers onto the soybean physical map. A total of 1,470 markers (580 SSRs and 890 STSs) were anchored by PCR on a subset of a Williams 82 BstY I BAC library pooled into 208 pools in six dimensions. This resulted in 7,463 clones (approximately 1x genome equivalent) associated with 1470 markers, of which the majority of clones (6,157, 82.5%) were anchored by one marker and 1106 (17.5%) individual clones contained two or more markers. This contributed to 1184 contigs having anchor points through this 6-D pool screening effort. In parallel, the 21,700 soybean Unigene set from NCBI was used to perform in silico mapping on 80,700 Williams 82 BAC end sequences (BES). This in silico analysis yielded 9,835 positive results anchored by 4152 unigenes that contributed to 1305 contigs and 1624 singletons. Among the 1305 contigs, 305 have not been previously anchored by PCR. Therefore, 1489 (78.8%) of 1893 contigs are anchored with molecular markers. These results are being integrated with BAC fingerprints to assemble the BAC contigs. Ultimately, these efforts will lead to an integrated physical and genetic map resource. We demonstrated that the six-dimensional soybean BAC pools can be efficiently used to anchor markers to soybean BACs despite the complexity of the soybean genome. In addition to anchoring markers, the 6-D pooling method was also effective for targeting BAC clones for investigating gene families and duplicated regions

  2. Estimating ancestry and heterozygosity of hybrids using molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hybridization, genetic mixture of distinct populations, gives rise to myriad recombinant genotypes. Characterizing the genomic composition of hybrids is critical for studies of hybrid zone dynamics, inheritance of traits, and consequences of hybridization for evolution and conservation. Hybrid genomes are often summarized either by an estimate of the proportion of alleles coming from each ancestral population or classification into discrete categories like F1, F2, backcross, or merely “hybrid” vs. “pure”. In most cases, it is not realistic to classify individuals into the restricted set of classes produced in the first two generations of admixture. However, the continuous ancestry index misses an important dimension of the genotype. Joint consideration of ancestry together with interclass heterozygosity (proportion of loci with alleles from both ancestral populations) captures all of the information in the discrete classification without the unrealistic assumption that only two generations of admixture have transpired. Methods I describe a maximum likelihood method for joint estimation of ancestry and interclass heterozygosity. I present two worked examples illustrating the value of the approach for describing variation among hybrid populations and evaluating the validity of the assumption underlying discrete classification. Results Naively classifying natural hybrids into the standard six line cross categories can be misleading, and false classification can be a serious problem for datasets with few molecular markers. My analysis underscores previous work showing that many (50 or more) ancestry informative markers are needed to avoid erroneous classification. Conclusion Although classification of hybrids might often be misleading, valuable inferences can be obtained by focusing directly on distributions of ancestry and heterozygosity. Estimating and visualizing the joint distribution of ancestry and interclass heterozygosity is an effective way

  3. Genetic characterization of Uruguayan Pampa Rocha pigs with microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, M; Llambí, S; Castro, G; Barlocco, N; Vadell, A; Landi, V; Delgado, JV; Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we genetically characterized the Uruguayan pig breed Pampa Rocha. Genetic variability was assessed by analyzing a panel of 25 microsatellite markers from a sample of 39 individuals. Pampa Rocha pigs showed high genetic variability with observed and expected heterozygosities of 0.583 and 0.603, respectively. The mean number of alleles was 5.72. Twenty-four markers were polymorphic, with 95.8% of them in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. The level of endogamy was low (FIS = 0.0475). A factorial analysis of correspondence was used to assess the genetic differences between Pampa Rocha and other pig breeds; genetic distances were calculated, and a tree was designed to reflect the distance matrix. Individuals were also allocated into clusters. This analysis showed that the Pampa Rocha breed was separated from the other breeds along the first and second axes. The neighbour-joining tree generated by the genetic distances DA showed clustering of Pampa Rocha with the Meishan breed. The allocation of individuals to clusters showed a clear separation of Pampa Rocha pigs. These results provide insights into the genetic variability of Pampa Rocha pigs and indicate that this breed is a well-defined genetic entity. PMID:25983624

  4. Molecular markers linked to the apple scab resistance gene Vbj derived from Malus baccata jackii.

    PubMed

    Gygax, M; Gianfranceschi, L; Liebhard, R; Kellerhals, M; Gessler, C; Patocchi, A

    2004-11-01

    Breeding for scab-resistant apple cultivars by pyramiding several resistance genes in the same genetic background is a promising way to control apple scab caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis. To achieve this goal, DNA markers linked to the genes of interest are required in order to select seedlings with the desired resistance allele combinations. For several apple scab resistance genes, molecular markers are already available; but until now, none existed for the apple scab resistance gene Vbj originating from the crab apple Malus baccata jackii. Using bulk segregant analysis, three RAPD markers linked to Vbj were first identified. These markers were transformed into more reliable sequence-characterised amplified region (SCAR) markers that proved to be co-dominant. In addition, three SSR markers and one SCAR were identified by comparing homologous linkage groups of existing genetic maps. Discarding plants showing genotype-phenotype incongruence (GPI plants) plants, a linkage map was calculated. Vbj mapped between the markers CH05e03 (SSR) and T6-SCAR, at 0.6 cM from CH05e03 and at 3.9 cM from T6-SCAR. Without the removal of the GPI plants, Vbj was placed 15 cM away from the closest markers. Problems and pitfalls due to GPI plants and the consequences for mapping the resistance gene accurately are discussed. Finally, the usefulness of co-dominant markers for pedigree analysis is also demonstrated.

  5. Molecular marker genes for ectomycorrhizal symbiosis

    Treesearch

    Shiv Hiremath; Carolyn McQuattie; Gopi Podila; Jenise. Bauman

    2013-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is a mutually beneficial association very commonly found among most vascular plants. Formation of mycorrhiza happens only between compatible partners and predicting this is often accomplished through a trial and error process. We investigated the possibility of using expression of symbiosis specific genes as markers to predict the formation of...

  6. World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN) III: Molecular markers for drug resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Plowe, Christopher V; Roper, Cally; Barnwell, John W; Happi, Christian T; Joshi, Hema H; Mbacham, Wilfred; Meshnick, Steven R; Mugittu, Kefas; Naidoo, Inbarani; Price, Ric N; Shafer, Robert W; Sibley, Carol H; Sutherland, Colin J; Zimmerman, Peter A; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    Molecular markers for drug resistant malaria represent public health tools of great but mostly unrealized potential value. A key reason for the failure of molecular resistance markers to live up to their potential is that data on the their prevalence is scattered in disparate databases with no linkage to the clinical, in vitro and pharmacokinetic data that are needed to relate the genetic data to relevant phenotypes. The ongoing replacement of older monotherapies for malaria by new, more effective combination therapies presents an opportunity to create an open access database that brings together standardized data on molecular markers of drug resistant malaria from around the world. This paper presents a rationale for creating a global database of molecular markers for drug resistant malaria and for linking it to similar databases containing results from clinical trials of drug efficacy, in vitro studies of drug susceptibility, and pharmacokinetic studies of antimalarial drugs, in a World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN). This database will be a global resource, guiding the selection of first line drugs for treating uncomplicated malaria, for preventing malaria in travelers and for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnant women, infants and other vulnerable groups. Perhaps most important, a global database for molecular markers of drug resistant malaria will accelerate the identification and validation of markers for resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapies and, thereby, potentially prolong the useful therapeutic lives of these important new drugs. PMID:17822535

  7. SSR Marker Analysis of Genetic Relationships within Hydrangea paniculata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic diversity studies using 26 simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers were conducted with 36 taxa of Hydrangea paniculata Sieb. The SSR loci were highly variable among the taxa, producing a mean of 5.8 alleles per locus. Three cultivars (Boskoop, Compact Grandiflora and Webb) were either identic...

  8. Association of genetic markers in cattle receiving differing implant protocols

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potential interaction of growth-promoting implants and genetic markers previously reported to be associated with growth, carcass traits, and tenderness was evaluated. Two implant protocols were applied to subsets of steers (n=383) and heifers (n=65) that were also genotyped for 47 SNP reported ...

  9. Diversity Array Technology Markers: Genetic Diversity Analyses and Linkage Map Construction in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N.; Aslam, M.N.; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A.; Kilian, A.; Sharpe, Andrew G.; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines ‘Lynx-037DH’ and ‘Monty-028DH’. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed. PMID:22193366

  10. Diversity array technology markers: genetic diversity analyses and linkage map construction in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N; Aslam, M N; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A; Kilian, A; Sharpe, Andrew G; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines 'Lynx-037DH' and 'Monty-028DH'. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed.

  11. Behavioral and genetic markers of sleepiness.

    PubMed

    Goel, Namni; Dinges, David F

    2011-10-15

    Neurobehavioral responses to acute total and chronic partial sleep deprivation occur in healthy adults and are particularly evident in vigilant attention performance. There are large inter-individual differences in the degree of cognitive deficits--such differences are manifested in proportionality between the mean and variance as sleep loss progresses. It has recently been demonstrated via laboratory experiments that differential neurobehavioral vulnerability to sleep deprivation is not random--but rather is stable and trait-like--strongly suggesting a phenotypic response with possible genotypic involvement. These experiments also showed that vulnerability was not explained by subjects' baseline functioning or a number of other potential predictors. Differential vulnerability has been shown to extend to chronic partial sleep deprivation. One potential genetic biomarker for such differential vulnerability is the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1*0602, an allele which we recently demonstrated predicts interindividual differences in sleepiness, physiological sleep, and fatigue to chronic partial sleep deprivation in healthy adults. Determination of biomarkers of individual differences to sleep loss will help identify those individuals in the general population who are most in need of prevention of sleep debt and in need of effective countermeasures for sleep loss; will further understanding and management of vulnerability to excessive sleepiness due to common sleep and medical disorders; and will inform public policies pertaining to the need for adequate sleep.

  12. Evaluation of algorithms used to order markers on genetic maps.

    PubMed

    Mollinari, M; Margarido, G R A; Vencovsky, R; Garcia, A A F

    2009-12-01

    When building genetic maps, it is necessary to choose from several marker ordering algorithms and criteria, and the choice is not always simple. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of algorithms try (TRY), seriation (SER), rapid chain delineation (RCD), recombination counting and ordering (RECORD) and unidirectional growth (UG), as well as the criteria PARF (product of adjacent recombination fractions), SARF (sum of adjacent recombination fractions), SALOD (sum of adjacent LOD scores) and LHMC (likelihood through hidden Markov chains), used with the RIPPLE algorithm for error verification, in the construction of genetic linkage maps. A linkage map of a hypothetical diploid and monoecious plant species was simulated containing one linkage group and 21 markers with fixed distance of 3 cM between them. In all, 700 F(2) populations were randomly simulated with 100 and 400 individuals with different combinations of dominant and co-dominant markers, as well as 10 and 20% of missing data. The simulations showed that, in the presence of co-dominant markers only, any combination of algorithm and criteria may be used, even for a reduced population size. In the case of a smaller proportion of dominant markers, any of the algorithms and criteria (except SALOD) investigated may be used. In the presence of high proportions of dominant markers and smaller samples (around 100), the probability of repulsion linkage increases between them and, in this case, use of the algorithms TRY and SER associated to RIPPLE with criterion LHMC would provide better results.

  13. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint ( Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4 S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general “allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction” scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1 R, 3 R, 4 S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  14. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L; Wildung, Mark R

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general "allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction" scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1R, 3R, 4S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  15. [Research progress on molecular genetics of forest musk deer].

    PubMed

    Jie, Hang; Zheng, Cheng-li; Wang, Jian-ming; Feng, Xiao-lan; Zeng, De-jun; Zhao, Gui-jun

    2015-11-01

    Forest musk deer is one of the large-scale farming musk deer animals with the largest population at the same time. The male musk deer can secrete valuable medicines, which has high medicinal and economic value. Due to the loss of habitat and indiscriminate hunting, the numbers of wild population specie and the distribution have been drastically reduced. Therefore, in-depth understanding of the molecular genetics progress of forest musk deer will pave a way for musk deer protection and breeding. In this review, the progress associated with the molecular marker, genetic classification, artificial breeding, musk secretion and disease in past decades were reviewed, in order to provide a theoretical basis for subsequent molecular genetic researches in forest musk deer.

  16. Novel SSR Markers from BAC-End Sequences, DArT Arrays and a Comprehensive Genetic Map with 1,291 Marker Loci for Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Spurthi N.; Varghese, Nicy; Shah, Trushar M.; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Gudipati, Srivani; Gaur, Pooran M.; Kulwal, Pawan L.; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; KaviKishor, Polavarapu B.; Winter, Peter; Kahl, Günter; Town, Christopher D.; Kilian, Andrzej; Cook, Douglas R.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2011-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is the third most important cool season food legume, cultivated in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. The goal of this study was to develop novel molecular markers such as microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences (BESs) and diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers, and to construct a high-density genetic map based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) population ICC 4958 (C. arietinum)×PI 489777 (C. reticulatum). A BAC-library comprising 55,680 clones was constructed and 46,270 BESs were generated. Mining of these BESs provided 6,845 SSRs, and primer pairs were designed for 1,344 SSRs. In parallel, DArT arrays with ca. 15,000 clones were developed, and 5,397 clones were found polymorphic among 94 genotypes tested. Screening of newly developed BES-SSR markers and DArT arrays on the parental genotypes of the RIL mapping population showed polymorphism with 253 BES-SSR markers and 675 DArT markers. Segregation data obtained for these polymorphic markers and 494 markers data compiled from published reports or collaborators were used for constructing the genetic map. As a result, a comprehensive genetic map comprising 1,291 markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total of 845.56 cM distance was developed (http://cmap.icrisat.ac.in/cmap/sm/cp/thudi/). The number of markers per linkage group ranged from 68 (LG 8) to 218 (LG 3) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.65 cM. While the developed resource of molecular markers will be useful for genetic diversity, genetic mapping and molecular breeding applications, the comprehensive genetic map with integrated BES-SSR markers will facilitate its anchoring to the physical map (under construction) to accelerate map-based cloning of genes in chickpea and comparative genome evolution studies in legumes. PMID:22102885

  17. Application of DNA markers to estimate genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Korzekwa, Karol; Polok, Kornelia; Zieliński, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The obligatory human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the most important etiological factor of tuberculosis. Unfortunately, there is little information about genetic diversity of this pathogen. The main aim of this research was the estimation of genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis on the basis of various categories of DNA markers. The genome of 32 strains were scanned by DNA markers such RAPD, IS6110 and catalase-peroxidase katG gene. All 162 identified loci were polymorphic. The genetic diversity coefficient (HT) of M. tuberculosis was 0.32 for RAPD and 0.27 for IS 6110. There were 14 alleles in katG gene. All strains were characterised by the individual molecular pattern. Genetic similarity varied from 0.13 to 0.94 (RAPD markers) and from 0 to 1 for (IS6110). M. tuberculosis strains did not represent a clonal structure, single source of transmission and epidemiological relationships as well. The applied DNA markers proved to be highly efficient for analysis of genetic structure of M. tuberculosis.

  18. Functional markers for gene mapping and genetic diversity studies in sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The database of sugarcane expressed sequence tags (EST) offers a great opportunity for developing molecular markers that are directly associated with important agronomic traits. The development of new EST-SSR markers represents an important tool for genetic analysis. In sugarcane breeding programs, functional markers can be used to accelerate the process and select important agronomic traits, especially in the mapping of quantitative traits loci (QTL) and plant resistant pathogens or qualitative resistance loci (QRL). The aim of this work was to develop new simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in sugarcane using the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database). Findings A total of 365 EST-SSR molecular markers with trinucleotide motifs were developed and evaluated in a collection of 18 genotypes of sugarcane (15 varieties and 3 species). In total, 287 of the EST-SSRs markers amplified fragments of the expected size and were polymorphic in the analyzed sugarcane varieties. The number of alleles ranged from 2-18, with an average of 6 alleles per locus, while polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.21-0.92, with an average of 0.69. The discrimination power was high for the majority of the EST-SSRs, with an average value of 0.80. Among the markers characterized in this study some have particular interest, those that are related to bacterial defense responses, generation of precursor metabolites and energy and those involved in carbohydrate metabolic process. Conclusions These EST-SSR markers presented in this work can be efficiently used for genetic mapping studies of segregating sugarcane populations. The high Polymorphism Information Content (PIC) and Discriminant Power (DP) presented facilitate the QTL identification and marker-assisted selection due the association with functional regions of the genome became an important tool for the sugarcane breeding program. PMID:21798036

  19. Molecular Imaging Markers to Track Huntington’s Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Heather; De Micco, Rosa; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2017-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive, monogenic dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by repeat expansion mutation in the huntingtin gene. The accumulation of mutant huntingtin protein, forming intranuclear inclusions, subsequently leads to degeneration of medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortical areas. Genetic testing can identify HD gene carriers before individuals develop overt cognitive, psychiatric, and chorea symptoms. Thus, HD gene carriers can be studied in premanifest stages to understand and track the evolution of HD pathology. While advances have been made, the precise pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HD are unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been employed to understand HD pathology in presymptomatic and symptomatic disease stages. PET imaging uses radioactive tracers to detect specific changes, at a molecular level, which could be used as markers of HD progression and to monitor response to therapeutic treatments for HD gene expansion carriers (HDGECs). This review focuses on available PET techniques, employed in cross-sectional and longitudinal human studies, as biomarkers for HD, and highlights future potential PET targets. PET studies have assessed changes in postsynaptic dopaminergic receptors, brain metabolism, microglial activation, and recently phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) as markers to track HD progression. Alterations in PDE10A expression are the earliest biochemical change identified in HD gene carriers up to 43 years before predicted symptomatic onset. Thus, PDE10A expression could be a promising marker to track HD progression from early premanifest disease stages. Other PET targets which have been less well investigated as biomarkers include cannabinoid, adenosine, and GABA receptors. Future longitudinal studies are required to fully validate these PET biomarkers for use to track disease progression from far-onset premanifest to manifest HD stages. PET

  20. Molecular Imaging Markers to Track Huntington's Disease Pathology.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather; De Micco, Rosa; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive, monogenic dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by repeat expansion mutation in the huntingtin gene. The accumulation of mutant huntingtin protein, forming intranuclear inclusions, subsequently leads to degeneration of medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortical areas. Genetic testing can identify HD gene carriers before individuals develop overt cognitive, psychiatric, and chorea symptoms. Thus, HD gene carriers can be studied in premanifest stages to understand and track the evolution of HD pathology. While advances have been made, the precise pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HD are unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been employed to understand HD pathology in presymptomatic and symptomatic disease stages. PET imaging uses radioactive tracers to detect specific changes, at a molecular level, which could be used as markers of HD progression and to monitor response to therapeutic treatments for HD gene expansion carriers (HDGECs). This review focuses on available PET techniques, employed in cross-sectional and longitudinal human studies, as biomarkers for HD, and highlights future potential PET targets. PET studies have assessed changes in postsynaptic dopaminergic receptors, brain metabolism, microglial activation, and recently phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) as markers to track HD progression. Alterations in PDE10A expression are the earliest biochemical change identified in HD gene carriers up to 43 years before predicted symptomatic onset. Thus, PDE10A expression could be a promising marker to track HD progression from early premanifest disease stages. Other PET targets which have been less well investigated as biomarkers include cannabinoid, adenosine, and GABA receptors. Future longitudinal studies are required to fully validate these PET biomarkers for use to track disease progression from far-onset premanifest to manifest HD stages. PET imaging

  1. Microsatellite markers for genetic studies of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Pavinato, V A C; Martinelli, S; de Lima, P F; Zucchi, M I; Omoto, C

    2013-02-08

    We developed six microsatellite markers for the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The SSR loci were isolated with enriched genomic library protocol by using native individuals as a genome source for markers. These loci were characterized in 48 individuals and they were tested for the ability to identify candidate migrants exchanged among the samples. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 5 to 18 (10.8 on average). The observed polymorphism information content ranged from 0.172 to 0.891. Beside the lower efficiency to obtain SSR loci, the six microsatellites were polymorphic and sufficiently discriminant for the genetic studies of S. frugiperda; it allowed us to identify migrants with both NJ clustering and the Bayesian methods. These markers will be useful for molecular ecology studies of this highly polyphagous species in order to understand the processes that determine genetic differentiation in the complex agro-ecosystems that it infests and improve local integrated pest management practices.

  2. A strategy for using multiple linked markers for genetic counseling.

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, A; Buetow, K H

    1985-01-01

    A strategy for using multiple linked markers for genetic counseling is to test sequentially individual markers until a diagnosis can be made. We show that in order to minimize the number of tests performed per case while diagnosing all informative cases the order in which the markers are to be tested is critical. We describe an algorithm to obtain this order using the parameter "I," the frequency of informative cases. The I value for a specific locus used depends on the marker frequency, association with the disease locus, and also on the informativeness of the marker loci already tested. Realizing that a direct assay for the beta S gene already exists, and that most cases of beta-thalassemia in Mediterraneans can be directly diagnosed using synthetic oligonucleotide probes, we illustrate the above technique by examining nine DNA polymorphisms in the human beta-globin cluster for their ability to diagnose sickle-cell anemia in American blacks and beta-thalassemia in Mediterraneans. This analysis shows that 95.39% of all sickle-cell pregnancies can be diagnosed by testing a subset of only six markers chosen by our algorithm. Furthermore, six markers can also diagnose 88.03% of beta-thalassemia in Greeks and 83.56% of beta-thalassemia in Italians. The test set is different from that suggested by the individual informative frequencies due to nonrandom associations between the restriction sites. PMID:2996337

  3. Segmental distribution of some common molecular markers for colorectal cancer (CRC): influencing factors and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Papagiorgis, Petros Christakis

    2016-05-01

    Proximal and distal colorectal cancers (CRCs) are regarded as distinct disease entities, evolving through different genetic pathways and showing multiple clinicopathological and molecular differences. Segmental distribution of some common markers (e.g., KRAS, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, COX-2) is clinically important, potentially affecting their prognostic or predictive value. However, this distribution is influenced by a variety of factors such as the anatomical overlap of tumorigenic molecular events, associations of some markers with other clinicopathological features (stage and/or grade), and wide methodological variability in markers' assessment. All these factors represent principal influences followed by intratumoral heterogeneity and geographic variation in the frequency of detection of particular markers, whereas the role of other potential influences (e.g., pre-adjuvant treatment, interaction between markers) remains rather unclear. Better understanding and elucidation of the various influences may provide a more accurate picture of the segmental distribution of molecular markers in CRC, potentially allowing the application of a novel patient stratification for treatment, based on particular molecular profiles in combination with tumor location.

  4. Myeloproliferative neoplasms: Current molecular biology and genetics.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Kolsoum

    2016-02-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal disorders characterized by increased production of mature blood cells. Philadelphia chromosome-negative MPNs (Ph-MPNs) consist of polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). A number of stem cell derived mutations have been identified in the past 10 years. These findings showed that JAK2V617F, as a diagnostic marker involving JAK2 exon 14 with a high frequency, is the best molecular characterization of Ph-MPNs. Somatic mutations in an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, named calreticulin (CALR), is the second most common mutation in patients with ET and PMF after JAK2 V617F mutation. Discovery of CALR mutations led to the increased molecular diagnostic of ET and PMF up to 90%. It has been shown that JAK2V617F is not the unique event in disease pathogenesis. Some other genes' location such as TET oncogene family member 2 (TET2), additional sex combs-like 1 (ASXL1), casitas B-lineage lymphoma proto-oncogene (CBL), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH1/IDH2), IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1), DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS), enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), tumor protein p53 (TP53), runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) and high mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) have also identified to be involved in MPNs phenotypes. Here, current molecular biology and genetic mechanisms involved in MNPs with a focus on the aforementioned factors is presented.

  5. [Genetics and molecular medicine in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Rojas Martínez, A; Ortiz López, R; Delgado Enciso, I

    2001-01-01

    The discoveries on molecular aspects of cellular function are changing the concepts of health and disease. All medical fields, including cardiology, have been enriched with several diagnostic test to determine predisposition and to detect molecular dysfunctions. This review on the genetic and molecular aspects of cardiovascular diseases is written at the Centenary of the rediscovery of Mendel's principles on heredity and at the time of the announcement of the end of the human genome sequencing task. The review starts with considerations on the pluricellular constitution of the human body, and the principles of genetics with their molecular bases; including a short description of the methods for gene mapping. The following sections give a historic synopsis on the concepts of medical genetics, molecular medicine, and the Human Genome Project. The review ends with a brief description of the spectrum of genetic diseases, using examples of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Genetic bottlenecks in Turkish okra germplasm and utility of iPBS retrotransposon markers for genetic diversity assessment.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, M; Koçak, M; Baloch, F S

    2015-09-08

    Lack of requisite genetic variation in Turkish okra has necessitated the use of different types of markers for estimating the genetic diversity and identifying the source of variation. Transposable elements, present abundantly in plant genomes, generate genomic diversity through their replication and are thus an excellent source of molecular markers. We hypothesized that inter-primer binding site (iPBS)-retrotransposons could be the source of variation because of their genome plasticity nature. In the present study, genetic diversity of 66 okra landraces was analyzed using iPBS-retrotransposon markers. iPBS-retrotransposons detected 88 bands with 40.2% polymorphism and an average of 6.8 bands per primer. Gene diversity and Shannon's information index ranged from 0.01 to 0.13 and 0.02 to 0.21 for iPBS-retrotransposons and from 0.06 to 0.46 and 0.14 to 0.65 for simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, respectively. Polymorphism information content value for retrotransposons varied between 0.12 and 0.99, while that for SSR was from 0.52 to 0.81. Neighbor joining analysis based on retrotransposons and SSRs divided all the accessions into four clusters; however, SSR markers were more efficient in clustering the landraces based on their origin. Using the STRUCTURE software for determining population structure, and two populations (at the number of hypothetical subpopulations, K = 2) were identified among the landraces. Low genetic diversity in Turkish okra highlights the need for the introduction of plants from countries with greater genetic diversity for these crops. This study also demonstrates the utility and role of iPBS-retrotransposons, a dominant and ubiquitous part of eukaryotic genomes, for diversity studies in okra.

  7. Assessment of genetic purity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) hybrids using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Bora, Anjana; Choudhury, Partha Ray; Pande, Veena; Mandal, Asit B

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to detect genetic impurity in the seed lots of CMS lines, restorers and hybrids and to identify signature markers to differentiate parents and hybrids through DNA-based assays. Furthermore, attempts have been made to find out an alternative to Grow-Out-Test, which is very tedious, time consuming and used conventionally for seed genetic purity testing since beginning of quality seed multiplication chain. Fifty-one rice-specific sequence tagged microsatellite (STMS) primer pairs distributed throughout the rice genome were employed for fingerprinting of eight rice hybrids and their parental lines with a view to assess variation within parental lines and to test the genetic purity of the commercial seed lots. Among those, 51 markers, 28 microsatellite markers showed polymorphism (54.90 %). A total of 98 alleles were obtained with an average of 1.92 alleles per primer pair and number of alleles amplified for each primer pair ranged from 1 to 4. A set of markers were identified to differentiate parental lines of the hybrids and which emphasizes the immense scope of those molecular markers for their use in the unambiguous identification of hybrid, which would be of great benefit to farmers that depend on the hybrids.

  8. Development of INDEL Markers for Genetic Mapping Based on Whole Genome Resequencing in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaofeng; Wei, Haichao; Cheng, Wen; Yang, Suxin; Zhao, Yanxiu; Li, Xuan; Luo, Da; Zhang, Hui; Feng, Xianzhong

    2015-10-19

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is an important crop worldwide. In this study, a Chinese local soybean cultivar, Hedou 12, was resequenced by next generation sequencing technology to develop INsertion/DELetion (INDEL) markers for genetic mapping. 49,276 INDEL polymorphisms and 242,059 single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between Hedou 12 and the Williams 82 reference sequence. Of these, 243 candidate INDEL markers ranging from 5-50 bp in length were chosen for validation, and 165 (68%) of them revealed polymorphisms between Hedou 12 and Williams 82. The validated INDEL markers were also tested in 12 other soybean cultivars. The number of polymorphisms in the pairwise comparisons of 14 soybean cultivars varied from 27 to 165. To test the utility of these INDEL markers, they were used to perform genetic mapping of a crinkly leaf mutant, and the CRINKLY LEAF locus was successfully mapped to a 360 kb region on chromosome 7. This research shows that high-throughput sequencing technologies can facilitate the development of genome-wide molecular markers for genetic mapping in soybean. Copyright © 2015 Song et al.

  9. Evaluation of genetic diversity in fig accessions by using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    do Val, A D B; Souza, C S; Ferreira, E A; Salgado, S M L; Pasqual, M; Cançado, G M A

    2013-04-25

    Fig (Ficus carica L.) is a fruit of great importance worldwide. Its propagation is carried out with stem cuttings, a procedure that favors the occurrence of synonymy among specimens. Thus, molecular markers have become an important tool for studies of DNA fingerprinting, germplasm characterization, and genetic diversity evaluation in this plant species. The aim of this study was the analysis of genetic diversity among accessions of fig and the detection of synonyms among samples using molecular markers. Five microsatellite markers previously reported as polymorphic to fig were used to characterize 11 fig cultivars maintained in the germplasm bank located in Lavras, Minas Gerais. A total of 21 polymorphic DNA fragments were amplified, with an average of 4.2 alleles per locus. The average allelic diversity and polymorphic information content were 0.6300 and 0.5644, respectively, whereas the total value for the probability of identity was 1.45 x 10(-4). The study allowed the identification of 10 genotypes and 2 synonymous individuals. The principal coordinate analysis showed no defined clusters despite the formation of groups according to geographical origin. However, neighbor-joining analysis identified the same case of synonymy detected using principal coordinate analysis. The data also indicated that the fig cultivars analyzed constitute a population of individuals with high genetic diversity and a broad range of genetic variation.

  10. Genetic diversity in natural populations of Jacaranda decurrens Cham. determined using RAPD and AFLP markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Jacaranda decurrens (Bignoniaceae) is an endemic species of the Cerrado with validated antitumoral activity. The genetic diversity of six populations of J. decurrens located in the State of São Paulo was determined in this study by using molecular markers for randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Following optimization of the amplification reaction, 10 selected primers generated 78 reproducible RAPD fragments that were mostly (69.2%) polymorphic. Two hundred and five reproducible AFLP fragments were generated by using four selected primer combinations; 46.3% of these fragments were polymorphic, indicating a considerable level of genetic diversity. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) using these two groups of markers indicated that variability was strongly structured amongst populations. The unweighted pair group method with arithmatic mean (UPGMA) and Pearson's correlation coefficient (RAPD -0.16, p = 0.2082; AFLP 0.37, p = 0.1006) between genetic matrices and geographic distances suggested that the population structure followed an island model in which a single population of infinite size gave rise to the current populations of J. decurrens, independently of their spatial position. The results of this study indicate that RAPD and AFLP markers were similarly efficient in measuring the genetic variability amongst natural populations of J. decurrens. These data may be useful for developing strategies for the preservation of this medicinal species in the Cerrado. PMID:21637428

  11. Analysis of genetic diversity in Larix gmelinii (Pinaceae) with RAPD and ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, H G; Li, X F

    2013-01-24

    Dahurian larch (Larix gmelinii), a deciduous conifer, is the northernmost tree, native to eastern Siberia and nearby regions of China. We used growth traits and molecular markers to assess genetic variation in different L. gmelinii growing regions; 105 individual samples were collected from seven regions of the Qingshan Forestry Centre, Heilongjiang Province, China. The greatest genetic regional variation was seen in the Youhao area, based on coefficients of variation for tree height, diameter and volume (14.73, 28.25, and 55.27%, respectively). Analysis using molecular markers showed rich genetic diversity. The RAPD and ISSR methods both indicated that most variation came from within populations. The seven regions were divided into two groups (Daxing'an and Xiaoxing'an Mountain ranges) by RAPD cluster analysis: Tianchi, Xiaojiuya, Yuanjiang, and Taiping regions were placed in the first group at a genetic distance of 0.08; while the other regions were in the second group. The correlation between RAPD markers and geographical distance was significant, with a correlation coefficient of 0.752.

  12. Genetic diversity in natural populations of Jacaranda decurrens Cham. determined using RAPD and AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, Bianca W; de C Telles, Mariana P; Malosso, Milena G; Torres, Simone C Z; Pereira, José O; Lourenço, Mirian V; de C França, Suzelei; Pereira, Ana M S

    2010-07-01

    Jacaranda decurrens (Bignoniaceae) is an endemic species of the Cerrado with validated antitumoral activity. The genetic diversity of six populations of J. decurrens located in the State of São Paulo was determined in this study by using molecular markers for randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Following optimization of the amplification reaction, 10 selected primers generated 78 reproducible RAPD fragments that were mostly (69.2%) polymorphic. Two hundred and five reproducible AFLP fragments were generated by using four selected primer combinations; 46.3% of these fragments were polymorphic, indicating a considerable level of genetic diversity. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) using these two groups of markers indicated that variability was strongly structured amongst populations. The unweighted pair group method with arithmatic mean (UPGMA) and Pearson's correlation coefficient (RAPD -0.16, p = 0.2082; AFLP 0.37, p = 0.1006) between genetic matrices and geographic distances suggested that the population structure followed an island model in which a single population of infinite size gave rise to the current populations of J. decurrens, independently of their spatial position. The results of this study indicate that RAPD and AFLP markers were similarly efficient in measuring the genetic variability amongst natural populations of J. decurrens. These data may be useful for developing strategies for the preservation of this medicinal species in the Cerrado.

  13. Identification of molecular markers to study the Garcinia spp. diversity.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Utpala; Nandakishore, O P; Rosana, O B; Babu, K Nirmal; Kumar, R Senthil; Parthasarathy, V A

    2016-06-01

    The genus Garcinia shows a considerable variation in its morphological characters such as leaf, flower and fruit with taxonomic ambiguity. It is a potential under-exploited multipurpose crop that gained considerable attention for the presence of (-) hydroxycitric acid, an anti-obesity compound, in its fruit rind and leaves. Here, we evaluated the genetic relationship through molecular markers among the selected 9 species commonly available in the Western Ghats and the Northeastern Himalayan foot hills of India. The nucleotide sequence data obtained from two prominent monomorphic bands generated in ISSR profiling of the species was utilized for the study. The selected bands were found to be of ITS region (700 bp) and partial region of KNOX-1 gene (600 bp). The evolutionary cluster was formed using MEGA5 software. The study indicated 2 major clusters, influenced by floral morphology of the species and availability of (-) hydroxycitric acid in their fruit rinds. In the subclusters, one species from the Western Ghats were paired with another from Northeastern Himalayas with relatively similar morphological traits.

  14. Evaluation of genetic diversity of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceaea) using RAPD, ISSR and RAMP markers.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Noor Zafirah; Arsad, Hasni; Samian, Mohammed Razip; Ab Majid, Abdul Hafiz; Hamdan, Mohammad Razak

    2016-10-01

    Three polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were compared to analyse the genetic diversity of Clinacanthus nutans eight populations in the northern region of Peninsular Malaysia. The PCR techniques were random amplified polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acids (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and random amplified microsatellite polymorphisms (RAMP). Leaf genomic DNA was PCR amplified using 17 RAPD, 8 ISSR and 136 RAMP primers . However, only 10 RAPD primers, 5 ISSR primers and 37 RAMP primers produced reproducible bands. The results were evaluated for polymorphic information content (PIC), marker index (MI) and resolving power (RP). The RAMP marker was the most useful marker compared to RAPD and ISSR markers because it showed the highest average value of PIC (0.25), MI (11.36) and RP (2.86). The genetic diversity showed a high percentage of polymorphism at the species level compared to the population level. Furthermore, analysis of molecular variance revealed that the genetic diversity was higher within populations, as compared to among populations of C. nutans. From the results, the RAMP technique was recommended for the analysis of genetic diversity of C. nutans.

  15. On marker-assisted prediction of genetic value: beyond the ridge.

    PubMed Central

    Gianola, Daniel; Perez-Enciso, Miguel; Toro, Miguel A

    2003-01-01

    Marked-assisted genetic improvement of agricultural species exploits statistical dependencies in the joint distribution of marker genotypes and quantitative traits. An issue is how molecular (e.g., dense marker maps) and phenotypic information (e.g., some measure of yield in plants) is to be used for predicting the genetic value of candidates for selection. Multiple regression, selection index techniques, best linear unbiased prediction, and ridge regression of phenotypes on marker genotypes have been suggested, as well as more elaborate methods. Here, phenotype-marker associations are modeled hierarchically via multilevel models including chromosomal effects, a spatial covariance of marked effects within chromosomes, background genetic variability, and family heterogeneity. Lorenz curves and Gini coefficients are suggested for assessing the inequality of the contribution of different marked effects to genetic variability. Classical and Bayesian methods are presented. The Bayesian approach includes a Markov chain Monte Carlo implementation. The generality and flexibility of the Bayesian method is illustrated when a Lorenz curve is to be inferred. PMID:12586721

  16. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1990-04-01

    The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of the small aquarium fish, Japanese Medaka, as a predictor of potential genotoxicity following exposure to carcinogens. This will be accomplished by quantitatively investigating the early molecular events associated with genotoxicity of various tissues of Medaka subsequent to exposure of the organism to several known carcinogens, such as diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Analysis of genetic diversity in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) breeding populations as revealed by RAPD genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Odeth; Ortega, Fernando; Campos, Hugo

    2003-08-01

    Red clover is an important forage legume species for temperate regions and very little is known about the genetic organization of its breeding populations. We used random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) genetic markers to address the genetic diversity and the distribution of variation in 20 breeding populations and cultivars from Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Switzerland. Genetic distances were calculated for all possible pairwise combinations. A high level of polymorphism was found and the proportion of polymorphic loci across populations was 74.2%. A population derived from a non-certified seedlot displayed a higher proportion of polymorphic loci than its respective certified seedlot. Gene diversity values and population genetics parameters suggest that the populations analyzed are diverse. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that the largest proportion of variation (80.4%) resides at the within population level. RAPD markers are a useful tool for red clover breeding programs. A dendrogram based on genetic distances divided the breeding populations analyzed into three distinct groups. The amount and partition of diversity observed can be of value in identifying the populations that parents of synthetic cultivars are derived from and to exploit the variation available in the populations analyzed.

  18. Genetic Kinship Investigation from Blood Groups to DNA Markers

    PubMed Central

    Geserick, Gunther; Wirth, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    The forensic application of hereditary characteristics became possible after the discovery of human blood groups by Karl Landsteiner in 1901. The foundation for their use in kinship investigation was laid by Emil von Dungern and Ludwig Hirschfeld in 1910 by clarification of the inheritance of the ABO groups. Up to the middle of the 20th century further red cell membrane systems were discovered. From the 1920s Fritz Schiff and Georg Strassmann fought for the introduction of blood groups into forensic kinship investigation. A new era of hemogenetics was opened from 1955 as genetic polymorphisms were described in serum proteins. Starting in 1958 there followed the complex HLA system of white blood cells, which from 1963 was joined by polymophisms in erythrocyte enzymes. Therefore, from the 1980s, it was possible to clarify the majority of kinship cases with a combination of conventional markers. From 1990 to 2000 the conventional markers were gradually replaced by the more effective DNA markers. Simultaneously typing shifted from the phenotype level to the genotype level. The genomic structure of conventional genetic markers could also now be explained. As a reflection of scientific progress the legal situation also changed, particularly in the form of the official guidelines for kinship investigation. PMID:22851931

  19. Data resolution: a jackknife procedure for determining the consistency of molecular marker datasets.

    PubMed

    van Hintum, Th J L

    2007-08-01

    The results of genetic diversity studies using molecular markers not only depend on the biology of the studied objects but also on the quality of the marker data. Poor data quality may hamper the correct answering of biological questions. A new statistic is proposed to estimate the quality of a marker data set with regard to its ability to describe the structure of the biological material under study. This statistic is called data resolution (DR). It is calculated by splitting a marker data set at random into two sets each with half the number of markers. In each set, similarities between all pairs of objects are calculated. Subsequently, the similarities obtained for the two sets are correlated. This process is repeated a large number of times. The average of the correlation coefficients obtained in this way is the DR of the dataset. In the present paper, the DR statistic is applied to four studies involving amplified fragment length polymorphism as well as micro-satellite markers. In addition, some properties and possible applications of DR are discussed, including the prediction of the added value of scoring additional markers, and the determination of which similarity measure is, apart from genetical considerations, most appropriate for analyzing the data.

  20. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  1. Rapid SNP Discovery and Genetic Mapping Using Sequenced RAD Markers

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Tressa S.; Currey, Mark C.; Shiver, Anthony L.; Lewis, Zachary A.; Selker, Eric U.; Cresko, William A.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2008-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and genotyping are essential to genetic mapping. There remains a need for a simple, inexpensive platform that allows high-density SNP discovery and genotyping in large populations. Here we describe the sequencing of restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) tags, which identified more than 13,000 SNPs, and mapped three traits in two model organisms, using less than half the capacity of one Illumina sequencing run. We demonstrated that different marker densities can be attained by choice of restriction enzyme. Furthermore, we developed a barcoding system for sample multiplexing and fine mapped the genetic basis of lateral plate armor loss in threespine stickleback by identifying recombinant breakpoints in F2 individuals. Barcoding also facilitated mapping of a second trait, a reduction of pelvic structure, by in silico re-sorting of individuals. To further demonstrate the ease of the RAD sequencing approach we identified polymorphic markers and mapped an induced mutation in Neurospora crassa. Sequencing of RAD markers is an integrated platform for SNP discovery and genotyping. This approach should be widely applicable to genetic mapping in a variety of organisms. PMID:18852878

  2. Genetic Markers Associated with Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K; Fonseca-Camarillo, Gabriela

    2015-11-01

    Genetic factors play a significant role in determining inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility. Epidemiologic data support genetic contribution to the pathogenesis of IBD, which include familial aggregation, twin studies, and racial and ethnic differences in disease prevalence. Recently, several new genes have been identified to be involved in the genetic susceptibility to IBD. The characterization of novel genes potentially will lead to the identification of therapeutic agents and clinical assessment of phenotype and prognosis in patients with IBD. The development of genetic markers associated with clinical outcomes in patients with IBD will be very important in the future. The progress of molecular biology tools (microarrays, proteomics, and epigenetics) have progressed the field of the genetic markers discovery. The advances in bioinformatics coupled with cross-disciplinary collaborations have greatly enhanced our ability to retrieve, characterize, and analyze large amounts of data generated by the technological advances. The techniques available for markers development are genomics (single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, pharmacogenetics, and gene expression analyses) and proteomics. This could be a potential great benefit in predicting the course of disease in individual patients and in guiding appropriate medical therapy.

  3. Electrophysiological markers of genetic risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tye, Charlotte; McLoughlin, Gráinne; Kuntsi, Jonna; Asherson, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an ideal neuroscientific approach, providing a direct measurement of neural activity that demonstrates reliability, developmental stability and high heritability. This systematic review of a subset of domains evaluates the utility of electrophysiological measures as potential intermediate phenotypes for ADHD in the domains of quantitative EEG indices of arousal and intra-individual variability, and functional investigations of inhibitory and error processing using the event-related potential (ERP) technique. Each domain demonstrates consistent and meaningful associations with ADHD, a degree of genetic overlap with ADHD and potential links to specific genetic variants. Investigations of the genetic and environmental contributions to EEG/ERP and shared genetic overlap with ADHD may enhance molecular genetic studies and provide novel insights into aetiology. Such research will aid in the precise characterisation of the clinical deficits seen in ADHD and guide the development of novel intervention and prevention strategies for those at risk. PMID:21426626

  4. Genetic variability and structure of Quercus brantii assessed by ISSR, IRAP and SCoT markers.

    PubMed

    Alikhani, Leila; Rahmani, Mohammad-Shafie; Shabanian, Naghi; Badakhshan, Hedieh; Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah

    2014-11-15

    Persian oak (Quercus brantii Lindl.) is one of the most important woody species of the Zagros forests in Iran. Three molecular marker techniques: start codon targeted (SCoT), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) markers were compared for fingerprinting of 125 individuals of this species collected from different geographical locations of north-west of Iran. A total of 233 bands were amplified by 18 ISSR primers, of which 224 (96.10%) were polymorphic, and 126 polymorphic bands (97.65%) were observed in 129 bands amplified by 10 IRAP primers. Besides, 118 bands were observed for all 10 SCoT primers, of which 113 were polymorphic (95.71%). Average polymorphism information content (PIC) for ISSR, IRAP and SCoT markers was 0.30, 0.32 and 0.38, respectively, and this revealed that SCoT markers were more informative than IRAP and ISSR for the assessment of diversity among individuals. Based on the three different molecular types, cluster analysis revealed that 125 individuals taken for the analysis can be divided into three distinct clusters. The Jaccard's genetic similarity based on the combined data ranged from 0.23 to 0.76. These results suggest that efficiency of SCoT, IRAP and ISSR markers was relatively the same in fingerprinting of individuals. All molecular marker types revealed a low genetic differentiation among populations, indicating the possibility of gene flow between the studied populations. These results have an important implication for Persian oak (Q. brantii) germplasm characterization, improvement, and conservation.

  5. Comparative assessment of genetic diversity among Indian bamboo genotypes using RAPD and ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Desai, Parth; Gajera, Bhavesh; Mankad, Mounil; Shah, Shikha; Patel, Armi; Patil, Ghanshyam; Narayanan, Subhash; Kumar, Nitish

    2015-08-01

    Bamboo is one of the important plant for pulp, paper and charcoal industries. After China, India is the second largest bamboo reserve in Asia. Around the globe, wide genetic diversity of bamboo is present which serves as the base for selection and improvement. DNA based molecular markers appears to be a striking substitute for systematic assessment of the genetic diversity in conservation and genetic improvement of plants. DNA based molecular markers such as RAPD and ISSR were used to assess the genetic diversity in 13 bamboo genotypes. Total 120 RAPD and 63 ISSR primers were tested, of which only 42 polymorphic primers (30 RAPD and 12 ISSR), gave reproducible amplification profile and were used in this study. 30 RAPD primers yielded total 645 amplified fragments, of which 623 were polymorphic, and 20.76 polymorphic bands per primer were observed across 13 genotypes. 12 ISSR primers produced 246 amplified fragments, of which 241 were polymorphic, and 20.08 polymorphic bands per primer was observed across 13 different genotypes. The Jaccard's coefficient of RAPD, ISSR and pooled RAPD and ISSR dendrograms ranged from 0.26 to 0.83, 0.23 to 0.86 and 0.26 to 0.84 respectively. The present study found the large genetic diversity present between different elite genotypes of bamboo. Such investigation can deliver a well understanding of the available genotypes, which might be further exploited for the paper industry.

  6. Use of the IRAP marker to study genetic variability in Pseudocercospora fijiensis populations.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Casley Borges; Santana, Mateus Ferreira; da Silva, Gilvan Ferreira; Mizubuti, Eduardo Seiti Gomide; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira

    2014-03-01

    Pseudocercospora fijiensis is the etiological agent of black Sigatoka, which is currently considered as one of the most destructive banana diseases in all locations where it occurs. It is estimated that a large portion of the P. fijiensis genome consists of transposable elements, which allows researchers to use transposon-based molecular markers in the analysis of genetic variability in populations of this pathogen. In this context, the inter-retrotransposon-amplified polymorphism (IRAP) was used to study the genetic variability in P. fijiensis populations from different hosts and different geographical origins in Brazil. A total of 22 loci were amplified and 77.3 % showed a polymorphism. Cluster analysis revealed two major groups in Brazil. The observed genetic diversity (H E) was 0.22, and through molecular analysis of variance, it was determined that the greatest genetic variability occurs within populations. The discriminant analysis of principal components revealed no structuring related to the geographical origin of culture of the host. The IRAP-based marker system is a suitable tool for the study of genetic variability in P. fijiensis.

  7. Assessment of genetic diversity in Brazilian barley using SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jéssica Rosset; Pereira, Jorge Fernando; Turchetto, Caroline; Minella, Euclydes; Consoli, Luciano; Delatorre, Carla Andréa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Barley is a major cereal grown widely and used in several food products, beverage production and animal fodder. Genetic diversity is a key component in breeding programs. We have analyzed the genetic diversity of barley accessions using microsatellite markers. The accessions were composed of wild and domesticated barley representing genotypes from six countries and three breeding programs in Brazil. A total of 280 alleles were detected, 36 unique to Brazilian barley. The marker Bmag120 showed the greatest polymorphism information content (PIC), with the highest mean value found on chromosome three, and the lowest on chromosomes four and six. The wild accessions presented the highest diversity followed by the foreign genotypes. Genetic analysis was performed using Principal Coordinates Analysis, UPGMA clustering, and Bayesian clustering analysis implemented in Structure. All results obtained by the different methods were similar. Loss of genetic diversity has occurred in Brazilian genotypes. The number of alleles detected in genotypes released in 1980s was higher, whereas most of the cultivars released thereafter showed lower PIC and clustered in separate subgroups from the older cultivars. The use of a more diverse panel of genotypes should be considered in order to exploit novel alleles in Brazilian barley breeding programs. PMID:27007902

  8. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1990-10-01

    The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of the small aquarium fish, Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes), as a predictor of potential genotoxicity following exposure to carcinogens. This will be accomplished by quantitatively investigating the early molecular events associated with genotoxicity of various tissues of Medaka subsequent to exposure of the organism to several known carcinogens, such as diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Because of the often long latent period between initial contact with certain chemical and physical agents in our environment and subsequent expression of deleterious health or ecological impact, the development of sensitive methods for detecting and estimating early exposure is needed so that necessary interventions can ensue. A promising biological endpoint for detecting early exposure to damaging chemicals is the interaction of these compounds with cellular macromolecules such as Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA). This biological endpoint assumes significance because it can be one of the critical early events leading eventually to adverse effects (neoplasia) in the exposed organism.

  9. Genetic Markers for Western Corn Rootworm Resistance to Bt Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Flagel, Lex E.; Swarup, Shilpa; Chen, Mao; Bauer, Christopher; Wanjugi, Humphrey; Carroll, Matthew; Hill, Patrick; Tuscan, Meghan; Bansal, Raman; Flannagan, Ronald; Clark, Thomas L.; Michel, Andrew P.; Head, Graham P.; Goldman, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    Western corn rootworm (WCR) is a major maize (Zea mays L.) pest leading to annual economic losses of more than 1 billion dollars in the United States. Transgenic maize expressing insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used for the management of WCR. However, cultivation of Bt-expressing maize places intense selection pressure on pest populations to evolve resistance. Instances of resistance to Bt toxins have been reported in WCR. Developing genetic markers for resistance will help in characterizing the extent of existing issues, predicting where future field failures may occur, improving insect resistance management strategies, and in designing and sustainably implementing forthcoming WCR control products. Here, we discover and validate genetic markers in WCR that are associated with resistance to the Cry3Bb1 Bt toxin. A field-derived WCR population known to be resistant to the Cry3Bb1 Bt toxin was used to generate a genetic map and to identify a genomic region associated with Cry3Bb1 resistance. Our results indicate that resistance is inherited in a nearly recessive manner and associated with a single autosomal linkage group. Markers tightly linked with resistance were validated using WCR populations collected from Cry3Bb1 maize fields showing significant WCR damage from across the US Corn Belt. Two markers were found to be correlated with both diet (R2 = 0.14) and plant (R2 = 0.23) bioassays for resistance. These results will assist in assessing resistance risk for different WCR populations, and can be used to improve insect resistance management strategies. PMID:25566794

  10. Genetic markers for western corn rootworm resistance to Bt toxin.

    PubMed

    Flagel, Lex E; Swarup, Shilpa; Chen, Mao; Bauer, Christopher; Wanjugi, Humphrey; Carroll, Matthew; Hill, Patrick; Tuscan, Meghan; Bansal, Raman; Flannagan, Ronald; Clark, Thomas L; Michel, Andrew P; Head, Graham P; Goldman, Barry S

    2015-01-07

    Western corn rootworm (WCR) is a major maize (Zea mays L.) pest leading to annual economic losses of more than 1 billion dollars in the United States. Transgenic maize expressing insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used for the management of WCR. However, cultivation of Bt-expressing maize places intense selection pressure on pest populations to evolve resistance. Instances of resistance to Bt toxins have been reported in WCR. Developing genetic markers for resistance will help in characterizing the extent of existing issues, predicting where future field failures may occur, improving insect resistance management strategies, and in designing and sustainably implementing forthcoming WCR control products. Here, we discover and validate genetic markers in WCR that are associated with resistance to the Cry3Bb1 Bt toxin. A field-derived WCR population known to be resistant to the Cry3Bb1 Bt toxin was used to generate a genetic map and to identify a genomic region associated with Cry3Bb1 resistance. Our results indicate that resistance is inherited in a nearly recessive manner and associated with a single autosomal linkage group. Markers tightly linked with resistance were validated using WCR populations collected from Cry3Bb1 maize fields showing significant WCR damage from across the US Corn Belt. Two markers were found to be correlated with both diet (R2 = 0.14) and plant (R2 = 0.23) bioassays for resistance. These results will assist in assessing resistance risk for different WCR populations, and can be used to improve insect resistance management strategies.

  11. Fundamentals of fungal molecular population genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianping

    2006-07-01

    The last two decades have seen tremendous growth in the development and application of molecular methods in the analyses of fungal species and populations. In this paper, I provide an overview of the molecular techniques and the basic analytical tools used to address various fundamental population and evolutionary genetic questions in fungi. With increasing availability and decreasing cost, DNA sequencing is becoming a mainstream data acquisition method in fungal evolutionary genetic studies. However, other methods, especially those based on the polymerase chain reaction, remain powerful in addressing specific questions for certain groups of taxa. These developments are bringing fungal population and evolutionary genetics into mainstream ecology and evolutionary biology.

  12. Development of new molecular markers for the Colletotrichum genus using RetroCl1 sequences.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Leandro Vieira; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira; Santana, Mateus Ferreira; Soares, Marcos Antônio; de Barros, Everaldo Gonçalves; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes; Langin, Thierry

    2012-03-01

    A nonautonomous element of 624 bp, called RetroCl1 (Retroelement Colletotrichum lindemuthianum 1), was identified in the plant pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. RetroCl1 contains terminal direct repeats (223 bp) that are surrounded by CTAGT sequences. It has a short internal domain of 178 bp and shows characteristics of terminal-repeat retrotransposon in miniature (TRIM) family. We used RetroCl1 sequence to develop molecular markers for the Colletotrichum genus. IRAP (Inter-Retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism) and REMAP (Retrotransposon-Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism) markers were used to analyze the genetic diversity of C. lindemuthianum. Fifty-four isolates belonging to different races were used. A total of 45 loci were amplified. The Nei index showed significant differences among the populations divided according to race, indicating that they are structured according to pathotype. No clear correlation between IRAP and REMAP markers with pathogenic characterization was found. C. lindemuthianum has high genetic diversity, and the analysis of molecular variance showed that 51% of variability is found among the populations of different races. The markers were also tested in different Colletotrichum species. In every case, multiple bands were amplified, indicating that these markers can be successfully used in different species belonging to the Colletotrichum genus.

  13. Genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae) using inter simple sequence repeats markers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Shi, Juan; Luo, You-Qing; Sun, Shuang-Yan; Pu, Min

    2013-01-01

    This study provides the first genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lymantriadispar), one of the most recognized pests of forests and ornamental trees in the world. We assessed genetic diversity and structure in eight geographic populations of gypsy moths from China using five polymorphic Inter simple sequence repeat markers, which produced reproducible banding patterns. We observed 102 polymorphic loci across the 176 individuals sampled. Overall genetic diversity (Nei's, H) was 0.2357, while the mean genetic diversity within geographic populations was 0.1845 ± 0.0150. The observed genetic distance among the eight populations ranged from 0.0432 to 0.1034. Clustering analysis (using an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean and multidimensional scaling), revealed strong concordance between the strength of genetic relationships among populations and their geographic proximity. Analysis of molecular variance demonstrated that 25.43% of the total variability (F ST = 0.2543, P < 0.001) was attributable to variation among geographic populations. The results of our analyses investigating the degree of polymorphism, genetic diversity (Nei's and Shannon) and genetic structure, suggest that individuals from Hebei may be better able to adapt to different environments and to disperse to new habitats. This study provides crucial genetic information needed to assess the distribution and population dynamics of this important pest species of global concern.

  14. Genetic Characterization of the Gypsy Moth from China (Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae) Using Inter Simple Sequence Repeats Markers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; Shi, Juan; Luo, You-qing; Sun, Shuang-yan; Pu, Min

    2013-01-01

    This study provides the first genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lymantriadispar), one of the most recognized pests of forests and ornamental trees in the world. We assessed genetic diversity and structure in eight geographic populations of gypsy moths from China using five polymorphic Inter simple sequence repeat markers, which produced reproducible banding patterns. We observed 102 polymorphic loci across the 176 individuals sampled. Overall genetic diversity (Nei’s, H) was 0.2357, while the mean genetic diversity within geographic populations was 0.1845 ± 0.0150. The observed genetic distance among the eight populations ranged from 0.0432 to 0.1034. Clustering analysis (using an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean and multidimensional scaling), revealed strong concordance between the strength of genetic relationships among populations and their geographic proximity. Analysis of molecular variance demonstrated that 25.43% of the total variability (FST = 0.2543, P < 0.001) was attributable to variation among geographic populations. The results of our analyses investigating the degree of polymorphism, genetic diversity (Nei’s and Shannon) and genetic structure, suggest that individuals from Hebei may be better able to adapt to different environments and to disperse to new habitats. This study provides crucial genetic information needed to assess the distribution and population dynamics of this important pest species of global concern. PMID:23951339

  15. Confirmation of hybrid origin in Arisaema (Araceae) using molecular markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A population of hybrids between Arisaema triphyllum subsp. stewardsonii and A. dracontium was investigated using molecular markers to document the hybrid origin. Total genomic DNA was extracted from A. triphyllum, A. dracontium, and the hybrids, and subjected to sequence analysis of various regions...

  16. Acceleration of peanut breeding programs by molecular marker assisted selection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut breeding has played a significant role in yield increases and disease control. Conventional breeding focuses on field selection and phenotypic analysis and it typically takes 12-15 years before a new cultivar can be released. Molecular markers developed from sequencing data can be of great ...

  17. Genetic diversity among oat varieties of worldwide origin and associations of AFLP markers with quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Achleitner, Andreas; Tinker, Nicholas A; Zechner, Elisabeth; Buerstmayr, Hermann

    2008-11-01

    One hundred and fourteen oat (Avena sativa L.) varieties of worldwide origin were evaluated for genetic diversity based on 77 molecular polymorphisms produced by eight selective AFLP primer combinations. Genetic similarity, calculated using the DICE coefficient, was used for cluster analysis and principal component analysis was applied. In addition population structure was explored to identify discrete subpopulations based on allele frequency. Although clustering and population structure showed relationships with region and country of origin, there was no obvious relationship to hull presence or hull colour. Oat varieties originating from European breeding programs showed less diversity than varieties originating from North and South America. Associations between AFLP markers and agronomic traits (grain yield, groat yield, panicle emergence, plant height, and lodging) as well as kernel quality traits (kernel weight, test weight, screening percent and groat percent) were also investigated. Marker-trait associations were tested using a naïve simple regression model and five additional models that account for population structure. Significant associations were found for 23 AFLP markers, with many of these affecting multiple traits. This study demonstrates that diversity can be significantly enhanced using a global collection, and provides evidence for marker-trait associations that can be validated in segregating populations and exploited through marker-assisted selection.

  18. The same but different: monomorphic microsatellite markers as a new tool for genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nazareno, Alison G; dos Reis, Mauricio S

    2011-10-01

    The nucleotide variation at a microsatellite locus lacking length polymorphisms among its alleles was assessed to generate an informative tool for genetic analysis. From a set of microsatellite markers, a monomorphic microsatellite locus developed for the palm species Butia eriospatha was used to elucidate whether there are polymorphic sites in its flanking regions. DNA sequences ≈133 bp long were obtained. Aligned sequences show variation at 17 polymorphic sites with both insertions and nucleotide substitutions. Fourteen distinct sequences (alleles) among 22 individuals were identified. The percent sequence difference varied from 0.0 to 5%, indicating that there is significant variation among sequences. Due to significant levels of information and sequence diversity on a simple sequence repeat (SSR) locus of identical size, our study highlights that this molecular marker class can be a useful tool for population genetics and evolutionary studies for many plant species.

  19. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, David; Belanger, Faith C; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L.) x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease), antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase), energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), cell expansion (expansin), and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101). Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection.

  20. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, David; Belanger, Faith C.; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L.) x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease), antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase), energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), cell expansion (expansin), and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101). Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection. PMID:28187136

  1. Genetic variability analysis of Byrsonima crassifolia germplasm collected in Pará State using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S M; Moura, E F; Ramos, G K S; Oliveira, M S P

    2016-10-17

    Native of the Amazon, the nanche (Byrsonima crassifolia) is a fruit cultivated by family farmers and used in cooking; as such, it represents an opportunity for regional agribusiness. The Embrapa Eastern Amazon set up an active germplasm bank (BAG) consisting of 22 accessions sampled in 11 municipalities of Pará State. Due to its economic potential, there is an interest to advance the genetic breeding program of this species. The aim of this study was to characterize the BAG nanche collection using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Accessions were genotyped using 23 pre-selected ISSR primers resulting in 109 amplified polymorphic and 51 monomorphic bands. With eight polymorphic bands each, the most polymorphic primers were UBC 809 and UBC 848. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average cluster analysis based on Jaccard's coefficient indicated that the individuals clustered into two distinct groups. Accessions Igarapé Açu-2 and Augusto Corrêa-Pl 1 were most similar. The genetic dissimilarity values ranged from 0.10 to 0.59. We conclude that the ISSR markers were efficient in detecting polymorphisms in the nanche accessions, and that it is possible to infer the genetic variability among accessions of the collection. This demonstrate the importance of using molecular markers in poorly studied species and the advantages that this information can bring to the genetic improvement of such species.

  2. Estimating heritabilities and genetic correlations with marker-based methods: an experimental test in Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed

    van Kleunen, M; Ritland, K

    2005-01-01

    The calculation of heritabilities and genetic correlations, which are necessary for predicting evolutionary responses, requires knowledge about the relatedness between individuals. This information is often not directly available, especially not for natural populations, but can be inferred by using molecular markers such as allozymes. Several methods based on inferred relatedness from marker data have been developed to estimate heritabilities and genetic correlations in natural populations. Most methods use maximum-likelihood procedures to assign pairs or groups of individuals to predefined discrete relatedness classes (e.g., half sibs and unrelated individuals). The Ritland method, on the other hand, uses method of moments estimators to estimate pairwise relatedness among individuals as continuous values. We tested both the Ritland method and a maximum-likelihood method by applying them to a greenhouse population consisting of seed families of the herb Mimulus guttatus and comparing the results to the ones from a frequently used standard method based on half-sib families. Estimates of genetic correlations were far from accurate, especially when we used the Ritland method. However, this study shows that even with a few variable allozyme loci, it is possible to get qualitatively good indications about the presence of heritable genetic variation from marker-based methods, even though both methods underestimated it.

  3. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  4. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  5. Molecular genetics of sex determination.

    PubMed

    Cotinot, Corinne; Pailhoux, Eric; Jaubert, Francis; Fellous, Marc

    2002-08-01

    In humans, the choice between male or female development is genetically determined. Sex determination take place when the bipotential embryonic gonad becomes either testis or ovary. This process is directed by genes that have been discovered by genetic analysis of sex-reversed patients and confirmed by knockout experiments in mice. The testis-determining pathway is better known than the ovary pathway. SRY, a gene located on the Y chromosome, triggers a complex genetic cascade leading to testicular differentiation. In this cascade, two genes play a crucial role in male differentiation, SOX9 and FGF9, which contribute to testicular cord formation. However, only a minority of 46,XY sex-reversed patients can be explained by mutations in known genes such as SRY, SOX9, WTI, and SF1, suggesting that other genes influencing sex determination are yet to be discovered. In females, some rare genes that induce ovarian failure or female-to-male sex reversal have been found through gene-targeted inactivation in mice or positional cloning of mutations in humans and goats. In both sexes, genetic analysis of sex-reversed individuals (XX males, XX and XY hermaphrodites, and XY with complete or partial dysgenesis) remains an approach of choice to isolate new genes involved in sex determination.

  6. A molecular marker based linkage map of Vitis.

    PubMed

    Lodhi, M A; Daly, M J; Ye, G N; Weeden, N F; Reisch, B I

    1995-08-01

    Genetic linkage maps of Vitis (2n = 38) have been constructed from a single interspecific hybrid grape population (60 seedlings) of 'Cayuga White' X 'Aurore'. The maps were primarily based on 422 RAPD markers but also included 16 RFLP and isozyme markers. These maps had an average distance of 6.1 cM between markers and were developed using a double-pseudotestcross strategy. The 'Cayuga White' map had 214 markers covering 1196 cM and that of 'Aurore' spanned over 1477 cM with 225 markers. The 'Cayuga White' map consisted of 20 linkage groups, whereas 22 linkage groups comprised the 'Aurore' map. The number of groups reduced to 19, as in some instances two or more groups from one parent showed homology with a single group from the other parent on the basis of markers heterozygous in both parents. Each linkage group ranged in size from 14 to 135 cM in 'Aurore' and from 14 to 124 cM in 'Cayuga White'. These maps provide enough coverage of the genome to allow quantitative trait locus analysis and map-based gene cloning.

  7. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-08-19

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients.

  8. Microsatellite isolation and marker development in carrot - genomic distribution, linkage mapping, genetic diversity analysis and marker transferability across Apiaceae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Apiaceae family includes several vegetable and spice crop species among which carrot is the most economically important member, with ~21 million tons produced yearly worldwide. Despite its importance, molecular resources in this species are relatively underdeveloped. The availability of informative, polymorphic, and robust PCR-based markers, such as microsatellites (or SSRs), will facilitate genetics and breeding of carrot and other Apiaceae, including integration of linkage maps, tagging of phenotypic traits and assisting positional gene cloning. Thus, with the purpose of isolating carrot microsatellites, two different strategies were used; a hybridization-based library enrichment for SSRs, and bioinformatic mining of SSRs in BAC-end sequence and EST sequence databases. This work reports on the development of 300 carrot SSR markers and their characterization at various levels. Results Evaluation of microsatellites isolated from both DNA sources in subsets of 7 carrot F2 mapping populations revealed that SSRs from the hybridization-based method were longer, had more repeat units and were more polymorphic than SSRs isolated by sequence search. Overall, 196 SSRs (65.1%) were polymorphic in at least one mapping population, and the percentage of polymophic SSRs across F2 populations ranged from 17.8 to 24.7. Polymorphic markers in one family were evaluated in the entire F2, allowing the genetic mapping of 55 SSRs (38 codominant) onto the carrot reference map. The SSR loci were distributed throughout all 9 carrot linkage groups (LGs), with 2 to 9 SSRs/LG. In addition, SSR evaluations in carrot-related taxa indicated that a significant fraction of the carrot SSRs transfer successfully across Apiaceae, with heterologous amplification success rate decreasing with the target-species evolutionary distance from carrot. SSR diversity evaluated in a collection of 65 D. carota accessions revealed a high level of polymorphism for these selected loci, with an

  9. Genetic and molecular ecotoxicology: a research framework.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S; Sadinski, W; Shugart, L; Brussard, P; Depledge, M; Ford, T; Hose, J; Stegeman, J; Suk, W; Wirgin, I

    1994-12-01

    Participants at the Napa Conference on Genetic and Molecular Ecotoxicology assessed the status of this field in light of heightened concerns about the genetic effects of exposure to hazardous substances and recent advancements in our capabilities to measure those effects. We present here a synthesis of the ideas discussed throughout the conference, including definitions of important concepts in the field and critical research needs and opportunities. While there were many opinions expressed on these topics, there was general agreement that there are substantive new opportunities to improve the impact of genetic and molecular ecotoxicology on prediction of sublethal effects of exposure to hazardous substances. Future studies should emphasize integration of genetic ecotoxicology, ecological genetics, and molecular biology and should be directed toward improving our understanding of the ecological implications of genotoxic responses. Ecological implications may be assessed at either the population or ecosystem level; however, a population-level focus may be most pragmatic. Recent technical advancements in measuring genetic and molecular responses to toxicant exposure will spur rapid progress. These new techniques have considerable promise for increasing our understanding of both mechanisms of toxicity on genes or gene products and the relevance of detrimental effects to individual fitness.

  10. Molecular genetic variation in cultivated peanuts germplasm of Henan and detection of their elite allelic variations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Groundnut or peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an economically important crop worldwide as a source of protein and cooking oil, particularly in developing countries. Because of its narrow genetic background and shortage of polymorphic genetic markers, molecular characterization of cultivated peanuts i...

  11. Molecular genetic diversity in populations of the stingless bee Plebeia remota: A case study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Francisco, Flávio; Santiago, Leandro Rodrigues; Arias, Maria Cristina

    2013-03-01

    Genetic diversity is a major component of the biological diversity of an ecosystem. The survival of a population may be seriously threatened if its genetic diversity values are low. In this work, we measured the genetic diversity of the stingless bee Plebeia remota based on molecular data obtained by analyzing 15 microsatellite loci and sequencing two mitochondrial genes. Population structure and genetic diversity differed depending on the molecular marker analyzed: microsatellites showed low population structure and moderate to high genetic diversity, while mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) showed high population structure and low diversity in three populations. Queen philopatry and male dispersal behavior are discussed as the main reasons for these findings.

  12. Genetic divergence of rubber tree estimated by multivariate techniques and microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Genetic diversity of 60 Hevea genotypes, consisting of Asiatic, Amazonian, African and IAC clones, and pertaining to the genetic breeding program of the Agronomic Institute (IAC), Brazil, was estimated. Analyses were based on phenotypic multivariate parameters and microsatellites. Five agronomic descriptors were employed in multivariate procedures, such as Standard Euclidian Distance, Tocher clustering and principal component analysis. Genetic variability among the genotypes was estimated with 68 selected polymorphic SSRs, by way of Modified Rogers Genetic Distance and UPGMA clustering. Structure software in a Bayesian approach was used in discriminating among groups. Genetic diversity was estimated through Nei's statistics. The genotypes were clustered into 12 groups according to the Tocher method, while the molecular analysis identified six groups. In the phenotypic and microsatellite analyses, the Amazonian and IAC genotypes were distributed in several groups, whereas the Asiatic were in only a few. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.05 to 0.96. Both high total diversity (HT' = 0.58) and high gene differentiation (G st' = 0.61) were observed, and indicated high genetic variation among the 60 genotypes, which may be useful for breeding programs. The analyzed agronomic parameters and SSRs markers were effective in assessing genetic diversity among Hevea genotypes, besides proving to be useful for characterizing genetic variability. PMID:21637487

  13. [Molecular Genetics as Best Evidence in Glioma Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Komori, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    The development of a genomic landscape of gliomas has led to the internally consistent, molecularly-based classifiers. However, development of a biologically insightful classification to guide therapy is still ongoing. Further, tumors are heterogeneous, and they change and adapt in response to drugs. The challenge of developing molecular classifiers that provide meaningful ways to stratify patients for therapy remains a major challenge for the field. Therefore, by incorporating molecular markers into the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system, the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria will be replaced by a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis", to define tumor entities as narrowly as possible. We herein review the current status of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on IDH mutation, ATRX mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, and TERT promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as BRAF and H3F3A aberrations in pediatric gliomas, the combination of which will be a promising endeavor to render molecular genetics as a best evidence in the glioma diagnositics.

  14. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiations and Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Howard B.

    1999-06-01

    The major goal of the research project is to define the role of HRAD9 in the response of cells to radiation or chemical exposure, and to establish this gene as a genetic marker to predict predisposition to the deleterious health effects that may result after exposure to these agents. HRAD9 is a human homologue of fission yeast S. pombe rad9, a gene known to promote radioresistance and chemoresistance, and to regulate cell cycle progression after DNA is damaged or DNA replication is incomplete -i.e., it mediates cell cycle checkpoint control. Therefore, HRAD9 likely plays an important role in humans to determine the biological consequences of DNA damage.

  15. Transcriptome Analysis and Development of SSR Molecular Markers in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaling; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Meiling; Hou, Junling; Qing, Mei; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Licorice is an important traditional Chinese medicine with clinical and industrial applications. Genetic resources of licorice are insufficient for analysis of molecular biology and genetic functions; as such, transcriptome sequencing must be conducted for functional characterization and development of molecular markers. In this study, transcriptome sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencing platform generated a total of 5.41 Gb clean data. De novo assembly yielded a total of 46,641 unigenes. Comparison analysis using BLAST showed that the annotations of 29,614 unigenes were conserved. Further study revealed 773 genes related to biosynthesis of secondary metabolites of licorice, 40 genes involved in biosynthesis of the terpenoid backbone, and 16 genes associated with biosynthesis of glycyrrhizic acid. Analysis of unigenes larger than 1 Kb with a length of 11,702 nt presented 7,032 simple sequence repeats (SSR). Sixty-four of 69 randomly designed and synthesized SSR pairs were successfully amplified, 33 pairs of primers were polymorphism in in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., Glycyrrhiza inflata Bat., Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza pallidiflora Maxim. This study not only presents the molecular biology data of licorice but also provides a basis for genetic diversity research and molecular marker-assisted breeding of licorice. PMID:26571372

  16. Transcriptome Analysis and Development of SSR Molecular Markers in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaling; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Meiling; Hou, Junling; Qing, Mei; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Licorice is an important traditional Chinese medicine with clinical and industrial applications. Genetic resources of licorice are insufficient for analysis of molecular biology and genetic functions; as such, transcriptome sequencing must be conducted for functional characterization and development of molecular markers. In this study, transcriptome sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencing platform generated a total of 5.41 Gb clean data. De novo assembly yielded a total of 46,641 unigenes. Comparison analysis using BLAST showed that the annotations of 29,614 unigenes were conserved. Further study revealed 773 genes related to biosynthesis of secondary metabolites of licorice, 40 genes involved in biosynthesis of the terpenoid backbone, and 16 genes associated with biosynthesis of glycyrrhizic acid. Analysis of unigenes larger than 1 Kb with a length of 11,702 nt presented 7,032 simple sequence repeats (SSR). Sixty-four of 69 randomly designed and synthesized SSR pairs were successfully amplified, 33 pairs of primers were polymorphism in in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., Glycyrrhiza inflata Bat., Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza pallidiflora Maxim. This study not only presents the molecular biology data of licorice but also provides a basis for genetic diversity research and molecular marker-assisted breeding of licorice.

  17. Using microsatellite DNA markers to determine the genetic identity of parental clones used in the Louisiana sugarcane breeding program

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugarcane propagates asexually through vegetative cuttings. To validate the genetic identity of sugarcane clones during shipping and handling, we produced molecular fingerprints based on 21 microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers for 116 Louisiana parental clones that were included in the crossing program...

  18. Review: domestic animal forensic genetics - biological evidence, genetic markers, analytical approaches and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kanthaswamy, S

    2015-10-01

    This review highlights the importance of domestic animal genetic evidence sources, genetic testing, markers and analytical approaches as well as the challenges this field is facing in view of the de facto 'gold standard' human DNA identification. Because of the genetic similarity between humans and domestic animals, genetic analysis of domestic animal hair, saliva, urine, blood and other biological material has generated vital investigative leads that have been admitted into a variety of court proceedings, including criminal and civil litigation. Information on validated short tandem repeat, single nucleotide polymorphism and mitochondrial DNA markers and public access to genetic databases for forensic DNA analysis is becoming readily available. Although the fundamental aspects of animal forensic genetic testing may be reliable and acceptable, animal forensic testing still lacks the standardized testing protocols that human genetic profiling requires, probably because of the absence of monetary support from government agencies and the difficulty in promoting cooperation among competing laboratories. Moreover, there is a lack in consensus about how to best present the results and expert opinion to comply with court standards and bear judicial scrutiny. This has been the single most persistent challenge ever since the earliest use of domestic animal forensic genetic testing in a criminal case in the mid-1990s. Crime laboratory accreditation ensures that genetic test results have the courts' confidence. Because accreditation requires significant commitments of effort, time and resources, the vast majority of animal forensic genetic laboratories are not accredited nor are their analysts certified forensic examiners. The relevance of domestic animal forensic genetics in the criminal justice system is undeniable. However, further improvements are needed in a wide range of supporting resources, including standardized quality assurance and control protocols for sample

  19. [Genetic marker findings in systematic and unsystematic schizophrenias].

    PubMed

    Lange, V

    1989-04-01

    The systematic schizophrenias are marked genetically by a significant surplus of the Gc serum type 1-1 (p less than 0.0005), what can be demonstrated by the separated analysis of the hebephrenias (p less than 0.0005), paraphrenias (p less than 0.01) and catatonias (p less than 0.05) also. Furtheron there is some evidence that the Gc subtype 1F plays a predominant role within the Gc 1-1 excess (p less than 0.01). The unsystematic schizophrenias (periodic catatonias and affective paraphrenias) do not deviate in their Gc distribution from the corresponding control values, but they exhibit contrary to the systematic forms a surplus of the haptoglobin serum group 2-2 like phasic psychoses. The marker findings are discussed with respect to the relevant data of biological psychiatry and biochemical genetics.

  20. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Chlamydia Species.

    PubMed

    Sixt, Barbara S; Valdivia, Raphael H

    2016-09-08

    Species of Chlamydia are the etiologic agent of endemic blinding trachoma, the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases, significant respiratory pathogens, and a zoonotic threat. Their dependence on an intracellular growth niche and their peculiar developmental cycle are major challenges to elucidating their biology and virulence traits. The last decade has seen tremendous advances in our ability to perform a molecular genetic analysis of Chlamydia species. Major achievements include the generation of large collections of mutant strains, now available for forward- and reverse-genetic applications, and the introduction of a system for plasmid-based transformation enabling complementation of mutations; expression of foreign, modified, or reporter genes; and even targeted gene disruptions. This review summarizes the current status of the molecular genetic toolbox for Chlamydia species and highlights new insights into their biology and new challenges in the nascent field of Chlamydia genetics.

  1. Evaluation of Hbr (MITE) markers for assessment of genetic relationships among maize ( Zea mays L.) inbred lines.

    PubMed

    Casa, A M; Mitchell, S E; Smith, O S; Register, J C; Wessler, S R; Kresovich, S

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a new type of molecular marker has been developed that is based on the presence or absence of the miniature inverted repeat transposable element (MITE) family Heartbreaker ( Hbr) in the maize genome. These so-called Hbr markers have been shown to be stable, highly polymorphic, easily mapped, and evenly distributed throughout the maize genome. In this work, we used Hbr-derived markers for genetic characterization of a set of maize inbred lines belonging to Stiff Stalk (SS) and Non-Stiff Stalk (NSS) heterotic groups. In total, 111 markers were evaluated across 62 SS and NSS lines. Seventy six markers (68%) were shared between the two groups, and 25 of the common markers occurred at fairly low frequency (markers (3%) were monomorphic in all samples. Although DNA sequencing indicated that 5.5% of same-sized DNA fragments were non-homologous, this result did not affect the cluster analyses (i.e., relationships obtained from the Hbr data were congruent with those derived from pedigree information). Distance matrices generated from Hbr markers were significantly correlated ( p<0.001) with those obtained from pedigree ( r=0.782), RFLPs ( r=0.747), and SSRs ( r=0.719). Overall, these results indicated that Hbr markers could be used in conjunction with other molecular markers for genotyping and relationship studies of related maize inbred lines.

  2. Contrasting patterns of genetic diversity at three different genetic markers in a marine mammal metapopulation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, J I; Dasmahapatra, K K; Amos, W; Phillips, C D; Gelatt, T S; Bickham, J W

    2009-07-01

    Many studies use genetic markers to explore population structure and variability within species. However, only a minority use more than one type of marker and, despite increasing evidence of a link between heterozygosity and individual fitness, few ask whether diversity correlates with population trajectory. To address these issues, we analysed data from the Steller's sea lion, Eumetiopias jubatus, where three stocks are distributed over a vast geographical range and where both genetic samples and detailed demographic data have been collected from many diverse breeding colonies. To previously published mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and microsatellite data sets, we have added new data for amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, comprising 238 loci scored in 285 sea lions sampled from 23 natal rookeries. Genotypic diversity was low relative to most vertebrates, with only 37 loci (15.5%) being polymorphic. Moreover, contrasting geographical patterns of genetic diversity were found at the three markers, with Nei's gene diversity tending to be higher for AFLPs and microsatellites in rookeries of the western and Asian stocks, while the highest mtDNA values were found in the eastern stock. Overall, and despite strongly contrasting demographic histories, after applying phylogenetic correction we found little correlation between genetic diversity and either colony size or demography. In contrast, we were able to show a highly significant positive relationship between AFLP diversity and current population size across a range of pinniped species, even though equivalent analyses did not reveal significant trends for either microsatellites or mtDNA.

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of molecular markers during local adaptation: a case study in Drosophila subobscura

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Natural selection and genetic drift are major forces responsible for temporal genetic changes in populations. Furthermore, these evolutionary forces may interact with each other. Here we study the impact of an ongoing adaptive process at the molecular genetic level by analyzing the temporal genetic changes throughout 40 generations of adaptation to a common laboratory environment. Specifically, genetic variability, population differentiation and demographic structure were compared in two replicated groups of Drosophila subobscura populations recently sampled from different wild sources. Results We found evidence for a decline in genetic variability through time, along with an increase in genetic differentiation between all populations studied. The observed decline in genetic variability was higher during the first 14 generations of laboratory adaptation. The two groups of replicated populations showed overall similarity in variability patterns. Our results also revealed changing demographic structure of the populations during laboratory evolution, with lower effective population sizes in the early phase of the adaptive process. One of the ten microsatellites analyzed showed a clearly distinct temporal pattern of allele frequency change, suggesting the occurrence of positive selection affecting the region around that particular locus. Conclusion Genetic drift was responsible for most of the divergence and loss of variability between and within replicates, with most changes occurring during the first generations of laboratory adaptation. We also found evidence suggesting a selective sweep, despite the low number of molecular markers analyzed. Overall, there was a similarity of evolutionary dynamics at the molecular level in our laboratory populations, despite distinct genetic backgrounds and some differences in phenotypic evolution. PMID:18302790

  4. Identification of a molecular marker for genotyping human lymphatic filarial nematode parasite Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Patra, K P; Ramu, Thangadurai; Hoti, S L; Pragasam, G Siva; Das, P K

    2007-05-01

    In India, Mass Drug Administration is on going towards elimination of lymphatic filariasis in many areas, which might lead to intense selection pressure on the parasite populations and their genetic restructuring. This calls for molecular finger printing of Wuchereria bancrofti parasite populations at national level and monitoring genetic changes in the future. For this purpose a reliable, less expensive, rapid, and reproducible molecular tool is necessary, which is not available for W. bancrofti at this time. We identified robust molecular markers based on the comparison of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiles and the genetic data generated from parasite populations collected from areas in Northern (Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh state), Southern (Kozhikode, Kerala State) and Central regions (Jagdalpur, Chattisgarh state) of India, where lymphatic filariasis is endemic for many decades. RAPD profiles for these parasite populations were generated using three different primers and the dendrograms constructed using the profiles were all different. In order to identify appropriate RAPD primer(s), we compared the results of RAPD with the fingerprint profile and genetic data obtained by the more reliable AFLP technique, using the parasite populations from the same areas. RAPD marker (OP8) primer produced phylogenetic data almost similar to that of AFLP analysis. The marker was able to reveal variations between the parasite populations collected from Varanasi, Kozhikode, and Jagdalpur. Most importantly, RAPD primer OP8 produced reproducible results, when tested in three different trials. In view of the limited availability of W. bancrofti parasite DNA, along with a lower cost and ease of performance, RAPD appears to be more suitable compared to AFLP at the present juncture, since complete genome information of this parasite is still not available. Thus, RAPD primer OP8 can be a very useful molecular maker for DNA

  5. Genetic diversity of the Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray collection of the USDA National Plant Germplasm system using targeted region amplified polymorphism markers designed from genes associated with heat and drought stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Molecular genetic relationships among 222 accessions of the Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray collection were assessed using Targeted Region Amplified Polymorphic (TRAP) markers designed from sequences of genes associated with heat and drought tolerance. Genetic relationships were compared to reactions ...

  6. Molecular markers in oral lichen planus: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sagari, Shitalkumar; Sanadhya, Sudhanshu; Doddamani, Mallikarjun; Rajput, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory mucosal disease that is usually detected in 0.5–2.2% of the human population. Among these, only 0.5–2.9% of the lesions progress to carcinoma. However, there are no prognostic markers available presently to recognize the increased risk in malignant transformation of the lesions. Selected markers for cell proliferation, adhesion, apoptosis and lymphocytic infiltration were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in addition to static cytometry for DNA content. The concept linking OLP and oral squamous cell carcinoma states that chronic inflammation results in crucial DNA damage, which further progresses to development of carcinoma. Even though in the past decade, enormous information has been accumulated on malignant potential of OLP, its transformation still remains unclear. Hence, the purpose of this article was to review cellular and molecular markers to understand the pathogenesis of OLP and its progression toward malignancy. PMID:27194873

  7. Genetic recombination and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, B; Betancourt, A J; Kaiser, V B; Gordo, I

    2009-01-01

    Reduced rates of genetic recombination are often associated with reduced genetic variability and levels of adaptation. Several different evolutionary processes, collectively known as Hill-Robertson (HR) effects, have been proposed as causes of these correlates of recombination. Here, we use DNA sequence polymorphism and divergence data from the noncrossing over dot chromosome of Drosophila to discriminate between two of the major forms of HR effects: selective sweeps and background selection. This chromosome shows reduced levels of silent variability and reduced effectiveness of selection. We show that neither model fits the data on variability. We propose that, in large genomic regions with restricted recombination, HR effects among nonsynonymous mutations undermine the effective strength of selection, so that their background selection effects are weakened. This modified model fits the data on variability and also explains why variability in very large nonrecombining genomes is not completely wiped out. We also show that HR effects of this type can produce an individual selection advantage to recombination, as well as greatly reduce the mean fitness of nonrecombining genomes and genomic regions.

  8. [Clinical implications of molecular genetic research in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    Gürtler, N

    2003-08-01

    Molecular-genetic research in Otolaryngology has seen a rapid advancement during the last ten years, especially in the fields of otology and head and neck tumors. The results of this basic research have now started to be implemented in the clinic. In otology the understanding of auditive function has dramatically improved. The syndromic and non-syndromic forms of hereditary hearing impairment can be subdivided into their underlying genetic defects, as more and more genes are identified. Diagnostic of syndromic hearing loss has been improved and can be done earlier. But the molecular-genetic analysis is still time-consuming and difficult. Currently, in our clinic, only patients with suspected Pendred-syndrome, representing the most frequent syndrome with hearing impairment, undergo a routine search for mutation detection in the corresponding gene SLC26A4. A multitude of genes and mutations are seen in the non-syndromic forms of hereditary hearing impairment. The gene gap-junction-protein beta2, encoding connexin 26, is encountered most frequently. Its prevalence in Switzerland is high with about 20% in the non-syndromic group. A molecular-genetic analysis of connexin 26 is offered in cases of congenital hearing loss. Another analysis, which has been implemented in the clinic, is the sequencing of Wolfram-syndrome gene 1 in familial low-frequency hearing loss. This gene seems to be involved in the majority of families with this type of hearing loss. Gene therapy for hearing loss is currently not an option in the clinical field. The different steps in carcinogenesis of head and neck cancer have further been elucidated by molecular-genetic research. Clinical applications are the establishment of risk-profiles for tumor-development and defining prognostic markers as well as the development of new treatment strategies based on genetic therapy.

  9. Application of resistance gene analog markers to analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juansheng; Yu, Yuchao; Gao, Fangyuan; Zeng, Lihua; Lu, Xianjun; Wu, Xianting; Yan, Wengui; Ren, Guangjun

    2013-07-01

    Plant disease resistance gene analog (RGA) markers were designed according to the conserved sequence of known RGAs and used to map resistance genes. We used genome-wide RGA markers for genetic analyses of structure and diversity in a global rice germplasm collection. Of the 472 RGA markers, 138 were polymorphic and these were applied to 178 entries selected from the USDA rice core collection. Results from the RGA markers were similar between two methods, UPGMA and STRUCTURE. Additionally, the results from RGA markers in our study were agreeable with those previously reported from SSR markers, including cluster of ancestral classification, genetic diversity estimates, genetic relatedness, and cluster of geographic origins. These results suggest that RGA markers are applicable for analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice. However, unlike SSR markers, the RGA markers failed to differentiate temperate japonica, tropical japonica, and aromatic subgroups. The restricted way for developing RGA markers from the cDNA sequence might limit the polymorphism of RGA markers in the genome, thus limiting the discriminatory power in comparison with SSR markers. Genetic differentiation obtained using RGA markers may be useful for defining genetic diversity of a suite of random R genes in plants, as many studies show a differentiation of resistance to a wide array of pathogens. They could also help to characterize the genetic structure and geographic distribution in crops, including rice, wheat, barley, and banana.

  10. A Parallel Genetic Algorithm to Discover Patterns in Genetic Markers that Indicate Predisposition to Multifactorial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Tobias; Thomas, Alun; Camp, Nicola J.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a novel algorithm to analyze genetic linkage data using pattern recognition techniques and genetic algorithms (GA). The method allows a search for regions of the chromosome that may contain genetic variations that jointly predispose individuals for a particular disease. The method uses correlation analysis, filtering theory and genetic algorithms (GA) to achieve this goal. Because current genome scans use from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of markers, two versions of the method have been implemented. The first is an exhaustive analysis version that can be used to visualize, explore, and analyze small genetic data sets for two marker correlations; the second is a GA version, which uses a parallel implementation allowing searches of higher-order correlations in large data sets. Results on simulated data sets indicate that the method can be informative in the identification of major disease loci and gene-gene interactions in genome-wide linkage data and that further exploration of these techniques is justified. The results presented for both variants of the method show that it can help genetic epidemiologists to identify promising combinations of genetic factors that might predispose to complex disorders. In particular, the correlation analysis of IBD expression patterns might hint to possible gene-gene interactions and the filtering might be a fruitful approach to distinguish true correlation signals from noise. PMID:18547558

  11. Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical management in cancer patients, assisting in diagnostic, staging, evaluation of therapeutic response, detection of recurrence and metastasis, and development of new treatment modalities. In this context, this review aims to discuss the main tumor markers in breast carcinogenesis. The most well-established breast molecular markers with prognostic and/or therapeutic value like hormone receptors, HER-2 oncogene, Ki-67, and p53 proteins, and the genes for hereditary breast cancer will be presented. Furthermore, this review shows the new molecular targets in breast cancer: CXCR4, caveolin, miRNA, and FOXP3, as promising candidates for future development of effective and targeted therapies, also with lower toxicity. PMID:24591761

  12. Variety discrimination in pea (Pisum sativum L.) by molecular, biochemical and morphological markers.

    PubMed

    Smykal, Peter; Horacek, Jiri; Dostalova, Radmila; Hybl, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    The distinctness, uniformity and stability (DUS) requirements involve expensive, space- and time-consuming measurements of morphological traits. Moreover, for a majority of traits, interactions between genotype and environment complicate the evaluation. Molecular markers have a potential to facilitate this procedure, increase the reliability of decisions, and substantially save the time and space needed for experiments. We chose 25 varieties of pea (Pisum sativum L.) from the list of recommended varieties for cultivation in the Czech Republic, and made both a standard classification by 12 morphological descriptors and a classification by biochemical-molecular markers. Two isozyme systems, 10 microsatellite loci, 2 retrotransposons for multilocus inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP), and 12 retrotransposon-based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) DNA markers were analysed. The main objective of the study was to examine the potential of each method for discrimination between pea varieties. The results demonstrate a high potential and resolving power of DNA-based methods. Superior in terms of high information content and discrimination power were SSR markers, owing to high allelic variation, which was the only biochemical-molecular method allowing clear identification of all varieties. Retrotransposon markers in RBIP format proved to be the most robust and easy to score method, while multilocus IRAP produced informative fingerprint already in a single analysis. Isozyme analysis offered a fast and less expensive alternative. The results showed that molecular identification could be used to assess distinctness and complement morphological assessment, especially in cases where the time frame plays an important role. Currently developed pea marker systems might serve also for germplasm management and genetic diversity studies.

  13. Potential role of genetic markers in the management of kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Junker, Kerstin; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Kwon, Eugene D; Leibovich, Bradley C; Thompson, R Houston; Oosterwijk, Egbert

    2013-02-01

    Kidney cancer is not a single entity but comprises a number of different types of cancer that occur in the kidney including renal cell tumours as the most common type. Four major renal cell tumour subtypes can be distinguished based on morphologic and genetic characteristics. To individualise therapy and to improve the prognosis in patients with renal cell tumours, accurate subtyping, definition of individual course of disease, and the prediction of therapy response are necessary. To discuss the potential role of genetic markers in the management of kidney cancer. A Medline search was conducted to identify original articles, review articles, and editorials addressing the role of genetic alterations in kidney cancer management. Keywords included kidney neoplasms, genetics, SNP, gene expression, miRNA, classification, diagnosis, drug therapy, prognosis, and therapy. The articles with the highest level of evidence were identified and critically reviewed. This review is the result of an interactive peer-reviewing process by an expert panel of co-authors. Each subtype is characterised by specific genetic, epigenetic, and expression patterns that potentially can be used to subclassify renal cell tumours in cases of ambivalent histopathology. Molecular signatures and single alterations in primary tumours are associated with aggressiveness and prognosis. Germline polymorphisms in specific genes encoding for metabolizing enzymes, efflux transporters, and drug targets seem to be associated with toxicity and response in patients receiving targeted therapy. Significant advances have been achieved in the molecular analysis of renal cancer. Validation of findings is greatly needed to implement genetic markers in the management of renal cancer. This should lead to improved diagnosis, prognosis, and personalised therapy in this heterogeneous disease. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of Molecular Markers for Catfish Production and Product Quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Channel catfish are a diploid species native to North America and the primary product of U.S. aquaculture, and molecular genetic research supports selective breeding of catfish for commercial production. To date, short tandem repeat loci have been used to characterize DNA sequence variation within ...

  15. Genetic diversity of a germplasm collection of Cucurbita pepo using SRAP and AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Ferriol, M; Picó, B; Nuez, F

    2003-07-01

    Cucurbita pepo is a highly polymorphic species. The cultivars can be grouped into eight morphotypes in two subspecies, ssp. pepo and ssp. ovifera. A collection of 69 accessions representative of the morphotypes and some unclassified types was used for analysing the morphological and molecular diversity of this species. This collection includes commercial cultivars and Spanish landraces, which represent the great diversification of types that have arisen in Europe after this species arrived from America. For the molecular variability studies, two PCR-based systems were employed, AFLP and SRAP, which preferentially amplify ORFs. Principal coordinates analysis and cluster analysis using the UPGMA method clearly separate the accessions into the two subspecies through the use of both markers. However, the gene diversity and the genetic identity values among morphotypes and subspecies varied between the two marker systems. The information given by SRAP markers was more concordant to the morphological variability and to the evolutionary history of the morphotypes than that of AFLP markers. In ssp. ovifera, the accessions of the different morphotypes were basically grouped according to the fruit colour. This may indicate different times of development and also the extent of breeding in the accessions used. This study has allowed identification of new types that can be employed for the development of new cultivars. The landraces of the spp. ovifera, used as ornamental in Europe, have proved to be of great interest for preserving the diversity of C. pepo.

  16. Molecular marker development from transcript sequences and germplasm evaluation for cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Peng, Ze; Gallo, Maria; Tillman, Barry L; Rowland, Diane; Wang, Jianping

    2016-02-01

    Molecular markers are important tools for genotyping in genetic studies and molecular breeding. The SSR and SNP are two commonly used marker systems developed from genomic or transcript sequences. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assemble and annotate the publicly available ESTs in Arachis and the in-house short reads, (2) develop and validate SSR and SNP markers, and (3) investigate the genetic diversity and population structure of the peanut breeding lines and the U.S. peanut mini core collection using developed SSR markers. An NCBI EST dataset with 252,951 sequences and an in-house 454 RNAseq dataset with 288,701 sequences were assembled separately after trimming. Transcript sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis suggested that peanut is closer to cowpea and scarlet bean than to soybean, common bean and Medicago. From these two datasets, 6455 novel SSRs and 11,902 SNPs were identified. Of the discovered SSRs, 380 representing various SSR types were selected for PCR validation. The amplification rate was 89.2 %. Twenty-two (6.5 %) SSRs were polymorphic between at least one pair of four genotypes. Sanger sequencing of PCR products targeting 110 SNPs revealed 13 true SNPs between tetraploid genotypes and 193 homoeologous SNPs within genotypes. Eight out of the 22 polymorphic SSR markers were selected to evaluate the genetic diversity of Florida peanut breeding lines and the U.S. peanut mini core collection. This marker set demonstrated high discrimination power by displaying an average polymorphism information content value of 0.783, a combined probability of identity of 10(-11), and a combined power of exclusion of 0.99991. The structure analysis revealed four sub-populations among the peanut accessions and lines evaluated. The results of this study enriched the peanut genomic resources, provided over 6000 novel SSR markers and the credentials for true peanut SNP marker development, and demonstrated the power of newly developed SSR markers in

  17. Population structure and genotypic variation of Crataegus pontica inferred by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Mohammad-Shafie; Shabanian, Naghi; Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah; Woeste, Keith E; Badakhshan, Hedieh; Alikhani, Leila

    2015-11-01

    Information about the natural patterns of genetic variability and their evolutionary bases are of fundamental practical importance for sustainable forest management and conservation. In the present study, the genetic diversity of 164 individuals from fourteen natural populations of Crataegus pontica K.Koch was assessed for the first time using three genome-based molecular techniques; inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP); inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism. IRAP, ISSR and SCoT analyses yielded 126, 254 and 199 scorable amplified bands, respectively, of which 90.48, 93.37 and 83.78% were polymorphic. ISSR revealed efficiency over IRAP and SCoT due to high effective multiplex ratio, marker index and resolving power. The dendrograms based on the markers used and combined data divided individuals into three major clusters. The correlation between the coefficient matrices for the IRAP, ISSR and SCoT data was significant. A higher level of genetic variation was observed within populations than among populations based on the markers used. The lower divergence levels depicted among the studied populations could be seen as evidence of gene flow. The promotion of gene exchange will be very beneficial to conserve and utilize the enormous genetic variability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Corylus mandshurica in China Using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Tian-Tian; Ma, Qing-Hua; Liang, Li-Song; Wang, Gui-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Corylus mandshurica, also known as pilose hazelnut, is an economically and ecologically important species in China. In this study, ten polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were applied to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of 348 C. mandshurica individuals among 12 populations in China. The SSR markers expressed a relatively high level of genetic diversity (Na = 15.3, Ne = 5.6604, I = 1.8853, Ho = 0.6668, and He = 0.7777). According to the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.1215), genetic variation within the populations (87.85%) were remarkably higher than among populations (12.15%). The average gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) significantly impacts the genetic structure of C. mandshurica populations. The relatively high gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) among wild C. mandshurica may be caused by wind-pollinated flowers, highly nutritious seeds and self-incompatible mating system. The UPGMA (unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages) dendrogram was divided into two main clusters. Moreover, the results of STRUCTURE analysis suggested that C. mandshurica populations fell into two main clusters. Comparison of the UPGMA dendrogram and the Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed general agreement between the population subdivisions and the genetic relationships among populations of C. mandshurica. Group I accessions were located in Northeast China, while Group II accessions were in North China. It is worth noting that a number of genetically similar populations were located in the same geographic region. The results further showed that there was obvious genetic differentiation among populations from Northeast China to North China. Results from the Mantel test showed a weak but still significant positive correlation between Nei’s genetic distance and geographic distance (km) among populations (r = 0.419, P = 0.005), suggesting that genetic differentiation in the 12 C. mandshurica populations might be related to geographic distance

  19. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Corylus mandshurica in China Using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Tian-Tian; Ma, Qing-Hua; Liang, Li-Song; Wang, Gui-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Corylus mandshurica, also known as pilose hazelnut, is an economically and ecologically important species in China. In this study, ten polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were applied to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of 348 C. mandshurica individuals among 12 populations in China. The SSR markers expressed a relatively high level of genetic diversity (Na = 15.3, Ne = 5.6604, I = 1.8853, Ho = 0.6668, and He = 0.7777). According to the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.1215), genetic variation within the populations (87.85%) were remarkably higher than among populations (12.15%). The average gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) significantly impacts the genetic structure of C. mandshurica populations. The relatively high gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) among wild C. mandshurica may be caused by wind-pollinated flowers, highly nutritious seeds and self-incompatible mating system. The UPGMA (unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages) dendrogram was divided into two main clusters. Moreover, the results of STRUCTURE analysis suggested that C. mandshurica populations fell into two main clusters. Comparison of the UPGMA dendrogram and the Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed general agreement between the population subdivisions and the genetic relationships among populations of C. mandshurica. Group I accessions were located in Northeast China, while Group II accessions were in North China. It is worth noting that a number of genetically similar populations were located in the same geographic region. The results further showed that there was obvious genetic differentiation among populations from Northeast China to North China. Results from the Mantel test showed a weak but still significant positive correlation between Nei's genetic distance and geographic distance (km) among populations (r = 0.419, P = 0.005), suggesting that genetic differentiation in the 12 C. mandshurica populations might be related to geographic distance. These

  20. Association of susceptible genetic markers and autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vasanth Konda; Ganesan, Nalini; Gopalakrishnan, Rajasekhar

    2014-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology resulting in inflammation of the synovium, cartilage and bone. The disease has a heterogeneous character, consisting of clinical subsets of anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive and APCA-negative disease. Although, the pathogenesis of RA is incompletely understood, genetic factors play a vital role in susceptibility to RA as the heritability of RA is between 50 and 60%, with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus accounting for at least 30% of overall genetic risk. Non-HLA genes, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) within the MHC (major histocompatibility complex) have also been investigated for association with RA. Although, some contradictory results have originated from several studies on TNF-α gene, the data published so far indicate the possible existence of TNF-α gene promoter variants that act as markers for disease severity and response to treatment in RA. The correlation of HLA and non-HLA genes within MHC region is apparently interpreted. A considerable number of confirmed associations with RA and other autoimmune disease susceptibility loci including peptidylarginine deiminase type 4 (PADI4), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT4), cluster of differentiation 244 (CD244) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4), located outside the MHC have been reported recently. In this review, we aim to give an update on recent progress in RA genetics, the importance of the combination of HLA-DRB1 alleles, non-HLA gene polymorphism, its detection and autoantibodies as susceptibility markers for early RA disease.

  1. Toward diagnostic and phenotype markers for genetically transmitted speech delay.

    PubMed

    Shriberg, Lawrence D; Lewis, Barbara A; Tomblin, J Bruce; McSweeny, Jane L; Karlsson, Heather B; Scheer, Alison R

    2005-08-01

    Converging evidence supports the hypothesis that the most common subtype of childhood speech sound disorder (SSD) of currently unknown origin is genetically transmitted. We report the first findings toward a set of diagnostic markers to differentiate this proposed etiological subtype (provisionally termed speech delay-genetic) from other proposed subtypes of SSD of unknown origin. Conversational speech samples from 72 preschool children with speech delay of unknown origin from 3 research centers were selected from an audio archive. Participants differed on the number of biological, nuclear family members (0 or 2+) classified as positive for current and/or prior speech-language disorder. Although participants in the 2 groups were found to have similar speech competence, as indexed by their Percentage of Consonants Correct scores, their speech error patterns differed significantly in 3 ways. Compared with children who may have reduced genetic load for speech delay (no affected nuclear family members), children with possibly higher genetic load (2+ affected members) had (a) a significantly higher proportion of relative omission errors on the Late-8 consonants; (b) a significantly lower proportion of relative distortion errors on these consonants, particularly on the sibilant fricatives /s/, /z/, and //; and (c) a significantly lower proportion of backed /s/ distortions, as assessed by both perceptual and acoustic methods. Machine learning routines identified a 3-part classification rule that included differential weightings of these variables. The classification rule had diagnostic accuracy value of 0.83 (95% confidence limits = 0.74-0.92), with positive and negative likelihood ratios of 9.6 (95% confidence limits = 3.1-29.9) and 0.40 (95% confidence limits = 0.24-0.68), respectively. The diagnostic accuracy findings are viewed as promising. The error pattern for this proposed subtype of SSD is viewed as consistent with the cognitive-linguistic processing deficits

  2. Plasmodium falciparum kelch 13: a potential molecular marker for tackling artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Mita, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Shin-Ichiro; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirai, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Although artemisinin combination therapies have been deployed as a first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in almost all endemic countries, artemisinin-resistant parasites have emerged and have gradually spread across the Greater Mekong subregions. There is growing concern that the resistant parasites may migrate to or emerge indigenously in sub-Saharan Africa, which might provoke a global increase in malaria-associated morbidity and mortality. Therefore, development of molecular markers that enable identification of artemisinin resistance with high sensitivity is urgently required to combat this issue. In 2014, a potential artemisinin-resistance responsible gene, Plasmodium falciparum kelch13, was discovered. Here, we review the genetic features of P. falciparum kelch13 and discuss its related resistant mechanisms and potential as a molecular marker.

  3. Identification of genetic markers linked to anthracnose resistance in sorghum using association analysis.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Hari D; Wang, Yi-Hong; Sharma, Rajan; Sharma, Shivali

    2013-06-01

    Anthracnose in sorghum caused by Colletotrichum sublineolum is one of the most destructive diseases affecting sorghum production under warm and humid conditions. Markers and genes linked to resistance to the disease are important for plant breeding. Using 14,739 SNP markers, we have mapped eight loci linked to resistance in sorghum through association analysis of a sorghum mini-core collection consisting of 242 diverse accessions evaluated for anthracnose resistance for 2 years in the field. The mini-core was representative of the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics' world-wide sorghum landrace collection. Eight marker loci were associated with anthracnose resistance in both years. Except locus 8, disease resistance-related genes were found in all loci based on their physical distance from linked SNP markers. These include two NB-ARC class of R genes on chromosome 10 that were partially homologous to the rice blast resistance gene Pib, two hypersensitive response-related genes: autophagy-related protein 3 on chromosome 1 and 4 harpin-induced 1 (Hin1) homologs on chromosome 8, a RAV transcription factor that is also part of R gene pathway, an oxysterol-binding protein that functions in the non-specific host resistance, and homologs of menthone:neomenthol reductase (MNR) that catalyzes a menthone reduction to produce the antimicrobial neomenthol. These genes and markers may be developed into molecular tools for genetic improvement of anthracnose resistance in sorghum.

  4. Teaching molecular genetics: chapter 4—positional cloning of genetic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Puliti, Aldamaria; Caridi, Gianluca; Ravazzolo, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Positional cloning is the approach of choice for the identification of genetic mutations underlying the pathological development of diseases with simple Mendelian inheritance. It consists of different consecutive steps, starting with recruitment of patients and DNA collection, that are critical to the overall process. A genetic analysis of the enrolled patients and their families is performed, based on genetic recombination frequencies generated by meiotic cross-overs and on genome-wide molecular studies, to define a critical DNA region of interest. This analysis culminates in a statistical estimate of the probability that disease features may segregate in the families independently or in association with specific molecular markers located in known regions. In this latter case, a marker can be defined as being linked to the disease manifestations. The genetic markers define an interval that is a function of their recombination frequencies with the disease, in which the disease gene is localised. The identification and characterisation of chromosome abnormalities as translocations, deletions and duplications by classical cytogenetic methods or by the newly developed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) technique may define extensions and borders of the genomic regions involved. The step following the definition of a critical genomic region is the identification of candidate genes that is based on the analysis of available databases from genome browsers. Positional cloning culminates in the identification of the causative gene mutation, and the definition of its functional role in the pathogenesis of the disorder, by the use of cell-based or animal-based experiments. More often, positional cloning ends with the generation of mice with homologous mutations reproducing the human clinical phenotype. Altogether, positional cloning has represented a fundamental step in the research on genetic renal disorders, leading to the definition of several

  5. Book: Genetics for obstetricians and gynaecologists: Chapter: Genetic markers on ultrasound scan.

    PubMed

    Sivanathan, Janani; Thilaganathan, Basky

    2017-07-01

    Prenatal diagnosis is a rapidly evolving speciality. Screening for aneuploidy begins with non-sonographic features of background risk of maternal age and past and family history. It is possible to diagnose major structural defects in the foetus using second trimester scans. Serum biochemistry markers in the early second trimester were added to increase the detection rate of aneuploidy. However, as some of these abnormalities were amenable to detection earlier in the first trimester, newer modalities were introduced. Nuchal translucency (NT) measurement was one of the main advances with regard to first trimester screening. Additional markers such as the presence of nasal bone, tricuspid regurgitation, ductus venosus and megacystis; together with first trimester serum biochemistry, further enhanced the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities. Advances in research and technology have resulted in the availability of non-invasive prenatal testing from 10 weeks of gestation. This has facilitated the detection of the three major chromosomal aneuploidies at very early gestation. However, there are a wide range of genetic syndromes that are not confined to the main trisomies. There are specific markers on ultrasound that can be linked to specific syndromes. Hence, a structured and stepwise approach is needed to identify and reach a possible diagnosis. As anomalies are classified into malformations, deformations and disruptions, it is important to note that not all markers detected are due to genetic syndromes and not all genetic syndromes can be detected on ultrasound scan. In this chapter, we outline common structural markers and their association with main genetic syndromes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Traditional Approaches to Molecular Genetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher J; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    Molecular studies of endometrial cancer have evolved with the tools available to researchers: the methods for measuring nucleic acids, protein expression, and combinations thereof. Today "molecular genetic analysis" implies a broad range of indirect and direct tests that yield molecular phenotypes or genotypes, immunotypes, or signatures that were not conceived of when the histologic and biologic heterogeneity was first fully acknowledged.We will provide a historical perspective on molecular genetic studies of endometrial cancers focusing on candidate genes and how early foundational research shaped both our understanding of the disease and current research directions. Examples of direct tests (mutation, DNA methylation, and/or protein expression) will be provided along with examples of indirect tests that have been and continue to be central to endometrial cancer molecular biology, such as DNA content or microsatellite instability analysis. We will highlight clinically relevant examples of molecular phenotyping and direct evaluation of candidate genes that integrate direct and indirect testing as part of routine patient care. This is not intended to be an exhaustive review but rather an overview of the progress that has been made and how early work is shaping current molecular, clinical, and biologic studies of endometrial cancer.

  7. Comparative transcriptomics uncovers alternative splicing and molecular marker development in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaobo; Xu, Liang; Liang, Dongyi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Xianwen; Zhu, Yuelin; Jiang, Haiyan; Tang, Mingjia; Liu, Liwang

    2017-07-03

    Alternative splicing (AS) plays important roles in gene expression and proteome diversity. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and insertion/deletion (InDel) are abundant polymorphisms and co-dominant inheritance markers, which have been widely used in germplasm identification, genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection in plants. So far, however, little information is available on utilization of AS events and development of SNP and InDel markers from transcriptome in radish. In this study, three radish transcriptome datasets were collected and aligned to the reference radish genome. A total of 56,530 AS events were identified from three radish genotypes with intron retention (IR) being the most frequent AS type, which accounted for 59.4% of the total expressed genes in radish. In all, 22,412 SNPs and 9436 InDels were identified with an average frequency of 1 SNP/17.9 kb and 1 InDel/42.5 kb, respectively. A total of 43,680 potential SSRs were identified in 31,604 assembled unigenes with a density of 1 SSR/2.5 kb. The ratio of SNPs with nonsynonymous/synonymous mutations was 1.05:1. Moreover, 35 SNPs and 200 InDels were randomly selected and validated by Sanger sequencing, 83.9% of the SNPs and 70% of the InDels exhibited polymorphism among these three genotypes. In addition, the 15 SNPs and 125 InDels were found to be unevenly distributed on 9 linkage groups. Furthermore, 40 informative InDel markers were successfully used for the genetic diversity analysis on 32 radish accessions. These results would not only provide new insights into transcriptome complexity and AS regulation, but also furnish large amount of molecular marker resources for germplasm identification, genetic mapping and further genetic improvement of radish in breeding programs.

  8. Molecular genetics of dyslexia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Carrion-Castillo, Amaia; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E

    2013-11-01

    Dyslexia is a highly heritable learning disorder with a complex underlying genetic architecture. Over the past decade, researchers have pinpointed a number of candidate genes that may contribute to dyslexia susceptibility. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art, describing how studies have moved from mapping potential risk loci, through identification of associated gene variants, to characterization of gene function in cellular and animal model systems. Work thus far has highlighted some intriguing mechanistic pathways, such as neuronal migration, axon guidance, and ciliary biology, but it is clear that we still have much to learn about the molecular networks that are involved. We end the review by highlighting the past, present, and future contributions of the Dutch Dyslexia Programme to studies of genetic factors. In particular, we emphasize the importance of relating genetic information to intermediate neurobiological measures, as well as the value of incorporating longitudinal and developmental data into molecular designs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Genetic Differences in Hemoglobin as Markers for Bone Marrow Transplantation in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1959-03-01

    derived. Thus, genetic differences in hemoglobin can be used as markers for bone marrow transplantation in irradiated mice. Hemoglobin typing may be particularly useful where the H-2 markers cannot be used.

  10. Identifying the genetic diversity, genetic structure and a core collection of Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. jujuba accessions using microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chaoqun; Gao, Jiao; Du, Zengfeng; Li, Dengke; Wang, Zhe; Li, Yingyue; Pang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Ziziphus is a genus of spiny shrubs and small trees in the Rhamnaceae family. This group has a controversial taxonomy, with more than 200 species described, including Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. jujuba) and Indian jujube (Z. mauritiana), as well as several other important cultivated fruit crops. Using 24 SSR markers distributed across the Chinese jujube genome, 962 jujube accessions from the two largest germplasm repositories were genotyped with the aim of analyzing the genetic diversity and structure and constructing a core collection that retain high genetic diversity. A molecular profile comparison revealed 622 unique genotypes, among which 123 genotypes were genetically identical to at least one other accessions. STRUCTURE analysis and multivariate analyses (Cluster and PCoA) roughly divided the accessions into three major groups, with some admixture among groups. A simulated annealing algorithm and a heuristic algorithm were chosen to construct the core collection. A final core of 150 accessions was selected, comprising 15.6% of the analyzed accessions and retaining more than 99.5% of the total alleles detected. We found no significant differences in allele frequency distributions or in genetic diversity parameters between the chosen core accessions and the 622 genetically unique accessions. This work contributes to the understanding of Chinese jujube diversification and the protection of important germplasm resources. PMID:27531220

  11. Genetic diversity and genetic structure of consecutive breeding generations of golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Luo, X N; Yang, M; Liang, X F; Jin, K; Lv, L Y; Tian, C X; Yuan, Y C; Sun, J

    2015-09-25

    In this study, 12 polymorphic microsatellites were inves-tigated to determine the genetic diversity and structure of 5 consecu-tive selected populations of golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner). The total numbers of alleles, average heterozyosity, and average polymorphism information content showed that the genetic diversity of these breeding populations was decreasing. Additionally, pairwise fixation index FST values among populations and Da values in-creased from F1 generation to subsequent generations (FST values from 0.0221-0.1408; Da values from 0.0608-0.1951). Analysis of molecular variance indicated that most genetic variations arise from individuals within populations (about 92.05%), while variation among populations accounted for only 7.95%. The allele frequency of the loci SC75-220 and SC101-222 bp changed regularly in the 5 breeding generations. Their frequencies were gradually increased and showed an enrichment trend, indicating that there may be genetic correlations between these 2 loci and breeding traits. Our study indicated that microsatellite markers are effective for assessing the genetic variability in the golden mandarin fish breeding program.

  12. Congruent climate-related genecological responses from molecular markers and quantitative traits for western white pine (Pinus monticola)

    Treesearch

    Bryce A. Richardson; Gerald E. Rehfeldt; Mee-Sook Kim

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of molecular and quantitative genetic data demonstrate the existence of congruent climate-related patterns in western white pine (Pinus monticola). Two independent studies allowed comparisons of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers with quantitative variation in adaptive traits. Principal component analyses...

  13. A sex-averaged genetic linkage map in coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb] Franco var menziesii) based on RFLP and RAPD markers

    Treesearch

    K.D. Jermstad; D.L. Bassoni; N.C. Wheeler; D.B. Neale

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed a sex-averaged genetic linkage map in coastal Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco var menziesii) using a three-generation outcrossed pedigree and molecular markers. Our research objectives are to learn about genome organization and to identify markers associated with adaptive traits. The map...

  14. Universality and predictability in molecular quantitative genetics.

    PubMed

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Held, Torsten; Lässig, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Molecular traits, such as gene expression levels or protein binding affinities, are increasingly accessible to quantitative measurement by modern high-throughput techniques. Such traits measure molecular functions and, from an evolutionary point of view, are important as targets of natural selection. We review recent developments in evolutionary theory and experiments that are expected to become building blocks of a quantitative genetics of molecular traits. We focus on universal evolutionary characteristics: these are largely independent of a trait's genetic basis, which is often at least partially unknown. We show that universal measurements can be used to infer selection on a quantitative trait, which determines its evolutionary mode of conservation or adaptation. Furthermore, universality is closely linked to predictability of trait evolution across lineages. We argue that universal trait statistics extends over a range of cellular scales and opens new avenues of quantitative evolutionary systems biology.

  15. Distribution of genetic markers of fecal pollution on a freshwater sandy shoreline in proximity to wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Eichmiller, Jessica J; Hicks, Randall E; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2013-04-02

    Water, sand, and sediment from a Lake Superior harbor site continuously receiving wastewater effluent was sampled monthly for June to October 2010 and from May to September 2011. Understanding the dynamics of genetic markers of fecal bacteria in these matrices is essential to accurately characterizing health risks. Genetic markers for enterococci, total Bacteroides, and human-associated Bacteroides were measured in site-water, sand, and sediment and in final effluent by quantitative PCR. The similarity between the quantity of molecular markers in the water column and effluent indicated that the abundance of genetic markers in the water column was likely controlled by effluent inputs. Effluent turbidity was positively correlated (p ≤ 0.05) with AllBac and HF183 in final effluent and AllBac in the water column. In sand and sediment, Entero1 and AllBac were most abundant in the upper 1-3 cm depths, whereas HF183 was most abundant in the upper 1 cm of sand and at 7 cm in sediment. The AllBac and Entero1 markers were 1- and 2-orders of magnitude more abundant in sand and sediment relative to the water column per unit mass. These results indicate that sand and sediment may act as reservoirs for genetic markers of fecal pollution at some freshwater sites.

  16. Integrating evolutionary and molecular genetics of aging.

    PubMed

    Flatt, Thomas; Schmidt, Paul S

    2009-10-01

    Aging or senescence is an age-dependent decline in physiological function, demographically manifest as decreased survival and fecundity with increasing age. Since aging is disadvantageous it should not evolve by natural selection. So why do organisms age and die? In the 1940s and 1950s evolutionary geneticists resolved this paradox by positing that aging evolves because selection is inefficient at maintaining function late in life. By the 1980s and 1990s this evolutionary theory of aging had received firm empirical support, but little was known about the mechanisms of aging. Around the same time biologists began to apply the tools of molecular genetics to aging and successfully identified mutations that affect longevity. Today, the molecular genetics of aging is a burgeoning field, but progress in evolutionary genetics of aging has largely stalled. Here we argue that some of the most exciting and unresolved questions about aging require an integration of molecular and evolutionary approaches. Is aging a universal process? Why do species age at different rates? Are the mechanisms of aging conserved or lineage-specific? Are longevity genes identified in the laboratory under selection in natural populations? What is the genetic basis of plasticity in aging in response to environmental cues and is this plasticity adaptive? What are the mechanisms underlying trade-offs between early fitness traits and life span? To answer these questions evolutionary biologists must adopt the tools of molecular biology, while molecular biologists must put their experiments into an evolutionary framework. The time is ripe for a synthesis of molecular biogerontology and the evolutionary biology of aging.

  17. A new nuclear DNA marker from ubiquitin ligase gene region for genetic diversity detection of walnut germplasm resources.

    PubMed

    Suo, Zhili; Chen, Lingna; Pei, Dong; Jin, Xiaobai; Zhang, Huijin

    2015-03-01

    Development of more sensitive nuclear DNA markers for identification of species, particularly closely allied taxa has been a challenging task that has attracted interest from scientists in fields of biotechnological development and genetic diversity detection. In this study, the sequence of the ubiquitin ligase gene (UBE3) region of nuclear DNA was tested for applicability and efficacy in revealing genetic diversity of walnut resources, with an emphasis on inter- and intra-specific levels. Analysis on genetic relationship among the taxa was conducted with the neighbor-joining (NJ) method. The number of variable bases in the UBE3 region was 20 sites. All nine taxa (species/variety/cultivars) were distinguished using the UBE3 sequence. In addition, each taxon was characterized molecularly with a unique nucleotide molecular formula using ten variable base sites derived from the nuclear DNA UBE3 gene sequence. This study presents a good complementary methodology for developing new DNA markers for identification of genus Juglans.

  18. Genetic maps of SSR and SRAP markers in diploid orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) using the pseudo-testcross strategy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wengang; Zhang, Xinquan; Cai, Hongwei; Huang, Linkai; Peng, Yan; Ma, Xiao

    2011-03-01

    Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) is one of the most important cool-season forage grasses commonly grown throughout the temperate regions of the world. The objective of this work was to construct a diploid (2n = 2x = 14) orchardgrass genetic linkage map useful as a framework for basic genetic studies and plant breeding. A combination of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular markers were used for map construction. The linkage relationships among 164 SSRs and 108 SRAPs, assayed in a pseudo-testcross F1 segregating population generated from a cross between two diploid parents, were used to construct male (01996) and female (YA02-103) parental genetic maps. The paternal genetic map contains 90 markers (57 SSRs and 33 SRAPs) over 9 linkage groups (LGs), and the maternal genetic map is composed of 87 markers (54 SSRs and 33 SRAPs) assembled over 10 LGs. The total map distance of the male map is 866.7 centimorgans (cM), representing 81% genome coverage, whereas the female map spans 772.0 cM, representing 75% coverage. The mean map distance between markers is 9.6 cM in the male map and 8.9 cM in the female map. About 14% of the markers remained unassigned. The level of segregation distortion observed in this cross was 15%. Homology between the two maps was established between five LGs of the male map and five LGs of the female map using 10 bridging markers. The information presented in this study establishes a foundation for extending genetic mapping in this species, serves as a framework for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs), and provides basic information for future molecular breeding studies.

  19. Genetic characterization of an elite coffee germplasm assessed by gSSR and EST-SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Missio, R F; Caixeta, E T; Zambolim, E M; Pena, G F; Zambolim, L; Dias, L A S; Sakiyama, N S

    2011-10-06

    Coffee is one of the main agrifood commodities traded worldwide. In 2009, coffee accounted for 6.1% of the value of Brazilian agricultural production, generating a revenue of US$6 billion. Despite the importance of coffee production in Brazil, it is supported by a narrow genetic base, with few accessions. Molecular differentiation and diversity of a coffee breeding program were assessed with gSSR and EST-SSR markers. The study comprised 24 coffee accessions according to their genetic origin: arabica accessions (six traditional genotypes of C. arabica), resistant arabica (six leaf rust-resistant C. arabica genotypes with introgression of Híbrido de Timor), robusta (five C. canephora genotypes), Híbrido de Timor (three C. arabica x C. canephora), triploids (three C. arabica x C. racemosa), and racemosa (one C. racemosa). Allele and polymorphism analysis, AMOVA, the Student t-test, Jaccard's dissimilarity coefficient, cluster analysis, correlation of genetic distances, and discriminant analysis, were performed. EST-SSR markers gave 25 exclusive alleles per genetic group, while gSSR showed 47, which will be useful for differentiating accessions and for fingerprinting varieties. The gSSR markers detected a higher percentage of polymorphism among (35% higher on average) and within (42.9% higher on average) the genetic groups, compared to EST-SSR markers. The highest percentage of polymorphism within the genetic groups was found with gSSR markers for robusta (89.2%) and for resistant arabica (39.5%). It was possible to differentiate all genotypes including the arabica-related accessions. Nevertheless, combined use of gSSR and EST-SSR markers is recommended for coffee molecular characterization, because EST-SSRs can provide complementary information.

  20. Evaluation of Pakistan wheat germplasms for stripe rust resistance using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Sobia, Tabassum; Muhammad, Ashraf; Chen, XianMing

    2010-09-01

    Wheat production in Pakistan is seriously constrained due to rust diseases and stripe rust (yellow) caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, which could limit yields. Thus development and cultivation of genetically diverse and resistant varieties is the most sustainable solution to overcome these diseases. The first objective of the present study was to evaluate 100 Pakistan wheat cultivars that have been grown over the past 60 years. These cultivars were inoculated at the seedling stage with two virulent stripe rust isolates from the United States and two from Pakistan. None of the wheat cultivars were resistant to all tested stripe rust isolates, and 16% of cultivars were susceptible to the four isolates at the seedling stage. The data indicated that none of the Pakistan wheat cultivars contained either Yr5 or Yr15 genes that were considered to be effective against most P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates from around the world. Several Pakistan wheat cultivars may have gene Yr10, which is effective against isolate PST-127 but ineffective against PST-116. It is also possible that these cultivars may have other previously unidentified genes or gene combinations. The second objective was to evaluate the 100 Pakistan wheat cultivars for stripe rust resistance during natural epidemics in Pakistan and Washington State, USA. It was found that a higher frequency of resistance was present under field conditions compared with greenhouse conditions. Thirty genotypes (30% of germplasms) were found to have a potentially high temperature adult plant (HTAP) resistance. The third objective was to determine the genetic diversity in Pakistan wheat germplasms using molecular markers. This study was based on DNA fingerprinting using resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) marker analysis. The highest polymorphism detected with RGAP primer pairs was 40%, 50% and 57% with a mean polymorphism of 36%. A total of 22 RGAP markers were obtained in this study. RGAP, simple

  1. Genetic markers of comorbid depression and alcoholism in women.

    PubMed

    Procopio, Daniela O; Saba, Laura M; Walter, Henriette; Lesch, Otto; Skala, Katrin; Schlaff, Golda; Vanderlinden, Lauren; Clapp, Peter; Hoffman, Paula L; Tabakoff, Boris

    2013-06-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is often accompanied by comorbid depression. Recent clinical evidence supports the benefit of subtype-specific pharmacotherapy in treating the population of alcohol-dependent subjects with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD). However, in many alcohol-dependent subjects, depression is a reactive response to chronic alcohol use and withdrawal and abates with a period of abstinence. Genetic markers may distinguish alcohol-dependent subjects with MDD not tied chronologically and etiologically to their alcohol consumption. In this work, we investigated the association of adenylyl cyclase genes (ADCY1-9), which are implicated in both AD and mood disorders, with alcoholism and comorbid depression. Subjects from Vienna, Austria (n = 323) were genotyped, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (1,152) encompassing the genetic locations of the 9 ADCY genes were examined. The Vienna cohort contained alcohol-dependent subjects differentiated using the Lesch Alcoholism Typology. In this typology, subjects are segregated into 4 types. Type III alcoholism is distinguished by co-occurrence of symptoms of depression and by affecting predominantly females. We identified 4 haplotypes associated with the phenotype of Type III alcoholism in females. One haplotype was in a genomic area in proximity to ADCY2, but actually within a lincRNA gene, 2 haplotypes were within ADCY5, and 1 haplotype was within the coding region of ADCY8. Three of the 4 haplotypes contributed independently to Type III alcoholism and together generated a positive predictive value of 72% and a negative predictive value of 78% for distinguishing women with a Lesch Type III diagnosis versus women designated as Type I or II alcoholics. Polymorphisms in ADCY8 and ADCY5 and within a lincRNA are associated with an alcohol-dependent phenotype in females, which is distinguished by comorbid signs of depression. Each of these genetic locations can rationally contribute to the polygenic etiology of

  2. Mismatches in genetic markers in a large family study.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, G C

    1980-01-01

    The Hawaii Family Study of Cognition provided an opportunity to investigate the frequency and implications of non-agreement, or mismatches, between observed and expected genetic marker phenotypes of husbands, wives, and children. Mismatch data from 68 families in which one or both spouses were known not to be a biological parent were used to determine the rate of undeclared nonparentage in 1,748 families in which conventional relationships were claimed. Two independent approaches gave consistent estimates, suggesting that approximately 2.3% of the 2,839 tested children from these families were probably the result of infidelity, concealed adoption, or another event. About two-thirds of the mismatches detected were probably due to properties of the techniques employed. PMID:6930820

  3. Reconciling patterns of inter-ocean molecular variance from four classes of molecular markers in blue marlin (Makaira nigricans).

    PubMed

    Buonaccorsi, V P; McDowell, J R; Graves, J E

    2001-05-01

    Different classes of molecular markers occasionally yield discordant views of population structure within a species. Here, we examine the distribution of molecular variance from 14 polymorphic loci comprising four classes of molecular markers within approximately 400 blue marlin individuals (Makaira nigricans). Samples were collected from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans over 5 years. Data from five hypervariable tetranucleotide microsatellite loci and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of whole molecule mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were reported and compared with previous analyses of allozyme and single-copy nuclear DNA (scnDNA) loci. Temporal variance in allele frequencies was nonsignificant in nearly all cases. Mitochondrial and microsatellite loci revealed striking phylogeographic partitioning among Atlantic and Pacific Ocean samples. A large cluster of alleles was present almost exclusively in Atlantic individuals at one microsatellite locus and for mtDNA, suggesting that, if gene flow occurs, it is likely to be unidirectional from Pacific to Atlantic oceans. Mitochondrial DNA inter-ocean divergence (FST) was almost four times greater than microsatellite or combined nuclear divergences including allozyme and scnDNA markers. Estimates of Neu varied by five orders of magnitude among marker classes. Using mathematical and computer simulation approaches, we show that substantially different distributions of FST are expected from marker classes that differ in mode of inheritance and rate of mutation, without influence of natural selection or sex-biased dispersal. Furthermore, divergent FST values can be reconciled by quantifying the balance between genetic drift, mutation and migration. These results illustrate the usefulness of a mitochondrial analysis of population history, and relative precision of nuclear estimates of gene flow based on a mean of several loci.

  4. The Promise of Novel Molecular Markers in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miremami, Jahan; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the US and is associated with the highest cost per patient. A high likelihood of recurrence, mandating stringent surveillance protocols, has made the development of urinary markers a focus of intense pursuit with the hope of decreasing the burden this disease places on patients and the healthcare system. To date, routine use of markers is not recommended for screening or diagnosis. Interests include the development of a single urinary marker that can be used in place of or as an adjunct to current screening and surveillance techniques, as well identifying a molecular signature for an individual’s disease that can help predict progression, prognosis, and potential therapeutic response. Markers have shown potential value in improving diagnostic accuracy when used as an adjunct to current modalities, risk-stratification of patients that could aid the clinician in determining aggressiveness of surveillance, and allowing for a decrease in invasive surveillance procedures. This review discusses the current understanding of emerging biomarkers, including miRNAs, gene signatures and detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood, and their potential clinical value in bladder cancer diagnosis, as prognostic indicators, and surveillance tools, as well as limitations to their incorporation into medical practice. PMID:25535079

  5. Genetic diversity of bovine Neospora caninum determined by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Salehi, N; Gottstein, B; Haddadzadeh, H R

    2015-10-01

    Neospora caninum is one of the most significant parasitic organisms causing bovine abortion worldwide. Despite the economic impact of this infection, relatively little is known about the genetic diversity of this parasite. In this study, using Nc5 and ITS1 nested PCR, N. caninum has been detected in 12 brain samples of aborted fetuses from 298 seropositive dairy cattle collected from four different regions in Tehran, Iran. These specimen (Nc-Iran) were genotyped in multilocus using 9 different microsatellite markers previously described (MS4, MS5, MS6A, MS6B, MS7, MS8, MS10, MS12 and MS21). Microsatellite amplification was completely feasible in 2 samples, semi-completely in 8 samples, and failed in 2 samples. Within the two completely performed allelic profiles of Nc-Iran strains, unique multilocus profiles were obtained for both and novel allelic patterns were found in the MS8 and MS10 microsatellite markers. The Jaccard's similarity index showed significant difference between these two strains and from other standard isolates derived from GenBank such as Nc-Liv, Nc-SweB1, Nc-GER1, KBA1, and KBA2. All samples originating from the same area showed identical allelic numbers and a correlation between the number of repeats and geographic districts was observed.

  6. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies.

  7. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies. PMID:26558925

  8. DNA-Based Genetic Markers for Rapid Cycling Brassica Rapa (Fast Plants Type) Designed for the Teaching Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Slankster, Eryn E; Chase, Jillian M; Jones, Lauren A; Wendell, Douglas L

    2012-01-01

    We have developed DNA-based genetic markers for rapid cycling Brassica rapa (RCBr), also known as Fast Plants. Although markers for B. rapa already exist, ours were intentionally designed for use in a teaching laboratory environment. The qualities we selected for were robust amplification in PCR, polymorphism in RCBr strains, and alleles that can be easily resolved in simple agarose slab gels. We have developed two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based markers and 14 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)-type markers spread over four chromosomes. The DNA sequences of these markers represent variation in a wide range of genomic features. Among the VNTR-type markers, there are examples of variation in a non-genic region, variation within an intron, and variation in the coding sequence of a gene. Among the SNP-based markers there are examples of polymorphism in intronic DNA and synonymous substitution in a coding sequence. Thus these markers can serve laboratory exercises in both transmission genetics and molecular biology.

  9. DNA-Based Genetic Markers for Rapid Cycling Brassica Rapa (Fast Plants Type) Designed for the Teaching Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Slankster, Eryn E.; Chase, Jillian M.; Jones, Lauren A.; Wendell, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed DNA-based genetic markers for rapid cycling Brassica rapa (RCBr), also known as Fast Plants. Although markers for B. rapa already exist, ours were intentionally designed for use in a teaching laboratory environment. The qualities we selected for were robust amplification in PCR, polymorphism in RCBr strains, and alleles that can be easily resolved in simple agarose slab gels. We have developed two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based markers and 14 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)-type markers spread over four chromosomes. The DNA sequences of these markers represent variation in a wide range of genomic features. Among the VNTR-type markers, there are examples of variation in a non-genic region, variation within an intron, and variation in the coding sequence of a gene. Among the SNP-based markers there are examples of polymorphism in intronic DNA and synonymous substitution in a coding sequence. Thus these markers can serve laboratory exercises in both transmission genetics and molecular biology. PMID:22675329

  10. Determinant molecular markers for peri-gastrulating bovine embryo development.

    PubMed

    Hue, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Peri-gastrulation defines the time frame between blastocyst formation and implantation that also corresponds in cattle to elongation, pregnancy recognition and uterine secretion. Optimally, this developmental window prepares the conceptus for implantation, placenta formation and fetal development. However, this is a highly sensitive period, as evidenced by the incidence of embryo loss or early post-implantation mortality after AI, embryo transfer or somatic cell nuclear transfer. Elongation markers have often been used within this time frame to assess developmental defects or delays, originating either from the embryo, the uterus or the dam. Comparatively, gastrulation markers have not received great attention, although elongation and gastrulation are linked by reciprocal interactions at the molecular and cellular levels. To make this clearer, this peri-gastrulating period is described herein with a focus on its main developmental landmarks, and the resilience of the landmarks in the face of biotechnologies is questioned.

  11. Molecular Genetic Manipulation of Vector Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Terenius, Olle; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Sieglaff, Douglas; James, Anthony A.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic strategies for reducing populations of vector mosquitoes or replacing them with those that are not able to transmit pathogens benefit greatly from molecular tools that allow gene manipulation and transgenesis. Mosquito genome sequences and associated EST (Expressed Sequence Tags) databases enable large-scale investigations to provide new insights into evolutionary, biochemical, genetic, metabolic and physiological pathways. Additionally, comparative genomics reveals the bases for evolutionary mechanisms with particular focus on specific interactions between vectors and pathogens. We discuss how this information may be exploited for the optimization of transgenes that interfere with the propagation and development of pathogens in their mosquito hosts. PMID:18996342

  12. A single molecular marker to distinguish between species of Dioscorea.

    PubMed

    Techen, Natascha; Parveen, Iffat; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-03-01

    Yams are species of the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae), which consists of approximately 630 species. The majority of the world production of yams occurs in Africa with 58.8 million t annually, but they are also produced in the Americas and Asia. The saponins in yams have been reported to possess various properties to improve health. The tuber and aerial parts of various species often share morphological similarities, which can cause problems in the proper identification of sample material. For example, the rootstocks and aerial parts of Dioscorea villosa L. share similarities with Dioscorea polystachia Turcz. Dioscorea bulbifera L. may be mistaken for Dioscorea alata L. owing to similar morphologies. Various molecular analyses have been published to help with the identification of species and varieties within the genus Dioscorea. The multi-loci or single-locus analysis has resulted in varying success, some with only a limited discrimination rate. In the present study, a single nuclear genomic region, biparentally inherited, was analyzed for its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification and discrimination between D. bulbifera, D. villosa, D. nipponica, D. alata, D. caucasica, and D. deltoidea samples. The results of this study show that the LFY genomic region can be useful as a molecular marker to distinguish between samples.

  13. Molecular genetic manipulation of mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J; Olson, K; Higgs, S; Beaty, B

    1995-01-01

    Despite their central role in disease transmission, relatively little is known of the molecular biology of arthropod vectors. Modern molecular approaches will undoubtedly provide considerable information about gene regulation and expression in vectors and consequently a much better understanding of the biology and molecular biology of vectors. Such knowledge is essential for developing effective control strategies for vector-borne diseases. In this review, we focus upon techniques and approaches used at the Arthropod-Borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory (AIDL) at Colorado State University to bioengineer mosquitoes with reduced vector competence. We have developed technologies and procedures that allow genetic manipulation of mosquitoes, including RNA and DNA virus gene-delivery vehicles and efficacious antiviral constructs, which will facilitate the development of pathogen-resistant, transformed mosquitoes. Many of the approaches, constructs, and technologies developed at AIDL will be applicable to molecular manipulation of other arthropod genomes.

  14. Detection of Variation in Long-Term Micropropagated Mature Pistachio via DNA-Based Molecular Markers.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Hülya; Suzerer, Veysel; Tilkat, Engin; Onay, Ahmet; Çiftçi, Yelda Ozden

    2016-12-01

    Determination of genetic stability of in vitro-grown plantlets is needed for safe and large-scale production of mature trees. In this study, genetic variation of long-term micropropagated mature pistachio developed through direct shoot bud regeneration using apical buds (protocol A) and in vitro-derived leaves (protocol B) was assessed via DNA-based molecular markers. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) were employed, and the obtained PIC values from RAPD (0.226), ISSR (0.220), and AFLP (0.241) showed that micropropagation of pistachio for different periods of time resulted in "reasonable polymorphism" among donor plant and its 18 clones. Mantel's test showed a consistence polymorphism level between marker systems based on similarity matrices. In conclusion, this is the first study on occurrence of genetic variability in long-term micropropagated mature pistachio plantlets. The obtained results clearly indicated that different marker approaches used in this study are reliable for assessing tissue culture-induced variations in long-term cultured pistachio plantlets.

  15. Genetic diversity of yacon accessions using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, R M; Menine, F; Júnior, E Marques; Oliveira, F L; Soares, T C B

    2017-04-13

    Yacon cultivation has been intensified and the investigations of this crop have increased at the scientific, agricultural, and social levels because the roots of yacon show beneficial properties for human health, such as reducing cholesterol and glucose blood levels. Since the investigations involving yacon are very recent, there is little information available in terms of the genetic characterization of the cultivated genotypes. In view of the lack of information on the accessions cultivated in the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil, this pioneering study aimed to characterize 60 accessions cultivated in the state using ISSR yacon markers with emphasis on identifying the genetic diversity among the materials. The 20 ISSR primers used produced a total of 82 fragments, 39.6% of which presented polymorphism. The number of fragments per primer ranged from 1 to 10. The dissimilarity values ranged from 0 to 0.54 according to the Jaccard coefficient. A dendrogram was generated in which the accessions were divided into 3 groups; group 1 contained 58 individuals and groups 2 and 3 had only one individual in each group. The clustering of 58 accessions in a single group shows the low diversity in the materials examined. This low diversity indicates that new genotypes must be introduced in order to promote increased variability, which would minimize the adverse effects caused by biotic and abiotic factors.

  16. Genetic structure of the Korean black scraper Thamnaconus modestus inferred from microsatellite marker analysis.

    PubMed

    An, Hye Suck; Lee, Jang Wook; Park, Jung Yeon; Jung, Hyung Taek

    2013-05-01

    The Korean black scraper, Thamnaconus modestus, is one of the most economically important maricultural fish species in Korea. However, the annual catch of this fish has been continuously declining over the past several decades. In this study, the genetic diversity and relationships among four wild populations and two hatchery stocks of Korean black scraper were assessed based on 16 microsatellite (MS) markers. A total of 319 different alleles were detected over all loci with an average of 19.94 alleles per locus. The hatchery stocks [mean number of alleles (N(A)) = 12, allelic richness (A(R)) = 12, expected heterozygosity (He) = 0.834] showed a slight reduction (P > 0.05) in genetic variability in comparison with wild populations (mean N(A) = 13.86, A(R) = 12.35, He = 0.844), suggesting a sufficient level of genetic variation in the hatchery populations. Similarly low levels of inbreeding and significant Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deviations were detected in both wild and hatchery populations. The genetic subdivision among all six populations was low but significant (overall F(ST) = 0.008, P < 0.01). Pairwise F(ST), a phylogenetic tree, and multidimensional scaling analysis suggested the existence of three geographically structured populations based on different sea basin origins, although the isolation-by-distance model was rejected. This result was corroborated by an analysis of molecular variance. This genetic differentiation may result from the co-effects of various factors, such as historical dispersal, local environment and ocean currents. These three geographical groups can be considered as independent management units. Our results show that MS markers may be suitable not only for the genetic monitoring of hatchery stocks but also for revealing the population structure of Korean black scraper populations. These results will provide critical information for breeding programs, the management of cultured stocks and the conservation of this species.

  17. Molecular diversity analysis of eggplant (Solanum melongena) genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z; Xu, Z L; Zhang, D Y; He, X L; Bahadur, S; Yi, J X

    2011-06-14

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena), a vegetable that is cultivated worldwide, is of considerable importance to agriculture in China. We analyzed the diversity of this plant using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and RAPD procedures to subdivide 143 Chinese-cultivated eggplants based on coefficient of parentage, genetic diversity index (GDI) and canonical discriminant analysis. ISSR markers were more effective than RAPD markers for detecting genetic diversity, which ranged from 0.10-0.51, slightly lower than what is known from other crops. Our ISSR/RAPD data provide molecular evidence that coincides with morphological-based classification into three varieties and further subdivision into eight groups, except for two groups. Intensive use of elite parents and extensive crossing within groups have resulted in increased coefficient of parentage and proportional contribution but decreased GDI during the past decades. The mean coefficient of parentage and proportional contribution increased from 0.05 to 0.10% and from 3.22 to 6.46% during 1980-1991 and 1992-2003, respectively. The GDI of landraces was 0.21, higher than the 0.09 and 0.08 calculated for the hybrid cultivars released during the two periods. The recent introduction of alien genotypes into eggplant breeding programs may broaden the genetic base.

  18. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Silje; Evans, D. Gareth; Abraham, Jean E.; Earl, Helena M.; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A.; Bowden, Sarah; Berg, Christine; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)–negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24.2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10–8). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association in this set of case patients was stronger for the observed genotypes than for the imputed genotypes. A second locus (rs148760487 at 2q24.2) was associated at genome-wide statistical significance in initial analyses; the association was similar in ER-positive and ER-negative case patients. Here the results of genotyping suggested that the finding was less robust. Conclusions: This is currently the largest study investigating genetic variation associated with breast cancer survival. Our results have potential clinical implications, as they confirm that germline genotype can provide prognostic information in addition to standard tumor prognostic factors. PMID:25890600

  19. Population genetics and drug resistance markers: an essential for malaria surveillance in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Raza, Afsheen; Beg, Mohammad Asim

    2013-12-01

    Plasmodium (P.) vivax is the prevalent malarial species accounting for 70% of malaria cases in Pakistan. However, baseline epidemiological data on P. vivax population structure and drug resistance are lacking from Pakistan. For population structure studies, molecular genetic markers, circumsporozoite protein (csp) and merozoite surface protein-1 (msp-1) are considered useful as these play an important role in P. vivax survival under immune and environmental pressure. Furthermore, these genes have also been identified as suitable candidates for vaccine development. While efforts for effective vaccine are underway, anti-malarial agents remain the mainstay for control. Evidence of resistance against commonly used anti-malarial agents, particularly Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) is threatening to make this form of control defunct. Therefore, studies on drug resistance are necessary so that anti-malarial treatment strategies can be structured and implemented accordingly by the Malaria Control Program, Pakistan. This review aims to provide information on genetic markers of P. vivax population structure and drug resistance and comment on their usefulness in molecular surveillance and control.

  20. Genetic relationship of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) varieties from Senegal based on SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Badiane, F A; Gowda, B S; Cissé, N; Diouf, D; Sadio, O; Timko, M P

    2012-02-08

    Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among 22 local cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) varieties and inbred lines collected throughout Senegal were evaluated using simple sequence repeat molecular markers. A set of 49 primer combinations were developed from cowpea genomic/expressed sequence tags and evaluated for their ability to detect polymorphisms among the various cowpea genotypes. Forty-four primer combinations detected polymorphisms, with the remaining five primer sets failing to yield PCR amplification products. From one to 16 alleles were found among the informative primer combinations; their frequencies ranged from 0.60 to 0.95 (mean = 0.79). The genetic diversity of the sample varied from 0.08 to 0.42 (mean = 0.28). The polymorphic information content ranged from 0.08 to 0.33 (mean = 0.23). The local varieties clustered in the same group, except 53-3, 58-53, and 58-57; while Ndoute yellow pods, Ndoute violet pods and Baye Ngagne were in the second group. The photosensitive varieties (Ndoute yellow pods and Ndoute violet pods) were closely clustered in the second group and so were inbred line Mouride and local cultivar 58-57, which is also one of the parents for inbred line Mouride. These molecular markers could be used for selection and identification of elite varieties for cowpea improvement and germplasm management in Senegal.

  1. Molecular genetics and genetic testing in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Savić Pavićević, Dušanka; Miladinović, Jelena; Brkušanin, Miloš; Šviković, Saša; Djurica, Svetlana; Brajušković, Goran; Romac, Stanka

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common adult onset muscular dystrophy, presenting as a multisystemic disorder with extremely variable clinical manifestation, from asymptomatic adults to severely affected neonates. A striking anticipation and parental-gender effect upon transmission are distinguishing genetic features in DM1 pedigrees. It is an autosomal dominant hereditary disease associated with an unstable expansion of CTG repeats in the 3'-UTR of the DMPK gene, with the number of repeats ranging from 50 to several thousand. The number of CTG repeats broadly correlates with both the age-at-onset and overall severity of the disease. Expanded DM1 alleles are characterized by a remarkable expansion-biased and gender-specific germline instability, and tissue-specific, expansion-biased, age-dependent, and individual-specific somatic instability. Mutational dynamics in male and female germline account for observed anticipation and parental-gender effect in DM1 pedigrees, while mutational dynamics in somatic tissues contribute toward the tissue-specificity and progressive nature of the disease. Genetic test is routinely used in diagnostic procedure for DM1 for symptomatic, asymptomatic, and prenatal testing, accompanied with appropriate genetic counseling and, as recommended, without predictive information about the disease course. We review molecular genetics of DM1 with focus on those issues important for genetic testing and counseling.

  2. Transcriptome survey of Patagonian southern beech Nothofagus nervosa (= N. Alpina): assembly, annotation and molecular marker discovery.

    PubMed

    Torales, Susana L; Rivarola, Máximo; Pomponio, María F; Fernández, Paula; Acuña, Cintia V; Marchelli, Paula; Gonzalez, Sergio; Azpilicueta, María M; Hopp, Horacio Esteban; Gallo, Leonardo A; Paniego, Norma B; Poltri, Susana N Marcucci

    2012-07-02

    Nothofagus nervosa is one of the most emblematic native tree species of Patagonian temperate forests. Here, the shotgun RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) of the transcriptome of N. nervosa, including de novo assembly, functional annotation, and in silico discovery of potential molecular markers to support population and associations genetic studies, are described. Pyrosequencing of a young leaf cDNA library generated a total of 111,814 high quality reads, with an average length of 447 bp. De novo assembly using Newbler resulted into 3,005 tentative isotigs (including alternative transcripts). The non-assembled sequences (singletons) were clustered with CD-HIT-454 to identify natural and artificial duplicates from pyrosequencing reads, leading to 21,881 unique singletons. 15,497 out of 24,886 non-redundant sequences or unigenes, were successfully annotated against a plant protein database. A substantial number of simple sequence repeat markers (SSRs) were discovered in the assembled and annotated sequences. More than 40% of the SSR sequences were inside ORF sequences. To confirm the validity of these predicted markers, a subset of 73 SSRs selected through functional annotation evidences were successfully amplified from six seedlings DNA samples, being 14 polymorphic. This paper is the first report that shows a highly precise representation of the mRNAs diversity present in young leaves of a native South American tree, N. nervosa, as well as its in silico deduced putative functionality. The reported Nothofagus transcriptome sequences represent a unique resource for genetic studies and provide a tool to discover genes of interest and genetic markers that will greatly aid questions involving evolution, ecology, and conservation using genetic and genomic approaches in the genus.

  3. Transcriptome survey of Patagonian southern beech Nothofagus nervosa (= N. Alpina): assembly, annotation and molecular marker discovery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nothofagus nervosa is one of the most emblematic native tree species of Patagonian temperate forests. Here, the shotgun RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) of the transcriptome of N. nervosa, including de novo assembly, functional annotation, and in silico discovery of potential molecular markers to support population and associations genetic studies, are described. Results Pyrosequencing of a young leaf cDNA library generated a total of 111,814 high quality reads, with an average length of 447 bp. De novo assembly using Newbler resulted into 3,005 tentative isotigs (including alternative transcripts). The non-assembled sequences (singletons) were clustered with CD-HIT-454 to identify natural and artificial duplicates from pyrosequencing reads, leading to 21,881 unique singletons. 15,497 out of 24,886 non-redundant sequences or unigenes, were successfully annotated against a plant protein database. A substantial number of simple sequence repeat markers (SSRs) were discovered in the assembled and annotated sequences. More than 40% of the SSR sequences were inside ORF sequences. To confirm the validity of these predicted markers, a subset of 73 SSRs selected through functional annotation evidences were successfully amplified from six seedlings DNA samples, being 14 polymorphic. Conclusions This paper is the first report that shows a highly precise representation of the mRNAs diversity present in young leaves of a native South American tree, N. nervosa, as well as its in silico deduced putative functionality. The reported Nothofagus transcriptome sequences represent a unique resource for genetic studies and provide a tool to discover genes of interest and genetic markers that will greatly aid questions involving evolution, ecology, and conservation using genetic and genomic approaches in the genus. PMID:22747958

  4. Genetic variation in the Solanaceae fruit bearing species lulo and tree tomato revealed by Conserved Ortholog (COSII) markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Lulo or naranjilla (Solanum quitoense Lam.) and the tree tomato or tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav. Sendt.) are both Andean tropical fruit species with high nutritional value and the potential for becoming premium products in local and export markets. Herein, we present a report on the genetic characterization of 62 accessions of lulos (n = 32) and tree tomatoes (n = 30) through the use of PCR-based markers developed from single-copy conserved orthologous genes (COSII) in other Solanaceae (Asterid) species. We successfully PCR amplified a set of these markers for lulos (34 out of 46 initially tested) and tree tomatoes (26 out of 41) for molecular studies. Six polymorphic COSII markers were found in lulo with a total of 47 alleles and five polymorphic markers in tree tomato with a total of 39 alleles in the two populations. Further genetic analyses indicated a high population structure (with FST > 0.90), which may be a result of low migration between populations, adaptation to various niches and the number of markers evaluated. We propose COSII markers as sound tools for molecular studies, conservation and the breeding of these two fruit species. PMID:21637482

  5. Genetic variation in the Solanaceae fruit bearing species lulo and tree tomato revealed by Conserved Ortholog (COSII) markers.

    PubMed

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix; Martínez, Rodrigo; Lobo, Mario; Barrero, Luz Stella

    2010-04-01

    The Lulo or naranjilla (Solanum quitoense Lam.) and the tree tomato or tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav. Sendt.) are both Andean tropical fruit species with high nutritional value and the potential for becoming premium products in local and export markets. Herein, we present a report on the genetic characterization of 62 accessions of lulos (n = 32) and tree tomatoes (n = 30) through the use of PCR-based markers developed from single-copy conserved orthologous genes (COSII) in other Solanaceae (Asterid) species. We successfully PCR amplified a set of these markers for lulos (34 out of 46 initially tested) and tree tomatoes (26 out of 41) for molecular studies. Six polymorphic COSII markers were found in lulo with a total of 47 alleles and five polymorphic markers in tree tomato with a total of 39 alleles in the two populations. Further genetic analyses indicated a high population structure (with F(ST) > 0.90), which may be a result of low migration between populations, adaptation to various niches and the number of markers evaluated. We propose COSII markers as sound tools for molecular studies, conservation and the breeding of these two fruit species.

  6. A consensus linkage map for molecular markers and quantitative trait loci associated with economically important traits in melon (Cucumis melo L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A number of molecular marker linkage maps have been developed for melon (Cucumis melo L.) over the last two decades. However, these maps were constructed using different marker sets, thus, making comparative analysis among maps difficult. In order to solve this problem, a consensus genetic map in ...

  7. Genetic diversity analysis of tree peony germplasm using iPBS markers.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y B; Guo, D L; Guo, L L; Wei, D F; Hou, X G

    2015-07-06

    We examined the genetic diversity of 10 wild species (populations) and 55 varieties of tree peony using inter-primer binding site (iPBS) markers. From a total of 36 iPBS primers, 16 were selected based on polymorphic amplification. The number of bands amplified by each primer ranged from 9 to 19, with an average of 12.88 bands per primer. The length of bands ranged from 100 to 2000 bp, concentrated at 200 to 1800 bp. Sixteen primers amplified 206 bands in total, of which 173 bands were polymorphic with a polymorphism ratio of 83.98%. Each primer amplified 10.81 polymorphic bands on average. The data were then used to construct a phylogenetic tree using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean methods. Clustering analysis showed that the genetic relationships among the varieties were not only related to the genetic background or geographic origin, but also to the flowering phase, flower color, and flower type. Our data also indicated that iPBS markers were useful tools for classifying tree peony germplasms and for tree peony breeding, and the specific bands were helpful for molecular identification of tree peony varieties.

  8. Central pattern generators deciphered by molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Kiehn, Ole; Kullander, Klas

    2004-02-05

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are localized neuronal networks that have the ability to produce rhythmic movements even in the absence of movement-related sensory feedback. They are found in all animals, including man, and serve as informative model systems for understanding how neuronal networks produce behavior. Traditionally, CPGs have been investigated with electrophysiological techniques. Here we review recent molecular and genetic approaches for dissecting the organization and development of CPGs.

  9. ACOG Technology Assessment No. 11: Genetics and molecular diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Human genetics and molecular testing are playing an increasingly important role in medicine, including obstetric and gynecologic practice. As the genetic basis for reproductive disorders, common diseases, and cancer is elucidated with improved molecular technology, genetic testing opportunities are expanding and influencing treatment options and prevention strategies. It is essential that obstetrician-gynecologists be aware of advances in the understanding of genetic disease and the fundamental principles of genetic screening and molecular testing as genetics becomes a more integral part of routine medical practice. This document reviews the basics of genetic transmission and genetic technologies in current use.

  10. Evaluation of insertion-deletion markers suitable for genetic diversity studies and marker-trait correlation analyses in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Meng, S; Yang, X L; Dang, P M; Cui, S L; Mu, G J; Chen, C Y; Liu, L F

    2016-08-12

    Peanut is one of the most important oil crops worldwide. We used insertion-deletion (InDel) markers to assess the genetic diversity and population structure in cultivated peanut. Fifty-four accessions from North China were genotyped using 48 InDel markers. The markers amplified 61 polymorphic loci with 1 to 8 alleles and an average of 2.6 alleles per marker. The polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.0364 to 0.9030, with an average of 0.5038. Population structure and neighbor-joining (NJ) tree analyses suggested that all accessions could be divided into four clusters (A1-A4), using the NJ method. Likewise, four subpopulations (G1-G4) were identified using STRUCTURE analysis. A principal component analysis was also used and results concordant with the other analysis methods were found. A multi-linear stepwise regression analysis revealed that 13 InDel markers correlated with five measured agronomical traits. Our results will provide important information for future peanut molecular breeding and genetic research.

  11. Biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers associated with quality-of-life domains: an update

    PubMed Central

    Sprangers, Mirjam A.G.; Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Bartels, Meike; Barsevick, Andrea; Ordoñana, Juan; Shi, Qiuling; Wang, Xin Shelley; Klepstad, Pål; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sloan, Jeff A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is compelling evidence of a genetic foundation of patient-reported QOL. Given the rapid development of substantial scientific advances in this area of research, the current paper updates and extends reviews published in 2010. Objectives The objective is to provide an updated overview of the biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers involved in fatigue, pain, negative (depressed mood) and positive (well-being/happiness) emotional functioning, social functioning, and overall QOL. Methods We followed a purposeful search algorithm of existing literature to capture empirical papers investigating the relationship between biological pathways and molecular markers and the identified QOL domains. Results Multiple major pathways are involved in each QOL domain. The inflammatory pathway has the strongest evidence as a controlling mechanism underlying fatigue. Inflammation and neurotransmission are key processes involved in pain perception and the COMT gene is associated with multiple sorts of pain. The neurotransmitter and neuroplasticity theories have the strongest evidence for their relationship with depression. Oxytocin-related genes and genes involved in the serotonergic and dopaminergic pathways play a role in social functioning. Inflammatory pathways, via cytokines, also play an important role in overall QOL. Conclusions Whereas the current findings need future experiments and replication efforts, they will provide researchers supportive background information when embarking on studies relating candidate genes and/or molecular markers to QOL domains. The ultimate goal of this area of research is to enhance patients’ QOL. PMID:24604075

  12. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Sugarcane Parents in Chinese Breeding Programmes Using gSSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    You, Qian; Xu, Liping; Zheng, Yifeng; Que, Youxiong

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane is the most important sugar and bioenergy crop in the world. The selection and combination of parents for crossing rely on an understanding of their genetic structures and molecular diversity. In the present study, 115 sugarcane genotypes used for parental crossing were genotyped based on five genomic simple sequence repeat marker (gSSR) loci and 88 polymorphic alleles of loci (100%) as detected by capillary electrophoresis. The values of genetic diversity parameters across the populations indicate that the genetic variation intrapopulation (90.5%) was much larger than that of interpopulation (9.5%). Cluster analysis revealed that there were three groups termed as groups I, II, and III within the 115 genotypes. The genotypes released by each breeding programme showed closer genetic relationships, except the YC series released by Hainan sugarcane breeding station. Using principle component analysis (PCA), the first and second principal components accounted for a cumulative 76% of the total variances, in which 43% were for common parents and 33% were for new parents, respectively. The knowledge obtained in this study should be useful to future breeding programs for increasing genetic diversity of sugarcane varieties and cultivars to meet the demand of sugarcane cultivation for sugar and bioenergy use. PMID:23990759

  13. Molecular genetics of neuronal migration disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Judy S

    2011-04-01

    Cortical malformations associated with defects in neuronal migration result in severe developmental consequences including intractable epilepsy and intellectual disability. Genetic causes of migration defects have been identified with the advent and widespread use of high-resolution MRI and genetic techniques. Thus, the full phenotypic range of these genetic disorders is becoming apparent. Genes that cause lissencephaly, pachygyria, subcortical band heterotopia, and periventricular nodular heterotopias have been defined. Many of these genes are involved in cytoskeletal regulation including the function of microtubules (LIS1, TUBA1A,TUBB3, and DCX) and of actin (FilaminA). Thus, the molecular pathways regulating neuronal migration including the cytoskeletal pathways appear to be defined by human mutation syndromes. Basic science, including cell biology and animal models of these disorders, has informed our understanding of the pathogenesis of neuronal migration disorders and further progress depends on the continued integration of the clinical and basic sciences.

  14. Molecular predictive markers in tumors of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Eirini; Metaxa-Mariatou, Vasiliki; Tsaousis, Georgios; Tsoulos, Nikolaos; Tsirigoti, Angeliki; Efstathiadou, Chrisoula; Apessos, Angela; Agiannitopoulos, Konstantinos; Pepe, Georgia; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Nasioulas, George

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal malignancies are among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Like all human malignancies they are characterized by accumulation of mutations which lead to inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or activation of oncogenes. Advances in Molecular Biology techniques have allowed for more accurate analysis of tumors’ genetic profiling using new breakthrough technologies such as next generation sequencing (NGS), leading to the development of targeted therapeutical approaches based upon biomarker-selection. During the last 10 years tremendous advances in the development of targeted therapies for patients with advanced cancer have been made, thus various targeted agents, associated with predictive biomarkers, have been developed or are in development for the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal cancer patients. This review summarizes the advances in the field of molecular biomarkers in tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, with focus on the available NGS platforms that enable comprehensive tumor molecular profile analysis. PMID:27895815

  15. Population genetic data and forensic parameters of 30 autosomal InDel markers in Santa Catarina State population, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sandra Regina Rachadel; Uehara, Clineu Julien Seki; Sutter-Latorre, Ana Frederica; de Almeida, Bibiana Sgorla; Sauerbier, Tania Streck; Muniz, Yara Costa Netto; Marrero, Andrea Rita; de Souza, Ilíada Rainha

    2014-08-01

    The application of DNA technology in forensic investigations has grown rapidly in the last 25 years and with an exponential increase of short tandem repeats (STRs) data, usually presented as allele frequencies, that may be later used as databases for forensic and population genetics purposes. Thereby, classes of molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions (InDels) have been presented as another option of genetic marker sets. These markers can be used in paternity cases, when mutations in STR polymorphisms are present, as well as in highly degraded DNA analysis. In the present study, the allele frequencies and heterozygosity (H) of a 30 InDel markers set were determined and the forensic efficacy was evaluated through estimation of discrimination power (DP), match probability, typical paternity index and power of paternity exclusion in 108 unrelated volunteers from the State of Santa Catarina (South Brazil). The observed H per locus showed a range between 0.370 and 0.574 (mean = 0.479). HLD128 was the locus with the highest DP (DP = 0.656). DP for all markers combined was greater than 99.9999999999646 % which provides satisfactory levels of information for forensic demands. Genetic comparisons (exact tests of population differentiation and pairwise genetic distances) revealed that the population of Santa Catarina State differs from Korea and USA Afro-American populations but is similar to the Portuguese, German, Polish, Spanish and Basque populations.

  16. Exploring genetic variability within lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and across related legumes using a newly developed set of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Sharma, Tilak R; Srivastava, Prem S; Abdin, M Z; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2014-09-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an economically important grain legume, yet the genetic and genomic resources remain largely uncharacterized and unexploited in this crop. Microsatellites have become markers of choice for crop improvement applications. Hence, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for lentil through the construction of genomic library enriched for GA/CT motifs. As a result 122 functional SSR primer pairs were developed from 151 microsatellite loci and validated in L. culinaris cv. Precoz. Thirty three SSR markers were utilized for the analysis of genetic relationships between cultivated and wild species of Lens and related legumes. A total of 123 alleles were amplified at 33 loci ranging from 2-5 alleles with an average of 3.73 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content (PIC) for all the loci ranged from 0.13 to 0.99 with an average of 0.66 per locus. Varied levels of cross genera transferability were obtained ranging from 69.70 % across Pisum sativum to 12.12 % across Vigna radiata. The UPGMA based dendrogram was able to establish the uniqueness of each genotype and grouped them into two major clusters clearly resolving the genetic relationships within lentil and related species. The new set of SSR markers reported here were efficient and highly polymorphic and would add to the existing repertoire of lentil SSR markers to be utilized in molecular breeding. Moreover, the improved knowledge about intra- and inter-specific genetic relationships would facilitate germplasm utilization for lentil improvement.

  17. Microbial Biofilms: from Ecology to Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Mary Ellen; O'toole, George A.

    2000-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms attached to surfaces or associated with interfaces. Despite the focus of modern microbiology research on pure culture, planktonic (free-swimming) bacteria, it is now widely recognized that most bacteria found in natural, clinical, and industrial settings persist in association with surfaces. Furthermore, these microbial communities are often composed of multiple species that interact with each other and their environment. The determination of biofilm architecture, particularly the spatial arrangement of microcolonies (clusters of cells) relative to one another, has profound implications for the function of these complex communities. Numerous new experimental approaches and methodologies have been developed in order to explore metabolic interactions, phylogenetic groupings, and competition among members of the biofilm. To complement this broad view of biofilm ecology, individual organisms have been studied using molecular genetics in order to identify the genes required for biofilm development and to dissect the regulatory pathways that control the plankton-to-biofilm transition. These molecular genetic studies have led to the emergence of the concept of biofilm formation as a novel system for the study of bacterial development. The recent explosion in the field of biofilm research has led to exciting progress in the development of new technologies for studying these communities, advanced our understanding of the ecological significance of surface-attached bacteria, and provided new insights into the molecular genetic basis of biofilm development. PMID:11104821

  18. Guidelines on the use of molecular genetics in reintroduction programs

    Treesearch

    Michael K. Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    The use of molecular genetics can play a key role in reintroduction efforts. Prior to the introduction of any individuals, molecular genetics can be used to identify the most appropriate source population for the reintroduction, ensure that no relic populations exist in the reintroduction area, and guide captive breeding programs. The use of molecular genetics post-...

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of giant cell glioblastomas.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Puttlitz, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Waha, A.; Rollbrocker, B.; Boström, J.; Wiestler, O. D.; Louis, D. N.; Reifenberger, G.; von Deimling, A.

    1997-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Recently, distinct molecular genetic alterations have been linked to subgroups of patients with GBM. Giant cell (gc)GBMs are a rare variant of GBM characterized by a marked preponderance of multinucleated giant cells. Several reports have associated this entity with a more favorable prognosis than the majority of GBMs. To evaluate whether gcGBM may also represent a genetically defined subgroup of GBM, we analyzed a series of 19 gcGBMs for mutations in the TP53 gene for amplification of the EGFR and CDK4 genes and for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A (p16/MTS1) gene. Seventeen of nineteen gcGBMs carried TP53 mutations whereas EGFR and CDK4 gene amplification was seen in only one tumor each and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was not observed at all. The strikingly high incidence of TP53 mutations and the relative absence of other genetic alterations groups gcGBM together with a previously recognized molecular genetic variant of GBM (type 1 GBM). It is tempting to speculate that the better prognosis of gcGBM patients may result from the low incidence of EGFR amplification and CDKN2A deletion, changes known for their growth-promoting potential. Images Figure 1 PMID:9284834

  20. Identification of molecular markers of bipolar cells in the murine retina

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Douglas S; Ross, Sarah E; Trimarchi, Jeffrey M; Aach, John; Greenberg, Michael E; Cepko, Constance L

    2008-01-01

    Retinal bipolar neurons serve as relay interneurons that connect rod and cone photoreceptor cells to amacrine and ganglion cells. They exhibit diverse morphologies essential for correct routing of photoreceptor cell signals to specific postsynaptic amacrine and ganglion cells. The development and physiology of these interneurons have not been completely defined molecularly. Despite previous identification of genes expressed in several bipolar cell subtypes, molecules that mark each bipolar cell type still await discovery. In this report, novel genetic markers of murine bipolar cells were found. Candidates were initially generated by using microarray analysis of single bipolar cells and mining of retinal serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) data. These candidates were subsequently tested for expression in bipolar cells by RNA in situ hybridization. Ten new molecular markers were identified, five of which are highly enriched in their expression in bipolar cells within the adult retina. Double-labeling experiments using probes for previously characterized subsets of bipolar cells were performed to identify the subtypes of bipolar cells that express the novel markers. Additionally, the expression of bipolar cell genes was analyzed in Bhlhb4 knockout retinas, in which rod bipolar cells degenerate postnatally, to delineate further the identity of bipolar cells in which novel markers are found. From the analysis of Bhlhb4 mutant retinas, cone bipolar cell gene expression appears to be relatively unaffected by the degeneration of rod bipolar cells. Identification of molecular markers for the various subtypes of bipolar cells will lead to greater insights into the development and function of these diverse interneurons. PMID:18260140

  1. Genetic diversity in South African Nguni cattle ecotypes based on microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Sanarana, Yandisiwe; Visser, Carina; Bosman, Lydia; Nephawe, Khathutshelo; Maiwashe, Azwihangwisi; van Marle-Köster, Este

    2016-02-01

    The Nguni cattle breed is a landrace breed adapted to different ecological regions of South Africa. A number of ecotypes are recognised based on phenotype within the breed, but it is not known if they are genetically distinct. In this study, molecular characterisation was performed on Makhathini (MAK), Pedi (PED), Shangaan (SHA) and Venda (VEN) Nguni cattle ecotypes. Two Nguni cattle populations, not kept as separate ecotypes, from the University of Fort Hare (UFH) and Agricultural Research Council Loskop South farm (LOS) were also included. Genotypic data was generated for 189 unrelated Nguni cattle selected based on pedigree records using 22 microsatellite markers. The expected heterozygosity values varied from 69 % (UFH) to 72 % (PED) with a mean number of alleles ranging from 6.0 to 6.9. The F ST estimate demonstrated that 4.8 % of the total genetic variation was due to the genetic differentiation between the populations and 92.2 % accounted for differences within the populations. The genetic distances and structure analysis revealed the closest relationship between MAK, PEDI and SHA ecotypes, followed by SHA and VEN. The UFH population clustered with the MAK ecotype, indicating that they are more genetically similar, while the LOS cattle grouped as a distinct cluster. Results suggest that the genetic differentiation between the PED and SHA ecotypes is low and can be regarded as one ecotype based on limited genetic differences. The results of this study can be applied as a point of reference for further genetic studies towards conservation of Nguni cattle ecotypes.

  2. Buprenorphine Alters Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Molecular Markers in Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitchon, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Buprenorphine is recommended for use as an analgesic in animal models including in murine models of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). However, the effect of buprenorphine on the expression of disease-associated biomarkers is not well defined. We examined the effect of buprenorphine administration on disease progression and the expression of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, in a murine model of CIA. Buprenorphine administration altered the expression of cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-6, and MMP-3, and oxidative markers, for example, iNOS, superoxide dismutase (SOD1), and catalase (CAT), in the CIA mice. As buprenorphine is an analgesic, we further monitored the association of expression of these biomarkers with pain scores in a human cohort of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Serum MMP-3 levels and blood mRNA expression of antioxidants sod1 and cat correlated with pain scores in the RA cohort. We have demonstrated that administration of buprenorphine alters the expression of inflammatory and oxidative stress-related molecular markers in a murine model of CIA. This caveat needs to be considered in animal experiments using buprenorphine as an analgesic, as it can be a confounding factor in murine studies used for prediction of response to therapy. Furthermore, the antioxidant enzymes that showed an association with pain scores in the human cohort may be explored as biomarkers for pain in future studies. PMID:28572711

  3. Molecular approaches for genetic improvement of seed quality and characterization of genetic diversity in soybean: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Niraj; Khare, Dhirendra

    2016-10-01

    Soybean is an economically important leguminous crop. Genetic improvements of soybeans have focused on enhancement of seed and oil yield, development of varieties suited to different cropping systems, and breeding resistant/tolerant varieties for various biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant breeders have used conventional breeding techniques for the improvement of these traits in soybean. The conventional breeding process can be greatly accelerated through the application of molecular and genomic approaches. Molecular markers have proved to be a new tool in soybean breeding by enhancing selection efficiency in a rapid and time-bound manner. An overview of molecular approaches for the genetic improvement of soybean seed quality parameters, considering recent applications of marker-assisted selection and 'omics' research, is provided in this article.

  4. Development of Pineapple Microsatellite Markers and Germplasm Genetic Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Helin; Chen, You; Wang, Jingyi; Chen, Yeyuan; Sun, Guangming; He, Junhu; Wu, Yaoting

    2013-01-01

    Two methods were used to develop pineapple microsatellite markers. Genomic library-based SSR development: using selectively amplified microsatellite assay, 86 sequences were generated from pineapple genomic library. 91 (96.8%) of the 94 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) loci were dinucleotide repeats (39 AC/GT repeats and 52 GA/TC repeats, accounting for 42.9% and 57.1%, resp.), and the other three were mononucleotide repeats. Thirty-six pairs of SSR primers were designed; 24 of them generated clear bands of expected sizes, and 13 of them showed polymorphism. EST-based SSR development: 5659 pineapple EST sequences obtained from NCBI were analyzed; among 1397 nonredundant EST sequences, 843 were found containing 1110 SSR loci (217 of them contained more than one SSR locus). Frequency of SSRs in pineapple EST sequences is 1SSR/3.73 kb, and 44 types were found. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats dominate, accounting for 95.6% in total. AG/CT and AGC/GCT were the dominant type of dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeats, accounting for 83.5% and 24.1%, respectively. Thirty pairs of primers were designed for each of randomly selected 30 sequences; 26 of them generated clear and reproducible bands, and 22 of them showed polymorphism. Eighteen pairs of primers obtained by the one or the other of the two methods above that showed polymorphism were selected to carry out germplasm genetic diversity analysis for 48 breeds of pineapple; similarity coefficients of these breeds were between 0.59 and 1.00, and they can be divided into four groups accordingly. Amplification products of five SSR markers were extracted and sequenced, corresponding repeat loci were found and locus mutations are mainly in copy number of repeats and base mutations in the flanking region. PMID:24024187

  5. Selectable Markers for Use in Genetic Manipulation of Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannii HUMC1

    PubMed Central

    Ulhaq, Amber; Yan, Jun; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Nielsen, Travis B.; Davies, Bryan W.; Actis, Luis A.; Spellberg, Brad

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most antibiotic-resistant pathogens in clinical medicine, and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains are commonly isolated from infected patients. Such XDR strains are already resistant to traditional selectable genetic markers, limiting the ability to conduct pathogenesis research by genetic disruption. Optimization of selectable markers is therefore critical for the advancement of fundamental molecular biology techniques to use in these strains. We screened 23 drugs that constitute a broad array of antibiotics spanning multiple drug classes against HUMC1, a highly virulent and XDR A. baumannii clinical blood and lung isolate. HUMC1 is resistant to all clinically useful antibiotics that are reported by the clinical microbiology laboratory, except for colistin. Ethical concerns about intentionally establishing pan-resistance, including to the last-line agent, colistin, in a clinical isolate made identification of other markers desirable. We screened additional antibiotics that are in clinical use and those that are useful only in a lab setting to identify selectable markers that were effective at selecting for transformants in vitro. We show that supraphysiological levels of tetracycline can overcome innate drug resistance displayed by this XDR strain. Last, we demonstrate that transformation of the tetA (tetracycline resistance) and Sh ble (zeocin resistance), but not pac (puromycin resistance), resistance cassettes allow for selection of drug-resistant transformants. These results make the genetic manipulation of XDR A. baumannii strains easily achieved. IMPORTANCE Multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and pan-drug-resistant (PDR) strains of Acinetobacter baumannii have frequently been characterized. The ability of A. baumannii to develop resistance to antibiotics is a key reason this organism has been difficult to study using genetic and molecular biology approaches. Here we report

  6. Selectable Markers for Use in Genetic Manipulation of Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannii HUMC1.

    PubMed

    Luna, Brian M; Ulhaq, Amber; Yan, Jun; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Nielsen, Travis B; Davies, Bryan W; Actis, Luis A; Spellberg, Brad

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most antibiotic-resistant pathogens in clinical medicine, and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains are commonly isolated from infected patients. Such XDR strains are already resistant to traditional selectable genetic markers, limiting the ability to conduct pathogenesis research by genetic disruption. Optimization of selectable markers is therefore critical for the advancement of fundamental molecular biology techniques to use in these strains. We screened 23 drugs that constitute a broad array of antibiotics spanning multiple drug classes against HUMC1, a highly virulent and XDR A. baumannii clinical blood and lung isolate. HUMC1 is resistant to all clinically useful antibiotics that are reported by the clinical microbiology laboratory, except for colistin. Ethical concerns about intentionally establishing pan-resistance, including to the last-line agent, colistin, in a clinical isolate made identification of other markers desirable. We screened additional antibiotics that are in clinical use and those that are useful only in a lab setting to identify selectable markers that were effective at selecting for transformants in vitro. We show that supraphysiological levels of tetracycline can overcome innate drug resistance displayed by this XDR strain. Last, we demonstrate that transformation of the tetA (tetracycline resistance) and Sh ble (zeocin resistance), but not pac (puromycin resistance), resistance cassettes allow for selection of drug-resistant transformants. These results make the genetic manipulation of XDR A. baumannii strains easily achieved. IMPORTANCE Multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and pan-drug-resistant (PDR) strains of Acinetobacter baumannii have frequently been characterized. The ability of A. baumannii to develop resistance to antibiotics is a key reason this organism has been difficult to study using genetic and molecular biology approaches. Here we report selectable

  7. Determination of Genetic Diversity Using 15 Simple Sequence Repeats Markers in Long Term Selected Japanese Quail Lines

    PubMed Central

    Karabağ, Kemal; Balcıoğlu, Murat Soner; Karlı, Taki; Alkan, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    Japanese quail is still used as a model for poultry research because of their usefulness as laying, meat, and laboratory animals. Microsatellite markers are the most widely used molecular markers, due to their relative ease of scoring and high levels of polymorphism. The objective of the research was to determine genetic diversity and population genetic structures of selected Japanese quail lines (high body weight 1 [HBW1], HBW2, low body weight [LBW], and layer [L]) throughout 15th generations and an unselected control (C). A total of 69 individuals from five quail lines were genotyped by fifteen microsatellite markers. When analyzed profiles of the markers the observed (Ho) and expected (He) heterozygosity ranged from 0.04 (GUJ0027) to 0.64 (GUJ0087) and 0.21 (GUJ0027) to 0.84 (GUJ0037), respectively. Also, Ho and He were separated from 0.30 (L and LBW) to 0.33 (C and HBW2) and from 0.52 (HBW2) to 0.58 (L and LBW), respectively. The mean polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.46 (HBW2) to 0.52 (L). Approximately half of the markers were informative (PIC≥0.50). Genetic distances were calculated from 0.09 (HBW1 and HBW2) to 0.33 (C and L). Phylogenetic dendrogram showed that the quail lines were clearly defined by the microsatellite markers used here. Bayesian model-based clustering supported the results from the phylogenetic tree. These results reflect that the set of studied markers can be used effectively to capture the magnitude of genetic variability in selected Japanese quail lines. Also, to identify markers and alleles which are specific to the divergence lines, further generations of selection are required. PMID:27165027

  8. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (`K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.

  9. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (‘K13-propeller’) with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread. PMID:24352242

  10. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-02

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain ('K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.

  11. Construction of a Genetic Linkage Map Based on Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Markers and Development of Sequence-Tagged Site Markers for Marker-Assisted Selection of the Sporeless Trait in the Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii)

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Jun; Obatake, Yasushi; Murakami, Shigeyuki; Fukumasa, Yukitaka; Matsumoto, Teruyuki

    2012-01-01

    A large number of spores from fruiting bodies can lead to allergic reactions and other problems during the cultivation of edible mushrooms, including Pleurotus eryngii (DC.) Quél. A cultivar harboring a sporulation-deficient (sporeless) mutation would be useful for preventing these problems, but traditional breeding requires extensive time and labor. In this study, using a sporeless P. eryngii strain, we constructed a genetic linkage map to introduce a molecular breeding program like marker-assisted selection. Based on the segregation of 294 amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, two mating type factors, and the sporeless trait, the linkage map consisted of 11 linkage groups with a total length of 837.2 centimorgans (cM). The gene region responsible for the sporeless trait was located in linkage group IX with 32 amplified fragment length polymorphism markers and the B mating type factor. We also identified eight markers closely linked (within 1.2 cM) to the sporeless locus using bulked-segregant analysis-based amplified fragment length polymorphism. One such amplified fragment length polymorphism marker was converted into two sequence-tagged site markers, SD488-I and SD488-II. Using 14 wild isolates, sequence-tagged site analysis indicated the potential usefulness of the combination of two sequence-tagged site markers in cross-breeding of the sporeless strain. It also suggested that a map constructed for P. eryngii has adequate accuracy for marker-assisted selection. PMID:22210222

  12. Genetic variation detected by RAPD markers in natural populations of babassu palm (Attalea speciosa Mart.).

    PubMed

    Santos, M F; Damasceno-Silva, K J; Carvalhaes, M A; Lima, P S C

    2015-06-10

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of management on the genetic structure of natural populations of Attalea speciosa in the State of Piauí, Brazil, using random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Three babassu populations under different management systems were selected. Polymerase chain reactions were performed for 20 RAPD primers. A total of 146 bands were generated, 141 of which were polymorphic (96.58%), with a variation of 4 and 12 loci and an average of 7 bands per primer. A dendrogram revealed a clear separation between the three populations (0.57). Data reliability and node consistency were verified by bootstrap values and the cophenetic correlation coefficient (88.15%). Coefficients of similarity between pairs of genotypes ranged from 0.26 to 0.86, with a mean of 0.57. Nei's genetic diversity index (HE) value of the population sampled in Teresina was 0.212, of Esperantina it was 0.195, and of José de Freitas it was 0.207. After the HE was decomposed, the complete diversity was found to be 0.3213. Genetic differentiation between populations was 0.362, and the estimation of gene flow between populations was low (0.879). Analysis of molecular variance revealed that 59.52% of the variation was contained within populations, and 40.48% was between populations. RAPD markers were effective for genetic diversity analysis within and between natural babassu populations, and exhibited a high level of polymorphism. Genetic diversity was the highest within populations; variability was lower in the managed populations than in the undisturbed populations.

  13. Genetic stability of micropropagated plants of Crambe abyssinica Hochst using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Werner, E T; Soares, T C B; Gontijo, A B P L; Souza Neto, J D; do Amaral, J A T

    2015-12-09

    Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is a non-edible annual herb, which was first cultivated to extract oil for industry, and now has great potential for biodiesel production. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the genetic stability of micropropagated plants of the C. abyssinica Hochst cultivar 'FMS brilhante' using polymerase chain reaction techniques based on inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. The aim was to develop a protocol for the in vitro regeneration of these plants with low genetic variation as compared to the donor plant. For micropropagation, shoot tips from in vitro germinated seedlings were used as explants and were initially cultivated for 90 days on MS medium with 5.0 μM 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), which at 90 days, led to the highest number of shoots per explant (NSE) (12.20 shoots) being detected. After 120 days, the interaction between BAP concentration and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) was tested, and the highest NSE was observed following exposure to 0.0/0.5 μM BAP/NAA (11.40 shoots) and 1.0/0.0 μM BAP/NAA (11.00 shoots). The highest proportion of rooting phase were observed following exposure to 0.5 μM NAA (30%). The 13 ISSR primers used to analyze genetic stability produced 91 amplification products, of which only eight bands were polymorphic and 83 were monomorphic for all 10 regenerated crambe plants, compared to the donor plant explant. These results indicate that crambe shoot tips are a highly reliable explant that can be used to micropropagate genetically true-to-type plants or to maintain genetic stability, as verified using ISSR markers.

  14. Questionable Specificity of Genetic Total Faecal Pollution Markers for Integrated Water Quality Monitoring and Source Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierheilig, Julia; Reischer, Georg H.; Farnleitner, Andreas H.

    2010-05-01

    Characterisation of microbial faecal hazards in water is a fundamental aspect for target-orientated water resources management to achieve appropriate water quality for various purposes like water supply or agriculture and thus to minimize related health risks. Nowadays the management of water resources increasingly demands detailed knowledge on the extent and the origin of microbial pollution. Cultivation of standard faecal indicator bacteria, which has been used for over a century to test the microbiological water quality, cannot sufficiently meet these challenges. The abundant intestinal bacterial populations are very promising alternative targets for modern faecal indication systems. Numerous assays for the detection of genetic markers targeting source-specific populations of the phylum Bacteroidetes have been developed in recent years. In some cases markers for total faecal pollution were also proposed in order to relate source-specific marker concentrations to general faecal pollution levels. However, microbial populations in intestinal and non-intestinal systems exhibit a dazzling array of diversity and molecular analysis of microbial faecal pollution has been based on a fragmentary puzzle of very limited sequence information. The aim of this study was to test the available qPCR-based methods detecting genetic Bacteroidetes markers for total faecal pollution in terms of their value and specificity as indicators of faecal pollution. We applied the AllBac (Layton et al., 2006) the BacUni (Kildare et al., 2007) and the Bacteroidetes (Dick and Field, 2004) assays on soil DNA samples. Samples were collected in well characterised karst spring catchments in Austria's Eastern Calcareous Alps. They were at various levels of altitude between 800 and 1800 meters above sea level and from several different habitats (woodland, alpine pastures, krummholz). In addition we tried to choose sampling sites representing a presumptive gradient of faecal pollution levels. For

  15. Associations of genetic markers in cattle receiving differing implant protocols.

    PubMed

    King, D A; Shackelford, S D; McDaneld, T G; Kuehn, L A; Kemp, C M; Smith, T P L; Wheeler, T L; Koohmaraie, M

    2012-07-01

    The potential interaction of growth-promoting implants and genetic markers previously reported to be associated with growth, carcass traits, and tenderness was evaluated. Two implant protocols were applied to subsets of steers (n = 383) and heifers (n = 65) that were also genotyped for 47 SNP reported to be associated with variation in growth, fat thickness, LM area, marbling, or tenderness. The "mild" protocol consisted of a single terminal implant [16 mg estradiol benzoate (EB), 80 mg trenbalone acetate (TBA) or 8 mg EB, 80 mg TBA given to steers and heifers, respectively]. The "aggressive" protocol consisted of both a growing implant (8 mg EB, 40 mg TBA) for the lightest half of the animals on the aggressive protocol and 2 successive implants (28 mg EB, 200 mg TBA) given to all animals assigned to the aggressive treatment. Implant protocol had measurable impact on BW and ADG (P < 0.05), with the aggressive protocol increasing these traits before the terminal implant (relative to the mild protocol), whereas the mild protocol increased ADG after the terminal implant so that the final BW and ADG over the experimental period were similar between protocols. Animals on the aggressive protocol had significantly increased (P < 0.05) LM area (1.9 cm(2)), slice shear force (1.4 kg), and intact desmin (0.05 units), but decreased (P < 0.05) marbling score (49 units) and adjusted fat thickness (0.1 cm), and yield grade (0.15 units). Among both treatments, 8 of 9 growth-related SNP were associated with BW or ADG, and 6 of 17 tenderness-related SNP were associated with slice shear force or intact desmin. Favorable growth alleles generally were associated with increased carcass yield traits but decreased tenderness. Similarly, favorable tenderness genotypes for some markers were associated with decreased BW and ADG. Some interactions of implant protocol and genotype were noted, with some growth SNP alleles increasing the effect of the aggressive protocol. In contrast, putative

  16. Molecular Genetic of Atopic dermatitis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Alnomair, Naief; Alobead, Zeiad Abdulaziz; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory skin disease. The pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, but the disease results from dysfunctions of skin barrier and immune response, where both genetic and environmental factors play a key role. Recent studies demonstrate the substantial evidences that show a strong genetic association with AD. As for example, AD patients have a positive family history and have a concordance rate in twins. Moreover, several candidate genes have now been suspected that play a central role in the genetic background of AD. In last decade advanced procedures similar to genome-wide association (GWA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been applied on different population and now it has been clarified that AD is significantly associated with genes of innate/adaptive immune systems, human leukocyte antigens (HLA), cytokines, chemokines, drug-metabolizing genes or various other genes. In this review, we will highlight the recent advancements in the molecular genetics of AD, especially on possible functional relevance of genetic variants discovered to date. PMID:27004062

  17. Cultivar identification and genetic relatedness among 25 black walnut (Juglans nigra) clones based on microsatellite markers

    Treesearch

    Kejia Pang; Keith Woeste; Charles. Michler

    2017-01-01

    A set of eight microsatellite markers was used to genotype 25 black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) clones within the Purdue University germplasm repository. The identities of 212 ramets were verified using the same eight microsatellite markers. Some trees were mislabeled and corrected as to clone using analysis of microsatellite markers. A genetic...

  18. Comparative mitochondrial genomics toward exploring molecular markers in the medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Hao, Ai-Jing; Zhao, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Jie

    2017-01-10

    Cordyceps militaris is a fungus used for developing health food, but knowledge about its intraspecific differentiation is limited due to lack of efficient markers. Herein, we assembled the mitochondrial genomes of eight C. militaris strains and performed a comparative mitochondrial genomic analysis together with three previously reported mitochondrial genomes of the fungus. Sizes of the 11 mitochondrial genomes varied from 26.5 to 33.9 kb mainly due to variable intron contents (from two to eight introns per strain). Nucleotide variability varied according to different regions with non-coding regions showing higher variation frequency than coding regions. Recombination events were identified between some locus pairs but seemed not to contribute greatly to genetic variations of the fungus. Based on nucleotide diversity fluctuations across the alignment of all mitochondrial genomes, molecular markers with the potential to be used for future typing studies were determined.

  19. Comparative mitochondrial genomics toward exploring molecular markers in the medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Hao, Ai-Jing; Zhao, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a fungus used for developing health food, but knowledge about its intraspecific differentiation is limited due to lack of efficient markers. Herein, we assembled the mitochondrial genomes of eight C. militaris strains and performed a comparative mitochondrial genomic analysis together with three previously reported mitochondrial genomes of the fungus. Sizes of the 11 mitochondrial genomes varied from 26.5 to 33.9 kb mainly due to variable intron contents (from two to eight introns per strain). Nucleotide variability varied according to different regions with non-coding regions showing higher variation frequency than coding regions. Recombination events were identified between some locus pairs but seemed not to contribute greatly to genetic variations of the fungus. Based on nucleotide diversity fluctuations across the alignment of all mitochondrial genomes, molecular markers with the potential to be used for future typing studies were determined. PMID:28071691

  20. Multidrug resistance as a dominant molecular marker in transformation of wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Kozovska, Z; Maraz, A; Magyar, I; Subik, J

    2001-12-14

    Pure wine yeast cultures are increasingly used in winemaking to perform controlled fermentations and produce wine of reproducible quality. For the genetic manipulation of natural wine yeast strains dominant selective markers are obviously useful. Here we demonstrate the successful use of the mutated PDR3 gene as a dominant molecular marker for the selection of transformants of prototrophic wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The selected transformants displayed a multidrug resistance phenotype that was resistant to strobilurin derivatives and azoles used to control pathogenic fungi in agriculture and medicine, respectively. Random amplification of DNA sequences and electrophoretic karyotyping of the host and transformed strains after microvinification experiments resulted in the same gel electrophoresis patterns. The chemical and sensory analysis of experimental wines proved that the used transformants preserved all their useful winemaking properties indicating that the pdr3-9 allele does not deteriorate the technological properties of the transformed wine yeast strain.

  1. Comparison of the effectiveness of ISJ and SSR markers and detection of outlier loci in conservation genetics of Pulsatilla patens populations

    PubMed Central

    Szczecińska, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Background Research into the protection of rare and endangered plant species involves genetic analyses to determine their genetic variation and genetic structure. Various categories of genetic markers are used for this purpose. Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR), are the most popular category of markers in population genetics research. In most cases, microsatellites account for a large part of the noncoding DNA and exert a neutral effect on the genome. Neutrality is a desirable feature in evaluations of genetic differences between populations, but it does not support analyses of a population’s ability to adapt to a given environment or its evolutionary potential. Despite the numerous advantages of microsatellites, non-neutral markers may supply important information in conservation genetics research. They are used to evaluate adaptation to specific environmental conditions and a population’s adaptive potential. The aim of this study was to compare the level of genetic variation in Pulsatilla patens populations revealed by neutral SSR markers and putatively adaptive ISJ markers (intron-exon splice junction). Methods The experiment was conducted on 14 Polish populations of P. patens and three P. patens populations from the nearby region of Vitebsk in Belarus. A total of 345 individuals were examined. Analyses were performed with the use of eight SSR primers specific to P. patens and three ISJ primers. Results SSR markers revealed a higher level of genetic variation than ISJ markers (He = 0.609, He = 0.145, respectively). An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that, the overall genetic diversity between the analyzed populations defined by parameters FST and ΦPT for SSR (20%) and ΦPT for ISJ (21%) markers was similar. Analysis conducted in the Structure program divided analyzed populations into two groups (SSR loci) and three groups (ISJ markers). Mantel test revealed correlations between the geographic distance and genetic

  2. Genetic African Ancestry and Markers of Mineral Metabolism in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Afshin; Isakova, Tamara; Scialla, Julia J.; Chen, Jing; Flack, John M.; Nessel, Lisa C.; Gupta, Jayanta; Bellovich, Keith A.; Steigerwalt, Susan; Sondheimer, James H.; Wright, Jackson T.; Feldman, Harold I.; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Wolf, Myles

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Disorders of mineral metabolism are more common in African Americans with CKD than in European Americans with CKD. Previous studies have focused on the differences in mineral metabolism by self-reported race, making it difficult to delineate the importance of environmental compared with biologic factors. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In a cross-sectional analysis of 3013 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study with complete data, we compared markers of mineral metabolism (phosphorus, calcium, alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, and urine calcium and phosphorus excretion) in European Americans versus African Americans and separately, across quartiles of genetic African ancestry in African Americans (n=1490). Results Compared with European Americans, African Americans had higher blood concentrations of phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, fibroblast growth factor 23, and parathyroid hormone, lower 24-hour urinary excretion of calcium and phosphorus, and lower urinary fractional excretion of calcium and phosphorus at baseline (P<0.001 for all). Among African Americans, a higher percentage of African ancestry was associated with lower 24-hour urinary excretion of phosphorus (Ptrend<0.01) in unadjusted analyses. In linear regression models adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, kidney function, serum phosphorus, and dietary phosphorus intake, higher percentage of African ancestry was significantly associated with lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus excretion (each 10% higher African ancestry was associated with 39.6 mg lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus, P<0.001) and fractional excretion of phosphorus (each 10% higher African ancestry was associated with an absolute 1.1% lower fractional excretion of phosphorus, P=0.01). Conclusions A higher percentage of African ancestry was independently associated with lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus excretion and lower fractional

  3. Genetic African Ancestry and Markers of Mineral Metabolism in CKD.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M; Parsa, Afshin; Isakova, Tamara; Scialla, Julia J; Chen, Jing; Flack, John M; Nessel, Lisa C; Gupta, Jayanta; Bellovich, Keith A; Steigerwalt, Susan; Sondheimer, James H; Wright, Jackson T; Feldman, Harold I; Kusek, John W; Lash, James P; Wolf, Myles

    2016-04-07

    Disorders of mineral metabolism are more common in African Americans with CKD than in European Americans with CKD. Previous studies have focused on the differences in mineral metabolism by self-reported race, making it difficult to delineate the importance of environmental compared with biologic factors. In a cross-sectional analysis of 3013 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study with complete data, we compared markers of mineral metabolism (phosphorus, calcium, alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, and urine calcium and phosphorus excretion) in European Americans versus African Americans and separately, across quartiles of genetic African ancestry in African Americans (n=1490). Compared with European Americans, African Americans had higher blood concentrations of phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, fibroblast growth factor 23, and parathyroid hormone, lower 24-hour urinary excretion of calcium and phosphorus, and lower urinary fractional excretion of calcium and phosphorus at baseline (P<0.001 for all). Among African Americans, a higher percentage of African ancestry was associated with lower 24-hour urinary excretion of phosphorus (Ptrend<0.01) in unadjusted analyses. In linear regression models adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, kidney function, serum phosphorus, and dietary phosphorus intake, higher percentage of African ancestry was significantly associated with lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus excretion (each 10% higher African ancestry was associated with 39.6 mg lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus, P<0.001) and fractional excretion of phosphorus (each 10% higher African ancestry was associated with an absolute 1.1% lower fractional excretion of phosphorus, P=0.01). A higher percentage of African ancestry was independently associated with lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus excretion and lower fractional excretion of phosphorus among African Americans with CKD. These findings suggest that genetic

  4. Molecular diversity and population structure of the forage grass Hemarthria compressa (Poaceae) in south China based on SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Huang, L-K; Zhang, X-Q; Xie, W-G; Zhang, J; Cheng, L; Yan, H D

    2012-08-16

    Hemarthria compressa is one of the most important and widely utilized forage crops in south China, owing to its high forage yield and capability of adaptation to hot and humid conditions. We examined the population structure and genetic variation within and among 12 populations of H. compressa in south China using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers. High genetic diversity was found in these samples [percentage polymorphic bands (PPB) = 82.21%, Shannon's diversity index (I) = 0.352]. However, there was relatively low level of genetic diversity at the population level (PPB = 29.17%, I = 0.155). A high degree of genetic differentiation among populations was detected based on other measures and molecular markers (Nei's genetic diversity analysis: G(ST) = 54.19%; AMOVA analysis: F(ST) = 53.35%). The SRAP markers were found to be more efficient than ISSR markers for evaluating population diversity. Based on these findings, we propose changes in sampling strategies for appraising and utilizing the genetic resources of this species.

  5. Clinical and molecular genetics of psychotic depression.

    PubMed

    Domschke, Katharina

    2013-07-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of clinical and molecular genetic as well as pharmacogenetic studies regarding the clinical phenotype of "psychotic depression." Results are discussed with regard to the long-standing debate on categorical vs dimensional disease models of affective and psychotic disorders on a continuum from unipolar depression over bipolar disorder and schizoaffective disorder to schizophrenia. Clinical genetic studies suggest a familial aggregation and a considerable heritability (39%) of psychotic depression partly shared with schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia, and affective disorders. Molecular genetic studies point to potential risk loci of psychotic depression shared with schizoaffective disorder (1q42, 22q11, 19p13), depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia (6p, 8p22, 10p13-12, 10p14, 13q13-14, 13q32, 18p, 22q11-13) and several vulnerability genes possibly contributing to an increased risk of psychotic symptoms in depression (eg, BDNF, DBH, DTNBP1, DRD2, DRD4, GSK-3beta, MAO-A). Pharmacogenetic studies implicate 5-HTT, TPH1, and DTNBP1 gene variation in the mediation of antidepressant treatment response in psychotic depression. Genetic factors are suggested to contribute to the disease risk of psychotic depression in partial overlap with disorders along the affective-psychotic spectrum. Thus, genetic research focusing on psychotic depression might inspire a more dimensional, neurobiologically and symptom-oriented taxonomy of affective and psychotic disorders challenging the dichotomous Kraepelinian view. Additionally, pharmacogenetic studies might aid in the development of a more personalized treatment of psychotic depression with an individually tailored antidepressive/antipsychotic pharmacotherapy according to genotype.

  6. Exploring the genetic diversity of Ethiopian grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) using EST-SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Shiferaw, E; Pè, M E; Porceddu, E; Ponnaiah, M

    2012-08-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in public databases and cross-species transferable markers are considered to be a cost-effective means for developing sequence-based markers for less-studied species. In this study, EST-simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed from Lathyrus sativus L. EST sequences and cross-transferable EST-SSRs derived from Medicago truncatula L. were utilized to investigate the genetic diversity among grass pea populations from Ethiopia. A total of 45 alleles were detected using eleven EST-SSRs with an average of four alleles per locus. The average polymorphism information content for all primers was 0.416. The average gene diversity was 0.477, ranging from 0.205 for marker Ls942 to 0.804 for MtBA32F05. F(ST) values estimated by analysis of molecular variance were 0.01, 0.15, and 0.84 for among regions, among accessions and within accessions respectively, indicating that most of the variation (84%) resides within accessions. Model-based cluster analysis grouped the accessions into three clusters, grouping accessions irrespective of their collection regions. Among the regions, high levels of diversity were observed in Gojam, Gonder, Shewa and Welo regions, with Gonder region showing a higher number of different alleles. From breeding and conservation aspects, conducting a close study on a specific population would be advisable for genetic improvement in the crop, and it would be appropriate if future collection and conservation plans give due attention to under-represented regions. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11032-011-9662-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  7. Annotated genetic linkage maps of Pinus pinaster Ait. from a Central Spain population using microsatellite and gene based markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pinus pinaster Ait. is a major resin producing species in Spain. Genetic linkage mapping can facilitate marker-assisted selection (MAS) through the identification of Quantitative Trait Loci and selection of allelic variants of interest in breeding populations. In this study, we report annotated genetic linkage maps for two individuals (C14 and C15) belonging to a breeding program aiming to increase resin production. We use different types of DNA markers, including last-generation molecular markers. Results We obtained 13 and 14 linkage groups for C14 and C15 maps, respectively. A total of 211 and 215 markers were positioned on each map and estimated genome length was between 1,870 and 2,166 cM respectively, which represents near 65% of genome coverage. Comparative mapping with previously developed genetic linkage maps for P. pinaster based on about 60 common markers enabled aligning linkage groups to this reference map. The comparison of our annotated linkage maps and linkage maps reporting QTL information revealed 11 annotated SNPs in candidate genes that co-localized with previously reported QTLs for wood properties and water use efficiency. Conclusions This study provides genetic linkage maps from a Spanish population that shows high levels of genetic divergence with French populations from which segregating progenies have been previously mapped. These genetic maps will be of interest to construct a reliable consensus linkage map for the species. The importance of developing functional genetic linkage maps is highlighted, especially when working with breeding populations for its future application in MAS for traits of interest. PMID:23036012

  8. Hypertension genes are genetic markers for insulin sensitivity and resistance.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuqing; Cheng, Suzanne; Taylor, Kent D; Cui, Jinrui; Hughes, Randall; Quiñones, Manuel J; Bulnes-Enriquez, Isabel; De la Rosa, Roxana; Aurea, George; Yang, Huiying; Hsueh, Willa; Rotter, Jerome I

    2005-04-01

    Insulin resistance is a determinant of blood pressure variation and risk factor for hypertension. Because insulin resistance and blood pressure cosegregate in Mexican American families, we thus investigated the association between variations in 9 previously reported hypertension genes (ACE, AGT, AGTRI, ADDI, NPPA, ADDRB2, SCNN1A, GNB3, and NOS3) and insulin resistance. Families were ascertained via a coronary artery disease proband in the Mexican American Coronary Artery Disease Project. Individuals from 100 Mexican American families (n=656) were genotyped for 14 polymorphisms in the 9 genes and all adult offspring and offspring spouses were phenotyped for insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (n=449). AGT M235T and NOS3 A(-922)G and E298D polymorphisms were significantly associated with insulin sensitivity (P=0.018, 0.036, 0.039) but were not significant after adjusting for body mass index. ADD1 G460W was associated with insulin sensitivity only after adjusting for body mass index. The NPPA T2238C and SCNN1A A663T were associated with decreased fasting insulin levels after adjusting for body mass index (P=0.015 and 0.028). In conclusion, AGT, NOS3, NPPA, ADRB2, ADD1, and SCNN1A may well be genetic markers for insulin resistance, and adiposity was a potential modifier for only some gene/trait combinations. Our data support the hypothesis that genes in the blood pressure pathway may play a role in insulin resistance in Mexican Americans.