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Sample records for molecular genetic markers

  1. Molecular Marker Systems for Oenothera Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Rauwolf, Uwe; Golczyk, Hieronim; Meurer, Jörg; Herrmann, Reinhold G.; Greiner, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The genus Oenothera has an outstanding scientific tradition. It has been a model for studying aspects of chromosome evolution and speciation, including the impact of plastid nuclear co-evolution. A large collection of strains analyzed during a century of experimental work and unique genetic possibilities allow the exchange of genetically definable plastids, individual or multiple chromosomes, and/or entire haploid genomes (Renner complexes) between species. However, molecular genetic approaches for the genus are largely lacking. In this study, we describe the development of efficient PCR-based marker systems for both the nuclear genome and the plastome. They allow distinguishing individual chromosomes, Renner complexes, plastomes, and subplastomes. We demonstrate their application by monitoring interspecific exchanges of genomes, chromosome pairs, and/or plastids during crossing programs, e.g., to produce plastome–genome incompatible hybrids. Using an appropriate partial permanent translocation heterozygous hybrid, linkage group 7 of the molecular map could be assigned to chromosome 9·8 of the classical Oenothera map. Finally, we provide the first direct molecular evidence that homologous recombination and free segregation of chromosomes in permanent translocation heterozygous strains is suppressed. PMID:18791241

  2. Molecular Genetic Markers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yohe, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Genetics play an increasingly important role in the risk stratification and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Traditionally, AML classification and risk stratification relied on cytogenetic studies; however, molecular detection of gene mutations is playing an increasingly important role in classification, risk stratification, and management of AML. Molecular testing does not take the place of cytogenetic testing results, but plays a complementary role to help refine prognosis, especially within specific AML subgroups. With the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML therapy is not targeted but the intensity of therapy is driven by the prognostic subgroup. Many prognostic scoring systems classify patients into favorable, poor, or intermediate prognostic subgroups based on clinical and genetic features. Current standard of care combines cytogenetic results with targeted testing for mutations in FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and KIT to determine the prognostic subgroup. Other gene mutations have also been demonstrated to predict prognosis and may play a role in future risk stratification, although some of these have not been confirmed in multiple studies or established as standard of care. This paper will review the contribution of cytogenetic results to prognosis in AML and then will focus on molecular mutations that have a prognostic or possible therapeutic impact. PMID:26239249

  3. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  4. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R.; Muruaga-Martínez, José S.; Vargas-Vázquez, M.L. Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-01-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  5. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  6. Genetic characterization of fig tree mutants with molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M G F; Martins, A B G; Desidério, J A; Bertoni, B W; Alves, M C

    2012-08-06

    The fig (Ficus carica L.) is a fruit tree of great world importance and, therefore, the genetic improvement becomes an important field of research for better crops, being necessary to gather information on this species, mainly regarding its genetic variability so that appropriate propagation projects and management are made. The improvement programs of fig trees using conventional procedures in order to obtain new cultivars are rare in many countries, such as Brazil, especially due to the little genetic variability and to the difficulties in obtaining plants from gamete fusion once the wasp Blastophaga psenes, responsible for the natural pollinating, is not found in Brazil. In this way, the mutagenic genetic improvement becomes a solution of it. For this reason, in an experiment conducted earlier, fig plants formed by cuttings treated with gamma ray were selected based on their agronomic characteristics of interest. We determined the genetic variability in these fig tree selections, using RAPD and AFLP molecular markers, comparing them to each other and to the Roxo-de-Valinhos, used as the standard. For the reactions of DNA amplification, 140 RAPD primers and 12 primer combinations for AFLP analysis were used. The selections did not differ genetically between themselves and between them and the Roxo-de-Valinhos cultivar. Techniques that can detect polymorphism between treatments, such as DNA sequencing, must be tested. The phenotypic variation of plants may be due to epigenetic variation, necessitating the use of techniques with methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes.

  7. Genetic diversity assessment of summer squash landraces using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Mady, Emad A; Helaly, Alaa Al-Din; Abu El-Hamd, Abdel Naem; Abdou, Arafa; Shanan, Shamel A; Craker, Lyle E

    2013-07-01

    Plant identification, classification, and genotyping within a germplasm collection are essential elements for establishing a breeding program that enhances the probability of plants with desirable characteristics in the market place. In this study, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used as a molecular tool to assess the diversity and relationship among 20 summer squash (Curcubita pepo L.) landraces traditionally used to treat hypertension and prostate hyperplasia. A total of 10 RAPD primers produced 65 reproducible bands of which 46 (70.77 %) were polymorphic, indicating a large number of genotypes within the summer squash lines. Cluster analysis divided the summer squash germplasm into two groups, one including one landrace and a second containing 19 landraces that could be divided into five sub-groups. Results of this study indicate the potential of RAPD markers for the identification and assessment of genetic variations among squash landraces and provide a number of choices for developing a successful breeding program to improve summer squash.

  8. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) Molecular Genetic Markers1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Burkart-Waco, Diana; Kuppu, Sundaram; Britt, Anne; Chetelat, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Genetic markers are essential when developing or working with genetically variable populations. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) markers are primer pairs that amplify single-locus sequences that differ in size for two or more alleles. They are attractive for their ease of use for rapid genotyping and their codominant nature. Here, we describe a heuristic algorithm that uses a k-mer-based approach to search two or more genome sequences to locate polymorphic regions suitable for designing candidate IGG marker primers. As input to the IGG pipeline software, the user provides genome sequences and the desired amplicon sizes and size differences. Primer sequences flanking polymorphic insertions/deletions are produced as output. IGG marker files for three sets of genomes, Solanum lycopersicum/Solanum pennellii, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Columbia-0/Landsberg erecta-0 accessions, and S. lycopersicum/S. pennellii/Solanum tuberosum (three-way polymorphic) are included. PMID:27436831

  9. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) Molecular Genetic Markers.

    PubMed

    Toal, Ted W; Burkart-Waco, Diana; Howell, Tyson; Ron, Mily; Kuppu, Sundaram; Britt, Anne; Chetelat, Roger; Brady, Siobhan M

    2016-09-01

    Genetic markers are essential when developing or working with genetically variable populations. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) markers are primer pairs that amplify single-locus sequences that differ in size for two or more alleles. They are attractive for their ease of use for rapid genotyping and their codominant nature. Here, we describe a heuristic algorithm that uses a k-mer-based approach to search two or more genome sequences to locate polymorphic regions suitable for designing candidate IGG marker primers. As input to the IGG pipeline software, the user provides genome sequences and the desired amplicon sizes and size differences. Primer sequences flanking polymorphic insertions/deletions are produced as output. IGG marker files for three sets of genomes, Solanum lycopersicum/Solanum pennellii, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Columbia-0/Landsberg erecta-0 accessions, and S. lycopersicum/S. pennellii/Solanum tuberosum (three-way polymorphic) are included. PMID:27436831

  10. Genetic Confirmation of Mungbean (Vigna radiata) and Mashbean (Vigna mungo) Interspecific Recombinants using Molecular Markers.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Hameed, Amjad; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ahsan, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad J; Iqbal, Nayyer

    2015-01-01

    Molecular confirmation of interspecific recombinants is essential to overcome the issues like self-pollination, environmental influence, and inadequacy of morphological characteristics during interspecific hybridization. The present study was conducted for genetic confirmation of mungbean (female) and mashbean (male) interspecific crosses using molecular markers. Initially, polymorphic random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), universal rice primers (URP), and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers differentiating parent genotypes were identified. Recombination in hybrids was confirmed using these polymorphic DNA markers. The NM 2006 × Mash 88 was most successful interspecific cross. Most of true recombinants confirmed by molecular markers were from this cross combination. SSR markers were efficient in detecting genetic variability and recombination with reference to specific chromosomes and particular loci. SSR (RIS) and RAPD identified variability dispersed throughout the genome. In conclusion, DNA based marker assisted selection (MAS) efficiently confirmed the interspecific recombinants. The results provided evidence that MAS can enhance the authenticity of selection in mungbean improvement program. PMID:26697053

  11. Genetic Confirmation of Mungbean (Vigna radiata) and Mashbean (Vigna mungo) Interspecific Recombinants using Molecular Markers.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Hameed, Amjad; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ahsan, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad J; Iqbal, Nayyer

    2015-01-01

    Molecular confirmation of interspecific recombinants is essential to overcome the issues like self-pollination, environmental influence, and inadequacy of morphological characteristics during interspecific hybridization. The present study was conducted for genetic confirmation of mungbean (female) and mashbean (male) interspecific crosses using molecular markers. Initially, polymorphic random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), universal rice primers (URP), and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers differentiating parent genotypes were identified. Recombination in hybrids was confirmed using these polymorphic DNA markers. The NM 2006 × Mash 88 was most successful interspecific cross. Most of true recombinants confirmed by molecular markers were from this cross combination. SSR markers were efficient in detecting genetic variability and recombination with reference to specific chromosomes and particular loci. SSR (RIS) and RAPD identified variability dispersed throughout the genome. In conclusion, DNA based marker assisted selection (MAS) efficiently confirmed the interspecific recombinants. The results provided evidence that MAS can enhance the authenticity of selection in mungbean improvement program.

  12. Genetic Confirmation of Mungbean (Vigna radiata) and Mashbean (Vigna mungo) Interspecific Recombinants using Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Ghulam; Hameed, Amjad; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ahsan, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad J.; Iqbal, Nayyer

    2015-01-01

    Molecular confirmation of interspecific recombinants is essential to overcome the issues like self-pollination, environmental influence, and inadequacy of morphological characteristics during interspecific hybridization. The present study was conducted for genetic confirmation of mungbean (female) and mashbean (male) interspecific crosses using molecular markers. Initially, polymorphic random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), universal rice primers (URP), and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers differentiating parent genotypes were identified. Recombination in hybrids was confirmed using these polymorphic DNA markers. The NM 2006 × Mash 88 was most successful interspecific cross. Most of true recombinants confirmed by molecular markers were from this cross combination. SSR markers were efficient in detecting genetic variability and recombination with reference to specific chromosomes and particular loci. SSR (RIS) and RAPD identified variability dispersed throughout the genome. In conclusion, DNA based marker assisted selection (MAS) efficiently confirmed the interspecific recombinants. The results provided evidence that MAS can enhance the authenticity of selection in mungbean improvement program. PMID:26697053

  13. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  14. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops.

  15. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  16. Choosing the right molecular genetic markers for studying biodiversity: from molecular evolution to practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Chenuil, Anne; Anne, Chenuil

    2006-05-01

    The use of molecular genetic markers (MGMs) has become widespread among evolutionary biologists, and the methods of analysis of genetic data improve rapidly, yet an organized framework in which scientists can work is lacking. Elements of molecular evolution are summarized to explain the origin of variation at the DNA level, its measures, and the relationships linking genetic variability to the biological parameters of the studied organisms. MGM are defined by two components: the DNA region(s) screened, and the technique used to reveal its variation. Criteria of choice belong to three categories: (1) the level of variability, (2) the nature of the information (e.g. dominance vs. codominance, ploidy, ... ) which must be determined according to the biological question and (3) some practical criteria which mainly depend on the equipment of the laboratory and experience of the scientist. A three-step procedure is proposed for drawing up MGMs suitable to answer given biological questions, and compiled data are organized to guide the choice at each step: (1) choice, determined by the biological question, of the level of variability and of the criteria of the nature of information, (2) choice of the DNA region and (3) choice of the technique.

  17. Comprehensive genetic discrimination of Leonurus cardiaca populations by AFLP, ISSR, RAPD and IRAP molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah; Soorni, Aboozar

    2014-06-01

    Leonurus cardiaca is well known for its medicinal importance. In this investigation, genotypic characterization of this species from six eco-geographical regions of Iran was evaluated by four molecular techniques (AFLP, RAPD, ISSR and IRAP). A total of 899 polymorphic fragments were detected by used molecular markers (AFLP = 356, RAPD = 325, ISSR = 113 and IRAP = 105) with an overall average polymorphism of 81.24%. Genetic variation calculated using Shannon's Information index (I) and Nei's gene diversity index (H) showed high genetic diversity in studied germplasm. Also, analysis of molecular variance showed high genetic variation among (55%) and within populations (45%). UPGMA dendrogram constructed from combined data of molecular markers distinguished studied populations in accordance with the results obtained by each marker which all individuals were clearly differentiated into two major clusters. The correlation coefficients were statistically significant for all marker systems with the highest correlation between similarity matrixes of RAPD and ISSR markers (r = 0.82). The present results have an important implication for L. cardiaca germplasm characterization, improvement, and conservation. Furthermore, the characterized individuals exhibited a great deal of molecular variation and they seem to have a rich gene pool for breeding programs.

  18. A review on SNP and other types of molecular markers and their use in animal genetics

    PubMed Central

    Vignal, Alain; Milan, Denis; SanCristobal, Magali; Eggen, André

    2002-01-01

    During the last ten years, the use of molecular markers, revealing polymorphism at the DNA level, has been playing an increasing part in animal genetics studies. Amongst others, the microsatellite DNA marker has been the most widely used, due to its easy use by simple PCR, followed by a denaturing gel electrophoresis for allele size determination, and to the high degree of information provided by its large number of alleles per locus. Despite this, a new marker type, named SNP, for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism, is now on the scene and has gained high popularity, even though it is only a bi-allelic type of marker. In this review, we will discuss the reasons for this apparent step backwards, and the pertinence of the use of SNPs in animal genetics, in comparison with other marker types. PMID:12081799

  19. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In...

  20. Molecular Markers and Cotton Genetic Improvement: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Waqas; Iqbal, Muhammad Zaffar; Ali Khan, Asif; Qayyum, Abdul; Ali Abid, Muhammad; Noor, Etrat; Qadir Ahmad, Muhammad; Hasan Abbasi, Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    Narrow genetic base and complex allotetraploid genome of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is stimulating efforts to avail required polymorphism for marker based breeding. The availability of draft genome sequence of G. raimondii and G. arboreum and next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies facilitated the development of high-throughput marker technologies in cotton. The concepts of genetic diversity, QTL mapping, and marker assisted selection (MAS) are evolving into more efficient concepts of linkage disequilibrium, association mapping, and genomic selection, respectively. The objective of the current review is to analyze the pace of evolution in the molecular marker technologies in cotton during the last ten years into the following four areas: (i) comparative analysis of low- and high-throughput marker technologies available in cotton, (ii) genetic diversity in the available wild and improved gene pools of cotton, (iii) identification of the genomic regions within cotton genome underlying economic traits, and (iv) marker based selection methodologies. Moreover, the applications of marker technologies to enhance the breeding efficiency in cotton are also summarized. Aforementioned genomic technologies and the integration of several other omics resources are expected to enhance the cotton productivity and meet the global fiber quantity and quality demands. PMID:25401149

  1. Molecular marker development and genetic diversity exploration by RNA-seq in Platycodon grandiflorum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Jung, Jungsu; Kim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Je Min; Choi, Doil; Yeam, Inhwa

    2015-10-01

    Platycodon grandiflorum, generally known as the bellflower or balloon flower, is the only species in the genus Platycodon of the family Campanulaceae. Platycodon plants have been traditionally used as a medicinal crop in East Asia for their antiphlogistic, antitussive, and expectorant properties. Despite these practical uses, marker-assisted selection and molecular breeding in platycodons have lagged due to the lack of genetic information on this genus. In this study, we performed RNA-seq analysis of three platycodon accessions to develop molecular markers and explore genetic diversity. First, genic simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were retrieved and compared; dinucleotide motifs were the most abundant repeats (39%-40%) followed by trinucleotide (25%-31%), tetranucleotide (1.5%-1.9%), and pentanucleotide (0.3%-1.0%) repeats. The result of in silico SSR analysis, three SSR markers were detected and showed possibility to distinguish three platycodon accessions. After several filtering procedures, 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to design 40 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers. Twelve of these PCR-based markers were validated as highly polymorphic and utilized to investigate genetic diversity in 21 platycodon accessions collected from various regions of South Korea. Collectively, the 12 markers yielded 35 alleles, with an average of 3 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.087 to 0.693, averaging 0.373 per locus. Since platycodon genetics have not been actively studied, the sequence information and the DNA markers generated from our research have the potential to contribute to further genetic improvements, genomic studies, and gene discovery in this genus.

  2. Molecular profiling for genetic variability in Capsicum species based on ISSR and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Thul, Sanjog T; Darokar, Mahendra P; Shasany, Ajit K; Khanuja, Suman P S

    2012-06-01

    The taxonomic identity of Capsicum species is found to be difficult as it displays variations at morpho-chemical characters. Twenty-two accessions of six Capsicum species, namely, C. annuum, C. baccatum, C. chinense, C. eximium, C. frutescens, and C. luteum were investigated for phenotypic diversity based on flower color and for genetic differences by molecular makers. The genetic cluster analyses of 27 RAPD and eight ISSR primers, respectively, revealed genetic similarities in the ranges of 23-88% and 11-96%. Principal component analysis of the pooled RAPD and ISSR data further supports the genetic similarity and groupings. Different species showed variations in relation to corolla shade of flower. C. annuum accessions formed a single cluster in the molecular analysis as maintaining their flower characteristic. C. chinense accession shared flower features with the accessions of C. frutescens and were found to be closer at genotypic level. C. luteum was found to be rather closer to C. baccatum complex, both phenotypically and genetically. The only accession of C. eximium presenting purple flowers falls apart from the groupings. The floral characteristics and the molecular markers are found to be useful toward the delineation of the species specificity in Capsicum collection and identification of genetic stock.

  3. [Genetic singularity coefficients of common vetch Vicia sativa L. accessions determined with molecular markers].

    PubMed

    Potokina, E K; Aleksandrova, T G

    2008-11-01

    Organization and practical application of ex situ collections require estimation of genetic differences between numerous accessions of local cultivars and field weed forms collected from the same ecological and geographical region and similar in their morphophysiological characteristics. A mathematical algorithm for estimating the degree of genetic singularity of a specimen in the system of local gene pool determined with the help of molecular markers is described. The utility of this algorithm is demonstrated by the example of classification of 677 common vetch accessions from the collection of the Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry from 11 ecological-geographic regions of Russia analyzed using AFLP. The proposed classification of accessions is the result of processing the AFLP data by weighting the marker traits based on their frequency in particular regions. This allowed each accession to be characterized according to the ratio of rare and frequent alleles as a genetic singularity coefficient. The proposed method is appropriate for any types of molecular markers. A practical result of its application is the classification of accessions using a five-point score scale, which can be added to descriptors of certificate databases and used for optimization of the work with collections.

  4. Assessment of genetic diversity among 16 promising cultivars of ginger using cytological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Sanghamitra; Naik, Pradeep K; Acharya, Laxmikanta; Mukherjee, Arup K; Panda, Pratap C; Das, Premananda

    2005-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is an economically important plant, valued all over the world. The existing variation among 16 promising cultivars as observed through differential rhizome yield (181.9 to 477.3 g) was proved to have a genetic basis using different genetic markers such as karyotype, 4C nuclear DNA content and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The karyotypic analysis revealed a differential distribution of A, B, C, D and E type of chromosomes among different cultivars as represented by different karyotype formulas. A significant variation of 4C DNA content was recorded in ginger at an intraspecific level with values ranging from 17.1 to 24.3 pg. RAPD analysis revealed a differential polymorphism of DNA showing a number of polymorphic bands ranging from 26 to 70 among 16 cultivars. The RAPD primers OPC02, OPA02, OPD20 and OPN06 showing strong resolving power were able to distinguish all 16 cultivars. The extent of genetic diversity among these cultivars was computed through parameters of gene diversity, sum of allele numbers per locus and Shannon's information indices. Cluster analysis, Nei's genetic similarity and genetic distances, distribution of cultivars into special distance classes and principal coordinate analysis and the analysis of molecular variance suggested a conspicuous genetic diversity among different cultivars studied. The genetic variation thus detected among promising cultivars of ginger has significance for ginger improvement programs.

  5. Assessment of genetic diversity among 16 promising cultivars of ginger using cytological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Sanghamitra; Naik, Pradeep K; Acharya, Laxmikanta; Mukherjee, Arup K; Panda, Pratap C; Das, Premananda

    2005-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is an economically important plant, valued all over the world. The existing variation among 16 promising cultivars as observed through differential rhizome yield (181.9 to 477.3 g) was proved to have a genetic basis using different genetic markers such as karyotype, 4C nuclear DNA content and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The karyotypic analysis revealed a differential distribution of A, B, C, D and E type of chromosomes among different cultivars as represented by different karyotype formulas. A significant variation of 4C DNA content was recorded in ginger at an intraspecific level with values ranging from 17.1 to 24.3 pg. RAPD analysis revealed a differential polymorphism of DNA showing a number of polymorphic bands ranging from 26 to 70 among 16 cultivars. The RAPD primers OPC02, OPA02, OPD20 and OPN06 showing strong resolving power were able to distinguish all 16 cultivars. The extent of genetic diversity among these cultivars was computed through parameters of gene diversity, sum of allele numbers per locus and Shannon's information indices. Cluster analysis, Nei's genetic similarity and genetic distances, distribution of cultivars into special distance classes and principal coordinate analysis and the analysis of molecular variance suggested a conspicuous genetic diversity among different cultivars studied. The genetic variation thus detected among promising cultivars of ginger has significance for ginger improvement programs. PMID:16047412

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity among faba bean genotypes using agro-morphological and molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Megahed H.; Alghamdi, Salem S.; Migdadi, Hussein M.; Khan, Muhammad A.; El-Harty, Ehab H.; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A.

    2015-01-01

    Forty faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes were evaluated for their agro-morphological performance and molecular diversity under Central Region of Saudi Arabia conditions during 2010–11 and 2011–12 seasons. Field performance results showed that faba genotypes exhibited a significant amount of variation for their agro-morphological studied parameters. Giza40 recorded the tallest genotype (139.5 cm), highest number of seeds per plants (100.8), and the highest seed yield per plant (70.8 g). The best performing genotypes were Giza40, FLIP03-014FB, Gazira1 and Goff1. Genetic variability among genotypes was determined using Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 183 amplified fragments (alleles) and 1758 polymorphic fragments (bands) in SRAP and 202 alleles and 716 bands in AFLP were obtained using six SRAP and four AFLP primer combinations respectively. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for AFLP and SRAP markers were higher than 0.8, indicating the existence of a considerable amount of genetic diversity among faba tested genotypes. The UPGMA based clustering of faba genotypes was largely based on origin and/or genetic background. Result of cluster analysis based on SRAP showed weak and not significant correlation while, it was highly significant based on AFLP analysis with agro-morphological characters (r = 0.01, p > 0.54 and r = 0.26, p < 0.004 respectively). Combined SRAP and AFLP markers proved to be significantly useful for genetic diversity assessment at molecular level. They exhibited high discrimination power, and were able to distinguish the faba bean genotypes with high efficiency and accuracy levels. PMID:25972757

  7. Population genetic structure of rare and endangered plants using molecular markers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raji, Jennifer; Atkinson, Carter T.

    2013-01-01

    This study was initiated to assess the levels of genetic diversity and differentiation in the remaining populations of Phyllostegia stachyoides and Melicope zahlbruckneri in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and determine the extent of gene flow to identify genetically distinct individuals or groups for conservation purposes. Thirty-six Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphic (AFLP) primer combinations generated a total of 3,242 polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments in the P. stachyoides population with a percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB) ranging from 39.3 to 65.7% and 2,780 for the M. zahlbruckneri population with a PPB of 18.8 to 64.6%. Population differentiation (Fst) of AFLP loci between subpopulations of P. stachyoides was low (0.043) across populations. Analysis of molecular variance of P. stachyoides showed that 4% of the observed genetic differentiation occurred between populations in different kīpuka and 96% when individuals were pooled from all kīpuka. Moderate genetic diversity was detected within the M. zahlbruckneri population. Bayesian and multivariate analyses both classified the P. stachyoides and M. zahlbruckneri populations into genetic groups with considerable sub-structuring detected in the P. stachyoides population. The proportion of genetic differentiation among populations explained by geographical distance was estimated by Mantel tests. No spatial correlation was found between genetic and geographic distances in both populations. Finally, a moderate but significant gene flow that could be attributed to insect or bird-mediated dispersal of pollen across the different kīpuka was observed. The results of this study highlight the utility of a multi-allelic DNA-based marker in screening a large number of polymorphic loci in small and closely related endangered populations and revealed the presence of genetically unique groups of individuals in both M. zahlbruckneri and P. stachyoides populations. Based on these findings

  8. Genetic approaches for studying myiasis-causing flies: molecular markers and mitochondrial genomics.

    PubMed

    de Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria Lima; Lessinger, Ana Cláudia

    2006-01-01

    "Myiasis-causing flies" is a generic term that includes species from numerous dipteran families, mainly Calliphoridae and Oestridae, of which blowflies, screwworm flies and botflies are among the most important. This group of flies is characterized by the ability of their larvae to develop in animal flesh. When the host is a live vertebrate, such parasitism by dipterous larvae is known as primary myiasis. Myiasis-causing flies can be classified as saprophagous (free-living species), facultative or obligate parasites. Many of these flies are of great medical and veterinary importance in Brazil because of their role as key livestock insect-pests and vectors of pathogens, in addition to being considered important legal evidence in forensic entomology. The characterization of myiasis-causing flies using molecular markers to study mtDNA (by RFLP) and nuclear DNA (by RAPD and microsatellite) has been used to identify the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for specific patterns of genetic variability. These approaches have been successfully used to analyze the population structures of the New World screwworm fly Cochliomyia hominivorax and the botfly Dermatobia hominis. In this review, various aspects of the organization, evolution and potential applications of the mitochondrial genome of myiasis-causing flies in Brazil, and the analysis of nuclear markers in genetic studies of populations, are discussed.

  9. Short Communication: Genetic linkage map of Cucurbita maxima with molecular and morphological markers.

    PubMed

    Ge, Y; Li, X; Yang, X X; Cui, C S; Qu, S P

    2015-05-22

    Cucurbita maxima is one of the most widely cultivated vegetables in China and exhibits distinct morphological characteristics. In this study, genetic linkage analysis with 57 simple-sequence repeats, 21 amplified fragment length polymorphisms, 3 random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and one morphological marker revealed 20 genetic linkage groups of C. maxima covering a genetic distance of 991.5 cM with an average of 12.1 cM between adjacent markers. Genetic linkage analysis identified the simple-sequence repeat marker 'PU078072' 5.9 cM away from the locus 'Rc', which controls rind color. The genetic map in the present study will be useful for better mapping, tagging, and cloning of quantitative trait loci/gene(s) affecting economically important traits and for breeding new varieties of C. maxima through marker-assisted selection.

  10. Genetic rearrangements of six wheat-agropyron cristatum 6P addition lines revealed by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Han, Haiming; Bai, Li; Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat-A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

  11. [Use of morphological and physiological characters, and molecular markers to evaluate the genetic diversity of three clementine cultivars].

    PubMed

    Chahidi, Bouchra; El-Otmani, Mohamed; Jacquemond, Camille; Tijane, M'hamed; El-Mousadik, Abdelhamid; Srairi, Ikbal; Luro, François

    2008-01-01

    Originating from a natural crossing between mandarin and sweet orange at the end of the 19(th) century, clementine diversified through the selection of spontaneous mutations. Today, it seems almost impossible to distinguish one variety from another. The development of molecular tools for variety identification is thus necessary. Three clementine cultivars, representing distinct groups of fruit maturity, were evaluated. Identification criteria were searched at the phenotypical level (organoleptic characteristics, leaves morphology) as well as the DNA level (isozymes, RAPD, and ISSR). The phenotypical diversity observed is relatively high and contrasted with the low molecular polymorphism. In fact, only the cultivar 'Guerdane' presents profiles of genetic fingerprints different from those of the two other cultivars. The frequency of the genetic modifications would thus be variable from a cultivar to another. Moreover, the specific molecular markers of the cultivar 'Guerdane', added to the phenotypic markers, extend the possibilities of identification to the young nursery plants.

  12. Population Structure, Genetic Diversity and Molecular Marker-Trait Association Analysis for High Temperature Stress Tolerance in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Saumya Ranjan; Sahoo, Ambika; Mohapatra, Sudipti; Nayak, Deepak Kumar; Mahender, Anumalla; Meher, Jitandriya; Anandan, Annamalai

    2016-01-01

    Rice exhibits enormous genetic diversity, population structure and molecular marker-traits associated with abiotic stress tolerance to high temperature stress. A set of breeding lines and landraces representing 240 germplasm lines were studied. Based on spikelet fertility percent under high temperature, tolerant genotypes were broadly classified into four classes. Genetic diversity indicated a moderate level of genetic base of the population for the trait studied. Wright’s F statistic estimates showed a deviation of Hardy-Weinberg expectation in the population. The analysis of molecular variance revealed 25 percent variation between population, 61 percent among individuals and 14 percent within individuals in the set. The STRUCTURE analysis categorized the entire population into three sub-populations and suggested that most of the landraces in each sub-population had a common primary ancestor with few admix individuals. The composition of materials in the panel showed the presence of many QTLs representing the entire genome for the expression of tolerance. The strongly associated marker RM547 tagged with spikelet fertility under stress and the markers like RM228, RM205, RM247, RM242, INDEL3 and RM314 indirectly controlling the high temperature stress tolerance were detected through both mixed linear model and general linear model TASSEL analysis. These markers can be deployed as a resource for marker-assisted breeding program of high temperature stress tolerance. PMID:27494320

  13. New STS molecular markers for assessment of genetic diversity and DNA fingerprinting in hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Patzak, Josef; Vrba, Lukás; Matousek, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Molecular markers have been increasingly used in genetic studies of crop species for their applicability in breeding programs. In this work, we report on the development of new sequence-tagged site (STS) markers based on sequence information from several identified hop (Humulus lupulus L.) genes. We demonstrate the usefulness of these STS markers and compare them to SSRs for identifying hop genotypes and estimating genetic diversity in a collection of 68 hop cultivars from around the world. We found 3 individual gene variants (A, B, C) of the chs_H1 gene in this collection. The most frequent gene variant, B (AJ304877), was not detected in Mt. Hood, Glacier, and Horizon (US) cultivars. Gene variant A came from an American germplasm through wild hops. We found length polymorphism in intron 1 of the chs2 gene, and 4 different amplified markers were detected in PCRs. The chs3 gene was found in only one third of the cultivars. None of the variants of the studied CHS genes were found in Humulus japonicus. We detected 5 major gene variants of DNA-binding protein in the collection of H. lupulus cultivars and 2 others in H. japonicus. We also found 3 individual gene variants of an endochitinase gene. The distribution of gene variants did not correlate with any resistance. We proved that developed STS markers can be successfully used for the analysis of genetic diversity and can substitute and supplement SSR markers in hop.

  14. New STS molecular markers for assessment of genetic diversity and DNA fingerprinting in hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Patzak, Josef; Vrba, Lukás; Matousek, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Molecular markers have been increasingly used in genetic studies of crop species for their applicability in breeding programs. In this work, we report on the development of new sequence-tagged site (STS) markers based on sequence information from several identified hop (Humulus lupulus L.) genes. We demonstrate the usefulness of these STS markers and compare them to SSRs for identifying hop genotypes and estimating genetic diversity in a collection of 68 hop cultivars from around the world. We found 3 individual gene variants (A, B, C) of the chs_H1 gene in this collection. The most frequent gene variant, B (AJ304877), was not detected in Mt. Hood, Glacier, and Horizon (US) cultivars. Gene variant A came from an American germplasm through wild hops. We found length polymorphism in intron 1 of the chs2 gene, and 4 different amplified markers were detected in PCRs. The chs3 gene was found in only one third of the cultivars. None of the variants of the studied CHS genes were found in Humulus japonicus. We detected 5 major gene variants of DNA-binding protein in the collection of H. lupulus cultivars and 2 others in H. japonicus. We also found 3 individual gene variants of an endochitinase gene. The distribution of gene variants did not correlate with any resistance. We proved that developed STS markers can be successfully used for the analysis of genetic diversity and can substitute and supplement SSR markers in hop. PMID:17546067

  15. Molecular identification and genetic variation of varieties of Styphnolobium japonicum (Fabaceae) using SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Sun, R X; Zhang, C H; Zheng, Y Q; Zong, Y C; Yu, X D; Huang, P

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-four Styphnolobium japonicum varieties were analyzed using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers, to investigate genetic variation and test the effectiveness of SRAP markers in DNA fingerprint establishment. Twelve primer pairs were selected from 120 primer combinations for their reproducibility and high polymorphism. We found a total of 430 amplified fragments, of which 415 fragments were considered polymorphic with an average of 34.58 polymorphic fragments for each primer combination. The percentage of polymorphic fragments was 96.60%, and four primer pairs showed 100% polymorphism. Moreover, simple matched coefficients ranged between 0.68 and 0.89, with an average of 0.785, indicating that the genetic variation among varieties was relatively low. This could be because of the narrow genetic basis of the selected breeding material. Based on the similarity coefficient value of 0.76, the varieties were divided into four major groups. In addition, abundant and clear SRAP fingerprints were obtained and could be used to establish DNA fingerprints. In the DNA fingerprints, each variety had its unique pattern that could be easily distinguished from others. The results demonstrated that 34 varieties of S. japonicum had a relatively narrow genetic variation. Hence, a broadening of the genetic basis of breeding material is necessary. We conclude that establishment of DNA fingerprint is feasible by means of SRAP markers. PMID:27173318

  16. Assessment of genetic diversity in indigenous turmeric (Curcuma longa) germplasm from India using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sushma; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Suresh; Tewari, S K; Roy, R K; Goel, A K; Rana, T S

    2015-04-01

    Curcuma longa L., commonly known as turmeric, is one of the economically and medicinally important plant species. It is predominantly cultivated in the tropical and sub tropical countries. India is the largest producer, and exporter of turmeric in the world, followed by China, Indonesia, Bangladesh and Thailand. In the present study, Directed Amplification of Minisatellite DNA (DAMD) and Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR), methods were used to estimate the genetic variability in indigenous turmeric germplasm. Cumulative data analysis for DAMD (15) and ISSR (13) markers resulted into 478 fragments, out of which 392 fragments were polymorphic, revealing 82 % polymorphism across the turmeric genotypes. Wide range of pairwise genetic distances (0.03-0.59) across the genotypes revealed that these genotypes are genetically quite diverse. The UPGMA dendrogram generated using cumulative data showed significant relationships amongst the genotypes. All 29 genotypes studied grouped into two clusters irrespective of their geographical affiliations with 100 % bootstrap value except few genotypes, suggesting considerable diversity amongst the genotypes. These results suggested that the current collection of turmeric genotypes preserve the vast majority of natural variations. The results further demonstrate the efficiency and reliability of DAMD and ISSR markers in determining the genetic diversity and relationships among the indigenous turmeric germplasm. DAMD and ISSR profiling have identified diverse turmeric genotypes, which could be further utilized in various genetic improvement programmes including conventional as well as marker assisted breeding towards development of new and desirable turmeric genotypes.

  17. Construction of intersubspecific molecular genetic map of lentil based on ISSR, RAPD and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mamta; Verma, Bhawna; Kumar, Naresh; Chahota, Rakesh K; Rathour, Rajeev; Sharma, Shyam K; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Sharma, Tilak R

    2012-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris), is a self-pollinating diploid (2n = 2x = 14), cool-season legume crop and is consumed worldwide as a rich source of protein (~24.0%), largely in vegetarian diets. Here we report development of a genetic linkage map of Lens using 114 F(2) plants derived from the intersubspecific cross between L 830 and ILWL 77. RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) primers revealed more polymorphism than ISSR (intersimple sequence repeat) and SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers. The highest proportion (30.72%) of segregation distortion was observed in RAPD markers. Of the 235 markers (34 SSR, 9 ISSR and 192 RAPD) used in the mapping study, 199 (28 SSRs, 9 ISSRs and 162 RAPDs) were mapped into 11 linkage groups (LGs), varying between 17.3 and 433.8 cM and covering 3843.4 cM, with an average marker spacing of 19.3 cM. Linkage analysis revealed nine major groups with 15 or more markers each and two small LGs with two markers each, and 36 unlinked markers. The study reported assigning of 11 new SSRs on the linkage map. Of the 66 markers with aberrant segregation, 14 were unlinked and the remaining 52 were mapped. ISSR and RAPD markers were found to be useful in map construction and saturation. The current map represents maximum coverage of lentil genome and could be used for identification of QTL regions linked to agronomic traits, and for marker-assisted selection in lentil. PMID:23271013

  18. Molecular Genetic Markers of Intra- and Interspecific Divergence within Starfish and Sea Urchins (Echinodermata).

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Vladychenskaya, I P; Drozdov, A L; Kedrova, O S

    2016-09-01

    A fragment of the mitochondrial COI gene from isolates of several echinoderm species was sequenced. The isolates were from three species of starfish from the Asteriidae family (Asterias amurensis and Aphelasterias japonica collected in the Sea of Japan and Asterias rubens collected in the White Sea) and from the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum (family Loveniidae) collected in the Sea of Japan. Additionally, regions including internal transcribed spacers and 5.8S rRNA (ITS1 - 5.8S rDNA - ITS2) were sequenced for the three studied starfish species. Phylogenetic analysis of the obtained COI sequences together with earlier determined homologous COI sequences from Ast. forbesii, Ast. rubens, and Echinocardium laevigaster from the North Atlantic and E. cordatum from the Yellow and North Seas (GenBank) placed them into strictly conspecific clusters with high bootstrap support (99% in all cases). Only two exceptions - Ast. rubens DQ077915 sequence placed with the Ast. forbesii cluster and Aph. japonica DQ992560 sequence placed with the Ast. amurensis cluster - were likely results of species misidentification. The intraspecific polymorphism for the COI gene within the Asteriidae family varied within a range of 0.2-0.9% as estimated from the genetic distances. The corresponding intrageneric and intergeneric values were 10.4-12.1 and 21.8-29.8%, respectively. The interspecific divergence for the COI gene in the sea urchin of Echinocardium genus (family Loveniidae) was significantly higher (17.1-17.7%) than in the starfish, while intergeneric divergence (14.6-25.7%) was similar to that in asteroids. The interspecific genetic distances for the nuclear transcribed sequences (ITS1 - 5.8S rDNA - ITS2) within the Asteriidae family were lower (3.1-4.5%), and the intergeneric distances were significantly higher (32.8-35.0%), compared to the corresponding distances for the COI gene. These results suggest that the investigated molecular-genetic markers could be used for segregation

  19. Molecular Genetic Markers of Intra- and Interspecific Divergence within Starfish and Sea Urchins (Echinodermata).

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Vladychenskaya, I P; Drozdov, A L; Kedrova, O S

    2016-09-01

    A fragment of the mitochondrial COI gene from isolates of several echinoderm species was sequenced. The isolates were from three species of starfish from the Asteriidae family (Asterias amurensis and Aphelasterias japonica collected in the Sea of Japan and Asterias rubens collected in the White Sea) and from the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum (family Loveniidae) collected in the Sea of Japan. Additionally, regions including internal transcribed spacers and 5.8S rRNA (ITS1 - 5.8S rDNA - ITS2) were sequenced for the three studied starfish species. Phylogenetic analysis of the obtained COI sequences together with earlier determined homologous COI sequences from Ast. forbesii, Ast. rubens, and Echinocardium laevigaster from the North Atlantic and E. cordatum from the Yellow and North Seas (GenBank) placed them into strictly conspecific clusters with high bootstrap support (99% in all cases). Only two exceptions - Ast. rubens DQ077915 sequence placed with the Ast. forbesii cluster and Aph. japonica DQ992560 sequence placed with the Ast. amurensis cluster - were likely results of species misidentification. The intraspecific polymorphism for the COI gene within the Asteriidae family varied within a range of 0.2-0.9% as estimated from the genetic distances. The corresponding intrageneric and intergeneric values were 10.4-12.1 and 21.8-29.8%, respectively. The interspecific divergence for the COI gene in the sea urchin of Echinocardium genus (family Loveniidae) was significantly higher (17.1-17.7%) than in the starfish, while intergeneric divergence (14.6-25.7%) was similar to that in asteroids. The interspecific genetic distances for the nuclear transcribed sequences (ITS1 - 5.8S rDNA - ITS2) within the Asteriidae family were lower (3.1-4.5%), and the intergeneric distances were significantly higher (32.8-35.0%), compared to the corresponding distances for the COI gene. These results suggest that the investigated molecular-genetic markers could be used for segregation

  20. Ricebase: a breeding and genetics platform for rice, integrating individual molecular markers, pedigrees and whole-genome-based data.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J D; Baldo, A M; Mueller, L A

    2016-01-01

    Ricebase (http://ricebase.org) is an integrative genomic database for rice (Oryza sativa) with an emphasis on combining datasets in a way that maintains the key links between past and current genetic studies. Ricebase includes DNA sequence data, gene annotations, nucleotide variation data and molecular marker fragment size data. Rice research has benefited from early adoption and extensive use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers; however, the majority of rice SSR markers were developed prior to the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. Interpretation of new research using SNPs in the context of literature citing SSRs requires a common coordinate system. A new pipeline, using a stepwise relaxation of stringency, was used to map SSR primers onto the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. The SSR markers and experimentally assayed amplicon sizes are presented in a relational database with a web-based front end, and are available as a track loaded in a genome browser with links connecting the browser and database. The combined capabilities of Ricebase link genetic markers, genome context, allele states across rice germplasm and potentially user curated phenotypic interpretations as a community resource for genetic discovery and breeding in rice. PMID:27515824

  1. Ricebase: a breeding and genetics platform for rice, integrating individual molecular markers, pedigrees and whole-genome-based data

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. D.; Baldo, A. M.; Mueller, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Ricebase (http://ricebase.org) is an integrative genomic database for rice (Oryza sativa) with an emphasis on combining datasets in a way that maintains the key links between past and current genetic studies. Ricebase includes DNA sequence data, gene annotations, nucleotide variation data and molecular marker fragment size data. Rice research has benefited from early adoption and extensive use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers; however, the majority of rice SSR markers were developed prior to the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. Interpretation of new research using SNPs in the context of literature citing SSRs requires a common coordinate system. A new pipeline, using a stepwise relaxation of stringency, was used to map SSR primers onto the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. The SSR markers and experimentally assayed amplicon sizes are presented in a relational database with a web-based front end, and are available as a track loaded in a genome browser with links connecting the browser and database. The combined capabilities of Ricebase link genetic markers, genome context, allele states across rice germplasm and potentially user curated phenotypic interpretations as a community resource for genetic discovery and breeding in rice. PMID:27515824

  2. Construction of a genetic linkage map of black gram, Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper, based on molecular markers and comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Souframanien, J; Gopalakrishna, T

    2008-08-01

    A genetic linkage map of black gram, Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper, was constructed with 428 molecular markers using an F9 recombinant inbred population of 104 individuals. The population was derived from an inter-subspecific cross between a black gram cultivar, TU94-2, and a wild genotype, V. mungo var. silvestris. The linkage analysis at a LOD score of 5.0 distributed all 428 markers (254 AFLP, 47 SSR, 86 RAPD, and 41 ISSR) into 11 linkage groups. The map spanned a total distance of 865.1 cM with an average marker density of 2 cM. The largest linkage group spanned 115 cM and the smallest linkage group was of 44.9 cM. The number of markers per linkage group ranged from 11 to 86 and the average distance between markers varied from 1.1 to 5.6 cM. Comparison of the map with other published azuki bean and black gram maps showed high colinearity of markers, with some inversions. The current map is the most saturated map for black gram to date and will provide a useful tool for identification of QTLs and for marker-assisted selection of agronomically important characters in black gram.

  3. The use of genetic markers in the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, L S; Leitão, T M J S; Taylor, M L; Muniz, M M; Zancopé-Oliveira, R M

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum, a dimorphic fungal pathogen that can infect both humans and animals. This disease has worldwide distribution and affects mainly immunocompromised individuals. In the environment, H. capsulatum grows as mold but undergoes a morphologic transition to the yeast morphotype under special conditions. Molecular techniques are important tools to conduct epidemiologic investigations for fungal detection, identification of infection sources, and determination of different fungal genotypes associated to a particular disease symptom. In this study, we performed a systematic review in the PubMed database to improve the understanding about the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis. This search was restricted to English and Spanish articles. We included a combination of specific keywords: molecular typing [OR] genetic diversity [OR] polymorphism [AND] H. capsulatum; molecular epidemiology [AND] histoplasmosis; and molecular epidemiology [AND] Histoplasma. In addition, we used the specific terms: histoplasmosis [AND] outbreaks. Non-English or non-Spanish articles, dead links, and duplicate results were excluded from the review. The results reached show that the main methods used for molecular typing of H. capsulatum were: restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, microsatellites polymorphism, sequencing of internal transcribed spacers region, and multilocus sequence typing. Different genetic profiles were identified among H. capsulatum isolates, which can be grouped according to their source, geographical origin, and clinical manifestations. PMID:26589702

  4. Genetic diversity of Capsicum chinensis (Solanaceae) accessions based on molecular markers and morphological and agronomic traits.

    PubMed

    Finger, F L; Lannes, S D; Schuelter, A R; Doege, J; Comerlato, A P; Gonçalves, L S A; Ferreira, F R A; Clovis, L R; Scapim, C A

    2010-01-01

    We estimated the genetic diversity of 49 accessions of the hot pepper species Capsicum chinensis through analyses of 12 physicochemical traits of the fruit, eight multi-categorical variables, and with 32 RAPD primers. Data from the physicochemical traits were submitted to analysis of variance to estimate the genetic parameters, and their means were clustered by the Scott-Knott test. The matrices from the individual and combined distance were estimated by multivariate analyses before applying Tocher's optimization method. All physicochemical traits were examined for genetic variability by analysis of variance. The responses of these traits showed more contribution from genetic than from environmental factors, except the percentage of dry biomass, content of soluble solids and vitamin C level. Total capsaicin had the greatest genetic divergence. Nine clusters were formed from the quantitative data based on the generalized distance of Mahalanobis, using Tocher's method; four were formed from the multi-categorical data using the Cole-Rodgers coefficient, and eight were formed from the molecular data using the Nei and Li coefficient. The accessions were distributed into 14 groups using Tocher's method, and no significant correlation between pungency and origin was detected. Uni- and multivariate analyses permitted the identification of marked genetic diversity and fruit attributes capable of being improved through breeding programs. PMID:20882481

  5. Comparison of genetic diversity structure analyses of SSR molecular marker data within apple (Malus×domestica) genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Patzak, Josef; Paprštein, František; Henychová, Alena; Sedlák, Jiří

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare traditional hierarchical clustering techniques and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) with the model-based Bayesian cluster analyses in relation to subpopulation differentiation based on breeding history and geographical origin of apple (Malus×domestica Borkh.) cultivars and landraces. We presented the use of a set of 10 microsatellite (SSR) loci for genetic diversity structure analyses of 273 apple accessions from national genetic resources. These SSR loci yielded a total of 113 polymorphic SSR alleles, with 5-18 alleles per locus. SSR molecular data were successfully used in binary and allelic input format for all genetic diversity analyses, but allelic molecular data did not reveal reliable results with the NTSYS-pc and BAPS softwares. A traditional cluster analysis still provided an easy and effective way for determining genetic diversity structure in the apple germplasm collection. A model-based Bayesian analysis also provided the clustering results in accordance to traditional cluster analysis, but the analyses were distorted by the presence of a dominant group of apple genetic resources owing to the narrow origin of the apple genome. PCoA confirmed that there were no noticeable differences in genetic diversity structure of apple genetic resources during the breeding history. The results of our analyses are useful in the context of enhancing apple collection management, sampling of core collections, and improving breeding processes. PMID:22954156

  6. Genetic profiling of the Plasmodium falciparum population using antigenic molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Purva; Singh, Ruchi; Khan, Haris; Raza, Adil; Yadavendu, Veena; Bhatt, R M; Singh, Vineeta

    2014-01-01

    About 50% of malaria infections in India are attributed to Plasmodium falciparum but relatively little is known about the genetic structure of the parasite populations. The molecular genotyping of the parasite populations by merozoite surface protein (msp1 and msp2) and glutamate-rich protein (glurp) genes identifies the existing parasite population in the regions which help in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the parasite's drive for survival. This study reveals the genetic profile of the parasite population in selected regions across the country with varying degree of endemicity among them. We also report the prevalence of Pfcrt mutations in this parasite population to evaluate the pattern of drug resistance development in them. PMID:25405214

  7. Genetic diversity in Tunisian populations of faba bean (Vicia faba L.) based on morphological traits and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Backouchi, I Z; Aouida, M; Khemiri, N; Jebara, M

    2015-07-13

    Genetic diversity within Vicia faba L. is key to the genetic improvement of this important species. In this study, morphological traits and RAPD molecular markers were used to assess the levels of polymorphism across 12 Tunisian populations, three major and nine minor from different locations. Analysis of morphological traits indicated that the three major populations showed significant differences and the nine minor populations exhibited considerable variation for most traits. The grain yield of the Alia population could be increased by inoculation. Of the seven primers tested, it was clear that the Cs12 primer would be recommend for genetic diversity analysis of V. faba.Within population genetic diversity exhibited 94% of total diversity. Intra-population genetic diversity (HS) was 0.16, which was clearly higher than between population genetic diversity (DST = 0.06) UPG-MA showed a high level of genetic variation between major and minor populations of V. faba L. Particularly the minor populations showed a high level of diversity and was divided into two subclusters. Ltaifia was separated from the other populations. In addition to a high grain yield, these populations showed the lowest Nei and Shannon indices (H = 0.08 and I = 0.13) justifying their homogeneity. For these reasons, these cultivars can be considered a selected population. However, the Takelsa population showed the highest Nei and Shannon indices (H = 0.13 and I = 0.21), indicating that this population was the most heterogeneous, which is interesting for breeding programs.

  8. A reference consensus genetic map for molecular markers and economically important traits in faba bean (Vicia faba L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is among the earliest domesticated crops from the Near East. Today this legume is a key protein feed and food worldwide and continues to serve an important role in culinary traditions throughout Middle East, Mediterranean region, China and Ethiopia. Adapted to a wide range of soil types, the main faba bean breeding objectives are to improve yield, resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, seed quality and other agronomic traits. Genomic approaches aimed at enhancing faba bean breeding programs require high-quality genetic linkage maps to facilitate quantitative trait locus analysis and gene tagging for use in a marker-assisted selection. The objective of this study was to construct a reference consensus map in faba bean by joining the information from the most relevant maps reported so far in this crop. Results A combination of two approaches, increasing the number of anchor loci in diverse mapping populations and joining the corresponding genetic maps, was used to develop a reference consensus map in faba bean. The map was constructed from three main recombinant inbreed populations derived from four parental lines, incorporates 729 markers and is based on 69 common loci. It spans 4,602 cM with a range from 323 to 1041 loci in six main linkage groups or chromosomes, and an average marker density of one locus every 6 cM. Locus order is generally well maintained between the consensus map and the individual maps. Conclusion We have constructed a reliable and fairly dense consensus genetic linkage map that will serve as a basis for genomic approaches in faba bean research and breeding. The core map contains a larger number of markers than any previous individual map, covers existing gaps and achieves a wider coverage of the large faba bean genome as a whole. This tool can be used as a reference resource for studies in different genetic backgrounds, and provides a framework for transferring genetic information when using different

  9. Identification of Single-Copy Orthologous Genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and Analysis of Genetic Diversity in Physalis Using Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jingli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yang, Jingjing; Yang, Wencai

    2012-01-01

    The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG) Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40) discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2%) of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei’s genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis. PMID:23166835

  10. Population genetic structure and trait associations in forest savory using molecular, morphological and phytochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah; Karimi, Ehsan; Hadian, Javad

    2014-08-10

    In this investigation, morphological, phytochemical and ISSR markers were used to estimate the relationships among and within seven populations of white savory (Satureja mutica), belonging to four provinces in Iran. The individuals were phenotypically diverse, which stamen length, corolla length, corolla diameter, calyx length, bract length, inflorescence length, calyx length and bracteole width were characteristics with the highest variation. Leaf dimensions were in significant correlation with flower and inflorescence characteristics. Chemical compounds of essential oils were found variable in various individuals and all samples were principally composed of phenolic constituents (carvacrol and/or thymol). As a consequence, the plants were classified into two major chemotypes including carvacrol and thymol. A total of 197 band positions were produced by 14 ISSR primers, of which 176 were found polymorphic with 88.91% polymorphism. ISSR genetic similarity values among individuals ranged between 0.45 and 0.94 which was indicative of a high level of genetic variation. Multiple regression analysis (MRA) revealed that phytochemical compositions as dependent variable, showed statistically significant correlation and in association with leaf and flower traits as independent variable, indicating a main role of leaf and flower on production of these compounds. Also, several ISSR fragments were found associated with some morphological traits and phytochemical compositions. The high diversity within and among populations of S. mutica according to different data systems could provide useful information for conservation and selection of cross-parents in breeding programs. PMID:24878369

  11. Retrotransposon-Based Molecular Markers for Analysis of Genetic Diversity within the Genus Linum

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Kudryavtseva, Anna V.; Zelenin, Alexander V.; Lakunina, Valentina A.; Yurkevich, Olga Yu.; Speranskaya, Anna S.; Dmitriev, Alexey A.; Krinitsina, Anastasia A.; Belenikin, Maxim S.; Uroshlev, Leonid A.; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.; Koroban, Nadezda V.; Amosova, Alexandra V.; Samatadze, Tatiana E.; Guzenko, Elena V.; Lemesh, Valentina A.; Savilova, Anastasya M.; Rachinskaia, Olga A.; Kishlyan, Natalya V.; Rozhmina, Tatiana A.; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L.; Muravenko, Olga V.

    2014-01-01

    SSAP method was used to study the genetic diversity of 22 Linum species from sections Linum, Adenolinum, Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, and 46 flax cultivars. All the studied flax varieties were distinguished using SSAP for retrotransposons FL9 and FL11. Thus, the validity of SSAP method was demonstrated for flax marking, identification of accessions in genebank collections, and control during propagation of flax varieties. Polymorphism of Fl1a, Fl1b, and Cassandra insertions were very low in flax varieties, but these retrotransposons were successfully used for the investigation of Linum species. Species clusterization based on SSAP markers was in concordance with their taxonomic division into sections Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, Adenolinum, and Linum. All species of sect. Adenolinum clustered apart from species of sect. Linum. The data confirmed the accuracy of the separation in these sections. Members of section Linum are not as closely related as members of other sections, so taxonomic revision of this section is desirable. L. usitatissimum accessions genetically distant from modern flax cultivars were revealed in our work. These accessions are of utmost interest for flax breeding and introduction of new useful traits into flax cultivars. The chromosome localization of Cassandra retrotransposon in Linum species was determined. PMID:25243121

  12. Genetic diversity and molecular markers of the tropical abalone (Haliotis asinina) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Klinbunga, S; Pripue, P; Khamnamtong, N; Puanglarp, N; Tassanakajon, A; Jarayabhand, P; Hirono, I; Aoki, T; Menasveta, P

    2003-01-01

    Genetic diversity of abalone in Thailand, Haliotis asinina, H. ovina, and H. varia, was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of 18S and 16S rDNAs, with randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Species-specific RAPD markers were found in each abalone species. Restriction analysis of 18S (nuclear) ribosomal DNA with Alu I, Taq I, and Hae III and 16S (mitochondrial) rDNA with Bam HI, Eco RI, Hae III, and Alu I gave 12 and 13 digestion patterns, respectively. A total of 49 composite haplotypes were found. A dendogram obtained by the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean, constructed from divergence between pairs of composite haplotypes, revealed reproductively isolated gene pools of these abalone and indicated that H. asinina and H. ovina are genetically closer than H. varia. When H. varia was discovered owing to small sample sizes, geographic heterogeneity analysis and FST estimate indicated clear genetic differentiation between H. ovina originating from the Andaman Sea (west) and the Gulf of Thailand (east, P<0.0001), whereas partial differentiation was observed between the Philippines and the remaining H. asinina samples (P<0.0021). The amplified 16S rDNAs of individuals representing composite haplotypes found in this study were cloned and sequenced. A neighbor-joining tree constructed from sequence divergence of 16S rDNA accurately allocated those sequences according to species origins of abalone. Species-specific PCR based on 16S rDNA polymorphism was successfully developed in H. asinina and H. varia but not in H. ovina.

  13. Genetic variation assessment of acid lime accessions collected from south of Iran using SSR and ISSR molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Sharafi, Ata Allah; Abkenar, Asad Asadi; Sharafi, Ali; Masaeli, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Iran has a long history of acid lime cultivation and propagation. In this study, genetic variation in 28 acid lime accessions from five regions of south of Iran, and their relatedness with other 19 citrus cultivars were analyzed using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. Nine primers for SSR and nine ISSR primers were used for allele scoring. In total, 49 SSR and 131 ISSR polymorphic alleles were detected. Cluster analysis of SSR and ISSR data showed that most of the acid lime accessions (19 genotypes) have hybrid origin and genetically distance with nucellar of Mexican lime (9 genotypes). As nucellar of Mexican lime are susceptible to phytoplasma, these acid lime genotypes can be used to evaluate their tolerance against biotic constricts like lime "witches' broom disease".

  14. [Evaluation of Molecular Genetic Diversity of Wild Apple Malus sieversii Populations from Zailiysky Alatau by Microsatellite Markers].

    PubMed

    Omasheva, M E; Chekalin, S V; Galiakparov, N N

    2015-07-01

    The territory of Kazakhstan is part of the distribution range of Malus sieversii, which is one of the ancestors of cultivated apple tree varieties. The collected samples of Sievers apple leaves from five populations growing in the Zailiysky Alatau region served as a source not only for the creation of a bank of genomic DNA but also for determination ofthe wild apple genetic polymorphism. The seven microsatellite markers used in this study revealed 86 alleles with different frequencies, as well as the characteristic pools of rare alleles for each of the populations. Molecular genetic analysis showed a high level of genetic diversity (H(o) = 0.704; PIC = 0.752; I = 1.617). Moreover, interpopulation variability accounted only for 7.5% of total variability, confirming the genetic closeness of the populations examined. Based on phylogenetic analysis, it was demonstrated that the Bel'bulak and Almaty Reserve populations were closest to each other, while the most distant were the Ketmen and Great Almaty gorge populations, which suggests the dependence of genetic distance on the geographical.

  15. [Molecular and genetic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Kang, D H

    2001-04-21

    Molecular epidemiology is defined as "the use of biological markers in epidemiologic research" and genetic epidemiology is defined as "the study of the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in epidemiologic research". Traditional epidemiologic approaches defined as "the study of the distribution and determinants of disease frequency in human population" could not address the importance of genetic susceptibility of humans in disease occurrence. However, the use of biological or genetic markers identified and characterized by the help of advance in molecular biology and human genetics now can provide us better understanding of multi-factorial or multistep disease occurrence in humans. Biological markers used in molecular epidemiology are classified into three groups: biomarkers of exposure (i.e., carcinogen metabolites in human urine, DNA-adducts, etc.), biomarkers of effects (i.e., oncoproteins, tumor markers, etc.), and biomarkers of susceptibility (i.e., genetic polymorphisms of carcinogen metabolism enzymes, DNA repair, etc.). Susceptibility genes involved in disease pathogenesis are categorized into two groups: high penetrance genes (i.e., BRAC1, RB, etc.) and low penetrance genes (i.e., GSTs, XRCC1, etc.). This paper will address the usefulnesses of bomarkers in edpidemiologic research and will show the examples of the use of selected low penetrance genes involved in human carcinogenesis. The importance of multidisciplinary approaches among epidemiologists, molecular biologists, and human geneticists will also be discussed.

  16. Molecular Assay for Detection of Genetic Markers Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, S. W.; Martin, I.; Demczuk, W.; Bharat, A.; Hoang, L.; Wylie, J.; Allen, V.; Lefebvre, B.; Tyrrell, G.; Horsman, G.; Haldane, D.; Garceau, R.; Wong, T.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to rise in Canada; however, antimicrobial resistance data are lacking for approximately 70% of gonorrhea infections that are diagnosed directly from clinical specimens by nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). We developed a molecular assay for surveillance use to detect mutations in genes associated with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins that can be applied to both culture isolates and clinical samples. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ponA, mtrR, penA, porB, and one N. gonorrhoeae-specific marker (porA). We tested the real-time PCR assay with 252 gonococcal isolates, 50 nongonococcal isolates, 24 N. gonorrhoeae-negative NAAT specimens, and 34 N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens. Twenty-four of the N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens had matched culture isolates. Assay results were confirmed by comparison with whole-genome sequencing data. For 252 N. gonorrhoeae strains, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porA, ponA, and penA, 99.6% for mtrR, and 95.2% for porB. The presence of ≥2 SNPs correlated with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (sensitivities of >98%) and cefixime (sensitivities of >96%). Of 24 NAAT specimens with matched cultures, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porB, 95.8% for ponA and mtrR, and 91.7% for penA. We demonstrated the utility of a real-time PCR assay for sensitive detection of known markers for the decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins in N. gonorrhoeae. Preliminary results with clinical NAAT specimens were also promising, as they correlated well with bacterial culture results. PMID:25878350

  17. Molecular Assay for Detection of Genetic Markers Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S W; Martin, I; Demczuk, W; Bharat, A; Hoang, L; Wylie, J; Allen, V; Lefebvre, B; Tyrrell, G; Horsman, G; Haldane, D; Garceau, R; Wong, T; Mulvey, M R

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to rise in Canada; however, antimicrobial resistance data are lacking for approximately 70% of gonorrhea infections that are diagnosed directly from clinical specimens by nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). We developed a molecular assay for surveillance use to detect mutations in genes associated with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins that can be applied to both culture isolates and clinical samples. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ponA, mtrR, penA, porB, and one N. gonorrhoeae-specific marker (porA). We tested the real-time PCR assay with 252 gonococcal isolates, 50 nongonococcal isolates, 24 N. gonorrhoeae-negative NAAT specimens, and 34 N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens. Twenty-four of the N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens had matched culture isolates. Assay results were confirmed by comparison with whole-genome sequencing data. For 252 N. gonorrhoeae strains, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porA, ponA, and penA, 99.6% for mtrR, and 95.2% for porB. The presence of ≥2 SNPs correlated with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (sensitivities of >98%) and cefixime (sensitivities of >96%). Of 24 NAAT specimens with matched cultures, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porB, 95.8% for ponA and mtrR, and 91.7% for penA. We demonstrated the utility of a real-time PCR assay for sensitive detection of known markers for the decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins in N. gonorrhoeae. Preliminary results with clinical NAAT specimens were also promising, as they correlated well with bacterial culture results.

  18. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers for molecular genetic diversity in Siganus fuscescens.

    PubMed

    Ning, Y F; Li, Z B; Li, Q H; Dai, G; Shangguan, J B; Yuan, Y; Huang, Y S

    2015-01-15

    The rabbitfish Siganus fuscescens is an economically valuable species that is widely distributed throughout the estuaries, intertidal, and offshore coasts of the Indo-Pacific and eastern Mediterranean. Ten novel microsatellite loci from the genome of S. fuscescens were developed using the fast isolation protocol with amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeats. Polymorphisms in these 10 microsatellite markers were determined from 32 wild individuals. The number of alleles per locus and the polymorphism information content ranged from 2 to 5 and from 0.059 to 0.668, respectively. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.063 to 0.781 and from 0.062 to 0.731, respectively. Although 1 locus (LZY-X7, P < 0.005) showed significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, no deviations were detected in the other 9 loci. These microsatellite loci may be useful for further population genetic studies, conservation studies, population structure assessment, and linkage map construction of S. fuscescens.

  19. Characterization and genetic variability of feed-borne and clinical animal/human Aspergillus fumigatus strains using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Pena, Gabriela A; Coelho, Irene; Reynoso, María M; Soleiro, Carla; Cavaglieri, Lilia R

    2015-09-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, the major etiological agent of human and animal aspergillosis, is a toxigenic fungus largely regarded as a single species by macroscopic and microscopic features. However, molecular studies have demonstrated that several morphologically identified A. fumigatus strains might be genetically distinct. This work was aimed to apply PCR-restriction length fragment polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP) and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers to characterize a set of feed-borne and clinical A. fumigatus sensu lato strains isolated from Argentina and Brazil and to determine and compare their genetic variability. All A. fumigatus strains had the same band profile and those typical of A. fumigatus sensu stricto positive controls by PCR-RFLP. Moreover, all Argentinian and Brazilian strains typified by RAPD showed similar band patterns to each other and to A. fumigatus sensu stricto reference strains regardless of their isolation source (animal feeds or human/animal clinical cases) and geographic origin. Genetic similarity coefficients ranged from 0.61 to 1.00, but almost all isolates showed 78% of genetic similarly suggesting that genetic variability was found at intraspecific level. Finally, benA sequencing confirmed its identification as A. fumigatus sensu stricto species. These results suggest that A. fumigatus sensu stricto is a predominant species into Aspergillus section Fumigati found in animal environments as well as in human/animal clinical cases, while other species may be rarely isolated. The strains involved in human and animal aspergillosis could come from the environment where this fungus is frequently found. Rural workers and animals would be constantly exposed.

  20. Molecular phylogeography of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) and genetic relationships with congeners using cytochrome b gene marker.

    PubMed

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Song, Sze-Looi; Prasartvit, Anchana; Lim, Phaik-Eem

    2015-08-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is an important emerging zoonotic parasite causing human eosinophilic meningitis (or meningoencephalitis) in many parts of the world. To-date there is only a single study using mitochondrial cytochrome b (CYTB) gene to determine its genetic structure in eight geographical localities in Thailand. The present study examined the molecular phylogeography of this rat lungworm and its phylogenetic relationship with congeners using CYTB gene marker. A total of 15 CYTB haplotypes was found in 37 sequences from 14 geographical localities (covering north, west, east, central and south regions) in Thailand. These CYTB haplotypes were distinct from those of A. cantonensis for China and Hawaii. In Thailand, some CYTB haplotypes appeared to be confined to specific geographical localities. The partial CYTB DNA nucleotide sequences separated unequivocally the A. cantonensis isolates of Thailand, China and Hawaii as well as the congeners Angiostrongylus malaysiensis, A. costaricensis and Angiostrongylus vasorum, with A. malaysiensis grouped with A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis grouped with A. vasorum. Likewise the congeners of Metastrongylus and Onchocerca genera could also be clearly differentiated. The present study added two new definitive hosts (Bandicota savilei and Rattus losea) and three new localities (Mae Hong Son in the north, Tak in the west, and Phang Nga in the south) for A. malaysiensis in Thailand, indicating its wide occurrence in the country. Three CYTB haplotypes were found in the Thailand samples of A. malaysiensis. In addition to differentiation of congeners, CYTB gene marker could be used for determining the genetic diversity of a given population/taxon.

  1. Genetic diversity of Cercospora kikuchii isolates from soybean cultured in Argentina as revealed by molecular markers and cercosporin production.

    PubMed

    Lurá, María Cristina; Latorre Rapela, María Gabriela; Vaccari, María Celia; Maumary, Roxana; Soldano, Anabel; Mattio, Mónica; González, Ana María

    2011-05-01

    Leaf blight and purple seed, caused by the fungal pathogen Cercospora kikuchii (Matsumoto & Tomoyasu) M. W. Gardner are very important diseases of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in Argentina. The aims of this work were: (a) to confirm and to assess the genetic variability among C. kikuchii isolates collected from different soybean growing areas in Santa Fe province using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers and sequence information from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA and (b) to analyze the cercosporin production of the regional C. kikuchi isolates in order to assess whether there was any relationship between the molecular profiles and the toxin production. Isolates from different regions in Santa Fe province were studied. The sequence of the ITS regions showed high similarity (99-100%) to the GenBank sequences of C. kikuchii BRCK179 (accession number AY633838). The ISSR markers clustered all the isolates into many groups and cercosporin content was highly variable among isolates. No relationship was observed between ITS region, ISSR groups and origin or cercosporin content. The high degree of genetic variability and cercosporin production among isolates compared in this study characterizes a diverse population of C. kikuchii in the region.

  2. Development of molecular genetic markers from a cDNA subtraction library of Frosty Pod inoculated cacao

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have been employing a candidate gene approach to identify molecular markers associated with disease resistance in Theobroma cacao. Candidate genes can be turned into molecular markers using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. As a novel approach to identifying genes associa...

  3. Assessment of genetic relationship in Persea spp by traditional molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Alemán, J C; Valadez-Moctezuma, E; Barrientos-Priego, A F

    2016-04-04

    Currently, the reclassification of the genus Persea is under discussion with molecular techniques for DNA analysis representing an alternative for inter- and intra-specific differentiation. In the present study, the traditional random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and the inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to determine the genomic relationship of different species and hybrids representative of the subgenera Eriodaphne and Persea in a population conserved in a germplasm bank. The data were analyzed statistically using multivariate methods. In the RAPD analysis, a total of 190 polymorphic bands were produced, with an average of 23.7 bands per primer, the percentage contribution of each primer was from 7.66 to 19.63; the polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.23 to 0.45, with an average of 0.35. In the ISSR analysis, a total of 111 polymorphic bands were considered, with an average of 18.5 bands per primer, the percentage contribution of each was from 11.83 to 19.57; the PIC ranged from 0.35 to 0.48, with an average of 0.42. The phenograms obtained in each technique showed the relationship among the accessions through the clusters formed. In general, both the techniques grouped representatives of the Persea americana races (P. americana var. drymifolia, P. americana var. guatemalensis, and P. americana var. americana). However, it was not possible to separate the species of Persea used as reference into independent clades. In addition, they tended to separate the representatives of subgenera Eriodaphne and Persea.

  4. Assessment of genetic relationship in Persea spp by traditional molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Alemán, J C; Valadez-Moctezuma, E; Barrientos-Priego, A F

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the reclassification of the genus Persea is under discussion with molecular techniques for DNA analysis representing an alternative for inter- and intra-specific differentiation. In the present study, the traditional random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and the inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to determine the genomic relationship of different species and hybrids representative of the subgenera Eriodaphne and Persea in a population conserved in a germplasm bank. The data were analyzed statistically using multivariate methods. In the RAPD analysis, a total of 190 polymorphic bands were produced, with an average of 23.7 bands per primer, the percentage contribution of each primer was from 7.66 to 19.63; the polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.23 to 0.45, with an average of 0.35. In the ISSR analysis, a total of 111 polymorphic bands were considered, with an average of 18.5 bands per primer, the percentage contribution of each was from 11.83 to 19.57; the PIC ranged from 0.35 to 0.48, with an average of 0.42. The phenograms obtained in each technique showed the relationship among the accessions through the clusters formed. In general, both the techniques grouped representatives of the Persea americana races (P. americana var. drymifolia, P. americana var. guatemalensis, and P. americana var. americana). However, it was not possible to separate the species of Persea used as reference into independent clades. In addition, they tended to separate the representatives of subgenera Eriodaphne and Persea. PMID:27173181

  5. Genetic variability of oil palm parental genotypes and performance of its' progenies as revealed by molecular markers and quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Norziha; Rafii Yusop, Mohd; Ithnin, Maizura; Saleh, Ghizan; Latif, M A

    2011-04-01

    Studies were conducted to assess the genetic relationships between the parental palms (dura and pisifera) and performance of their progenies based on nine microsatellite markers and 29 quantitative traits. Correlation analyses between genetic distances and hybrids performance were estimated. The coefficients of correlation values of genetic distances with hybrid performance were non-significant, except for mean nut weight and leaf number. However, the correlation coefficient of genetic distances with these characters was low to be used as predicted value. These results indicated that genetic distances based on the microsatellite markers may not be useful for predicting hybrid performance. The genetic distance analysis using UPGMA clustering system generated 5 genetic clusters with coefficient of 1.26 based on quantitative traits of progenies. The genotypes, DP16, DP14, DP4, DP13, DP12, DP15, DP8, DP1 and DP2 belonging to distant clusters and greater genetic distances could be selected for further breeding programs.

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity and relationships among caladium cultivars and species using molecular markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caladium (Caladium hortulanum Birdsey) is an important aroid widely used in the ornamental plant industry. Concerns have been raised about possible loss of genetic diversity due to a drastic decline in the number of cultivars in the last century. This study assessed genetic diversity and relationshi...

  7. A multi-farm assessment of Greek black pig genetic diversity using microsatellite molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, S; Kalivas, A; Ganopoulos, I; Stea, E; Michailidis, G; Tsaftaris, A; Argiriou, A

    2014-01-01

    Local breeds are important for the maintenance of genetic diversity and future food security. Nowadays, the worldwide distribution of pigs is dominated by a few breeds, tending towards a severe loss of pig biodiversity. Thus, it is critical to maintain distinct populations of pig breeds. The Greek black pig, a breed raised locally and known for the high quality of its meat for cured products, is the only traditional indigenous pig breed reared in Greece. We investigated the genetic diversity, based on microsatellite analysis, of the Greek black pig and evaluated its genetic uniqueness. One hundred and three pigs from 12 Greek farms were analyzed using 11 microsatellites. The total number of alleles amounted to 135, with a mean number of alleles per locus of 12.27, ranging between 10 and 16 alleles. The observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.363 to 0.825 per locus. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.471 to 0.707. The inbreeding coefficient ranged from -0.329 to 0.229. We conclude that the Greek black pig, despite its low population size, has a high degree of genetic variability, which will be useful for breeding programs aimed at maintaining long-term survival of this ancient breed. PMID:24782089

  8. A High Density Consensus Genetic Map of Tetraploid Cotton That Integrates Multiple Component Maps through Molecular Marker Redundancy Check

    PubMed Central

    Blenda, Anna; Fang, David D.; Rami, Jean-François; Garsmeur, Olivier; Luo, Feng; Lacape, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    A consensus genetic map of tetraploid cotton was constructed using six high-density maps and after the integration of a sequence-based marker redundancy check. Public cotton SSR libraries (17,343 markers) were curated for sequence redundancy using 90% as a similarity cutoff. As a result, 20% of the markers (3,410) could be considered as redundant with some other markers. The marker redundancy information had been a crucial part of the map integration process, in which the six most informative interspecific Gossypium hirsutum×G. barbadense genetic maps were used for assembling a high density consensus (HDC) map for tetraploid cotton. With redundant markers being removed, the HDC map could be constructed thanks to the sufficient number of collinear non-redundant markers in common between the component maps. The HDC map consists of 8,254 loci, originating from 6,669 markers, and spans 4,070 cM, with an average of 2 loci per cM. The HDC map presents a high rate of locus duplications, as 1,292 markers among the 6,669 were mapped in more than one locus. Two thirds of the duplications are bridging homoeologous AT and DT chromosomes constitutive of allopolyploid cotton genome, with an average of 64 duplications per AT/DT chromosome pair. Sequences of 4,744 mapped markers were used for a mutual blast alignment (BBMH) with the 13 major scaffolds of the recently released Gossypium raimondii genome indicating high level of homology between the diploid D genome and the tetraploid cotton genetic map, with only a few minor possible structural rearrangements. Overall, the HDC map will serve as a valuable resource for trait QTL comparative mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and better understanding of the genome structure and evolution of tetraploid cotton. PMID:23029214

  9. Reviewe: Genetics and genomics in equine exercise physiology: an overview of the new applications of molecular biology as positive and negative markers of performance and health.

    PubMed

    Barrey, E

    2010-11-01

    Equine breeding selection has been developed by applying quantitative genetic methods for calculating the heritability of the complex traits such as performance in racing or sport competitions. With the great development of biotechnologies, equine molecular genetics has come of age. The recent sequencing of the equine genome by an international consortium was a major advance that will impact equine genomics in the near future. With the rapid progress in equine genetics, new applications in early performance evaluation and the detection of disease markers become available. Many new biomolecular tools will change management of horse selection, disease diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this review is to present new developments in equine genetics and genomics for performance evaluation and health markers after a short summary of the previous knowledge about the genetic components of the exercise performance traits.

  10. Classical and molecular genetic mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A brief history of classical genetic mapping in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is described. Detailed descriptions are given of the development of molecular genetic linkage maps based upon various types of DNA markers Like many plant and animal species, the first molecular map of soybean was bas...

  11. How do novel molecular genetic markers influence treatment decisions in acute myeloid leukemia?

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay P; Levine, Ross L

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia diagnosed in adults, and the majority of patients with AML die from relapsed disease. Although many studies over the past 4 decades have identified disease alleles in AML, recent genome-wide and candidate gene studies have identified additional recurrent somatic mutations in AML patients with biologic, clinical, and therapeutic importance. Herein we review our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of AML and discuss how mutational profiling can be used to refine prognostication in AML and to inform therapeutic approaches. We also review the current challenges in translating genomic studies to the clinical setting, which remains a significant challenge and an urgent priority.

  12. A molecular marker for in situ genetic resource conservation of Capsicum annuum var. acuminatum (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Kaewdoungdee, N; Tanee, T

    2013-02-28

    The Thailand cultivar pepper 'phrik man bangchang' (Capsicum annuum var. acuminatum, Solanaceae) was originally cultivated in the Bangchang Subdistrict, Amphawa District in Samut Songkhram Province. The cultivated areas are limited; we verified its distribution in Thailand for in situ 'phrik man bangchang' genetic resource conservation. Samples were collected from the original cultivation area of Bangchang Subdistrict (Or) and were randomly explored in Ratchaburi Province (RB), Khon Kaen Province (KK), and Sakon Nakhon Province (SN). A pure line from The Tropical Vegetable Research Center at Kasetsart University was used as the standard indicator. Two more Capsicum species, C. chinensis and C. frutescens, and a species from another genus in the family, Solanum melongena, were included. A dendrogram constructed from random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints indicated that the Or, RB, KK, and SN samples were C. annuum var. acuminatum with supportive similarity coefficients of 0.79 to 0.98. Finally, DNA barcodes, from psbA-trnH spacer region, were provided for the 3 wild species, C. annuum var. acuminatum, C. chinensis, and C. frutescens under GenBank accession Nos. JQ087869-JQ087871. The nucleotide variations between species were 0.23 to 0.26. In summary, 'phrik man bangchang' is still being planted in Bangchang Subdistrict, but only in small areas. The distribution of planting areas is expected to be throughout Thailand.

  13. CNMS: The preferred genic markers for comparative genomic, molecular phylogenetic, functional genetic diversity and differential gene regulatory expression analyses in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Deepak; Das, Shouvik; Parida, Swarup K

    2015-09-01

    The intra/inter-genomic comparative mapping-based phylogenetic footprinting identified 5 paralogous and 656 orthologous genome-wide CNMS markers in the upstream sequences of chickpea genes. These CNMS markers revealed a high-degree of gene-based syntenic relationship between chickpea and Medicago genomes while minimum between chickpea and Vitis genomes. The time of divergence and duplication estimated using CNMS markers highlight the expected phylogenetic relationships between chickpea and six dicot (legume) species as well as occurrence of ancient genome (approximately 53 Mya) with small-scale recent segmental (approximately 10 Mya) duplication events in chickpea. A wider level of functional molecular diversity (14 to 88 percent) and admixed population genetic structure was detected among desi, kabuli and wild genotypes by genic CNMS markers at a genome-wide scale suggesting their utility in large-scale genetic analysis in chickpea. The subfunctionalization at the cis-regulatory element region and TFBS (transcription factor binding site) motif levels in the upstream sequences of CNMS marker-associated orthologous genes than the paralogues was predominant. Functional constraint might have considerable effect on these CNMScontaining regulatory elements controlling consistent orthologous gene expression in dicots. A rapid subfunctionalization based on diverge differential expression of paralogous CNMS marker-associated genes particularly those that underwent recent small-scale segmental duplication events in chickpea was apparent. The differential regulation of expression and subfunctionalization potential of Ultra CNMS marker-associated genes suggest their utility in deciphering the complex gene regulatory function as well as identification and targeted mapping of potential genes/QTLs governing vital agronomic traits in chickpea. The gene-based CNMS markers with desirable inherent genetic attributes like higher degree of comparative genome mapping, functional

  14. Genetic analysis and molecular characterization of Chinese sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) cultivars using Insertion-Deletion (InDel) and Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sesame is an important and ancient oil crop in tropical and subtropical areas. China is one of the most important sesame producing countries with many germplasm accessions and excellent cultivars. Domestication and modern plant breeding have presumably narrowed the genetic basis of cultivated sesame. Several modern sesame cultivars were bred with a limited number of landrace cultivars in their pedigree. The genetic variation was subsequently reduced by genetic drift and selection. Characterization of genetic diversity of these cultivars by molecular markers is of great value to assist parental line selection and breeding strategy design. Results Three hundred and forty nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 79 insertion-deletion (InDel) markers were developed from cDNA library and reduced-representation sequencing of a sesame cultivar Zhongzhi 14, respectively. Combined with previously published SSR markers, 88 polymorphic markers were used to assess the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships, population structure, and allele distribution among 130 Chinese sesame accessions including 82 cultivars, 44 landraces and 4 wild germplasm accessions. A total of 325 alleles were detected, with the average gene diversity of 0.432. Model-based structure analysis revealed the presence of five subgroups belonging to two main groups, which were consistent with the results from principal coordinate analysis (PCA), phylogenetic clustering and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Several missing or unique alleles were identified from particular types, subgroups or families, even though they share one or both parental/progenitor lines. Conclusions This report presented a by far most comprehensive characterization of the molecular and genetic diversity of sesame cultivars in China. InDels are more polymorphic than SSRs, but their ability for deciphering genetic diversity compared to the later. Improved sesame cultivars have narrower genetic basis than landraces

  15. Genetic distances between popcorn populations based on molecular markers and correlations with heterosis estimates made by diallel analysis of hybrids.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, R E F; Prioli, A J; Amaral, A T; Scapim, C A; Simon, G A

    2009-01-01

    Diallel analysis was used to obtain information on combining ability, heterosis, estimates of genetic distances by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and on their correlations with heterosis, for the popcorn varieties RS 20, UNB2, CMS 43, CMS 42, Zélia, UEM J1, UEM M2, Beija-Flor, and Viçosa, which were crossed to obtain all possible combinations, without reciprocals. The genitors and the 36 F(1) hybrids were evaluated in field trials in Maringá during two growing seasons in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Based on the results, strategies for further studies were developed, including the construction of composites by joining varieties with high general combining ability for grain yield (UNB2 and CMS 42) with those with high general combining ability for popping expansion (Zélia, RS 20 and UEM M2). Based on the RAPD markers, UEM J1 and Zélia were the most genetically distant and RS 20 and UNB2 were the most similar. The low correlation between heterosis and genetic distances may be explained by the random dispersion of the RAPD markers, which were insufficient for the exploitation of the popcorn genome. We concluded that an association between genetic dissimilarity and heterosis based only on genetic distance is not expected without considering the effect of dominant loci. PMID:19731196

  16. [The use of RAPD and ITE molecular markers to study genetical structure of the Crimean population of Triticum boeoticum Boiss].

    PubMed

    Mallabaeva, D Sh; Ignatov, A N; Sheĭko, I A; Isikov, V P; Geliuta, V P; Boĭko, N G; Seriapin, A A; Dorokhov, D B

    2007-01-01

    Wild wheat Triticum boeoticum Boiss. is the rare species are included in the Red Book of Ukraine. This species are reducing the magnitude of population and the area of distribution under anthropogenic activity. We studied genetic structure of two populations of T. boeoticum, located on Sapun Mountain and in Baidar Valley in Crimea. According RAPD and ITE molecular analysis we have estimated that the population of T. boeoticum on Sapun Mountain is genetically more impoverished than a population from the Baidar Valley. For preservation of maximal natural genetic polymorphism of the rare species it is recommended to direct efforts to preservations of a population of T. boeoticum from the Baidar Valley.

  17. [Genetic diversity revealed by ISSR molecular marker in common wheat, spelt, compactum and progeny of recurrent selection].

    PubMed

    Du, Jin-Kun; Yao, Ying-Yin; Ni, Zhong-Fu; Peng, Hui-Ru; Sun, Qi-Xin

    2002-05-01

    It is important to estimate the genetic diversity between the parents for improving the heterosis of hybrid wheat. In this study, ISSR(inter-simple sequence repeat) marker was used to measure the genetic diversity within and among common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), spelt (Triticum spelta L.), compactum (Triticum compactum Host.) and progeny of foreign wheat-based recurrent selection, and the possibility of establishing the new heterotic group was also assessed. Forty seven genotypes were used for ISSR analysis, which included 14 common wheat, 10 spelt wheat, 11 compactum and 12 progeny of recurrent selection. Eleven of 33 ISSR primers that can produce distinguishable bands were selected for PCR amplification. A total of 238 bands were amplified, among which 207 (87%) bands were polymorphic. The polymorphic bands amplified by each primer ranged from 11 to 38, with an averaged of 18.8. The percentage of polymorphic band (80.3%) in common wheat was higher than that in progeny of recurrent selection (78.7%), spelt (75.0%) and compactum (74.9%). The 238 polymorphic products were used to calculate Nei's similarity index (GS) and the genetic distance (GD). It was found that the mean genetic distance between different wheat types (0.3115-0.3442) was obviously higher than that within common wheat (0.2743), spelt (0.2351), compactum (0.2622). In addition, progeny of recurrent selection also showed much higher genetic distance with other three wheat types (0.3217, 0.3256, 0.3198). The cluster analysis was performed based on the genetic distance (GD) matrix by using UPGMA method. Common wheat, spelt, compactum and progeny of recurrent selection were classified into four different groups. In this study, ISSR marker was firstly used to assess genetic diversity among common wheat, spelt, compactum and progeny of recurrent selection, and can differentiate the wheat cultivars (lines) that selected from the same cross combination. It was concluded that spelt, compactum and progeny

  18. Identification of Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine-strain genetic markers: Towards understanding the molecular mechanism behind virulence attenuation.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mohammad Nouh; Ashhab, Yaqoub

    2016-09-22

    Brucella melitensis Rev.1 is an avirulent strain that is widely used as a live vaccine to control brucellosis in small ruminants. Although an assembled draft version of Rev.1 genome has been available since 2009, this genome has not been investigated to characterize this important vaccine. In the present work, we used the draft genome of Rev.1 to perform a thorough genomic comparison and sequence analysis to identify and characterize the panel of its unique genetic markers. The draft genome of Rev.1 was compared with genome sequences of 36 different Brucella melitensis strains from the Brucella project of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. The comparative analyses revealed 32 genetic alterations (30 SNPs, 1 single-bp insertion and 1 single-bp deletion) that are exclusively present in the Rev.1 genome. In silico analyses showed that 9 out of the 17 non-synonymous mutations are deleterious. Three ABC transporters are among the disrupted genes that can be linked to virulence attenuation. Out of the 32 mutations, 11 Rev.1 specific markers were selected to test their potential to discriminate Rev.1 using a bi-directional allele-specific PCR assay. Six markers were able to distinguish between Rev.1 and a set of control strains. We succeeded in identifying a panel of 32 genome-specific markers of the B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine strain. Extensive in silico analysis showed that a considerable number of these mutations could severely affect the function of the associated genes. In addition, some of the discovered markers were able to discriminate Rev.1 strain from a group of control strains using practical PCR tests that can be applied in resource-limited settings. PMID:27595444

  19. Genetic markers as instrumental variables

    PubMed Central

    von Hinke, Stephanie; Davey Smith, George; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Propper, Carol; Windmeijer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The use of genetic markers as instrumental variables (IV) is receiving increasing attention from economists, statisticians, epidemiologists and social scientists. Although IV is commonly used in economics, the appropriate conditions for the use of genetic variants as instruments have not been well defined. The increasing availability of biomedical data, however, makes understanding of these conditions crucial to the successful use of genotypes as instruments. We combine the econometric IV literature with that from genetic epidemiology, and discuss the biological conditions and IV assumptions within the statistical potential outcomes framework. We review this in the context of two illustrative applications. PMID:26614692

  20. Molecular marker technologies for plant improvement.

    PubMed

    Winter, P; Kahl, G

    1995-07-01

    The exploitation of DNA polymorphisms by an ever-increasing number of molecular marker technologies has begun to have an impact on plant genome research and breeding. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms, micro- and mini-satellites and PCR-based approaches are used to determine inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity and construct molecular maps of crops using specially designed mapping populations. Resistance genes and other agronomically important loci are tagged with tightly linked DNA markers and the genes isolated by magabase DNA technology and cloning into yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC). This review discusses some recent developments and results in this field.

  1. Genetic fidelity of long-term micropropagated shoot cultures of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) as assessed by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, Reddampalli V; Venkatachalam, Lakshmanan; Bhagyalakshmi, Neelwarne

    2007-08-01

    Occurrence of genetic variants during micropropagation is occasionally encountered when the cultures are maintained in vitro for long period. Therefore, the micropropagated multiple shoots of Vanilla planifolia Andrews developed from axillary bud explants established 10 years ago were used to determine somaclonal variation using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and intersimple sequence repeats markers (ISSR). One thousand micro-plants were established in soil of which 95 plantlets (consisting of four phenotypes) along with the mother plant were subjected to genetic analyses using RAPD and ISSR markers. Out of the 45 RAPD and 20 ISSR primers screened, 30 RAPD and 7 ISSR primers showed 317 clear, distinct and reproducible band classes resulting in a total of 30 115 bands. However, no difference was observed in banding patterns of any of the samples for a particular primer, indicating the absence of variation among the micropropagated plants. Our results allow us to conclude that the micropropagation protocol that we have used for in vitro proliferation of vanilla plantlets for the last 10 years might be applicable for the production of clonal plants over a considerable period of time.

  2. High gene flow and genetic diversity in three economically important Zanthoxylum Spp. of Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of NE India using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Medhi, K; Sarmah, D K; Deka, M; Bhau, B S

    2014-12-01

    The genetic diversity in Zanthoxylum species viz.  Zanthoxylum nitidum, Zanthoxylum oxyphyllum and Zanthoxylum rhesta collected from the Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of Assam (NE India) was amplified using 13 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and 9 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. RAPD markers were able to detect 81.82% polymorphism whereas ISSR detected 98.02% polymorphism. The genetic similarities were analyzed from the dendrogram constructed by RAPD and ISSR fingerprinting methods which divided the 3 species of Zanthoxylum into 3 clear different clusters. The principle component analysis (PCA) was carried out to confirm the clustering pattern of RAPD and ISSR analysis. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed the presence of significant variability between different Zanthoxylum species and within the species by both RAPD and ISSR markers. Z. nitidum was found to be sharing a high degree of variation with the other two Zanthoxylum species under study. The Nei's gene diversity (h), Shannon's information index (I), observed number of alleles (na) and effective number of alleles (ne) were also found to be higher in ISSR markers (0.3526, 0.5230, 1.9802 and 1.6145) than in RAPD markers (0.3144, 0.4610, 1.8182 and 1.5571). The values for total genotype diversity for among population (HT), within population diversity (Hs) and gene flow (Nm) were more in ISSR (0.3491, 0.2644 and 1.5610) than RAPD (0.3128, 0.2264 and 1.3087) but the mean coefficient of gene differentiation (GST) was more in RAPD (0.2764) than ISSR (0.2426). A comparison of this two finger printing methods was done by calculating MR, EMI and MI. The correlation coefficient between data matrices of RAPD and ISSR based on Mantel test was found to be significant (r = 0.65612). PMID:25606454

  3. High gene flow and genetic diversity in three economically important Zanthoxylum Spp. of Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of NE India using molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Medhi, K.; Sarmah, D.K.; Deka, M.; Bhau, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity in Zanthoxylum species viz.  Zanthoxylum nitidum, Zanthoxylum oxyphyllum and Zanthoxylum rhesta collected from the Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of Assam (NE India) was amplified using 13 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and 9 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. RAPD markers were able to detect 81.82% polymorphism whereas ISSR detected 98.02% polymorphism. The genetic similarities were analyzed from the dendrogram constructed by RAPD and ISSR fingerprinting methods which divided the 3 species of Zanthoxylum into 3 clear different clusters. The principle component analysis (PCA) was carried out to confirm the clustering pattern of RAPD and ISSR analysis. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed the presence of significant variability between different Zanthoxylum species and within the species by both RAPD and ISSR markers. Z. nitidum was found to be sharing a high degree of variation with the other two Zanthoxylum species under study. The Nei's gene diversity (h), Shannon's information index (I), observed number of alleles (na) and effective number of alleles (ne) were also found to be higher in ISSR markers (0.3526, 0.5230, 1.9802 and 1.6145) than in RAPD markers (0.3144, 0.4610, 1.8182 and 1.5571). The values for total genotype diversity for among population (HT), within population diversity (Hs) and gene flow (Nm) were more in ISSR (0.3491, 0.2644 and 1.5610) than RAPD (0.3128, 0.2264 and 1.3087) but the mean coefficient of gene differentiation (GST) was more in RAPD (0.2764) than ISSR (0.2426). A comparison of this two finger printing methods was done by calculating MR, EMI and MI. The correlation coefficient between data matrices of RAPD and ISSR based on Mantel test was found to be significant (r = 0.65612). PMID:25606454

  4. More parasitic myositis cases in humans in Australia, and the definition of genetic markers for the causative agents as a basis for molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Anson V; Spratt, David M; Norton, Robert; Warren, Sanchia; McEwan, Belinda; Urkude, Ravindra; Murthy, Suresh; Robertson, Thomas; McCallum, Naomi; Parsonson, Fiona; Bradbury, Richard S; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-10-01

    Since 1998, there have been six reported human cases of myositis in Australia, attributable to infection with the nematode Haycocknema perplexum. However, an unequivocal diagnosis of H. perplexum infection and associated disease has been seriously compromised by a lack of molecular markers for this nematode. Here, we report new cases of disseminated myositis in two male patients from the states of Queensland and Tasmania in Australia, respectively; genetically characterize the causative agent from each case; and, also establish a PCR-based sequencing approach as a tool to support the diagnosis of future cases and to underpin epidemiological studies.

  5. Searching for non-genetic molecular and imaging PTSD risk and resilience markers: Systematic review of literature and design of the German Armed Forces PTSD biomarker study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulrike; Willmund, Gerd-Dieter; Holsboer, Florian; Wotjak, Carsten T; Gallinat, Jürgen; Kowalski, Jens T; Zimmermann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers allowing the identification of individuals with an above average vulnerability or resilience for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) would especially serve populations at high risk for trauma exposure like firefighters, police officers and combat soldiers. Aiming to identify the most promising putative PTSD vulnerability markers, we conducted the first systematic review on potential imaging and non-genetic molecular markers for PTSD risk and resilience. Following the PRISMA guidelines, we systematically screened the PubMed database for prospective longitudinal clinical studies and twin studies reporting on pre-trauma and post-trauma PTSD risk and resilience biomarkers. Using 25 different combinations of search terms, we retrieved 8151 articles of which we finally included and evaluated 9 imaging and 27 molecular studies. In addition, we briefly illustrate the design of the ongoing prospective German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) PTSD biomarker study (Bw-BioPTSD) which not only aims to validate these previous findings but also to identify novel and clinically applicable molecular, psychological and imaging risk, resilience and disease markers for deployment-related psychopathology in a cohort of German soldiers who served in Afghanistan.

  6. Molecular Typing and Presence of Genetic Markers Among Strains of Banana Finger-Tip Rot Pathogen, Burkholderia cenocepacia, in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-An; Chan, Chih-Wen

    2007-02-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia cenocepacia (genomovar III of B. cepacia complex), the causal agent of banana finger-tip rot, is a common plant-associated bacterium but also an important opportunistic pathogen of humans. To better understand the nature of B. cenocepacia from banana, the genetic variation among B. cenocepacia isolates from various banana-growing regions in southern Taiwan was examined. Forty-four serial isolates recovered from diseased banana stigmata from three banana-growing regions during the periods ranging from 2002 to 2004 were investigated. All B. cenocepacia isolates picked from quinate-yeast extract tetracycline-polymyxin semiselective medium could cause onion maceration and were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for bcscV, which is a type III secretion gene present in all members of the B. cepacia complex except B. cepacia (formerly genomovar I). Genetic diversity was assessed using recA PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism, recA nucleotide sequence analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assays. The assays revealed the genetic variability among the isolates and also allowed us to trace the relationship among isolates. The isolates all were assigned to genomovar III and consisted of two groups, A and B, which corresponded to recA lineage IIIA and IIIB. The group B strains were separated into B1 and B2 subgroups and the B1 strains were further divided into distinct lineages. The B1 strains were the most frequently detected and occurred in all regions tested. There was no significant difference between strains from each subgroup in the virulence on banana fingers of cv. Cavendish. PCR assays were further used to determine whether B. cenocepacia from banana contained the cable pilus subunit gene (cblA), IS1356, and B. cepacia epidemic strain marker (BCESM), which are DNA markers associated with epidemic B. cepacia clinic strains. The results indicated that cblA and IS1356 were absent but the BCESM was found in all isolates. The

  7. Accurate determination of genetic identity for a single cacao bean, using molecular markers with a nanofluidic system, ensures cocoa authentication.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wanping; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Bellato, Cláudia M; Motilal, Lambert; Zhang, Dapeng

    2014-01-15

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.), the source of cocoa, is an economically important tropical crop. One problem with the premium cacao market is contamination with off-types adulterating raw premium material. Accurate determination of the genetic identity of single cacao beans is essential for ensuring cocoa authentication. Using nanofluidic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping with 48 SNP markers, we generated SNP fingerprints for small quantities of DNA extracted from the seed coat of single cacao beans. On the basis of the SNP profiles, we identified an assumed adulterant variety, which was unambiguously distinguished from the authentic beans by multilocus matching. Assignment tests based on both Bayesian clustering analysis and allele frequency clearly separated all 30 authentic samples from the non-authentic samples. Distance-based principle coordinate analysis further supported these results. The nanofluidic SNP protocol, together with forensic statistical tools, is sufficiently robust to establish authentication and to verify gourmet cacao varieties. This method shows significant potential for practical application.

  8. Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers (2010) Fungal Genetics and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Murat, Claude; Riccioni, C; Belfiori, B; Cichocki, N; Labbe, Jessy L; Morin, Emmanuelle; Tisserant, Emilie; Paolocci, F; Rubini, A; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.

  9. Dominance Is the Major Genetic Basis of Heterosis in Rice as Revealed by Qtl Analysis Using Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, J.; Li, J.; Yuan, L.; Tanksley, S. D.

    1995-01-01

    A set of 194 F(7) lines derived from a subspecific rice cross showing strong F(1) heterosis was backcrossed to the two parents. The materials (388 BC(1)F(7) lines, 194 F(8) lines, two parents, F(1)) were phenotyped for 12 quantitative traits. A total of 37 significant QTLs (LOD >/= 2.0) was detected through 141 RFLP markers in the BC(1)F(7) populations. Twenty-seven (73%) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected in only one of the BC(1)F(7) populations. In 82% of these cases, the heterozygotes were superior to the respective homozygotes. The remaining 10 (27%) QTLs were detected in both BC(1)F(7) populations, and the heterozygote had a phenotype falling between those of the two homozygotes and in no instances were the heterozygotes found to be superior to both homozygotes. These results suggest that dominance complementation is the major genetic basis of heterosis in rice. This conclusion was strengthened by the finding that there was no correlation between most traits and overall genome heterozygosity and that there were some recombinant inbred lines in the F(8) population having phenotypic values superior to the F(1) for all of the traits evaluated--a result not expected if overdominance was a major contributor to heterosis. Digenic epistasis was not evident. PMID:7498751

  10. A Preliminary Study of Genetic Variation in Populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae) from North-East Brazil, Estimated with AFLP Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, I. M.; Mayo, S. J.; van den Berg, C.; Fay, M. F.; Chester, M.; Lexer, C.; Kirkup, D.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims This study sought genetic evidence of long-term isolation in populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae), a herbaceous, probably outbreeding, humid forest hemi-epiphyte, in the brejo forests of Ceará (north-east Brazil), and clarification of their relationships with populations in Amazonia and the Atlantic forest of Brazil. Methods Within-population genetic diversity and between-population dissimilarity were estimated using AFLP molecular markers in 75 individuals from eight populations located in Ceará, the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and Amazonia. Key Results The populations showed a clinal pattern of weak genetic differentiation over a large geographical region (FST = 0·1896). A strong correlation between genetic and geographical distance (Mantel test: r = 0·6903, P = 0·002) suggests a historical pattern of isolation by distance. Genetic structure analysis revealed at least two distinct gene pools in the data. The two isolated Ceará populations are significantly different from each other (pairwise ΦPT = 0·137, P = 0·003) and as diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·1832, 0·1706) as those in the Atlantic and Amazon forest regions. The population in southern Brazil is less diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·127) than the rest. The Ceará populations are related to those of the Atlantic forest rather than those from Amazonia (AMOVA, among-groups variation = 11·95 %, P = 0·037). Conclusions The gene pools detected within an overall pattern of clinal variation suggest distinct episodes of gene flow, possibly correlated with past humid forest expansions. The Ceará populations show no evidence of erosion of genetic diversity, although this was expected because of their isolation. Their genetic differentiation and relatively high diversity reinforce the importance of conserving the endangered brejo forests. PMID:17823112

  11. [Results of applying molecular-and-genetic markers of chromosomal DNA in identification of unrecognizable remains of servicemen lost in military actions in the Northern Caucasus].

    PubMed

    Kornienko, I V; Iakushev, V V; Frolova, S A; Zemskova, E Iu; Kabanova, N P; Ivanov, P L

    2003-01-01

    The results of applying molecular-and-genetic markers of chromosomal DNA in identifying unrecognizable remains of servicemen lost as dead in 1994-1996 and 1999-2001 military campaigns in the Northern Caucuses are summarized in the paper. Some of the specific features related with enzymatic amplification typing of DNA preparations sampled from degraded biological tissues of strongly deformed or decayed cadavers were analyzed. The typing results were analyzed by the AB0 system of degraded expertise samples in order to check the reliability of routine forensic-biological examinations as applicable to cadaver tissues with pronounced putrefactive changes. It was established that group-specific antigens of the AB0 system were correctly determined only in 67.5% of cases. False results were obtained in the other 32.5% of cases. Most of them were related with determination of groups 0(I) and A(II).

  12. Estimation of genetic diversity using SSR markers in sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower is a major oilseed crop in central Asia, but little is known of the molecular diversity among collections of sunflower from Pakistan region. This paper described inherent genetic relationships among sunflower collections using Simple Sequence Repeat molecular markers. Results should help...

  13. Ricebase: a breeding and genetics platform for rice, integrating individual molecular markers, pedigrees, and whole-genome-based data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ricebase (http://ricebase.org) is an integrative genomic database for rice (Oryza sativa) with an emphasis on combining data sets in a way that maintains the key links between past and current genetic studies. Ricebase includes DNA sequence data, gene annotations, nucleotide variation data, and mol...

  14. Genetic identity and parentage in farmer selections of cacao from Southern Sulawesi, Indonesia revealed by molecular markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indonesia is the 3rd largest cocoa producing countries in the world and 71% of its production is from Sulawesi Island. Knowledge about the genetic background of farmer selections is highly important for effective identification and rational deployment of superior cacao clones in farmers’ fields. Mor...

  15. Plant tissue culture and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Tamayo-Ordoñez, María; Huijara-Vasconselos, Javier; Quiroz-Moreno, Adriana; Ortíz-García, Matilde; Sánchez-Teyer, Lorenzo Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Tissue culture can be used to propagate elite material or to generate new variability by employing somaclonal variation. Genetic stability of the process must be evaluated analyzing DNA profiles by the use of molecular markers. Several techniques have been reported for the screening of genetic variation on tissue culture derived material; however, a highly informative and good relation among the time-cost-information is obtained using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) in automatic sequencer. This technique involves a double-digestion of DNA with restriction enzymes, ligation of adapters at both extremities of the restriction fragments, and finally, selective polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the fragments. A semiautomatic process for the analysis could be used, but several considerations must be taken into account before such a use. PMID:22610640

  16. Molecular genetic evidence for the human settlement of the Pacific: analysis of mitochondrial DNA, Y chromosome and HLA markers.

    PubMed

    Hagelberg, E; Kayser, M; Nagy, M; Roewer, L; Zimdahl, H; Krawczak, M; Lió, P; Schiefenhövel, W

    1999-01-29

    Present-day Pacific islanders are thought to be the descendants of Neolithic agriculturalists who expanded from island South-east Asia several thousand years ago. They speak languages belonging to the Austronesian language family, spoken today in an area spanning half of the circumference of the world, from Madagascar to Easter Island, and from Taiwan to New Zealand. To investigate the genetic affinities of the Austronesian-speaking peoples, we analysed mitochondrial DNA, HLA and Y-chromosome polymorphisms in individuals from eight geographical locations in Asia and the Pacific (China, Taiwan, Java, New Guinea highlands, New Guinea coast, Trobriand Islands, New Britain and Western Samoa). Our results show that the demographic expansion of the Austronesians has left a genetic footprint. However, there is no simple correlation between languages and genes in the Pacific.

  17. Molecular genetic evidence for the human settlement of the Pacific: analysis of mitochondrial DNA, Y chromosome and HLA markers.

    PubMed Central

    Hagelberg, E; Kayser, M; Nagy, M; Roewer, L; Zimdahl, H; Krawczak, M; Lió, P; Schiefenhövel, W

    1999-01-01

    Present-day Pacific islanders are thought to be the descendants of Neolithic agriculturalists who expanded from island South-east Asia several thousand years ago. They speak languages belonging to the Austronesian language family, spoken today in an area spanning half of the circumference of the world, from Madagascar to Easter Island, and from Taiwan to New Zealand. To investigate the genetic affinities of the Austronesian-speaking peoples, we analysed mitochondrial DNA, HLA and Y-chromosome polymorphisms in individuals from eight geographical locations in Asia and the Pacific (China, Taiwan, Java, New Guinea highlands, New Guinea coast, Trobriand Islands, New Britain and Western Samoa). Our results show that the demographic expansion of the Austronesians has left a genetic footprint. However, there is no simple correlation between languages and genes in the Pacific. PMID:10091254

  18. Genetic Structure of Earthworm Populations at a Regional Scale: Inferences from Mitochondrial and Microsatellite Molecular Markers in Aporrectodea icterica (Savigny 1826)

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Leguizamon, Magally; Mathieu, Jérôme; Decaëns, Thibaud; Dupont, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fundamental role that soil invertebrates (e.g. earthworms) play in soil ecosystems, the magnitude of their spatial genetic variation is still largely unknown and only a few studies have investigated the population genetic structure of these organisms. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of seven populations of a common endogeic earthworm (Aporrectodea icterica) sampled in northern France to explore how historical species range changes, microevolutionary processes and human activities interact in shaping genetic variation at a regional scale. Because combining markers with distinct modes of inheritance can provide extra, complementary information on gene flow, we compared the patterns of genetic structure revealed using nuclear (7 microsatellite loci) and mitochondrial markers (COI). Both types of markers indicated low genetic polymorphism compared to other earthworm species, a result that can be attributed to ancient bottlenecks, for instance due to species isolation in southern refugia during the ice ages with subsequent expansion toward northern Europe. Historical events can also be responsible for the existence of two divergent, but randomly interbreeding mitochondrial lineages within all study populations. In addition, the comparison of observed heterozygosity among microsatellite loci and heterozygosity expected under mutation-drift equilibrium suggested a recent decrease in effective size in some populations that could be due to contemporary events such as habitat fragmentation. The absence of relationship between geographic and genetic distances estimated from microsatellite allele frequency data also suggested that dispersal is haphazard and that human activities favour passive dispersal among geographically distant populations. PMID:25003795

  19. Analysis of genetic diversity in earthworms using DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshul; Sonah, Humira; Deshmukh, Rupesh K; Gupta, Navneet K; Singh, Nagendra K; Sharma, Tilak R

    2011-01-01

    Earthworms are one of the most important and beneficial macrofauna, and are used extensively in organic farming. Earthworms mediate soil biological regulation systems, and produce biogenic structures. They help to maintain soil structure, water infiltration, and regulate the availability of nutrients assimilated by plants. The objectives of this study were to perform morphological and molecular characterizations of 24 earthworm individuals collected from geographically diverse locations to assess the level of genetic variation. For molecular analysis, the effectiveness of RAPD, ISSR, and Universal rice primers (URPs) markers was investigated to identify polymorphism among 24 isolates of earthworms. A total of 62 molecular markers were used for amplification of genomic DNA of earthworms. Of these, 10 RAPD, 10 ISSR, and 10 URPs markers were used for characterization, which showed 95.7%, 96.7% and 98.3% polymorphism, respectively. The dendrogram, generated from the DNA markers by the unweighted pair group method using arithmetic averages, grouped all the isolates into two main clusters. All Eisenia fetida isolates were clustered in group A, whereas group B included three isolates belonging to Eudrilus eugeniae. Molecular markers allowed a rapid assessment of genetic variation among these closely related isolates of earthworms. These results suggest that molecular markers are a good choice for diversity analysis of earthworm individuals. PMID:21186943

  20. Molecular genetic analysis of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Eastern and Central Sudan using pvcsp and pvmsp-3α genes as molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Talha, Albadawi Abdelbagi; Pirahmadi, Sekineh; Mehrizi, Akram Abouie; Djadid, Navid Dinparast; Nour, Bakri Y M; Zakeri, Sedigheh

    2015-06-01

    In Sudan, Plasmodium vivax accounts for approximately 5-10% of malaria cases. This study was carried out to determine the genetic diversity of P. vivax population from Sudan by analyzing the polymorphism of P. vivax csp (pvcsp) and pvmsp-3α genes. Blood samples (n=76) were taken from suspected malaria cases from 2012-2013 in three health centers of Eastern and Central Sudan. Parasite detection was performed by microscopy and molecular techniques, and genotyping of both genes was performed by PCR-RFLP followed by DNA sequence for only pvcsp gene (n=30). Based on microscopy analysis, 76 (%100) patients were infected with P. vivax, whereas nested-PCR results showed that 86.8% (n=66), 3.9% (n=3), and 3.9% (n=3) of tested samples had P. vivax as well as Plasmodium falciparum mono- and mixed infections, respectively. Four out of 76 samples had no results in molecular diagnosis. All sequenced samples were found to be of VK210 (100%) genotype with six distinct amino acid haplotypes, and 210A (66.7%) was the most prevalent haplotype. The Sudanese isolates displayed variations in the peptide repeat motifs (PRMs) ranging from 17 to 19 with GDRADGQPA (PRM1), GDRAAGQPA (PRM2) and DDRAAGQPA (PRM3). Also, 54 polymorphic sites with 56 mutations were found in repeat and post-repeat regions of the pvcsp and the overall nucleotide diversity (π) was 0.02149±0.00539. A negative value of dN-dS (-0.0344) was found that suggested a significant purifying selection of Sudanese pvcsp, (Z test, P<0.05). Regarding pvmsp-3α, three types were detected: types A (94.6%, 52/55), type C (3.6%, 2/55), and type B (1.8%, 1/55). No multiclonal infections were detected, and RFLP analysis identified 13 (Hha I, A1-A11, B1, and C1) and 16 (Alu I, A1-A14, B1, and C1) distinct allelic forms. In conclusion, genetic investigation among Sudanese P. vivax isolates indicated that this antigen showed limited antigenic diversity.

  1. Molecular markers in the epidemiology and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Frías-De-León, María Guadalupe; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Martínez-Herrera, Erick; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of coccidioidomycosis in endemic areas has been observed to increase daily. To understand the causes of the spread of the disease and design strategies for fungal detection in clinical and environmental samples, scientists have resorted to molecular tools that allow fungal detection in a natural environment, reliable identification in clinical cases and the study of biological characteristics, such as reproductive and genetic structure, demographic history and diversification. We conducted a review of the most important molecular markers in the epidemiology of Coccidioides spp. and the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. A literature search was performed for scientific publications concerning the application of molecular tools for the epidemiology and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. The use of molecular markers in the epidemiological study and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis has allowed for the typing of Coccidioides spp. isolates, improved understanding of their mode of reproduction, genetic variation and speciation and resulted in the development specific, rapid and sensitive strategies for detecting the fungus in environmental and clinical samples. Molecular markers have revealed genetic variability in Coccidioides spp. This finding influences changes in the epidemiology of coccidioidomycosis, such as the emergence of more virulent or antifungal resistant genotypes. Furthermore, the molecular markers currently used to identify Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are specific and sensitive. However, they must be validated to determine their application in diagnosis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  2. The development of genetic and molecular markers to register and commercialize Penicillium rubens (formerly Penicillium oxalicum) strain 212 as a biocontrol agent.

    PubMed

    Villarino, Maria; De Cal, Antonieta; Melgarejo, Paloma; Larena, Inmaculada; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium oxalicum strain 212 (PO212) is an effective biocontrol agent (BCA) against a large number of economically important fungal plant pathogens. For successful registration as a BCA in Europe, PO212 must be accurately identified. In this report, we describe the use of classical genetic and molecular markers to characterize and identify PO212 in order to understand its ecological role in the environment or host. We successfully generated pyrimidine (pyr-) auxotrophic mutants. In addition we also designed specific oligonucleotides for the pyrF gene at their untranslated regions for rapid and reliable identification and classification of strains of P. oxalicum and P. rubens, formerly P. chrysogenum. Using these DNA-based technologies, we found that PO212 is a strain of P. rubens, and is not a strain of P. oxalicum. This work presents PO212 as the unique P. rubens strain to be described as a BCA and the information contained here serves for its registration and commercialization in Europe.

  3. Molecular marker systems in insects: current trends and future avenues.

    PubMed

    Behura, Susanta K

    2006-10-01

    Insects comprise the largest species composition in the entire animal kingdom and possess a vast undiscovered genetic diversity and gene pool that can be better explored using molecular marker techniques. Current trends of application of DNA marker techniques in diverse domains of insect ecological studies show that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), microsatellites, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), expressed sequence tags (EST) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers have contributed significantly for progresses towards understanding genetic basis of insect diversity and for mapping medically and agriculturally important genes and quantitative trait loci in insect pests. Apart from these popular marker systems, other novel approaches including transposon display, sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (S-SAP), repeat-associated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) markers have been identified as alternate marker systems in insect studies. Besides, whole genome microarray and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays are becoming more popular to screen genome-wide polymorphisms in fast and cost effective manner. However, use of such methodologies has not gained widespread popularity in entomological studies. The current study highlights the recent trends of applications of molecular markers in insect studies and explores the technological advancements in molecular marker tools and modern high throughput genotyping methodologies that may be applied in entomological researches for better understanding of insect ecology at molecular level.

  4. Genetic analyses of the host-pathogen system Turnip yellows virus (TuYV)-rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) and development of molecular markers for TuYV-resistance.

    PubMed

    Juergens, Monique; Paetsch, Claudia; Krämer, Ilona; Zahn, Marc; Rabenstein, Frank; Schondelmaier, Jörg; Schliephake, Edgar; Snowdon, Rod; Friedt, Wolfgang; Ordon, Frank

    2010-02-01

    The aphid transmitted Turnip yellows virus (TuYV) has become a serious pathogen in many rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) growing areas. Three-years' field trials were carried out to get detailed information on the genetics of TuYV resistance derived from the resynthesised B. napus line 'R54' and to develop closely linked markers. F(1) plants and segregating doubled-haploid (DH) populations derived from crosses to susceptible cultivars were analysed using artificial inoculation with virus-bearing aphids, followed by DAS-ELISA. Assuming a threshold of E (405) = 0.1 in ELISA carried out in December, the results led to the conclusion that pre-winter inhibition of TuYV is inherited in a monogenic dominant manner. However, the virus titre in most resistant lines increased during the growing period, indicating that the resistance is incomplete and that the level of the virus titre is influenced by environmental factors. Bulked-segregant marker analysis for this resistance locus identified two closely linked SSR markers along with six closely linked and three co-segregating AFLP markers. Two AFLP markers were converted into co-dominant STS markers, facilitating efficient marker-based selection for TuYV resistance. Effective markers are particularly valuable with respect to breeding for TuYV resistance, because artificial inoculation procedures using virus-bearing aphids are extremely difficult to integrate into practical rapeseed breeding programs.

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphism markers for genetic mapping in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Phan, Alexander C.; Naeemuddin, Mohammed; Mapa, Felipa A.; Ruddy, David A.; Ryan, Jessica J.; Young, Lynn M.; Wells, Trent; Kopczynski, Casey; Ellis, Michael C.

    2001-04-16

    For nearly a century, genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful tool for analyzing gene function, yet Drosophila lacks the molecular genetic mapping tools that have recently revolutionized human, mouse and plant genetics. Here, we describe the systematic characterization of a dense set of molecular markers in Drosophila using an STS-based physical map of the genome. We identify 474 biallelic markers in standard laboratory strains of Drosophila that the genome. The majority of these markers are single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and sequences for these variants are provided in an accessible format. The average density of the new markers is 1 marker per 225 kb on the autosomes and 1 marker per 1 Mb on the X chromosome. We include in this survey a set of P-element strains that provide additional utility for high-resolution mapping. We demonstrate one application of the new markers in a simple set of crosses to map a mutation in the hedgehog gene to an interval of <1 Mb. This new map resource significantly increases the efficiency and resolution of recombination mapping and will be of immediate value to the Drosophila research community.

  6. Study of genetic variation of eggplant cultivars by using RAPD-PCR molecular markers and the relationship with Phomopsis blight disease reaction.

    PubMed

    Asad, H A; Meah, M B; Begum, S N; Khalil, M I; Rafii, M Y; Latif, M A

    2015-01-01

    Disease susceptibility and genetic variability in 10 eggplant genotypes were studied after inoculating Phomopsis vexans under confined field conditions. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to assess genetic variation and relationships among eggplant genotypes. The disease index of leaves ranged 0.208-13.79%, while fruit infection ranged 2.15-42.76%. Two varieties, Dohazari G and Laffa S, were found to be susceptible, 6 were moderately resistant, 1 was moderately susceptible, and BAU Begun-1 was resistant to P. vexans. Amplification of genomic DNA by using 3 RAPD primers produced 20 bands: 14 (70%) were polymorphic and 6 (30%) were monomorphic. The highest intra-variety similarity indices values were found in ISD 006, Ishurdi L, Jessore L, and BAU Begun-1 (100%), while the lowest was in Dohazari G (90%). The lowest genetic distance (0.0513) and the highest genetic identity (0.9500) were observed between the ISD 006 and Ishurdi L combinations. A comparatively higher genetic distance (0.3724) and the lowest genetic identity (0.6891) were observed between the ISD 006 and Dohazari G combinations. A dendogram was constructed based on Nei's genetic distance, which produced 2 main clusters of the genotypes - Cluster I: ISD 006, Ishurdi L, Marich begun L, BAU Begun-1, Marich begun S, and Chega and Cluster 2: Laffa S, Dohazari G, Jessore L, and Singhnath. Genetic variation and its relationship with disease susceptibility were assessed using RAPD markers, to develop disease-resistant varieties and improve eggplant crops.

  7. Primer on molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  8. Impact of marker ascertainment bias on genomic selection accuracy and estimates of genetic diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide molecular markers are readily being applied to evaluate genetic diversity in germplasm collections and for making genomic selections in breeding programs. To accurately predict phenotypes and assay genetic diversity, molecular markers should assay a representative sample of the polymorp...

  9. [Genetic virulence markers of opportunistic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V M

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of opportunistic bacteria phenotypic and genetic virulence markers indicates that pathogenicity formation is based on a structural modification of bacterial DNA which is linked with migration of interbacterial pathogenicity "islands" genetic determinants. Structural organization features of these mobile genetic elements determine high expression probability, and PCR detection of pathogenicity "islands" determinants that control adhesins, invasins, cytotoxic and cytolitic toxines synthesis may indicate etiopathogenetic significance of clinical isolates.

  10. The impact of genetic markers on selection.

    PubMed

    Davis, G P; DeNise, S K

    1998-09-01

    Genetic marker technologies, such as marker-assisted selection, parentage identification, and gene introgression can be applied to livestock selection programs. Highly saturated genetic maps are now available for cattle, swine, and sheep to provide the genetic framework for developing MAS programs. These programs rely on three phases for commercialization of the technology: the detection phase, in which quantitative trait loci are located and their effects on the phenotype measured; the evaluation phase, in which the markers are evaluated in commercial populations; and the implementation phase, in which markers are combined with phenotypic and pedigree information in genetic evaluation for predicting the genetic merit of individuals within the population. Predicting the economic impact of genetic technologies is a complex process that requires quantitative prediction and economic analysis. Evaluating the impact of these benefits across an industry can be achieved through a process in which gains from implementation of a genetic technology are assessed at the individual, enterprise, and industry levels. A pattern of annual benefits and costs can be predicted using gene flows that can be evaluated by conventional economic analysis.

  11. Genetic diversity analysis among male and female Jojoba genotypes employing gene targeted molecular markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) markers.

    PubMed

    Heikrujam, Monika; Kumar, Jatin; Agrawal, Veena

    2015-09-01

    To detect genetic variations among different Simmondsia chinensis genotypes, two gene targeted markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) were employed in terms of their informativeness and efficiency in analyzing genetic relationships among different genotypes. A total of 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP primers detected genetic polymorphism among 39 Jojoba genotypes (22 females and 17 males). Comparatively, CBDP markers proved to be more effective than SCoT markers in terms of percentage polymorphism as the former detecting an average of 53.4% and the latter as 49.4%. The Polymorphic information content (PIC) value and marker index (MI) of CBPD were 0.43 and 1.10, respectively which were higher than those of SCoT where the respective values of PIC and MI were 0.38 and 1.09. While comparing male and female genotype populations, the former showed higher variation in respect of polymorphic percentage and PIC, MI and Rp values over female populations. Nei's diversity (h) and Shannon index (I) were calculated for each genotype and found that the genotype "MS F" (in both markers) was highly diverse and genotypes "Q104 F" (SCoT) and "82-18 F" (CBDP) were least diverse among the female genotype populations. Among male genotypes, "32 M" (CBDP) and "MS M" (SCoT) revealed highest h and I values while "58-5 M" (both markers) was the least diverse. Jaccard's similarity co-efficient of SCoT markers ranged from 0.733 to 0.922 in female genotypes and 0.941 to 0.746 in male genotype population. Likewise, CBDP data analysis also revealed similarity ranging from 0.751 to 0.958 within female genotypes and 0.754 to 0.976 within male genotype populations thereby, indicating genetically diverse Jojoba population. Employing the NTSYS (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system) Version 2.1 software, both the markers generated dendrograms which revealed that all the Jojoba genotypes were clustered into two major groups, one group consisting of

  12. Genetic diversity analysis among male and female Jojoba genotypes employing gene targeted molecular markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) markers

    PubMed Central

    Heikrujam, Monika; Kumar, Jatin; Agrawal, Veena

    2015-01-01

    To detect genetic variations among different Simmondsia chinensis genotypes, two gene targeted markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) were employed in terms of their informativeness and efficiency in analyzing genetic relationships among different genotypes. A total of 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP primers detected genetic polymorphism among 39 Jojoba genotypes (22 females and 17 males). Comparatively, CBDP markers proved to be more effective than SCoT markers in terms of percentage polymorphism as the former detecting an average of 53.4% and the latter as 49.4%. The Polymorphic information content (PIC) value and marker index (MI) of CBPD were 0.43 and 1.10, respectively which were higher than those of SCoT where the respective values of PIC and MI were 0.38 and 1.09. While comparing male and female genotype populations, the former showed higher variation in respect of polymorphic percentage and PIC, MI and Rp values over female populations. Nei's diversity (h) and Shannon index (I) were calculated for each genotype and found that the genotype “MS F” (in both markers) was highly diverse and genotypes “Q104 F” (SCoT) and “82–18 F” (CBDP) were least diverse among the female genotype populations. Among male genotypes, “32 M” (CBDP) and “MS M” (SCoT) revealed highest h and I values while “58-5 M” (both markers) was the least diverse. Jaccard's similarity co-efficient of SCoT markers ranged from 0.733 to 0.922 in female genotypes and 0.941 to 0.746 in male genotype population. Likewise, CBDP data analysis also revealed similarity ranging from 0.751 to 0.958 within female genotypes and 0.754 to 0.976 within male genotype populations thereby, indicating genetically diverse Jojoba population. Employing the NTSYS (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system) Version 2.1 software, both the markers generated dendrograms which revealed that all the Jojoba genotypes were clustered into two major groups

  13. Study of genetic variation of eggplant cultivars by using RAPD-PCR molecular markers and the relationship with Phomopsis blight disease reaction.

    PubMed

    Asad, H A; Meah, M B; Begum, S N; Khalil, M I; Rafii, M Y; Latif, M A

    2015-01-01

    Disease susceptibility and genetic variability in 10 eggplant genotypes were studied after inoculating Phomopsis vexans under confined field conditions. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to assess genetic variation and relationships among eggplant genotypes. The disease index of leaves ranged 0.208-13.79%, while fruit infection ranged 2.15-42.76%. Two varieties, Dohazari G and Laffa S, were found to be susceptible, 6 were moderately resistant, 1 was moderately susceptible, and BAU Begun-1 was resistant to P. vexans. Amplification of genomic DNA by using 3 RAPD primers produced 20 bands: 14 (70%) were polymorphic and 6 (30%) were monomorphic. The highest intra-variety similarity indices values were found in ISD 006, Ishurdi L, Jessore L, and BAU Begun-1 (100%), while the lowest was in Dohazari G (90%). The lowest genetic distance (0.0513) and the highest genetic identity (0.9500) were observed between the ISD 006 and Ishurdi L combinations. A comparatively higher genetic distance (0.3724) and the lowest genetic identity (0.6891) were observed between the ISD 006 and Dohazari G combinations. A dendogram was constructed based on Nei's genetic distance, which produced 2 main clusters of the genotypes - Cluster I: ISD 006, Ishurdi L, Marich begun L, BAU Begun-1, Marich begun S, and Chega and Cluster 2: Laffa S, Dohazari G, Jessore L, and Singhnath. Genetic variation and its relationship with disease susceptibility were assessed using RAPD markers, to develop disease-resistant varieties and improve eggplant crops. PMID:26681048

  14. MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  15. (ISEA) MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  16. Construction of a genetic linkage map for identification of molecular markers associated with resistance to Xanthomonas arboriciola pv. pruni in peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial spot, caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni, is a serious disease that can affect peach fruit quality and production. The molecular basis of its tolerance and susceptibility is yet to be understood. To study the genetics of the peach in response to bacterial spot, an F2 population of ...

  17. Genetics and biological markers in urachal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Rhijn, Bas W. G.

    2016-01-01

    Urachal cancer (UraC) is a rare tumor entity that usually develops at the basis of the remnant embryologic urachus. Consisting of mostly adenocarcinomas, most patients present with secondary symptoms due to an advanced stage with urinary bladder infiltration. One third of patients are already metastasized at presentation rendering them unsuitable for curative surgical treatment. In order to improve staging, treatment and follow-up, adequate knowledge about the genetic origin and potential markers is necessary. This paper reviews the English literature until December 2015. Pathologists argue for and against metaplasia or remnant enteric cells as origin for the adenomatous tissue found in UraC. Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, GNAS and Her2 have been associated with UraC. Immunohistochemical (IHC) markers like CEA, 34βE12, Claudin-18 and RegIV are indicative for mucous producing UraC. So far, IHC markers fail as prognosticators when matched to clinical data. Little is known about serum markers for UraC. CEA, CA19-9, CA125 and CA724 are mentioned as being elevated in UraC by some reports. Regarding the literature for biological markers in UraC, knowledge is mostly derived from case reports or cohort studies mentioning markers or predictors. More genetic research is needed to show whether UraC stems from progenitor cells of the cloaca or is due to metaplasia of transitional cells. Few IHC markers have shown indicative potential for UraC. A useful panel for differential diagnostics and clinicopathologic prognostication needs to be developed. Serum markers show very little potential for neither diagnosis nor follow-up in UraC. Further research on larger cohorts is necessary. PMID:27785422

  18. Molecular genetic analysis of some mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene in Moldova: Characterization of molecular markers and their linkage to various mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Gimbovskaya, S.D.; Kalinin, V.N.; Ivashchenko, T.E.; Baranov, V.S.

    1994-12-01

    Sixty-one patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) from Moldova were tested for mutations {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Frequencies of various alleles of the repeated GATT sequence in intron 6B of the GFTR gene, their linkage to other polymorphic markers, and various mutations were determined. The frequency of occurrence of mutation {Delta}F508 was only 25%. An absolute majority of CF patients (80%) had pancreatic insufficiency. Mutations G551D and R553X were not found in our sample. Each of 31 chromosomes with mutation {Delta}F508 carry the 6-GATT allele. Most {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} (78%) and normal (80%) chromosomes were marked by the 7-GATT allele. Twenty-seven {Delta}F508 chromosomes (96.4%) belong to haplotype B6, and only one to D6. Most chromosomes with {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} mutations are associated with haplotypes D7 (26.3%) and C7 (21%). In addition, a significant portion of chromosomes from this subgroup were associated with haplotypes A7 (23.7%), A6 (10.5%), and C6 (2.7%), which are not yet described for mutant chromosomes. The results obtained demonstrate that CF in Moldova is mainly associated with mutations other than {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Severe forms of the disease, with pancreatic insufficiency, are more frequently caused by these mutations; moreover, our data provides strong evidence for the presence of at least seven additional CF mutations in Moldova, apart from {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Some of these are probably not described.

  19. Molecular genetics of ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuan; Mack, Stephen C.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer death in children, with ependymoma being the third most common and posing a significant clinical burden. Its mechanism of pathogenesis, reliable prognostic indicators, and effective treatments other than surgical resection have all remained elusive. Until recently, ependymoma research was hindered by the small number of tumors available for study, low resolution of cytogenetic techniques, and lack of cell lines and animal models. Ependymoma heterogeneity, which manifests as variations in tumor location, patient age, histological grade, and clinical behavior, together with the observation of a balanced genomic profile in up to 50% of cases, presents additional challenges in understanding the development and progression of this disease. Despite these difficulties, we have made significant headway in the past decade in identifying the genetic alterations and pathways involved in ependymoma tumorigenesis through collaborative efforts and the application of microarray-based genetic (copy number) and transcriptome profiling platforms. Genetic characterization of ependymoma unraveled distinct mRNA-defined subclasses and led to the identification of radial glial cells as its cell type of origin. This review summarizes our current knowledge in the molecular genetics of ependymoma and proposes future research directions necessary to further advance this field. PMID:21959044

  20. Genetic and metal analyses of fragmented populations of Betula papyrifera (Marsh) in a mining reclaimed region: identification of population–diagnostic molecular marker

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Gabriel; Nkongolo, Kabwe K; Michael, Paul

    2014-01-01

    White birch (Betula papyrifera) is an open pollinate species that is, dominant in the Northern Ontario after land reclamation. In fact, this species represents 65% of all trees in the region. We hypothesized that the exchange of genetic information between fragmented populations by range-wide paternal introgression is possible in wind-pollinated species such as B. papyrifera. On the other hand, the effects of heavy metal contamination from the mining activities on plant growth and population dynamics are well documented. The main objectives of this study were (1) to assess the level of genetic variation, gene flow, and population sustainability of B. papyrifera after land reclamation; and (2) to determine the level of phytoavailable metals in soil and their accumulation in trees. We found that B. papyrifera is a Ni and Zn accumulator with a translocation factor of 6.4 and 81, respectively, and an indicator of Cu and Pb. The level of polymorphic loci, Shannon index, Nei's genetic diversity, observed number of alleles, and gene flow were determined for the fragmented populations within the targeted region. The percent of polymorphic loci ranged from 28% to 56%; the gene flow was also low with a value of 0.89, and the population differentiation was very high with a value of 0.36. Two population–diagnostic ISSR markers were identified. They were cloned, sequenced, and converted to SCAR markers. Overall, the fragmented populations of B. papyrifera in Northern Ontario are genetically sustainable based on the moderate level of intrapopulation variability. PMID:25535559

  1. Genetic and metal analyses of fragmented populations of Betula papyrifera (Marsh) in a mining reclaimed region: identification of population-diagnostic molecular marker.

    PubMed

    Theriault, Gabriel; Nkongolo, Kabwe K; Michael, Paul

    2014-09-01

    White birch (Betula papyrifera) is an open pollinate species that is, dominant in the Northern Ontario after land reclamation. In fact, this species represents 65% of all trees in the region. We hypothesized that the exchange of genetic information between fragmented populations by range-wide paternal introgression is possible in wind-pollinated species such as B. papyrifera. On the other hand, the effects of heavy metal contamination from the mining activities on plant growth and population dynamics are well documented. The main objectives of this study were (1) to assess the level of genetic variation, gene flow, and population sustainability of B. papyrifera after land reclamation; and (2) to determine the level of phytoavailable metals in soil and their accumulation in trees. We found that B. papyrifera is a Ni and Zn accumulator with a translocation factor of 6.4 and 81, respectively, and an indicator of Cu and Pb. The level of polymorphic loci, Shannon index, Nei's genetic diversity, observed number of alleles, and gene flow were determined for the fragmented populations within the targeted region. The percent of polymorphic loci ranged from 28% to 56%; the gene flow was also low with a value of 0.89, and the population differentiation was very high with a value of 0.36. Two population-diagnostic ISSR markers were identified. They were cloned, sequenced, and converted to SCAR markers. Overall, the fragmented populations of B. papyrifera in Northern Ontario are genetically sustainable based on the moderate level of intrapopulation variability. PMID:25535559

  2. Linkage and association to genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Elston, R C

    1995-01-01

    Genetic markers that are sufficiently polymorphic (as measured by their heterozygosities) can be used in linkage and association analyses to detect Mendelian segregation underlying disease phenotypes. Each type of analysis can either be based on a specific genetic model or not make any assumptions about the mode of inheritance of the disease. Principles underlying these methods are reviewed, and the assumptions underlying them stressed. Association analyses are more powerful, provided there is linkage disequilibrium between the marker and disease loci; however, only linkage analyses have power in the absence of such disequilibrium. For this reason, models that allow for both kinds of tests are preferred, and such models must adequately approximate the complexity of the disease being studied.

  3. Genetic markers: Potential candidates for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rather, Riyaz Ahmad; Dhawan, Veena

    2016-10-01

    The effective prevention of cardiovascular disease depends upon the ability to recognize the high-risk individuals at an early stage of the disease or long before the development of adverse events. Evolving technologies in the fields of proteomics, metabolomics, and genomics have played a significant role in the discovery of cardiovascular biomarkers, but so far these methods have achieved the modest success. Hence, there is a crucial need for more reliable, suitable, and lasting diagnostic and therapeutic markers to screen the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Gene polymorphisms associated with the cardiovascular disease play a decisive role in the disease onset. Therefore, the genetic marker evaluation to classify high-risk patients from low-risk patients trends an effective approach to patient management and care. Currently, there are no genetic markers available for extensive adoption as risk factors for coronary vascular disease, yet, there are numerous promising, biologically acceptable candidates. Many of these gene biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play an essential role in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. The present review highlights some putative emerging genetic biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVD. This review also briefly describes few technological approaches employed in the biomarker search. PMID:27416153

  4. Genetic markers: Potential candidates for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rather, Riyaz Ahmad; Dhawan, Veena

    2016-10-01

    The effective prevention of cardiovascular disease depends upon the ability to recognize the high-risk individuals at an early stage of the disease or long before the development of adverse events. Evolving technologies in the fields of proteomics, metabolomics, and genomics have played a significant role in the discovery of cardiovascular biomarkers, but so far these methods have achieved the modest success. Hence, there is a crucial need for more reliable, suitable, and lasting diagnostic and therapeutic markers to screen the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Gene polymorphisms associated with the cardiovascular disease play a decisive role in the disease onset. Therefore, the genetic marker evaluation to classify high-risk patients from low-risk patients trends an effective approach to patient management and care. Currently, there are no genetic markers available for extensive adoption as risk factors for coronary vascular disease, yet, there are numerous promising, biologically acceptable candidates. Many of these gene biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play an essential role in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. The present review highlights some putative emerging genetic biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVD. This review also briefly describes few technological approaches employed in the biomarker search.

  5. Molecular genetics of ABO.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, F

    2000-01-01

    This year commemorates the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the ABO blood group system by Karl Landsteiner. His findings of red cell agglutination by serum and recognition of blood groups laid the scientific basis for safe practice of blood transfusion. Even though dozens of blood systems have been identified, the ABO system still remains to be one of the most important systems in transfusion medicine. In 1990, we elucidated the molecular genetic basis of three major alleles at the ABO locus. Since then we have witnessed the progress in our understanding of ABO genes and A and B glycosyltransferases specified by a variety of functional alleles at this locus. Mutations affecting the activity and specificity of the enzymes have been identified. Not only has ABO genotyping become possible, but it has also become possible to genetically engineer the activity and specificity of the enzymes. We are now at a point of embarking upon the quest of understanding the functional significance of ABO polymorphism.

  6. Micropropagation of Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth-a multipurpose leguminous tree and assessment of genetic fidelity of micropropagated plants using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Pooja; Kachhwaha, Sumita; Kothari, S L

    2012-04-01

    An efficient and reproducible protocol has been developed for in vitro propagation of Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth (a multipurpose leguminous tree) from field grown nodal segments (axillary bud). Shoot bud induction occurred from nodal explants of 15-years-old tree on Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium supplemented with 4.4 μM 6-benzyladenine (BA) and multiplication was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 4.4 μM BA + 0.73 μM phenylacetic acid (PAA) i.e. up to 7 shoot buds in the period of 5-6 weeks. Addition of adenine sulphate (AdS) to this medium further enhanced the number of shoot buds up to 10. Proliferating shoot cultures were established by repeatedly subculturing primary culture on fresh medium (MS + 4.4 μM BA + 0.73 μM PAA) after every 25 days. In vitro rooting was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 2.46 μM Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) + 41.63 μM activated charcoal (AC). The micropropagated shoots with well developed roots were acclimatized in green house in pots containing sand, soil and manure (1:1:1). Genetic stability of micropropagated clones was evaluated using Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. The amplification products were monomorphic in micropropagated plants and similar to those of mother plant. No polymorphism was detected revealing the genetic uniformity of micropropagated plants. This is the first report of an efficient protocol for regeneration of P. dulce through organogenesis, which can be used for further genetic transformation and pharmaceutical purposes.

  7. Prognostic molecular markers in early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esteva, Francisco J; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N

    2004-01-01

    A multitude of molecules involved in breast cancer biology have been studied as potential prognostic markers. In the present review we discuss the role of established molecular markers, as well as potential applications of emerging new technologies. Those molecules used routinely to make treatment decisions in patients with early-stage breast cancer include markers of proliferation (e.g. Ki-67), hormone receptors, and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Tumor markers shown to have prognostic value but not used routinely include cyclin D1 and cyclin E, urokinase-like plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor, and cathepsin D. The level of evidence for other molecular markers is lower, in part because most studies were retrospective and not adequately powered, making their findings unsuitable for choosing treatments for individual patients. Gene microarrays have been successfuly used to classify breast cancers into subtypes with specific gene expression profiles and to evaluate prognosis. RT-PCR has also been used to evaluate expression of multiple genes in archival tissue. Proteomics technologies are in development. PMID:15084231

  8. Using Molecular Genetic Markers to Resolve a Subspecies Boundary: The Northern Boundary of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher in the Four-Corner States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Sogge, Mark K.; Theimer, Tad C.; Girard, Jessica; Keim, Paul

    2008-01-01

    *Executive Summary* The northern boundary of the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is currently approximated as running through southern Colorado and Utah, but the exact placement is uncertain because this subspecies shares a border with the more northern and non-endangered E. t. adastus. To help resolve this issue, we evaluated the geographic distribution of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by sampling breeding sites across the four-corner states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). We found that breeding sites clustered into two major groups generally consistent with the currently designated boundary, with the exception of three sites situated along the current boundary. However, delineating a precise boundary that would separate the two subspecies is made difficult because (1) we found evidence for a region of intergradation along the boundary area, suggesting the boundary is not discreet, and (2) the boundary region is sparsely populated, with too few extant breeding populations to precisely locate a boundary. The boundary region encompasses an area where elevation changes markedly over relatively short distances, with low elevation deserts to the south and more mesic, higher elevation habitats to the north. We hypothesized that latitudinal and elevational differences and their concomitant ecological effects could form an ecological barrier that inhibited gene flow between the subspecies, forming the basis for the subspecies boundary. We modeled changes in geographic patterns of genetic markers as a function of latitude and elevation finding significant support for this relationship. The model was brought into a GIS environment to create multiple subspecies boundaries, with the strength of each predicted boundary evaluated on the basis of how much genetic variation it explained. The candidate boundary that accounted for the most genetic variation was situated generally near the currently recognized subspecies boundary

  9. Genetic and biological markers in drug abuse and alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Braude, M.C.; Chao, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. Some of the titles are: Polymorphic Gene Marker Studies; Pharmacogenetic Approaches to the Prediction of Drug Response; Genetic Markers of Drug Abuse in Mouse Models; Genetics as a Tool for Identifying Biological Markers of Drug Abuse; and Studies of an Animal Model of Alcoholism.

  10. An improved micropropagation of Arnebia hispidissima (Lehm.) DC. and assessment of genetic fidelity of micropropagated plants using DNA-based molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Phulwaria, Mahendra; Rai, Manoj K; Shekhawat, N S

    2013-07-01

    An efficient and improved in vitro propagation method has been developed for Arnebia hispidissima, a medicinally and pharmaceutically important plant species of arid and semiarid regions. Nodal segments (3-4 cm) with two to three nodes obtained from field grown plants were used as explants for shoot proliferation. Murashige and Skoog's (MS) medium supplemented with cytokinins with or without indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or naphthalene acetic acid was used for shoot multiplication. Out of different PGRs combinations, MS medium containing 0.5 mg l(-1) 6-benzylaminopurine and 0.1 mg l(-1) IAA was optimal for shoot multiplication. On this medium, explants produced the highest number of shoots (47.50 ± 0.38). About 90 % of shoots rooted ex vitro on sterile soilrite under the greenhouse condition when the base (2-4 mm) of shoots was treated with 300 mg l(-1) of indole-3-butyric acid for 5 min. The plantlets were hardened successfully in the greenhouse with 85-90 % survival rate. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were employed to assess the genetic stability of in vitro-regenerated plants of A. hispidissima. Out of 40 (25 RAPD and 15 ISSR) primers screened, 15 RAPD and 7 ISSR primers produced a total number of 111 (77 RAPD and 34 ISSR) reproducible amplicons. The amplified products were monomorphic across all the micropropagated plants and were similar to the mother plant. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report on the assessment of the genetic fidelity in micropropagated plants of A. hispidissima.

  11. The genetic and molecular origin of natural variation for the fragrance trait in an elite Malaysian aromatic rice through quantitative trait loci mapping using SSR and gene-based markers.

    PubMed

    Golestan Hashemi, Farahnaz Sadat; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Mohamed, Mahmud Tengku Muda; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad Abdul; Aslani, Farzad

    2015-01-25

    MRQ74, a popular aromatic Malaysian landrace, allows for charging considerably higher prices than non-aromatic landraces. Thus, breeding this profitable trait has become a priority for Malaysian rice breeding. Despite many studies on aroma genetics, ambiguities considering its genetic basis remain. It has been observed that identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) based on anchor markers, particularly candidate genes controlling a trait of interest, can increase the power of QTL detection. Hence, this study aimed to locate QTLs that influence natural variations in rice scent using microsatellites and candidate gene-based sequence polymorphisms. For this purpose, an F2 mapping population including 189 individual plants was developed by MRQ74 crosses with 'MR84', a non-scented Malaysian accession. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative approaches were applied to obtain a phenotype data framework. Consequently, we identified two QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 8. These QTLs explained from 3.2% to 39.3% of the total fragrance phenotypic variance. In addition, we could resolve linkage group 8 by adding six gene-based primers in the interval harboring the most robust QTL. Hence, we could locate a putative fgr allele in the QTL found on chromosome 8 in the interval RM223-SCU015RM (1.63cM). The identified QTLs represent an important step toward recognition of the rice flavor genetic control mechanism. In addition, this identification will likely accelerate the progress of the use of molecular markers for gene isolation, gene-based cloning, and marker-assisted selection breeding programs aimed at improving rice cultivars. PMID:25445269

  12. Genetic diversity of sweet sorghum germplasm in Mexico using AFLP and SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the diversity and genetic relationships between lines and varieties of the sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) germplasm bank of the National Institute for Forestry, Agriculture and Livestock Research, Mexico, using AFLP and SSR markers. The molecular markers ...

  13. Molecular markers reveal narrow genetic base and culturing-associated genetic drift in Teretrius nigrescens Lewis populations released for the biological control of the larger grain borer in Africa.

    PubMed

    Omondi, B A; van den Berg, J; Masiga, D; Schulthess, F

    2014-04-01

    In biological control, successful establishment of a natural enemy species depends on its adaptability in the introduced range including its ability to re-establish desired ecological interactions with the pest. These are affected by genetic parameters hitherto largely unresolved in biological control. The larger grain borer (LGB), Prostephanus truncatus, an invasive species from meso-America, is the most important post-harvest pest of maize in Africa. We studied the genetic structure of Teretrius nigrescens, a predatory beetle previously released for the control of the pest in Africa, to test the hypothesis that establishment patterns were a result of ecotype-environment mismatch and to follow up on our earlier reports of distinct lineages of the predator. We studied 13 populations of T. nigrescens, using 16 polymorphic microsatellite markers. Five genetic populations with a hierarchical structure and significant isolation by distance were detected. The most diverse population was found in southern Mexico, consistent with earlier lineage coexistence observations. Populations introduced to Africa maintained genetic similarity to local geographic populations of their area of origin. The more successful Benin releases were also more genetically diverse. Loss of rare alleles and a higher frequency of existing private alleles in some populations indicated population expansions following bottleneck events. Sustainable biological control should accommodate pest and natural enemy species, and monitor genetic changes associated with introduction and release.

  14. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Two Seahorse Species (Hippocampus erectus and H. mohnikei) and the Development of Molecular Markers for Population Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiang; Luo, Wei; Wan, Shiming; Gao, Zexia

    2016-01-01

    Seahorse conservation has been performed utilizing various strategies for many decades, and the deeper understanding of genomic information is necessary to more efficiently protect the germplasm resources of seahorse species. However, little genetic information about seahorses currently exists in the public databases. In this study, high-throughput RNA sequencing for two seahorse species, Hippocampus erectus and H. mohnikei, was carried out, and de novo assembly generated 37,506 unigenes for H. erectus and 36,113 unigenes for H. mohnikei. Among them, 17,338 (46.23%) unigenes for H. erectus and 17,900 (49.57%) for H. mohnikei were successfully annotated based on the information available from the public databases. Through comparing the unigenes of two seahorse species, 7,802 candidate orthologous genes were identified and 5,268 genes among them could be annotated. In addition, gene ontology analysis of two species was similarly performed on biological processes, cellular components, and molecular functions. Twenty-four and twenty-one unigenes in H. erectus and H. mohnikei were annotated in the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids pathways, and both seahorses lacked the Δ12 and Δ15 desaturases. Total of 8,992 and 9,116 SSR loci were obtained from H. erectus and H. mohnikei unigenes, respectively. Dozens of SSR were developed and then applied to assess the population genetic diversity, as well as cross-amplified in a related species, H. trimaculatus. The HO and HE values of the tested populations for H. erectus, H. mohnikei, and H. trimaculatus were medium. These resources would facilitate the conservation of the species through a better understanding of the genomics and comparative genome analysis within the Hippocampus genus. PMID:27128031

  15. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Two Seahorse Species (Hippocampus erectus and H. mohnikei) and the Development of Molecular Markers for Population Genetics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; Luo, Wei; Wan, Shiming; Gao, Zexia

    2016-01-01

    Seahorse conservation has been performed utilizing various strategies for many decades, and the deeper understanding of genomic information is necessary to more efficiently protect the germplasm resources of seahorse species. However, little genetic information about seahorses currently exists in the public databases. In this study, high-throughput RNA sequencing for two seahorse species, Hippocampus erectus and H. mohnikei, was carried out, and de novo assembly generated 37,506 unigenes for H. erectus and 36,113 unigenes for H. mohnikei. Among them, 17,338 (46.23%) unigenes for H. erectus and 17,900 (49.57%) for H. mohnikei were successfully annotated based on the information available from the public databases. Through comparing the unigenes of two seahorse species, 7,802 candidate orthologous genes were identified and 5,268 genes among them could be annotated. In addition, gene ontology analysis of two species was similarly performed on biological processes, cellular components, and molecular functions. Twenty-four and twenty-one unigenes in H. erectus and H. mohnikei were annotated in the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids pathways, and both seahorses lacked the Δ12 and Δ15 desaturases. Total of 8,992 and 9,116 SSR loci were obtained from H. erectus and H. mohnikei unigenes, respectively. Dozens of SSR were developed and then applied to assess the population genetic diversity, as well as cross-amplified in a related species, H. trimaculatus. The HO and HE values of the tested populations for H. erectus, H. mohnikei, and H. trimaculatus were medium. These resources would facilitate the conservation of the species through a better understanding of the genomics and comparative genome analysis within the Hippocampus genus.

  16. Functional molecular markers for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Kage, Udaykumar; Kumar, Arun; Dhokane, Dhananjay; Karre, Shailesh; Kushalappa, Ajjamada C

    2016-10-01

    A tremendous decline in cultivable land and resources and a huge increase in food demand calls for immediate attention to crop improvement. Though molecular plant breeding serves as a viable solution and is considered as "foundation for twenty-first century crop improvement", a major stumbling block for crop improvement is the availability of a limited functional gene pool for cereal crops. Advancement in the next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies integrated with tools like metabolomics, proteomics and association mapping studies have facilitated the identification of candidate genes, their allelic variants and opened new avenues to accelerate crop improvement through development and use of functional molecular markers (FMMs). The FMMs are developed from the sequence polymorphisms present within functional gene(s) which are associated with phenotypic trait variations. Since FMMs obviate the problems associated with random DNA markers, these are considered as "the holy grail" of plant breeders who employ targeted marker assisted selections (MAS) for crop improvement. This review article attempts to consider the current resources and novel methods such as metabolomics, proteomics and association studies for the identification of candidate genes and their validation through virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) for the development of FMMs. A number of examples where the FMMs have been developed and used for the improvement of cereal crops for agronomic, food quality, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance traits have been considered. PMID:26171816

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of dioxygen pathways through mini singlet oxygen generator (miniSOG), a genetically encoded marker and killer protein.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the permeation of proteins by small gases of biological significance have been extended from gas carrier, sensor, and enzymatic proteins to genetically encoded tags and killer proteins. To this end, miniSOG was taken as an example of current high interest, using a biased form of MD, called random-acceleration MD. Various egress gates and binding pockets for dioxygen, as an indistinguishable mimic of singlet dioxygen, were found on both above and below the isoalloxazine plane of the flavin mononucleotide cofactor in miniSOG. Of such gates and binding pockets, those lying within two opposite cones, coaxial with a line normal to the isoalloxazine plane, and with the vertex at the center of such a plane are those most visited by the escaping gas molecule. Out of residues most capable of quenching (1) O2 , Y30, lying near the base of one such a cone, and H85, near the base of the opposite cone, are held to be most responsible for the reduced quantum yield of (1) O2 with folded miniSOG with respect to free flavin mononucleotide in solution.

  18. Developing AFLP Markers to study genetic differentiation of the Cotton Fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic comparisons of fleahopper populations in cotton and weed hosts may be useful for identifying the weed sources contributing the majority of fleahoppers in cotton. Molecular markers such as amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) are useful to identify genetic similarities and differen...

  19. Genetic marker anchoring by six-dimensional pools for development of a soybean physical map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrated genetic and physical maps are extremely valuable for genomic studies and as important references for assembling of whole genome shotgun sequences. Screening of a BAC library using molecular markers is an indispensable procedure for integration of both physical and genetic maps of a genom...

  20. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiations and Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Howard B.

    2000-06-01

    The major objective of this project is to understand the genetic basis for resistance of humans to radiations and chemicals. In the fission yeast S. pombe, a gene called rad9 plays a key role in promoting resistance to DNA damaging agents and controlling cell cycle progression after radiation or chemical exposure. This investigation focuses on the characterization of a human homologue of this yeast gene, called HRAD9, with the longterm goal of developing the gene as a genetic marker to predict inherent susceptibility to the deleterious health effects caused by DNA damage. The aims concern a molecular characterization of HRAD9 and determination of its role in mediating the cellular response to radiations and chemicals, as well as its potential role in carcinogenesis.

  1. How many marker loci are necessary? Analysis of dominant marker data sets using two popular population genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael F; Anderson, Neil O

    2013-09-01

    The number of marker loci required to answer a given research question satisfactorily is especially important for dominant markers since they have a lower information content than co-dominant marker systems. In this study, we used simulated dominant marker data sets to determine the number of dominant marker loci needed to obtain satisfactory results from two popular population genetic analyses: STRUCTURE and AMOVA (analysis of molecular variance). Factors such as migration, level of population differentiation, and unequal sampling were varied in the data sets to mirror a range of realistic research scenarios. AMOVA performed well under all scenarios with a modest quantity of markers while STRUCTURE required a greater number, especially when populations were closely related. The popular ΔK method of determining the number of genetically distinct groups worked well when sampling was balanced, but underestimated the true number of groups with unbalanced sampling. These results provide a window through which to interpret previous work with dominant markers and we provide a protocol for determining the number of markers needed for future dominant marker studies.

  2. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of Pummelo and Molecular Marker Development

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mei; Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Hang; Su, Shiying; Yi, Hualin; Chai, Lijun; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    Pummelo (Citrus grandis) is an important fruit crop worldwide because of its nutritional value. To accelerate the pummelo breeding program, it is essential to obtain extensive genetic information and develop relative molecular markers. Here, we obtained a 12-Gb transcriptome dataset of pummelo through a mixture of RNA from seven tissues using Illumina pair-end sequencing, assembled into 57,212 unigenes with an average length of 1010 bp. The annotation and classification results showed that a total of 39,584 unigenes had similar hits to the known proteins of four public databases, and 31,501 were classified into 55 Gene Ontology (GO) functional sub-categories. The search for putative molecular markers among 57,212 unigenes identified 10,276 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 64,720 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). High-quality primers of 1174 SSR loci were designed, of which 88.16% were localized to nine chromosomes of sweet orange. Of 100 SSR primers that were randomly selected for testing, 87 successfully amplified clear banding patterns. Of these primers, 29 with a mean PIC (polymorphic information content) value of 0.52 were effectively applied for phylogenetic analysis. Of the 20 SNP primers, 14 primers, including 54 potential SNPs, yielded target amplifications, and 46 loci were verified via Sanger sequencing. This new dataset will be a valuable resource for molecular biology studies of pummelo and provides reliable information regarding SNP and SSR marker development, thus expediting the breeding program of pummelo. PMID:25799271

  3. Molecular genetics of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Singh, A K; Pandey, P; Chandra, S; Singh, K A; Gambhir, I S

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major public health problem in the developing as well as in developed countries due to its high prevalence and its association with coronary heart disease, renal disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and related disorders. Essential hypertension (EH) is the most common diagnosis in this disease, suggesting that a monocausal etiology has not been identified. However, a number of risk factors associated with EH have also been identified such as age, sex, demographic, environmental, genetic, and vascular factors. Recent advances in molecular biological research had achieved clarifying the molecular basis of Mendelian hypertensive disorders. Molecular genetic studies have now identified mutations in several genes that cause Mendelian forms of hypertension in humans. However, none of the single genetic variants has emerged from linkage or association analyses as consistently related to the blood pressure level in every sample and in all populations. Besides, a number of polymorphisms in candidate genes have been associated with differences in blood pressure. The most prominent candidate has been the polymorphisms in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. In total, EH is likely to be a polygenic disorder that results from inheritance of a number of susceptibility genes and involves multiple environmental determinants. These determinants complicate the study of blood pressure variations in the general population. The complex nature of the hypertension phenotype makes large-scale studies indispensable, when screening of familial and genetic factors was intended. In this review, recent genetic studies exploring the molecular basis of EH, including different molecular pathways, are highlighted. PMID:27028574

  4. Genetic assessment of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) collection with microsatellite markers acquired via pyrosequencing method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-An; Sung, Jung-Sook; Lee, Sok-Young; Chung, Jong-Wook; Yi, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Gyu; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2014-01-01

    A genetic evaluation of safflower germplasm collections derived from different geographical regions and countries will provide useful information for sustainable conservation and the utilization of genetic diversity. However, the molecular marker information is limited for evaluation of genetic diversity of safflower germplasm. In this study, we acquired 509 putative genomic SSR markers for sufficient genome coverage using next-generation sequencing methods and characterized thirty polymorphic SSRs in safflower collection composed of 100 diverse accessions. The average allele number and expected heterozygosity were 2.8 and 0.386, respectively. Analysis of population structure and phylogeny based on thirty SSR profiles revealed genetic admixture between geographical regions contrary to genetic clustering. However, the accessions from Korea were genetically conserved in distinctive groups in contrast to other safflower gene pool. In conclusion, these new genomic SSRs will facilitate valuable studies to clarify genetic relationships as well as conduct population structure analyses, genetic map construction and association analysis for safflower.

  5. Genetic diversity in three natural populations of Pitcairnia flammea (l.) John (Bromeliaceae) estimated by ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Souza-Sobreira, F B; Souza, G B; Rosado, C C G; Miranda, F D; Soares, T C B; Gontijo, A B P L

    2015-01-01

    Bromeliads are greatly represented in the Atlantic Forest, although many species are threatened with extinction owing to habitat fragmentation and intense extraction for ornamental purposes. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct studies generating knowledge about genetic diversity and the distribution of this diversity among and within natural populations to establish conservation strategies. These studies can be performed with the use of molecular markers. Molecular markers are advantageous for studies of natural populations, for conservation programs, and to aid in properly classifying plant species. This study aimed to evaluate the genetic diversity among and within natural populations of Pitcairnia flammea, occurring in three fragments of the Atlantic Forest in the southern State of Espírito Santo through the use of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. DNA samples from 55 individuals were amplified with 18 ISSR primers, generating 180 bands, 159 of which were polymorphic. The Shannon genetic diversity index ranged from 0.348 to 0.465, with an average of 0.412. The Bayesian approach for the molecular data indicated the existence of two genetic groups. Analysis of molecular variance indicated the existence of 90.3% diversity within the population and 9.74% among populations. The amount of genetic differentiation of populations was moderate (0.0974), indicating that gene flow rates may be enough to counteract the effects of genetic drift. Greater genetic variability found in population B indicates that this area is an important source of genetic variability. PMID:26634557

  6. Genetic diversity in three natural populations of Pitcairnia flammea (l.) John (Bromeliaceae) estimated by ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Souza-Sobreira, F B; Souza, G B; Rosado, C C G; Miranda, F D; Soares, T C B; Gontijo, A B P L

    2015-12-03

    Bromeliads are greatly represented in the Atlantic Forest, although many species are threatened with extinction owing to habitat fragmentation and intense extraction for ornamental purposes. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct studies generating knowledge about genetic diversity and the distribution of this diversity among and within natural populations to establish conservation strategies. These studies can be performed with the use of molecular markers. Molecular markers are advantageous for studies of natural populations, for conservation programs, and to aid in properly classifying plant species. This study aimed to evaluate the genetic diversity among and within natural populations of Pitcairnia flammea, occurring in three fragments of the Atlantic Forest in the southern State of Espírito Santo through the use of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. DNA samples from 55 individuals were amplified with 18 ISSR primers, generating 180 bands, 159 of which were polymorphic. The Shannon genetic diversity index ranged from 0.348 to 0.465, with an average of 0.412. The Bayesian approach for the molecular data indicated the existence of two genetic groups. Analysis of molecular variance indicated the existence of 90.3% diversity within the population and 9.74% among populations. The amount of genetic differentiation of populations was moderate (0.0974), indicating that gene flow rates may be enough to counteract the effects of genetic drift. Greater genetic variability found in population B indicates that this area is an important source of genetic variability.

  7. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of a new fertility restorer gene Rf8 for Triticum timopheevi cytoplasm in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pallavi; Tomar, S M S; Vinod; Singh, Vikas K; Balyan, H S

    2013-12-01

    A study on mode of inheritance and mapping of fertility restorer (Rf) gene(s) using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers was conducted in a cross of male sterile line 2041A having Triticum timopheevi cytoplasm and a restorer line PWR4099 of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The F1 hybrid was completely fertile indicating that fertility restoration is a dominant trait. Based on the pollen fertility and seed set of bagged spikes in F2 generation, the individual plants were classified into fertile and sterile groups. Out of 120 F2 plants, 97 were fertile and 23 sterile (based on pollen fertility) while 98 plants set ≥ 5 seeds/spike and 22 produced ≤ 4 or no seed. The observed frequency fits well into Mendelian ratio of 3 fertile: 1 sterile with χ(2) value of 2.84 for pollen fertility and 2.17 for seed setting indicating that the fertility restoration is governed by a single dominant gene in PWR4099. The three linked SSR markers, Xwmc503, Xgwm296 and Xwmc112 located on the chromosome 2DS were placed at a distance of 3.3, 5.8 and 6.7 cM, respectively, from the Rf gene. Since, no known Rf gene is located on the chromosome arm 2DS, the Rf gene in PWR4099 is a new gene and proposed as Rf8. The closest SSR marker, Xwmc503, linked to the Rf8 was validated in a set of Rf, maintainer and cytoplasmic male sterile lines. The closely linked SSR marker Xwmc503 may be used in marker-assisted backcross breeding facilitating the transfer of fertility restoration gene Rf8 into elite backgrounds with ease.

  8. Genetic markers, genotyping methods & next generation sequencing in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Srinidhi; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2015-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology (ME) is one of the main areas in tuberculosis research which is widely used to study the transmission epidemics and outbreaks of tubercle bacilli. It exploits the presence of various polymorphisms in the genome of the bacteria that can be widely used as genetic markers. Many DNA typing methods apply these genetic markers to differentiate various strains and to study the evolutionary relationships between them. The three widely used genotyping tools to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spacer oligotyping (Spoligotyping), and mycobacterial interspersed repeat units - variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR). A new prospect towards ME was introduced with the development of whole genome sequencing (WGS) and the next generation sequencing (NGS) methods, where the entire genome is sequenced that not only helps in pointing out minute differences between the various sequences but also saves time and the cost. NGS is also found to be useful in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), comparative genomics and also various aspects about transmission dynamics. These techniques enable the identification of mycobacterial strains and also facilitate the study of their phylogenetic and evolutionary traits. PMID:26205019

  9. Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) project began in 2005 as a 3-year pilot study to identify inherited genetic susceptibility to prostate and breast cancer. CGEMS has developed into a successful research program of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify genetic variants that affect a person’s risk of developing cancer.

  10. Liposarcoma: Molecular Genetics and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Conyers, Rachel; Young, Sophie; Thomas, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcomas are a group of heterogeneous tumours with varying genetic basis. Cytogenetic abnormalities range from distinct genomic rearrangements such as pathognomonic translocation events and common chromosomal amplification or loss, to more complex rearrangements involving multiple chromosomes. The different subtypes of liposarcoma are spread across this spectrum and constitute an interesting tumour type for molecular review. This paper will outline molecular pathogenesis of the three main subtypes of liposarcoma: well-differentiated/dedifferentiated, myxoid/round cell, and pleomorphic liposarcoma. Both the molecular basis and future avenues for therapeutic intervention will be discussed. PMID:21253554

  11. Structural Variation (SV) Markers in the Basidiomycete Volvariella volvacea and Their Application in the Construction of a Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Bingzhi; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Junjie; Lu, Yuanping; Zhang, Xiaoyin; Jiang, Yuji; Wu, Taju; van Peer, Arend Frans; Li, Shaojie; Xie, Baogui

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps are useful tools in genetic studies. Novel molecular markers and their applications have been developed in recent years. With the recent advancements in sequencing technology, the genomic sequences of an increasingly great number of fungi have become available. A novel type of molecular marker was developed to construct the first reported linkage map of the edible and economically important basidiomycete Volvariella volvacea by using 104 structural variation (SV) markers that are based on the genomic sequences. Because of the special and simple life cycle in basidiomycete, SV markers can be effectively developed by genomic comparison and tested in single spore isolates (SSIs). This stable, convenient and rapidly developed marker may assist in the construction of genetic maps and facilitate genomic research for other species of fungi. PMID:26204838

  12. Molecular genetics of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Gusella, J F; Gilliam, T C; Tanzi, R E; MacDonald, M E; Cheng, S V; Wallace, M; Haines, J; Conneally, P M; Wexler, N S

    1986-01-01

    The discovery of a DNA marker linked to the HD gene has provided new avenues into the investigation of this devastating disorder. Genetic investigations have determined that in most and possibly all HD families, the disease is caused by a defect that maps near the telomere on the short arm of chromosome 4. DNA markers will soon provide presymptomatic diagnosis for this disorder, but this increased capability may be a mixed blessing in the absence of effective treatment. The most hopeful route to developing such treatment lies in cloning and characterization of the primary defect. Precise genetic and physical mapping using DNA markers and improvements in techniques for analyzing large segments of DNA have set the stage for cloning of the disease gene in the near future. It will undoubtedly reveal an interesting mechanism for complete phenotypic dominance in man for comparison with completely dominant mutations in other species, particularly Drosophila. The nature of the defect may provide new insights into the functional organization of the central nervous system. For the sake of the many individuals who are afflicted by HD or who are asymptomatic gene carriers, it is to be hoped that cloning and characterizing the disease gene will also yield the necessary information to develop an effective therapy.

  13. Genetic markers and the coregonid problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stott, W.; Todd, T.N.; ,

    2007-01-01

    Coregonid fishes are the forage base in many ecosystems in the northern hemisphere and they have traditionally been part of commercial and native fisheries. Coregonids display extreme variability in morphology, life history, and behavior. Defining boundaries among coregonid taxa has been (and continues to be) the focus of many studies. Cytogenetic, biochemical, and molecular methods have been used to study the 'coregonid problem'. A survey of the literature reveals that questions of taxonomy, followed by phylogeography are most often studied. Sample collections have occurred throughout a representative portion of the coregonid range. The whitefish species Coregonus clupeaformis and C. lavaretus are most often studied. This was expected however because they are the most widely distributed, display the most variation, and are the most commercially important. However, species with restricted ranges such as the Irish pollan (C. pollan) or omul (C. migratorius) have also been studied intensively. Genetic methods have provided insights into several issues, including the placement of Stenodus and the status of C. clupeaformis and C. lavaretus. More recently, studies of sympatric forms over broad geographic scales shed light on processes involved in the evolution of the group and suggest different approaches for management and designation of taxa. ?? 2007 E. Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung.

  14. Novel Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of molecular biomarkers assures that breast cancer (BC) patients receive optimal treatment. Established biomarkers, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2, and Ki67, have been playing significant roles in the subcategorization of BC to predict the prognosis and decide the specific therapy to each patient. Antihormonal therapy using 4-hydroxytamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors have been employed in patients whose tumor cells express hormone receptors, while monoclonal antibody to HER2 has been administered to HER2-positive BCs. Although new therapeutic agents have been developed in the past few decades, many patients still die of the disease due to relapse; thus, novel molecular markers that predict therapeutic failure and those that can be targets for specific therapy are expected. We have chosen four of such molecules by reviewing recent publications, which are cyclin E, B-Myb, Twist, and DMP1β. The oncogenicity of these molecules has been demonstrated in vivo and/or in vitro through studies using transgenic mice or siRNAs, and their expressions have been shown to be associated with shortened overall or disease-free survival of BC patients. The former three molecules have been shown to accelerate epithelial–mesenchymal transition that is often associated with cancer stem cell-ness and metastasis; all these four can be novel therapeutic targets as well. Thus, large prospective studies employing immunohistochemistry will be needed to establish the predictive values of these molecules in patients with BC. PMID:26997872

  15. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale.

    PubMed

    Santos, E; Matos, M; Silva, P; Figueiras, A M; Benito, C; Pinto-Carnide, O

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the molecular diversity and to determine the genetic relationships among Secale spp. and among cultivars of Secale cereale using RAPDs, ISSRs and sequence analysis of six exons of ScMATE1 gene. Thirteen ryes (cultivated and wild) were genotyped using 21 RAPD and 16 ISSR primers. A total of 435 markers (242 RAPDs and 193 ISSRs) were obtained, with 293 being polymorphic (146 RAPDs and 147 ISSRs). Two RAPD and nine ISSR primers generated more than 80% of polymorphism. The ISSR markers were more polymorphic and informative than RAPDs. Further, 69% of the ISSR primers selected achieved at least 70% of DNA polymorphism. The study of six exons of the ScMATE1 gene also demonstrated a high genetic variability that subsists in Secale genus. One difference observed in exon 1 sequences from S. vavilovii seems to be correlated with Al sensitivity in this species. The genetic relationships obtained using RAPDs, ISSRs and exons of ScMATE1 gene were similar. S. ancestrale, S. kuprijanovii and S. cereale were grouped in the same cluster and S. segetale was in another cluster. S. vavilovii showed evidences of not being clearly an isolate species and having great intraspecific differences. PMID:27350669

  16. Development of Public Immortal Mapping Populations, Molecular Markers, and Linkage Maps for Rapid Cycling Brassica rapa and B. oleracea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Past research efforts on genetic mapping in Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa have been disconnected, utilizing separate mapping populations and different sets of molecular markers. Here we present public immortal mapping populations, molecular markers and linkage maps for rapid cycling B. rapa a...

  17. New models and molecular markers in evaluation of developmental toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huuskonen, Hannele . E-mail: hannele.huuskonen@sttv.fi

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian and non-mammalian embryos and embryonic stem cells may be used as models in mechanistic studies and in testing embryotoxicity of compounds. In addition to conventional culture methods, genetic modifications and use of molecular markers offer significant advantages in mechanistic studies as well as in developing new test methods for embryotoxicity. Zebrafish model has been used for a long time and at present several applications are available. It is an easy vertebral non-mammalian model, whose genome is largely known and several genetic modifications are easily constructed to study gene expression or knocked down genes. Fluorescent marker proteins can be used also in zebrafish to indicate gene activation in transgenic models. Chemical genetics approach has been developed using zebrafish model. This is a new approach to screen small molecules that regulate signaling pathways. Embryonic stem cells have been used in mechanistic studies and mouse embryonic stem cell test has been validated to study embryotoxicity in vitro. This method has been improved using quantitative measurements of molecular endpoints by real-time RT-PCR or fluorescent activated cell sorting methods (FACS). Methods facilitating differentiation to several different cell types are available. We have studied preimplantation mouse embryos as a possible model for in vitro testing. In this method, superovulated and in vivo fertilized preimplantation embryos were collected at morula stage and cultured up to blastocysts. The mouse preimplantation culture test was improved by quantitative gene expression measurement using two-step real-time RT-PCR methods. New endpoints improve the tests of in vitro embryotoxicity because subjective assessments are replaced by objective measurements. In addition, automation is possible and less time is needed for analysis. Thus, high throughput screening will come possible to test large numbers of compounds.

  18. Validation of genetic markers associated with chalkbrood resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chalkbrood is one of the major fungal diseases of honey bee brood. Systemic mycoses caused by the fungus, Ascosphaera apis, may significantly reduce brood population, and consequently, colony strength and productivity. Developing genetic marker(s) associated with the enhanced brood survival will be ...

  19. Genetic diversity of Poa pratensis L. depending on geographical origin and compared with genetic markers

    PubMed Central

    Śmietana, Przemysław; Stępień, Edyta

    2016-01-01

    Background Poa pratensis is one of the most common species of meadow grass in Europe. Most cultivars of the species found in Poland were originally derived from its ecotypes. We compared the effectiveness of the RAPD and ISSR methods in assessing the genetic diversity of the selected populations of P. pratensis. We examined whether these methods could be useful for detecting a possible link between the geographical origin of a given population and its assessed genetic variation. Methods The molecular markers RAPD and ISSR were used and their efficiency compared using, inter alia, statistical multivariate methods (UPGMA and PCA). Results The low value of Dice’s coefficient (0.369) along with the significantly high percentage of polymorphic products indicates a substantial degree of genetic diversity among the studied populations. Our results found a correlation between the geographical origin of the studied populations and their genetic variations. For ISSR, which proved to be the more effective method in that respect, we selected primers with the greatest differentiating powers correlating to geographical origin. Discussion The populations evaluated in this study were characterized by a high genetic diversity. This seems to confirm the hypothesis that ecotypes of P. pratensis originating from different regions of Central Europe with different terrain structures and habitat conditions can be a source of great genetic variability. PMID:27703847

  20. Molecular genetics of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ichihara, Sahoko; Nishida, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial infarction (MI) is an important clinical problem because of its large contribution to mortality. The main causal and treatable risk factors for MI include hypertension, hypercholesterolemia or dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. In addition to these risk factors, recent studies have shown the importance of genetic factors and interactions between multiple genes and environmental factors. Disease prevention is an important strategy for reducing the overall burden of MI, with the identification of markers for disease risk being key both for risk prediction and for potential intervention to lower the chance of future events. Although genetic linkage analyses of families and sib-pairs as well as candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have implicated several loci and candidate genes in predisposition to coronary heart disease (CHD) or MI, the genes that contribute to genetic susceptibility to these conditions remain to be identified definitively. In this review, we summarize both candidate loci for CHD or MI identified by linkage analyses and candidate genes examined by association studies. We also review in more detail studies that have revealed the association with MI or CHD of polymorphisms in MTHFR, LPL, and APOE by the candidate gene approach and those in LTA and at chromosomal region 9p21.3 by genome-wide scans. Such studies may provide insight into the function of implicated genes as well as into the role of genetic factors in the development of CHD and MI. PMID:18704761

  1. Genetic relationships among Heliconia (Heliconiaceae) species based on RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Marouelli, L P; Inglis, P W; Ferreira, M A; Buso, G S C

    2010-07-13

    The family Heliconiaceae contains a single genus, Heliconia, with approximately 180 species of Neotropical origin. This genus was formerly allocated to the family Musaceae, but today forms its own family, in the order Zingiberales. The combination of inverted flowers, a single staminode and drupe fruits is an exclusive characteristic of Heliconia. Heliconias are cultivated as ornamental garden plants, and are of increasing importance as cut flowers. However, there are taxonomic confusions and uncertainties about the number of species and the relationships among them. Molecular studies are therefore necessary for better understanding of the species boundaries of these plants. We examined the genetic variability and the phylogenetic relationships of 124 accessions of the genus Heliconia based on RAPD markers. Phenetic and cladistic analyses, using 231 polymorphic RAPD markers, demonstrated that the genus Heliconia is monophyletic. Groupings corresponding to currently recognized species and some subgenera were found, and cultivars and hybrids were found to cluster with their parents. RAPD analysis generally agreed with morphological species classification, except for the position of the subgenus Stenochlamys, which was found to be polyphyletic.

  2. Applications and implications of neutral versus non-neutral markers in molecular ecology.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Heather; Freeland, Joanna R

    2011-01-01

    The field of molecular ecology has expanded enormously in the past two decades, largely because of the growing ease with which neutral molecular genetic data can be obtained from virtually any taxonomic group. However, there is also a growing awareness that neutral molecular data can provide only partial insight into parameters such as genetic diversity, local adaptation, evolutionary potential, effective population size, and taxonomic designations. Here we review some of the applications of neutral versus adaptive markers in molecular ecology, discuss some of the advantages that can be obtained by supplementing studies of molecular ecology with data from non-neutral molecular markers, and summarize new methods that are enabling researchers to generate data from genes that are under selection.

  3. Evolving Molecular Genetics of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiu-Ju; Cai, Jin-Quan; Liu, Cheng-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To summary the recent advances in molecular research of glioblastoma (GBM) and current trends in personalized therapy of this disease. Data Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed in English up to 2015, with keywords “molecular”, “genetics”, “GBM”, “isocitrate dehydrogenase”, “telomerase reverse transcriptase”, “epidermal growth factor receptor”, “PTPRZ1-MET”, and “clinical treatment”. Study Selection: Articles regarding the morphological pathology of GBM, the epidemiology of GBM, genetic alteration of GBM, and the development of treatment for GBM patients were identified, retrieved, and reviewed. Results: There is a large amount of data supporting the view that these recurrent genetic aberrations occur in a specific context of cellular origin, co-oncogenic hits and are present in distinct patient populations. Primary and secondary GBMs are distinct disease entities that affect different age groups of patients and develop through distinct genetic aberrations. These differences are important, especially because they may affect sensitivity to radio- and chemo-therapy and should thus be considered in the identification of targets for novel therapeutic approaches. Conclusion: This review highlights the molecular and genetic alterations of GBM, indicating that they are of potential value in the diagnosis and treatment for patients with GBM. PMID:26879021

  4. Genetic diversity of functional food species Spinacia oleracea L. by protein markers.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M; Yousaf, Z; Haider, M S; Khalid, S; Rehman, H A; Younas, A; Arif, A

    2014-01-01

    Exploration of genetic diversity contributes primarily towards crop improvement. Spinaciaoleracea L. is a functional food species but unfortunately the genetic diversity of this vegetable is still unexplored. Therefore, this research was planned to explore the genetic diversity of S. oleracea by using morphological and protein markers. Protein profile of 25 accessions was generated on sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel. Total allelic variation of 27 bands was found. Out of these, 20 were polymorphic and the rest of the bands were monomorphic. Molecular weights of the bands ranged from 12.6 to 91.2 kDa. Major genetic differences were observed in accession 20541 (Peshawar) followed by 20180 (Lahore) and 19902 (AVRDC). Significant differences exist in the protein banding pattern. This variation can further be studied by advanced molecular techniques, including two-dimensional electrophoresis and DNA markers.

  5. Toward Diagnostic and Phenotype Markers for Genetically Transmitted Speech Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Lewis, Barbara A.; Tomblin, J. Bruce; McSweeny, Jane L.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Scheer, Alison R.

    2005-01-01

    Converging evidence supports the hypothesis that the most common subtype of childhood speech sound disorder (SSD) of currently unknown origin is genetically transmitted. We report the first findings toward a set of diagnostic markers to differentiate this proposed etiological subtype (provisionally termed "speech delay-genetic") from other…

  6. Genetic Breeding and Diversity of the Genus Passiflora: Progress and Perspectives in Molecular and Genetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos Bernard M.; Jesus, Onildo N.; Santos, Elisa S. L.; Corrêa, Ronan X.; Souza, Anete P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of passion fruit (Passiflora spp.), molecular markers have only recently been utilized in genetic studies of this genus. In addition, both basic genetic researches related to population studies and pre-breeding programs of passion fruit remain scarce for most Passiflora species. Considering the number of Passiflora species and the increasing use of these species as a resource for ornamental, medicinal, and food purposes, the aims of this review are the following: (i) to present the current condition of the passion fruit crop; (ii) to quantify the applications and effects of using molecular markers in studies of Passiflora; (iii) to present the contributions of genetic engineering for passion fruit culture; and (iv) to discuss the progress and perspectives of this research. Thus, the present review aims to summarize and discuss the relationship between historical and current progress on the culture, breeding, and molecular genetics of passion fruit. PMID:25196515

  7. Genetic breeding and diversity of the genus Passiflora: progress and perspectives in molecular and genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos Bernard M; Jesus, Onildo N; Santos, Elisa S L; Corrêa, Ronan X; Souza, Anete P

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of passion fruit (Passiflora spp.), molecular markers have only recently been utilized in genetic studies of this genus. In addition, both basic genetic researches related to population studies and pre-breeding programs of passion fruit remain scarce for most Passiflora species. Considering the number of Passiflora species and the increasing use of these species as a resource for ornamental, medicinal, and food purposes, the aims of this review are the following: (i) to present the current condition of the passion fruit crop; (ii) to quantify the applications and effects of using molecular markers in studies of Passiflora; (iii) to present the contributions of genetic engineering for passion fruit culture; and (iv) to discuss the progress and perspectives of this research. Thus, the present review aims to summarize and discuss the relationship between historical and current progress on the culture, breeding, and molecular genetics of passion fruit. PMID:25196515

  8. [Study of genetic markers of duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Onosova, E A; Tsimmerman, I Ia

    1989-05-01

    The results of determination of various hereditary predisposition markers in peptic ulcer are given: in the population, in patients with duodenal ulcer and in their siblings (risk group). Of importance for revealing subjects with hereditary predisposition to duodenal ulcer are the clinico-genealogical analysis, determination of the blood group, especially in simultaneous determination of a "secretory status" ("status of non-secretion" of the ABH blood system agglutinogen in the saliva), increase in the mass of parietal cells and, to some extent, of the distinguishing features of dermatoglyphics (in combination with the above markers). Determination of taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide is non-informative. PMID:2770215

  9. Analysis of Variance Components for Genetic Markers with Unphased Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    An ANOVA type general multi-allele (GMA) model was proposed in Wang (2014) on analysis of variance components for quantitative trait loci or genetic markers with phased or unphased genotypes. In this study, by applying the GMA model, we further examine estimation of the genetic variance components for genetic markers with unphased genotypes based on a random sample from a study population. In one locus and two loci cases, we first derive the least square estimates (LSE) of model parameters in fitting the GMA model. Then we construct estimators of the genetic variance components for one marker locus in a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium population and two marker loci in an equilibrium population. Meanwhile, we explore the difference between the classical general linear model (GLM) and GMA based approaches in association analysis of genetic markers with quantitative traits. We show that the GMA model can retain the same partition on the genetic variance components as the traditional Fisher's ANOVA model, while the GLM cannot. We clarify that the standard F-statistics based on the partial reductions in sums of squares from GLM for testing the fixed allelic effects could be inadequate for testing the existence of the variance component when allelic interactions are present. We point out that the GMA model can reduce the confounding between the allelic effects and allelic interactions at least for independent alleles. As a result, the GMA model could be more beneficial than GLM for detecting allelic interactions.

  10. Molecular evidence of host-associated genetic divergence in the holly leafminer Phytomyza glabricola (Diptera: Agromyzidae): apparent discordance among marker systems.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Sonja J; Hawthorne, David J

    2007-07-01

    Host races play a central part in understanding the role of host plant mediated divergence and speciation of phytophagous insects. Of greatest interest are host-associated populations that have recently diverged; however, finding genetic evidence for very recent divergences is difficult because initially only a few loci are expected to evolve diagnostic differences. The holly leafminer Phytomyza glabricola feeds on two hollies, Ilex glabra and I. coriacea, that are broadly sympatric throughout most of their ranges. The leafminer is often present on both host plants and exhibits a dramatic life history difference on the two hosts, suggesting that host races may be present. We collected 1393 bp of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequence and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) data (45 polymorphic bands) from sympatric populations of flies reared from the two hosts. Phylogenetic and frequency analysis of mitochondrial COI sequence data uncovered considerable variation but no structuring by the host plant, and only limited differentiation among geographical locations. In contrast, analysis of AFLP frequency data found a significant effect with host plant, and a much smaller effect with geographical location. Likewise, neighbour-joining analysis of AFLP data resulted in clustering by host plant. The AFLP data indicate that P. glabricola is most likely comprised of two host races. Because there were no fixed differences in mitochondrial or AFLP data, this host-associated divergence is likely to have occurred very recently. P. glabricola therefore provides a new sympatric system for exploring the role of geography and ecological specialization in the speciation of phytophagous insects.

  11. [Matrix metalloproteases as molecular markers in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara L; León-Córdoba, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in the world. Prognosis in patients with gastric cancer is difficult to establish because it is commonly diagnosed when gastric wall invasion and metastasis have occurred. Currently, some members of the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases have been identified, whose expression in gastric tumor tissue is significantly elevated compared to healthy gastric tissue. Matrix metalloproteinases are 24 zinc-dependent endopeptidases that catalyze the proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. This degradation allows the cancer cells invade the surrounding stroma and trigger metastasis. Upregulation of certain matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer has been associated with a poor prognosis and elevated invasive capacity. This review compiles evidence about the genetic expression of matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer and their role in tumour invasion and metastasis, emphasizing their potential as molecular markers of prognosis.

  12. Prediction of industrial tomato hybrids from agronomic traits and ISSR molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, A S T; Resende, J T V; Faria, M V; Da-Silva, P R; Fagundes, B S; Morales, R G F

    2016-05-13

    Heterosis is a highly relevant phenomenon in plant breeding. This condition is usually established in hybrids derived from crosses of highly divergent parents. The success of a breeder in obtaining heterosis is directly related to the correct identification of genetically contrasting parents. Currently, the diallel cross is the most commonly used methodology to detect contrasting parents; however, it is a time- and cost-consuming procedure. Therefore, new tools capable of performing this task quickly and accurately are required. Thus, the purpose of this study was to estimate the genetic divergence in industrial tomato lines, based on agronomic traits, and to compare with estimates obtained using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. The genetic divergence among 10 industrial tomato lines, based on nine morphological characters and 12 ISSR primers was analyzed. For data analysis, Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between the genetic dissimilarity measures estimated by Mahalanobis distance and Jaccard's coefficient of genetic dissimilarity from the heterosis estimates, combining ability, and means of important traits of industrial tomato. The ISSR markers efficiently detected contrasting parents for hybrid production in tomato. Parent RVTD-08 was indicated as the most divergent, both by molecular and morphological markers, that positively contributed to increased heterosis and by the specific combining ability in the crosses in which it participated. The genetic dissimilarity estimated by ISSR molecular markers aided the identification of the best hybrids of the experiment in terms of total fruit yield, pulp yield, and soluble solids content.

  13. Prediction of industrial tomato hybrids from agronomic traits and ISSR molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, A S T; Resende, J T V; Faria, M V; Da-Silva, P R; Fagundes, B S; Morales, R G F

    2016-01-01

    Heterosis is a highly relevant phenomenon in plant breeding. This condition is usually established in hybrids derived from crosses of highly divergent parents. The success of a breeder in obtaining heterosis is directly related to the correct identification of genetically contrasting parents. Currently, the diallel cross is the most commonly used methodology to detect contrasting parents; however, it is a time- and cost-consuming procedure. Therefore, new tools capable of performing this task quickly and accurately are required. Thus, the purpose of this study was to estimate the genetic divergence in industrial tomato lines, based on agronomic traits, and to compare with estimates obtained using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. The genetic divergence among 10 industrial tomato lines, based on nine morphological characters and 12 ISSR primers was analyzed. For data analysis, Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between the genetic dissimilarity measures estimated by Mahalanobis distance and Jaccard's coefficient of genetic dissimilarity from the heterosis estimates, combining ability, and means of important traits of industrial tomato. The ISSR markers efficiently detected contrasting parents for hybrid production in tomato. Parent RVTD-08 was indicated as the most divergent, both by molecular and morphological markers, that positively contributed to increased heterosis and by the specific combining ability in the crosses in which it participated. The genetic dissimilarity estimated by ISSR molecular markers aided the identification of the best hybrids of the experiment in terms of total fruit yield, pulp yield, and soluble solids content. PMID:27323023

  14. Characterizing Safflower Germplasm with AFLP Molecular Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) accessions from the U.S. germplasm collection were characterized using AFLP (Amplified Length Polymorphisms) markers. Separation and scoring of 392 markers was completed using the Beckman CEQ8000 capillary electrophoresis system. Twelve plants from each of eight...

  15. Molecular genetics in affective illness

    SciTech Connect

    Mendlewicz, J.; Sevy, S.; Mendelbaum, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Genetic transmission in manic depressive illness (MDI) has been explored in twins, adoption, association, and linkage studies. The X-linked transmission hypothesis has been tested by using several markers on chromosome X: Xg blood group, color blindness, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), factor IX (hemophilia B), and DNA probes such as DXS15, DXS52, F8C, ST14. The hypothesis of autosomal transmission has been tested by association studies with the O blood group located on chromosome 9, as well as linkage studies on chromosome 6 with the Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA) haplotypes and on Chromosome 11 with DNA markers for the following genes: D2 dopamine receptor, tyrosinase, C-Harvey-Ras-A (HRAS) oncogene, insuline (ins), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Although linkage studies support the hypothesis of a major locus for the transmission of MDI in the Xq27-28 region, several factors are limiting the results, and are discussed in the present review. 105 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Comparison of RAMP and SSR markers for the study of wild barley genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Dávila, J A; Loarce, Y; Ramsay, L; Waugh, R; Ferrer, E

    1999-01-01

    Two molecular marker technologies, random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR), were used to determine genetic diversity of 27 accessions of the wild barley Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum. 19 primer combinations were used to generate RAMP fragments and 16 SSR loci were analysed. A high level of polymorphism was found with both kind of markers as revealed by the mean polymorphism information content (PIC) values obtained: 0.838 and 0.855 for RAMP and SSR, respectively. Genetic dissimilarities between genotypes were estimated from RAMP and SSR data. A lack of correlation was found between both sets of data. This was reflected in the two dendrograms obtained which presented accessions clustered differently. The results suggest that both sets of markers reveal genetic variation induced by different mechanisms. The dendrogram produced from the RAMP dissimilarity estimates showed most of the groups related to the geographic origin of the accessions. PMID:10628292

  17. Genetic mapping and marker development for resistance of wheat against the root lesion nematode Pratylenchus neglectus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Rlnn1 locus, which resides on chromosome 7A of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) confers moderate resistance against the root lesion nematode Pratylenchus neglectus. Prior to this research, the exact linkage relationships of Rlnn1 with other loci on chromosome 7A were not clear and there were no simple codominant markers available for selection of Rlnn1 in wheat breeding. The objectives of the research reported here were to (1) develop an improved genetic map of the Rlnn1 region of chromosome 7A and (2) develop molecular markers that could be used in marker-assisted selection to improve resistance of wheat against P. neglectus. Results A large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) for resistance against P. neglectus was genetically mapped using a population of Excalibur/Kukri doubled haploid lines. This QTL coincides in position with the rust resistance gene(s) Lr20/Sr15, the phytoene synthase gene Psy-A1 and 10 molecular markers, including five new markers designed using wheat-rice comparative genomics and wheat expressed sequence tags. Two of the new markers are suitable for use as molecular diagnostic tools to distinguish plants that carry Rlnn1 and Lr20/Sr15 from those that do not carry these resistance genes. Conclusions The genomic location of Rlnn1 was confirmed to be in the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 7A. Molecular markers were developed that provide simple alternatives to costly phenotypic assessment of resistance against P. neglectus in wheat breeding. In Excalibur, genetic recombination seems to be completely suppressed in the Rlnn1 region. PMID:24377498

  18. Chondrosarcoma: With Updates on Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Jung; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Ayala, Alberto G.; Ro, Jae Y.

    2011-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma (CHS) is a malignant cartilage-forming tumor and usually occurs within the medullary canal of long bones and pelvic bones. Based on the morphologic feature alone, a correct diangosis of CHS may be difficult, Therefore, correlation of radiological and clinicopathological features is mandatory in the diagnosis of CHS. The prognosis of CHS is closely related to histologic grading, however, histologic grading may be subjective with high inter-observer variability. In this paper, we present histologic grading system and clinicopathological and radiological findings of conventional CHS. Subtypes of CHSs, such as dedifferentiated, mesenchymal, and clear cell CHSs are also presented. In addition, we introduce updated cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings to expand our understanding of CHS biology. New markers of cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell signaling might offer important therapeutic and prognostic information in near future. PMID:21403832

  19. Uniparental genetic markers in South Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco Mauro

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive review of uniparental systems in South Amerindians was undertaken. Variability in the Y-chromosome haplogroups were assessed in 68 populations and 1,814 individuals whereas that of Y-STR markers was assessed in 29 populations and 590 subjects. Variability in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup was examined in 108 populations and 6,697 persons, and sequencing studies used either the complete mtDNA genome or the highly variable segments 1 and 2. The diversity of the markers made it difficult to establish a general picture of Y-chromosome variability in the populations studied. However, haplogroup Q1a3a* was almost always the most prevalent whereas Q1a3* occurred equally in all regions, which suggested its prevalence among the early colonizers. The STR allele frequencies were used to derive a possible ancient Native American Q-clade chromosome haplotype and five of six STR loci showed significant geographic variation. Geographic and linguistic factors moderately influenced the mtDNA distributions (6% and 7%, respectively) and mtDNA haplogroups A and D correlated positively and negatively, respectively, with latitude. The data analyzed here provide rich material for understanding the biological history of South Amerindians and can serve as a basis for comparative studies involving other types of data, such as cultural data. PMID:22888284

  20. Uniparental genetic markers in South Amerindians.

    PubMed

    Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco Mauro

    2012-04-01

    A comprehensive review of uniparental systems in South Amerindians was undertaken. Variability in the Y-chromosome haplogroups were assessed in 68 populations and 1,814 individuals whereas that of Y-STR markers was assessed in 29 populations and 590 subjects. Variability in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup was examined in 108 populations and 6,697 persons, and sequencing studies used either the complete mtDNA genome or the highly variable segments 1 and 2. The diversity of the markers made it difficult to establish a general picture of Y-chromosome variability in the populations studied. However, haplogroup Q1a3a* was almost always the most prevalent whereas Q1a3* occurred equally in all regions, which suggested its prevalence among the early colonizers. The STR allele frequencies were used to derive a possible ancient Native American Q-clade chromosome haplotype and five of six STR loci showed significant geographic variation. Geographic and linguistic factors moderately influenced the mtDNA distributions (6% and 7%, respectively) and mtDNA haplogroups A and D correlated positively and negatively, respectively, with latitude. The data analyzed here provide rich material for understanding the biological history of South Amerindians and can serve as a basis for comparative studies involving other types of data, such as cultural data. PMID:22888284

  1. Genetic fidelity and variability of micropropagated cassava plants (Manihot esculenta Crantz) evaluated using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Á M; Vieira, L J; Ferreira, C F; Souza, F V D; Souza, A S; Ledo, C A S

    2015-07-14

    Molecular markers are efficient for assessing the genetic fidelity of various species of plants after in vitro culture. In this study, we evaluated the genetic fidelity and variability of micropropagated cassava plants (Manihot esculenta Crantz) using inter-simple sequence repeat markers. Twenty-two cassava accessions from the Embrapa Cassava & Fruits Germplasm Bank were used. For each accession, DNA was extracted from a plant maintained in the field and from 3 plants grown in vitro. For DNA amplification, 27 inter-simple sequence repeat primers were used, of which 24 generated 175 bands; 100 of those bands were polymorphic and were used to study genetic variability among accessions of cassava plants maintained in the field. Based on the genetic distance matrix calculated using the arithmetic complement of the Jaccard's index, genotypes were clustered using the unweighted pair group method using arithmetic averages. The number of bands per primer was 2-13, with an average of 7.3. For most micropropagated accessions, the fidelity study showed no genetic variation between plants of the same accessions maintained in the field and those maintained in vitro, confirming the high genetic fidelity of the micropropagated plants. However, genetic variability was observed among different accessions grown in the field, and clustering based on the dissimilarity matrix revealed 7 groups. Inter-simple sequence repeat markers were efficient for detecting the genetic homogeneity of cassava plants derived from meristem culture, demonstrating the reliability of this propagation system.

  2. Genetic markers cannot determine Jewish descent.

    PubMed

    Falk, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Humans differentiate, classify, and discriminate: social interaction is a basic property of human Darwinian evolution. Presumably inherent differential physical as well as behavioral properties have always been criteria for identifying friend or foe. Yet, biological determinism is a relatively modern term, and scientific racism is, oddly enough, largely a consequence or a product of the Age of Enlightenment and the establishment of the notion of human equality. In recent decades ever-increasing efforts and ingenuity were invested in identifying Biblical Israelite genotypic common denominators by analysing an assortment of phenotypes, like facial patterns, blood types, diseases, DNA-sequences, and more. It becomes overwhelmingly clear that although Jews maintained detectable vertical genetic continuity along generations of socio-religious-cultural relationship, also intensive horizontal genetic relations were maintained both between Jewish communities and with the gentile surrounding. Thus, in spite of considerable consanguinity, there is no Jewish genotype to identify. PMID:25653666

  3. Genetic markers cannot determine Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Humans differentiate, classify, and discriminate: social interaction is a basic property of human Darwinian evolution. Presumably inherent differential physical as well as behavioral properties have always been criteria for identifying friend or foe. Yet, biological determinism is a relatively modern term, and scientific racism is, oddly enough, largely a consequence or a product of the Age of Enlightenment and the establishment of the notion of human equality. In recent decades ever-increasing efforts and ingenuity were invested in identifying Biblical Israelite genotypic common denominators by analysing an assortment of phenotypes, like facial patterns, blood types, diseases, DNA-sequences, and more. It becomes overwhelmingly clear that although Jews maintained detectable vertical genetic continuity along generations of socio-religious-cultural relationship, also intensive horizontal genetic relations were maintained both between Jewish communities and with the gentile surrounding. Thus, in spite of considerable consanguinity, there is no Jewish genotype to identify. PMID:25653666

  4. Genetic markers cannot determine Jewish descent.

    PubMed

    Falk, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Humans differentiate, classify, and discriminate: social interaction is a basic property of human Darwinian evolution. Presumably inherent differential physical as well as behavioral properties have always been criteria for identifying friend or foe. Yet, biological determinism is a relatively modern term, and scientific racism is, oddly enough, largely a consequence or a product of the Age of Enlightenment and the establishment of the notion of human equality. In recent decades ever-increasing efforts and ingenuity were invested in identifying Biblical Israelite genotypic common denominators by analysing an assortment of phenotypes, like facial patterns, blood types, diseases, DNA-sequences, and more. It becomes overwhelmingly clear that although Jews maintained detectable vertical genetic continuity along generations of socio-religious-cultural relationship, also intensive horizontal genetic relations were maintained both between Jewish communities and with the gentile surrounding. Thus, in spite of considerable consanguinity, there is no Jewish genotype to identify.

  5. Molecular genetics of human color vision.

    PubMed

    Deeb, S S; Motulsky, A G

    1996-05-01

    The significant advances in our understanding of color vision has been due to the convergence of information from behavioral and molecular genetic analyses. The molecular biology of the visual pigments; molecular genetic basis of variation in normal and abnormal color vision, and regulation of the genes at the LWS-MWS pigment gene locus are discussed.

  6. Genetic diversity analysis in Opal cotton hybrids based on SSR, ISSR, and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Noormohammadi, Z; Hasheminejad-Ahangarani Farahani, Y; Sheidai, M; Ghasemzadeh-Baraki, S; Alishah, O

    2013-01-01

    Cotton is one of the most economically important crops in Iran; hybridization is a means to increase the genetic diversity and obtain new elite cultivars in this crop. We examined agronomic characteristics and molecular genetic diversity in the Opal cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cultivar and in F(2) progenies. Ten homo-primers and seven hetero-primers of 26 RAPD primers produced 261 reproducible bands, with an average of 4.18 bands per primer and 22% polymorphism. The OPB12/OPH08 primer gave the highest effective number of alleles (N(E)), and the largest Shannon index (I), Nei's genetic diversity (H), and polymorphism information content (PIC) values. Some RAPD bands were present in the parental genotypes but were absent in their hybrids. Ten ISSR primers produced 206 reproducible bands, with 49.4% polymorphism. The UBC807 locus gave the highest N(E), I, H, and PIC values. Some ISSR bands occurred only in the parental genotype, while others were only present in the hybrid genotypes. Four microsatellite loci produced 12 alleles, ranging from 181 to 236 bp, with 54% polymorphism. The TMB1421 locus, with a monomorphic allele, was digested with three restriction enzymes (CAP-microsatellite) to evaluate sequence variations among samples. Association analysis between molecular markers and agronomic data revealed a significant correlation between ISSR-UBC807-1500 and yield. The Mantel test performed among the genetic distance matrices obtained from RAPD, ISSR and SSR showed a non-significant regression between RAPD versus ISSR and ISSR versus SSR, while RAPD versus SSR showed a significant regression; regression for ISSR and RAPD+ISSR+SSR combined data was also significant. Cluster analysis (UPGMA) based on these three types of molecular markers differentiated cotton genotypes and their progenies. Among the molecular markers, ISSR revealed more genetic variation among the genotypes. However, using all three types of molecular markers provided a better overall view of cotton

  7. Genetic marker anchoring by six-dimensional pools for development of a soybean physical map

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Zhong, Guohua; Findley, Seth D; Cregan, Perry; Stacey, Gary; Nguyen, Henry T

    2008-01-01

    Background Integrated genetic and physical maps are extremely valuable for genomic studies and as important references for assembling whole genome shotgun sequences. Screening of a BAC library using molecular markers is an indispensable procedure for integration of both physical and genetic maps of a genome. Molecular markers provide anchor points for integration of genetic and physical maps and also validate BAC contigs assembled based solely on BAC fingerprints. We employed a six-dimensional BAC pooling strategy and an in silico approach to anchor molecular markers onto the soybean physical map. Results A total of 1,470 markers (580 SSRs and 890 STSs) were anchored by PCR on a subset of a Williams 82 BstY I BAC library pooled into 208 pools in six dimensions. This resulted in 7,463 clones (~1× genome equivalent) associated with 1470 markers, of which the majority of clones (6,157, 82.5%) were anchored by one marker and 1106 (17.5%) individual clones contained two or more markers. This contributed to 1184 contigs having anchor points through this 6-D pool screening effort. In parallel, the 21,700 soybean Unigene set from NCBI was used to perform in silico mapping on 80,700 Williams 82 BAC end sequences (BES). This in silico analysis yielded 9,835 positive results anchored by 4152 unigenes that contributed to 1305 contigs and 1624 singletons. Among the 1305 contigs, 305 have not been previously anchored by PCR. Therefore, 1489 (78.8%) of 1893 contigs are anchored with molecular markers. These results are being integrated with BAC fingerprints to assemble the BAC contigs. Ultimately, these efforts will lead to an integrated physical and genetic map resource. Conclusion We demonstrated that the six-dimensional soybean BAC pools can be efficiently used to anchor markers to soybean BACs despite the complexity of the soybean genome. In addition to anchoring markers, the 6-D pooling method was also effective for targeting BAC clones for investigating gene families and

  8. Blood groups as genetic markers in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A M; Gillies, W E

    1988-04-01

    A series of 474 mixed cases of glaucoma was assessed to determine whether there were any genetic differences between different types of glaucoma. A careful distinction was made between chronic open angle glaucoma (COAG), acute and chronic angle closure glaucoma, ocular hypertension, low tension glaucoma, patients with large cup disc ratios, and various types of secondary glaucoma including pseudoexfoliation of the lens capsule, uveitic and traumatic glaucoma. Using ABO blood groups, Rhesus groups, ABH secretion or non-secretion, and phenylthiourea tasting we identified certain differences. The differences from normal were significant decrease in Rh-negative patients in chronic closed angle glaucoma (p less than 0.05), a decrease in ABH secretors in ocular hypertension (p less than 0.01), and fewer HB secretors in patients with COAG (p less than 0.02). There was a significant decrease in AH secretors and increase in HB secretors in both pseudoexfoliation with raised intraocular pressure compared with COAG (p less than 0.01) and in secondary glaucomas as a group compared with COAG (p less than 0.01). Tasters of phenylthiourea were more common in traumatic and uveitic glaucoma than in normal controls (p less than 0.05). These results suggest that secondary glaucoma develops in different subjects from COAG, while patients who develop a rise in intraocular pressure proceed to cupping and field loss if they have a certain genetic constitution. The groups of patients are too small for the differences to be of great prognostic value.

  9. Diversity array technology markers: genetic diversity analyses and linkage map construction in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N; Aslam, M N; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A; Kilian, A; Sharpe, Andrew G; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines 'Lynx-037DH' and 'Monty-028DH'. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed.

  10. Novel SSR Markers from BAC-End Sequences, DArT Arrays and a Comprehensive Genetic Map with 1,291 Marker Loci for Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Spurthi N.; Varghese, Nicy; Shah, Trushar M.; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Gudipati, Srivani; Gaur, Pooran M.; Kulwal, Pawan L.; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; KaviKishor, Polavarapu B.; Winter, Peter; Kahl, Günter; Town, Christopher D.; Kilian, Andrzej; Cook, Douglas R.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2011-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is the third most important cool season food legume, cultivated in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. The goal of this study was to develop novel molecular markers such as microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences (BESs) and diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers, and to construct a high-density genetic map based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) population ICC 4958 (C. arietinum)×PI 489777 (C. reticulatum). A BAC-library comprising 55,680 clones was constructed and 46,270 BESs were generated. Mining of these BESs provided 6,845 SSRs, and primer pairs were designed for 1,344 SSRs. In parallel, DArT arrays with ca. 15,000 clones were developed, and 5,397 clones were found polymorphic among 94 genotypes tested. Screening of newly developed BES-SSR markers and DArT arrays on the parental genotypes of the RIL mapping population showed polymorphism with 253 BES-SSR markers and 675 DArT markers. Segregation data obtained for these polymorphic markers and 494 markers data compiled from published reports or collaborators were used for constructing the genetic map. As a result, a comprehensive genetic map comprising 1,291 markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total of 845.56 cM distance was developed (http://cmap.icrisat.ac.in/cmap/sm/cp/thudi/). The number of markers per linkage group ranged from 68 (LG 8) to 218 (LG 3) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.65 cM. While the developed resource of molecular markers will be useful for genetic diversity, genetic mapping and molecular breeding applications, the comprehensive genetic map with integrated BES-SSR markers will facilitate its anchoring to the physical map (under construction) to accelerate map-based cloning of genes in chickpea and comparative genome evolution studies in legumes. PMID:22102885

  11. SSR Marker Analysis of Genetic Relationships within Hydrangea paniculata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity studies using 26 simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers were conducted with 36 taxa of Hydrangea paniculata Sieb. The SSR loci were highly variable among the taxa, producing a mean of 5.8 alleles per locus. Three cultivars (Boskoop, Compact Grandiflora and Webb) were either identic...

  12. A polymorphic DNA marker genetically linked to Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Gusella, J F; Wexler, N S; Conneally, P M; Naylor, S L; Anderson, M A; Tanzi, R E; Watkins, P C; Ottina, K; Wallace, M R; Sakaguchi, A Y

    Family studies show that the Huntington's disease gene is linked to a polymorphic DNA marker that maps to human chromosome 4. The chromosomal localization of the Huntington's disease gene is the first step in using recombinant DNA technology to identify the primary genetic defect in this disorder.

  13. Evaluation of algorithms used to order markers on genetic maps.

    PubMed

    Mollinari, M; Margarido, G R A; Vencovsky, R; Garcia, A A F

    2009-12-01

    When building genetic maps, it is necessary to choose from several marker ordering algorithms and criteria, and the choice is not always simple. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of algorithms try (TRY), seriation (SER), rapid chain delineation (RCD), recombination counting and ordering (RECORD) and unidirectional growth (UG), as well as the criteria PARF (product of adjacent recombination fractions), SARF (sum of adjacent recombination fractions), SALOD (sum of adjacent LOD scores) and LHMC (likelihood through hidden Markov chains), used with the RIPPLE algorithm for error verification, in the construction of genetic linkage maps. A linkage map of a hypothetical diploid and monoecious plant species was simulated containing one linkage group and 21 markers with fixed distance of 3 cM between them. In all, 700 F(2) populations were randomly simulated with 100 and 400 individuals with different combinations of dominant and co-dominant markers, as well as 10 and 20% of missing data. The simulations showed that, in the presence of co-dominant markers only, any combination of algorithm and criteria may be used, even for a reduced population size. In the case of a smaller proportion of dominant markers, any of the algorithms and criteria (except SALOD) investigated may be used. In the presence of high proportions of dominant markers and smaller samples (around 100), the probability of repulsion linkage increases between them and, in this case, use of the algorithms TRY and SER associated to RIPPLE with criterion LHMC would provide better results.

  14. Molecular marker database for efficient use in agricultural breeding programs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Kug; Lee, Gang-Seob; Mo, Ji-Su; Bae, Seon-Hwa; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The National Agricultural Biotechnology Information Center (NABIC) constructed a web-based molecular marker database to provide information about 7,847 sequence-tagged site (STS) markers identified in the 11 species using a next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. The database consists of three major functional categories: keyword search, detailed viewer and download function. The molecular marker annotation table provides detailed information such as ownership information, basic information, and STS-related characterization information. Availability The database is available for free at http://nabic.rda.go.kr/Molecularmarker PMID:26527854

  15. Genetic Authentication of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis var. grandiflora Nakai by Improved RAPD-Derived DNA Markers.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Boxu; Wei, Chunli; Cheng, Jingliang; Imani, Saber; Chen, Hanchun; Fu, Junjiang

    2015-01-01

    The evergreen shrub, Gardenia jasminoides Ellis var. grandiflora Nakai is one of the most popular garden-plants, with significant ornamental importance. Here, we have cloned improved random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) derived fragments into T-vector, and developed sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. These markers have been deposited in GenBank database with the accession numbers KP641310, KP641311, KP641312 and KP641313 respectively. The BLAST search of database confirmed the novelty of these markers. The four SCAR markers, namely ZZH11, ZZH31, ZZH41 and ZZH51 can specifically recognize the genetic materials of G. jasminoides from other plant species. Moreover, SCAR marker ZZH31 can be used to distinguish G. jasminoides Ellis var. grandiflora Nakai from other G. jasminoides on the market. Together, this study has developed four stably molecular SCAR markers by improved RAPD-derived DNA markers for the genetic identification and authentication, and for ecological conservation of medicinal and ornamental plant G. jasminoides. PMID:26569205

  16. Molecular Pathology: Predictive, Prognostic, and Diagnostic Markers in Lymphoid Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Ho, Caleb; Kluk, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Lymphoid neoplasms show great diversity in morphology, immunophenotypic profile, and postulated cells of origin, which also reflects the variety of genetic alterations within this group of tumors. This review discusses many of the currently known genetic alterations in selected mature B-cell and T-cell lymphoid neoplasms, and their significance as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic markers. Given the rapidly increasing number of genetic alterations that have been described in this group of tumors, and that the clinical significance of many is still being studied, this is not an entirely exhaustive review of all of the genetic alterations that have been reported. PMID:27523974

  17. [Research progress on molecular genetics of forest musk deer].

    PubMed

    Jie, Hang; Zheng, Cheng-li; Wang, Jian-ming; Feng, Xiao-lan; Zeng, De-jun; Zhao, Gui-jun

    2015-11-01

    Forest musk deer is one of the large-scale farming musk deer animals with the largest population at the same time. The male musk deer can secrete valuable medicines, which has high medicinal and economic value. Due to the loss of habitat and indiscriminate hunting, the numbers of wild population specie and the distribution have been drastically reduced. Therefore, in-depth understanding of the molecular genetics progress of forest musk deer will pave a way for musk deer protection and breeding. In this review, the progress associated with the molecular marker, genetic classification, artificial breeding, musk secretion and disease in past decades were reviewed, in order to provide a theoretical basis for subsequent molecular genetic researches in forest musk deer.

  18. [Research progress on molecular genetics of forest musk deer].

    PubMed

    Jie, Hang; Zheng, Cheng-li; Wang, Jian-ming; Feng, Xiao-lan; Zeng, De-jun; Zhao, Gui-jun

    2015-11-01

    Forest musk deer is one of the large-scale farming musk deer animals with the largest population at the same time. The male musk deer can secrete valuable medicines, which has high medicinal and economic value. Due to the loss of habitat and indiscriminate hunting, the numbers of wild population specie and the distribution have been drastically reduced. Therefore, in-depth understanding of the molecular genetics progress of forest musk deer will pave a way for musk deer protection and breeding. In this review, the progress associated with the molecular marker, genetic classification, artificial breeding, musk secretion and disease in past decades were reviewed, in order to provide a theoretical basis for subsequent molecular genetic researches in forest musk deer. PMID:27097400

  19. Genetic bottlenecks in Turkish okra germplasm and utility of iPBS retrotransposon markers for genetic diversity assessment.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, M; Koçak, M; Baloch, F S

    2015-09-08

    Lack of requisite genetic variation in Turkish okra has necessitated the use of different types of markers for estimating the genetic diversity and identifying the source of variation. Transposable elements, present abundantly in plant genomes, generate genomic diversity through their replication and are thus an excellent source of molecular markers. We hypothesized that inter-primer binding site (iPBS)-retrotransposons could be the source of variation because of their genome plasticity nature. In the present study, genetic diversity of 66 okra landraces was analyzed using iPBS-retrotransposon markers. iPBS-retrotransposons detected 88 bands with 40.2% polymorphism and an average of 6.8 bands per primer. Gene diversity and Shannon's information index ranged from 0.01 to 0.13 and 0.02 to 0.21 for iPBS-retrotransposons and from 0.06 to 0.46 and 0.14 to 0.65 for simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, respectively. Polymorphism information content value for retrotransposons varied between 0.12 and 0.99, while that for SSR was from 0.52 to 0.81. Neighbor joining analysis based on retrotransposons and SSRs divided all the accessions into four clusters; however, SSR markers were more efficient in clustering the landraces based on their origin. Using the STRUCTURE software for determining population structure, and two populations (at the number of hypothetical subpopulations, K = 2) were identified among the landraces. Low genetic diversity in Turkish okra highlights the need for the introduction of plants from countries with greater genetic diversity for these crops. This study also demonstrates the utility and role of iPBS-retrotransposons, a dominant and ubiquitous part of eukaryotic genomes, for diversity studies in okra.

  20. Genetic bottlenecks in Turkish okra germplasm and utility of iPBS retrotransposon markers for genetic diversity assessment.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, M; Koçak, M; Baloch, F S

    2015-01-01

    Lack of requisite genetic variation in Turkish okra has necessitated the use of different types of markers for estimating the genetic diversity and identifying the source of variation. Transposable elements, present abundantly in plant genomes, generate genomic diversity through their replication and are thus an excellent source of molecular markers. We hypothesized that inter-primer binding site (iPBS)-retrotransposons could be the source of variation because of their genome plasticity nature. In the present study, genetic diversity of 66 okra landraces was analyzed using iPBS-retrotransposon markers. iPBS-retrotransposons detected 88 bands with 40.2% polymorphism and an average of 6.8 bands per primer. Gene diversity and Shannon's information index ranged from 0.01 to 0.13 and 0.02 to 0.21 for iPBS-retrotransposons and from 0.06 to 0.46 and 0.14 to 0.65 for simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, respectively. Polymorphism information content value for retrotransposons varied between 0.12 and 0.99, while that for SSR was from 0.52 to 0.81. Neighbor joining analysis based on retrotransposons and SSRs divided all the accessions into four clusters; however, SSR markers were more efficient in clustering the landraces based on their origin. Using the STRUCTURE software for determining population structure, and two populations (at the number of hypothetical subpopulations, K = 2) were identified among the landraces. Low genetic diversity in Turkish okra highlights the need for the introduction of plants from countries with greater genetic diversity for these crops. This study also demonstrates the utility and role of iPBS-retrotransposons, a dominant and ubiquitous part of eukaryotic genomes, for diversity studies in okra. PMID:26400290

  1. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L; Wildung, Mark R

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general "allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction" scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1R, 3R, 4S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil. PMID:16292524

  2. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint ( Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4 S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general “allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction” scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1 R, 3 R, 4 S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  3. Genetic analysis and marker assisted identification of life phases of red alga Gracilaria corticata (J. Agardh).

    PubMed

    Baghel, Ravi S; Kumari, Puja; Bijo, A J; Gupta, Vishal; Reddy, C R K; Jha, B

    2011-08-01

    The present study firstly reports the cytological and molecular marker assisted differentiation of isomorphic population of Gracilaria corticata (J. Agardh) with inter and intra-phasic genetic diversity analysis using ISSR markers. The genetic diversity of inbreeding population of G. corticata as determined in terms of percentage of polymorphic loci (PPL), average heterozygosity (He) and Shannon's Weaver index (I) were 59.80, 0.59 and 1.21, respectively. The inter-phasic pair-wise average polymorphism were found to be 31.6% between male and female, 24.0% in male and tetrasporophyte and 25.3% in female and tetrasporophyte. The intra-phasic average polymorphisms were calculated as a maximum of 5.5% between females, 4.2% between males and the lowest 2.4% between tetrasporophytes. The primer 10 generated a marker of 800 bp specific to male and 650 bp to female gametophyte, while the primer 17 generated a marker of 2,500 bp specific to tetrasporophyte. Both the UPGMA based dendrogram and PCA analysis clustered all the three life phases differentially as distinct identity. Cytological analysis by chromosome count revealed 24 chromosomes in both haploid male and female gametophytes (N) and 48 for diploid (2 N) tetrasporophyte further confirming their genetic distinctness. The life phase specific markers reported in this study could be of help in breeding programmes where differentiation of life phases at the early developmental stages is crucial.

  4. Development of INDEL Markers for Genetic Mapping Based on Whole Genome Resequencing in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaofeng; Wei, Haichao; Cheng, Wen; Yang, Suxin; Zhao, Yanxiu; Li, Xuan; Luo, Da; Zhang, Hui; Feng, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is an important crop worldwide. In this study, a Chinese local soybean cultivar, Hedou 12, was resequenced by next generation sequencing technology to develop INsertion/DELetion (INDEL) markers for genetic mapping. 49,276 INDEL polymorphisms and 242,059 single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between Hedou 12 and the Williams 82 reference sequence. Of these, 243 candidate INDEL markers ranging from 5–50 bp in length were chosen for validation, and 165 (68%) of them revealed polymorphisms between Hedou 12 and Williams 82. The validated INDEL markers were also tested in 12 other soybean cultivars. The number of polymorphisms in the pairwise comparisons of 14 soybean cultivars varied from 27 to 165. To test the utility of these INDEL markers, they were used to perform genetic mapping of a crinkly leaf mutant, and the CRINKLY LEAF locus was successfully mapped to a 360 kb region on chromosome 7. This research shows that high-throughput sequencing technologies can facilitate the development of genome-wide molecular markers for genetic mapping in soybean. PMID:26483012

  5. Development of INDEL Markers for Genetic Mapping Based on Whole Genome Resequencing in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaofeng; Wei, Haichao; Cheng, Wen; Yang, Suxin; Zhao, Yanxiu; Li, Xuan; Luo, Da; Zhang, Hui; Feng, Xianzhong

    2015-10-19

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is an important crop worldwide. In this study, a Chinese local soybean cultivar, Hedou 12, was resequenced by next generation sequencing technology to develop INsertion/DELetion (INDEL) markers for genetic mapping. 49,276 INDEL polymorphisms and 242,059 single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between Hedou 12 and the Williams 82 reference sequence. Of these, 243 candidate INDEL markers ranging from 5-50 bp in length were chosen for validation, and 165 (68%) of them revealed polymorphisms between Hedou 12 and Williams 82. The validated INDEL markers were also tested in 12 other soybean cultivars. The number of polymorphisms in the pairwise comparisons of 14 soybean cultivars varied from 27 to 165. To test the utility of these INDEL markers, they were used to perform genetic mapping of a crinkly leaf mutant, and the CRINKLY LEAF locus was successfully mapped to a 360 kb region on chromosome 7. This research shows that high-throughput sequencing technologies can facilitate the development of genome-wide molecular markers for genetic mapping in soybean.

  6. Evaluation of genetic diversity in fig accessions by using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    do Val, A D B; Souza, C S; Ferreira, E A; Salgado, S M L; Pasqual, M; Cançado, G M A

    2013-04-25

    Fig (Ficus carica L.) is a fruit of great importance worldwide. Its propagation is carried out with stem cuttings, a procedure that favors the occurrence of synonymy among specimens. Thus, molecular markers have become an important tool for studies of DNA fingerprinting, germplasm characterization, and genetic diversity evaluation in this plant species. The aim of this study was the analysis of genetic diversity among accessions of fig and the detection of synonyms among samples using molecular markers. Five microsatellite markers previously reported as polymorphic to fig were used to characterize 11 fig cultivars maintained in the germplasm bank located in Lavras, Minas Gerais. A total of 21 polymorphic DNA fragments were amplified, with an average of 4.2 alleles per locus. The average allelic diversity and polymorphic information content were 0.6300 and 0.5644, respectively, whereas the total value for the probability of identity was 1.45 x 10(-4). The study allowed the identification of 10 genotypes and 2 synonymous individuals. The principal coordinate analysis showed no defined clusters despite the formation of groups according to geographical origin. However, neighbor-joining analysis identified the same case of synonymy detected using principal coordinate analysis. The data also indicated that the fig cultivars analyzed constitute a population of individuals with high genetic diversity and a broad range of genetic variation.

  7. Analysis of genetic diversity in Larix gmelinii (Pinaceae) with RAPD and ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, H G; Li, X F

    2013-01-01

    Dahurian larch (Larix gmelinii), a deciduous conifer, is the northernmost tree, native to eastern Siberia and nearby regions of China. We used growth traits and molecular markers to assess genetic variation in different L. gmelinii growing regions; 105 individual samples were collected from seven regions of the Qingshan Forestry Centre, Heilongjiang Province, China. The greatest genetic regional variation was seen in the Youhao area, based on coefficients of variation for tree height, diameter and volume (14.73, 28.25, and 55.27%, respectively). Analysis using molecular markers showed rich genetic diversity. The RAPD and ISSR methods both indicated that most variation came from within populations. The seven regions were divided into two groups (Daxing'an and Xiaoxing'an Mountain ranges) by RAPD cluster analysis: Tianchi, Xiaojiuya, Yuanjiang, and Taiping regions were placed in the first group at a genetic distance of 0.08; while the other regions were in the second group. The correlation between RAPD markers and geographical distance was significant, with a correlation coefficient of 0.752.

  8. On marker-assisted prediction of genetic value: beyond the ridge.

    PubMed Central

    Gianola, Daniel; Perez-Enciso, Miguel; Toro, Miguel A

    2003-01-01

    Marked-assisted genetic improvement of agricultural species exploits statistical dependencies in the joint distribution of marker genotypes and quantitative traits. An issue is how molecular (e.g., dense marker maps) and phenotypic information (e.g., some measure of yield in plants) is to be used for predicting the genetic value of candidates for selection. Multiple regression, selection index techniques, best linear unbiased prediction, and ridge regression of phenotypes on marker genotypes have been suggested, as well as more elaborate methods. Here, phenotype-marker associations are modeled hierarchically via multilevel models including chromosomal effects, a spatial covariance of marked effects within chromosomes, background genetic variability, and family heterogeneity. Lorenz curves and Gini coefficients are suggested for assessing the inequality of the contribution of different marked effects to genetic variability. Classical and Bayesian methods are presented. The Bayesian approach includes a Markov chain Monte Carlo implementation. The generality and flexibility of the Bayesian method is illustrated when a Lorenz curve is to be inferred. PMID:12586721

  9. Identification of molecular markers to study the Garcinia spp. diversity.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Utpala; Nandakishore, O P; Rosana, O B; Babu, K Nirmal; Kumar, R Senthil; Parthasarathy, V A

    2016-06-01

    The genus Garcinia shows a considerable variation in its morphological characters such as leaf, flower and fruit with taxonomic ambiguity. It is a potential under-exploited multipurpose crop that gained considerable attention for the presence of (-) hydroxycitric acid, an anti-obesity compound, in its fruit rind and leaves. Here, we evaluated the genetic relationship through molecular markers among the selected 9 species commonly available in the Western Ghats and the Northeastern Himalayan foot hills of India. The nucleotide sequence data obtained from two prominent monomorphic bands generated in ISSR profiling of the species was utilized for the study. The selected bands were found to be of ITS region (700 bp) and partial region of KNOX-1 gene (600 bp). The evolutionary cluster was formed using MEGA5 software. The study indicated 2 major clusters, influenced by floral morphology of the species and availability of (-) hydroxycitric acid in their fruit rinds. In the subclusters, one species from the Western Ghats were paired with another from Northeastern Himalayas with relatively similar morphological traits. PMID:27468467

  10. Elucidating genetic diversity among sour orange rootstocks: a comparative study of the efficiency of RAPD and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Lamine, Myriam; Mliki, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    In order to compare the effectiveness of two molecular marker systems, a set of six RAPD and nine SSR markers were used to study the genetic diversity in a population of 46 sour orange accessions, a common rootstock used in almost all citrus orchards in Tunisia. Genetic diversity parameters [average and effective number of alleles, percentage of polymorphism, polymorphic information content (PIC), effective marker index (EMI), and marker index (MI) parameters] for RAPD, SSR, and RAPD + SSR were determined in order to assess the efficiency of the two marker systems. The results revealed that these parameters were significantly higher when using RAPD markers. Similarly, cluster analysis using the results of RAPD was practically the same as that obtained when combining data from the two marker systems (RAPD + SSR) demonstrating the efficiency of RAPD in discriminating between sour orange accessions. Therefore, the use of SSR markers, known to be more efficient and discriminatory, does not bring significant supplementary information in this work. Indeed, results would have been obtained using only the RAPD markers. Accordingly, this work highlights the efficiency and advantages of RAPD, as an easy and efficient technique, in studying citrus rootstock's genetic diversity, and establishing genetic relationships among citrus accessions.

  11. Analysis of genetic diversity in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) breeding populations as revealed by RAPD genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Odeth; Ortega, Fernando; Campos, Hugo

    2003-08-01

    Red clover is an important forage legume species for temperate regions and very little is known about the genetic organization of its breeding populations. We used random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) genetic markers to address the genetic diversity and the distribution of variation in 20 breeding populations and cultivars from Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Switzerland. Genetic distances were calculated for all possible pairwise combinations. A high level of polymorphism was found and the proportion of polymorphic loci across populations was 74.2%. A population derived from a non-certified seedlot displayed a higher proportion of polymorphic loci than its respective certified seedlot. Gene diversity values and population genetics parameters suggest that the populations analyzed are diverse. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that the largest proportion of variation (80.4%) resides at the within population level. RAPD markers are a useful tool for red clover breeding programs. A dendrogram based on genetic distances divided the breeding populations analyzed into three distinct groups. The amount and partition of diversity observed can be of value in identifying the populations that parents of synthetic cultivars are derived from and to exploit the variation available in the populations analyzed. PMID:12897860

  12. Development of microsatellite markers from an enriched genomic library for genetic analysis of melon (Cucumis melo L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ritschel, Patricia Silva; Lins, Tulio Cesar de Lima; Tristan, Rodrigo Lourenço; Buso, Gláucia Salles Cortopassi; Buso, José Amauri; Ferreira, Márcio Elias

    2004-01-01

    Background Despite the great advances in genomic technology observed in several crop species, the availability of molecular tools such as microsatellite markers has been limited in melon (Cucumis melo L.) and cucurbit species. The development of microsatellite markers will have a major impact on genetic analysis and breeding of melon, especially on the generation of marker saturated genetic maps and implementation of marker assisted breeding programs. Genomic microsatellite enriched libraries can be an efficient alternative for marker development in such species. Results Seven hundred clones containing microsatellite sequences from a Tsp-AG/TC microsatellite enriched library were identified and one-hundred and forty-four primer pairs designed and synthesized. When 67 microsatellite markers were tested on a panel of melon and other cucurbit accessions, 65 revealed DNA polymorphisms among the melon accessions. For some cucurbit species, such as Cucumis sativus, up to 50% of the melon microsatellite markers could be readily used for DNA polymophism assessment, representing a significant reduction of marker development costs. A random sample of 25 microsatellite markers was extracted from the new microsatellite marker set and characterized on 40 accessions of melon, generating an allelic frequency database for the species. The average expected heterozygosity was 0.52, varying from 0.45 to 0.70, indicating that a small set of selected markers should be sufficient to solve questions regarding genotype identity and variety protection. Genetic distances based on microsatellite polymorphism were congruent with data obtained from RAPD marker analysis. Mapping analysis was initiated with 55 newly developed markers and most primers showed segregation according to Mendelian expectations. Linkage analysis detected linkage between 56% of the markers, distributed in nine linkage groups. Conclusions Genomic library microsatellite enrichment is an efficient procedure for marker

  13. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1990-04-01

    The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of the small aquarium fish, Japanese Medaka, as a predictor of potential genotoxicity following exposure to carcinogens. This will be accomplished by quantitatively investigating the early molecular events associated with genotoxicity of various tissues of Medaka subsequent to exposure of the organism to several known carcinogens, such as diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Applying molecular genetic tools to tiger conservation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shu-Jin; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2010-12-01

    The utility of molecular genetic approaches in conservation of endangered taxa is now commonly recognized. Over the past decade, conservation genetic analyses based on mitochondrial DNA sequencing and microsatellite genotyping have provided powerful tools to resolve taxonomy uncertainty of tiger subspecies, to define conservation units, to reconstruct phylogeography and demographic history, to examine the genetic ancestry of extinct subspecies, to assess population genetic status non-invasively, and to verify genetic background of captive tigers worldwide. The genetic status of tiger subspecies and populations and implications for developing strategies for the survival of this charismatic species both in situ and ex situ are discussed.

  15. Applying molecular genetic tools to tiger conservation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shu-Jin; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2010-12-01

    The utility of molecular genetic approaches in conservation of endangered taxa is now commonly recognized. Over the past decade, conservation genetic analyses based on mitochondrial DNA sequencing and microsatellite genotyping have provided powerful tools to resolve taxonomy uncertainty of tiger subspecies, to define conservation units, to reconstruct phylogeography and demographic history, to examine the genetic ancestry of extinct subspecies, to assess population genetic status non-invasively, and to verify genetic background of captive tigers worldwide. The genetic status of tiger subspecies and populations and implications for developing strategies for the survival of this charismatic species both in situ and ex situ are discussed. PMID:21392353

  16. Genetic Kinship Investigation from Blood Groups to DNA Markers.

    PubMed

    Geserick, Gunther; Wirth, Ingo

    2012-06-01

    The forensic application of hereditary characteristics became possible after the discovery of human blood groups by Karl Landsteiner in 1901. The foundation for their use in kinship investigation was laid by Emil von Dungern and Ludwig Hirschfeld in 1910 by clarification of the inheritance of the ABO groups. Up to the middle of the 20th century further red cell membrane systems were discovered. From the 1920s Fritz Schiff and Georg Strassmann fought for the introduction of blood groups into forensic kinship investigation. A new era of hemogenetics was opened from 1955 as genetic polymorphisms were described in serum proteins. Starting in 1958 there followed the complex HLA system of white blood cells, which from 1963 was joined by polymophisms in erythrocyte enzymes. Therefore, from the 1980s, it was possible to clarify the majority of kinship cases with a combination of conventional markers. From 1990 to 2000 the conventional markers were gradually replaced by the more effective DNA markers. Simultaneously typing shifted from the phenotype level to the genotype level. The genomic structure of conventional genetic markers could also now be explained. As a reflection of scientific progress the legal situation also changed, particularly in the form of the official guidelines for kinship investigation.

  17. Genetic Kinship Investigation from Blood Groups to DNA Markers

    PubMed Central

    Geserick, Gunther; Wirth, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    The forensic application of hereditary characteristics became possible after the discovery of human blood groups by Karl Landsteiner in 1901. The foundation for their use in kinship investigation was laid by Emil von Dungern and Ludwig Hirschfeld in 1910 by clarification of the inheritance of the ABO groups. Up to the middle of the 20th century further red cell membrane systems were discovered. From the 1920s Fritz Schiff and Georg Strassmann fought for the introduction of blood groups into forensic kinship investigation. A new era of hemogenetics was opened from 1955 as genetic polymorphisms were described in serum proteins. Starting in 1958 there followed the complex HLA system of white blood cells, which from 1963 was joined by polymophisms in erythrocyte enzymes. Therefore, from the 1980s, it was possible to clarify the majority of kinship cases with a combination of conventional markers. From 1990 to 2000 the conventional markers were gradually replaced by the more effective DNA markers. Simultaneously typing shifted from the phenotype level to the genotype level. The genomic structure of conventional genetic markers could also now be explained. As a reflection of scientific progress the legal situation also changed, particularly in the form of the official guidelines for kinship investigation. PMID:22851931

  18. Genetic Markers Associated with Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K; Fonseca-Camarillo, Gabriela

    2015-11-01

    Genetic factors play a significant role in determining inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility. Epidemiologic data support genetic contribution to the pathogenesis of IBD, which include familial aggregation, twin studies, and racial and ethnic differences in disease prevalence. Recently, several new genes have been identified to be involved in the genetic susceptibility to IBD. The characterization of novel genes potentially will lead to the identification of therapeutic agents and clinical assessment of phenotype and prognosis in patients with IBD. The development of genetic markers associated with clinical outcomes in patients with IBD will be very important in the future. The progress of molecular biology tools (microarrays, proteomics, and epigenetics) have progressed the field of the genetic markers discovery. The advances in bioinformatics coupled with cross-disciplinary collaborations have greatly enhanced our ability to retrieve, characterize, and analyze large amounts of data generated by the technological advances. The techniques available for markers development are genomics (single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, pharmacogenetics, and gene expression analyses) and proteomics. This could be a potential great benefit in predicting the course of disease in individual patients and in guiding appropriate medical therapy.

  19. Advances in genetics. Volume 22: Molecular genetics of plants

    SciTech Connect

    Scandalios, J.G.; Caspari, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains the following four chapters: Structural Variation in Mitochondrial DNA; The Structure and Expression of Nuclear Genes in Higher Plants; Chromatin Structure and Gene Regulation in Higher Plants; and The Molecular Genetics of Crown Gall Tumorigenesis.

  20. The first genetic linkage map of Luohanguo (Siraitia grosvenorii ) based on ISSR and SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihua; Ma, Xiaojun; Wei, Jianhe; Qin, Jiaming; Mo, Changming

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the first genetic map of Luohanguo (Siraitia grosvenorii (Swingle) C. Jeffrey) was constructed with 150 F₂ population individuals using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers. A total of 100 ISSRs and 196 SRAP primer combinations generated 51 and 222 polymorphic markers, respectively. Among the 273 markers obtained, 199 markers (29 ISSRs and 170 SRAPs) were mapped to 25 linkage groups. The map covered 1463.3 cM with a mean map distance of 7.35 cM between adjacent markers and a maximum map distance of 52.6 cM between two markers. The markers were distributed randomly in 25 groups except for minor clusters in the distal region of linkage groups. All 25 linkage groups consisted of 2-36 loci ranging in length from 19.5 to 152.6 cM and accounted for 59.8% of the total map distance. This map provides reference information for future molecular breeding work on Luohanguo.

  1. [Molecular genetics of hemophilia A].

    PubMed

    De Brasi, C D; Slavutsky, I R; Larripa, I B

    1996-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HemA), an X linked genetic disease, is the most common coagulation disorder with an incidence of about 1-2 in 10,000 males and is caused by mutations in the factor VIII (FVIII) coagulation gene. Firstly, some clinical aspects of the HemA are presented: the current methods to assess both the amount and activity of FVIII, the severity range observed and the presence of inhibitor antibodies against the therapeutic FVIII. Follows a discussion of the relationship of the structural domains of the FVIII protein (Figure 1), the aminoacid sequence and their functions. An activation-inactivation model of the successive peptide bonds cleavages of the FVIII is also presented (Figure 2). After the cloning of the FVIII gene in 1984, almost all types of HemA causing mutations have been characterized. However, the size and complexity of this gene prevented a screening of the full range of mutations for an accurate molecular diagnosis. Moreover, most of the patients with moderate and mild disease have missense mutations whereas approximately half of severe patients have nonsense, frameshift, and some missense mutations. There are also less frequently mutations such as deletions and insertions leading to severe phenotype and mutations affecting mRNA splicing and duplications causing both severe and mild HemA. In order to give genetic counselling in HemA families, studies at the DNA level using intragenic and/ or extragenic polymorphism analysis have been used. But this approach is not entirely satisfactory because it fails in several situations. Most of the causing mutations described above are private, and they have been found in only a few unrelated families. Recently, a common molecular inversion of the FVIII gene was identified in 50% of unrelated patients with severe HemA. The copies of a particular DNA sequence (termed F8A gene). One copy is located within intron 22 of the FVIII gene and the other two, 500 kb upstream. An homologous recombination mechanism was

  2. Assessment of genetic diversity in the sorghum reference set using EST-SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Ramu, P; Billot, C; Rami, J-F; Senthilvel, S; Upadhyaya, H D; Ananda Reddy, L; Hash, C T

    2013-08-01

    Selection and use of genetically diverse genotypes are key factors in any crop breeding program to develop cultivars with a broad genetic base. Molecular markers play a major role in selecting diverse genotypes. In the present study, a reference set representing a wide range of sorghum genetic diversity was screened with 40 EST-SSR markers to validate both the use of these markers for genetic structure analyses and the population structure of this set. Grouping of accessions is identical in distance-based and model-based clustering methods. Genotypes were grouped primarily based on race within the geographic origins. Accessions derived from the African continent contributed 88.6 % of alleles confirming the African origin of sorghum. In total, 360 alleles were detected in the reference set with an average of 9 alleles per marker. The average PIC value was 0.5230 with a range of 0.1379-0.9483. Sub-race, guinea margaritiferum (Gma) from West Africa formed a separate cluster in close proximity to wild accessions suggesting that the Gma group represents an independent domestication event. Guineas from India and Western Africa formed two distinct clusters. Accessions belongs to the kafir race formed the most homogeneous group as observed in earlier studies. This analysis suggests that the EST-SSR markers used in the present study have greater discriminating power than the genomic SSRs. Genetic variance within the subpopulations was very high (71.7 %) suggesting that the germplasm lines included in the set are more diverse. Thus, this reference set representing the global germplasm is an ideal material for the breeding community, serving as a community resource for trait-specific allele mining as well as genome-wide association mapping.

  3. Assessment of genetic diversity in Brazilian barley using SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jéssica Rosset; Pereira, Jorge Fernando; Turchetto, Caroline; Minella, Euclydes; Consoli, Luciano; Delatorre, Carla Andréa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Barley is a major cereal grown widely and used in several food products, beverage production and animal fodder. Genetic diversity is a key component in breeding programs. We have analyzed the genetic diversity of barley accessions using microsatellite markers. The accessions were composed of wild and domesticated barley representing genotypes from six countries and three breeding programs in Brazil. A total of 280 alleles were detected, 36 unique to Brazilian barley. The marker Bmag120 showed the greatest polymorphism information content (PIC), with the highest mean value found on chromosome three, and the lowest on chromosomes four and six. The wild accessions presented the highest diversity followed by the foreign genotypes. Genetic analysis was performed using Principal Coordinates Analysis, UPGMA clustering, and Bayesian clustering analysis implemented in Structure. All results obtained by the different methods were similar. Loss of genetic diversity has occurred in Brazilian genotypes. The number of alleles detected in genotypes released in 1980s was higher, whereas most of the cultivars released thereafter showed lower PIC and clustered in separate subgroups from the older cultivars. The use of a more diverse panel of genotypes should be considered in order to exploit novel alleles in Brazilian barley breeding programs. PMID:27007902

  4. Assessment of genetic diversity in Brazilian barley using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Jéssica Rosset; Pereira, Jorge Fernando; Turchetto, Caroline; Minella, Euclydes; Consoli, Luciano; Delatorre, Carla Andréa

    2016-03-01

    Barley is a major cereal grown widely and used in several food products, beverage production and animal fodder. Genetic diversity is a key component in breeding programs. We have analyzed the genetic diversity of barley accessions using microsatellite markers. The accessions were composed of wild and domesticated barley representing genotypes from six countries and three breeding programs in Brazil. A total of 280 alleles were detected, 36 unique to Brazilian barley. The marker Bmag120 showed the greatest polymorphism information content (PIC), with the highest mean value found on chromosome three, and the lowest on chromosomes four and six. The wild accessions presented the highest diversity followed by the foreign genotypes. Genetic analysis was performed using Principal Coordinates Analysis, UPGMA clustering, and Bayesian clustering analysis implemented in Structure. All results obtained by the different methods were similar. Loss of genetic diversity has occurred in Brazilian genotypes. The number of alleles detected in genotypes released in 1980s was higher, whereas most of the cultivars released thereafter showed lower PIC and clustered in separate subgroups from the older cultivars. The use of a more diverse panel of genotypes should be considered in order to exploit novel alleles in Brazilian barley breeding programs. PMID:27007902

  5. Genetic markers for western corn rootworm resistance to Bt toxin.

    PubMed

    Flagel, Lex E; Swarup, Shilpa; Chen, Mao; Bauer, Christopher; Wanjugi, Humphrey; Carroll, Matthew; Hill, Patrick; Tuscan, Meghan; Bansal, Raman; Flannagan, Ronald; Clark, Thomas L; Michel, Andrew P; Head, Graham P; Goldman, Barry S

    2015-03-01

    Western corn rootworm (WCR) is a major maize (Zea mays L.) pest leading to annual economic losses of more than 1 billion dollars in the United States. Transgenic maize expressing insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used for the management of WCR. However, cultivation of Bt-expressing maize places intense selection pressure on pest populations to evolve resistance. Instances of resistance to Bt toxins have been reported in WCR. Developing genetic markers for resistance will help in characterizing the extent of existing issues, predicting where future field failures may occur, improving insect resistance management strategies, and in designing and sustainably implementing forthcoming WCR control products. Here, we discover and validate genetic markers in WCR that are associated with resistance to the Cry3Bb1 Bt toxin. A field-derived WCR population known to be resistant to the Cry3Bb1 Bt toxin was used to generate a genetic map and to identify a genomic region associated with Cry3Bb1 resistance. Our results indicate that resistance is inherited in a nearly recessive manner and associated with a single autosomal linkage group. Markers tightly linked with resistance were validated using WCR populations collected from Cry3Bb1 maize fields showing significant WCR damage from across the US Corn Belt. Two markers were found to be correlated with both diet (R2 = 0.14) and plant (R2 = 0.23) bioassays for resistance. These results will assist in assessing resistance risk for different WCR populations, and can be used to improve insect resistance management strategies.

  6. Genetic markers for western corn rootworm resistance to Bt toxin.

    PubMed

    Flagel, Lex E; Swarup, Shilpa; Chen, Mao; Bauer, Christopher; Wanjugi, Humphrey; Carroll, Matthew; Hill, Patrick; Tuscan, Meghan; Bansal, Raman; Flannagan, Ronald; Clark, Thomas L; Michel, Andrew P; Head, Graham P; Goldman, Barry S

    2015-03-01

    Western corn rootworm (WCR) is a major maize (Zea mays L.) pest leading to annual economic losses of more than 1 billion dollars in the United States. Transgenic maize expressing insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used for the management of WCR. However, cultivation of Bt-expressing maize places intense selection pressure on pest populations to evolve resistance. Instances of resistance to Bt toxins have been reported in WCR. Developing genetic markers for resistance will help in characterizing the extent of existing issues, predicting where future field failures may occur, improving insect resistance management strategies, and in designing and sustainably implementing forthcoming WCR control products. Here, we discover and validate genetic markers in WCR that are associated with resistance to the Cry3Bb1 Bt toxin. A field-derived WCR population known to be resistant to the Cry3Bb1 Bt toxin was used to generate a genetic map and to identify a genomic region associated with Cry3Bb1 resistance. Our results indicate that resistance is inherited in a nearly recessive manner and associated with a single autosomal linkage group. Markers tightly linked with resistance were validated using WCR populations collected from Cry3Bb1 maize fields showing significant WCR damage from across the US Corn Belt. Two markers were found to be correlated with both diet (R2 = 0.14) and plant (R2 = 0.23) bioassays for resistance. These results will assist in assessing resistance risk for different WCR populations, and can be used to improve insect resistance management strategies. PMID:25566794

  7. Genetic Markers for Western Corn Rootworm Resistance to Bt Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Flagel, Lex E.; Swarup, Shilpa; Chen, Mao; Bauer, Christopher; Wanjugi, Humphrey; Carroll, Matthew; Hill, Patrick; Tuscan, Meghan; Bansal, Raman; Flannagan, Ronald; Clark, Thomas L.; Michel, Andrew P.; Head, Graham P.; Goldman, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    Western corn rootworm (WCR) is a major maize (Zea mays L.) pest leading to annual economic losses of more than 1 billion dollars in the United States. Transgenic maize expressing insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used for the management of WCR. However, cultivation of Bt-expressing maize places intense selection pressure on pest populations to evolve resistance. Instances of resistance to Bt toxins have been reported in WCR. Developing genetic markers for resistance will help in characterizing the extent of existing issues, predicting where future field failures may occur, improving insect resistance management strategies, and in designing and sustainably implementing forthcoming WCR control products. Here, we discover and validate genetic markers in WCR that are associated with resistance to the Cry3Bb1 Bt toxin. A field-derived WCR population known to be resistant to the Cry3Bb1 Bt toxin was used to generate a genetic map and to identify a genomic region associated with Cry3Bb1 resistance. Our results indicate that resistance is inherited in a nearly recessive manner and associated with a single autosomal linkage group. Markers tightly linked with resistance were validated using WCR populations collected from Cry3Bb1 maize fields showing significant WCR damage from across the US Corn Belt. Two markers were found to be correlated with both diet (R2 = 0.14) and plant (R2 = 0.23) bioassays for resistance. These results will assist in assessing resistance risk for different WCR populations, and can be used to improve insect resistance management strategies. PMID:25566794

  8. Development of public immortal mapping populations, molecular markers and linkage maps for rapid cycling Brassica rapa and B. oleracea.

    PubMed

    Iniguez-Luy, Federico Luis; Lukens, Lewis; Farnham, Mark W; Amasino, Richard M; Osborn, Thomas C

    2009-12-01

    Publicly available genomic tools help researchers integrate information and make new discoveries. In this paper, we describe the development of immortal mapping populations of rapid cycling, self-compatible lines, molecular markers, and linkage maps for Brassica rapa and B. oleracea and make the data and germplasm available to the Brassica research community. The B. rapa population consists of 160 recombinant inbred (RI) lines derived from the cross of highly inbred lines of rapid cycling and yellow sarson B. rapa. The B. oleracea population consists of 155 double haploid (DH) lines derived from an F1 cross between two DH lines, rapid cycling and broccoli. A total of 120 RFLP probes, 146 SSR markers, and one phenotypic trait (flower color) were used to construct genetic linkage maps for both species. The B. rapa map consists of 224 molecular markers distributed along 10 linkage groups (A1-A10) with a total distance of 1125.3 cM and a marker density of 5.7 cM/marker. The B. oleracea genetic map consists of 279 molecular markers and one phenotypic marker distributed along nine linkage groups (C1-C9) with a total distance of 891.4 cM and a marker density of 3.2 cM/marker. A syntenic analysis with Arabidopsis thaliana identified collinear genomic blocks that are in agreement with previous studies, reinforcing the idea of conserved chromosomal regions across the Brassicaceae.

  9. Genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae) using inter simple sequence repeats markers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Shi, Juan; Luo, You-Qing; Sun, Shuang-Yan; Pu, Min

    2013-01-01

    This study provides the first genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lymantriadispar), one of the most recognized pests of forests and ornamental trees in the world. We assessed genetic diversity and structure in eight geographic populations of gypsy moths from China using five polymorphic Inter simple sequence repeat markers, which produced reproducible banding patterns. We observed 102 polymorphic loci across the 176 individuals sampled. Overall genetic diversity (Nei's, H) was 0.2357, while the mean genetic diversity within geographic populations was 0.1845 ± 0.0150. The observed genetic distance among the eight populations ranged from 0.0432 to 0.1034. Clustering analysis (using an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean and multidimensional scaling), revealed strong concordance between the strength of genetic relationships among populations and their geographic proximity. Analysis of molecular variance demonstrated that 25.43% of the total variability (F ST = 0.2543, P < 0.001) was attributable to variation among geographic populations. The results of our analyses investigating the degree of polymorphism, genetic diversity (Nei's and Shannon) and genetic structure, suggest that individuals from Hebei may be better able to adapt to different environments and to disperse to new habitats. This study provides crucial genetic information needed to assess the distribution and population dynamics of this important pest species of global concern. PMID:23951339

  10. Genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae) using inter simple sequence repeats markers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Shi, Juan; Luo, You-Qing; Sun, Shuang-Yan; Pu, Min

    2013-01-01

    This study provides the first genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lymantriadispar), one of the most recognized pests of forests and ornamental trees in the world. We assessed genetic diversity and structure in eight geographic populations of gypsy moths from China using five polymorphic Inter simple sequence repeat markers, which produced reproducible banding patterns. We observed 102 polymorphic loci across the 176 individuals sampled. Overall genetic diversity (Nei's, H) was 0.2357, while the mean genetic diversity within geographic populations was 0.1845 ± 0.0150. The observed genetic distance among the eight populations ranged from 0.0432 to 0.1034. Clustering analysis (using an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean and multidimensional scaling), revealed strong concordance between the strength of genetic relationships among populations and their geographic proximity. Analysis of molecular variance demonstrated that 25.43% of the total variability (F ST = 0.2543, P < 0.001) was attributable to variation among geographic populations. The results of our analyses investigating the degree of polymorphism, genetic diversity (Nei's and Shannon) and genetic structure, suggest that individuals from Hebei may be better able to adapt to different environments and to disperse to new habitats. This study provides crucial genetic information needed to assess the distribution and population dynamics of this important pest species of global concern.

  11. Genetic traceability of black pig meats using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Don; Song, Ki-Duk; Seo, Joo-Hee; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Seo, Kang-Seok; Lim, Hyun-Tae; Lee, Jae-Bong; Park, Hwa-Chun; Ryu, Youn-Chul; Kang, Min-Soo; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Eui-Soo; Choe, Ho-Sung; Kong, Hong-Sik; Lee, Hak-Kyo

    2014-07-01

    Pork from Jeju black pig (population J) and Berkshire (population B) has a unique market share in Korea because of their high meat quality. Due to the high demand of this pork, traceability of the pork to its origin is becoming an important part of the consumer demand. To examine the feasibility of such a system, we aim to provide basic genetic information of the two black pig populations and assess the possibility of genetically distinguishing between the two breeds. Muscle samples were collected from slaughter houses in Jeju Island and Namwon, Chonbuk province, Korea, for populations J and B, respectively. In total 800 Jeju black pigs and 351 Berkshires were genotyped at thirteen microsatellite (MS) markers. Analyses on the genetic diversity of the two populations were carried out in the programs MS toolkit and FSTAT. The population structure of the two breeds was determined by a Bayesian clustering method implemented in structure and by a phylogenetic analysis in Phylip. Population J exhibited higher mean number of alleles, expected heterozygosity and observed heterozygosity value, and polymorphism information content, compared to population B. The FIS values of population J and population B were 0.03 and -0.005, respectively, indicating that little or no inbreeding has occurred. In addition, genetic structure analysis revealed the possibility of gene flow from population B to population J. The expected probability of identify value of the 13 MS markers was 9.87×10(-14) in population J, 3.17×10(-9) in population B, and 1.03×10(-12) in the two populations. The results of this study are useful in distinguishing between the two black pig breeds and can be used as a foundation for further development of DNA markers. PMID:25050032

  12. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1990-10-01

    The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of the small aquarium fish, Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes), as a predictor of potential genotoxicity following exposure to carcinogens. This will be accomplished by quantitatively investigating the early molecular events associated with genotoxicity of various tissues of Medaka subsequent to exposure of the organism to several known carcinogens, such as diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Because of the often long latent period between initial contact with certain chemical and physical agents in our environment and subsequent expression of deleterious health or ecological impact, the development of sensitive methods for detecting and estimating early exposure is needed so that necessary interventions can ensue. A promising biological endpoint for detecting early exposure to damaging chemicals is the interaction of these compounds with cellular macromolecules such as Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA). This biological endpoint assumes significance because it can be one of the critical early events leading eventually to adverse effects (neoplasia) in the exposed organism.

  13. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  14. Acceleration of peanut breeding programs by molecular marker assisted selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut breeding has played a significant role in yield increases and disease control. Conventional breeding focuses on field selection and phenotypic analysis and it typically takes 12-15 years before a new cultivar can be released. Molecular markers developed from sequencing data can be of great ...

  15. Association of Wegener's granulomatosis with HLA antigens and other genetic markers.

    PubMed Central

    Papiha, S S; Murty, G E; Ad'Hia, A; Mains, B T; Venning, M

    1992-01-01

    The frequencies of the HLA-A, B, C, DR, DQ antigens and of several other genetic markers in biopsy proved and well characterised patients with Wegener's granulomatosis were compared with control frequencies of the region. A highly significant increase in HLA-DR1 was found. The percentage combined frequency of DR1-DQw1 was significantly higher in patients than in the controls. Interestingly, association with the red cell enzyme GLOI and complement locus C4B was also seen. As both of these markers are either linked or within the major histocompatibility complex region (MHC) this is further evidence for the involvement of chromosome 6 in the pathogenesis of Wegener's granulomatosis. To understand the pathology of the disease fully molecular genetic studies of the MHC region are warranted. PMID:1550412

  16. Genetic diversity analysis in Tunisian perennial ryegrass germplasm as estimated by RAPD, ISSR, and morpho-agronomical markers.

    PubMed

    Ghariani, S; Elazreg, H; Chtourou-Ghorbel, N; Chakroun, M; Trifi-Farah, N

    2015-01-01

    Tunisia is rich in diverse forage and pasture species including perennial ryegrass. In order to enhance forage production and improve agronomic performance of this local germplasm, a molecular analysis was undertaken. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and morpho-agronomical traits markers were used for genetic diversity estimation of ryegrass germplasm after screening 20 spontaneous accessions, including a local and an introduced cultivars. Same mean polymorphism information content values were obtained (0.37) for RAPD and ISSR suggesting that both marker systems were equally effective in determining polymorphisms. The average pairwise genetic distance values were 0.57 (morpho-agronomical traits), 0.68 (RAPD), and 0.51 (ISSR) markers data sets. A higher Shannon diversity index was obtained with ISSR marker (0.57) than for RAPD (0.54) and morpho-agronomical traits (0.36). The Mantel test based on genetic distances of a combination of molecular markers and morpho-agronomical data exhibited a significant correlation between RAPD and ISSR data, suggesting that the use of a combination of molecular techniques was a highly efficient method of estimating genetic variability levels among Tunisian ryegrass germplasm. In summary, results showed that combining molecular and morpho-agronomical markers is an efficient way in assessing the genetic variability among Tunisian ryegrass genotypes. In addition, the combined analysis provided an exhaustive coverage for the analyzed diversity and helped us to identify suitable accessions showed by Beja and Jendouba localities, which present large similarities with cultivated forms and can be exploited for designing breeding programmes, conservation of germplasm and management of ryegrass genetic resources. PMID:26782500

  17. Genetic diversity analysis in Tunisian perennial ryegrass germplasm as estimated by RAPD, ISSR, and morpho-agronomical markers.

    PubMed

    Ghariani, S; Elazreg, H; Chtourou-Ghorbel, N; Chakroun, M; Trifi-Farah, N

    2015-12-28

    Tunisia is rich in diverse forage and pasture species including perennial ryegrass. In order to enhance forage production and improve agronomic performance of this local germplasm, a molecular analysis was undertaken. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and morpho-agronomical traits markers were used for genetic diversity estimation of ryegrass germplasm after screening 20 spontaneous accessions, including a local and an introduced cultivars. Same mean polymorphism information content values were obtained (0.37) for RAPD and ISSR suggesting that both marker systems were equally effective in determining polymorphisms. The average pairwise genetic distance values were 0.57 (morpho-agronomical traits), 0.68 (RAPD), and 0.51 (ISSR) markers data sets. A higher Shannon diversity index was obtained with ISSR marker (0.57) than for RAPD (0.54) and morpho-agronomical traits (0.36). The Mantel test based on genetic distances of a combination of molecular markers and morpho-agronomical data exhibited a significant correlation between RAPD and ISSR data, suggesting that the use of a combination of molecular techniques was a highly efficient method of estimating genetic variability levels among Tunisian ryegrass germplasm. In summary, results showed that combining molecular and morpho-agronomical markers is an efficient way in assessing the genetic variability among Tunisian ryegrass genotypes. In addition, the combined analysis provided an exhaustive coverage for the analyzed diversity and helped us to identify suitable accessions showed by Beja and Jendouba localities, which present large similarities with cultivated forms and can be exploited for designing breeding programmes, conservation of germplasm and management of ryegrass genetic resources.

  18. Identification of RAPD markers and their use for molecular mapping in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Cheghamirza, Kianoosh; Koveza, Oksana; Konovalov, Fedor; Gostimsky, Sergei

    2002-01-01

    The RAPD method (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) was used for identifying and mapping new molecular markers in pea. RAPD analysis of various cultivars and lines of pea was carried out using 10-mer random primers. The presence of multiple polymorphism between cultivars and lines was revealed; at least one fragment for any given primer was present in the DNA of one form of pea and absent in the DNA of another line or cultivar. To detect molecular markers linked to the genes of chi-15, xa-18 and also to the 12 morphological markers of the L-1238 line, the F2 populations (Chi-15 ? L-1238), (Vio ? L-1238), (Xa-18 ? L-1238), (L-111 ? Chi-15) and (L-84 ? Xa-18) were studied via bulked segregant analysis. DNA molecular analysis of F1 hybrids revealed the presence of parental polymorphic fragments in all of the populations. The study of the F2 plants showed that the obtained fragments are inherited as Mendelian factors. 13 RAPD-markers linked to genes of A/a (flower color), I/i (seed color), Gp/gp (pod color), R/r (seed form), S/s (seeds linkage), and also to genes of Chi-15/chi-15 (leaf color) and Xa-18/xa-18 (leaf color) were discovered. The study of individual plant DNA from the F2 populations allowed us to determine the genetic distances between genes and the RAPD markers linked to them.

  19. Using microsatellite DNA markers to determine the genetic identity of parental clones used in the Louisiana sugarcane breeding program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane propagates asexually through vegetative cuttings. To validate the genetic identity of sugarcane clones during shipping and handling, we produced molecular fingerprints based on 21 microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers for 116 Louisiana parental clones that were included in the crossing program...

  20. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiations and Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Howard B.

    1999-06-01

    The major goal of the research project is to define the role of HRAD9 in the response of cells to radiation or chemical exposure, and to establish this gene as a genetic marker to predict predisposition to the deleterious health effects that may result after exposure to these agents. HRAD9 is a human homologue of fission yeast S. pombe rad9, a gene known to promote radioresistance and chemoresistance, and to regulate cell cycle progression after DNA is damaged or DNA replication is incomplete -i.e., it mediates cell cycle checkpoint control. Therefore, HRAD9 likely plays an important role in humans to determine the biological consequences of DNA damage.

  1. Transcriptome Analysis and Development of SSR Molecular Markers in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaling; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Meiling; Hou, Junling; Qing, Mei; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Licorice is an important traditional Chinese medicine with clinical and industrial applications. Genetic resources of licorice are insufficient for analysis of molecular biology and genetic functions; as such, transcriptome sequencing must be conducted for functional characterization and development of molecular markers. In this study, transcriptome sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencing platform generated a total of 5.41 Gb clean data. De novo assembly yielded a total of 46,641 unigenes. Comparison analysis using BLAST showed that the annotations of 29,614 unigenes were conserved. Further study revealed 773 genes related to biosynthesis of secondary metabolites of licorice, 40 genes involved in biosynthesis of the terpenoid backbone, and 16 genes associated with biosynthesis of glycyrrhizic acid. Analysis of unigenes larger than 1 Kb with a length of 11,702 nt presented 7,032 simple sequence repeats (SSR). Sixty-four of 69 randomly designed and synthesized SSR pairs were successfully amplified, 33 pairs of primers were polymorphism in in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., Glycyrrhiza inflata Bat., Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza pallidiflora Maxim. This study not only presents the molecular biology data of licorice but also provides a basis for genetic diversity research and molecular marker-assisted breeding of licorice. PMID:26571372

  2. Transcriptome Analysis and Development of SSR Molecular Markers in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaling; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Meiling; Hou, Junling; Qing, Mei; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Licorice is an important traditional Chinese medicine with clinical and industrial applications. Genetic resources of licorice are insufficient for analysis of molecular biology and genetic functions; as such, transcriptome sequencing must be conducted for functional characterization and development of molecular markers. In this study, transcriptome sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencing platform generated a total of 5.41 Gb clean data. De novo assembly yielded a total of 46,641 unigenes. Comparison analysis using BLAST showed that the annotations of 29,614 unigenes were conserved. Further study revealed 773 genes related to biosynthesis of secondary metabolites of licorice, 40 genes involved in biosynthesis of the terpenoid backbone, and 16 genes associated with biosynthesis of glycyrrhizic acid. Analysis of unigenes larger than 1 Kb with a length of 11,702 nt presented 7,032 simple sequence repeats (SSR). Sixty-four of 69 randomly designed and synthesized SSR pairs were successfully amplified, 33 pairs of primers were polymorphism in in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., Glycyrrhiza inflata Bat., Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza pallidiflora Maxim. This study not only presents the molecular biology data of licorice but also provides a basis for genetic diversity research and molecular marker-assisted breeding of licorice.

  3. A comparison of single-sample estimators of effective population sizes from genetic marker data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang

    2016-10-01

    In molecular ecology and conservation genetics studies, the important parameter of effective population size (Ne ) is increasingly estimated from a single sample of individuals taken at random from a population and genotyped at a number of marker loci. Several estimators are developed, based on the information of linkage disequilibrium (LD), heterozygote excess (HE), molecular coancestry (MC) and sibship frequency (SF) in marker data. The most popular is the LD estimator, because it is more accurate than HE and MC estimators and is simpler to calculate than SF estimator. However, little is known about the accuracy of LD estimator relative to that of SF and about the robustness of all single-sample estimators when some simplifying assumptions (e.g. random mating, no linkage, no genotyping errors) are violated. This study fills the gaps and uses extensive simulations to compare the biases and accuracies of the four estimators for different population properties (e.g. bottlenecks, nonrandom mating, haplodiploid), marker properties (e.g. linkage, polymorphisms) and sample properties (e.g. numbers of individuals and markers) and to compare the robustness of the four estimators when marker data are imperfect (with allelic dropouts). Extensive simulations show that SF estimator is more accurate, has a much wider application scope (e.g. suitable to nonrandom mating such as selfing, haplodiploid species, dominant markers) and is more robust (e.g. to the presence of linkage and genotyping errors of markers) than the other estimators. An empirical data set from a Yellowstone grizzly bear population was analysed to demonstrate the use of the SF estimator in practice.

  4. A comparison of single-sample estimators of effective population sizes from genetic marker data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang

    2016-10-01

    In molecular ecology and conservation genetics studies, the important parameter of effective population size (Ne ) is increasingly estimated from a single sample of individuals taken at random from a population and genotyped at a number of marker loci. Several estimators are developed, based on the information of linkage disequilibrium (LD), heterozygote excess (HE), molecular coancestry (MC) and sibship frequency (SF) in marker data. The most popular is the LD estimator, because it is more accurate than HE and MC estimators and is simpler to calculate than SF estimator. However, little is known about the accuracy of LD estimator relative to that of SF and about the robustness of all single-sample estimators when some simplifying assumptions (e.g. random mating, no linkage, no genotyping errors) are violated. This study fills the gaps and uses extensive simulations to compare the biases and accuracies of the four estimators for different population properties (e.g. bottlenecks, nonrandom mating, haplodiploid), marker properties (e.g. linkage, polymorphisms) and sample properties (e.g. numbers of individuals and markers) and to compare the robustness of the four estimators when marker data are imperfect (with allelic dropouts). Extensive simulations show that SF estimator is more accurate, has a much wider application scope (e.g. suitable to nonrandom mating such as selfing, haplodiploid species, dominant markers) and is more robust (e.g. to the presence of linkage and genotyping errors of markers) than the other estimators. An empirical data set from a Yellowstone grizzly bear population was analysed to demonstrate the use of the SF estimator in practice. PMID:27288989

  5. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-08-19

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients.

  6. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients. PMID:26345916

  7. Application of resistance gene analog markers to analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juansheng; Yu, Yuchao; Gao, Fangyuan; Zeng, Lihua; Lu, Xianjun; Wu, Xianting; Yan, Wengui; Ren, Guangjun

    2013-07-01

    Plant disease resistance gene analog (RGA) markers were designed according to the conserved sequence of known RGAs and used to map resistance genes. We used genome-wide RGA markers for genetic analyses of structure and diversity in a global rice germplasm collection. Of the 472 RGA markers, 138 were polymorphic and these were applied to 178 entries selected from the USDA rice core collection. Results from the RGA markers were similar between two methods, UPGMA and STRUCTURE. Additionally, the results from RGA markers in our study were agreeable with those previously reported from SSR markers, including cluster of ancestral classification, genetic diversity estimates, genetic relatedness, and cluster of geographic origins. These results suggest that RGA markers are applicable for analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice. However, unlike SSR markers, the RGA markers failed to differentiate temperate japonica, tropical japonica, and aromatic subgroups. The restricted way for developing RGA markers from the cDNA sequence might limit the polymorphism of RGA markers in the genome, thus limiting the discriminatory power in comparison with SSR markers. Genetic differentiation obtained using RGA markers may be useful for defining genetic diversity of a suite of random R genes in plants, as many studies show a differentiation of resistance to a wide array of pathogens. They could also help to characterize the genetic structure and geographic distribution in crops, including rice, wheat, barley, and banana.

  8. Application of resistance gene analog markers to analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juansheng; Yu, Yuchao; Gao, Fangyuan; Zeng, Lihua; Lu, Xianjun; Wu, Xianting; Yan, Wengui; Ren, Guangjun

    2013-07-01

    Plant disease resistance gene analog (RGA) markers were designed according to the conserved sequence of known RGAs and used to map resistance genes. We used genome-wide RGA markers for genetic analyses of structure and diversity in a global rice germplasm collection. Of the 472 RGA markers, 138 were polymorphic and these were applied to 178 entries selected from the USDA rice core collection. Results from the RGA markers were similar between two methods, UPGMA and STRUCTURE. Additionally, the results from RGA markers in our study were agreeable with those previously reported from SSR markers, including cluster of ancestral classification, genetic diversity estimates, genetic relatedness, and cluster of geographic origins. These results suggest that RGA markers are applicable for analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice. However, unlike SSR markers, the RGA markers failed to differentiate temperate japonica, tropical japonica, and aromatic subgroups. The restricted way for developing RGA markers from the cDNA sequence might limit the polymorphism of RGA markers in the genome, thus limiting the discriminatory power in comparison with SSR markers. Genetic differentiation obtained using RGA markers may be useful for defining genetic diversity of a suite of random R genes in plants, as many studies show a differentiation of resistance to a wide array of pathogens. They could also help to characterize the genetic structure and geographic distribution in crops, including rice, wheat, barley, and banana. PMID:24099390

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of molecular markers during local adaptation: a case study in Drosophila subobscura

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Natural selection and genetic drift are major forces responsible for temporal genetic changes in populations. Furthermore, these evolutionary forces may interact with each other. Here we study the impact of an ongoing adaptive process at the molecular genetic level by analyzing the temporal genetic changes throughout 40 generations of adaptation to a common laboratory environment. Specifically, genetic variability, population differentiation and demographic structure were compared in two replicated groups of Drosophila subobscura populations recently sampled from different wild sources. Results We found evidence for a decline in genetic variability through time, along with an increase in genetic differentiation between all populations studied. The observed decline in genetic variability was higher during the first 14 generations of laboratory adaptation. The two groups of replicated populations showed overall similarity in variability patterns. Our results also revealed changing demographic structure of the populations during laboratory evolution, with lower effective population sizes in the early phase of the adaptive process. One of the ten microsatellites analyzed showed a clearly distinct temporal pattern of allele frequency change, suggesting the occurrence of positive selection affecting the region around that particular locus. Conclusion Genetic drift was responsible for most of the divergence and loss of variability between and within replicates, with most changes occurring during the first generations of laboratory adaptation. We also found evidence suggesting a selective sweep, despite the low number of molecular markers analyzed. Overall, there was a similarity of evolutionary dynamics at the molecular level in our laboratory populations, despite distinct genetic backgrounds and some differences in phenotypic evolution. PMID:18302790

  10. Genetic diversity analysis of Tibetan wild barley using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zong-Yun; Liu, Xian-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Zheng; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2006-10-01

    One hundred and six accessions of wild barley collected from Tibet, China, including 50 entries of the two-rowed wild barley Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum (HS), 29 entries of the six-rowed wild barley Hordeum vulgare ssp. agriocrithon (HA), and 27 entries of the six-rowed wild barley Hordeum vulgare ssp. agriocrithon var. lagunculiforme (HL), were analyzed using 30 SSR markers selected from the seven barley linkage groups for studying genetic diversity and evolutionary relationship of the three subspecies of Tibetan wild barley to cultivated barley in China. Over the 30 genetic loci that were studied, 229 alleles were identified among the 106 accessions, of which 70 were common alleles. H. vulgare ssp. spontaneum possesses about thrice more private alleles (2.83 alleles/locus) than HS (0.93 alleles/locus), whereas almost no private alleles were detected in HL. The genetic diversity among-subspecies is much higher than that within-subspecies. Generally, the genetic diversity among the three subspecies is of the order HS > HL > HA. Phylogenetic analysis of the 106 accessions showed that all the accessions of HS and HA was clustered in their own groups, whereas the 27 accessions of HL were separated into two groups (14 entries with group HS and the rest with group HA). This indicated that HL was an intermediate form between HS and HA. Based on this study and previous works, we suggested that Chinese cultivated barley might evolve from HS via HL to HA. PMID:17046592

  11. [Molecular Genetics as Best Evidence in Glioma Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Komori, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    The development of a genomic landscape of gliomas has led to the internally consistent, molecularly-based classifiers. However, development of a biologically insightful classification to guide therapy is still ongoing. Further, tumors are heterogeneous, and they change and adapt in response to drugs. The challenge of developing molecular classifiers that provide meaningful ways to stratify patients for therapy remains a major challenge for the field. Therefore, by incorporating molecular markers into the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system, the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria will be replaced by a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis", to define tumor entities as narrowly as possible. We herein review the current status of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on IDH mutation, ATRX mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, and TERT promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as BRAF and H3F3A aberrations in pediatric gliomas, the combination of which will be a promising endeavor to render molecular genetics as a best evidence in the glioma diagnositics. PMID:27001774

  12. Molecular markers in oral lichen planus: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sagari, Shitalkumar; Sanadhya, Sudhanshu; Doddamani, Mallikarjun; Rajput, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory mucosal disease that is usually detected in 0.5–2.2% of the human population. Among these, only 0.5–2.9% of the lesions progress to carcinoma. However, there are no prognostic markers available presently to recognize the increased risk in malignant transformation of the lesions. Selected markers for cell proliferation, adhesion, apoptosis and lymphocytic infiltration were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in addition to static cytometry for DNA content. The concept linking OLP and oral squamous cell carcinoma states that chronic inflammation results in crucial DNA damage, which further progresses to development of carcinoma. Even though in the past decade, enormous information has been accumulated on malignant potential of OLP, its transformation still remains unclear. Hence, the purpose of this article was to review cellular and molecular markers to understand the pathogenesis of OLP and its progression toward malignancy. PMID:27194873

  13. Molecular cladistic markers in New World monkey phylogeny (Platyrrhini, Primates).

    PubMed

    Singer, Silke S; Schmitz, Jürgen; Schwiegk, Claudia; Zischler, Hans

    2003-03-01

    Transpositions of primate-specific Alu elements were applied as molecular cladistic markers in a phylogenetic analysis of South American primates. Seventy-four human and platyrrhine loci containing intronic Alu elements were PCR screened in various New World monkeys and the human outgroup to detect the presence of orthologous retrotransposons informative of New World monkey phylogeny. Six loci revealed size polymorphism in the amplification pattern, indicating a shared derived character state due to the presence of orthologous Alu elements confirmed by subsequent sequencing. Three markers corroborate (1) New World monkey monophyly and one marker supports each of the following callitrichine relationships: (2) Callithrix and Cebuella are more closely related to each other than to any other callitrichine, (3) the callitrichines form a monophyletic clade including Callimico, and (4) the next living relatives to the callitrichines are Cebus, Saimiri, and Aotus.

  14. Genetic relationship of Curcuma species from Northeast India using PCR-based markers.

    PubMed

    Das, Archana; Kesari, Vigya; Satyanarayana, Vinod M; Parida, Ajay; Rangan, Latha

    2011-09-01

    Molecular genetic fingerprints of nine Curcuma species from Northeast India were developed using PCR-based markers. The aim involves elucidating there intra- and inter-specific genetic diversity important for utilization, management, and conservation. Twelve random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), 19 Inter simple sequence repeats (ISSRs), and four amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) primers produced 266 polymorphic fragments. ISSR confirmed maximum polymorphism of 98.55% whereas RAPD and AFLP showed 93.22 and 97.27%, respectively. Marker index and polymorphic information content varied in the range of 8.64-48.1, 19.75-48.14, and 25-28 and 0.17-0.48, 0.19-0.48, and 0.25-0.29 for RAPD, ISSR, and AFLP markers, respectively. The average value of number of observed alleles, number of effective alleles, mean Nei's gene diversity, and Shannon's information index were 1.93-1.98, 1.37-1.62, 0.23-0.36, and 0.38-0.50, respectively, for three DNA markers used. Dendrograms based on three molecular data using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) was congruent and classified the Curcuma species into two major clusters. Cophenetic correlation coefficient between dendrogram and original similarity matrix were significant for RAPD (r = 0.96), ISSR (r = 0.94), and AFLP (r = 0.97). Clustering was further supported by principle coordinate analysis. High genetic polymorphism documented is significant for conservation and further improvement of Curcuma species.

  15. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  16. Review: domestic animal forensic genetics - biological evidence, genetic markers, analytical approaches and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kanthaswamy, S

    2015-10-01

    This review highlights the importance of domestic animal genetic evidence sources, genetic testing, markers and analytical approaches as well as the challenges this field is facing in view of the de facto 'gold standard' human DNA identification. Because of the genetic similarity between humans and domestic animals, genetic analysis of domestic animal hair, saliva, urine, blood and other biological material has generated vital investigative leads that have been admitted into a variety of court proceedings, including criminal and civil litigation. Information on validated short tandem repeat, single nucleotide polymorphism and mitochondrial DNA markers and public access to genetic databases for forensic DNA analysis is becoming readily available. Although the fundamental aspects of animal forensic genetic testing may be reliable and acceptable, animal forensic testing still lacks the standardized testing protocols that human genetic profiling requires, probably because of the absence of monetary support from government agencies and the difficulty in promoting cooperation among competing laboratories. Moreover, there is a lack in consensus about how to best present the results and expert opinion to comply with court standards and bear judicial scrutiny. This has been the single most persistent challenge ever since the earliest use of domestic animal forensic genetic testing in a criminal case in the mid-1990s. Crime laboratory accreditation ensures that genetic test results have the courts' confidence. Because accreditation requires significant commitments of effort, time and resources, the vast majority of animal forensic genetic laboratories are not accredited nor are their analysts certified forensic examiners. The relevance of domestic animal forensic genetics in the criminal justice system is undeniable. However, further improvements are needed in a wide range of supporting resources, including standardized quality assurance and control protocols for sample

  17. Review: domestic animal forensic genetics - biological evidence, genetic markers, analytical approaches and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kanthaswamy, S

    2015-10-01

    This review highlights the importance of domestic animal genetic evidence sources, genetic testing, markers and analytical approaches as well as the challenges this field is facing in view of the de facto 'gold standard' human DNA identification. Because of the genetic similarity between humans and domestic animals, genetic analysis of domestic animal hair, saliva, urine, blood and other biological material has generated vital investigative leads that have been admitted into a variety of court proceedings, including criminal and civil litigation. Information on validated short tandem repeat, single nucleotide polymorphism and mitochondrial DNA markers and public access to genetic databases for forensic DNA analysis is becoming readily available. Although the fundamental aspects of animal forensic genetic testing may be reliable and acceptable, animal forensic testing still lacks the standardized testing protocols that human genetic profiling requires, probably because of the absence of monetary support from government agencies and the difficulty in promoting cooperation among competing laboratories. Moreover, there is a lack in consensus about how to best present the results and expert opinion to comply with court standards and bear judicial scrutiny. This has been the single most persistent challenge ever since the earliest use of domestic animal forensic genetic testing in a criminal case in the mid-1990s. Crime laboratory accreditation ensures that genetic test results have the courts' confidence. Because accreditation requires significant commitments of effort, time and resources, the vast majority of animal forensic genetic laboratories are not accredited nor are their analysts certified forensic examiners. The relevance of domestic animal forensic genetics in the criminal justice system is undeniable. However, further improvements are needed in a wide range of supporting resources, including standardized quality assurance and control protocols for sample

  18. Genetic and Molecular Ecotoxicology: A Research Framework

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Susan; Sadinski, Walter; Shugart, Lee; Brussard, Peter; Depledge, Michael; Ford, Tim; Hose, JoEllen; Stegeman, John; Suk, William; Wirgin, Isaac; Wogan, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Participants at the Napa Conference on Genetic and Molecular Ecotoxicology assessed the status of this field in light of heightened concerns about the genetic effects of exposure to hazardous substances and recent advancements in our capabilities to measure those effects. We present here a synthesis of the ideas discussed throughout the conference, including definitions of important concepts in the field and critical research needs and opportunities. While there were many opinions expressed on these topics, there was general agreement that there are substantive new opportunities to improve the impact of genetic and molecular ecotoxicology on prediction of sublethal effects of exposure to hazardous substances. Future studies should emphasize integration of genetic ecotoxicology, ecological genetics, and molecular biology and should be directed toward improving our understanding of the ecological implications of genotoxic responses. Ecological implications may be assessed at either the population or ecosystem level; however, a population-level focus may be most pragmatic. Recent technical advancements in measuring genetic and molecular responses to toxicant exposure will spur rapid progress. These new techniques have considerable promise for increasing our understanding of both mechanisms of toxicity on genes or gene products and the relevance of detrimental effects to individual fitness. — Environ Health Perspect 102(Suppl 12):3–8 (1994) PMID:7713030

  19. Molecular characterization of tree peony germplasm using sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao Yan; Wang, Liang Sheng; Shu, Qing Yan; Liu, Zheng An; Xu, Su Xia; Tetsumura, Takuya

    2008-04-01

    This study examined 63 tree peony specimens, consisting of 3 wild species and 63 cultivars, using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers for the purpose of detecting genomic polymorphisms. Bulk DNA samples from each specimen were evaluated with 23 SRAP primer pairs. Among the 296 different amplicons, 262 were polymorphic. The maximum parsimony, neighbor-joining, and unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic average trees were largely in congruence. In the three trees, the wild species Paeonia ludlowii and P. delavayi formed separate clusters with strong bootstrap support, and P. ostii was closely related to all cultivars. The cultivars were divided into groups with various corresponding bootstrap values. The genetic similarity among the genotypes ranged from 0.02 to 0.73. These results demonstrate that SRAP markers are effective in detecting genomic polymorphisms in the tree peony and should be useful for linkage map construction and molecular marker assisted selection breeding.

  20. Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical management in cancer patients, assisting in diagnostic, staging, evaluation of therapeutic response, detection of recurrence and metastasis, and development of new treatment modalities. In this context, this review aims to discuss the main tumor markers in breast carcinogenesis. The most well-established breast molecular markers with prognostic and/or therapeutic value like hormone receptors, HER-2 oncogene, Ki-67, and p53 proteins, and the genes for hereditary breast cancer will be presented. Furthermore, this review shows the new molecular targets in breast cancer: CXCR4, caveolin, miRNA, and FOXP3, as promising candidates for future development of effective and targeted therapies, also with lower toxicity. PMID:24591761

  1. Molecular marker development from transcript sequences and germplasm evaluation for cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Peng, Ze; Gallo, Maria; Tillman, Barry L; Rowland, Diane; Wang, Jianping

    2016-02-01

    Molecular markers are important tools for genotyping in genetic studies and molecular breeding. The SSR and SNP are two commonly used marker systems developed from genomic or transcript sequences. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assemble and annotate the publicly available ESTs in Arachis and the in-house short reads, (2) develop and validate SSR and SNP markers, and (3) investigate the genetic diversity and population structure of the peanut breeding lines and the U.S. peanut mini core collection using developed SSR markers. An NCBI EST dataset with 252,951 sequences and an in-house 454 RNAseq dataset with 288,701 sequences were assembled separately after trimming. Transcript sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis suggested that peanut is closer to cowpea and scarlet bean than to soybean, common bean and Medicago. From these two datasets, 6455 novel SSRs and 11,902 SNPs were identified. Of the discovered SSRs, 380 representing various SSR types were selected for PCR validation. The amplification rate was 89.2 %. Twenty-two (6.5 %) SSRs were polymorphic between at least one pair of four genotypes. Sanger sequencing of PCR products targeting 110 SNPs revealed 13 true SNPs between tetraploid genotypes and 193 homoeologous SNPs within genotypes. Eight out of the 22 polymorphic SSR markers were selected to evaluate the genetic diversity of Florida peanut breeding lines and the U.S. peanut mini core collection. This marker set demonstrated high discrimination power by displaying an average polymorphism information content value of 0.783, a combined probability of identity of 10(-11), and a combined power of exclusion of 0.99991. The structure analysis revealed four sub-populations among the peanut accessions and lines evaluated. The results of this study enriched the peanut genomic resources, provided over 6000 novel SSR markers and the credentials for true peanut SNP marker development, and demonstrated the power of newly developed SSR markers in

  2. Molecular marker development from transcript sequences and germplasm evaluation for cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Peng, Ze; Gallo, Maria; Tillman, Barry L; Rowland, Diane; Wang, Jianping

    2016-02-01

    Molecular markers are important tools for genotyping in genetic studies and molecular breeding. The SSR and SNP are two commonly used marker systems developed from genomic or transcript sequences. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assemble and annotate the publicly available ESTs in Arachis and the in-house short reads, (2) develop and validate SSR and SNP markers, and (3) investigate the genetic diversity and population structure of the peanut breeding lines and the U.S. peanut mini core collection using developed SSR markers. An NCBI EST dataset with 252,951 sequences and an in-house 454 RNAseq dataset with 288,701 sequences were assembled separately after trimming. Transcript sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis suggested that peanut is closer to cowpea and scarlet bean than to soybean, common bean and Medicago. From these two datasets, 6455 novel SSRs and 11,902 SNPs were identified. Of the discovered SSRs, 380 representing various SSR types were selected for PCR validation. The amplification rate was 89.2 %. Twenty-two (6.5 %) SSRs were polymorphic between at least one pair of four genotypes. Sanger sequencing of PCR products targeting 110 SNPs revealed 13 true SNPs between tetraploid genotypes and 193 homoeologous SNPs within genotypes. Eight out of the 22 polymorphic SSR markers were selected to evaluate the genetic diversity of Florida peanut breeding lines and the U.S. peanut mini core collection. This marker set demonstrated high discrimination power by displaying an average polymorphism information content value of 0.783, a combined probability of identity of 10(-11), and a combined power of exclusion of 0.99991. The structure analysis revealed four sub-populations among the peanut accessions and lines evaluated. The results of this study enriched the peanut genomic resources, provided over 6000 novel SSR markers and the credentials for true peanut SNP marker development, and demonstrated the power of newly developed SSR markers in

  3. Genetic diversity of a germplasm collection of Cucurbita pepo using SRAP and AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Ferriol, M; Picó, B; Nuez, F

    2003-07-01

    Cucurbita pepo is a highly polymorphic species. The cultivars can be grouped into eight morphotypes in two subspecies, ssp. pepo and ssp. ovifera. A collection of 69 accessions representative of the morphotypes and some unclassified types was used for analysing the morphological and molecular diversity of this species. This collection includes commercial cultivars and Spanish landraces, which represent the great diversification of types that have arisen in Europe after this species arrived from America. For the molecular variability studies, two PCR-based systems were employed, AFLP and SRAP, which preferentially amplify ORFs. Principal coordinates analysis and cluster analysis using the UPGMA method clearly separate the accessions into the two subspecies through the use of both markers. However, the gene diversity and the genetic identity values among morphotypes and subspecies varied between the two marker systems. The information given by SRAP markers was more concordant to the morphological variability and to the evolutionary history of the morphotypes than that of AFLP markers. In ssp. ovifera, the accessions of the different morphotypes were basically grouped according to the fruit colour. This may indicate different times of development and also the extent of breeding in the accessions used. This study has allowed identification of new types that can be employed for the development of new cultivars. The landraces of the spp. ovifera, used as ornamental in Europe, have proved to be of great interest for preserving the diversity of C. pepo.

  4. Genetic patchiness in European eel adults evidenced by molecular genetics and population dynamics modelling.

    PubMed

    Pujolar, José Martin; Bevacqua, Daniele; Andrello, Marco; Capoccioni, Fabrizio; Ciccotti, Eleonora; De Leo, Giulio A; Zane, Lorenzo

    2011-02-01

    Disentangling the demographic processes that determine the genetic structure of a given species is a fundamental question in conservation and management. In the present study, the population structure of the European eel was examined with a multidisciplinary approach combining the fields of molecular genetics and population dynamics modelling. First, we analyzed a total of 346 adult specimens of known age collected in three separate sample sites using a large panel of 22 EST-linked microsatellite loci. Second, we developed a European eel-specific model to unravel the demographic mechanisms that can produce the level of genetic differentiation estimated by molecular markers. This is the first study that reveals a pattern of genetic patchiness in maturing adults of the European eel. A highly significant genetic differentiation was observed among samples that did not follow an Isolation-by-Distance or Isolation-by-Time pattern. The observation of genetic patchiness in adults is likely to result from a limited parental contribution to each spawning event as suggested by our modelling approach. The value of genetic differentiation found is predicted by the model when reproduction occurs in a limited number of spawning events isolated from each other in time or space, with an average of 130-375 breeders in each spawning event. Unpredictability in spawning success may have important consequences for the life-history evolution of the European eel, including a bet-hedging strategy (distributing reproductive efforts over time) which could in turn guarantee successful reproduction of some adults.

  5. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers.

  6. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers. PMID:27455559

  7. The molecular genetics of holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Erich; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-02-15

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) has captivated the imagination of Man for millennia because its most extreme manifestation, the single-eyed cyclopic newborn infant, brings to mind the fantastical creature Cyclops from Greek mythology. Attempting to understand this common malformation of the forebrain in modern medical terms requires a systematic synthesis of genetic, cytogenetic, and environmental information typical for studies of a complex disorder. However, even with the advances in our understanding of HPE in recent years, there are significant obstacles remaining to fully understand its heterogeneity and extensive variability in phenotype. General lessons learned from HPE will likely be applicable to other malformation syndromes. Here we outline the common, and rare, genetic and environmental influences on this conserved developmental program of forebrain development and illustrate the similarities and differences between these malformations in humans and those of animal models. PMID:20104595

  8. Molecular markers in prostate cancer. Part I: predicting lethality

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sachin; Dunsmuir, William D.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing the lethality of 'early,' potentially organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the central controversies in modern-day urological clinical practice. Such cases are often considered for radical 'curative' treatment, although active surveillance may be equally appropriate for many men. Moreover, the balance between judicious intervention and overtreatment can be difficult to judge. The patient's age, comorbidities, family history and philosophy of self-health care can be weighed against clinical features such as the palpability of disease, the number and percentage of biopsy cores involved with the disease, histological grade, presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and possible previous PSA kinetics. For many years, scientists and physicians have sought additional molecular factors that may be predictive for disease stage, progression and lethality. Usually, claims for a 'new' unique marker fall short of true clinical value. More often than not, such molecular markers are useful only in multivariate models. This review summarizes relevant molecular markers and models reported up to and including 2008. PMID:19050690

  9. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Corylus mandshurica in China Using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Tian-Tian; Ma, Qing-Hua; Liang, Li-Song; Wang, Gui-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Corylus mandshurica, also known as pilose hazelnut, is an economically and ecologically important species in China. In this study, ten polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were applied to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of 348 C. mandshurica individuals among 12 populations in China. The SSR markers expressed a relatively high level of genetic diversity (Na = 15.3, Ne = 5.6604, I = 1.8853, Ho = 0.6668, and He = 0.7777). According to the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.1215), genetic variation within the populations (87.85%) were remarkably higher than among populations (12.15%). The average gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) significantly impacts the genetic structure of C. mandshurica populations. The relatively high gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) among wild C. mandshurica may be caused by wind-pollinated flowers, highly nutritious seeds and self-incompatible mating system. The UPGMA (unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages) dendrogram was divided into two main clusters. Moreover, the results of STRUCTURE analysis suggested that C. mandshurica populations fell into two main clusters. Comparison of the UPGMA dendrogram and the Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed general agreement between the population subdivisions and the genetic relationships among populations of C. mandshurica. Group I accessions were located in Northeast China, while Group II accessions were in North China. It is worth noting that a number of genetically similar populations were located in the same geographic region. The results further showed that there was obvious genetic differentiation among populations from Northeast China to North China. Results from the Mantel test showed a weak but still significant positive correlation between Nei's genetic distance and geographic distance (km) among populations (r = 0.419, P = 0.005), suggesting that genetic differentiation in the 12 C. mandshurica populations might be related to geographic distance. These

  10. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Corylus mandshurica in China Using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Tian-Tian; Ma, Qing-Hua; Liang, Li-Song; Wang, Gui-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Corylus mandshurica, also known as pilose hazelnut, is an economically and ecologically important species in China. In this study, ten polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were applied to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of 348 C. mandshurica individuals among 12 populations in China. The SSR markers expressed a relatively high level of genetic diversity (Na = 15.3, Ne = 5.6604, I = 1.8853, Ho = 0.6668, and He = 0.7777). According to the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.1215), genetic variation within the populations (87.85%) were remarkably higher than among populations (12.15%). The average gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) significantly impacts the genetic structure of C. mandshurica populations. The relatively high gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) among wild C. mandshurica may be caused by wind-pollinated flowers, highly nutritious seeds and self-incompatible mating system. The UPGMA (unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages) dendrogram was divided into two main clusters. Moreover, the results of STRUCTURE analysis suggested that C. mandshurica populations fell into two main clusters. Comparison of the UPGMA dendrogram and the Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed general agreement between the population subdivisions and the genetic relationships among populations of C. mandshurica. Group I accessions were located in Northeast China, while Group II accessions were in North China. It is worth noting that a number of genetically similar populations were located in the same geographic region. The results further showed that there was obvious genetic differentiation among populations from Northeast China to North China. Results from the Mantel test showed a weak but still significant positive correlation between Nei’s genetic distance and geographic distance (km) among populations (r = 0.419, P = 0.005), suggesting that genetic differentiation in the 12 C. mandshurica populations might be related to geographic distance

  11. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Corylus mandshurica in China Using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Tian-Tian; Ma, Qing-Hua; Liang, Li-Song; Wang, Gui-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Corylus mandshurica, also known as pilose hazelnut, is an economically and ecologically important species in China. In this study, ten polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were applied to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of 348 C. mandshurica individuals among 12 populations in China. The SSR markers expressed a relatively high level of genetic diversity (Na = 15.3, Ne = 5.6604, I = 1.8853, Ho = 0.6668, and He = 0.7777). According to the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.1215), genetic variation within the populations (87.85%) were remarkably higher than among populations (12.15%). The average gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) significantly impacts the genetic structure of C. mandshurica populations. The relatively high gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) among wild C. mandshurica may be caused by wind-pollinated flowers, highly nutritious seeds and self-incompatible mating system. The UPGMA (unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages) dendrogram was divided into two main clusters. Moreover, the results of STRUCTURE analysis suggested that C. mandshurica populations fell into two main clusters. Comparison of the UPGMA dendrogram and the Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed general agreement between the population subdivisions and the genetic relationships among populations of C. mandshurica. Group I accessions were located in Northeast China, while Group II accessions were in North China. It is worth noting that a number of genetically similar populations were located in the same geographic region. The results further showed that there was obvious genetic differentiation among populations from Northeast China to North China. Results from the Mantel test showed a weak but still significant positive correlation between Nei's genetic distance and geographic distance (km) among populations (r = 0.419, P = 0.005), suggesting that genetic differentiation in the 12 C. mandshurica populations might be related to geographic distance. These

  12. Plasmodium falciparum kelch 13: a potential molecular marker for tackling artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Mita, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Shin-Ichiro; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirai, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Although artemisinin combination therapies have been deployed as a first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in almost all endemic countries, artemisinin-resistant parasites have emerged and have gradually spread across the Greater Mekong subregions. There is growing concern that the resistant parasites may migrate to or emerge indigenously in sub-Saharan Africa, which might provoke a global increase in malaria-associated morbidity and mortality. Therefore, development of molecular markers that enable identification of artemisinin resistance with high sensitivity is urgently required to combat this issue. In 2014, a potential artemisinin-resistance responsible gene, Plasmodium falciparum kelch13, was discovered. Here, we review the genetic features of P. falciparum kelch13 and discuss its related resistant mechanisms and potential as a molecular marker.

  13. Toward diagnostic and phenotype markers for genetically transmitted speech delay.

    PubMed

    Shriberg, Lawrence D; Lewis, Barbara A; Tomblin, J Bruce; McSweeny, Jane L; Karlsson, Heather B; Scheer, Alison R

    2005-08-01

    Converging evidence supports the hypothesis that the most common subtype of childhood speech sound disorder (SSD) of currently unknown origin is genetically transmitted. We report the first findings toward a set of diagnostic markers to differentiate this proposed etiological subtype (provisionally termed speech delay-genetic) from other proposed subtypes of SSD of unknown origin. Conversational speech samples from 72 preschool children with speech delay of unknown origin from 3 research centers were selected from an audio archive. Participants differed on the number of biological, nuclear family members (0 or 2+) classified as positive for current and/or prior speech-language disorder. Although participants in the 2 groups were found to have similar speech competence, as indexed by their Percentage of Consonants Correct scores, their speech error patterns differed significantly in 3 ways. Compared with children who may have reduced genetic load for speech delay (no affected nuclear family members), children with possibly higher genetic load (2+ affected members) had (a) a significantly higher proportion of relative omission errors on the Late-8 consonants; (b) a significantly lower proportion of relative distortion errors on these consonants, particularly on the sibilant fricatives /s/, /z/, and //; and (c) a significantly lower proportion of backed /s/ distortions, as assessed by both perceptual and acoustic methods. Machine learning routines identified a 3-part classification rule that included differential weightings of these variables. The classification rule had diagnostic accuracy value of 0.83 (95% confidence limits = 0.74-0.92), with positive and negative likelihood ratios of 9.6 (95% confidence limits = 3.1-29.9) and 0.40 (95% confidence limits = 0.24-0.68), respectively. The diagnostic accuracy findings are viewed as promising. The error pattern for this proposed subtype of SSD is viewed as consistent with the cognitive-linguistic processing deficits

  14. Genetic and molecular aspects of spinocerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Honti, Viktor; Vécsei, László

    2005-01-01

    The group of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) includes more than 20 subgroups based only on genetic research. The “ataxia genes” are autosomal; the “disease-alleles” are dominant, and many of them, but not all, encode a protein with an abnormally long polyglutamine domain. In DNA, this domain can be detected as an elongated CAG repeat region, which is the basis of genetic diagnostics. The polyglutamine tails often tend to aggregate and form inclusions. In some cases, protein–protein interactions are the key to understanding the disease. Protein partners of ataxia proteins include phosphatases and components of chromatin and the transcriptional machinery. To date, investigation of spinocerebellar ataxias involves population genetics, molecular methods, and studying model organisms. However, there is still no efficient therapy for patients. Here, we review the genetic and molecular data gained on spinocerebellar ataxias. PMID:18568057

  15. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Chlamydia Species.

    PubMed

    Sixt, Barbara S; Valdivia, Raphael H

    2016-09-01

    Species of Chlamydia are the etiologic agent of endemic blinding trachoma, the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases, significant respiratory pathogens, and a zoonotic threat. Their dependence on an intracellular growth niche and their peculiar developmental cycle are major challenges to elucidating their biology and virulence traits. The last decade has seen tremendous advances in our ability to perform a molecular genetic analysis of Chlamydia species. Major achievements include the generation of large collections of mutant strains, now available for forward- and reverse-genetic applications, and the introduction of a system for plasmid-based transformation enabling complementation of mutations; expression of foreign, modified, or reporter genes; and even targeted gene disruptions. This review summarizes the current status of the molecular genetic toolbox for Chlamydia species and highlights new insights into their biology and new challenges in the nascent field of Chlamydia genetics. PMID:27607551

  16. Automation of genetic linkage analysis using florescent microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.C.; Brown, A.F.; Green, D.K.

    1994-11-15

    Automation of the typing of genetic markers offers advantages of speed, accuracy, and cost in the mapping of genetic traits and the construction of high-resolution linkage maps. The authors have developed an automated linkage analysis system by (i) using a robotic pipettor to set up polymerase chain reactions (PCR) to amplify microsatellites with incorporation of a single fluorescent label; (ii) using an automated sequencing apparatus for detection of the PCR products; (iii) sizing alleles automatically by the use of internal and external standards; (iv) iteratively filtering out nonallelic fragments and checking for Mendelian consistency; (v) calculating the probabilities of selected genotypes; and (vi) automatically formatting the results for input to linkage analysis programs. The method provides accurate sizing of alleles, minimizes the risk of error during manual reading and transcription of data, and increases the throughput of reliable data. It brings any consistencies or ambiguities in the data to the attention of the user and facilitates examination of the raw data. The ALF/ALP system, together with new, optimized microsatellite sets, particularly tetranucleotide repeats, is likely to be well-suited to fully automatic genetic linkage analysis. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Molecular genetics of cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, S

    2001-09-01

    The underlying molecular basis of primary cutaneous lymphomas has not yet been clarified. However, abnormalities of cell cycle control genes and well-defined tumor suppressor genes such as p53 are common and may contribute to disease progression and treatment resistance. Biallelic inactivation of tumor suppressor genes usually occurs by a combination of deletion, point mutation, and/or promotor hypermethylation. The detection of UVB-specific mutations of p53 requires confirmation but may have important implications for the management of patients with mycosis fungoides. Molecular cytogenetic studies have identified common regions of chromosomal deletion and amplification, which suggests the presence and location of genes that are of critical importance in the pathogenesis of cutaneous lymphoma.

  18. Evaluation of genetic diversity in Chinese indigenous chicken breeds using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lujiang; Li, Xianyao; Xu, Guifang; Chen, Kuanwei; Yang, Hongjie; Zhang, Longchao; Wu, Guiqin; Hou, Zhuocheng; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2006-08-01

    China is rich in chicken genetic resources, and many indigenous breeds can be found throughout the country. Due to poor productive ability, some of them are threatened by the commercial varieties from domestic and foreign breeding companies. In a large-scale investigation into the current status of Chinese poultry genetic resources, 78 indigenous chicken breeds were surveyed and their blood samples collected. The genomes of these chickens were screened using microsatellite analysis. A total of 2740 individuals were genotyped for 27 microsatellite markers on 13 chromosomes. The number of alleles of the 27 markers ranged from 6 to 51 per locus with a mean of 18.74. Heterozygosity (H) values of the 78 chicken breeds were all more than 0.5. The average H value (0.622) and polymorphism information content (PIC, 0.573) of these breeds suggested that the Chinese indigenous chickens possessed more genetic diversity than that reported in many other countries. The fixation coefficients of subpopulations within the total population (F(ST)) for the 27 loci varied from 0.065 (LEI0166) to 0.209 (MCW0078), with a mean of 0.106. For all detected microsatellite loci, only one (LEI0194) deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) across all the populations. As genetic drift or non-random mating can occur in small populations, breeds kept on conservation farms such a Langshan chicken generally had lower H values, while those kept on large populations within conservation regions possessed higher polymorphisms. The high genetic diversity in Chinese indigenous breeds is in agreement with great phenotypic variation of these breeds. Using Nei's genetic distance and the Neighbor-Joining method, the indigenous Chinese chickens were classified into six categories that were generally consistent with their geographic distributions. The molecular information of genetic diversity will play an important role in conservation, supervision, and utilization of the chicken resources. PMID:16989278

  19. Genetic diversity of cultivated and wild tomatoes revealed by morphological traits and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, R; Wu, Z; Cao, X; Jiang, F L

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, morphological traits and molecular markers were used to assess the genetic diversity of 29 cultivated tomatoes, 14 wild tomatoes and seven introgression lines. The three components of the principal component analysis (PCA) explained 78.54% of the total morphological variation in the 50 tomato genotypes assessed. Based on these morphological traits, a three-dimensional PCA plot separated the 50 genotypes into distinct groups, and a dendrogram divided them into six clusters. Fifteen polymorphic genomic simple- sequence repeat (genomic-SSR) and 13 polymorphic expressed sequence tag-derived SSR (EST-SSR) markers amplified 1115 and 780 clear fragments, respectively. Genomic-SSRs detected a total of 64 alleles, with a mean of 4 alleles per primer, while EST-SSRs detected 52 alleles, with a mean of 4 alleles per primer. The polymorphism information content was slightly higher in genomic-SSRs (0.49) than in EST-SSRs (0.45). The mean similarity coefficient among the wild tomatoes was lower than the mean similarity coefficient among the cultivated tomatoes. The dendrogram based on genetic distance divided the 50 tomato genotypes into eight clusters. The Mantel test between genomic-SSR and EST-SSR matrices revealed a good correlation, whereas the morphological matrices and the molecular matrices were weakly correlated. We confirm the applicability of EST-SSRs in analyzing genetic diversity among cultivated and wild tomatoes. High variability of the 50 tomato genotypes was observed at the morphological and molecular level, indicating valuable tomato germplasm, especially in the wild tomatoes, which could be used for further genetic studies.

  20. Identifying the genetic diversity, genetic structure and a core collection of Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. jujuba accessions using microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chaoqun; Gao, Jiao; Du, Zengfeng; Li, Dengke; Wang, Zhe; Li, Yingyue; Pang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Ziziphus is a genus of spiny shrubs and small trees in the Rhamnaceae family. This group has a controversial taxonomy, with more than 200 species described, including Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. jujuba) and Indian jujube (Z. mauritiana), as well as several other important cultivated fruit crops. Using 24 SSR markers distributed across the Chinese jujube genome, 962 jujube accessions from the two largest germplasm repositories were genotyped with the aim of analyzing the genetic diversity and structure and constructing a core collection that retain high genetic diversity. A molecular profile comparison revealed 622 unique genotypes, among which 123 genotypes were genetically identical to at least one other accessions. STRUCTURE analysis and multivariate analyses (Cluster and PCoA) roughly divided the accessions into three major groups, with some admixture among groups. A simulated annealing algorithm and a heuristic algorithm were chosen to construct the core collection. A final core of 150 accessions was selected, comprising 15.6% of the analyzed accessions and retaining more than 99.5% of the total alleles detected. We found no significant differences in allele frequency distributions or in genetic diversity parameters between the chosen core accessions and the 622 genetically unique accessions. This work contributes to the understanding of Chinese jujube diversification and the protection of important germplasm resources. PMID:27531220

  1. Identifying the genetic diversity, genetic structure and a core collection of Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. jujuba accessions using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaoqun; Gao, Jiao; Du, Zengfeng; Li, Dengke; Wang, Zhe; Li, Yingyue; Pang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Ziziphus is a genus of spiny shrubs and small trees in the Rhamnaceae family. This group has a controversial taxonomy, with more than 200 species described, including Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. jujuba) and Indian jujube (Z. mauritiana), as well as several other important cultivated fruit crops. Using 24 SSR markers distributed across the Chinese jujube genome, 962 jujube accessions from the two largest germplasm repositories were genotyped with the aim of analyzing the genetic diversity and structure and constructing a core collection that retain high genetic diversity. A molecular profile comparison revealed 622 unique genotypes, among which 123 genotypes were genetically identical to at least one other accessions. STRUCTURE analysis and multivariate analyses (Cluster and PCoA) roughly divided the accessions into three major groups, with some admixture among groups. A simulated annealing algorithm and a heuristic algorithm were chosen to construct the core collection. A final core of 150 accessions was selected, comprising 15.6% of the analyzed accessions and retaining more than 99.5% of the total alleles detected. We found no significant differences in allele frequency distributions or in genetic diversity parameters between the chosen core accessions and the 622 genetically unique accessions. This work contributes to the understanding of Chinese jujube diversification and the protection of important germplasm resources.

  2. Identifying the genetic diversity, genetic structure and a core collection of Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. jujuba accessions using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaoqun; Gao, Jiao; Du, Zengfeng; Li, Dengke; Wang, Zhe; Li, Yingyue; Pang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Ziziphus is a genus of spiny shrubs and small trees in the Rhamnaceae family. This group has a controversial taxonomy, with more than 200 species described, including Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. jujuba) and Indian jujube (Z. mauritiana), as well as several other important cultivated fruit crops. Using 24 SSR markers distributed across the Chinese jujube genome, 962 jujube accessions from the two largest germplasm repositories were genotyped with the aim of analyzing the genetic diversity and structure and constructing a core collection that retain high genetic diversity. A molecular profile comparison revealed 622 unique genotypes, among which 123 genotypes were genetically identical to at least one other accessions. STRUCTURE analysis and multivariate analyses (Cluster and PCoA) roughly divided the accessions into three major groups, with some admixture among groups. A simulated annealing algorithm and a heuristic algorithm were chosen to construct the core collection. A final core of 150 accessions was selected, comprising 15.6% of the analyzed accessions and retaining more than 99.5% of the total alleles detected. We found no significant differences in allele frequency distributions or in genetic diversity parameters between the chosen core accessions and the 622 genetically unique accessions. This work contributes to the understanding of Chinese jujube diversification and the protection of important germplasm resources. PMID:27531220

  3. Genetic diversity and genetic structure of consecutive breeding generations of golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Luo, X N; Yang, M; Liang, X F; Jin, K; Lv, L Y; Tian, C X; Yuan, Y C; Sun, J

    2015-09-25

    In this study, 12 polymorphic microsatellites were inves-tigated to determine the genetic diversity and structure of 5 consecu-tive selected populations of golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner). The total numbers of alleles, average heterozyosity, and average polymorphism information content showed that the genetic diversity of these breeding populations was decreasing. Additionally, pairwise fixation index FST values among populations and Da values in-creased from F1 generation to subsequent generations (FST values from 0.0221-0.1408; Da values from 0.0608-0.1951). Analysis of molecular variance indicated that most genetic variations arise from individuals within populations (about 92.05%), while variation among populations accounted for only 7.95%. The allele frequency of the loci SC75-220 and SC101-222 bp changed regularly in the 5 breeding generations. Their frequencies were gradually increased and showed an enrichment trend, indicating that there may be genetic correlations between these 2 loci and breeding traits. Our study indicated that microsatellite markers are effective for assessing the genetic variability in the golden mandarin fish breeding program.

  4. Genetic recombination and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, B; Betancourt, A J; Kaiser, V B; Gordo, I

    2009-01-01

    Reduced rates of genetic recombination are often associated with reduced genetic variability and levels of adaptation. Several different evolutionary processes, collectively known as Hill-Robertson (HR) effects, have been proposed as causes of these correlates of recombination. Here, we use DNA sequence polymorphism and divergence data from the noncrossing over dot chromosome of Drosophila to discriminate between two of the major forms of HR effects: selective sweeps and background selection. This chromosome shows reduced levels of silent variability and reduced effectiveness of selection. We show that neither model fits the data on variability. We propose that, in large genomic regions with restricted recombination, HR effects among nonsynonymous mutations undermine the effective strength of selection, so that their background selection effects are weakened. This modified model fits the data on variability and also explains why variability in very large nonrecombining genomes is not completely wiped out. We also show that HR effects of this type can produce an individual selection advantage to recombination, as well as greatly reduce the mean fitness of nonrecombining genomes and genomic regions.

  5. Genetic characterization of an elite coffee germplasm assessed by gSSR and EST-SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Missio, R F; Caixeta, E T; Zambolim, E M; Pena, G F; Zambolim, L; Dias, L A S; Sakiyama, N S

    2011-10-06

    Coffee is one of the main agrifood commodities traded worldwide. In 2009, coffee accounted for 6.1% of the value of Brazilian agricultural production, generating a revenue of US$6 billion. Despite the importance of coffee production in Brazil, it is supported by a narrow genetic base, with few accessions. Molecular differentiation and diversity of a coffee breeding program were assessed with gSSR and EST-SSR markers. The study comprised 24 coffee accessions according to their genetic origin: arabica accessions (six traditional genotypes of C. arabica), resistant arabica (six leaf rust-resistant C. arabica genotypes with introgression of Híbrido de Timor), robusta (five C. canephora genotypes), Híbrido de Timor (three C. arabica x C. canephora), triploids (three C. arabica x C. racemosa), and racemosa (one C. racemosa). Allele and polymorphism analysis, AMOVA, the Student t-test, Jaccard's dissimilarity coefficient, cluster analysis, correlation of genetic distances, and discriminant analysis, were performed. EST-SSR markers gave 25 exclusive alleles per genetic group, while gSSR showed 47, which will be useful for differentiating accessions and for fingerprinting varieties. The gSSR markers detected a higher percentage of polymorphism among (35% higher on average) and within (42.9% higher on average) the genetic groups, compared to EST-SSR markers. The highest percentage of polymorphism within the genetic groups was found with gSSR markers for robusta (89.2%) and for resistant arabica (39.5%). It was possible to differentiate all genotypes including the arabica-related accessions. Nevertheless, combined use of gSSR and EST-SSR markers is recommended for coffee molecular characterization, because EST-SSRs can provide complementary information.

  6. Evaluation of Pakistan wheat germplasms for stripe rust resistance using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Sobia, Tabassum; Muhammad, Ashraf; Chen, XianMing

    2010-09-01

    Wheat production in Pakistan is seriously constrained due to rust diseases and stripe rust (yellow) caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, which could limit yields. Thus development and cultivation of genetically diverse and resistant varieties is the most sustainable solution to overcome these diseases. The first objective of the present study was to evaluate 100 Pakistan wheat cultivars that have been grown over the past 60 years. These cultivars were inoculated at the seedling stage with two virulent stripe rust isolates from the United States and two from Pakistan. None of the wheat cultivars were resistant to all tested stripe rust isolates, and 16% of cultivars were susceptible to the four isolates at the seedling stage. The data indicated that none of the Pakistan wheat cultivars contained either Yr5 or Yr15 genes that were considered to be effective against most P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates from around the world. Several Pakistan wheat cultivars may have gene Yr10, which is effective against isolate PST-127 but ineffective against PST-116. It is also possible that these cultivars may have other previously unidentified genes or gene combinations. The second objective was to evaluate the 100 Pakistan wheat cultivars for stripe rust resistance during natural epidemics in Pakistan and Washington State, USA. It was found that a higher frequency of resistance was present under field conditions compared with greenhouse conditions. Thirty genotypes (30% of germplasms) were found to have a potentially high temperature adult plant (HTAP) resistance. The third objective was to determine the genetic diversity in Pakistan wheat germplasms using molecular markers. This study was based on DNA fingerprinting using resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) marker analysis. The highest polymorphism detected with RGAP primer pairs was 40%, 50% and 57% with a mean polymorphism of 36%. A total of 22 RGAP markers were obtained in this study. RGAP, simple

  7. Simple sequence repeat markers in genetic divergence and marker-assisted selection of rice cultivars: a review.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Shubhneet; Panesar, Parmjit S; Bera, Manab B; Kaur, Varinder

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of rice genome has facilitated the understanding of rice evolution and has been utilized extensively for mining of DNA markers to facilitate marker-assisted breeding. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers that are tandemly repeated nucleotide sequence motifs flanked by unique sequences are presently the maker of choice in rice improvement due to their abundance, co-dominant inheritance, high levels of allelic diversity, and simple reproducible assay. The current level of genome coverage by SSR markers in rice is sufficient to employ them for genotype identification and marker-assisted selection in breeding for mapping of genes and quantitative trait loci analysis. This review provides comprehensive information on the mapping and applications of SSR markers in investigation of rice cultivars to study their genetic divergence and marker-assisted selection of important agronomic traits.

  8. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    PubMed

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  9. DNA-Based Genetic Markers for Rapid Cycling Brassica Rapa (Fast Plants Type) Designed for the Teaching Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Slankster, Eryn E; Chase, Jillian M; Jones, Lauren A; Wendell, Douglas L

    2012-01-01

    We have developed DNA-based genetic markers for rapid cycling Brassica rapa (RCBr), also known as Fast Plants. Although markers for B. rapa already exist, ours were intentionally designed for use in a teaching laboratory environment. The qualities we selected for were robust amplification in PCR, polymorphism in RCBr strains, and alleles that can be easily resolved in simple agarose slab gels. We have developed two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based markers and 14 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)-type markers spread over four chromosomes. The DNA sequences of these markers represent variation in a wide range of genomic features. Among the VNTR-type markers, there are examples of variation in a non-genic region, variation within an intron, and variation in the coding sequence of a gene. Among the SNP-based markers there are examples of polymorphism in intronic DNA and synonymous substitution in a coding sequence. Thus these markers can serve laboratory exercises in both transmission genetics and molecular biology.

  10. DNA-Based Genetic Markers for Rapid Cycling Brassica Rapa (Fast Plants Type) Designed for the Teaching Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Slankster, Eryn E.; Chase, Jillian M.; Jones, Lauren A.; Wendell, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed DNA-based genetic markers for rapid cycling Brassica rapa (RCBr), also known as Fast Plants. Although markers for B. rapa already exist, ours were intentionally designed for use in a teaching laboratory environment. The qualities we selected for were robust amplification in PCR, polymorphism in RCBr strains, and alleles that can be easily resolved in simple agarose slab gels. We have developed two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based markers and 14 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)-type markers spread over four chromosomes. The DNA sequences of these markers represent variation in a wide range of genomic features. Among the VNTR-type markers, there are examples of variation in a non-genic region, variation within an intron, and variation in the coding sequence of a gene. Among the SNP-based markers there are examples of polymorphism in intronic DNA and synonymous substitution in a coding sequence. Thus these markers can serve laboratory exercises in both transmission genetics and molecular biology. PMID:22675329

  11. DNA-Based Genetic Markers for Rapid Cycling Brassica Rapa (Fast Plants Type) Designed for the Teaching Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Slankster, Eryn E; Chase, Jillian M; Jones, Lauren A; Wendell, Douglas L

    2012-01-01

    We have developed DNA-based genetic markers for rapid cycling Brassica rapa (RCBr), also known as Fast Plants. Although markers for B. rapa already exist, ours were intentionally designed for use in a teaching laboratory environment. The qualities we selected for were robust amplification in PCR, polymorphism in RCBr strains, and alleles that can be easily resolved in simple agarose slab gels. We have developed two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based markers and 14 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)-type markers spread over four chromosomes. The DNA sequences of these markers represent variation in a wide range of genomic features. Among the VNTR-type markers, there are examples of variation in a non-genic region, variation within an intron, and variation in the coding sequence of a gene. Among the SNP-based markers there are examples of polymorphism in intronic DNA and synonymous substitution in a coding sequence. Thus these markers can serve laboratory exercises in both transmission genetics and molecular biology. PMID:22675329

  12. Genetic divergence among sweet corn lines estimated by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Lopes, A D; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity of 15 sugary-1 sweet corn lines by microsatellite markers. One hundred pairs of simple sequence repeat primers that were mapped for field corn were tested. Of these primers, 15% were polymorphic, and all were selected for the evaluation. These primers identified a total of 39 alleles among the 15 loci that were evaluated. The number of alleles per locus in the genotypes ranged from 2 to 4, with an average of 2.60 alleles per locus; the highest number of alleles was observed at the loci Bnlg1083, Umc1241, and Umc1590. The occurrence of null alleles at locus Umc1363 was evident only in line DN44. The proportion of polymorphic loci was the highest in lines DN17.1 and DN6 (73.33%), whereas lines DN47, DN23, and DN28 were more monomorphic than other lines. The loci Bnlg1083 and Umc1506 were polymorphic in 8 and 7 lines, respectively, indicating that these loci might be effective and promising for the identification of polymorphism in other sweet corn lines. The genetic diversity calculated by Rogers' genetic distances indicated the lowest genetic similarity between lines DN9 and DN28 (0.7603) and the highest similarity between lines DN19 and DN6 (0.3724). The dendrogram obtained by the unweighted pair-group method based on arithmetic averages indicated the formation of 4 major groups, showing the crossing of the genotypes DN19 and DN6 with DN8 as a possible alternative for the expression of heterozygosis. PMID:25511025

  13. Molecular genetics of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Gusella, J F; MacDonald, M E; Ambrose, C M; Duyao, M P

    1993-11-01

    Huntington's disease is an inherited disorder in which selective neuronal loss in the brain leads to a characteristic choreic movement disorder. The successful mapping of the Huntington's disease gene to chromosome 4 set off a torrent of similar studies in other inherited disorders as investigators attempted to locate and isolate human disease genes with this new approach. Although it took a decade-long quest since the initial mapping of the genetic defect, the gene causing Huntington's disease has recently been isolated. Discovery of the mutational mechanism causing Huntington's disease has explained some of the peculiarities of inheritance of this intriguing disorder and creates hope for a better understanding of the cause of neuronal cell death that could eventually lead to a treatment.

  14. Mismatches in genetic markers in a large family study.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, G C

    1980-01-01

    The Hawaii Family Study of Cognition provided an opportunity to investigate the frequency and implications of non-agreement, or mismatches, between observed and expected genetic marker phenotypes of husbands, wives, and children. Mismatch data from 68 families in which one or both spouses were known not to be a biological parent were used to determine the rate of undeclared nonparentage in 1,748 families in which conventional relationships were claimed. Two independent approaches gave consistent estimates, suggesting that approximately 2.3% of the 2,839 tested children from these families were probably the result of infidelity, concealed adoption, or another event. About two-thirds of the mismatches detected were probably due to properties of the techniques employed. PMID:6930820

  15. Reconciling patterns of inter-ocean molecular variance from four classes of molecular markers in blue marlin (Makaira nigricans).

    PubMed

    Buonaccorsi, V P; McDowell, J R; Graves, J E

    2001-05-01

    Different classes of molecular markers occasionally yield discordant views of population structure within a species. Here, we examine the distribution of molecular variance from 14 polymorphic loci comprising four classes of molecular markers within approximately 400 blue marlin individuals (Makaira nigricans). Samples were collected from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans over 5 years. Data from five hypervariable tetranucleotide microsatellite loci and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of whole molecule mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were reported and compared with previous analyses of allozyme and single-copy nuclear DNA (scnDNA) loci. Temporal variance in allele frequencies was nonsignificant in nearly all cases. Mitochondrial and microsatellite loci revealed striking phylogeographic partitioning among Atlantic and Pacific Ocean samples. A large cluster of alleles was present almost exclusively in Atlantic individuals at one microsatellite locus and for mtDNA, suggesting that, if gene flow occurs, it is likely to be unidirectional from Pacific to Atlantic oceans. Mitochondrial DNA inter-ocean divergence (FST) was almost four times greater than microsatellite or combined nuclear divergences including allozyme and scnDNA markers. Estimates of Neu varied by five orders of magnitude among marker classes. Using mathematical and computer simulation approaches, we show that substantially different distributions of FST are expected from marker classes that differ in mode of inheritance and rate of mutation, without influence of natural selection or sex-biased dispersal. Furthermore, divergent FST values can be reconciled by quantifying the balance between genetic drift, mutation and migration. These results illustrate the usefulness of a mitochondrial analysis of population history, and relative precision of nuclear estimates of gene flow based on a mean of several loci.

  16. The Promise of Novel Molecular Markers in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miremami, Jahan; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the US and is associated with the highest cost per patient. A high likelihood of recurrence, mandating stringent surveillance protocols, has made the development of urinary markers a focus of intense pursuit with the hope of decreasing the burden this disease places on patients and the healthcare system. To date, routine use of markers is not recommended for screening or diagnosis. Interests include the development of a single urinary marker that can be used in place of or as an adjunct to current screening and surveillance techniques, as well identifying a molecular signature for an individual’s disease that can help predict progression, prognosis, and potential therapeutic response. Markers have shown potential value in improving diagnostic accuracy when used as an adjunct to current modalities, risk-stratification of patients that could aid the clinician in determining aggressiveness of surveillance, and allowing for a decrease in invasive surveillance procedures. This review discusses the current understanding of emerging biomarkers, including miRNAs, gene signatures and detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood, and their potential clinical value in bladder cancer diagnosis, as prognostic indicators, and surveillance tools, as well as limitations to their incorporation into medical practice. PMID:25535079

  17. Molecular genetics of dyslexia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Carrion-Castillo, Amaia; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E

    2013-11-01

    Dyslexia is a highly heritable learning disorder with a complex underlying genetic architecture. Over the past decade, researchers have pinpointed a number of candidate genes that may contribute to dyslexia susceptibility. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art, describing how studies have moved from mapping potential risk loci, through identification of associated gene variants, to characterization of gene function in cellular and animal model systems. Work thus far has highlighted some intriguing mechanistic pathways, such as neuronal migration, axon guidance, and ciliary biology, but it is clear that we still have much to learn about the molecular networks that are involved. We end the review by highlighting the past, present, and future contributions of the Dutch Dyslexia Programme to studies of genetic factors. In particular, we emphasize the importance of relating genetic information to intermediate neurobiological measures, as well as the value of incorporating longitudinal and developmental data into molecular designs.

  18. Analysis of the genetic diversity of super sweet corn inbred lines using SSR and SSAP markers.

    PubMed

    Ko, W R; Sa, K J; Roy, N S; Choi, H-J; Lee, J K

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared the efficiency of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence specific amplified polymorphism (SSAP) markers for analyzing genetic diversity, genetic relationships, and population structure of 87 super sweet corn inbred lines from different origins. SSR markers showed higher average gene diversity and Shannon's information index than SSAP markers. To assess genetic relationships and characterize inbred lines using SSR and SSAP markers, genetic similarity (GS) matrices were constructed. The dendrogram using SSR marker data showed a complex pattern with nine clusters and a GS of 53.0%. For SSAP markers, three clusters were observed with a GS of 50.8%. Results of combined marker data showed six clusters with 53.5% GS. To analyze the genetic population structure of SSR and SSAP marker data, the 87 inbred lines were divided into groups I, II, and admixed based on the membership probability threshold of 0.8. Using combined marker data, the population structure was K = 3 and was divided into groups I, II, III, and admixed. This study represents a comparative analysis of SSR and SSAP marker data for the study of genetic diversity and genetic relationships in super sweet corn inbred lines. Our results would be useful for maize-breeding programs in Korea. PMID:26909914

  19. Analysis of the genetic diversity of super sweet corn inbred lines using SSR and SSAP markers.

    PubMed

    Ko, W R; Sa, K J; Roy, N S; Choi, H-J; Lee, J K

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared the efficiency of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence specific amplified polymorphism (SSAP) markers for analyzing genetic diversity, genetic relationships, and population structure of 87 super sweet corn inbred lines from different origins. SSR markers showed higher average gene diversity and Shannon's information index than SSAP markers. To assess genetic relationships and characterize inbred lines using SSR and SSAP markers, genetic similarity (GS) matrices were constructed. The dendrogram using SSR marker data showed a complex pattern with nine clusters and a GS of 53.0%. For SSAP markers, three clusters were observed with a GS of 50.8%. Results of combined marker data showed six clusters with 53.5% GS. To analyze the genetic population structure of SSR and SSAP marker data, the 87 inbred lines were divided into groups I, II, and admixed based on the membership probability threshold of 0.8. Using combined marker data, the population structure was K = 3 and was divided into groups I, II, III, and admixed. This study represents a comparative analysis of SSR and SSAP marker data for the study of genetic diversity and genetic relationships in super sweet corn inbred lines. Our results would be useful for maize-breeding programs in Korea.

  20. Pyrogenic molecular markers: linking PAH with BPCA analysis.

    PubMed

    Wiedemeier, Daniel B; Brodowski, Sonja; Wiesenberg, Guido L B

    2015-01-01

    Molecular characterization of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) is of great interest to understand the formation and behavior of these increasingly abundant materials in the environment. Two molecular marker methods have often been used to characterize and trace PyOM: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) analysis. Since both methods target pyrogenic polycyclic compounds, we investigated the linkages between the two approaches using chars that were produced under controlled conditions. Rye and maize straws and their analogues charred at 300, 400 and 500 °C, respectively, were thus analyzed with both methods. Moreover, we also measured BPCAs directly on the lipid extracts, on which PAHs were analyzed, and on the respective extraction residues, too. Both methods revealed important features of the chars, in particular the increasing degree of aromatic condensation with increasing highest heating temperature (HTT). The overlap between the two methods was identified in the lipid fraction, where the proportion of benzenetricarboxylic acids (B3CAs) correlated with PAH abundance. The results confirmed the validity and complementarity of the two molecular marker methods, which will likely continue to play a crucial role in PyOM research due to the recent developments of compound-specific PAH and BPCA stable carbon (δ(13)C) and radiocarbon ((14)C) isotope methods. PMID:25084061

  1. Short Communication Development of microsatellite markers and genetic diversity analysis for Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Zhao, J; Li, W; Shi, Y; Hong, X Y; Zhu, X P

    2016-01-01

    Pelodiscus sinensis is a common freshwater soft-shell turtle found in China, and is an important aquaculture species. In this study, 20 polymorphic microsatellite primers were developed from the transcriptome. The genetic diversity of three populations of P. sinensis was evaluated, using 72 individuals. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 26. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.208 to 0.958, and from 0.302 to 0.963, respectively. The polymorphic information content varied from 0.283 to 0.953. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected. These markers will be useful for future population genetic studies and molecular breeding of P. sinensis. PMID:27525890

  2. Genetic relationship of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) varieties from Senegal based on SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Badiane, F A; Gowda, B S; Cissé, N; Diouf, D; Sadio, O; Timko, M P

    2012-02-08

    Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among 22 local cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) varieties and inbred lines collected throughout Senegal were evaluated using simple sequence repeat molecular markers. A set of 49 primer combinations were developed from cowpea genomic/expressed sequence tags and evaluated for their ability to detect polymorphisms among the various cowpea genotypes. Forty-four primer combinations detected polymorphisms, with the remaining five primer sets failing to yield PCR amplification products. From one to 16 alleles were found among the informative primer combinations; their frequencies ranged from 0.60 to 0.95 (mean = 0.79). The genetic diversity of the sample varied from 0.08 to 0.42 (mean = 0.28). The polymorphic information content ranged from 0.08 to 0.33 (mean = 0.23). The local varieties clustered in the same group, except 53-3, 58-53, and 58-57; while Ndoute yellow pods, Ndoute violet pods and Baye Ngagne were in the second group. The photosensitive varieties (Ndoute yellow pods and Ndoute violet pods) were closely clustered in the second group and so were inbred line Mouride and local cultivar 58-57, which is also one of the parents for inbred line Mouride. These molecular markers could be used for selection and identification of elite varieties for cowpea improvement and germplasm management in Senegal.

  3. Evaluation of insertion-deletion markers suitable for genetic diversity studies and marker-trait correlation analyses in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Meng, S; Yang, X L; Dang, P M; Cui, S L; Mu, G J; Chen, C Y; Liu, L F

    2016-01-01

    Peanut is one of the most important oil crops worldwide. We used insertion-deletion (InDel) markers to assess the genetic diversity and population structure in cultivated peanut. Fifty-four accessions from North China were genotyped using 48 InDel markers. The markers amplified 61 polymorphic loci with 1 to 8 alleles and an average of 2.6 alleles per marker. The polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.0364 to 0.9030, with an average of 0.5038. Population structure and neighbor-joining (NJ) tree analyses suggested that all accessions could be divided into four clusters (A1-A4), using the NJ method. Likewise, four subpopulations (G1-G4) were identified using STRUCTURE analysis. A principal component analysis was also used and results concordant with the other analysis methods were found. A multi-linear stepwise regression analysis revealed that 13 InDel markers correlated with five measured agronomical traits. Our results will provide important information for future peanut molecular breeding and genetic research. PMID:27525935

  4. Evaluation of insertion-deletion markers suitable for genetic diversity studies and marker-trait correlation analyses in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Meng, S; Yang, X L; Dang, P M; Cui, S L; Mu, G J; Chen, C Y; Liu, L F

    2016-08-12

    Peanut is one of the most important oil crops worldwide. We used insertion-deletion (InDel) markers to assess the genetic diversity and population structure in cultivated peanut. Fifty-four accessions from North China were genotyped using 48 InDel markers. The markers amplified 61 polymorphic loci with 1 to 8 alleles and an average of 2.6 alleles per marker. The polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.0364 to 0.9030, with an average of 0.5038. Population structure and neighbor-joining (NJ) tree analyses suggested that all accessions could be divided into four clusters (A1-A4), using the NJ method. Likewise, four subpopulations (G1-G4) were identified using STRUCTURE analysis. A principal component analysis was also used and results concordant with the other analysis methods were found. A multi-linear stepwise regression analysis revealed that 13 InDel markers correlated with five measured agronomical traits. Our results will provide important information for future peanut molecular breeding and genetic research.

  5. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Silje; Evans, D. Gareth; Abraham, Jean E.; Earl, Helena M.; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A.; Bowden, Sarah; Berg, Christine; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)–negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24.2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10–8). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association in this set of case patients was stronger for the observed genotypes than for the imputed genotypes. A second locus (rs148760487 at 2q24.2) was associated at genome-wide statistical significance in initial analyses; the association was similar in ER-positive and ER-negative case patients. Here the results of genotyping suggested that the finding was less robust. Conclusions: This is currently the largest study investigating genetic variation associated with breast cancer survival. Our results have potential clinical implications, as they confirm that germline genotype can provide prognostic information in addition to standard tumor prognostic factors. PMID:25890600

  6. Genetic and Molecular Network Analysis of Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Robert W.; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction into the genetic control and analysis of behavioral variation using powerful online resources. We introduce you to the new field of systems genetics using "case studies" drawn from the world of behavioral genetics that exploit populations of genetically diverse lines of mice. These lines differ very widely in patterns of gene and protein expression in the brain and in patterns of behavior. In this chapter we address the following set of related questions: (1) Can we combine massive genomic data sets with large aggregates of precise quantitative data on behavior? (2) Can we map causal relations between gene variants and behavioral differences? (3) Can we simultaneously use these highly coherent data sets to understand more about the underlying molecular and cellular basis of behavior? PMID:23195314

  7. Primate Short-Wavelength Cones Share Molecular Markers with Rods

    PubMed Central

    Craft, Cheryl M.; Huang, Jing; Possin, Daniel E.; Hendrickson, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Macaca, Callithrix jacchus marmoset monkey, Pan troglodytes chim- panzee and human retinas were examined to define if short wavelength (S) cones share molecular markers with L&M cone or rod photoreceptors. S cones showed consistent differences in their immunohistochemical staining and expression levels compared to L&M cones for “rod” Arrestin1 (S-Antigen), “cone” Arrestin4, cone alpha transducin, and Calbindin. Our data verify a similar pattern of expression in these primate retinas and provide clues to the structural divergence of rods and S cones versus L&M cones, suggesting S cone retinal function is “intermediate” between them. PMID:24664680

  8. Genetic diversity revealed by morphological traits and ISSR markers in 48 Okras (Abelmoschus escullentus L.).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cong-Ying; Wang, Ping; Chen, Pang-Pang; Xiao, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Cheng; Hu, Shuai; Zhou, Ping; Chang, Hong-Ping; He, Zhuang; Hu, Rong; Lu, Xiu-Tao; Ye, Jia-Zhuo; Guo, Xin-Hong

    2015-07-01

    Okra is a widely distributed crop in the tropics, subtropics, and warmer areas of the temperate zones. Its major potential uses as a vegetable, oil and protein source, and source of paper pulp and fuel, or biomass are compatible. It is expected to have high value of exploitation and application. Due to the limited number of molecular studies focused on okras, the methods of morphological and ISSR markers were used to analysis the genetic diversity of 48 okras in the present study. The 22 primers were picked for ISSR-PCR, and a total of 154 fragments were amplified with an overall average polymorphism of 54.55 %. We used the 154 markers to construct the dendrogram based on the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA). A high level of genetic diversity was found among 48 individuals. The 48 Okras was divided into four clusters at Dice's coefficient of 0.19 with clustering analysis. Based on these data of the genetic diversity, it will be possible to exploit the available resources of okra in more valuable ways.

  9. Genetic diversity analysis of tree peony germplasm using iPBS markers.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y B; Guo, D L; Guo, L L; Wei, D F; Hou, X G

    2015-07-06

    We examined the genetic diversity of 10 wild species (populations) and 55 varieties of tree peony using inter-primer binding site (iPBS) markers. From a total of 36 iPBS primers, 16 were selected based on polymorphic amplification. The number of bands amplified by each primer ranged from 9 to 19, with an average of 12.88 bands per primer. The length of bands ranged from 100 to 2000 bp, concentrated at 200 to 1800 bp. Sixteen primers amplified 206 bands in total, of which 173 bands were polymorphic with a polymorphism ratio of 83.98%. Each primer amplified 10.81 polymorphic bands on average. The data were then used to construct a phylogenetic tree using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean methods. Clustering analysis showed that the genetic relationships among the varieties were not only related to the genetic background or geographic origin, but also to the flowering phase, flower color, and flower type. Our data also indicated that iPBS markers were useful tools for classifying tree peony germplasms and for tree peony breeding, and the specific bands were helpful for molecular identification of tree peony varieties.

  10. Genetic diversity analysis of tree peony germplasm using iPBS markers.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y B; Guo, D L; Guo, L L; Wei, D F; Hou, X G

    2015-01-01

    We examined the genetic diversity of 10 wild species (populations) and 55 varieties of tree peony using inter-primer binding site (iPBS) markers. From a total of 36 iPBS primers, 16 were selected based on polymorphic amplification. The number of bands amplified by each primer ranged from 9 to 19, with an average of 12.88 bands per primer. The length of bands ranged from 100 to 2000 bp, concentrated at 200 to 1800 bp. Sixteen primers amplified 206 bands in total, of which 173 bands were polymorphic with a polymorphism ratio of 83.98%. Each primer amplified 10.81 polymorphic bands on average. The data were then used to construct a phylogenetic tree using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean methods. Clustering analysis showed that the genetic relationships among the varieties were not only related to the genetic background or geographic origin, but also to the flowering phase, flower color, and flower type. Our data also indicated that iPBS markers were useful tools for classifying tree peony germplasms and for tree peony breeding, and the specific bands were helpful for molecular identification of tree peony varieties. PMID:26214434

  11. Genetic diversity revealed by morphological traits and ISSR markers in 48 Okras (Abelmoschus escullentus L.).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cong-Ying; Wang, Ping; Chen, Pang-Pang; Xiao, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Cheng; Hu, Shuai; Zhou, Ping; Chang, Hong-Ping; He, Zhuang; Hu, Rong; Lu, Xiu-Tao; Ye, Jia-Zhuo; Guo, Xin-Hong

    2015-07-01

    Okra is a widely distributed crop in the tropics, subtropics, and warmer areas of the temperate zones. Its major potential uses as a vegetable, oil and protein source, and source of paper pulp and fuel, or biomass are compatible. It is expected to have high value of exploitation and application. Due to the limited number of molecular studies focused on okras, the methods of morphological and ISSR markers were used to analysis the genetic diversity of 48 okras in the present study. The 22 primers were picked for ISSR-PCR, and a total of 154 fragments were amplified with an overall average polymorphism of 54.55 %. We used the 154 markers to construct the dendrogram based on the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA). A high level of genetic diversity was found among 48 individuals. The 48 Okras was divided into four clusters at Dice's coefficient of 0.19 with clustering analysis. Based on these data of the genetic diversity, it will be possible to exploit the available resources of okra in more valuable ways. PMID:26261400

  12. Population genetic data and forensic parameters of 30 autosomal InDel markers in Santa Catarina State population, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sandra Regina Rachadel; Uehara, Clineu Julien Seki; Sutter-Latorre, Ana Frederica; de Almeida, Bibiana Sgorla; Sauerbier, Tania Streck; Muniz, Yara Costa Netto; Marrero, Andrea Rita; de Souza, Ilíada Rainha

    2014-08-01

    The application of DNA technology in forensic investigations has grown rapidly in the last 25 years and with an exponential increase of short tandem repeats (STRs) data, usually presented as allele frequencies, that may be later used as databases for forensic and population genetics purposes. Thereby, classes of molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions (InDels) have been presented as another option of genetic marker sets. These markers can be used in paternity cases, when mutations in STR polymorphisms are present, as well as in highly degraded DNA analysis. In the present study, the allele frequencies and heterozygosity (H) of a 30 InDel markers set were determined and the forensic efficacy was evaluated through estimation of discrimination power (DP), match probability, typical paternity index and power of paternity exclusion in 108 unrelated volunteers from the State of Santa Catarina (South Brazil). The observed H per locus showed a range between 0.370 and 0.574 (mean = 0.479). HLD128 was the locus with the highest DP (DP = 0.656). DP for all markers combined was greater than 99.9999999999646 % which provides satisfactory levels of information for forensic demands. Genetic comparisons (exact tests of population differentiation and pairwise genetic distances) revealed that the population of Santa Catarina State differs from Korea and USA Afro-American populations but is similar to the Portuguese, German, Polish, Spanish and Basque populations.

  13. Exploring genetic variability within lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and across related legumes using a newly developed set of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Sharma, Tilak R; Srivastava, Prem S; Abdin, M Z; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2014-09-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an economically important grain legume, yet the genetic and genomic resources remain largely uncharacterized and unexploited in this crop. Microsatellites have become markers of choice for crop improvement applications. Hence, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for lentil through the construction of genomic library enriched for GA/CT motifs. As a result 122 functional SSR primer pairs were developed from 151 microsatellite loci and validated in L. culinaris cv. Precoz. Thirty three SSR markers were utilized for the analysis of genetic relationships between cultivated and wild species of Lens and related legumes. A total of 123 alleles were amplified at 33 loci ranging from 2-5 alleles with an average of 3.73 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content (PIC) for all the loci ranged from 0.13 to 0.99 with an average of 0.66 per locus. Varied levels of cross genera transferability were obtained ranging from 69.70 % across Pisum sativum to 12.12 % across Vigna radiata. The UPGMA based dendrogram was able to establish the uniqueness of each genotype and grouped them into two major clusters clearly resolving the genetic relationships within lentil and related species. The new set of SSR markers reported here were efficient and highly polymorphic and would add to the existing repertoire of lentil SSR markers to be utilized in molecular breeding. Moreover, the improved knowledge about intra- and inter-specific genetic relationships would facilitate germplasm utilization for lentil improvement.

  14. Biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers associated with quality-of-life domains: an update

    PubMed Central

    Sprangers, Mirjam A.G.; Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Bartels, Meike; Barsevick, Andrea; Ordoñana, Juan; Shi, Qiuling; Wang, Xin Shelley; Klepstad, Pål; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sloan, Jeff A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is compelling evidence of a genetic foundation of patient-reported QOL. Given the rapid development of substantial scientific advances in this area of research, the current paper updates and extends reviews published in 2010. Objectives The objective is to provide an updated overview of the biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers involved in fatigue, pain, negative (depressed mood) and positive (well-being/happiness) emotional functioning, social functioning, and overall QOL. Methods We followed a purposeful search algorithm of existing literature to capture empirical papers investigating the relationship between biological pathways and molecular markers and the identified QOL domains. Results Multiple major pathways are involved in each QOL domain. The inflammatory pathway has the strongest evidence as a controlling mechanism underlying fatigue. Inflammation and neurotransmission are key processes involved in pain perception and the COMT gene is associated with multiple sorts of pain. The neurotransmitter and neuroplasticity theories have the strongest evidence for their relationship with depression. Oxytocin-related genes and genes involved in the serotonergic and dopaminergic pathways play a role in social functioning. Inflammatory pathways, via cytokines, also play an important role in overall QOL. Conclusions Whereas the current findings need future experiments and replication efforts, they will provide researchers supportive background information when embarking on studies relating candidate genes and/or molecular markers to QOL domains. The ultimate goal of this area of research is to enhance patients’ QOL. PMID:24604075

  15. Variability analysis of 'Persian' acid lime tree selections using agronomic and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Santos, M G; Passos, O S; Soares Filho, W S; Girardi, E A; Gesteira, A S; Ferreira, C F

    2013-01-01

    'Persian' acid lime (PAL) is the most important triploid commercial citrus crop planted in the world. Little is known about the genetic variability of the selections used in Brazil. Therefore, 25 genotypes originating from the PAL, and three control species, Citrus sunki, C. limon, and C. aurantiifolia, were assessed using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) molecular markers and agronomic traits of the fruit. The dendrograms were designed using the mean Euclidean distance for the physicochemical attributes of the fruit (weight, length, diameter, peel color, peel thickness, number of seeds, juice yield, titratable acidity, soluble solids, and ratio) and the Jaccard distances using the data from the ISSR and IRAP molecular markers. In the physicochemical analysis, the genotypes were grouped according to species. The trait that contributed most to the diversity among accessions was the number of seeds. The 17 ISSR primers produced 69 polymorphic bands in the molecular analysis, and the seven IRAP primers generated 30 polymorphic bands. The markers detected polymorphisms within and among the PALs; two groups were formed within the PALs. PMID:24222236

  16. Molecular genetics, recombinant DNA techniques, and genetic neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, R N

    1984-06-01

    The molecular defects responsible for Huntington's disease, the spinocerebellar degenerations, myotonic muscular dystrophy, neurofibromatosis, and tuberous sclerosis, among other major dominant inherited diseases of the nervous system, will be identified using the new techniques of molecular genetics. With synthesized nucleic acid segments complementary to portions of the patient's DNA, known as complementary DNA probes, it will be possible to identify and isolate the mutant gene responsible for a particular disease. These events are referred to as gene cloning. In addition, complex genetic regulatory mechanisms involved in cell differentiation during neuroembryogenesis will be elucidated with the application of these strategies. It is important for the clinician to become familiar with the precision and potential of these new methodologies, because they will soon influence significantly the practice of neurology.

  17. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Sugarcane Parents in Chinese Breeding Programmes Using gSSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    You, Qian; Xu, Liping; Zheng, Yifeng; Que, Youxiong

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane is the most important sugar and bioenergy crop in the world. The selection and combination of parents for crossing rely on an understanding of their genetic structures and molecular diversity. In the present study, 115 sugarcane genotypes used for parental crossing were genotyped based on five genomic simple sequence repeat marker (gSSR) loci and 88 polymorphic alleles of loci (100%) as detected by capillary electrophoresis. The values of genetic diversity parameters across the populations indicate that the genetic variation intrapopulation (90.5%) was much larger than that of interpopulation (9.5%). Cluster analysis revealed that there were three groups termed as groups I, II, and III within the 115 genotypes. The genotypes released by each breeding programme showed closer genetic relationships, except the YC series released by Hainan sugarcane breeding station. Using principle component analysis (PCA), the first and second principal components accounted for a cumulative 76% of the total variances, in which 43% were for common parents and 33% were for new parents, respectively. The knowledge obtained in this study should be useful to future breeding programs for increasing genetic diversity of sugarcane varieties and cultivars to meet the demand of sugarcane cultivation for sugar and bioenergy use. PMID:23990759

  18. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies. PMID:26558925

  19. Genetic diversity in South African Nguni cattle ecotypes based on microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Sanarana, Yandisiwe; Visser, Carina; Bosman, Lydia; Nephawe, Khathutshelo; Maiwashe, Azwihangwisi; van Marle-Köster, Este

    2016-02-01

    The Nguni cattle breed is a landrace breed adapted to different ecological regions of South Africa. A number of ecotypes are recognised based on phenotype within the breed, but it is not known if they are genetically distinct. In this study, molecular characterisation was performed on Makhathini (MAK), Pedi (PED), Shangaan (SHA) and Venda (VEN) Nguni cattle ecotypes. Two Nguni cattle populations, not kept as separate ecotypes, from the University of Fort Hare (UFH) and Agricultural Research Council Loskop South farm (LOS) were also included. Genotypic data was generated for 189 unrelated Nguni cattle selected based on pedigree records using 22 microsatellite markers. The expected heterozygosity values varied from 69 % (UFH) to 72 % (PED) with a mean number of alleles ranging from 6.0 to 6.9. The F ST estimate demonstrated that 4.8 % of the total genetic variation was due to the genetic differentiation between the populations and 92.2 % accounted for differences within the populations. The genetic distances and structure analysis revealed the closest relationship between MAK, PEDI and SHA ecotypes, followed by SHA and VEN. The UFH population clustered with the MAK ecotype, indicating that they are more genetically similar, while the LOS cattle grouped as a distinct cluster. Results suggest that the genetic differentiation between the PED and SHA ecotypes is low and can be regarded as one ecotype based on limited genetic differences. The results of this study can be applied as a point of reference for further genetic studies towards conservation of Nguni cattle ecotypes.

  20. Molecular diversity analysis of eggplant (Solanum melongena) genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z; Xu, Z L; Zhang, D Y; He, X L; Bahadur, S; Yi, J X

    2011-06-14

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena), a vegetable that is cultivated worldwide, is of considerable importance to agriculture in China. We analyzed the diversity of this plant using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and RAPD procedures to subdivide 143 Chinese-cultivated eggplants based on coefficient of parentage, genetic diversity index (GDI) and canonical discriminant analysis. ISSR markers were more effective than RAPD markers for detecting genetic diversity, which ranged from 0.10-0.51, slightly lower than what is known from other crops. Our ISSR/RAPD data provide molecular evidence that coincides with morphological-based classification into three varieties and further subdivision into eight groups, except for two groups. Intensive use of elite parents and extensive crossing within groups have resulted in increased coefficient of parentage and proportional contribution but decreased GDI during the past decades. The mean coefficient of parentage and proportional contribution increased from 0.05 to 0.10% and from 3.22 to 6.46% during 1980-1991 and 1992-2003, respectively. The GDI of landraces was 0.21, higher than the 0.09 and 0.08 calculated for the hybrid cultivars released during the two periods. The recent introduction of alien genotypes into eggplant breeding programs may broaden the genetic base.

  1. Genetics of asthma: a molecular biologist perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amrendra; Ghosh, Balaram

    2009-01-01

    Asthma belongs to the category of classical allergic diseases which generally arise due to IgE mediated hypersensitivity to environmental triggers. Since its prevalence is very high in developed or urbanized societies it is also referred to as "disease of civilizations". Due to its increased prevalence among related individuals, it was understood quite long back that it is a genetic disorder. Well designed epidemiological studies reinforced these views. The advent of modern biological technology saw further refinements in our understanding of genetics of asthma and led to the realization that asthma is not a disorder with simple Mendelian mode of inheritance but a multifactorial disorder of the airways brought about by complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Current asthma research has witnessed evidences that are compelling researchers to redefine asthma altogether. Although no consensus exists among workers regarding its definition, it seems obvious that several pathologies, all affecting the airways, have been clubbed into one common category called asthma. Needless to say, genetic studies have led from the front in bringing about these transformations. Genomics, molecular biology, immunology and other interrelated disciplines have unearthed data that has changed the way we think about asthma now. In this review, we center our discussions on genetic basis of asthma; the molecular mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Taking cue from the existing data we would briefly ponder over the future directions that should improve our understanding of asthma pathogenesis. PMID:19419542

  2. Genetics of asthma: a molecular biologist perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amrendra; Ghosh, Balaram

    2009-05-06

    Asthma belongs to the category of classical allergic diseases which generally arise due to IgE mediated hypersensitivity to environmental triggers. Since its prevalence is very high in developed or urbanized societies it is also referred to as "disease of civilizations". Due to its increased prevalence among related individuals, it was understood quite long back that it is a genetic disorder. Well designed epidemiological studies reinforced these views. The advent of modern biological technology saw further refinements in our understanding of genetics of asthma and led to the realization that asthma is not a disorder with simple Mendelian mode of inheritance but a multifactorial disorder of the airways brought about by complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Current asthma research has witnessed evidences that are compelling researchers to redefine asthma altogether. Although no consensus exists among workers regarding its definition, it seems obvious that several pathologies, all affecting the airways, have been clubbed into one common category called asthma. Needless to say, genetic studies have led from the front in bringing about these transformations. Genomics, molecular biology, immunology and other interrelated disciplines have unearthed data that has changed the way we think about asthma now. In this review, we center our discussions on genetic basis of asthma; the molecular mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Taking cue from the existing data we would briefly ponder over the future directions that should improve our understanding of asthma pathogenesis.

  3. Genetics of asthma: a molecular biologist perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amrendra; Ghosh, Balaram

    2009-01-01

    Asthma belongs to the category of classical allergic diseases which generally arise due to IgE mediated hypersensitivity to environmental triggers. Since its prevalence is very high in developed or urbanized societies it is also referred to as "disease of civilizations". Due to its increased prevalence among related individuals, it was understood quite long back that it is a genetic disorder. Well designed epidemiological studies reinforced these views. The advent of modern biological technology saw further refinements in our understanding of genetics of asthma and led to the realization that asthma is not a disorder with simple Mendelian mode of inheritance but a multifactorial disorder of the airways brought about by complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Current asthma research has witnessed evidences that are compelling researchers to redefine asthma altogether. Although no consensus exists among workers regarding its definition, it seems obvious that several pathologies, all affecting the airways, have been clubbed into one common category called asthma. Needless to say, genetic studies have led from the front in bringing about these transformations. Genomics, molecular biology, immunology and other interrelated disciplines have unearthed data that has changed the way we think about asthma now. In this review, we center our discussions on genetic basis of asthma; the molecular mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Taking cue from the existing data we would briefly ponder over the future directions that should improve our understanding of asthma pathogenesis. PMID:19419542

  4. Comparison of SSR and SNP Markers in Estimation of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Indian Rice Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Sundeep; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Tyagi, R. K.; Singh, N. K.; Singh, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphic (SNP), the two most robust markers for identifying rice varieties were compared for assessment of genetic diversity and population structure. Total 375 varieties of rice from various regions of India archived at the Indian National GeneBank, NBPGR, New Delhi, were analyzed using thirty six genetic markers, each of hypervariable SSR (HvSSR) and SNP which were distributed across 12 rice chromosomes. A total of 80 alleles were amplified with the SSR markers with an average of 2.22 alleles per locus whereas, 72 alleles were amplified with SNP markers. Polymorphic information content (PIC) values for HvSSR ranged from 0.04 to 0.5 with an average of 0.25. In the case of SNP markers, PIC values ranged from 0.03 to 0.37 with an average of 0.23. Genetic relatedness among the varieties was studied; utilizing an unrooted tree all the genotypes were grouped into three major clusters with both SSR and SNP markers. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that maximum diversity was partitioned between and within individual level but not between populations. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) with SSR markers showed that genotypes were uniformly distributed across the two axes with 13.33% of cumulative variation whereas, in case of SNP markers varieties were grouped into three broad groups across two axes with 45.20% of cumulative variation. Population structure were tested using K values from 1 to 20, but there was no clear population structure, therefore Ln(PD) derived Δk was plotted against the K to determine the number of populations. In case of SSR maximum Δk was at K=5 whereas, in case of SNP maximum Δk was found at K=15, suggesting that resolution of population was higher with SNP markers, but SSR were more efficient for diversity analysis. PMID:24367635

  5. Development of pineapple microsatellite markers and germplasm genetic diversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Suping; Tong, Helin; Chen, You; Wang, Jingyi; Chen, Yeyuan; Sun, Guangming; He, Junhu; Wu, Yaoting

    2013-01-01

    Two methods were used to develop pineapple microsatellite markers. Genomic library-based SSR development: using selectively amplified microsatellite assay, 86 sequences were generated from pineapple genomic library. 91 (96.8%) of the 94 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) loci were dinucleotide repeats (39 AC/GT repeats and 52 GA/TC repeats, accounting for 42.9% and 57.1%, resp.), and the other three were mononucleotide repeats. Thirty-six pairs of SSR primers were designed; 24 of them generated clear bands of expected sizes, and 13 of them showed polymorphism. EST-based SSR development: 5659 pineapple EST sequences obtained from NCBI were analyzed; among 1397 nonredundant EST sequences, 843 were found containing 1110 SSR loci (217 of them contained more than one SSR locus). Frequency of SSRs in pineapple EST sequences is 1SSR/3.73 kb, and 44 types were found. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats dominate, accounting for 95.6% in total. AG/CT and AGC/GCT were the dominant type of dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeats, accounting for 83.5% and 24.1%, respectively. Thirty pairs of primers were designed for each of randomly selected 30 sequences; 26 of them generated clear and reproducible bands, and 22 of them showed polymorphism. Eighteen pairs of primers obtained by the one or the other of the two methods above that showed polymorphism were selected to carry out germplasm genetic diversity analysis for 48 breeds of pineapple; similarity coefficients of these breeds were between 0.59 and 1.00, and they can be divided into four groups accordingly. Amplification products of five SSR markers were extracted and sequenced, corresponding repeat loci were found and locus mutations are mainly in copy number of repeats and base mutations in the flanking region.

  6. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Robert L; Gourley, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research. PMID:27458531

  7. Genetics and Molecular Pathogenesis of Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Patrick; Yeoh, Khay-Guan

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is globally the fifth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death. A complex disease arising from the interaction of environmental and host-associated factors, key contributors to GC's high mortality include its silent nature, late clinical presentation, and underlying biological and genetic heterogeneity. Achieving a detailed molecular understanding of the various genomic aberrations associated with GC will be critical to improving patient outcomes. The recent years has seen considerable progress in deciphering the genomic landscape of GC, identifying new molecular components such as ARID1A and RHOA, cellular pathways, and tissue populations associated with gastric malignancy and progression. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project is a landmark in the molecular characterization of GC. Key challenges for the future will involve the translation of these molecular findings to clinical utility, by enabling novel strategies for early GC detection, and precision therapies for individual GC patients.

  8. Genetic diversity of Toona sinensis Roem in China revealed by ISSR and SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Xing, P Y; Liu, T; Song, Z Q; Li, X F

    2016-07-29

    Toona sinensis Roem has an important value as a type of traditional vegetable and Chinese medicinal herb, and is also a valuable source of wood in China. In this study, we used the inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers to assess the level and pattern of genetic diversity in five domesticated T. sinensis populations in China. Our results indicated a relatively low level of genetic diversity both at species (Hs = 0.1662, 0.2098, respectively) and population levels (Hs = 0.0978, 0.1145, respectively). Molecular variance analyses revealed a relatively high degree of differentiation among populations (GST = 0.3901, 0.4498), and low levels of gene flow (Nm = 0.7816 and 0.6116). We divided the five populations into two groups by cluster analysis: group one consists of populations collected from the south part of China (e.g., Yuxi, Yunan Province and Zuanjiang, Chongqing Municipality), and group two contains those cultivated in north part of China (e.g., Hengshui, Hebei Province, Jinan and Rizhao, Shandong Province). The correlation of genetic relationships among populations fits well with their geographical distribution (Mantel test; r = 0.7236 and 0.6789, respectively). Asexual propagation, limited gene flow and geographic isolation are most likely the key factors associated with the observed genetic structure of T. sinensis grown in China. The present study indicated that both ISSR and SRAP markers were effective and reliable for assessing the degree of T. sinensis genetic variations.

  9. Multilocus nuclear DNA markers and genetic parameters in an Indian Anopheles minimus population.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Jyotsana; Srivastava, Hemlata; Singh, O P; Saksena, D N; Das, Aparup

    2011-04-01

    Estimation of population genetic parameters is highly dependent on the choice of genetic markers. Furthermore, inferences based on single genes could lead to erroneous conclusions and population genetic outcomes, thus usage of multiple loci is suggested. Considering malaria is a highly fatal vector-borne infectious disease, inference on population genetic structure and demography could be of help in the long run for malaria vector management and control. Using the published genome sequence information of Anopheles gambiae we designed EPIC primers to amplify DNA fragments in An. minimus nuclear genome. Eight such DNA fragments could be successfully amplified and sequenced and homology to corresponding genes of An. gambiae was established. All the eight DNA fragments were found to be polymorphic for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a population sample of An. minimus from India. Several tests of neutrality confirmed that all the eight fragments evolve under a standard neutral model of molecular evolution. Furthermore, multilocus linkage disequilibrium studies revealed that the DNA fragments were not genetically linked to each other and thus are independently evolving. Tests of past population demographic events clearly revealed that this Indian population of An. minimus follows demographic equilibrium model, without any significant recent population bottleneck or expansion. The eight multilocus nuclear DNA fragments thus could be considered as 'putatively neutral' and be used to infer population structure and demographic history of An. minimus, a major malaria vector in the Southeast Asia and India. Moreover, the estimations of population demography using these putatively neutral markers can provide a baseline against which, test for the role of natural selection in functionally relevant genes of An. minimus would be possible.

  10. Genetic stability of micropropagated plants of Crambe abyssinica Hochst using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Werner, E T; Soares, T C B; Gontijo, A B P L; Souza Neto, J D; do Amaral, J A T

    2015-12-09

    Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is a non-edible annual herb, which was first cultivated to extract oil for industry, and now has great potential for biodiesel production. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the genetic stability of micropropagated plants of the C. abyssinica Hochst cultivar 'FMS brilhante' using polymerase chain reaction techniques based on inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. The aim was to develop a protocol for the in vitro regeneration of these plants with low genetic variation as compared to the donor plant. For micropropagation, shoot tips from in vitro germinated seedlings were used as explants and were initially cultivated for 90 days on MS medium with 5.0 μM 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), which at 90 days, led to the highest number of shoots per explant (NSE) (12.20 shoots) being detected. After 120 days, the interaction between BAP concentration and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) was tested, and the highest NSE was observed following exposure to 0.0/0.5 μM BAP/NAA (11.40 shoots) and 1.0/0.0 μM BAP/NAA (11.00 shoots). The highest proportion of rooting phase were observed following exposure to 0.5 μM NAA (30%). The 13 ISSR primers used to analyze genetic stability produced 91 amplification products, of which only eight bands were polymorphic and 83 were monomorphic for all 10 regenerated crambe plants, compared to the donor plant explant. These results indicate that crambe shoot tips are a highly reliable explant that can be used to micropropagate genetically true-to-type plants or to maintain genetic stability, as verified using ISSR markers.

  11. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (`K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.

  12. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (‘K13-propeller’) with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread. PMID:24352242

  13. Comparative use of InDel and SSR markers in deciphering the interspecific structure of cultivated citrus genetic diversity: a perspective for genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    García-Lor, Andrés; Luro, François; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Genetic stratification associated with domestication history is a key parameter for estimating the pertinence of genetic association study within a gene pool. Previous molecular and phenotypic studies have shown that most of the diversity of cultivated citrus results from recombination between three main species: C. medica (citron), C. reticulata (mandarin) and C. maxima (pummelo). However, the precise contribution of each of these basic species to the genomes of secondary cultivated species, such as C. sinensis (sweet orange), C. limon (lemon), C. aurantium (sour orange), C. paradisi (grapefruit) and recent hybrids is unknown. Our study focused on: (1) the development of insertion-deletion (InDel) markers and their comparison with SSR markers for use in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies; (2) the analysis of the contributions of basic taxa to the genomes of secondary species and modern cultivars and (3) the description of the organisation of the Citrus gene pool, to evaluate how genetic association studies should be done at the cultivated Citrus gene pool level. InDel markers appear to be better phylogenetic markers for tracing the contributions of the three ancestral species, whereas SSR markers are more useful for intraspecific diversity analysis. Most of the genetic organisation of the Citrus gene pool is related to the differentiation between C. reticulata, C. maxima and C. medica. High and generalised LD was observed, probably due to the initial differentiation between the basic species and a limited number of interspecific recombinations. This structure precludes association genetic studies at the genus level without developing additional recombinant populations from interspecific hybrids. Association genetic studies should also be affordable at intraspecific level in a less structured pool such as C. reticulata. PMID:22160318

  14. Molecular diversity and population structure of the forage grass Hemarthria compressa (Poaceae) in south China based on SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Huang, L-K; Zhang, X-Q; Xie, W-G; Zhang, J; Cheng, L; Yan, H D

    2012-08-16

    Hemarthria compressa is one of the most important and widely utilized forage crops in south China, owing to its high forage yield and capability of adaptation to hot and humid conditions. We examined the population structure and genetic variation within and among 12 populations of H. compressa in south China using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers. High genetic diversity was found in these samples [percentage polymorphic bands (PPB) = 82.21%, Shannon's diversity index (I) = 0.352]. However, there was relatively low level of genetic diversity at the population level (PPB = 29.17%, I = 0.155). A high degree of genetic differentiation among populations was detected based on other measures and molecular markers (Nei's genetic diversity analysis: G(ST) = 54.19%; AMOVA analysis: F(ST) = 53.35%). The SRAP markers were found to be more efficient than ISSR markers for evaluating population diversity. Based on these findings, we propose changes in sampling strategies for appraising and utilizing the genetic resources of this species.

  15. Annotated genetic linkage maps of Pinus pinaster Ait. from a Central Spain population using microsatellite and gene based markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pinus pinaster Ait. is a major resin producing species in Spain. Genetic linkage mapping can facilitate marker-assisted selection (MAS) through the identification of Quantitative Trait Loci and selection of allelic variants of interest in breeding populations. In this study, we report annotated genetic linkage maps for two individuals (C14 and C15) belonging to a breeding program aiming to increase resin production. We use different types of DNA markers, including last-generation molecular markers. Results We obtained 13 and 14 linkage groups for C14 and C15 maps, respectively. A total of 211 and 215 markers were positioned on each map and estimated genome length was between 1,870 and 2,166 cM respectively, which represents near 65% of genome coverage. Comparative mapping with previously developed genetic linkage maps for P. pinaster based on about 60 common markers enabled aligning linkage groups to this reference map. The comparison of our annotated linkage maps and linkage maps reporting QTL information revealed 11 annotated SNPs in candidate genes that co-localized with previously reported QTLs for wood properties and water use efficiency. Conclusions This study provides genetic linkage maps from a Spanish population that shows high levels of genetic divergence with French populations from which segregating progenies have been previously mapped. These genetic maps will be of interest to construct a reliable consensus linkage map for the species. The importance of developing functional genetic linkage maps is highlighted, especially when working with breeding populations for its future application in MAS for traits of interest. PMID:23036012

  16. Molecular content relations in the genetic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Gerald

    1999-03-01

    The codons are numbered from 1-64 by a simple formula based on the number of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen atoms in the nucleotides of each triplet. The codon range numbers that follow for the 20 amino acids are shown to be given by linear Diophantine and explicit molecular content equations in the number of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur atoms in each amino acid. Thus the universal genetic code that associated codons and amino acids is expressed in a precise way by purely physical molecular content relations.

  17. Development of novel SCAR markers for genetic characterization of Lonicera japonica from high GC-RAMP-PCR and DNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J L; Li, J; Qiu, Y M; Wei, C L; Yang, L Q; Fu, J J

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers were further developed from high-GC primer RAMP-PCR-amplified fragments from Lonicera japonica DNA by molecular cloning. The four DNA fragments from three high-GC primers (FY-27, FY-28, and FY-29) were successfully cloned into a pGM-T vector. The positive clones were sequenced; their names, sizes, and GenBank numbers were JYHGC1-1, 345 bp, KJ620024; YJHGC2-1, 388 bp, KJ620025; JYHGC7-2, 1036 bp, KJ620026; and JYHGC6-2, 715 bp, KJ620027, respectively. Four novel SCAR markers were developed by designing specific primers, optimizing conditions, and PCR validation. The developed SCAR markers were used for the genetic authentication of L. japonica from its substitutes. This technique provides another means of developing DNA markers for the characterization and authentication of various organisms including medicinal plants and their substitutes. PMID:27173286

  18. Genetic and molecular aspects of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Caulfield, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna F

    2015-03-13

    Until recently, significant advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of blood pressure regulation arose from studies of monogenic forms of hypertension and hypotension, which identified rare variants that primarily alter renal salt handling. Genome-wide association and exome sequencing studies over the past 6 years have resulted in an unparalleled burst of discovery in the genetics of blood pressure regulation and hypertension. More importantly, genome-wide association studies, while expanding the list of common genetic variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension, are also uncovering novel pathways of blood pressure regulation that augur a new era of novel drug development, repurposing, and stratification in the management of hypertension. In this review, we describe the current state of the art of the genetic and molecular basis of blood pressure and hypertension.

  19. Advances in molecular genetic systems in malaria.

    PubMed

    de Koning-Ward, Tania F; Gilson, Paul R; Crabb, Brendan S

    2015-06-01

    Robust tools for analysing gene function in Plasmodium parasites, which are the causative agents of malaria, are being developed at an accelerating rate. Two decades after genetic technologies for use in Plasmodium spp. were first described, a range of genetic tools are now available. These include conditional systems that can regulate gene expression at the genome, transcriptional or protein level, as well as more sophisticated tools for gene editing that use piggyBac transposases, integrases, zinc-finger nucleases or the CRISPR-Cas9 system. In this Review, we discuss the molecular genetic systems that are currently available for use in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei, and evaluate the advantages and limitations of these tools. We examine the insights that have been gained into the function of genes that are important during the blood stages of the parasites, which may help to guide the development and improvement of drug therapies and vaccines.

  20. Microbial Biofilms: from Ecology to Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Mary Ellen; O'toole, George A.

    2000-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms attached to surfaces or associated with interfaces. Despite the focus of modern microbiology research on pure culture, planktonic (free-swimming) bacteria, it is now widely recognized that most bacteria found in natural, clinical, and industrial settings persist in association with surfaces. Furthermore, these microbial communities are often composed of multiple species that interact with each other and their environment. The determination of biofilm architecture, particularly the spatial arrangement of microcolonies (clusters of cells) relative to one another, has profound implications for the function of these complex communities. Numerous new experimental approaches and methodologies have been developed in order to explore metabolic interactions, phylogenetic groupings, and competition among members of the biofilm. To complement this broad view of biofilm ecology, individual organisms have been studied using molecular genetics in order to identify the genes required for biofilm development and to dissect the regulatory pathways that control the plankton-to-biofilm transition. These molecular genetic studies have led to the emergence of the concept of biofilm formation as a novel system for the study of bacterial development. The recent explosion in the field of biofilm research has led to exciting progress in the development of new technologies for studying these communities, advanced our understanding of the ecological significance of surface-attached bacteria, and provided new insights into the molecular genetic basis of biofilm development. PMID:11104821

  1. Molecular genetic analysis of giant cell glioblastomas.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Puttlitz, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Waha, A.; Rollbrocker, B.; Boström, J.; Wiestler, O. D.; Louis, D. N.; Reifenberger, G.; von Deimling, A.

    1997-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Recently, distinct molecular genetic alterations have been linked to subgroups of patients with GBM. Giant cell (gc)GBMs are a rare variant of GBM characterized by a marked preponderance of multinucleated giant cells. Several reports have associated this entity with a more favorable prognosis than the majority of GBMs. To evaluate whether gcGBM may also represent a genetically defined subgroup of GBM, we analyzed a series of 19 gcGBMs for mutations in the TP53 gene for amplification of the EGFR and CDK4 genes and for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A (p16/MTS1) gene. Seventeen of nineteen gcGBMs carried TP53 mutations whereas EGFR and CDK4 gene amplification was seen in only one tumor each and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was not observed at all. The strikingly high incidence of TP53 mutations and the relative absence of other genetic alterations groups gcGBM together with a previously recognized molecular genetic variant of GBM (type 1 GBM). It is tempting to speculate that the better prognosis of gcGBM patients may result from the low incidence of EGFR amplification and CDKN2A deletion, changes known for their growth-promoting potential. Images Figure 1 PMID:9284834

  2. Genetic diversity of turmeric germplasm (Curcuma longa; Zingiberaceae) identified by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, M S; Pinheiro, J B; Filho, J A Azevedo; Zucchi, M I

    2011-03-09

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a triploid, vegetatively propagated crop introduced early during the colonization of Brazil. Turmeric rhizomes are ground into a powder used as a natural dye in the food industry, although recent research suggests a greater potential for the development of drugs and cosmetics. In Brazil, little is known about the genetic variability available for crop improvement. We examined the genetic diversity among turmeric accessions from a Brazilian germplasm collection comprising 39 accessions collected from the States of Goiás, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, São Paulo, and Pará. For comparison, 18 additional genotypes were analyzed, including samples from India and Puerto Rico. Total DNA was extracted from lyophilized leaf tissue and genetic analysis was performed using 17 microsatellite markers (single-sequence repeats). Shannon-Weiner indexes ranged from 0.017 (Minas Gerais) to 0.316 (São Paulo). Analyses of molecular variance (AMOVA) demonstrated major differences between countries (63.4%) and that most of the genetic diversity in Brazil is found within states (75.3%). Genotypes from São Paulo State were the most divergent and potentially useful for crop improvement. Structure analysis indicated two main groups of accessions. These results can help target future collecting efforts for introduction of new materials needed to develop more productive and better adapted cultivars.

  3. Species boundaries of Astreopora corals (Scleractinia, Acroporidae) inferred by mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go; Nomura, Keiichi

    2013-08-01

    The genus Astreopora is a small but ancestral group in Acroporidae, which is one of the most diverse and dominant families of scleractinian coral in Indo-Pacific reefs. We estimated the species boundaries of Astreopora corals using two molecular markers: a mitochondrial non-coding region and a nuclear ribosomal 5.8S region. Seven species (59 specimens) commonly observed around Japan (Astreopora expansa, A. gracilis, A. incrustans, A. listeri, A. myriophthalma, A. cf. suggesta, and Astreopora sp.1) were investigated, and we observed no genetic divergence in the mitochondrial marker, suggesting that these species are closely related, consistent with a species complex or recent divergence, although genotyping by the marker is not so sensitive. In the nuclear 5.8S region, 121 clones consisted of six species were divided into the four major genetic groups. Although there were no monophyletic clades, the two dominant species A. myriophthalma and A. gracilis rarely shared the same haplotypes, suggesting that gene flow is limited between them. However, A. incrustans frequently shared the same haplotypes with A. gracilis although the distributions do not overlap. We found that the ancestral genus Astreopora in Acroporidae shows less genetic variation than traditionally identified morphospecies. Although further research on fertilization rate among these species is required to determine if there are reproductive barriers, the low level of genetic diversification in this genus hints that some ecological differences among acroporid corals play a role in the evolution of scleractinian corals, considering that the other members of this family, Acropora and Montipora, are highly diversified.

  4. Species boundaries of Astreopora corals (Scleractinia, Acroporidae) inferred by mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go; Nomura, Keiichi

    2013-08-01

    The genus Astreopora is a small but ancestral group in Acroporidae, which is one of the most diverse and dominant families of scleractinian coral in Indo-Pacific reefs. We estimated the species boundaries of Astreopora corals using two molecular markers: a mitochondrial non-coding region and a nuclear ribosomal 5.8S region. Seven species (59 specimens) commonly observed around Japan (Astreopora expansa, A. gracilis, A. incrustans, A. listeri, A. myriophthalma, A. cf. suggesta, and Astreopora sp.1) were investigated, and we observed no genetic divergence in the mitochondrial marker, suggesting that these species are closely related, consistent with a species complex or recent divergence, although genotyping by the marker is not so sensitive. In the nuclear 5.8S region, 121 clones consisted of six species were divided into the four major genetic groups. Although there were no monophyletic clades, the two dominant species A. myriophthalma and A. gracilis rarely shared the same haplotypes, suggesting that gene flow is limited between them. However, A. incrustans frequently shared the same haplotypes with A. gracilis although the distributions do not overlap. We found that the ancestral genus Astreopora in Acroporidae shows less genetic variation than traditionally identified morphospecies. Although further research on fertilization rate among these species is required to determine if there are reproductive barriers, the low level of genetic diversification in this genus hints that some ecological differences among acroporid corals play a role in the evolution of scleractinian corals, considering that the other members of this family, Acropora and Montipora, are highly diversified. PMID:23915155

  5. Genetic Variability and Geographic Diversity of the Common Bed Bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) Populations from the Midwest Using Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Narain, Ralph B; Lalithambika, Sreedevi; Kamble, Shripat T

    2015-07-01

    With the recent global resurgence of the bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.), there is a need to better understand its biology, ecology, and ability to establish populations. Bed bugs are domestic pests that feed mainly on mammalian blood. Although bed bugs have not been implicated as vectors of pathogens, their biting activity inflicts severe insomnia and allergic reactions. Moreover, they have recently developed resistance to various insecticides, which requires further molecular research to determine genetic variation and appropriate interventions. Population dynamics, including genetic differentiation and genetic distance of 10 populations from the Midwest were analyzed in this study. The bed bug samples collected by pest control companies were genotyped using eight species-specific microsatellite markers. Results showed all eight markers were polymorphic, with 8-16 alleles per locus, suggesting high genetic diversity. The FST values were >0.25, signifying pronounced genetic differentiation. The G-test results also indicated high genetic differentiation among populations. The frequency of the most common allele across all eight loci was 0.42. The coefficient of relatedness between each of the populations was >0.5, indicative of sibling or parent-offspring relationships, while the FIS and its confidence interval values were statistically insignificant within the populations tested. The populations departed from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, possibly because of high heterozygosity. The genetic distance analysis using a neighbor-joining tree showed that the populations from Kansas City, MO, were genetically separate from most of those from Nebraska, indicating a geographic pattern of genetic structure. Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of using microsatellite markers to study bed bugs population structure, thereby improving our understanding of bed bug population dynamics in the Midwest. Overall, this study showed a high genetic diversity and identified several

  6. Recent trends and perspectives of molecular markers against fungal diseases in wheat.

    PubMed

    Goutam, Umesh; Kukreja, Sarvjeet; Yadav, Rakesh; Salaria, Neha; Thakur, Kajal; Goyal, Aakash K

    2015-01-01

    Wheat accounts for 19% of the total production of major cereal crops in the world. In view of ever increasing population and demand for global food production, there is an imperative need of 40-60% increase in wheat production to meet the requirement of developing world in coming 40 years. However, both biotic and abiotic stresses are major hurdles for attaining the goal. Among the most important diseases in wheat, fungal diseases pose serious threat for widening the gap between actual and attainable yield. Fungal disease management, mainly, depends on the pathogen detection, genetic and pathological variability in population, development of resistant cultivars and deployment of effective resistant genes in different epidemiological regions. Wheat protection and breeding of resistant cultivars using conventional methods are time-consuming, intricate and slow processes. Molecular markers offer an excellent alternative in development of improved disease resistant cultivars that would lead to increase in crop yield. They are employed for tagging the important disease resistance genes and provide valuable assistance in increasing selection efficiency for valuable traits via marker assisted selection (MAS). Plant breeding strategies with known molecular markers for resistance and functional genomics enable a breeder for developing resistant cultivars of wheat against different fungal diseases. PMID:26379639

  7. Recent trends and perspectives of molecular markers against fungal diseases in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Goutam, Umesh; Kukreja, Sarvjeet; Yadav, Rakesh; Salaria, Neha; Thakur, Kajal; Goyal, Aakash K.

    2015-01-01

    Wheat accounts for 19% of the total production of major cereal crops in the world. In view of ever increasing population and demand for global food production, there is an imperative need of 40–60% increase in wheat production to meet the requirement of developing world in coming 40 years. However, both biotic and abiotic stresses are major hurdles for attaining the goal. Among the most important diseases in wheat, fungal diseases pose serious threat for widening the gap between actual and attainable yield. Fungal disease management, mainly, depends on the pathogen detection, genetic and pathological variability in population, development of resistant cultivars and deployment of effective resistant genes in different epidemiological regions. Wheat protection and breeding of resistant cultivars using conventional methods are time-consuming, intricate and slow processes. Molecular markers offer an excellent alternative in development of improved disease resistant cultivars that would lead to increase in crop yield. They are employed for tagging the important disease resistance genes and provide valuable assistance in increasing selection efficiency for valuable traits via marker assisted selection (MAS). Plant breeding strategies with known molecular markers for resistance and functional genomics enable a breeder for developing resistant cultivars of wheat against different fungal diseases. PMID:26379639

  8. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers: A potential resource for studies in plant molecular biology1

    PubMed Central

    Robarts, Daniel W. H.; Wolfe, Andrea D.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, many investigations in the field of plant biology have employed selectively neutral, multilocus, dominant markers such as inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to address hypotheses at lower taxonomic levels. More recently, sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers have been developed, which are used to amplify coding regions of DNA with primers targeting open reading frames. These markers have proven to be robust and highly variable, on par with AFLP, and are attained through a significantly less technically demanding process. SRAP markers have been used primarily for agronomic and horticultural purposes, developing quantitative trait loci in advanced hybrids and assessing genetic diversity of large germplasm collections. Here, we suggest that SRAP markers should be employed for research addressing hypotheses in plant systematics, biogeography, conservation, ecology, and beyond. We provide an overview of the SRAP literature to date, review descriptive statistics of SRAP markers in a subset of 171 publications, and present relevant case studies to demonstrate the applicability of SRAP markers to the diverse field of plant biology. Results of these selected works indicate that SRAP markers have the potential to enhance the current suite of molecular tools in a diversity of fields by providing an easy-to-use, highly variable marker with inherent biological significance. PMID:25202637

  9. Development of microsatellite markers for Manilkara maxima T.D. Penn. (Sapotaceae) and their use in conservation genetics.

    PubMed

    Silva-Junior, José Audenor; de Souza França, Daniele; Moraes, Ramiris César Souza; Gaiotto, Fernanda Amato

    2016-06-01

    Manilkara maxima is an endemic tree species of the Atlantic Forest in southern Bahia, Brazil. It is considered important for forest conservation due to its mutualistic interactions with endemic and endangered animals. Our aim was to develop microsatellite markers to estimate genetic diversity in order to provide information for effectiveness of future conservation programs. We used next generation sequencing technology to develop the first specific microsatellite markers for M. maxima. Seventeen new microsatellite loci were applied in 72 individuals sampled in three natural populations. On average, the number of alleles per loci was 8.8. The expected heterozygosity varied between 0.72 and 0.77, indicating that the developed set of molecular markers is useful for genetic diversity studies. Additionally, the estimated value for the combined probability of exclusion (Q) was greater than 0.999, which indicates the powerful of these molecular tools for paternity and kinship analysis. Our results demonstrate that the set of microsatellites developed in this work is a powerful tool for population genetics, molecular ecology and conservation biology purposes. PMID:27061192

  10. Development of microsatellite markers for Manilkara maxima T.D. Penn. (Sapotaceae) and their use in conservation genetics.

    PubMed

    Silva-Junior, José Audenor; de Souza França, Daniele; Moraes, Ramiris César Souza; Gaiotto, Fernanda Amato

    2016-06-01

    Manilkara maxima is an endemic tree species of the Atlantic Forest in southern Bahia, Brazil. It is considered important for forest conservation due to its mutualistic interactions with endemic and endangered animals. Our aim was to develop microsatellite markers to estimate genetic diversity in order to provide information for effectiveness of future conservation programs. We used next generation sequencing technology to develop the first specific microsatellite markers for M. maxima. Seventeen new microsatellite loci were applied in 72 individuals sampled in three natural populations. On average, the number of alleles per loci was 8.8. The expected heterozygosity varied between 0.72 and 0.77, indicating that the developed set of molecular markers is useful for genetic diversity studies. Additionally, the estimated value for the combined probability of exclusion (Q) was greater than 0.999, which indicates the powerful of these molecular tools for paternity and kinship analysis. Our results demonstrate that the set of microsatellites developed in this work is a powerful tool for population genetics, molecular ecology and conservation biology purposes.

  11. Isolation and characterization of genomic microsatellite markers for small cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton) for utility in genetic diversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Cyriac, Anu; Paul, Ritto; Anupama, K; Senthil Kumar, R; Sheeja, T E; Nirmal Babu, K; Parthasarathy, V A

    2016-04-01

    Microsatellite markers in small cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton) were developed using the selective hybridization enrichment method. A total of 140 microsatellite repeats were identified from 270 clones. Primers were designed for 58 microsatellites and 44 primer pairs amplified products of expected size in cardamom. These markers were used for studying the diversity of 20 important small cardamom genotypes, and six markers were found to be polymorphic. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 7 with an average of 3.6 per locus. Polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.14 to 0.38 based on dominant scoring. The two markers ECM 47a and ECMG 28 generated specific banding patterns for the genotypes MCC7 (Pink tiller) and APG434 (MA18) respectively. Dendrogram illustrated the genetic similarity between different genotypes of Kerala and Karnataka regions. It differentiated the closely related genotypes and released varieties into separate groups. Principal coordinate analysis revealed PV1 and ICRI 1 as the most divergent genotypes. The study demonstrated that these markers are informative and can be further utilized for generating reliable molecular data for assisting the crop improvement of small cardamom. Cross generic transferability (71.4 %) of the developed primers proved that they are useful for phylogenetic studies in the family Zingiberaceae. This is the first report of de novo isolation, characterisation and utilization of microsatellite markers for the genetic diversity analysis of small cardamom.

  12. Isolation and characterization of genomic microsatellite markers for small cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton) for utility in genetic diversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Cyriac, Anu; Paul, Ritto; Anupama, K; Senthil Kumar, R; Sheeja, T E; Nirmal Babu, K; Parthasarathy, V A

    2016-04-01

    Microsatellite markers in small cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton) were developed using the selective hybridization enrichment method. A total of 140 microsatellite repeats were identified from 270 clones. Primers were designed for 58 microsatellites and 44 primer pairs amplified products of expected size in cardamom. These markers were used for studying the diversity of 20 important small cardamom genotypes, and six markers were found to be polymorphic. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 7 with an average of 3.6 per locus. Polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.14 to 0.38 based on dominant scoring. The two markers ECM 47a and ECMG 28 generated specific banding patterns for the genotypes MCC7 (Pink tiller) and APG434 (MA18) respectively. Dendrogram illustrated the genetic similarity between different genotypes of Kerala and Karnataka regions. It differentiated the closely related genotypes and released varieties into separate groups. Principal coordinate analysis revealed PV1 and ICRI 1 as the most divergent genotypes. The study demonstrated that these markers are informative and can be further utilized for generating reliable molecular data for assisting the crop improvement of small cardamom. Cross generic transferability (71.4 %) of the developed primers proved that they are useful for phylogenetic studies in the family Zingiberaceae. This is the first report of de novo isolation, characterisation and utilization of microsatellite markers for the genetic diversity analysis of small cardamom. PMID:27436913

  13. Genetic diversity analysis of Capparis spinosa L. populations by using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Xue, G P; Cheng, B; Wang, X; He, J; Liu, G H; Yang, W J

    2015-01-01

    Capparis spinosa L. is an important medicinal species in the Xinjiang Province of China. Ten natural populations of C. spinosa from 3 locations in North, Central, and South Xinjiang were studied using morphological trait inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers to assess the genetic diversity and population structure. In this study, the 10 ISSR primers produced 313 amplified DNA fragments, with 52% of fragments being polymorphic. Unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA) cluster analysis indicated that 10 C. spinosa populations were clustered into 3 geographically distinct groups. The Nei gene of C. spinosa populations in different regions had Diversity and Shannon's information index ranges of 0.1312-0.2001 and 0.1004-0.1875, respectively. The 362 markers were used to construct the dendrogram based on the UPGMA cluster analysis. The dendrogram indicated that 10 populations of C. spinosa were clustered into 3 geographically distinct groups. The results showed these genotypes have high genetic diversity, and can be used for an alternative breeding program.

  14. Genetic, epigenetic, and molecular landscapes of multifocal and multicentric glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qun; Liu, Yuexin; Li, Wenliang; Wang, Xiaoguang; Sawaya, Raymond; Lang, Frederick F; Yung, W K Alfred; Chen, Kexin; Fuller, Gregory N; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Ten to twenty percent of newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) patients initially present with multiple lesions, termed multifocal or multicentric GBM (M-GBM). The prognosis of these patients is poorer than that of solitary GBM (S-GBM) patients. However, it is unknown whether multifocality has a genetic, epigenetic, or molecular basis. Here, we identified the genetic and epigenetic characteristics of M-GBM by performing a comprehensive analysis of multidimensional data, including imaging, genetic, epigenetic, and gene expression profiles, from 30 M-GBM cases in The Cancer Genome Atlas database and comparing the results with those of 173 S-GBM cases. We found that M-GBMs had no IDH1, ATRX, or PDGFRA mutations and were significantly associated with the mesenchymal subtype. We also identified the CYB5R2 gene to be hypo-methylated and overexpressed in M-GBMs. The expression level of CYB5R2 was significantly associated with patient survival in two major independent GBM cohorts, totaling 758 cases. The IDH1 mutation was markedly associated with CYB5R2 promoter methylation, but the survival influence of CYB5R2 was independent of IDH1 mutation status. CYB5R2 expression was significantly associated with collagen maturation and the catabolic process and immunoregulation pathways. These results reveal that M-GBMs have some underlying genetic and epigenetic characteristics that are associated with poor prognosis and that CYB5R2 is a new epigenetic marker for GBM prognosis. PMID:26323991

  15. Assessment of genetic diversity among Indian potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) collection using microsatellite and retrotransposon based marker systems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishakha; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2014-04-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is an important non-cereal crop throughout the world and is highly recommended for ensuring global food security. Owing to the complexities in genetics and inheritance pattern of potato, the conventional method of cross breeding for developing improved varieties has been difficult. Identification and tagging of desirable traits with informative molecular markers would aid in the development of improved varieties. Insertional polymorphism of copia-like and gypsy-like long terminal repeat retrotransposons (RTN) were investigated among 47 potato varieties from India using Inter-Retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP) and Retrotransposon Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism (REMAP) marker techniques and were compared with the DNA profiles obtained with simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The genetic polymorphism, efficiency of polymorphism and effectiveness of marker systems were evaluated to assess the extent of genetic diversity among Indian potato varieties. A total of 139 polymorphic SSR alleles, 270 IRAP and 98 REMAP polymorphic bands, showing polymorphism of 100%, 87.9% and 68.5%, respectively, were used for detailed characterization of the genetic relationships among potato varieties by using cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). IRAP analysis resulted in the highest number of polymorphic bands with an average of 15 polymorphic bands per assay unit when compared to the other two marker systems. Based on pair-wise comparison, the genetic similarity was calculated using Dice similarity coefficient. The SSRs showed a wide range in genetic similarity values (0.485-0.971) as compared to IRAP (0.69-0.911) and REMAP (0.713-0.947). A Mantel's matrix correspondence test showed a high positive correlation (r=0.6) between IRAP and REMAP, an intermediate value (r=0.58) for IRAP and SSR and the lowest value (r=0.17) for SSR and REMAP. Statistically significant cophenetic correlation coefficient values, of 0.961, 0.941 and 0

  16. Assessment of genetic diversity among Indian potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) collection using microsatellite and retrotransposon based marker systems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishakha; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2014-04-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is an important non-cereal crop throughout the world and is highly recommended for ensuring global food security. Owing to the complexities in genetics and inheritance pattern of potato, the conventional method of cross breeding for developing improved varieties has been difficult. Identification and tagging of desirable traits with informative molecular markers would aid in the development of improved varieties. Insertional polymorphism of copia-like and gypsy-like long terminal repeat retrotransposons (RTN) were investigated among 47 potato varieties from India using Inter-Retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP) and Retrotransposon Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism (REMAP) marker techniques and were compared with the DNA profiles obtained with simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The genetic polymorphism, efficiency of polymorphism and effectiveness of marker systems were evaluated to assess the extent of genetic diversity among Indian potato varieties. A total of 139 polymorphic SSR alleles, 270 IRAP and 98 REMAP polymorphic bands, showing polymorphism of 100%, 87.9% and 68.5%, respectively, were used for detailed characterization of the genetic relationships among potato varieties by using cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). IRAP analysis resulted in the highest number of polymorphic bands with an average of 15 polymorphic bands per assay unit when compared to the other two marker systems. Based on pair-wise comparison, the genetic similarity was calculated using Dice similarity coefficient. The SSRs showed a wide range in genetic similarity values (0.485-0.971) as compared to IRAP (0.69-0.911) and REMAP (0.713-0.947). A Mantel's matrix correspondence test showed a high positive correlation (r=0.6) between IRAP and REMAP, an intermediate value (r=0.58) for IRAP and SSR and the lowest value (r=0.17) for SSR and REMAP. Statistically significant cophenetic correlation coefficient values, of 0.961, 0.941 and 0

  17. Advances in carcinogenic metal toxicity and potential molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system's ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  18. Identification of sex in hop (Humulus lupulus) using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Polley, A; Ganal, M W; Seigner, E

    1997-06-01

    The rapid identification of sex in the dioecious hop (Humulus lupulus) is important for the breeding of this cultivated plant because only unfertilized flowers of the female plants are used as an ingredient in the production of beer. It is thought that a sex-chromosome mechanism controls the development of male or female plants. We have compared pools of male and female plants derived from a hop cross to identify molecular markers associated with the Y or male-specific chromosome. Of 900 functional RAPD primers, 32 revealed fragments specific for male plants that were absent in female plants of this cross. Subsequently, the 32 positive primers were tested on unrelated male and female plants. Three of these 32 primers were specific for the Y chromosome in all lines. The Y-specific product derived from one of these primers (OPJ9) was of low copy in hybridization experiments and predominantly present in male plants. Primers developed from the DNA sequence of this product provide a marker for rapid sex identification in crosses of hop by means of PCR. PMID:18464833

  19. Advances in Carcinogenic Metal Toxicity and Potential Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system’s ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  20. Transferability of Cucurbita SSR markers for genetic diversity assessment of Turkish bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) genetic resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic diversity present in crop landraces represents a valuable genetic resource for breeding and genetic studies. Bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) landraces in Turkey are highly genetically diverse. However, the limited genomic resources available for this crop hinder the molecular characte...

  1. Analysis of genetic diversity of Brassica rapa var. chinensis using ISSR markers and development of SCAR marker specific for Fragrant Bok Choy, a product of geographic indication.

    PubMed

    Shen, X L; Zhang, Y M; Xue, J Y; Li, M M; Lin, Y B; Sun, X Q; Hang, Y Y

    2016-04-25

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage [Brassica rapa var. chinensis (Linnaeus) Kitamura] is a popular vegetable and is also used as a medicinal plant in traditional Chinese medicine. Fragrant Bok Choy is a unique accession of non-heading Chinese cabbage and a product of geographic indication certified by the Ministry of Agriculture of China, which is noted for its rich aromatic flavor. However, transitional and overlapping morphological traits can make it difficult to distinguish this accession from other non-heading Chinese cabbages. This study aimed to develop a molecular method for efficient identification of Fragrant Bok Choy. Genetic diversity analysis, based on inter-simple sequence repeat molecular markers, was conducted for 11 non-heading Chinese cabbage accessions grown in the Yangtze River Delta region. Genetic similarity coefficients between the 11 accessions ranged from 0.5455 to 0.8961, and the genetic distance ranged from 0.0755 to 0.4475. Cluster analysis divided the 11 accessions into two major groups. The primer ISSR-840 amplified a fragment specific for Fragrant Bok Choy. A pair of specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) primers based on this fragment amplified a target band in Fragrant Bok Choy individuals, but no band was detected in individuals of other accessions. In conclusion, this study has developed an efficient strategy for authentication of Fragrant Bok Choy. The SCAR marker described here will facilitate the conservation and utilization of this unique non-heading Chinese cabbage germplasm resource.

  2. Analysis of genetic diversity of Brassica rapa var. chinensis using ISSR markers and development of SCAR marker specific for Fragrant Bok Choy, a product of geographic indication.

    PubMed

    Shen, X L; Zhang, Y M; Xue, J Y; Li, M M; Lin, Y B; Sun, X Q; Hang, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage [Brassica rapa var. chinensis (Linnaeus) Kitamura] is a popular vegetable and is also used as a medicinal plant in traditional Chinese medicine. Fragrant Bok Choy is a unique accession of non-heading Chinese cabbage and a product of geographic indication certified by the Ministry of Agriculture of China, which is noted for its rich aromatic flavor. However, transitional and overlapping morphological traits can make it difficult to distinguish this accession from other non-heading Chinese cabbages. This study aimed to develop a molecular method for efficient identification of Fragrant Bok Choy. Genetic diversity analysis, based on inter-simple sequence repeat molecular markers, was conducted for 11 non-heading Chinese cabbage accessions grown in the Yangtze River Delta region. Genetic similarity coefficients between the 11 accessions ranged from 0.5455 to 0.8961, and the genetic distance ranged from 0.0755 to 0.4475. Cluster analysis divided the 11 accessions into two major groups. The primer ISSR-840 amplified a fragment specific for Fragrant Bok Choy. A pair of specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) primers based on this fragment amplified a target band in Fragrant Bok Choy individuals, but no band was detected in individuals of other accessions. In conclusion, this study has developed an efficient strategy for authentication of Fragrant Bok Choy. The SCAR marker described here will facilitate the conservation and utilization of this unique non-heading Chinese cabbage germplasm resource. PMID:27173238

  3. Molecular Pathogenesis and Diagnostic, Prognostic and Predictive Molecular Markers in Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mariño-Enríquez, Adrián; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2016-09-01

    Sarcomas are infrequent mesenchymal neoplasms characterized by notable morphological and molecular heterogeneity. Molecular studies in sarcoma provide refinements to morphologic classification, and contribute diagnostic information (frequently), prognostic stratification (rarely) and predict therapeutic response (occasionally). Herein, we summarize the major molecular mechanisms underlying sarcoma pathogenesis and present clinically useful diagnostic, prognostic and predictive molecular markers for sarcoma. Five major molecular alterations are discussed, illustrated with representative sarcoma types, including 1. the presence of chimeric transcription factors, in vascular tumors; 2. abnormal kinase signaling, in gastrointestinal stromal tumor; 3. epigenetic deregulation, in chondrosarcoma, chondroblastoma, and other tumors; 4. deregulated cell survival and proliferation, due to focal copy number alterations, in dedifferentiated liposarcoma; 5. extreme genomic instability, in conventional osteosarcoma as a representative example of sarcomas with highly complex karyotype. PMID:27523972

  4. Assessment of genetic variability in a traditional cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) farming system, using AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Elias, M; Panaud, O; Robert, T

    2000-09-01

    Despite the urgent need to conserve domesticated plant genetic resources, and developing 'on farm' strategies of conservation, the impact of traditional farming practices and of their interaction with ecological factors on the structure and evolutionary dynamics of the genetic variability of crop populations has been little documented. We assessed the genetic variability of 31 varieties of cassava (M. esculenta Crantz) traditionally grown by Makushi Amerindians from Guyana, using AFLP markers. We used a sample of 38 varieties from an ex situ core collection as a reference. Accessions of wild cassava were also included. While clonality of the varieties was expected due to the vegetative propagation of cassava, 21 varieties presented intravarietal polymorphism. Among the varieties from a single site in Guyana, genetic diversity was the same as that in the accessions from the core collection. We suggest that incorporation of volunteer seedlings, produced by sexual reproduction, into the stock of varieties grown by the Makushi plays a major role in explaining both intravarietal polymorphism and the high level of genetic diversity. No correspondence was found between the structure of molecular diversity and variation observed for agronomic traits that are targets for selection by cultivators. As found in previous studies, all wild forms of cassava clustered together and separately from the cultivated varieties in a Neighbour-Joining dendrogram. These results are consistent with the hypothesis of a limited domestication event in a restricted area, followed by rapid diffusion of cultivated phenotypes and convergent evolution. Our results show that local varieties are an important source of genetic diversity, and highlight the importance of the interaction between human and ecological factors in the dynamics of this diversity.

  5. Estimation of the Genetic Diversity in Tetraploid Alfalfa Populations Based on RAPD Markers for Breeding Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Nagl, Nevena; Taski-Ajdukovic, Ksenija; Barac, Goran; Baburski, Aleksandar; Seccareccia, Ivana; Milic, Dragan; Katic, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Alfalfa is an autotetraploid, allogamous and heterozygous forage legume, whose varieties are synthetic populations. Due to the complex nature of the species, information about genetic diversity of germplasm used in any alfalfa breeding program is most beneficial. The genetic diversity of five alfalfa varieties, involved in progeny tests at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops, was characterized based on RAPD markers. A total of 60 primers were screened, out of which 17 were selected for the analysis of genetic diversity. A total of 156 polymorphic bands were generated, with 10.6 bands per primer. Number and percentage of polymorphic loci, effective number of alleles, expected heterozygosity and Shannon’s information index were used to estimate genetic variation. Variety Zuzana had the highest values for all tested parameters, exhibiting the highest level of variation, whereas variety RSI 20 exhibited the lowest. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 88.39% of the total genetic variation was attributed to intra-varietal variance. The cluster analysis for individual samples and varieties revealed differences in their population structures: variety Zuzana showed a very high level of genetic variation, Banat and Ghareh were divided in subpopulations, while Pecy and RSI 20 were relatively uniform. Ways of exploiting the investigated germplasm in the breeding programs are suggested in this paper, depending on their population structure and diversity. The RAPD analysis shows potential to be applied in analysis of parental populations in semi-hybrid alfalfa breeding program in both, development of new homogenous germplasm, and identification of promising, complementary germplasm. PMID:21954370

  6. Molecular genetics of hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Mauko, Barbara; Auer-Grumbach, Piet; Pieber, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. They are caused by neuronal atrophy and degeneration, predominantly affecting peripheral sensory and autonomic neurons. Both congenital and juvenile to adulthood onset is possible. Currently, the classification of the HSN depends on the mode of inheritance, age at onset, and clinical presentation. Hallmark features are progressive sensory loss, chronic skin ulcers, and other skin abnormalities. Spontaneous fractures and neuropathic arthropathy are frequent complications and often necessitate amputations. Autonomic features vary between different subgroups. Distal muscle weakness and wasting may be present and is sometimes so prominent that it becomes difficult to distinguish HSN from Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. Recent major advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of seven gene loci and six-disease causing genes for autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive HSN. These genes have been shown to play roles in lipid metabolism and the regulation of intracellular vesicular transport, but also a presumptive transcriptional regulator, a nerve growth factor receptor, and a nerve growth factor have been described among the causative genes in HSN. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how mutations in the known genes lead to the phenotype of HSN. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of the molecular genetics of the HSN and the implicated genes. PMID:16775373

  7. Autism and genetics: Clinical approach and association study with two markers of HRAS gene

    SciTech Connect

    Herault, J.; Petit, E.; Cherpi, C.

    1995-08-14

    Twin studies and familial aggregation studies indicate that genetic factors could play a role in infantile autism. In an earlier study, we identified a possible positive association between autism and a c-Harvey-ras (HRAS) oncogene marker at the 3{prime} end of the coding region. In an attempt to confirm this finding, we studied a larger population, well-characterized clinically and genetically. We report a positive association between autism and two HRAS markers, the 3{prime} marker used in the initial study and an additional marker in exon 1. 46 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Construction of a genetic linkage map for cultivated peanut and development of QTLs/markers for marker-assisted breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several genetic maps based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) and backcross (BC) populations have been developed for tetraploid peanut recently. The marker density, however, is still very low especially in context of large genome size (2,800Mb/1C) and 20 linkage groups (LGs). Therefore, improvement of...

  9. Use of a genetic marker to examine genetic interaction among subpopulations of pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha).

    PubMed

    Gharrett, A J; Lane, S; McGregor, A J; Taylor, S G

    2001-01-01

    In 1979 and 1981, a genetic marker was bred into one of the five identifiable subpopulations of pink salmon [Oncorhynchus gorbuscha (Walbaum)] in the Auke Lake drainage in Southeast Alaska. As a result of the marking effort, the frequencies of two malate dehydrogenase (MDH-B1, 2*) alleles were changed in the marked subpopulation, but not in other subpopulations that spawn at different times or places. Between 1983 and 1989, the marker allele frequencies were monitored in many of these subpopulations and in early- and late-run pink salmon spawning in nearby Waydelich Creek, located approximately 1 km away. Changes in allele frequencies at MDH-B1, 2*, used to obtain direct estimates of average migration rates (m) from the marked to the unmarked subpopulations, revealed little or no introgression into early subpopulations or into nearby Waydelich Creek. Moreover, spatially distinct late-run Auke Creek subpopulations were not immediately overrun by the more abundant marked subpopulation. These observations suggest that genetic isolation exists between temporally distinct spawning runs and that small temporal and spatial (or ecological) differences contribute to population structure. These observations should be considered in taking actions that affect conservation and harvest management or extensive culture of salmonids.

  10. Genetic linkage of the Huntington's disease gene to a DNA marker.

    PubMed

    Gusella, J F

    1984-11-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques have provided the means to generate large numbers of new genetic linkage markers. This technology has been used to identify a DNA marker that coinherits with the Huntington's Disease (HD) gene in family studies. The HD locus has thereby been mapped to human chromosome 4. The discovery of a genetic marker for the inheritance of HD has implications both for patient care and future research. The same approach holds considerable promise for the investigation of other genetic diseases, including Dystonia Musculorum Deformans.

  11. Molecular genetic approaches to understanding disease.

    PubMed Central

    Savill, J.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular genetics has greatly increased the understanding of diseases in which there is a single gene defect such as cystic fibrosis. Discovering the gene responsible and its function not only helps determine the pathogenesis of the disease but also offers a possible treatment-gene therapy. Polygenic disorders such as diabetes may soon yield their secrets to the same approach. Animal models of genetic diseases are proving useful research tools, and transgenesis has made xenografting possible. Furthermore, antisense technology allows specific inhibition of undesirably overexpressed genes such as those driving unwanted vascular cell proliferation and restenosis after angioplasty. The completion of the human genome project should make the search for "disease" gene much quicker and will increase still further the importance of these gene based approaches toward diseases. PMID:9006475

  12. Genetics and molecular biology of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Albin, R L; Tagle, D A

    1995-01-01

    In 1993, the genetic abnormality responsible for Huntington's disease was identified as a trinucleotide-repeat expansion in a novel gene. Much has been learned about the molecular genetics of Huntington's disease and the possible effects of the trinucleotide expansion in the development of this disease and other neurological disorders. The Huntington's disease locus is widely expressed throughout the brain and in many non-neural tissues. Current speculation about the pathogenesis of neuronal death concentrates on a 'gain of function' effect in which the abnormal protein has acquired a new and lethal property. Future research will define the normal function of the Huntington's disease locus, test hypotheses regarding the putative gain of function, and explore the factors that determine neuronal susceptibility to the effects of the abnormal allele.

  13. Genetic and molecular genetic studies of murine and human lupus.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, A D; Klinman, D M; Kastner, D L; Seldin, M F; Gause, W C; Scribner, C L; Britten, J L; Siegel, J N; Mountz, J D

    1987-06-01

    Mice and humans with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been studied with regard to cellular, genetic and molecular genetic abnormalities. B cell hyperactivity and autoantibody production are the hallmarks of this illness. In humans with SLE, there is increased stem cell, B cell precursor and B cell proliferation. The same is true of NZB mice. In lpr/lpr and gld/gld mice, marked expansion of a subpopulation of T cells allows extrathymic terminal T cell maturation and secondary B cell hyperactivity. Androgens suppress these processes and polyclonal immune activators accelerate them. Three types of genes are identified: inducing genes, accelerating genes and background genes. These give rise to abnormal expression of various cellular oncogenes, T cell receptor genes and immunoglobulin genes. The data suggest that abnormal immune regulation plays a critical role in the development of SLE, with polyclonal B cell activation being common to both mice and humans with SLE. Different genetic and cellular abnormalities underlie the ultimate syndrome, the common denominator, generalized autoimmunity, that we call SLE.

  14. Molecular genetics of adult-type hypolactasia.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Irma E

    2005-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia (lactase non-persistence; primary lactose malabsorption) is characterized by the down-regulation of the lactase enzyme activity in the intestinal wall after weaning. The down-regulation is genetically determined and a mutation has occurred that has made part of mankind tolerate milk (lactase persistence). A DNA-variant, single nucleotide polymorphism C/T-13910 located 13 910 base pairs (bp) upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) at chromosome 2q21-22 has been shown to associate with the lactase persistence/non-persistence trait both in family and case-control studies. The C/T-13910 variant is located in a non-coding region in the genome in intron 13 of the minichromosome maintenance type 6 gene (MCM6). Significant correlation between the C/T-13910-variant and lactase activity in the intestinal biopsy specimens has been demonstrated. Molecular epidemiological studies on the prevalence of the C/C-13910 genotype associated with low lactase activity are in agreement with the prevalence figures for adult type hypolactasia in>70 diverse ethnic groups studied. Recent functional studies have suggested that this variant has an enhancer effect over the lactase gene. Based on the biochemical, functional, genetic and molecular epidemiological studies of the C/T-13910 variant, genetic testing for adult type hypolactasia has been introduced into clinical practice in Finland. Identification of the genetic change has highlighted the role of non-coding variants in the regulation of common genes and created new tools to study the mechanism of lactase enzyme activation.

  15. Mapping the Naked Neck (NA) and Polydactyly (PO) mutants of the chicken with microsatellite molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Pitel, Frédérique; Bergé, Régis; Coquerelle, Gérard; Crooijmans, Richard PMA; Groenen, Martien AM; Vignal, Alain; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle

    2000-01-01

    The bulked segregant analysis methodology has been used to map, with microsatellite markers, two morphological mutations in the chicken: polydactyly (PO) and naked neck (NA). These autosomal mutations show partial dominance for NA, and dominance with incomplete penetrance for PO. They were mapped previously to different linkage groups of the classical map, PO to the linkage group IV and NA being linked to the erythrocyte antigen CPPP. An informative family of 70 offspring was produced by mating a sire, heterozygous for each of the mutations, to 7 dams homozygous recessive for each locus. Three DNA pools were prepared, pool PO included 20 chicks exhibiting at least one extra-toe, pool NA included 20 non-polydactyly chicks showing the typical phenotype associated with heterozygosity for the naked neck mutation, and pool NP included 20 chicks exhibiting neither of the mutant phenotypes. Typings were done on an ABI-373 automatic sequencer with 147 microsatellite markers covering most of the genome. An unbalanced distribution of sire marker alleles were detected between pool PO, and pools NA and NP, for two markers of chromosome 2p, MCW0082 and MCW0247. A linkage analysis taking into account the incomplete penetrance of polydactyly (80%) was performed with additional markers of this region and showed that the closest marker to the PO locus was MCW0071 (5 cM, lod score = 9). MCW0071 lies within the engrailed gene EN2 in the chicken. In the mouse, the homologous gene maps on chromosome 5, close to the hemimelic extra-toes mutation Hx. In the case of the NA locus, markers of chromosome 3 were selected because CPPP was mapped on this chromosome. Analysis of individual typings showed a linkage of 5.7 cM (lod score = 13) between the NA locus and ADL0237 in the distal region of chromosome 3q. These results contribute to connecting the former classical map to the molecular genetic map of the chicken, and open the way to the identification of the molecular nature of two

  16. Genetics and molecular biology of hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Major strides in the molecular biology of essential hypertension are currently underway. This has tended to obscure the fact that a number of inherited disorders associated with low blood pressure exist and that these diseases may have milder and underrecognized phenotypes that contribute importantly to blood pressure variation in the general population. This review highlights some of the gene products that, if abnormal, could cause hypotension in some individuals. Diseases due to abnormalities in the catecholamine enzymes are discussed in detail. It is likely that genetic abnormalities with hypotensive phenotypes will be as interesting and diverse as those that give rise to hypertensive disorders.

  17. Molecular genetics of human lactase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Irma; Torniainen, Suvi; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2009-01-01

    Lactase non-persistence (adult-type hypolactasia) is present in more than half of the human population and is caused by the down-regulation of lactase enzyme activity during childhood. Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a rare severe gastrointestinal disorder of new-borns enriched in the Finnish population. Both lactase deficiencies are autosomal recessive traits and characterized by diminished expression of lactase activity in the intestine. Genetic variants underlying both forms have been identified. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular defects of human lactase deficiencies and their phenotype-genotype correlation, the implications on clinical practice, and the understanding of their function and role in human evolution.

  18. Characterization of genetic diversity in chickpea using SSR markers, Start Codon Targeted Polymorphism (SCoT) and Conserved DNA-Derived Polymorphism (CDDP).

    PubMed

    Hajibarat, Zahra; Saidi, Abbas; Hajibarat, Zohreh; Talebi, Reza

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the genetic diversity among 48 genotypes of chickpea comprising cultivars, landraces and internationally developed improved lines genetic distances were evaluated using three different molecular marker techniques: Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR); Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) and Conserved DNA-derived Polymorphism (CDDP). Average polymorphism information content (PIC) for SSR, SCoT and CDDP markers was 0.47, 0.45 and 0.45, respectively, and this revealed that three different marker types were equal for the assessment of diversity amongst genotypes. Cluster analysis for SSR and SCoT divided the genotypes in to three distinct clusters and using CDDP markers data, genotypes grouped in to five clusters. There were positive significant correlation (r = 0.43, P < 0.01) between similarity matrix obtained by SCoT and CDDP. Three different marker techniques showed relatively same pattern of diversity across genotypes and using each marker technique it's obvious that diversity pattern and polymorphism for varieties were higher than that of genotypes, and CDDP had superiority over SCoT and SSR markers. These results suggest that efficiency of SSR, SCOT and CDDP markers was relatively the same in fingerprinting of chickpea genotypes. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed report of using targeted DNA region molecular marker (CDDP) for genetic diversity analysis in chickpea in comparison with SCoT and SSR markers. Overall, our results are able to prove the suitability of SCoT and CDDP markers for genetic diversity analysis in chickpea for their high rates of polymorphism and their potential for genome diversity and germplasm conservation.

  19. Development of microsatellite markers and detection of genetic variation between Goniozus wasp populations.

    PubMed

    Khidr, Sahand K; Hardy, Ian C W; Zaviezo, Tania; Mayes, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Molecular genetic markers reveal differences between genotypes according to the presence of alleles (the same or different) at target loci. Microsatellite markers are especially useful co-dominant markers that have been used in a wide range of studies to elucidate the population structure and dynamics of a range of organisms, including agriculturally beneficial insects such as parasitic wasps (parasitoids). In the present study, twelve primer pairs were designed for the south Asian , Goniozus nephantidis (Muesebeck) (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae), and 24 for its New World congener, Goniozus legneri Gordh, parasitoids of the larvae of the lepidopteran coconut pest Opisina arenosella Walker (Lepidoptera: Crytophasidae) and other lepidopteran pests, respectively, in order to investigate polymorphism within and between populations. The wasps fingerprinted were a total of 85 G. nephantidis and G. legneri, including individuals belonging to three putatively different strains of G. legneri. Annealing gradient tests (50-65°C) were conducted to study the quality of the PCR amplification across an annealing temperature gradient using a mixed genotype DNA template from each species separately. Seven primer pairs, which amplified clear products of approximately the expected size of G. nephantidis and 18 of G. legneri, were then selected for capillary analysis for fragment size determination on a Beckmann CEQ 8000. Neither G. nephantidis nor G. legneri were polymorphic within populations. However, there were six primer pairs that did show polymorphism between G. legneri populations that originated from different geographical areas within South America (Uruguay and Chile). Furthermore, one primer pair revealed diversity between the two strains collected within Chile. One of the markers was subsequently used to provide unbiased assessment of primary sex ratio in G. legneri. PMID:25373190

  20. Development of Microsatellite Markers and Detection of Genetic Variation between Goniozus Wasp Populations

    PubMed Central

    Khidr, Sahand K.; Hardy, Ian C.W.; Zaviezo, Tania; Mayes, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Molecular genetic markers reveal differences between genotypes according to the presence of alleles (the same or different) at target loci. Microsatellite markers are especially useful codominant markers that have been used in a wide range of studies to elucidate the population structure and dynamics of a range of organisms, including agriculturally beneficial insects such as parasitic wasps (parasitoids). In the present study, twelve primer pairs were designed for the south Asian , Goniozus nephantidis (Muesebeck) (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae), and 24 for its New World congener, Goniozus legneri Gordh, parasitoids of the larvae of the lepidopteran coconut pest Opisina arenosella Walker (Lepidoptera: Crytophasidae) and other lepidopteran pests, respectively, in order to investigate polymorphism within and between populations. The wasps fingerprinted were a total of 85 G. nephantidis and G. legneri, including individuals belonging to three putatively different strains of G. legneri. Annealing gradient tests (50–65°C) were conducted to study the quality of the PCR amplification across an annealing temperature gradient using a mixed genotype DNA template from each species separately. Seven primer pairs, which amplified clear products of approximately the expected size of G. nephantidis and 18 of G. legneri, were then selected for capillary analysis for fragment size determination on a Beckmann CEQ 8000. Neither G. nephantidis nor G. legneri were polymorphic within populations. However, there were six primer pairs that did show polymorphism between G. legneri populations that originated from different geographical areas within South America (Uruguay and Chile). Furthermore, one primer pair revealed diversity between the two strains collected within Chile. One of the markers was subsequently used to provide unbiased assessment of primary sex ratio in G. legneri. PMID:25373190

  1. Development of microsatellite markers and detection of genetic variation between Goniozus wasp populations.

    PubMed

    Khidr, Sahand K; Hardy, Ian C W; Zaviezo, Tania; Mayes, Sean

    2014-03-20

    Molecular genetic markers reveal differences between genotypes according to the presence of alleles (the same or different) at target loci. Microsatellite markers are especially useful co-dominant markers that have been used in a wide range of studies to elucidate the population structure and dynamics of a range of organisms, including agriculturally beneficial insects such as parasitic wasps (parasitoids). In the present study, twelve primer pairs were designed for the south Asian , Goniozus nephantidis (Muesebeck) (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae), and 24 for its New World congener, Goniozus legneri Gordh, parasitoids of the larvae of the lepidopteran coconut pest Opisina arenosella Walker (Lepidoptera: Crytophasidae) and other lepidopteran pests, respectively, in order to investigate polymorphism within and between populations. The wasps fingerprinted were a total of 85 G. nephantidis and G. legneri, including individuals belonging to three putatively different strains of G. legneri. Annealing gradient tests (50-65°C) were conducted to study the quality of the PCR amplification across an annealing temperature gradient using a mixed genotype DNA template from each species separately. Seven primer pairs, which amplified clear products of approximately the expected size of G. nephantidis and 18 of G. legneri, were then selected for capillary analysis for fragment size determination on a Beckmann CEQ 8000. Neither G. nephantidis nor G. legneri were polymorphic within populations. However, there were six primer pairs that did show polymorphism between G. legneri populations that originated from different geographical areas within South America (Uruguay and Chile). Furthermore, one primer pair revealed diversity between the two strains collected within Chile. One of the markers was subsequently used to provide unbiased assessment of primary sex ratio in G. legneri.

  2. The molecular basis of genetic dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1994-01-01

    Studies of mutagenesis in many organisms indicate that the majority (over 90%) of mutations are recessive to wild type. If recessiveness represents the 'default' state, what are the distinguishing features that make a minority of mutations give rise to dominant or semidominant characters? This review draws on the rapid expansion in knowledge of molecular and cellular biology to classify the molecular mechanisms of dominant mutation. The categories discussed include (1) reduced gene dosage, expression, or protein activity (haploinsufficiency); (2) increased gene dosage; (3) ectopic or temporally altered mRNA expression; (4) increased or constitutive protein activity; (5) dominant negative effects; (6) altered structural proteins; (7) toxic protein alterations; and (8) new protein functions. This provides a framework for understanding the basis of dominant genetic phenomena in humans and other organisms. Images PMID:8182727

  3. [Searching for genetic markers--in the fields of forensic medicine and human genetics].

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, S

    1995-12-01

    Research on genetic markers in the fields of forensic medicine and human genetics did not begin in earnest until 1968. Study of an extended family in Wakayama Prefecture resulted in the discovery of the variant Bm type in the ABO blood group system. This family of nearly 40 members composed of Group A, B, O and AB spouses and type Bm monozygotic twins provided the best research material possible. An extremely rare case of an individual with type O red blood cells but no anti-A or anti-B antibodies led to the discovery of type AmBm. Fishman and Mitsuhashi advocated the concept of immunogenetic RNA. We attempted to examine the immunogenetic RNA function by isolating RNA from the human spleen but obtained no definitive results. Many researchers had since examined the genetic markers in erythrocytes, leukocytes, serum proteins and blood cell enzymes, but research on genetic marker in saliva had not been advanced. We searched for genetic markers in the parotid saliva and developed the PmF and Ph systems. A salivary amylase variant and acid phosphatase polymorphism were also discovered. We elucidated the genetic structure and geographic gradinet of the salivary genetic markers, such as the Pa, Pb, Pr, Db and PIF systems, in Japanese. The genetic markers in the tear and saliva of mice and rats were also detected. We demonstrated RFLP polymorphism using an amylase cDNA probe. Our report was one of the first on polymorphism in the field of forensic medicine in Japan. Interest was also directed to polymorphism in platelet and we employed two-dimensional electrophoresis to establish the ThA and ThB systems which are controlled by autosomal codominant genes. Regarding the research on monoclonal antibody production and their application in forensic medicine, we cloned and produced antibodies for ABO, MN and Lewis grouping. Anti-glycopholin-A, anti-glycopholin-B and anti-glycolipid monoclonal antibodies were also produced and used to divide the red blood cell antigens roughly

  4. Identification of RFLP and NBS/PK profiling markers for disease resistance loci in genetic maps of oats.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M J; Loarce, Y; Fominaya, A; Vossen, J H; Ferrer, E

    2013-01-01

    Two of the domains most widely shared among R genes are the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and protein kinase (PK) domains. The present study describes and maps a number of new oat resistance gene analogues (RGAs) with two purposes in mind: (1) to identify genetic regions that contain R genes and (2) to determine whether RGAs can be used as molecular markers for qualitative loci and for QTLs affording resistance to Puccinia coronata. Such genes have been mapped in the diploid A. strigosa × A. wiestii (Asw map) and the hexaploid MN841801-1 × Noble-2 (MN map). Genomic and cDNA NBS-RGA probes from oat, barley and wheat were used to produce RFLPs and to obtain markers by motif-directed profiling based on the NBS (NBS profiling) and PK (PK profiling) domains. The efficiency of primers used in NBS/PK profiling to amplify RGA fragments was assessed by sequencing individual marker bands derived from genomic and cDNA fragments. The positions of 184 markers were identified in the Asw map, while those for 99 were identified in the MN map. Large numbers of NBS and PK profiling markers were found in clusters across different linkage groups, with the PK profiling markers more evenly distributed. The location of markers throughout the genetic maps and the composition of marker clusters indicate that NBS- and PK-based markers cover partly complementary regions of oat genomes. Markers of the different classes obtained were found associated with the two resistance loci, PcA and R-284B-2, mapped on Asw, and with five out of eight QTLs for partial resistance in the MN map. 53 RGA-RFLPs and 187 NBS/PK profiling markers were also mapped on the hexaploid map A. byzantina cv. Kanota × A. sativa cv. Ogle. Significant co-localization was seen between the RGA markers in the KO map and other markers closely linked to resistance loci, such as those for P. coronata and barley yellow dwarf virus (Bydv) that were previously mapped in other segregating populations.

  5. Genetic diversity and identification of Chinese-grown pecan using ISSR and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Tao; Zhai, Min; Li, Yong-Rong; Guo, Zhong-Ren

    2011-01-01

    Pecan is an important horticultural nut crop originally from North America and now widely cultivated in China for its high ecological, ornamental and economic value. Currently, there are over one hundred cultivars grown in China, including introduced American cultivars and Chinese seedling breeding cultivars. Molecular markers were used to assess the genetic diversity of these cultivars and to identify the pedigrees of fine pecan plants with good characteristics and no cultivar-related data. A total of 77 samples grown in China were studied, including 14 introduced cultivars, 12 domestic seedling breeding cultivars, and 49 fine pecan plants with no cultivar data, together with Carya cathayensis and Juglans nigra. A total of 77 ISSR and 19 SSR primers were prescreened; 10 ISSR and eight SSR primers were selected, yielding a total of 94 amplified bands (100% polymorphic) in the range of 140-1,950 bp for the ISSR and 70 amplified bands (100% polymorphic) in the range of 50-350 bp for SSR markers. Genetic diversity analyses indicated Chinese-grown pecan cultivars and fine plants had significant diversity at the DNA level. The dengrograms constructed with ISSR, SSR or combined data were very similar, but showed very weak grouping association with morphological characters. However, the progeny were always grouped with the parents. The great diversity found among the Chinese cultivars and the interesting germplasm of the fine pecan plants analyzed in this study are very useful for increasing the diversity of the pecan gene pool. All 77 accessions in this study could be separated based on the ISSR and SSR fingerprints produced by one or more primers. The results of our study also showed that ISSR and SSR techniques were both suitable for genetic diversity analyses and the identification of pecan resources. PMID:22146370

  6. The Molecular Genetics of Insecticide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    ffrench-Constant, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    The past 60 years have seen a revolution in our understanding of the molecular genetics of insecticide resistance. While at first the field was split by arguments about the relative importance of mono- vs. polygenic resistance and field- vs. laboratory-based selection, the application of molecular cloning to insecticide targets and to the metabolic enzymes that degrade insecticides before they reach those targets has brought out an exponential growth in our understanding of the mutations involved. Molecular analysis has confirmed the relative importance of single major genes in target-site resistance and has also revealed some interesting surprises about the multi-gene families, such as cytochrome P450s, involved in metabolic resistance. Identification of the mutations involved in resistance has also led to parallel advances in our understanding of the enzymes and receptors involved, often with implications for the role of these receptors in humans. This Review seeks to provide an historical perspective on the impact of molecular biology on our understanding of resistance and to begin to look forward to the likely impact of rapid advances in both sequencing and genome-wide association analysis. PMID:23908373

  7. Genome-wide identification of novel genetic markers from RNA sequencing assembly of diverse Aegilops tauschii accessions.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Ryo; Yoshida, Kentaro; Motoi, Yuka; Sato, Kazuhiro; Takumi, Shigeo

    2016-08-01

    The wild species in the Triticeae tribe are tremendous resources for crop breeding due to their abundant natural variation. However, their huge and highly repetitive genomes have hindered the establishment of physical maps and the completeness of their genome sequences. To develop molecular markers for the efficient utilization of their valuable traits while avoiding their genome complexity, we assembled RNA sequences of ten representative accessions of Aegilops tauschii, the progenitor of the wheat D genome, and estimated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertions/deletions (indels). The deduced unigenes were anchored to the chromosomes of Ae. tauschii and barley. The SNPs and indels in the anchored unigenes, covering entire chromosomes, were sufficient for linkage map construction, even in combinations between the genetically closest accessions. Interestingly, the resolution of SNP and indel distribution on barley chromosomes was slightly higher than on Ae. tauschii chromosomes. Since barley chromosomes are regarded as virtual chromosomes of Triticeae species, our strategy allows capture of genetic markers arranged on the chromosomes in order based on the conserved synteny. The resolution of these genetic markers will be comparable to that of the Ae. tauschii whose draft genome sequence is available. Our procedure should be applicable to marker development for Triticeae species, which have no draft sequences available.

  8. Development and use of genic molecular markers (GMMs) for construction of a transcript map of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Gujaria, Neha; Kumar, Ashish; Dauthal, Preeti; Dubey, Anuja; Hiremath, Pavana; Bhanu Prakash, A; Farmer, Andrew; Bhide, Mangla; Shah, Trushar; Gaur, Pooran M; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Cook, Douglas R; May, Greg D; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2011-05-01

    A transcript map has been constructed by the development and integration of genic molecular markers (GMMs) including single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), genic microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) and intron spanning region (ISR)-based markers, on an inter-specific mapping population of chickpea, the third food legume crop of the world and the first food legume crop of India. For SNP discovery through allele re-sequencing, primer pairs were designed for 688 genes/expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of chickpea and 657 genes/ESTs of closely related species of chickpea. High-quality sequence data obtained for 220 candidate genic regions on 2-20 genotypes representing 9 Cicer species provided 1,893 SNPs with an average frequency of 1/35.83 bp and 0.34 PIC (polymorphism information content) value. On an average 2.9 haplotypes were present in 220 candidate genic regions with an average haplotype diversity of 0.6326. SNP2CAPS analysis of 220 sequence alignments, as mentioned above, provided a total of 192 CAPS candidates. Experimental analysis of these 192 CAPS candidates together with 87 CAPS candidates identified earlier through in silico mining of ESTs provided scorable amplification in 173 (62.01%) cases of which predicted assays were validated in 143 (82.66%) cases (CGMM). Alignments of chickpea unigenes with Medicago truncatula genome were used to develop 121 intron spanning region (CISR) markers of which 87 yielded scorable products. In addition, optimization of 77 EST-derived SSR (ICCeM) markers provided 51 scorable markers. Screening of easily assayable 281 markers including 143 CGMMs, 87 CISRs and 51 ICCeMs on 5 parental genotypes of three mapping populations identified 104 polymorphic markers including 90 markers on the inter-specific mapping population. Sixty-two of these GMMs together with 218 earlier published markers (including 64 GMM loci) and 20 other unpublished markers could be integrated into this genetic map. A genetic map developed here

  9. Tumor Heterogeneity: Mechanisms and Bases for a Reliable Application of Molecular Marker Design

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Cano, Salvador J.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity is a confusing finding in the assessment of neoplasms, potentially resulting in inaccurate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests. This tumor heterogeneity is not always a random and unpredictable phenomenon, whose knowledge helps designing better tests. The biologic reasons for this intratumoral heterogeneity would then be important to understand both the natural history of neoplasms and the selection of test samples for reliable analysis. The main factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity inducing gene abnormalities or modifying its expression include: the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, the action of tumor microenvironment (bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and stroma), mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes), and differential mechanisms of sequence-independent modifications of genetic material and proteins. The intratumoral heterogeneity is at the origin of tumor progression and it is also the byproduct of the selection process during progression. Any analysis of heterogeneity mechanisms must be integrated within the process of segregation of genetic changes in tumor cells during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The evaluation of these mechanisms must also consider the redundancy and pleiotropism of molecular pathways, for which appropriate surrogate markers would support the presence or not of heterogeneous genetics and the main mechanisms responsible. This knowledge would constitute a solid scientific background for future therapeutic planning. PMID:22408433

  10. One hundred fifty-four genetic markers for the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Knutson, Todd P; Chaves, Lee D; Hall, Majken K; Reed, Kent M

    2004-12-01

    Identifying and selectively breeding for improved traits is one of the ultimate goals of genetic research in agriculturally important species. Genome characterization and analysis are important first steps in this process. Genetic linkage maps based on the linear order of polymorphic DNA markers are typically developed through statistical analysis of inheritance patterns in pedigreed families. To develop microsatellite markers for further improvement of the turkey genetic linkage map, small-insert genomic libraries were screened for tandem repeats. Oligonuclotide primers were designed to amplify 164 microsatellite-containing fragments from genomic DNA. Genetic polymorphisms at 154 markers were determined by genotyping the F(1) individuals of two resource populations. Markers determined as segregating in the University of Minnesota/Nicholas Turkey Breeding Farms (UMN/NTBF) reference population were used to genotype F(2) individuals and a two-point linkage analysis was performed.

  11. [Progress on biosafety assessment of marker genes in genetically modified foods].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lichen; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2003-05-01

    Marker genes are useful in facilitating the detection of genetically modified organisms(GMO). These genes play an important role during the early identification stage of GMO development, but they exist in the mature genetically modified crops. So the safety assessment of these genes could not be neglected. In this paper, all the study on the biosafety assessment of marker genes were reviewed, their possible hazards and risks were appraised, and the marker genes proved safe were list too. GMO Labeling the is one important regulations for the development of genetically modified foods in the market. The accurate detecting techniques for GMO are the basis for setting up labeling regulation. In addition, some methods used to remove marker genes in genetically modified foods were introduced in the paper, which can eliminate their biosafety concern thoroughly.

  12. Identification of potential genetic markers for improved growth rate in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of genetic polymorphism associated with muscle growth would improve selection efficiency of channel catfish broodstock. Because faster growth is typically associated with increased food intake, factors involved in food intake regulation may serve as potential gene markers for selecti...

  13. Genetic variation in wild populations of the tuber crop Amorphophallus konjac (Araceae) in central China as revealed by AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Pan, C; Gichira, A W; Chen, J M

    2015-01-01

    Amorphophallus konjac is an economically important crop. In order to provide baseline information for sustainable development and conservation of the wild plant resources of A. konjac, we studied the genetic diversity and population structure of this species using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) molecular markers. We sampled 139 individuals from 10 wild populations of A. konjac in central China. Using five AFLP primer combinations, we scored a total of 270 DNA fragments, most of which were polymorphic (98.2%). Percentage of polymorphic loci, Nei's genetic diversity index, and Shannon's information index showed high levels of genetic variation within A. konjac populations. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that most of the variance (68%) resided within populations. The coefficient of genetic differentiation between populations was 0.348 and the estimated gene flow was 0.469, indicating that there was limited gene flow among the populations. Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analysis and principal coordinates analysis indicated that geographically close populations were more likely to cluster together. The Mantel test revealed a significant correlation between geographic and genetic distances (R2 = 0.2521, P < 0.05). The special insect-pollination system of A. konjac and the complex geography of central China are likely to have contributed to the current pattern of genetic variation of this species. In the present study, we provide several suggestions on the future protection of the wild plant genetic resources of A. konjac. PMID:26782525

  14. Analysis of genetic diversity through AFLP, SAMPL, ISSR and RAPD markers in Tribulus terrestris, a medicinal herb.

    PubMed

    Sarwat, Maryam; Das, S; Srivastava, P S

    2008-03-01

    Tribulus terrestris is well known for its medicinal importance in curing urino-genital disorders. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), selective amplification of microsatellite polymorphic loci (SAMPL), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used for the first time for the detection of genetic polymorphism in this medicinal herb from samples collected from various geographical regions of India. Six assays each of AFLP and SAMPL markers and 21 each of ISSR and RAPD markers were utilized. AFLP yielded 500 scorable amplified products, of which 82.9% were polymorphic. SAMPL primers amplified 488 bands, 462 being polymorphic (94.7%). The range of amplified bands was 66 [(TC)(8)G + M-CAG] to 98 [(CA)(6)AG + M-CAC] and the percentage polymorphism, 89.9 [from (CT)(4)C (AC)(4)A + M-CTG] to 100 [from (GACA)(4) + M-CTA]. The ISSR primers amplified 239 bands of 0.4-2.5 kb, 73.6% showed polymorphism. The amplified products ranged from 5 to 16 and the percentage polymorphism 40-100. RAPD assays produced 276 bands, of which 163 were polymorphic (59%). Mantel test employed for detection of goodness of fit established cophenetic correlation values above 0.9 for all the four marker systems. The dendrograms and PCA plots derived from the binary data matrices of the four marker systems are highly concordant. High bootstrap values were obtained at major nodes of phenograms through WINBOOT software. The relative efficiency of the four molecular marker systems calculated on the basis of multiplex ratio, marker index and average heterozygosity revealed SAMPL to be the best. Distinct DNA fingerprinting profile, unique to every geographical region could be obtained with all the four molecular marker systems. Clustering can be a good indicator for clear separation of genotypes from different regions in well-defined groups that are supported by high bootstrap values.

  15. Molecular characterization of Anthurium genotypes by using DNA fingerprinting and SPAR markers.

    PubMed

    Souza Neto, J D; Soares, T C B; Motta, L B; Cabral, P D S; Silva, J A

    2014-07-02

    We characterized single primer amplification reaction (SPAR) molecular markers from 20 genotypes of Anthurium andraeanum Lind., including 3 from commercial varieties and 17 from 2 communities in the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Twenty-four SPAR, consisting of 7 random amplified polymorphic DNA and 17 inter-simple sequence repeat markers were used to estimate the genetic diversity of 20 Anthurium accessions. The set of SPAR markers generated 288 bands and showed an average polymorphism percentage of 93.39%, ranging from 71.43 to 100%. The polymorphism information content (PIC) of the random amplified polymorphic DNA primers averaged 0.364 and ranged from 0.258 to 0.490. Primer OPF 06 showed the lowest PIC, while OPAM 14 was the highest. The average PIC of the inter-simple sequence repeat primers was 0.299, with values ranging from 0.196 to 0.401. Primer UBC 845 had the lowest PIC (0.196), while primer UCB 810 had the highest (0.401). By using the complement of Jaccard's similarity index and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering, 5 clusters were formed with a cophenetic correlation coefficient of 0.8093, indicating an acceptable clustering consistency. However, no genotype clustering patterns agreed with the morphological data. The Anthurium genotypes investigated in this study are a germplasm source for conservational research and may be used in improvement programs for this species.

  16. Transcriptome analysis of Capsicum annuum varieties Mandarin and Blackcluster: assembly, annotation and molecular marker discovery.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yul-Kyun; Tripathi, Swati; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Cho, Young-Il; Lee, Hye-Eun; Kim, Do-Sun; Woo, Jong-Gyu; Cho, Myeong-Cheoul

    2014-01-10

    Next generation sequencing technologies have proven to be a rapid and cost-effective means to assemble and characterize gene content and identify molecular markers in various organisms. Pepper (Capsicum annuum L., Solanaceae) is a major staple vegetable crop, which is economically important and has worldwide distribution. High-throughput transcriptome profiling of two pepper cultivars, Mandarin and Blackcluster, using 454 GS-FLX pyrosequencing yielded 279,221 and 316,357 sequenced reads with a total 120.44 and 142.54Mb of sequence data (average read length of 431 and 450 nucleotides). These reads resulted from 17,525 and 16,341 'isogroups' and were assembled into 19,388 and 18,057 isotigs, and 22,217 and 13,153 singletons for both the cultivars, respectively. Assembled sequences were annotated functionally based on homology to genes in multiple public databases. Detailed sequence variant analysis identified a total of 9701 and 12,741 potential SNPs which eventually resulted in 1025 and 1059 genotype specific SNPs, for both the varieties, respectively, after examining SNP frequency distribution for each mapped unigenes. These markers for pepper will be highly valuable for marker-assisted breeding and other genetic studies. PMID:24125952

  17. Genetic variation in polyploid forage grass: Assessing the molecular genetic variability in the Paspalum genus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paspalum (Poaceae) is an important genus of the tribe Paniceae, which includes several species of economic importance for foraging, turf and ornamental purposes, and has a complex taxonomical classification. Because of the widespread interest in several species of this genus, many accessions have been conserved in germplasm banks and distributed throughout various countries around the world, mainly for the purposes of cultivar development and cytogenetic studies. Correct identification of germplasms and quantification of their variability are necessary for the proper development of conservation and breeding programs. Evaluation of microsatellite markers in different species of Paspalum conserved in a germplasm bank allowed assessment of the genetic differences among them and assisted in their proper botanical classification. Results Seventeen new polymorphic microsatellites were developed for Paspalum atratum Swallen and Paspalum notatum Flüggé, twelve of which were transferred to 35 Paspalum species and used to evaluate their variability. Variable degrees of polymorphism were observed within the species. Based on distance-based methods and a Bayesian clustering approach, the accessions were divided into three main species groups, two of which corresponded to the previously described Plicatula and Notata Paspalum groups. In more accurate analyses of P. notatum accessions, the genetic variation that was evaluated used thirty simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci and revealed seven distinct genetic groups and a correspondence of these groups to the three botanical varieties of the species (P. notatum var. notatum, P. notatum var. saurae and P. notatum var. latiflorum). Conclusions The molecular genetic approach employed in this study was able to distinguish many of the different taxa examined, except for species that belong to the Plicatula group, which has historically been recognized as a highly complex group. Our molecular genetic approach represents a

  18. Molecular evolutionary genetics of isozymes: pattern, theory, and application.

    PubMed

    Nevo, E

    1990-01-01

    Isozyme studies at the population genetics-ecology interface conducted at the Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, during 15 years, 1974-1989, are reviewed in terms of the evidence, theoretical, and practical implications. These studies involve numerous individuals, populations, species, and higher taxa in nature of plants, animals, and humans tested for variation at 15 to 50 primary isozyme loci. The isozyme studies have been conducted mainly in individuals sampled in natural populations at the local, regional, and global levels. Two of the species studied were wild cereals, the progenitors of wheat and barley in the Near East Fertile Crescent. These studies have been complemented by laboratory controlled a priori experimentation of inorganic and organic pollution biology. The human genetics laboratory compared isozyme structure of Jewish and non-Jewish populations. Our results indicate that: (i) isozyme diversity in nature in abundant, at least partly adaptive, and is oriented and maintained primarily by ecological factors. (ii) Natural selection in action is highlighted by stresses involving among others thermal, chemical, and climatic factors. (iii) Speciation can occur with little change in isozyme diversity. (iv) Jews from diverse countries, and in spite of 2,000 years of Diaspora, retain in the frequencies of some isozymes their Near Eastern origins. (v) Wild cereals harbor rich genetic resources exploitable in breeding either directly as adaptive structures, or indirectly as genetic markers for genotypic production of elite agronomic traits. (vi) Isozymes have been utilized as genetic monitors of marine pollution thereby contributing to environmental quality and conservation. (vii) Isozymes can substantially contribute to conservation biology. (viii) Isozymes have been successfully utilized in constructing molecular phylogenies and in revealing new sibling species. (ix) Future theoretical and practical directions of isozyme studies at the protein

  19. Molecular evolutionary genetics of isozymes: pattern, theory, and application.

    PubMed

    Nevo, E

    1990-01-01

    Isozyme studies at the population genetics-ecology interface conducted at the Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, during 15 years, 1974-1989, are reviewed in terms of the evidence, theoretical, and practical implications. These studies involve numerous individuals, populations, species, and higher taxa in nature of plants, animals, and humans tested for variation at 15 to 50 primary isozyme loci. The isozyme studies have been conducted mainly in individuals sampled in natural populations at the local, regional, and global levels. Two of the species studied were wild cereals, the progenitors of wheat and barley in the Near East Fertile Crescent. These studies have been complemented by laboratory controlled a priori experimentation of inorganic and organic pollution biology. The human genetics laboratory compared isozyme structure of Jewish and non-Jewish populations. Our results indicate that: (i) isozyme diversity in nature in abundant, at least partly adaptive, and is oriented and maintained primarily by ecological factors. (ii) Natural selection in action is highlighted by stresses involving among others thermal, chemical, and climatic factors. (iii) Speciation can occur with little change in isozyme diversity. (iv) Jews from diverse countries, and in spite of 2,000 years of Diaspora, retain in the frequencies of some isozymes their Near Eastern origins. (v) Wild cereals harbor rich genetic resources exploitable in breeding either directly as adaptive structures, or indirectly as genetic markers for genotypic production of elite agronomic traits. (vi) Isozymes have been utilized as genetic monitors of marine pollution thereby contributing to environmental quality and conservation. (vii) Isozymes can substantially contribute to conservation biology. (viii) Isozymes have been successfully utilized in constructing molecular phylogenies and in revealing new sibling species. (ix) Future theoretical and practical directions of isozyme studies at the protein

  20. Development of Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Moges, Asmare D; Admassu, Belayneh; Belew, Derbew; Yesuf, Mohammed; Njuguna, Joyce; Kyalo, Martina; Ghimire, Sita R

    2016-01-01

    Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for citrus plant pathogenic fungus, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and were used to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of 163 isolates from four different geographical regions of Ethiopia. These loci produced a total of 118 alleles with an average of 5.13 alleles per microsatellite marker. The polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.104 to 0.597 with an average of 0.371. The average observed heterozygosity across all loci varied from 0.046 to 0.058. The gene diversity among the loci ranged from 0.106 to 0.664. Unweighted Neighbor-joining and population structure analysis grouped these 163 isolates into three major groups. The clusters were not according to the geographic origin of the isolates. Analysis of molecular variance showed 85% of the total variation within populations and only 5% among populations. There was low genetic differentiation in the total populations (FST = 0.049) as evidenced by high level of gene flow estimate (Nm = 4.8 per generation) among populations. The results show that Ethiopian C. gloeosporioides populations are generally characterized by a low level of genetic diversity. The newly developed microsatellite markers were useful in analyzing the genetic diversity and population structure of the C. gloeosporioides populations. Information obtained from this study could be useful as a base to design strategies for better management of leaf and fruit spot disease of citrus in Ethiopia.

  1. Development of Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Moges, Asmare D; Admassu, Belayneh; Belew, Derbew; Yesuf, Mohammed; Njuguna, Joyce; Kyalo, Martina; Ghimire, Sita R

    2016-01-01

    Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for citrus plant pathogenic fungus, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and were used to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of 163 isolates from four different geographical regions of Ethiopia. These loci produced a total of 118 alleles with an average of 5.13 alleles per microsatellite marker. The polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.104 to 0.597 with an average of 0.371. The average observed heterozygosity across all loci varied from 0.046 to 0.058. The gene diversity among the loci ranged from 0.106 to 0.664. Unweighted Neighbor-joining and population structure analysis grouped these 163 isolates into three major groups. The clusters were not according to the geographic origin of the isolates. Analysis of molecular variance showed 85% of the total variation within populations and only 5% among populations. There was low genetic differentiation in the total populations (FST = 0.049) as evidenced by high level of gene flow estimate (Nm = 4.8 per generation) among populations. The results show that Ethiopian C. gloeosporioides populations are generally characterized by a low level of genetic diversity. The newly developed microsatellite markers were useful in analyzing the genetic diversity and population structure of the C. gloeosporioides populations. Information obtained from this study could be useful as a base to design strategies for better management of leaf and fruit spot disease of citrus in Ethiopia. PMID:26978654

  2. Development of Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Moges, Asmare D.; Admassu, Belayneh; Belew, Derbew; Yesuf, Mohammed; Njuguna, Joyce; Kyalo, Martina; Ghimire, Sita R.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for citrus plant pathogenic fungus, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and were used to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of 163 isolates from four different geographical regions of Ethiopia. These loci produced a total of 118 alleles with an average of 5.13 alleles per microsatellite marker. The polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.104 to 0.597 with an average of 0.371. The average observed heterozygosity across all loci varied from 0.046 to 0.058. The gene diversity among the loci ranged from 0.106 to 0.664. Unweighted Neighbor-joining and population structure analysis grouped these 163 isolates into three major groups. The clusters were not according to the geographic origin of the isolates. Analysis of molecular variance showed 85% of the total variation within populations and only 5% among populations. There was low genetic differentiation in the total populations (FST = 0.049) as evidenced by high level of gene flow estimate (Nm = 4.8 per generation) among populations. The results show that Ethiopian C. gloeosporioides populations are generally characterized by a low level of genetic diversity. The newly developed microsatellite markers were useful in analyzing the genetic diversity and population structure of the C. gloeosporioides populations. Information obtained from this study could be useful as a base to design strategies for better management of leaf and fruit spot disease of citrus in Ethiopia. PMID:26978654

  3. Distribution of Genetic Marker Concentrations for Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Sewage and Animal Feces

    PubMed Central

    Kelty, Catherine A.; Varma, Manju; Sivaganesan, Mano; Haugland, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Very little is known about the density and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) genetic markers measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) in fecal pollution sources. Before qPCR-based FIB technologies can be applied to waste management and public health risk applications, it is vital to characterize the concentrations of these genetic markers in pollution sources (i.e., untreated wastewater and animal feces). We report the distribution of rRNA genetic markers for several general FIB groups, including Clostridium spp., Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Bacteroidales, as determined by qPCR on reference collections consisting of 54 primary influent sewage samples collected from treatment facilities across the United States and fecal samples representing 20 different animal species. Based on raw sewage sample collection data, individual FIB genetic markers exhibited a remarkable similarity in concentration estimates from locations across the United States ranging from Hawaii to Florida. However, there was no significant correlation between genetic markers for most FIB combinations (P > 0.05). In addition, large differences (up to 5 log10 copies) in the abundance of FIB genetic markers were observed between animal species, emphasizing the importance of indicator microorganism selection and animal source contribution for future FIB applications. PMID:22504809

  4. [Progress in researches on molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei-hua; Lu, Feng; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi

    2015-06-01

    Effective chemotherapy is the mainstay of malaria control. However, it is undergoing the serious threat by resis- tance of falciparum malaria to antimalarial drugs. In recent years, with the development of molecular biology technology, molec- ular markers have been widely used to monitor antimalarial drug resistance. This paper reviews the researches on the common molecular markers related to Plasmodiumfalciparum drug resistance.

  5. Ethical issues in the use of genetic markers in occupational epidemiologic research.

    PubMed

    Schulte, P A; Lomax, G P; Ward, E M; Colligan, M J

    1999-08-01

    This review was conducted to characterize the nature of contemporary occupational epidemiologic research involving genetic markers, consider how genetic information is unique with regard to its social applications, and examine some of the ethical dilemmas that may arise over the course of studies. We have reviewed the literature and the lessons from our experience in conducting occupational epidemiologic research involving genetic markers. This review describes how occupational epidemiologic studies differ from other epidemiologic studies on issues of participation, confidentiality, and the history of including genetic markers. Of primary concern in occupational studies are genes that have multiple alleles and are sometimes referred to as "metabolic polymorphisms." They generally do not confer risk on their own but rather only in combination with a specific exposure. There is a need for a clear policy and guidelines for the conduct of occupational epidemiologic studies using genetic material. This policy should address all of the steps in study design, implementation, interpretation, and communication of results.

  6. Molecular genetic diversity in populations of the stingless bee Plebeia remota: A case study

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Francisco, Flávio; Santiago, Leandro Rodrigues; Arias, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity is a major component of the biological diversity of an ecosystem. The survival of a population may be seriously threatened if its genetic diversity values are low. In this work, we measured the genetic diversity of the stingless bee Plebeia remota based on molecular data obtained by analyzing 15 microsatellite loci and sequencing two mitochondrial genes. Population structure and genetic diversity differed depending on the molecular marker analyzed: microsatellites showed low population structure and moderate to high genetic diversity, while mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) showed high population structure and low diversity in three populations. Queen philopatry and male dispersal behavior are discussed as the main reasons for these findings. PMID:23569417

  7. Molecular genetic diversity in populations of the stingless bee Plebeia remota: A case study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Francisco, Flávio; Santiago, Leandro Rodrigues; Arias, Maria Cristina

    2013-03-01

    Genetic diversity is a major component of the biological diversity of an ecosystem. The survival of a population may be seriously threatened if its genetic diversity values are low. In this work, we measured the genetic diversity of the stingless bee Plebeia remota based on molecular data obtained by analyzing 15 microsatellite loci and sequencing two mitochondrial genes. Population structure and genetic diversity differed depending on the molecular marker analyzed: microsatellites showed low population structure and moderate to high genetic diversity, while mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) showed high population structure and low diversity in three populations. Queen philopatry and male dispersal behavior are discussed as the main reasons for these findings. PMID:23569417

  8. Molecular and immunologic markers of kidney cancer-potential applications in predictive, preventive and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Mickley, Amanda; Kovaleva, Olga; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gratchev, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Kidney cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies due to frequent late diagnosis (33 % or renal cell carcinoma are metastatic at diagnosis) and poor treatment options. There are two major subtypes of kidney cancer: renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and renal pelvis carcinoma. The risk factors for RCC, accounting for more than 90 % of all kidney cancers, are smoking, obesity, hypertension, misuse of pain medication, and some genetic diseases. The most common molecular markers of kidney cancer include mutations and epigenetic inactivation of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, genes of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, and carbonic anhydrase IX (CIAX). The role of epigenetic pathways, including DNA methylation and chromatin structure remodeling, was also demonstrated. Immunologic properties of RCC enable this type of tumor to escape immune response effectively. An important role in this process is played by tumor-associated macrophages that demonstrate mixed M1/M2 phenotype. In this review, we discuss molecular and cellular aspects for RCC development and current state of knowledge allowing personalized approaches for diagnostics and prognostic prediction of this disease. A set of macrophage markers is suggested for the analysis of the association of macrophage phenotype and disease prognosis. PMID:26500709

  9. Applicability of RAPD markers on silver-stained polyacrylamide gels to ascertain genetic diversity in Peripatus acacioi (Peripatidae; Onychophora).

    PubMed

    DeLaat, Daiane Mariele; Carvalho, Maria Raquel Santos; Lovato, Maria Bernadete; Acedo, Maria Dolores Porto; da Fonseca, Cleusa Graça

    2005-12-30

    RAPD (random amplification of polymorphic DNA) molecular markers can be utilized for analyzing genetic variability in populations for which only a few or no molecular markers are available. They were used in a study of an endangered species, Peripatus acacioi, found in the Tripuí Ecological Station, in Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil. The ecological station was specifically created to protect this velvet worm species, the first of this group found in Brazil. For an initial evaluation of the genetic diversity of this species, DNA samples from the lobopods of four individuals, collected at random, were analyzed using RAPD. Each reaction was run with a different primer (Operon RAPD 10-mer Kits), totaling 13 primers (OPC2, OPC3, OPC4, OPC6, OPC8, OPC10, OPC11, OPL2, OPL7, OPL11, OPL13, OPL18, and OPL19). Due to the low amplification yield, RAPD fragments were separated in polyacrylamide gels and stained with silver nitrate. Numerous bands were observed. Fifty-five of the amplified bands proved to be reproducible, both in terms of presence and intensity. Among these, 27 were variable and 28 were constant. The average number of bands per gel was 4.2. Nine of the 13 primers tested allowed the identification of constant and variable bands among these four individuals. RAPD analysis of genetic variation using silver-stained polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis provided measures of band sharing among the individuals, and therefore could be used in population genetics studies of P. acacioi.

  10. Molecular markers in management of ex situ PGR-a case study.

    PubMed

    Börner, Andreas; Khlestkina, Elena K; Chebotar, Sabina; Nagel, Manuela; Arif, Mian Abdur Rehman; Neumann, Kerstin; Kobiljski, Borislav; Lohwasser, Ulrike; Röder, Marion S

    2012-11-01

    Worldwide germplasm collections contain about 7.4 million accessions of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture. One of the 10 largest ex situ genebanks of our globe is located at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research in Gatersleben, Germany. Molecular tools have been used for various gene bank management practices including characterization and utilization of the germplasm. The results on genetic integrity of longterm- stored gene bank accessions of wheat (self-pollinating) and rye (open-pollinating) cereal crops revealed a high degree of identity for wheat. In contrast, the out-pollinating accessions of rye exhibited shifts in allele frequencies. The genetic diversity of wheat and barley germplasm collected at intervals of 40 to 50 years in comparable geographical regions showed qualitative rather than a quantitative change in diversity. The inter- and intraspecific variation of seed longevity was analysed and differences were detected. Genetic studies in barley, wheat and oilseed rape revealed numerous QTL, indicating the complex and quantitative nature of seed longevity. Some of the loci identified were in genomic regions that co-localize with genes determining agronomic traits such as spike architecture or biotic and abiotic stress response. Finally, a genome-wide association mapping analysis of a core collection of wheat for flowering time was performed using diversity array technology (DArT) markers. Maker trait associations were detected in genomic regions where major genes or QTL have been described earlier. In addition, new loci were also detected, providing opportunities to monitor genetic variation for crop improvement.

  11. Expression of Molecular Markers of Angiogenesis, Lymphangiogenesis, and Proliferation Depending on the Stage of Skin Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bgatova, N P; Lomakin, A I; Fursov, S A; Kachesov, I V; Chepko, S A; Isakova, N B; Borodin, Yu I; Voytsitsky, V E; Konenkov, V I

    2016-08-01

    The expression of molecular markers characterizing activity of the tumor process and metastases (proliferation marker Ki-67, angiogenesis marker CD34, and lymphangiogenesis markers podoplanin and LYVE-1) was assessed by immunohictochemical method in the primary tumor specimens collected during surgery for cutaneous melanoma (40 patients). Proliferative activity of the tumor tissue and volume density of peritumoral blood and lymph vessels increased with increasing tumor malignancy, which could indicate the risk of metastases. PMID:27590758

  12. Rational approaches to design of therapeutics targeting molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Klasa, R J; List, A F; Cheson, B D

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces novel therapeutic strategies focusing on a molecular marker relevant to a particular hematologic malignancy. Four different approaches targeting specific molecules in unique pathways will be presented. The common theme will be rational target selection in a strategy that has reached the early phase of human clinical trial in one malignancy, but with a much broader potential applicability to the technology. In Section I Dr. Richard Klasa presents preclinical data on the use of antisense oligonucleotides directed at the bcl-2 gene message to specifically downregulate Bcl-2 protein expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and render the cells more susceptible to the induction of apoptosis. In Section II Dr. Alan List reviews the targeting of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor in anti-angiogenesis strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In Section III Dr. Bruce Cheson describes recent progress in inhibiting cell cycle progression by selectively disrupting cyclin D1 with structurally unique compounds such as flavopiridol in mantle cell lymphoma as well as describing a new class of agents that affect proteasome degradation pathways.

  13. Molecular markers of IGF-I-mediated mitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reiss, K; Valentinis, B; Tu, X; Xu, S Q; Baserga, R

    1998-07-10

    The aim of these investigations was to identify a number of molecular markers that correlate to growth stimulation by IGF-I. For this purpose, we have selected four cell lines that respond equally well to growth stimulation by serum, but differ in their proliferative response to IGF-I. Two cell lines (R503 and R600 cells) respond to IGF-I with both DNA synthesis and cell division, a third cell line (R508 cells) can enter S phase after IGF-I, but the cells do not divide, and a fourth one (R12 cells) totally fails to respond to IGF-I with growth. Using these cell lines, all of which had an intact mitogenic response program to serum, we show that: (1) an increase in GTP/GDP ratio is an early event that distinguishes cells capable of entering S phase after IGF-I from cells that do not; (2) all cells that are induced to synthesize DNA by IGF-I have increased phosphorylation of MAP kinases, regardless of their ability to divide; (3) the same cell lines display a similar increase in cyclin A and B expression at early times after stimulation; and (4) cyclin levels and cyclin B-associated cdc2 kinase activity remain elevated at later times only in cells that undergo cell division. These results establish certain parameters of IGF-I-mediated mitogenesis and clearly separate the occurrence of DNA synthesis from cell division in certain situations.

  14. Molecular genetics of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, I; Vesa, J; Santavuori, P; Hellsten, E; Peltonen, L

    1992-12-01

    This overview describes recent advances in molecular biology of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (CLN). Despite intensive research during last 20 years, the basic defects of these autosomal recessive-progressive encephalopathies of childhood remain unknown. Consequently, no specific cure is available. Methods of positional cloning (reverse genetics) starting from random linkage approach have been applied to search for gene defects in the infantile and juvenile forms of the disease. The results of this random search for disease loci have for the first time revealed molecular heterogeneity of CLN diseases. The gene defect causing the infantile form has been assigned to 1p32 in the Finnish family material, whereas the disease locus of the juvenile form has been localized to 16p12 in European and Canadian families. Finally, the gene defect causing the late infantile form has been excluded from both 1p32 and 16p12 chromosomal regions, referring to a third, still unknown locus causing CLN disease. Consequently, reliable prenatal and carrier diagnostics have now become possible in families with the infantile and juvenile forms of the disease, and DNA-based prenatal diagnostics have been successfully applied in the infantile form. Most importantly, the assignment of gene loci has brought these fatal brain diseases within the reach of molecular cloning strategies that eventually will result in revealing both the infantile and juvenile CLN genes and in identifying corresponding gene products. PMID:1287553

  15. Molecular cell biology and molecular genetics of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, Atanas; Keath, Elizabeth J

    2002-10-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is a dimorphic ascomycete which is capable of producing a broad spectrum of disease ranging from mild asymptomatic, pulmonary illness to severe, life-threatening systemic mycosis. Regulatory mechanisms that use temperature and other environmental cues are paramount to the successful adaptation of the organism as an effective intracellular pathogenic yeast. Although the biochemistry and phenomenology of reversible morphogenesis have been well examined in Histoplasma, the identification and functional characterization of genes and their products that are required for early establishment or maintenance of the parasitic yeast phase in intracellular host compartments have only recently been fruitful. Advances in the molecular biology of Histoplasma, including approaches to introduce telomeric plasmids, reporter fusion constructs, and gene disruption cassettes into the fungus are poised to solidify the pre-eminence of this fungus as a model system which can be applied to other dimorphic fungal pathogens that exhibit similar cellular and immunological complexities. This review centers on recent developments in the molecular cell biology and molecular genetics of Histoplasma capsulatum that provide important new avenues for examining the mold-to-yeast phase transition beyond the historical, binary view of dimorphism and the implications that these successful approaches may have on seminal issues in fungal pathogenesis. PMID:12452281

  16. Decay of genetic markers for fecal bacterial indicators and pathogens in sand from Lake Superior.

    PubMed

    Eichmiller, Jessica J; Borchert, Andrew J; Sadowsky, Michael J; Hicks, Randall E

    2014-08-01

    Beach sands impact water quality and pathogen loads, however, the comparative decay of the fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli, and pathogens in freshwater sand have not been examined. In this study, freshwater sand microcosms were inoculated with sewage and pure cultures of bacterial pathogens to compare relative decay rates. The abundance of culturable Enterococcus spp. and E. coli, genetic markers for Enterococcus spp. (Entero1), total Bacteroides (AllBac), and human-specific Bacteroides (HF183), and genetic markers for the pathogens Campylobacter jejuni, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Shigella flexneri were monitored over the course of two weeks using conventional culture methods and quantitative PCR (qPCR). The effect of moisture on the persistence of culturable FIB and all genetic markers was also determined. In addition, propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment was used to examine differences in the persistence of total genetic markers and those from live cells. Decay rates were statistically compared using Tukey's test. Moisture had a significant (p ≤ 0.05) effect on the decay rates of culturable indicator bacteria, total AllBac markers, and genetic markers for FIB, Salmonella, and MRSA from live cells. At 14% sand moisture, the decay rate of total markers was slower than that of live cells for all qPCR assays, but at 28% moisture, there was no difference in the decay rates of total and live markers for any assay. AllBac and MRSA markers increased in sand at 28% moisture, probably indicating cellular growth. Overall, culturable FIB and HF183 had decay rates that were most comparable to the bacterial pathogen markers examined in this study, whereas Entero1 and AllBac rarely exhibited decay rates similar to the bacterial pathogens in this study. The choice of FIB for assessment of fecal contamination in freshwater sand should take into account

  17. Genomic Selection for Adjacent Genetic Markers of Yorkshire Pigs Using Regularized Regression Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minsu; Kim, Tae-Hun; Cho, Eun-Seok; Kim, Heebal; Oh, Hee-Seok

    2014-01-01

    This study considers a problem of genomic selection (GS) for adjacent genetic markers of Yorkshire pigs which are typically correlated. The GS has been widely used to efficiently estimate target variables such as molecular breeding values using markers across the entire genome. Recently, GS has been applied to animals as well as plants, especially to pigs. For efficient selection of variables with specific traits in pig breeding, it is required that any such variable selection retains some properties: i) it produces a simple model by identifying insignificant variables; ii) it improves the accuracy of the prediction of future data; and iii) it is feasible to handle high-dimensional data in which the number of variables is larger than the number of observations. In this paper, we applied several variable selection methods including least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), fused LASSO and elastic net to data with 47K single nucleotide polymorphisms and litter size for 519 observed sows. Based on experiments, we observed that the fused LASSO outperforms other approaches. PMID:25358359

  18. Genetic variation and genetic structure of the endangered species Sinowilsonia henryi Hemsi. (Hamamelidaceae) revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Ji, W L; Li, M; Zhou, L Y

    2015-10-14

    Comprehensive research of genetic variation is crucial in designing conservation strategies for endangered and threatened species. Sinowilsonia henryi Hemsi. is a tertiary relic with a limited geographical distribution in the central and western areas of China. It is endangered because of climate change and habitat fragmentation over the last thousands of years. In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism markers were utilized to estimate genetic diversity and genetic structure in and among S. henryi. In this study, Nei's genetic diversity and Shannon's information index were found to be 0.192 and 0.325 respectively, indicating a moderate-to-high genetic diversity in species. According to analysis of molecular variation results, 32% of the genetic variation was shown to be partitioned among populations, demonstrating a relatively high genetic divergence; this was supported by principal coordinate analysis and unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average analysis. Moreover, the Mantel test showed that there was no significant correlation between genetic and geographical distances. The above results can be explained by the effects of habitat fragmentation, history traits, and gene drift. Based on the results, several implications were indicated and suggestions proposed for preservation strategies for this species.

  19. Comparison of RAPD, ISSR, and AFLP Molecular Markers to Reveal and Classify Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Germplasm Variations.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rita; Pereira, Graça; Garrido, Inmaculada; Tavares-de-Sousa, Manuel María; Espinosa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Three different DNA-based techniques, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers, were used for fingerprinting Dactylis glomerata genotypes and for detecting genetic variation between the three different subspecies. In this study, RAPD assays produced 97 bands, of which 40 were polymorphic (41.2%). The ISSR primers amplified 91 bands, and 54 showed polymorphism (59.3%). Finally, the AFLP showed 100 bands, of which 92 were polymorphic (92%). The fragments were scored as present (1) or absent (0), and those readings were entered in a computer file as a binary matrix (one for each marker). Three cluster analyses were performed to express--in the form of dendrograms--the relationships among the genotypes and the genetic variability detected. All DNA-based techniques used were able to amplify all of the genotypes. There were highly significant correlation coefficients between cophenetic matrices based on the genetic distance for the RAPD, ISSR, AFLP, and combined RAPD-ISSR-AFLP data (0.68, 0.78, 0.70, and 0.70, respectively). Two hypotheses were formulated to explain these results; both of them are in agreement with the results obtained using these three types of molecular markers. We conclude that when we study genotypes close related, the analysis of variability could require more than one DNA-based technique; in fact, the genetic variation present in different sources could interfere or combine with the more or less polymorphic ability, as our results showed for RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers. Our results indicate that AFLP seemed to be the best-suited molecular assay for fingerprinting and assessing genetic relationship among genotypes of Dactylis glomerata.

  20. Comparison of RAPD, ISSR, and AFLP Molecular Markers to Reveal and Classify Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Germplasm Variations

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Rita; Pereira, Graça; Garrido, Inmaculada; Tavares-de-Sousa, Manuel María; Espinosa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Three different DNA-based techniques, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers, were used for fingerprinting Dactylis glomerata genotypes and for detecting genetic variation between the three different subspecies. In this study, RAPD assays produced 97 bands, of which 40 were polymorphic (41.2%). The ISSR primers amplified 91 bands, and 54 showed polymorphism (59.3%). Finally, the AFLP showed 100 bands, of which 92 were polymorphic (92%). The fragments were scored as present (1) or absent (0), and those readings were entered in a computer file as a binary matrix (one for each marker). Three cluster analyses were performed to express–in the form of dendrograms–the relationships among the genotypes and the genetic variability detected. All DNA-based techniques used were able to amplify all of the genotypes. There were highly significant correlation coefficients between cophenetic matrices based on the genetic distance for the RAPD, ISSR, AFLP, and combined RAPD-ISSR-AFLP data (0.68, 0.78, 0.70, and 0.70, respectively). Two hypotheses were formulated to explain these results; both of them are in agreement with the results obtained using these three types of molecular markers. We conclude that when we study genotypes close related, the analysis of variability could require more than one DNA-based technique; in fact, the genetic variation present in different sources could interfere or combine with the more or less polymorphic ability, as our results showed for RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers. Our results indicate that AFLP seemed to be the best-suited molecular assay for fingerprinting and assessing genetic relationship among genotypes of Dactylis glomerata. PMID:27070939

  1. Comparison of RAPD, ISSR, and AFLP Molecular Markers to Reveal and Classify Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Germplasm Variations.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rita; Pereira, Graça; Garrido, Inmaculada; Tavares-de-Sousa, Manuel María; Espinosa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Three different DNA-based techniques, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers, were used for fingerprinting Dactylis glomerata genotypes and for detecting genetic variation between the three different subspecies. In this study, RAPD assays produced 97 bands, of which 40 were polymorphic (41.2%). The ISSR primers amplified 91 bands, and 54 showed polymorphism (59.3%). Finally, the AFLP showed 100 bands, of which 92 were polymorphic (92%). The fragments were scored as present (1) or absent (0), and those readings were entered in a computer file as a binary matrix (one for each marker). Three cluster analyses were performed to express--in the form of dendrograms--the relationships among the genotypes and the genetic variability detected. All DNA-based techniques used were able to amplify all of the genotypes. There were highly significant correlation coefficients between cophenetic matrices based on the genetic distance for the RAPD, ISSR, AFLP, and combined RAPD-ISSR-AFLP data (0.68, 0.78, 0.70, and 0.70, respectively). Two hypotheses were formulated to explain these results; both of them are in agreement with the results obtained using these three types of molecular markers. We conclude that when we study genotypes close related, the analysis of variability could require more than one DNA-based technique; in fact, the genetic variation present in different sources could interfere or combine with the more or less polymorphic ability, as our results showed for RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers. Our results indicate that AFLP seemed to be the best-suited molecular assay for fingerprinting and assessing genetic relationship among genotypes of Dactylis glomerata. PMID:27070939

  2. Levels of genetic polymorphism: marker loci versus quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Butlin, R K; Tregenza, T

    1998-02-28

    Species are the units used to measure ecological diversity and alleles are the units of genetic diversity. Genetic variation within and among species has been documented most extensively using allozyme electrophoresis. This reveals wide differences in genetic variability within, and genetic distances among, species, demonstrating that species are not equivalent units of diversity. The extent to which the pattern observed for allozymes can be used to infer patterns of genetic variation in quantitative traits depends on the forces generating and maintaining variability. Allozyme variation is probably not strictly neutral but, nevertheless, heterozygosity is expected to be influenced by population size and genetic distance will be affected by time since divergence. The same is true for quantitative traits influenced by many genes and under weak stabilizing selection. However, the limited data available suggest that allozyme variability is a poor predictor of genetic variation in quantitative traits within populations. It is a better predictor of general phenotypic divergence and of postzygotic isolation between populations or species, but is only weakly correlated with prezygotic isolation. Studies of grasshopper and planthopper mating signal variation and assortative mating illustrate how these characters evolve independently of general genetic and morphological variation. The role of such traits in prezygotic isolation, and hence speciation, means that they will contribute significantly to the diversity of levels of genetic variation within and among species.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Genetic Diversity in Chinese Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huabo; Tang, Yan; Wu, Liping; Wang, Zhe; Li, Yingyue; Wu, Rongling; Pang, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill, 2n = 2× = 24, Rhamnaceae) is an economically important Chinese native species. It has high nutritional value, and its medicinal properties have led to extensive use in traditional oriental medicine. The characterization of genotypes using molecular markers is important for genetic studies and plant breeding. However, few simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are available for this species. In this study, 1,488 unique SSR clones were isolated from Z. jujuba ‘Dongzao’ using enriched genomic libraries coupled with a three-primer colony PCR screening strategy, yielding a high enrichment rate of 73.3%. Finally, 1,188 (80.87%) primer pairs were amplified successfully in the size expected for ‘Dongzao’. A total of 350 primer pairs were further selected and evaluated for their ability to detect polymorphisms across a panel of six diverse cultivars; among these, 301 primer pairs detected polymorphisms, and the polymorphism information content (PIC) value across all loci ranged from 0.15 to 0.82, with an average of 0.52. An analysis of 76 major cultivars employed in Chinese jujube production using 31 primer pairs revealed comparatively high genetic diversity among these cultivars. Within-population differences among individuals accounted for 98.2% of the observed genetic variation. Neighbor-joining clustering divided the cultivars into three main groups, none of which correspond to major geographic regions, suggesting that the genetics and geographical origin of modern Chinese jujube cultivars might not be linked. The current work firstly reports the large-scale development of Chinese jujube SSR markers. The development of these markers and their polymorphic information represent a significant improvement in the available Chinese jujube genomic resources and will facilitate both genetic and breeding applications, further accelerating the development of new cultivars. PMID:24932973

  4. Molecular analysis of soybean varying in water use efficiency using SSRs markers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mithlesh; Lal, S K

    2015-07-01

    A set of 91 soybean germplasm lines, collected from different parts of the world, were screened for Water Use Efficiency (WUE) using Carbon Isotope Discrimination (CID) technique and were characterized for 10 quantitative traits. After screening under field condition, 44 soybean genotypes showed variations in WUE. Molecular diversity of these 44 diverse soybean lines was carried out with 26 Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) markers, of which 10 were polymorphic (38.47% polymorphism). 28 alleles were observed which were distributed over 10 loci, with an average of 2.8 alleles per locus. Polymorphism Information Content (PIC) value of 10 polymorphic markers ranged from 0.40 (locus Satt460) to 0.67 (locus satt260), with an average of 0.46. Pair-wise genetic similarity value, as calculated by simple matching coefficient, ranged from 0.99 to 0.40, with an average of 0.70. Genotypes were clustered using NTSYS-pc software employing unweighted paired group method using arithmetic averages to generate the dendrogram. Dendrogram exhibited 8 distinct clusters with a similarity coefficient of 0.69. Genotypes having low to medium and medium to high CID value were clustered in distant groups indicating usefulness of these polymorphic SSRs markers for differentiating genotypes on the basis of their CID value. The findings of this study indicate the need for broadening genetic base of the present Indian soybean cultivars through use of exotic sources of variation towards WUE. Thus, diverse genotypes identified in this study would be beneficial to soybean breeders to develop mapping population to identify QTLs for WUE. PMID:26364483

  5. Biomedical wellness monitoring system based upon molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Whitney

    2012-06-01

    We wish to assist caretakers with a sensor monitoring systems for tracking the physiological changes of homealone patients. One goal is seeking biomarkers and modern imaging sensors like stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), which has achieved visible imaging at the nano-scale range. Imaging techniques like STORM can be combined with a fluorescent functional marker in a system to capture the early transformation signs from wellness to illness. By exploiting both microscopic knowledge of genetic pre-disposition and the macroscopic influence of epigenetic factors we hope to target these changes remotely. We adopt dual spectral infrared imaging for blind source separation (BSS) to detect angiogenesis changes and use laser speckle imaging for hypertension blood flow monitoring. Our design hypothesis for the monitoring system is guided by the user-friendly, veteran-preferred "4-Non" principles (noninvasive, non-contact, non-tethered, non-stop-to-measure) and by the NIH's "4Ps" initiatives (predictive, personalized, preemptive, and participatory). We augment the potential storage system with the recent know-how of video Compressive Sampling (CSp) from surveillance cameras. In CSp only major changes are saved, which reduces the manpower cost of caretakers and medical analysts. This CSp algorithm is based on smart associative memory (AM) matrix storage: change features and detailed scenes are written by the outer-product and read by the inner product without the usual Harsh index for image searching. From this approach, we attempt to design an effective household monitoring approach to save healthcare costs and maintain the quality of life of seniors.

  6. Influence of wastewater disinfection on densities of culturable fecal indicator bacteria and genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Chern, Eunice C; Brenner, Kristen; Wymer, Larry; Haugland, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as a rapid alternative analytical method for monitoring recreational water quality at beaches. For qPCR to be considered for other Clean Water Act purposes, such as inclusion in discharge permits and use in Total Maximum Daily Load calculations, it is necessary to understand how qPCR detectable genetic markers are influenced by wastewater disinfection. This study investigated genetic markers for Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, Clostridium spp., Bacteroides, total Bacteroidales, as well as the human-associated Bacteroides markers, HF183 and HumM2, to determine which, if any, were influenced by disinfection (chlorination or ultraviolet light) of effluents from secondary wastewater treatment in different seasons. The effects of disinfection on culturable enterococci, E. coli, Bacteroides, and C. perfringens were also compared to their associated genetic markers. Disinfection of secondary treatment effluents significantly reduced culturable fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) but not genetic marker densities. No significant differences were observed in the responses of FIB culture and genetic marker densities to type of disinfection (chlorination vs UV) or season. Results of this study provide evidence that qPCR may not be suitable for monitoring efficacy of wastewater disinfection on the inactivation of bacterial pathogens. PMID:25252344

  7. Influence of wastewater disinfection on densities of culturable fecal indicator bacteria and genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Chern, Eunice C; Brenner, Kristen; Wymer, Larry; Haugland, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as a rapid alternative analytical method for monitoring recreational water quality at beaches. For qPCR to be considered for other Clean Water Act purposes, such as inclusion in discharge permits and use in Total Maximum Daily Load calculations, it is necessary to understand how qPCR detectable genetic markers are influenced by wastewater disinfection. This study investigated genetic markers for Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, Clostridium spp., Bacteroides, total Bacteroidales, as well as the human-associated Bacteroides markers, HF183 and HumM2, to determine which, if any, were influenced by disinfection (chlorination or ultraviolet light) of effluents from secondary wastewater treatment in different seasons. The effects of disinfection on culturable enterococci, E. coli, Bacteroides, and C. perfringens were also compared to their associated genetic markers. Disinfection of secondary treatment effluents significantly reduced culturable fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) but not genetic marker densities. No significant differences were observed in the responses of FIB culture and genetic marker densities to type of disinfection (chlorination vs UV) or season. Results of this study provide evidence that qPCR may not be suitable for monitoring efficacy of wastewater disinfection on the inactivation of bacterial pathogens.

  8. [Glucotransporters: clinical, molecular and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Muñiz, Roberto de Jesús; Vargas-Guerrero, Belinda; Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Gurrola-Díaz, Carmen Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of glucose is the major source of obtaining cell energy, this process requires glucose transport into the cell. However, cell membranes are not permeable to polar molecules such as glucose; therefore its internalization is accomplished by transporter proteins coupled to the cell membrane. In eukaryotic cells, there are two types of carriers coupled to the membrane: 1) cotransporter Na+-glucose (SGLT) where Na+ ion provides motive power for the glucose´s internalization, and 2) the glucotransporters (GLUT) act by facilitated diffusion. This review will focus on the 14 GLUT so far described. Despite the structural homology of GLUT, different genetic alterations of each GLUT cause specific clinical entities. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the molecular and biochemical available information of each GLUT as well as the particular syndromes and pathologies related with GLUT´s alterations and their clinical approaches. PMID:27595260

  9. A novel set of single-copy nuclear DNA markers for the genetic study of Salicaceae.

    PubMed

    Du, S H; Wang, Z S; Zhang, J G

    2014-07-04

    Species of Populus are widely distributed worldwide, playing a significant role in both ecology and economy. However, the lack of single-copy nuclear markers limits knowledge about the phylogeny and population genetics of this genus. In the present study, primer pairs of 15 single-copy nuclear markers were developed through bioinformatic methods based on complete genomic sequences of Populus trichocarpa and Salix arbutifolia. Twenty individuals of Populus davidiana Dode and Salix matsudana Koidz were used to evaluate the basic application of these markers with respect to marker length and diversity indices, respectively. The utility of single-copy nuclear markers is anticipated to facilitate further studies about the phylogeny, population genetics, and phylogeography of this genus, in addition to providing information about the evolutionary dynamics of Salicaceae.

  10. Recent patents on biosafety strategies of selectable marker genes in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Hu, Xiaoning; Huang, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified crops (GMCs) have been planted world wide since 1990s, but the potential insecurity of selectable marker genes raises the questions about GMC safety. Therefore, several researches have been conducted on marker gene safety issues and recently several patents have been issued on this subject. There are two main approaches to achieve this goal: seeking the biosafety selectable marker and eliminating these insecure marker genes after transformation. Results show that these two systems are quite effective. Recent patents on the two ways are discussed in this review.

  11. Assessment of genetic diversity in Mucuna species of India using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and inter simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ravishankar R; Pawar, Kiran D; Rane, Manali R; Yadav, Shrirang R; Bapat, Vishwas A; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2016-04-01

    Genus Mucuna which is native to China and Eastern India comprises of perennial climbing legume with long slender branches, trifoliate leaves and bear green or brown pod covered with soft or rigid hairs that cause intense irritation. The plants of this genus are agronomically and economically important and commercially cultivated in India, China and other regions of the world. The high degrees of taxonomical confusions exist in Mucuna species that make authentic identification and classification difficult. In the present study, the genetic diversity among the 59 accessions of six species and three varieties of M. pruriens has been assessed using DNA fingerprinting based molecular markers techniques namely randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and combined dataset of RAPD and ISSR. Also, genetic relationship among two endemic species of Mucuna namely M. imbricata and M. macrocarpa and two varieties namely IIHR hybrid (MHR) and Dhanwantari (MD) with other species under study was investigated by using cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis. The cluster analysis of RAPD, ISSR and combined dataset of RAPD and ISSR clearly demonstrated the existence of high interspecific variation than intra-specific variation in genus Mucuna. The utility and efficacy of RAPD and ISSR for the study of intra species and interspecies genetic diversity was evident from AMOVA and PCoA analysis. This study demonstrates the genetic diversity in Mucuna species and indicates that these markers could be successfully used to assess genetic variation among the accessions of Mucuna species. PMID:27436912

  12. Analysis of microsatellite DNA markers reveals no genetic differentiation between wild and hatchery populations of Pacific threadfin in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Yang, Jinzeng

    2010-01-01

    Pacific threadfin, Polydactylus sexfilis, is popular fish in recreational fishing, as well as aquaculture in Hawaii. Its natural population has been continuously declining in the past several decades. Microsatellite DNA markers are useful DNA-based tool for monitoring Pacific threadfin populations. In this study, fifteen Microsatellite (MS) DNA markers were identified from a partial genomic Pacific threadfin DNA library enriched in CA repeats, and six highly-polymorphic microsatellite loci were employed to analyze genetic similarity and differences between the wild population and hatchery population in Oahu Island. A total of 37 alleles were detected at the six MS loci in the two populations. Statistical analysis of fixation index (F(ST)) and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed no genetic differentiation between the wild and hatchery populations (F(ST) = 0.001, CI(95%) = -0.01-0.021). Both high genetic diversity (H(o) = 0.664-0.674 and H(e) = 0.710-0.715) and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed in the wild and hatchery populations. Results of genetic bottleneck analysis indicated that the hatchery was founded with sufficient numbers of brooders as inbreeding coefficient is very low (F(IS) = 0.052-0.072) in both wild and hatchery populations. Further studies are needed for comprehensive determinations of genetic varieties of primary founder broodstocks and successive offspring of the hatchery and wild populations with increased number of Pacific threadfin sample collections.

  13. Molecular and comparative genetics of mental retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Inlow, Jennifer K; Restifo, Linda L

    2004-01-01

    Affecting 1-3% of the population, mental retardation (MR) poses significant challenges for clinicians and scientists. Understanding the biology of MR is complicated by the extraordinary heterogeneity of genetic MR disorders. Detailed analyses of >1000 Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database entries and literature searches through September 2003 revealed 282 molecularly identified MR genes. We estimate that hundreds more MR genes remain to be identified. A novel test, in which we distributed unmapped MR disorders proportionately across the autosomes, failed to eliminate the well-known X-chromosome overrepresentation of MR genes and candidate genes. This evidence argues against ascertainment bias as the main cause of the skewed distribution. On the basis of a synthesis of clinical and laboratory data, we developed a biological functions classification scheme for MR genes. Metabolic pathways, signaling pathways, and transcription are the most common functions, but numerous other aspects of neuronal and glial biology are controlled by MR genes as well. Using protein sequence and domain-organization comparisons, we found a striking conservation of MR genes and genetic pathways across the approximately 700 million years that separate Homo sapiens and Drosophila melanogaster. Eighty-seven percent have one or more fruit fly homologs and 76% have at least one candidate functional ortholog. We propose that D. melanogaster can be used in a systematic manner to study MR and possibly to develop bioassays for therapeutic drug discovery. We selected 42 Drosophila orthologs as most likely to reveal molecular and cellular mechanisms of nervous system development or plasticity relevant to MR. PMID:15020472

  14. Molecular Assortment of Lens Species with Different Adaptations to Drought Conditions Using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharmendra; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Tomar, Ram Sewak Singh; Taunk, Jyoti; Singh, Ranjeet; Maurya, Sadhana; Chaturvedi, Ashish Kumar; Pal, Madan; Singh, Rajendra; Dubey, Sarawan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The success of drought tolerance breeding programs can be enhanced through molecular assortment of germplasm. This study was designed to characterize molecular diversity within and between Lens species with different adaptations to drought stress conditions using SSR markers. Drought stress was applied at seedling stage to study the effects on morpho-physiological traits under controlled condition, where tolerant cultivars and wilds showed 12.8–27.6% and 9.5–23.2% reduction in seed yield per plant respectively. When juxtaposed to field conditions, the tolerant cultivars (PDL-1 and PDL-2) and wild (ILWL-314 and ILWL-436) accessions showed 10.5–26.5% and 7.5%–15.6% reduction in seed yield per plant, respectively under rain-fed conditions. The reductions in seed yield in the two tolerant cultivars and wilds under severe drought condition were 48–49% and 30.5–45.3% respectively. A set of 258 alleles were identified among 278 genotypes using 35 SSR markers. Genetic diversity and polymorphism information contents varied between 0.321–0.854 and 0.299–0.836, with mean value of 0.682 and 0.643, respectively. All the genotypes were clustered into 11 groups based on SSR markers. Tolerant genotypes were grouped in cluster 6 while sensitive ones were mainly grouped into cluster 7. Wild accessions were separated from cultivars on the basis of both population structure and cluster analysis. Cluster analysis has further grouped the wild accessions on the basis of species and sub-species into 5 clusters. Physiological and morphological characters under drought stress were significantly (P = 0.05) different among microsatellite clusters. These findings suggest that drought adaptation is variable among wild and cultivated genotypes. Also, genotypes from contrasting clusters can be selected for hybridization which could help in evolution of better segregants for improving drought tolerance in lentil. PMID:26808306

  15. Molecular Assortment of Lens Species with Different Adaptations to Drought Conditions Using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Tomar, Ram Sewak Singh; Taunk, Jyoti; Singh, Ranjeet; Maurya, Sadhana; Chaturvedi, Ashish Kumar; Pal, Madan; Singh, Rajendra; Dubey, Sarawan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The success of drought tolerance breeding programs can be enhanced through molecular assortment of germplasm. This study was designed to characterize molecular diversity within and between Lens species with different adaptations to drought stress conditions using SSR markers. Drought stress was applied at seedling stage to study the effects on morpho-physiological traits under controlled condition, where tolerant cultivars and wilds showed 12.8-27.6% and 9.5-23.2% reduction in seed yield per plant respectively. When juxtaposed to field conditions, the tolerant cultivars (PDL-1 and PDL-2) and wild (ILWL-314 and ILWL-436) accessions showed 10.5-26.5% and 7.5%-15.6% reduction in seed yield per plant, respectively under rain-fed conditions. The reductions in seed yield in the two tolerant cultivars and wilds under severe drought condition were 48-49% and 30.5-45.3% respectively. A set of 258 alleles were identified among 278 genotypes using 35 SSR markers. Genetic diversity and polymorphism information contents varied between 0.321-0.854 and 0.299-0.836, with mean value of 0.682 and 0.643, respectively. All the genotypes were clustered into 11 groups based on SSR markers. Tolerant genotypes were grouped in cluster 6 while sensitive ones were mainly grouped into cluster 7. Wild accessions were separated from cultivars on the basis of both population structure and cluster analysis. Cluster analysis has further grouped the wild accessions on the basis of species and sub-species into 5 clusters. Physiological and morphological characters under drought stress were significantly (P = 0.05) different among microsatellite clusters. These findings suggest that drought adaptation is variable among wild and cultivated genotypes. Also, genotypes from contrasting clusters can be selected for hybridization which could help in evolution of better segregants for improving drought tolerance in lentil.

  16. Molecular Assortment of Lens Species with Different Adaptations to Drought Conditions Using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Tomar, Ram Sewak Singh; Taunk, Jyoti; Singh, Ranjeet; Maurya, Sadhana; Chaturvedi, Ashish Kumar; Pal, Madan; Singh, Rajendra; Dubey, Sarawan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The success of drought tolerance breeding programs can be enhanced through molecular assortment of germplasm. This study was designed to characterize molecular diversity within and between Lens species with different adaptations to drought stress conditions using SSR markers. Drought stress was applied at seedling stage to study the effects on morpho-physiological traits under controlled condition, where tolerant cultivars and wilds showed 12.8-27.6% and 9.5-23.2% reduction in seed yield per plant respectively. When juxtaposed to field conditions, the tolerant cultivars (PDL-1 and PDL-2) and wild (ILWL-314 and ILWL-436) accessions showed 10.5-26.5% and 7.5%-15.6% reduction in seed yield per plant, respectively under rain-fed conditions. The reductions in seed yield in the two tolerant cultivars and wilds under severe drought condition were 48-49% and 30.5-45.3% respectively. A set of 258 alleles were identified among 278 genotypes using 35 SSR markers. Genetic diversity and polymorphism information contents varied between 0.321-0.854 and 0.299-0.836, with mean value of 0.682 and 0.643, respectively. All the genotypes were clustered into 11 groups based on SSR markers. Tolerant genotypes were grouped in cluster 6 while sensitive ones were mainly grouped into cluster 7. Wild accessions were separated from cultivars on the basis of both population structure and cluster analysis. Cluster analysis has further grouped the wild accessions on the basis of species and sub-species into 5 clusters. Physiological and morphological characters under drought stress were significantly (P = 0.05) different among microsatellite clusters. These findings suggest that drought adaptation is variable among wild and cultivated genotypes. Also, genotypes from contrasting clusters can be selected for hybridization which could help in evolution of better segregants for improving drought tolerance in lentil. PMID:26808306

  17. Construction of an SSR and RAD-Marker Based Molecular Linkage Map of Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich.

    PubMed

    Marubodee, Rusama; Ogiso-Tanaka, Eri; Isemura, Takehisa; Chankaew, Sompong; Kaga, Akito; Naito, Ken; Ehara, Hiroshi; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich. (tuber cowpea) is an underutilized crop for consuming its tuber and mature seeds. Wild form of V. vexillata is a pan-tropical perennial herbaceous plant which has been used by local people as a food. Wild V. vexillata has also been considered as useful gene(s) source for V. unguiculata (cowpea), since it was reported to have various resistance gene(s) for insects and diseases of cowpea. To exploit the potential of V. vexillata, an SSR-based linkage map of V. vexillata was developed. A total of 874 SSR markers successfully amplified single DNA fragment in V. vexillata among 1,336 SSR markers developed from Vigna angularis (azuki bean), V. unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean). An F2 population of 300 plants derived from a cross between salt resistant (V1) and susceptible (V5) accessions was used for mapping. A genetic linkage map was constructed using 82 polymorphic SSR markers loci, which could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 511.5 cM in length with a mean distance of 7.2 cM between adjacent markers. To develop higher density molecular linkage map and to confirm SSR markers position in a linkage map, RAD markers were developed and a combined SSR and RAD markers linkage map of V. vexillata was constructed. A total of 559 (84 SSR and 475 RAD) markers loci could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 973.9 cM in length with a mean distance of 1.8 cM between adjacent markers. Linkage and genetic position of all SSR markers in an SSR linkage map were confirmed. When an SSR genetic linkage map of V. vexillata was compared with those of V. radiata and V. unguiculata, it was suggested that the structure of V. vexillata chromosome was considerably differentiated. This map is the first SSR and RAD marker-based V. vexillata linkage map which can be used for the mapping of useful traits. PMID:26398819

  18. Construction of an SSR and RAD-Marker Based Molecular Linkage Map of Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich

    PubMed Central

    Chankaew, Sompong; Kaga, Akito; Naito, Ken; Ehara, Hiroshi; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich. (tuber cowpea) is an underutilized crop for consuming its tuber and mature seeds. Wild form of V. vexillata is a pan-tropical perennial herbaceous plant which has been used by local people as a food. Wild V. vexillata has also been considered as useful gene(s) source for V. unguiculata (cowpea), since it was reported to have various resistance gene(s) for insects and diseases of cowpea. To exploit the potential of V. vexillata, an SSR-based linkage map of V. vexillata was developed. A total of 874 SSR markers successfully amplified single DNA fragment in V. vexillata among 1,336 SSR markers developed from Vigna angularis (azuki bean), V. unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean). An F2 population of 300 plants derived from a cross between salt resistant (V1) and susceptible (V5) accessions was used for mapping. A genetic linkage map was constructed using 82 polymorphic SSR markers loci, which could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 511.5 cM in length with a mean distance of 7.2 cM between adjacent markers. To develop higher density molecular linkage map and to confirm SSR markers position in a linkage map, RAD markers were developed and a combined SSR and RAD markers linkage map of V. vexillata was constructed. A total of 559 (84 SSR and 475 RAD) markers loci could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 973.9 cM in length with a mean distance of 1.8 cM between adjacent markers. Linkage and genetic position of all SSR markers in an SSR linkage map were confirmed. When an SSR genetic linkage map of V. vexillata was compared with those of V. radiata and V. unguiculata, it was suggested that the structure of V. vexillata chromosome was considerably differentiated. This map is the first SSR and RAD marker-based V. vexillata linkage map which can be used for the mapping of useful traits. PMID:26398819

  19. Construction of an SSR and RAD-Marker Based Molecular Linkage Map of Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich.

    PubMed

    Marubodee, Rusama; Ogiso-Tanaka, Eri; Isemura, Takehisa; Chankaew, Sompong; Kaga, Akito; Naito, Ken; Ehara, Hiroshi; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich. (tuber cowpea) is an underutilized crop for consuming its tuber and mature seeds. Wild form of V. vexillata is a pan-tropical perennial herbaceous plant which has been used by local people as a food. Wild V. vexillata has also been considered as useful gene(s) source for V. unguiculata (cowpea), since it was reported to have various resistance gene(s) for insects and diseases of cowpea. To exploit the potential of V. vexillata, an SSR-based linkage map of V. vexillata was developed. A total of 874 SSR markers successfully amplified single DNA fragment in V. vexillata among 1,336 SSR markers developed from Vigna angularis (azuki bean), V. unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean). An F2 population of 300 plants derived from a cross between salt resistant (V1) and susceptible (V5) accessions was used for mapping. A genetic linkage map was constructed using 82 polymorphic SSR markers loci, which could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 511.5 cM in length with a mean distance of 7.2 cM between adjacent markers. To develop higher density molecular linkage map and to confirm SSR markers position in a linkage map, RAD markers were developed and a combined SSR and RAD markers linkage map of V. vexillata was constructed. A total of 559 (84 SSR and 475 RAD) markers loci could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 973.9 cM in length with a mean distance of 1.8 cM between adjacent markers. Linkage and genetic position of all SSR markers in an SSR linkage map were confirmed. When an SSR genetic linkage map of V. vexillata was compared with those of V. radiata and V. unguiculata, it was suggested that the structure of V. vexillata chromosome was considerably differentiated. This map is the first SSR and RAD marker-based V. vexillata linkage map which can be used for the mapping of useful traits.

  20. Development of SCAR Markers Based on Improved RAPD Amplification Fragments and Molecular Cloning for Authentication of Herbal Medicines Angelica sinensis, Angelica acutiloba and Levisticum officinale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Mei, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Jingliang; He, Yin; Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Luo, Peiyi; Imani, Saber; Fu, Junjiang

    2015-10-01

    Molecular cloning from DNA fragments of improved RAPD amplification of Angelica sinensis, Angelica acutiloba and Levisticum officinale, provided novel sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers A13, A23, A1-34 and A1-0 whose sequences were deposited in the GenBank database with the accession numbers KP641315, KP641316, KP641317 and KP641318, respectively. By optional PCR amplification, the SCAR markers A13 and A23 are Levisticum officinale-specific, whereas the SCAR marker A1-34 is Angelica acutiloba-specific, and the SCAR marker A1-0 is Angelica sinensis-specific. These diagnostic SCAR markers may be useful for genetic authentications, for ecological conservation of all three medicinal plants and as a helpful tool for the genetic authentication of adulterant samples.

  1. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  2. Molecular analysis of East Anatolian traditional plum and cherry accessions using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Öz, M H; Vurgun, H; Bakir, M; Büyük, İ; Yüksel, C; Ünlü, H M; Çukadar, K; Karadoğan, B; Köse, Ö; Ergül, A

    2013-11-07

    We conducted SSR analyses of 59 accessions, including 29 traditional plum (Prunus domestica), 24 sweet cherry (Prunus avium), and 1 sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) selected from East Anatolian gene sources and 3 plum and 2 cherry reference accessions for molecular characterization and investigation of genetic relationships. Eight SSR loci [1 developed from the apricot (UDAp-404), 4 from the peach (UDP96-010, UDP96-001, UDP96-019, Pchgms1) and 3 from the cherry (UCD-CH13, UCD-CH17, UCD-CH31) genome] for plum accessions and 9 SSR loci [5 developed from the cherry (PS12A02, UCD-CH13, UCD-CH17, UCD-CH31, UCD-CH21), 3 from the peach (Pchgms1, UDP96-001, UDP96-005) and 1 from the plum (CPSCT010) genome] for cherry accessions were used for genetic identification. A total of 66 and 65 alleles were obtained in the genetic analyses of 31 plum and 28 cherry accessions, respectively. The number of alleles revealed by SSR analysis ranged from 4 to 14 alleles per locus, with a mean value of 8.25 in plum accessions, and from 5 to 10 alleles per locus with a mean value of 7.2 in cherry accessions. Only one case of synonym was identified among the cherry accessions, while no case of synonym was observed among the plum accessions. Genomic SSR markers used in discrimination of plum and cherry accessions showed high cross-species transferability in the Prunus genus. Because of their appreciable polymorphism and cross species transferability, the SSR markers that we evaluated in this study will be useful for studies involving fingerprinting of cherry and plum cultivars.

  3. Molecular analysis of East Anatolian traditional plum and cherry accessions using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Öz, M H; Vurgun, H; Bakir, M; Büyük, İ; Yüksel, C; Ünlü, H M; Çukadar, K; Karadoğan, B; Köse, Ö; Ergül, A

    2013-01-01

    We conducted SSR analyses of 59 accessions, including 29 traditional plum (Prunus domestica), 24 sweet cherry (Prunus avium), and 1 sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) selected from East Anatolian gene sources and 3 plum and 2 cherry reference accessions for molecular characterization and investigation of genetic relationships. Eight SSR loci [1 developed from the apricot (UDAp-404), 4 from the peach (UDP96-010, UDP96-001, UDP96-019, Pchgms1) and 3 from the cherry (UCD-CH13, UCD-CH17, UCD-CH31) genome] for plum accessions and 9 SSR loci [5 developed from the cherry (PS12A02, UCD-CH13, UCD-CH17, UCD-CH31, UCD-CH21), 3 from the peach (Pchgms1, UDP96-001, UDP96-005) and 1 from the plum (CPSCT010) genome] for cherry accessions were used for genetic identification. A total of 66 and 65 alleles were obtained in the genetic analyses of 31 plum and 28 cherry accessions, respectively. The number of alleles revealed by SSR analysis ranged from 4 to 14 alleles per locus, with a mean value of 8.25 in plum accessions, and from 5 to 10 alleles per locus with a mean value of 7.2 in cherry accessions. Only one case of synonym was identified among the cherry accessions, while no case of synonym was observed among the plum accessions. Genomic SSR markers used in discrimination of plum and cherry accessions showed high cross-species transferability in the Prunus genus. Because of their appreciable polymorphism and cross species transferability, the SSR markers that we evaluated in this study will be useful for studies involving fingerprinting of cherry and plum cultivars. PMID:24301792

  4. Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

    2007-02-15

    The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC

  5. Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to probe for genetic markers on single-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Benjamin; Leotaud, John; McCarty, Gregory S.

    2010-03-01

    Methods capable of quickly and inexpensively collecting genetic information are of increasing importance. We report a method of using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to probe single-stranded DNA for genetic markers. This unique approach is used to analyze unmodified genes of moderate length for genetic markers by hybridizing native test oligonucleotides into a surface-enhanced Raman complex, vastly increasing detection sensitivity as compared to traditional Raman spectroscopy. The Raman complex is formed by sandwiching the test DNA between 40-nm gold nanoparticles and a photolithographically defined gold surface. With this design, we are able to collect characteristic Raman spectra about the test DNA and to detect genetic markers such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and polymorphic regions. Results show that strands containing one of three different types of polymorphism can be differentiated using statistically significant trends regarding Raman intensity.

  6. ZIP4 is a novel molecular marker for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Chen, Yong; Wang, Yongzhi; Yang, Jingxuan; Zhu, Vivian F.; Liu, Yulun; Cui, Xiaobo; Chen, Leon; Yan, Wei; Jiang, Tao; Hergenroeder, Georgene W.; Fletcher, Stephen A.; Levine, Jonathan M.; Kim, Dong H.; Tandon, Nitin; Zhu, Jay-Jiguang; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Background Dysregulated zinc transport has been observed in many cancers. However, the status of zinc homeostasis and the expression profile of zinc transporters in brain and brain tumors have not been reported. Methods The gene profiles of 14 zinc importers (ZIPs) and 10 zinc exporters (ZnTs) in patients with glioma were studied by investigating the association between the zinc transporters and brain tumor characteristics (tumor grade and overall survival time). Three independent cohorts were analyzed to cross-validate the findings: the Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGCA) cohort (n = 186), the US National Cancer Institute Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) cohort (n = 335), and The University of Texas (UT) cohort (n = 34). Results The expression of ZIP3, 4, 8, 14, ZnT5, 6, and 7 were increased, and the expression of ZnT10 was decreased in grade IV gliomas, compared with grade II gliomas. Among all 24 zinc transporters, ZIP4 is most significantly associated with tumor grade and overall survival; this finding is consistent across 2 independent cohorts (CGCA and REMBRANDT) and is partially validated by the third cohort (UT). High ZIP4 expression was significantly associated with higher grade of gliomas and shorter overall survival (hazard ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval = 1.02–2.53, P = .040 in CGCA cohort; hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval = 1.08–1.61, P = .007 in REMBRANDT cohort). Conclusions Dysregulated expression of zinc transporters is involved in the progression of gliomas. Our results suggest that ZIP4 may serve as a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker for gliomas. PMID:23595627

  7. Morphological and molecular genetic variations of oat genotypes grown in Kermanshah, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sheikhehpour, Saeid; Bahraminejad, Sohbat; Cheghamirza, Kianoosh

    2014-06-01

    Morphological traits and molecular markers are two common methods for genetic variation studies. Molecular markers, morphological traits methods and relationship between the two were used to study genetic variation among 43 oat genotypes and varieties. For this purpose, an augmented design was conducted in three replicates at 2008-2009 cropping season in the experimental field of Campus of Agriculture and Natural Resources of Razi University, Kermanshah, Iran. Four wild oat accessions (Avena sterilis) were added to evaluated genotypes in molecular experiment. Results showed a significant variation among genotypes for all morphological traits and they were classified based on this variation in four groups by WARD cluster analysis. In molecular experiment, 28 inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) primers amplified 206 polymorph bands. Based on Jaccard similarity matrix, similarity among genotypes was varied from 0.23 to 0.66 and cluster analysis classified genotypes in seven groups by complete linkage method. The correlation between ISSR marker and morphological traits classifications was not significant. ISSR showed to be a helpful marker for genotype identity and separation as it put wild accessions in a group.

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of the major peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivars grown in China by SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoping; Jiang, Huifang; Yan, Zhongyuan; Chen, Yuning; Zhou, Xiaojing; Huang, Li; Lei, Yong; Huang, Jiaquan; Yan, Liying; Qi, Yue; Wei, Wenhui; Liao, Boshou

    2014-01-01

    One hundred and forty-six highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of 196 peanut (Arachis Hypogaea L.) cultivars which had been extensively planted in different regions in China. These SSR markers amplified 440 polymorphic bands with an average of 2.99, and the average gene diversity index was 0.11. Eighty-six rare alleles with a frequency of less than 1% were identified in these cultivars. The largest Fst or genetic distance was found between the cultivars that adapted to the south regions and those to the north regions in China. A neighbor-joining tree of cultivars adapted to different ecological regions was constructed based on pairwise Nei's genetic distances, which showed a significant difference between cultivars from the south and the north regions. A model-based population structure analysis divided these peanut cultivars into five subpopulations (P1a, P1b, P2, P3a and P3b). P1a and P1b included most the cultivars from the southern provinces including Guangdong, Guangxi and Fujian. P2 population consisted of the cultivars from Hubei province and parts from Shandong and Henan. P3a and P3b had cultivars from the northern provinces including Shandong, Anhui, Henan, Hebei, Jiangsu and the Yangtze River region including Sichuan province. The cluster analysis, PCoA and PCA based on the marker genotypes, revealed five distinct clusters for the entire population that were related to their germplasm regions. The results indicated that there were obvious genetic variations between cultivars from the south and the north, and there were distinct genetic differentiation among individual cultivars from the south and the north. Taken together, these results provided a molecular basis for understanding genetic diversity of Chinese peanut cultivars.

  9. LTR-retrotransposons Tnt1 and T135 markers reveal genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships of domesticated peppers.

    PubMed

    Tam, Sheh May; Lefebvre, Véronique; Palloix, Alain; Sage-Palloix, Anne-Marie; Mhiri, Corinne; Grandbastien, Marie-Angèle

    2009-10-01

    Plant genetic resources often constitute the foundation of successful breeding programs. Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is one of the most economically important and diversely utilized Solanaceous crop species worldwide, but less studied compared to tomato and potato. We developed and used molecular markers based on two copia-type retrotransposons, Tnt1 and T135, in a set of Capsicum species and wild relatives from diverse geographical origins. Results showed that Tnt1 and T135 insertion polymorphisms are very useful for studying genetic diversity and relationships within and among pepper species. Clusters of accessions correspond to cultivar types based on fruit shape, pungency, geographic origin and pedigree. Genetic diversity values, normally reflective of past transposition activity and population dynamics, showed positive correlation with the average number of insertions per accession. Similar evolutionary relationships are observed to that inferred by previous karyosystematics studies. These observations support the possibility that retrotransposons have contributed to genome inflation during Capsicum evolution. PMID:19618162

  10. Measuring the genetic diversity of Arabian Oryx using microsatellite markers: implication for captive breeding.

    PubMed

    Arif, Ibrahim A; Khan, Haseeb A; Shobrak, Mohammad; Homaidan, Ali A Al; Sadoon, Mohammad Al; Farhan, Ahmad H Al

    2010-04-01

    Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) is an endangered antelope that is being protected by captive breeding programs. However, the long term success of these programs mainly depends on the prudent use of molecular information for conservation management. We have used an array of seven microsatellite loci to examine the molecular diversity in a representative population of 24 captive-bred and reintroduced Arabian oryx. The locus-wise mean observed heterozygosity (0.601) was found to be comparatively higher than the mean expected heterozygosity (0.565). The specimen-wise observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.143 to 1.00 with an average of 0.60 whereas the mean d(2) varied from 0.57 to 1023.428 with an average value of 223.357. The results of Shannon information index (I = 0.898) also indicated a high level of within population genetic diversity. The average gene flow was 0.298, ranging between 0.204 and 0.424 for different loci. In conclusion, the information about the extent of heterozygosity, allelic diversity and inbreeding/outbreeding depression using microsatellite markers could be of potential relevance for the management of captive breeding programs for the conservation of Arabian oryx. PMID:20558900

  11. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  12. Isotopic and molecular fractionation in combustion; three routes to molecular marker validation, including direct molecular 'dating' (GC/AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, L. A.; Klouda, G. A.; Benner, B. A.; Garrity, K.; Eglinton, T. I.

    The identification of unique isotopic, elemental, and molecular markers for sources of combustion aerosol has growing practical importance because of the potential effects of fine particle aerosol on health, visibility and global climate. It is urgent, therefore, that substantial efforts be directed toward the validation of assumptions involving the use of such tracers for source apportionment. We describe here three independent routes toward carbonaceous aerosol molecular marker identification and validation: (1) tracer regression and multivariate statistical techniques applied to field measurements of mixed source, carbonaceous aerosols; (2) a new development in aerosol 14C metrology: direct, pure compound accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) by off-line GC/AMS ('molecular dating'); and (3) direct observation of isotopic and molecular source emissions during controlled laboratory combustion of specific fuels. Findings from the combined studies include: independent support for benzo( ghi)perylene as a motor vehicle tracer from the first (statistical) and second (direct 'dating') studies; a new indication, from the third (controlled combustion) study, of a relation between 13C isotopic fractionation and PAH molecular fractionation, also linked with fuel and stage of combustion; and quantitative data showing the influence of both fuel type and combustion conditions on the yields of such species as elemental carbon and PAH, reinforcing the importance of exercising caution when applying presumed conservative elemental or organic tracers to fossil or biomass burning field data as in the first study.

  13. Assessment of genetic diversity and relationships among wild and cultivated Tunisian plums (Prunus spp) using random amplified microsatellite polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Ben Tamarzizt, H; Ben Mustapha, S; Baraket, G; Abdallah, D; Salhi-Hannachi, A

    2015-03-20

    The usefulness of random amplified microsatellite polymorphism markers to study the genetic diversity and relationships among cultivars belonging to Prunus salicina and P. domestica and their wild relatives (P. insititia and P. spinosa) was investigated. A total of 226 of 234 bands were polymorphic (96.58%). The 226 random amplified microsatellite polymorphism markers were screened using 15 random amplified polymorphic DNA and inter-simple sequence repeat primers combinations for 54 Tunisian plum accessions. The percentage of polymorphic bands (96.58%), the resolving power of primers values (135.70), and the polymorphic information content demonstrated the efficiency of the primers used in this study. The genetic distances between accessions ranged from 0.18 to 0.79 with a mean of 0.24, suggesting a high level of genetic diversity at the intra- and interspecific levels. The unweighted pair group with arithmetic mean dendrogram and principal component analysis discriminated cultivars efficiently and illustrated relationships and divergence between spontaneous, locally cultivated, and introduced plum types. These procedures showed continuous variation that occurs independently of the status of the species and geographical origin of the plums. In this study, random amplified microsatellite polymorphism was found to be as a reliable molecular marker for fingerprinting and for examining the diversity study of the plum and its relatives.

  14. Study of the genetic diversity and structure of a natural population of Nectandra megapotamica (Spreng.) Mez. using RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Costa, L S; Reiniger, L R S; Heinzmann, B M; Amaral, L P; Serrote, C M L

    2015-01-01

    Nectandra megapotamica (Spreng.) Mez. is a tree species that naturally occurs in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity and structure of a natural population of 12 N. megapotamica individuals using random amplified polymorphic DNA markers. Eleven primers were used in this study, producing 81 bands, of which 98.99% were polymorphic. Analysis using STRUCTURE defined three different clusters (K = 3), results that were consistent with those of principal coordinates analysis. Both Nei's genetic diversity (h = 0.33) and Shannon's diversity index (I = 0.49) were relatively high. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that 24.89% of the genetic variability was among clusters, while the remaining 75.11% was within clusters. The Mantel test showed a weak correlation between genetic and geographic distances (r = 0.25, P = 0.105). Overall, the results revealed high levels of genetic diversity within clusters and high genetic differentiation among clusters without any spatial pattern of genetic variability. In addition, gene flow was independent of the geographical distribution and was compatible with the hierarchical island model. PMID:26782488

  15. A molecular approach towards the taxonomy of fresh water prawns Macrobrachium striatum and M. equidens (Decapoda, Palaemonidae) using mitochondrial markers.

    PubMed

    Jose, Deepak; Nidhin, B; Anil Kumar, K P; Pradeep, P J; Harikrishnan, M

    2016-07-01

    Genus Macrobrachium includes freshwater prawns which inhabit most diverse habitats ranging from low saline areas to inland hill streams and impounded water bodies. Being morphologically conserved, this genus has been exposed to severe disputes related to their taxonomy, systematics and phylogeny. Macrobrachium striatum and M. equidens represent two morphologically related congeneric species within this genus. Earlier, M. striatum was considered as a striped form of M. equidens. Though these species are now well-described morphologically and differentiated into two species, no molecular level investigation has been carried out in support of their speciation. We report a study on M. striatum and M. equidens with emphasis to their molecular data through mitochondrial markers (16S ribosomal RNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I). Results obtained from developed molecular markers of the two species revealed considerable genetic differentiation between them. Phylogram generated using Minimum evolution and Neighbour joining analyses differentiated M. striatum and M. equidens as two independent species. Genetic distance data showed high interspecific divergence (ranging from 3.9% to 17.0% for 16S rRNA sequences and 13.8% to 21.0% for COI sequences) between M. striatum and M. equidens confirming the findings of phylogram. Hence, it could be delineated that M. striatum and M. equidens represent two distinct species within genus Macrobrachium with emphasis to their morphology and genetics.

  16. Child Development and Molecular Genetics: 14 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen years ago, the first article on molecular genetics was published in this journal: "Child Development, Molecular Genetics, and What to Do With Genes Once They Are Found" (R. Plomin & M. Rutter, 1998). The goal of the article was to outline what developmentalists can do with genes once they are found. These new directions for developmental…

  17. Reasoning across Ontologically Distinct Levels: Students' Understandings of Molecular Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Ravit Golan; Reiser, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we apply a novel analytical framework to explore students' difficulties in understanding molecular genetics--a domain that is particularly challenging to learn. Our analytical framework posits that reasoning in molecular genetics entails mapping across ontologically distinct levels--an information level containing the genetic…

  18. Identification of QTLs Associated with Callogenesis and Embryogenesis in Oil Palm Using Genetic Linkage Maps Improved with SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Ngoot-Chin; Jansen, Johannes; Nagappan, Jayanthi; Ishak, Zamzuri; Chin, Cheuk-Weng; Tan, Soon-Guan; Cheah, Suan-Choo; Singh, Rajinder

    2013-01-01

    Clonal reproduction of oil palm by means of tissue culture is a very inefficient process. Tissue culturability is known to be genotype dependent with some genotypes being more amenable to tissue culture than others. In this study, genetic linkage maps enriched with simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for dura (ENL48) and pisifera (ML161), the two fruit forms of oil palm, Elaeis guineensis. The SSR markers were mapped onto earlier reported parental maps based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. The new linkage map of ENL48 contains 148 markers (33 AFLPs, 38 RFLPs and 77 SSRs) in 23 linkage groups (LGs), covering a total map length of 798.0 cM. The ML161 map contains 240 markers (50 AFLPs, 71 RFLPs and 119 SSRs) in 24 LGs covering a total of 1,328.1 cM. Using the improved maps, two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with tissue culturability were identified each for callusing rate and embryogenesis rate. A QTL for callogenesis was identified in LGD4b of ENL48 and explained 17.5% of the phenotypic variation. For embryogenesis rate, a QTL was detected on LGP16b in ML161 and explained 20.1% of the variation. This study is the first attempt to identify QTL associated with tissue culture amenity in oil palm which is an important step towards understanding the molecular processes underlying clonal regeneration of oil palm. PMID:23382832

  19. Identification of QTLs associated with callogenesis and embryogenesis in oil palm using genetic linkage maps improved with SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Ting, Ngoot-Chin; Jansen, Johannes; Nagappan, Jayanthi; Ishak, Zamzuri; Chin, Cheuk-Weng; Tan, Soon-Guan; Cheah, Suan-Choo; Singh, Rajinder

    2013-01-01

    Clonal reproduction of oil palm by means of tissue culture is a very inefficient process. Tissue culturability is known to be genotype dependent with some genotypes being more amenable to tissue culture than others. In this study, genetic linkage maps enriched with simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for dura (ENL48) and pisifera (ML161), the two fruit forms of oil palm, Elaeis guineensis. The SSR markers were mapped onto earlier reported parental maps based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. The new linkage map of ENL48 contains 148 markers (33 AFLPs, 38 RFLPs and 77 SSRs) in 23 linkage groups (LGs), covering a total map length of 798.0 cM. The ML161 map contains 240 markers (50 AFLPs, 71 RFLPs and 119 SSRs) in 24 LGs covering a total of 1,328.1 cM. Using the improved maps, two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with tissue culturability were identified each for callusing rate and embryogenesis rate. A QTL for callogenesis was identified in LGD4b of ENL48 and explained 17.5% of the phenotypic variation. For embryogenesis rate, a QTL was detected on LGP16b in ML161 and explained 20.1% of the variation. This study is the first attempt to identify QTL associated with tissue culture amenity in oil palm which is an important step towards understanding the molecular processes underlying clonal regeneration of oil palm. PMID:23382832

  20. Genetic analysis of metabolic polymorphisms in molecular epidemiological studies: social and ethical implications.

    PubMed

    Hainaut, P; Vähäkangas, K

    1999-01-01

    The use of genetic biomarkers in epidemiological studies raises specific social and ethical issues related to the selection of molecular markers and methods of analysis, obtaining participation, the storage of biological samples and their linkage with individual data, the disclosure of information and the publication of results. Several of these issues are similar to those associated with the use of any type of biomarker in epidemiology. Other problems are specifically related to the use of genetic material and the perception that genetic information raises special concerns regarding privacy, risk of abuse and psychosocial impact in this chapter we define how genetic studies performed in the context of molecular epidemiological studies (genetic analysis) differ from genetic screening or genetic testing conducted in a clinical or public health context We then examine the ethical implications of this distinction and describe how general ethical principles may apply to genetic analysis in the area of molecular epidemiology. In particular we discuss specific questions such as those of obtaining participation, working with archival samples and communicating results. We advocate an approach whereby ethical issues are tackled as an intrinsic part of study design; this requires broad discussion with all the parties involved.

  1. Use of EST-SSR markers for evaluating genetic diversity and fingerprinting celery (Apium graveolens L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Fu, Nan; Wang, Ping-Yong; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Shen, Huo-Lin

    2014-02-10

    Celery (Apium graveolens L.) is one of the most economically important vegetables worldwide, but genetic and genomic resources supporting celery molecular breeding are quite limited, thus few studies on celery have been conducted so far. In this study we made use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers generated from previous celery transcriptome sequencing and attempted to detect the genetic diversity and relationships of commonly used celery accessions and explore the efficiency of the primers used for cultivars identification. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) of Apium graveolens L. var. dulce showed that approximately 43% of genetic diversity was within accessions, 45% among accessions, and 22% among horticultural types. The neighbor-joining tree generated by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA), and population structure analysis, as well as principal components analysis (PCA), separated the cultivars into clusters corresponding to the geographical areas where they originated. Genetic distance analysis suggested that genetic variation within Apium graveolens was quite limited. Genotypic diversity showed any combinations of 55 genic SSRs were able to distinguish the genotypes of all 30 accessions.

  2. Genetic diversity analysis in Piper species (Piperaceae) using RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sandeep; Skaria, Reby; Abdul Muneer, P M

    2010-09-01

    The genetic diversity of eight species of Piper (Piperaceae) viz., P. nigrum, P. longum, P. betle, P. chaba, P. argyrophyllum, P. trichostachyon, P. galeatum, and P. hymenophyllum from Kerala state, India were analyzed by Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Out of 22 10-mer RAPD primers screened, 11 were selected for comparative analysis of different species of Piper. High genetic variations were found among different Piper species studied. Among the total of 149 RAPD fragments amplified, 12 bands (8.05%) were found monomorphic in eight species. The remaining 137 fragments were found polymorphic (91.95%). Species-specific bands were found in all eight species studied. The average gene diversity or heterozygosity (H) was 0.33 across all the species, genetic distances ranged from 0.21 to 0.69. The results of this study will facilitate germplasm identification, management, and conservation. PMID:20383613

  3. Development of DArT Marker Platforms and Genetic Diversity Assessment of the U.S. Collection of the New Oilseed Crop Lesquerella and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Von Mark V.; Kilian, Andrzej; Dierig, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of using molecular markers in modern genebanks are well documented. They are commonly used to understand the distribution of genetic diversity in populations and among species which is crucial for efficient management and effective utilization of germplasm collections. We describe the development of two types of DArT molecular marker platforms for the new oilseed crop lesquerella (Physaria spp.), a member of the Brassicaceae family, to characterize a collection in the National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) with relatively little known in regards to the genetic diversity and traits. The two types of platforms were developed using a subset of the germplasm conserved ex situ consisting of 87 Physaria and 2 Paysonia accessions. The microarray DArT revealed a total of 2,833 polymorphic markers with an average genotype call rate of 98.4% and a scoring reproducibility of 99.7%. On the other hand, the DArTseq platform developed for SNP and DArT markers from short sequence reads showed a total of 27,748 high quality markers. Cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis indicated that the different accessions were successfully classified by both systems based on species, by geographical source, and breeding status. In the germplasm set analyzed, which represented more than 80% of the P. fendleri collection, we observed that a substantial amount of variation exists in the species collection. These markers will be valuable in germplasm management studies and lesquerella breeding, and augment the microsatellite markers previously developed on the taxa. PMID:23724020

  4. [The importance of quality assurance in molecular genetic laboratories].

    PubMed

    Mannhalter, Christine

    2010-05-01

    Several challenges arise from the wide application of molecular genetic analyses, among them the need to introduce rules to evaluate molecular genetic test systems as well as test laboratories. This article specifically addresses laboratories performing molecular genetic tests for diagnosis, prevention and therapy of various diseases. The topics that will be discussed will support these laboratories to achieve and sustain a high quality and avoid mistakes and errors. The article covers important preanalytic, analytic and postanalytic aspects in regard to molecular genetic testing as well as quality management issues. In addition laboratory responsibilities, training of personnel, data protection issues, as well as informed consent aspects will be discussed. Beyond that, some molecular genetic methods will be dealt with in regard to potential quality criteria.

  5. [Assessment of applicability of archived cytological lung cancer specimens for molecular genetic analysis].

    PubMed

    Mityushkina, N V; Ievleva, A G; Poltoratsky, A N; Ivantsov, A O; Budovsky, A I; Novik, V I; Imyanitov, E N

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of lung tumors is often essential for the proper choice of therapy. EGFR mutation is a well-known