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Sample records for molecular genetic study

  1. Molecular Genetic Studies of Complex Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Marian, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The approach to molecular genetic studies of complex phenotypes has evolved considerably during the recent years. The candidate gene approach, restricted to analysis of a few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a modest number of cases and controls, has been supplanted by the unbiased approach of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), wherein a large number of tagger SNPs are typed in a large number of individuals. GWAS, which are designed upon the common disease- common variant hypothesis (CD-CV), have identified a large number of SNPs and loci for complex phenotypes. However, alleles identified through GWAS are typically not causative but rather in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the true causal variants. The common alleles, which may not capture the uncommon and rare variants, account only for a fraction of heritability of the complex traits. Hence, the focus is being shifted to rare variants – common disease (RV-CD) hypothesis, surmising that rare variants exert large effect sizes on the phenotype. In conjunctional with this conceptual shift technological advances in DNA sequencing techniques have dramatically enhanced whole genome or whole exome sequencing capacity. The sequencing approach affords identification of not only the rare but also the common variants. The approach – whether used in complementation with GWAS or as a stand-alone approach - could define the genetic architecture of the complex phenotypes. Robust phenotyping and large-scale sequencing studies are essential to extract the information content of the vast number of DNA sequence variants (DSVs) in the genome. To garner meaningful clinical information and link the genotype to a phenotype, identification and characterization of a very large number of causal fields beyond the information content of DNA sequence variants would be necessary. This review provides an update on the current progress and limitations in identifying DSVs that are associated with phenotypic effects. PMID

  2. Molecular markers: a potential resource for ginger genetic diversity studies.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nor Asiah; Rafii, M Y; Mahmud, T M M; Hanafi, M M; Miah, Gous

    2016-12-01

    Ginger is an economically important and valuable plant around the world. Ginger is used as a food, spice, condiment, medicine and ornament. There is available information on biochemical aspects of ginger, but few studies have been reported on its molecular aspects. The main objective of this review is to accumulate the available molecular marker information and its application in diverse ginger studies. This review article was prepared by combing material from published articles and our own research. Molecular markers allow the identification and characterization of plant genotypes through direct access to hereditary material. In crop species, molecular markers are applied in different aspects and are useful in breeding programs. In ginger, molecular markers are commonly used to identify genetic variation and classify the relatedness among varieties, accessions, and species. Consequently, it provides important input in determining resourceful management strategies for ginger improvement programs. Alternatively, a molecular marker could function as a harmonizing tool for documenting species. This review highlights the application of molecular markers (isozyme, RAPD, AFLP, SSR, ISSR and others such as RFLP, SCAR, NBS and SNP) in genetic diversity studies of ginger species. Some insights on the advantages of the markers are discussed. The detection of genetic variation among promising cultivars of ginger has significance for ginger improvement programs. This update of recent literature will help researchers and students select the appropriate molecular markers for ginger-related research.

  3. Recent molecular genetic studies and methodological issues in suicide research.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Jen; Hong, Chen-Jee; Liou, Ying-Jay

    2011-06-01

    Suicide behavior (SB) spans a spectrum ranging from suicidal ideation to suicide attempts and completed suicide. Strong evidence suggests a genetic susceptibility to SB, including familial heritability and common occurrence in twins. This review addresses recent molecular genetic studies in SB that include case-control association, genome gene-expression microarray, and genome-wide association (GWA). This work also reviews epigenetics in SB and pharmacogenetic studies of antidepressant-induced suicide. SB fulfills criteria for a complex genetic phenotype in which environmental factors interact with multiple genes to influence susceptibility. So far, case-control association approaches are still the mainstream in SB genetic studies, although whole genome gene-expression microarray and GWA studies have begun to emerge in recent years. Genetic association studies have suggested several genes (e.g., serotonin transporter, tryptophan hydroxylase 2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor) related to SB, but not all reports support these findings. The case-control approach while useful is limited by present knowledge of disease pathophysiology. Genome-wide studies of gene expression and genetic variation are not constrained by our limited knowledge. However, the explanatory power and path to clinical translation of risk estimates for common variants reported in genome-wide association studies remain unclear because of the presence of rare and structural genetic variation. As whole genome sequencing becomes increasingly widespread, available genomic information will no longer be the limiting factor in applying genetics to clinical medicine. These approaches provide exciting new avenues to identify new candidate genes for SB genetic studies. The other limitation of genetic association is the lack of a consistent definition of the SB phenotype among studies, an inconsistency that hampers the comparability of the studies and data pooling. In summary, SB involves multiple genes

  4. Molecular genetic studies of sporadic pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Boggild, M.D.; Jenkinson, S.; McTernan, P.; Perrett, C.W.; Clayton, R.N.; Thakker, R.V.; Pistorello, M.; Boscaro, M.; Scanarini, M.

    1994-02-01

    Tumor formation may result from the activation of dominant oncogenes or by inactivation of recessive, tumor suppressor genes. The role of such mutations in the development of pituitary tumors has been studied. Tumors from 88 patients, representing the 4 major classes of adenoma, were investigated. In DNA extracted from matched leukocyte and tumor samples, allelic deletions were sought with 15 probes identifying restriction, fragment length polymorphisms on chromosomes 1, 5, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, and 22. Evidence of amplification or rearrangement of 10 recognized cellular oncogenes (N-ras, mycL1, mycN, myc, H-ras, bcl1, H-stf1, sea, kraS2, and fos) was sought in tumor DNA. Activating dominant mutations of G{sub s{alpha}} were detected using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify exons 7-10 and hybridizing the product to normal and mutant allele-specific oligonucleotides. Allelic deletions on chromosome 11 were identified in 16 tumors (18%) representing all 4 major subtypes. Deletions on other autosomes were observed in less than 6% of tumors. Three adenomas had deletions on multiple autosomes, 2 of these were aggressive and recurrent. Mutations of G{sub s{alpha}} were confirmed to be specific to somatotrophinomas, being identified in 36% of such tumors in this series. No evidence of amplification or rearrangement of other recognized cellular oncogenes was found. Inactivation of a recessive oncogene on chromosome 11 is an important and possibly early event in the development of the four major types of pituitary adenoma, whereas activating mutations of G{sub s{alpha}} are confirmed to be specific to somatotropinomas. Two aggressive tumors were found to have multiple autosomal losses, suggesting a multistep progression in the development of tumors of this phenotype. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Genetic Breeding and Diversity of the Genus Passiflora: Progress and Perspectives in Molecular and Genetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos Bernard M.; Jesus, Onildo N.; Santos, Elisa S. L.; Corrêa, Ronan X.; Souza, Anete P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of passion fruit (Passiflora spp.), molecular markers have only recently been utilized in genetic studies of this genus. In addition, both basic genetic researches related to population studies and pre-breeding programs of passion fruit remain scarce for most Passiflora species. Considering the number of Passiflora species and the increasing use of these species as a resource for ornamental, medicinal, and food purposes, the aims of this review are the following: (i) to present the current condition of the passion fruit crop; (ii) to quantify the applications and effects of using molecular markers in studies of Passiflora; (iii) to present the contributions of genetic engineering for passion fruit culture; and (iv) to discuss the progress and perspectives of this research. Thus, the present review aims to summarize and discuss the relationship between historical and current progress on the culture, breeding, and molecular genetics of passion fruit. PMID:25196515

  6. Molecular genetic system for regenerative studies using newts.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshinori; Yokotani, Naoki; Tane, Shoji; Matsumoto, Akira; Myouga, Ayumi; Okamoto, Mitsumasa; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Urodele newts have the remarkable capability of organ regeneration, and have been used as a unique experimental model for more than a century. However, the mechanisms underlying regulation of the regeneration are not well understood, and gene functions in particular remain largely unknown. To elucidate gene function in regeneration, molecular genetic analyses are very powerful. In particular, it is important to establish transgenic or knockout (mutant) lines, and systematically cross these lines to study the functions of the genes. In fact, such systems have been developed for other vertebrate models. However, there is currently no experimental model system using molecular genetics for newt regenerative research due to difficulties with respect to breeding newts in the laboratory. Here, we show that the Iberian ribbed newt (Pleurodeles waltl) has outstanding properties as a laboratory newt. We developed conditions under which we can obtain a sufficient number and quality of eggs throughout the year, and shortened the period required for sexual maturation from 18 months to 6 months. In addition, P. waltl newts are known for their ability, like other newts, to regenerate various tissues. We revealed that their ability to regenerate various organs is equivalent to that of Japanese common newts. We also developed a method for efficient transgenesis. These studies demonstrate that P. waltl newts are a suitable model animal for analysis of regeneration using molecular genetics. Establishment of this experimental model will enable us to perform comparable studies using these newts and other vertebrate models.

  7. Molecular genetics study of deafness in Brazil: 8-year experience.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Camila Andréa; Alexandrino, Fabiana; Christiani, Thalita Vitachi; Steiner, Carlos Eduardo; Cunha, José Luiz Rosemberis; Guerra, Andréa Trevas Maciel; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2007-07-15

    Hereditary hearing loss is a complex disorder that involves a large number of genes. In developed countries, 1 in 1,000 children is born with deafness severe enough to require special education services, and about 60% of the cases of isolated deafness have a genetic origin. Although more than 100 genes for hearing loss are known currently, only a few are routinely tested in the clinical practice. In this study, we present our findings from the molecular diagnostic screening of the GJB2 and GJB3 genes, del(GJB6-D13S1,830) and del(GJB6-D13S1,854) deletions in the GJB6 gene, Q829X mutation in the otoferlin gene (OTOF) and, the A1,555G and A7,445G mutations in the mitochondrial genome over an 8-year period. Mutations analysis in the previously mentioned genes and mutations was performed on 645 unrelated Brazilian patients with hearing loss who fell into two different testing groups. Different mutations in the GJB2 gene were responsible for most of cases studied, but deletions in the GJB6 gene as well as mitochondrial mutations were also found. While most cases of hearing loss in this country are due to environmental factors, the genetic etiology of deafness will increasingly be determined as more genetic tests become available.

  8. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    THIS PAGE 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area U U U UU 264 code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Table of Contents Page SF...298 Table of Contents General Introduction 4 A. Molecular Genetics Projects Project I Introduction 4 Body 4 Key Research Accomplishments 12 Reportable...Statistica software (Statsoft Inc). Since total and cortical bone mineral content (BMC), total bone area, endosteal and periosteal circumference and cortical

  9. Molecular genetics of obsessive-compulsive disorder: a comprehensive meta-analysis of genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S

    2013-07-01

    Twin studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is strongly influenced by additive genetic factors. Yet, molecular genetic association studies have yielded inconsistent results, possibly because of differences across studies in statistical power. Meta-analysis can yield greater power. This study reports the first comprehensive meta-analysis of the relationship between OCD and all previously examined polymorphisms for which there was sufficient information in the source studies to compute odds ratios (ORs). A total of 230 polymorphisms from 113 genetic association studies were identified. A full meta-analysis was conducted for 20 polymorphisms that were examined in 5 or more data sets, and a secondary meta-analysis (limited to the computation of mean effect sizes) was conducted for 210 polymorphisms that were examined in fewer than 5 data sets. In the main meta-analysis, OCD was associated with serotonin-related polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and HTR2A) and, in males only, with polymorphisms involved in catecholamine modulation (COMT and MAOA). Nonsignificant trends were identified for two dopamine-related polymorphisms (DAT1 and DRD3) and a glutamate-related polymorphism (rs3087879). The secondary meta-analysis identified another 18 polymorphisms with significant ORs that merit further investigation. This study demonstrates that OCD is associated with multiple genes, with most having a modest association with OCD. This suggests a polygenic model of OCD, consistent with twin studies, in which multiple genes make small, incremental contributions to the risk of developing the disorder. Future studies, with sufficient power to detect small effects, are needed to investigate the genetic basis of OCD subtypes, such as early vs late onset OCD.

  10. Hamartomatous polyps - a clinical and molecular genetic study.

    PubMed

    Jelsig, Anne Marie

    2016-08-01

    Hamartomatous polyps (HPs) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are rare compared to other types of GI polyps, yet they are the most common type of polyp in children. The symptoms are usually rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, obstipation, anaemia, and/or small bowel obstruction. The polyps are typically removed concurrently with endoscopy when located in the colon, rectum, or stomach, whereas polyps in the small bowel are removed during push-enteroscopy, device-assisted enteroscopy, or by surgery. HPs can be classified as juvenile polyps or Peutz-Jeghers polyps based on their histopathological appearance. Patients with one or a few juvenile polyps are usually not offered clinical follow-up as the polyp(s) are considered not to harbour any malignant potential. Nevertheless, it is important to note that juvenile polyps and HPs are also found in patients with hereditary hamartomatous polyposis syndromes (HPS). Patients with HPS have an increased risk of cancer, recurrences of polyps, and extraintestinal complications. The syndromes are important to diagnose, as patients should be offered surveillance from childhood or early adolescence. The syndromes include juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and the PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome. Currently, the HPS diagnoses are based on clinical criteria and are often assisted with genetic testing as candidate genes have been described for each syndrome. This thesis is based on six scientific papers. The overall aim of the studies was to expand the knowledge on clinical course and molecular genetics in patients with HPs and HPS, and to investigate research participants' attitude towards the results of extensive genetic testing.   Paper I: In the first paper we investigated the occurrence, anatomic distribution, and other demographics of juvenile polyps in the colon and rectum in Denmark in 1995-2014. Based on the Danish Pathology Data Bank we found that 1772 patients had 2108 JPs examined in the period, and we

  11. A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thalian. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S. I.

    2000-06-01

    This is a final report describing the results of the research funded by the DOE Energy Biosciences Program grant entitled ''A Molecular-Genetic Approach to Studying Source-Sink Interactions in Arabidiopsis thaliana''.

  12. Introductory molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Moulds, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book begins with an overview of the current principles of genetics and molecular genetics. Over this foundation, it adds detailed and specialized information: a description of the translation, transcription, expression and regulation of DNA and RNA; a description of the manipulation of genetic material via promoters, enhancers, and gene splicing; and a description of cloning techniques, especially those for blood group genes. The last chapter looks to the impact of molecular genetics on transfusion medicine.

  13. Molecular Population Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. PMID:28270526

  14. Molecular Population Genetics.

    PubMed

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data.

  15. Clusters of Concepts in Molecular Genetics: A Study of Swedish Upper Secondary Science Students' Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gericke, Niklas; Wahlberg, Sara

    2013-01-01

    To understand genetics, students need to be able to explain and draw connections between a large number of concepts. The purpose of the study reported herein was to explore the way upper secondary science students reason about concepts in molecular genetics in order to understand protein synthesis. Data were collected by group interviews. Concept…

  16. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    of multiple cell types as well as patterning to direct the fate of undifferentiated cells. The determination of the fundamental molecular causes of...Genes that are differentially expressed only in MRL include multiple transcription factors suggesting increased cellular replication in regenerating...and development of musculoskeletal tissues and that deficiencies in these two growth factors contribute to impaired growth and maintenance. Furthermore

  17. Studying Human Disease Genes in "Caenorhabditis Elegans": A Molecular Genetics Laboratory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox-Paulson, Elisabeth A.; Grana, Theresa M.; Harris, Michelle A.; Batzli, Janet M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists routinely integrate information from various channels to explore topics under study. We designed a 4-wk undergraduate laboratory module that used a multifaceted approach to study a question in molecular genetics. Specifically, students investigated whether "Caenorhabditis elegans" can be a useful model system for studying genes…

  18. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    androgen action has been traditionally thought to be primarily anabolic, while the estrogen acts mainly through the suppression of resorption [11... Prostate stem cell antigen 2610028F08Rik 1.89 0.005 R-spondin 2 homolog protein amino acid phosphorylation; transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine...formation in response to exercise or injury requires the coordinated interactions of a number of molecular pathways of gene expression. However, a more

  19. [Molecular genetic study of a family featuring cardiac conduction block].

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaojun; Huang, He; Zhu, Li; Lu, Yongjuan; Jiang, Yunshan; Li, Hui; Huang, Xianghong; Sun, Zhishan; Li, Zhihong

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the genetic mechanism for a family affected with cardiac conduction block. METHODS Affected family members were screened for potential mutations of known candidate genes. As no pathogenic mutation was found, two patients and one healthy member from the family were further analyzed by exomic sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing. The pathogenicity of suspected mutation was analyzed using bioinformatics software. RESULTS Sequencing of the full exome has identified a c.G1725T mutation in the CLCA2 gene. Sanger sequencing has detected the same mutation in all five patients, but not in the normal member from the family. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the mutation has resulted in substitution of the 575th amino acid cysteine (C) by tryptophan (W). The site is highly conserved and becomes pathogenic with the mutation. CONCLUSION The heterozygous c.G1725T mutation in exon 11 of the CLCA2 gene probably underlies the disease and fit the autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.

  20. [Study of regeneration in amphibians in age of molecular-genetic approaches and methods].

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, E N; Markitantova, Yu V; Avdonin, P P; Radugina, E A

    2013-01-01

    The results of molecular-genetic mechanisms of regeneration in amphibians are reviewed. Based on the examples of traditional and well-studied models of the restoration of the retinas and lenses of eyes, as well as limbs and tails in amphibians, we analyze the current state of regeneration problems and questions linked to cell reprogramming, growth, and generate morphogenesis. The development of the Kol'tsov school of thought in the age of molecular-genetic approaches and methods are monitored. The contemporary interpretation of organ regeneration in terms of molecular-genetic regulation and a new look at the definition of regeneration as repeated development is proposed. We also emphasize the current problems that exist in that field of developmental biology and are caused by the many difficulties of genome sequencing and the introduction oftransgenesis in Urodela, the animal species with the highest regeneration abilities.

  1. Primer on molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  2. Twin Studies and Their Implications for Molecular Genetic Studies: Endophenotypes Integrate Quantitative and Molecular Genetics in ADHD Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Alexis C.; Neale, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the utility of twin studies for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) research and demonstrate their potential for the identification of alternative phenotypes suitable for genomewide association, developmental risk assessment, treatment response, and intervention targets. Method: Brief descriptions of the classic…

  3. Delivery of molecular genetic services within a health care system: time analysis of the clinical workload. The Molecular Genetic Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Surh, L C; Wright, P G; Cappelli, M; Kasaboski, A; Hastings, V A; Hunter, A G

    1995-01-01

    The most recent discoveries in molecular genetics today are rapidly incorporated into clinical practice and have resulted in an unprecedented expansion of medical options. Despite this, the impact of molecular genetics on health care services has yet to be evaluated. In order to begin this assessment, clinical genetic workload was prospectively collected from cases where molecular genetic testing was considered. Participation involved all 16 urban and outreach genetic centers regionalized to service the entire population of 10 million within the Canadian province of Ontario. Molecular genetic testing has been clinically available for > 5 years, as part of a publicly supported genetic network in which there are no direct costs to residents. Cross-sectional data were collected on 1,101 clients from 544 families involving 1,742 clinical actions relating to diseases in which molecular (DNA) tests were considered. Median times per clinical genetic action were as follows: formal counseling (60 min), case review (15 min), phone call (10 min), letter (15 min), specimen arrangement (15 min), and interpretation of molecular test results (10 min). Times varied significantly with the inheritance pattern of the disease, topics involved, and location. For any given genetic case, multiple clinical actions resulted in substantial time spent by the genetic professional. Clerical and administrative times were not captured. Workload unit measurements similar to those currently employed in hospital laboratories may be helpful for predicting the clinical resources and personnel that will be required as the use of molecular genetics by other medical specialties increases. PMID:7887432

  4. [Hereditary deafness: molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Denoyelle, Françoise; Levilliers, Jacqueline; Simmler, Marie-Christine; Petit, Christine

    2004-03-01

    This article outlines recent advances in explaining hereditary deafness in molecular terms, focusing on isolated (i.e. nonsyndromic) hearing loss. The number of genes identified (36 to date) is growing rapidly. However, difficulties inherent in genetic linkage analysis, coupled with the possible involvement of environmental causes, have so far prevented the characterization of the main genes causative or predisposing to the late-onset forms of deafness.

  5. Molecular genetic diversity in populations of the stingless bee Plebeia remota: A case study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Francisco, Flávio; Santiago, Leandro Rodrigues; Arias, Maria Cristina

    2013-03-01

    Genetic diversity is a major component of the biological diversity of an ecosystem. The survival of a population may be seriously threatened if its genetic diversity values are low. In this work, we measured the genetic diversity of the stingless bee Plebeia remota based on molecular data obtained by analyzing 15 microsatellite loci and sequencing two mitochondrial genes. Population structure and genetic diversity differed depending on the molecular marker analyzed: microsatellites showed low population structure and moderate to high genetic diversity, while mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) showed high population structure and low diversity in three populations. Queen philopatry and male dispersal behavior are discussed as the main reasons for these findings.

  6. Molecular genetic and molecular evolutionary studies on the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Burke-Agueero, Donald H.

    1992-08-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus, purple bacterium capable of either aerobic or photosynthetic growth, has proven to be very useful in genetic studies of photosynthesis. Forty-four genes clustered together within a 46 kilobase region are required to establish photosynthetic ability in R. capsulatus. Approximately twenty of these genes are involved in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis of which eight ``bch`` genes are the subject of this thesis. Six of these genes were found to code for the two ring reductases. The first converts protochlorophyllide (PChlide) into a chlorin, the immediate precursor to chlorophyll a, and then into a bacteriochlorin. Each reductase is shown to be made up of three subunits. PChlide reductase is coded by the genes bchN, bchB, and bchL. Proteins with amino acid sequences markedly similar to those of bchN and bchL have been shown in other organisms to be required for chlorophyll synthesis; hence, their designation as chlN and chlB. A third chloroplast-encoded gene of heretofore unknown function shares amino acid identities with bchB and is probably the third subunit of the plant PChlide reductase. The bchA locus, which encodes the chlorin reductase, is found to be made up of three separate, translationally coupled genes, referred to as bchX, bchY, and bchZ. Amino acid similarities between bchX, bchL, and the nitrogenase reductase protein nifH suggest that all three classes of proteins share certain three-dimensional structural features, including elements that are central to the enzymatic mechanism of nifH. PChlide reductase and chlorin reductase are clearly derived from a common ancestor. Several lines of analysis suggests the ancestor of both enzyme systems reduced PChlide twice to produce bacteriochlorophyll supporting the concept bacteriochlorophyll as the ancestral reaction center pigment.

  7. Molecular genetic and molecular evolutionary studies on the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Burke-Agueero, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus, purple bacterium capable of either aerobic or photosynthetic growth, has proven to be very useful in genetic studies of photosynthesis. Forty-four genes clustered together within a 46 kilobase region are required to establish photosynthetic ability in R. capsulatus. Approximately twenty of these genes are involved in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis of which eight bch'' genes are the subject of this thesis. Six of these genes were found to code for the two ring reductases. The first converts protochlorophyllide (PChlide) into a chlorin, the immediate precursor to chlorophyll a, and then into a bacteriochlorin. Each reductase is shown to be made up of three subunits. PChlide reductase is coded by the genes bchN, bchB, and bchL. Proteins with amino acid sequences markedly similar to those of bchN and bchL have been shown in other organisms to be required for chlorophyll synthesis; hence, their designation as chlN and chlB. A third chloroplast-encoded gene of heretofore unknown function shares amino acid identities with bchB and is probably the third subunit of the plant PChlide reductase. The bchA locus, which encodes the chlorin reductase, is found to be made up of three separate, translationally coupled genes, referred to as bchX, bchY, and bchZ. Amino acid similarities between bchX, bchL, and the nitrogenase reductase protein nifH suggest that all three classes of proteins share certain three-dimensional structural features, including elements that are central to the enzymatic mechanism of nifH. PChlide reductase and chlorin reductase are clearly derived from a common ancestor. Several lines of analysis suggests the ancestor of both enzyme systems reduced PChlide twice to produce bacteriochlorophyll supporting the concept bacteriochlorophyll as the ancestral reaction center pigment.

  8. Molecular study of Trypanosoma caninum isolates based on different genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Barros, Juliana H S; Toma, Helena K; de Fatima Madeira, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Trypanosoma caninum is a parasite recently described in dogs, whose life cycle is rather unknown. Here, we performed a genetic study with T. caninum samples obtained in different Brazilian regions. The study was based on PCR assays target to small and large subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) (18S rDNA and 24Sα rDNA), cytochrome B (Cyt b), and internal transcribed spacer 1 rDNA (ITS1 rDNA) following by the sequence analysis. Additionally, we used primers for the variable regions of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircles and endonucleases restriction in the ITS1 rDNA amplification product. T. caninum samples displayed the same patterns. Tree construction confirmed the close relationship between T. caninum samples, regardless of the molecular target used and endonuclease restriction digestion revealed that all samples have the same restriction profile. Therefore, T. caninum seems to be a genetically homogeneous specie. In the kDNA assay, T. caninum possessed a different molecular size profile with respect to others trypanosomes, 330 and 350 bp. This study provides nucleotide sequences from different regions of the genome of T. caninum that certainly facilitate future studies.

  9. Molecular approaches to the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: clinical molecular and genetic studies on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Mikio

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in clinical molecular and genetic studies on Alzheimer's disease (AD) are summarized here. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42 and tau are the most sensitive biomarkers for the diagnosis of AD and prediction of its onset following mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Based on this progress, new diagnostic criteria for AD dementia, MCI due to AD, and preclinical AD were proposed by the National Institute of Aging (NIA) and Alzheimer's Association (AA) in April 2011. In these new criteria, progress in CSF biomarker and amyloid imaging studies over the past 10 years has added to critical information. The marked contributions of basic and clinical studies have established clinical evidence supporting these markers. Based on this progress, essential curative therapy for AD is urgently expected.

  10. Molecular Genetic Studies of Gene Identification for Osteoporosis: The 2009 Update

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang-Hong; Dong, Shan-Shan; Guo, Yan; Yang, Tie-Lin; Lei, Shu-Feng; Papasian, Christopher J.; Zhao, Ming; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a complex human disease that results in increased susceptibility to fragility fractures. It can be phenotypically characterized using several traits, including bone mineral density, bone size, bone strength, and bone turnover markers. The identification of gene variants that contribute to osteoporosis phenotypes, or responses to therapy, can eventually help individualize the prognosis, treatment, and prevention of fractures and their adverse outcomes. Our previously published reviews have comprehensively summarized the progress of molecular genetic studies of gene identification for osteoporosis and have covered the data available to the end of September 2007. This review represents our continuing efforts to summarize the important and representative findings published between October 2007 and November 2009. The topics covered include genetic association and linkage studies in humans, transgenic and knockout mouse models, as well as gene-expression microarray and proteomics studies. Major results are tabulated for comparison and ease of reference. Comments are made on the notable findings and representative studies for their potential influence and implications on our present understanding of the genetics of osteoporosis. PMID:20357209

  11. [Molecular genetics of hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Schwarzová, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The review focuses on the molecular background of an inborn error of lipid metabolism -familial hypercholesterolemia. FH describes a group of genetic defects resulting in severe elevations of blood cholesterol levels and increased risk of premature coronary heart disease. Most cases are due to the mutations decreasing and/or destroying the function of the LDL receptor (85-90 % of cases), smaller portion of cases is caused by defects in the gene encoding the ligand for LDL receptor - apolipoprotein B-100 (5-10 %). Less than 5 % of cases has gain-of-function station of the PCSK9 gene that increases the rate of degradation of the LDL receptor molecules. Autosomal recessive form of the disease, caused by the mutations in LDLR adaptor protein 1 gene, is extremely rare.Key words: APOB - familial hypercholesterolemia - LDLR - LDLRAP1 - PCSK9.

  12. Molecular genetic diversity in populations of the stingless bee Plebeia remota: A case study

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Francisco, Flávio; Santiago, Leandro Rodrigues; Arias, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity is a major component of the biological diversity of an ecosystem. The survival of a population may be seriously threatened if its genetic diversity values are low. In this work, we measured the genetic diversity of the stingless bee Plebeia remota based on molecular data obtained by analyzing 15 microsatellite loci and sequencing two mitochondrial genes. Population structure and genetic diversity differed depending on the molecular marker analyzed: microsatellites showed low population structure and moderate to high genetic diversity, while mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) showed high population structure and low diversity in three populations. Queen philopatry and male dispersal behavior are discussed as the main reasons for these findings. PMID:23569417

  13. Classical and molecular genetic mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A brief history of classical genetic mapping in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is described. Detailed descriptions are given of the development of molecular genetic linkage maps based upon various types of DNA markers Like many plant and animal species, the first molecular map of soybean was bas...

  14. Molecular Genetics of Successful Smoking Cessation: Convergent Genome-Wide Association Study Results

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, George R.; Liu, Qing-Rong; Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine; Walther, Donna; Rose, Jed E.; David, Sean P.; Niaura, Ray; Lerman, Caryn

    2008-01-01

    Context Smoking remains a major public health problem. Twin studies indicate that the ability to quit smoking is substantially heritable, with genetics that overlap modestly with the genetics of vulnerability to dependence on addictive substances. Objectives To identify replicated genes that facilitate smokers’ abilities to achieve and sustain abstinence from smoking (hereinafter referred to as quit-success genes) found in more than 2 genome-wide association (GWA) studies of successful vs unsuccessful abstainers, and, secondarily, to nominate genes for selective involvement in smoking cessation success with bupropion hydrochloride vs nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Design The GWA results in subjects from 3 centers, with secondary analyses of NRT vs bupropion responders. Setting Outpatient smoking cessation trial participants from 3 centers. Participants European American smokers who successfully vs unsuccessfully abstain from smoking with biochemical confirmation in a smoking cessation trial using NRT, bupropion, or placebo (N=550). Main Outcome Measures Quit-success genes, reproducibly identified by clustered nominally positive single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in more than 2 independent samples with significant P values based on Monte Carlo simulation trials. The NRT-selective genes were nominated by clustered SNPs that display much larger t values for NRT vs placebo comparisons. The bupropion-selective genes were nominated by bupropion-selective results. Results Variants in quit-success genes are likely to alter cell adhesion, enzymatic, transcriptional, structural, and DNA, RNA, and/or protein-handling functions. Quit-success genes are identified by clustered nominally positive SNPs from more than 2 samples and are unlikely to represent chance observations (Monte Carlo P < .0003). These genes display modest overlap with genes identified in GWA studies of dependence on addictive substances and memory. Conclusions These results support polygenic

  15. Applying genetics and molecular biology to the study of the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Chun, Cheryl D; Madhani, Hiten D

    2010-01-01

    The basidiomycete yeast Crytococcus neoformans is a prominent human pathogen. It primarily infects immunocompromised individuals producing a meningoencephalitis that is lethal if untreated. Recent advances in its genetics and molecular biology have made it a model system for understanding both the Basidiomycota phylum and mechanisms of fungal pathogenesis. The relative ease of experimental manipulation coupled with the development of murine models for human disease allow for powerful studies in the mechanisms of virulence and host responses. This chapter introduces the organism and its life cycle and then provides detailed step-by-step protocols for culture, manipulation of the genome, analysis of nucleic acids and proteins, and assessment of virulence and expression of virulence factors.

  16. Genetic approaches for studying myiasis-causing flies: molecular markers and mitochondrial genomics.

    PubMed

    de Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria Lima; Lessinger, Ana Cláudia

    2006-01-01

    "Myiasis-causing flies" is a generic term that includes species from numerous dipteran families, mainly Calliphoridae and Oestridae, of which blowflies, screwworm flies and botflies are among the most important. This group of flies is characterized by the ability of their larvae to develop in animal flesh. When the host is a live vertebrate, such parasitism by dipterous larvae is known as primary myiasis. Myiasis-causing flies can be classified as saprophagous (free-living species), facultative or obligate parasites. Many of these flies are of great medical and veterinary importance in Brazil because of their role as key livestock insect-pests and vectors of pathogens, in addition to being considered important legal evidence in forensic entomology. The characterization of myiasis-causing flies using molecular markers to study mtDNA (by RFLP) and nuclear DNA (by RAPD and microsatellite) has been used to identify the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for specific patterns of genetic variability. These approaches have been successfully used to analyze the population structures of the New World screwworm fly Cochliomyia hominivorax and the botfly Dermatobia hominis. In this review, various aspects of the organization, evolution and potential applications of the mitochondrial genome of myiasis-causing flies in Brazil, and the analysis of nuclear markers in genetic studies of populations, are discussed.

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans as a Model to Study the Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Engleman, Eric A.; Katner, Simon N.; Neal-Beliveau, Bethany S.

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction takes a massive toll on society. Novel animal models are needed to test new treatments and understand the basic mechanisms underlying addiction. Rodent models have identified the neurocircuitry involved in addictive behavior and indicate that rodents possess some of the same neurobiologic mechanisms that mediate addiction in humans. Recent studies indicate that addiction is mechanistically and phylogenetically ancient and many mechanisms that underlie human addiction are also present in invertebrates. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has conserved neurobiologic systems with powerful molecular and genetic tools and a rapid rate of development that enables cost-effective translational discovery. Emerging evidence suggests that C. elegans is an excellent model to identify molecular mechanisms that mediate drug-induced behavior and potential targets for medications development for various addictive compounds. C. elegans emit many behaviors that can be easily quantitated including some that involve interactions with the environment. Ethanol (EtOH) is the best-studied drug-of-abuse in C. elegans and at least 50 different genes/targets have been identified as mediating EtOH’s effects and polymorphisms in some orthologs in humans are associated with alcohol use disorders. C. elegans has also been shown to display dopamine and cholinergic system–dependent attraction to nicotine and demonstrate preference for cues previously associated with nicotine. Cocaine and methamphetamine have been found to produce dopamine-dependent reward-like behaviors in C. elegans. These behavioral tests in combination with genetic/molecular manipulations have led to the identification of dozens of target genes/systems in C. elegans that mediate drug effects. The one target/gene identified as essential for drug-induced behavioral responses across all drugs of abuse was the cat-2 gene coding for tyrosine hydroxylase, which is consistent with the role of dopamine

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans as a Model to Study the Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Engleman, Eric A; Katner, Simon N; Neal-Beliveau, Bethany S

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction takes a massive toll on society. Novel animal models are needed to test new treatments and understand the basic mechanisms underlying addiction. Rodent models have identified the neurocircuitry involved in addictive behavior and indicate that rodents possess some of the same neurobiologic mechanisms that mediate addiction in humans. Recent studies indicate that addiction is mechanistically and phylogenetically ancient and many mechanisms that underlie human addiction are also present in invertebrates. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has conserved neurobiologic systems with powerful molecular and genetic tools and a rapid rate of development that enables cost-effective translational discovery. Emerging evidence suggests that C. elegans is an excellent model to identify molecular mechanisms that mediate drug-induced behavior and potential targets for medications development for various addictive compounds. C. elegans emit many behaviors that can be easily quantitated including some that involve interactions with the environment. Ethanol (EtOH) is the best-studied drug-of-abuse in C. elegans and at least 50 different genes/targets have been identified as mediating EtOH's effects and polymorphisms in some orthologs in humans are associated with alcohol use disorders. C. elegans has also been shown to display dopamine and cholinergic system-dependent attraction to nicotine and demonstrate preference for cues previously associated with nicotine. Cocaine and methamphetamine have been found to produce dopamine-dependent reward-like behaviors in C. elegans. These behavioral tests in combination with genetic/molecular manipulations have led to the identification of dozens of target genes/systems in C. elegans that mediate drug effects. The one target/gene identified as essential for drug-induced behavioral responses across all drugs of abuse was the cat-2 gene coding for tyrosine hydroxylase, which is consistent with the role of dopamine neurotransmission

  19. Molecular genetics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, D E; Kusano, T

    1994-01-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is a gram-negative, highly acidophilic (pH 1.5 to 2.0), autotrophic bacterium that obtains its energy through the oxidation of ferrous iron or reduced inorganic sulfur compounds. It is usually dominant in the mixed bacterial populations that are used industrially for the extraction of metals such as copper and uranium from their ores. More recently, these bacterial consortia have been used for the biooxidation of refractory gold-bearing arsenopyrite ores prior to the recovery of gold by cyanidation. The commercial use of T. ferrooxidans has led to an increasing interest in the genetics and molecular biology of the bacterium. Initial investigations were aimed at determining whether the unique physiology and specialized habitat of T. ferrooxidans had been accompanied by a high degree of genetic drift from other gram-negative bacteria. Early genetic studies were comparative in nature and concerned the isolation of genes such as nifHDK, glnA, and recA, which are widespread among bacteria. From a molecular biology viewpoint, T. ferrooxidans appears to be a typical member of the proteobacteria. In most instances, cloned gene promoters and protein products have been functional in Escherichia coli. Although T. ferrooxidans has proved difficult to transform with DNA, research on indigenous plasmids and the isolation of the T. ferrooxidans merA gene have resulted in the development of a low-efficiency electroporation system for one strain of T. ferrooxidans. The most recent studies have focused on the molecular genetics of the pathways associated with nitrogen metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation, and components of the energy-producing mechanisms. PMID:8177170

  20. An Overview of Genetic Polymorphisms and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in Molecular Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingsong; Yagyu, Kiyoko; Egawa, Naoto; Ueno, Makoto; Mori, Mitsuru; Nakao, Haruhisa; Ishii, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozue; Wakai, Kenji; Hosono, Satoyo; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kikuchi, Shogo

    2011-01-01

    Background Although pancreatic cancer has been extensively studied, few risk factors have been identified, and no validated biomarkers or screening tools exist for early detection in asymptomatic individuals. We present a broad overview of molecular epidemiologic studies that have addressed the relationship between pancreatic cancer risk and genetic polymorphisms in several candidate genes and suggest avenues for future research. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed using the PubMed database. Results Overall, individual polymorphisms did not seem to confer great susceptibility to pancreatic cancer; however, interactions of polymorphisms in carcinogen-metabolizing genes, DNA repair genes, and folate-metabolizing genes with smoking, diet, and obesity were shown in some studies. The major problem with these studies is that, due to small sample sizes, they lack sufficient statistical power to explore gene–gene or gene–environment interactions. Another important challenge is that the measurement of environmental influence needs to be improved to better define gene–environment interaction. It is noteworthy that 2 recent genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer have reported that variants in ABO blood type and in 3 other chromosomal regions are associated with risk for this cancer, thus providing new insight into pancreatic cancer etiology. Conclusions As is the case in other complex diseases, common, low-risk variants in different genes may act collectively to confer susceptibility to pancreatic cancer in individuals with repeated environmental exposures, such as smoking and red meat intake. Clarification of gene–gene and gene–environmental interaction is therefore indispensable for future studies. To address these issues, a rigorously designed molecular epidemiologic study with a large sample is desirable. PMID:21071884

  1. A study of the development of collaborative explanations in molecular genetics by secondary science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribbin, Mary Elizabeth

    Current science education standards documents include recommendations that learning activities employ authentic scientific inquiry. The product of scientific inquiry is a scientific explanation, and student inquiry should therefore be directed toward development of explanations. Science is a collaborative enterprise, and inquiry learning should include activities requiring collaboration. The ability of secondary students in an academic enrichment program in molecular genetics to collaborate to develop explanations in response to assigned questions for discussion was investigated in this study. The following research questions were addressed: (1) What kinds of explanations do students produce? (2) What kinds of cognitive and social processes do students engage in? (3) Which cognitive and social processes promote the development of better explanations? The participants of this study were thirty-four students from nineteen New Jersey high schools who took part in a four-week summer enrichment program in genetics and molecular biology at the Waksman Institute, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. The students were of high or very high academic ability. Students met once each week in small groups to discuss a challenging science question presented by the instructor. These discussions were audio taped, and data used in the study were obtained primarily from transcripts of the tapes. The procedure used to evaluate the students' arguments was based upon methods for analyzing the structure of arguments described by Chinn & Anderson (1999) and Halpern (1996), and employed taxonomies developed by the investigator. The taxonomies were shown to be an effective tool for evaluating and characterizing student discussions in terms of logical reasoning, content knowledge, and collaboration. Analyses of the transcripts indicated that groups in which the students had prior knowledge of the content related to the discussion questions produced complete and valid arguments, but

  2. Are Endophenotypes Based on Measures of Executive Functions Useful for Molecular Genetic Studies of ADHD?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Alysa E.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Seidman, Larry J.; Willcutt, Erik G.; Nigg, Joel T.; Waldman, Irwin D.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Peart, Joanne; Biederman, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Background: Behavioral genetic studies provide strong evidence that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has a substantial genetic component. Yet, due to the complexity of the ADHD phenotype, questions remain as to the specific genes that contribute to this condition as well as the pathways from genes to behavior. Endophenotypes, or…

  3. X-linked ichthyosis without STS deficiency: Clinical, genetical, and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, R.; Melis, P.; Schillinger, E.; Siniscalco, M.

    1995-11-06

    We report on a Sardinian pedigree with congenital ichthyosis associated with normal levels of steroid sulfatase and a normal molecular pattern, as detectable with a cDNA probe for the steroid sulfatase (STS) gene. Though the pattern of transmission of the disease is consistent with X-linked recessive inheritance, this form of ichthyosis was found to segregate independently of genetic polymorphisms detected by probes of the region Xp22.3, where the STS locus has been mapped. The search for close genetic linkages with other polymorphic markers scattered along the entire X chromosome has so far been fruitless. For the time being, the main conclusion derived from these data is that STS deficiency is not a sine qua non for X-linked ichthyosis which may also result from a mutational event at an X-chromosomal site genetically unlinked to the STS locus. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Molecular genetic and quantitative trait divergence associated with recent homoploid hybrid speciation: a study of Senecio squalidus (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Brennan, A C; Barker, D; Hiscock, S J; Abbott, R J

    2012-02-01

    Hybridization is increasingly seen as a trigger for rapid evolution and speciation. To quantify and qualify divergence associated with recent homoploid hybrid speciation, we compared quantitative trait (QT) and molecular genetic variation between the homoploid hybrid species Senecio squalidus and its parental species, S. aethnensis and S. chrysanthemifolius, and also their naturally occurring Sicilian hybrids. S. squalidus originated and became invasive in the United Kingdom following the introduction of hybrid plants from Mount Etna, Sicily, about 300 years ago. We recorded considerable molecular genetic differentiation between S. squalidus and its parents and their Sicilian hybrids in terms of both reduced genetic diversity and altered allele frequencies, potentially due to the genetic bottleneck associated with introduction to the United Kingdom. S. squalidus is also distinct from its parents and Sicilian hybrids for QTs, but less so than for molecular genetic markers. We suggest that this is due to resilience of polygenic QTs to changes in allele frequency or lack of selection for hybrid niche divergence in geographic isolation. While S. squalidus is intermediate or parental-like for most QTs, some trangressively distinct traits were observed, which might indicate emerging local adaptation in its invasive range. This study emphasizes the important contribution of founder events and geographic isolation to successful homoploid hybrid speciation.

  5. Molecular genetic and quantitative trait divergence associated with recent homoploid hybrid speciation: a study of Senecio squalidus (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, A C; Barker, D; Hiscock, S J; Abbott, R J

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization is increasingly seen as a trigger for rapid evolution and speciation. To quantify and qualify divergence associated with recent homoploid hybrid speciation, we compared quantitative trait (QT) and molecular genetic variation between the homoploid hybrid species Senecio squalidus and its parental species, S. aethnensis and S. chrysanthemifolius, and also their naturally occurring Sicilian hybrids. S. squalidus originated and became invasive in the United Kingdom following the introduction of hybrid plants from Mount Etna, Sicily, about 300 years ago. We recorded considerable molecular genetic differentiation between S. squalidus and its parents and their Sicilian hybrids in terms of both reduced genetic diversity and altered allele frequencies, potentially due to the genetic bottleneck associated with introduction to the United Kingdom. S. squalidus is also distinct from its parents and Sicilian hybrids for QTs, but less so than for molecular genetic markers. We suggest that this is due to resilience of polygenic QTs to changes in allele frequency or lack of selection for hybrid niche divergence in geographic isolation. While S. squalidus is intermediate or parental-like for most QTs, some trangressively distinct traits were observed, which might indicate emerging local adaptation in its invasive range. This study emphasizes the important contribution of founder events and geographic isolation to successful homoploid hybrid speciation. PMID:21829224

  6. Fundamentals of fungal molecular population genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianping

    2006-07-01

    The last two decades have seen tremendous growth in the development and application of molecular methods in the analyses of fungal species and populations. In this paper, I provide an overview of the molecular techniques and the basic analytical tools used to address various fundamental population and evolutionary genetic questions in fungi. With increasing availability and decreasing cost, DNA sequencing is becoming a mainstream data acquisition method in fungal evolutionary genetic studies. However, other methods, especially those based on the polymerase chain reaction, remain powerful in addressing specific questions for certain groups of taxa. These developments are bringing fungal population and evolutionary genetics into mainstream ecology and evolutionary biology.

  7. European guidance for the molecular diagnosis of pseudohypoparathyroidism not caused by point genetic variants at GNAS: an EQA study

    PubMed Central

    Garin, Intza; Mantovani, Giovanna; Aguirre, Urko; Barlier, Anne; Brix, Bettina; Elli, Francesca M; Freson, Kathleen; Grybek, Virginie; Izzi, Benedetta; Linglart, Agnès; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Silve, Caroline; Thiele, Susanne; Werner, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is a rare endocrine disorder that can be caused by genetic (mainly maternally inherited inactivating point mutations, although intragenic and gross deletions have rarely been reported) or epigenetic alterations at GNAS locus. Clinical and molecular characterization of this disease is not that easy because of phenotypic, biochemical and molecular overlapping features between both subtypes of the disease. The European Consortium for the study of PHP (EuroPHP) designed the present work with the intention of generating the standards of diagnostic clinical molecular (epi)genetic testing in PHP patients. With this aim, DNA samples of eight independent PHP patients carrying GNAS genetic and/or epigenetic defects (three patients with GNAS deletions, two with 20q uniparental disomy and three with a methylation defect of unknown origin) without GNAS point mutations were anonymized and sent to the five participant laboratories for their routine genetic analysis (methylation-specific (MS)-MLPA, pyrosequencing and EpiTYPER) and interpretations. All laboratories were able to detect methylation defects and, after the data analysis, the Consortium compared the results to define technical advantages and disadvantages of different techniques. To conclude, we propose as first-level investigation in PHP patients copy number and methylation analysis by MS-MLPA. Then, in patients with partial methylation defect, the result should be confirmed by single CpG bisulphite-based methods (ie pyrosequencing), whereas in case of a complete methylation defect without detectable deletion, microsatellites or SNP genotyping should be performed to exclude uniparental disomy 20. PMID:25005735

  8. European guidance for the molecular diagnosis of pseudohypoparathyroidism not caused by point genetic variants at GNAS: an EQA study.

    PubMed

    Garin, Intza; Mantovani, Giovanna; Aguirre, Urko; Barlier, Anne; Brix, Bettina; Elli, Francesca M; Freson, Kathleen; Grybek, Virginie; Izzi, Benedetta; Linglart, Agnès; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Silve, Caroline; Thiele, Susanne; Werner, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is a rare endocrine disorder that can be caused by genetic (mainly maternally inherited inactivating point mutations, although intragenic and gross deletions have rarely been reported) or epigenetic alterations at GNAS locus. Clinical and molecular characterization of this disease is not that easy because of phenotypic, biochemical and molecular overlapping features between both subtypes of the disease. The European Consortium for the study of PHP (EuroPHP) designed the present work with the intention of generating the standards of diagnostic clinical molecular (epi)genetic testing in PHP patients. With this aim, DNA samples of eight independent PHP patients carrying GNAS genetic and/or epigenetic defects (three patients with GNAS deletions, two with 20q uniparental disomy and three with a methylation defect of unknown origin) without GNAS point mutations were anonymized and sent to the five participant laboratories for their routine genetic analysis (methylation-specific (MS)-MLPA, pyrosequencing and EpiTYPER) and interpretations. All laboratories were able to detect methylation defects and, after the data analysis, the Consortium compared the results to define technical advantages and disadvantages of different techniques. To conclude, we propose as first-level investigation in PHP patients copy number and methylation analysis by MS-MLPA. Then, in patients with partial methylation defect, the result should be confirmed by single CpG bisulphite-based methods (ie pyrosequencing), whereas in case of a complete methylation defect without detectable deletion, microsatellites or SNP genotyping should be performed to exclude uniparental disomy 20.

  9. Molecular genetic medicine. Vol. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, T.

    1992-01-01

    Theodore Friedmann has put together an interesting spectrum of articles for volume 2 of Molecular Genetic Medicine. Perhaps related to his own interest in the X chromosome, three articles deal with X-chromosomal topics, while two deal with autosomal disorders and two treat viral disorders. The fragile-X syndrome is thoroughly covered by Brown and Jenkins with an article that is heavily weighted to clinical aspects and now out-of-date RFLP approaches. The timeliness of the volume is insured by the coverage (albeit brief) that they give to the cloning of FMR-1. Gartler et al. present a balanced review of X inactivation - the oft-surveyed subject was comprehensively covered in a manner that provided new perspectives. Lambert et al. provide an exhaustive review of natural and induced mutation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. For autosomal disorders, an excellent review of the molecular genetics of hemoglobin syntheses and their alterations in disease is provided by Berg and Schecter. The level of detail presented seemed just right to this reviewer. A concise review of recent advances in the study of Down syndrome and its animal model, trisomy 16 mice, is provided by Holtzman and Epstein. With regard to viral topics, Chisari thoughtfully reviews hepatitis B virus structure and function and the possible pathogenic mechanisms involved in its induction of hepatocellular carcinoma. Wong-Staal and Haseltine's up-to-date review of the increasingly complex regulatory genes of HIV is marred by a mix-up in figure legends - an exception to an otherwise well-proofread book. In summary, this is a good volume of its type and is recommended for those who might benefit from reading such review articles.

  10. Thirty years of tick molecular population genetic studies: a comprehensive review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Population genetic studies provide insights into the basic biology of arthropod disease vectors by estimating dispersal patterns and their potential to spread pathogens. In wingless vectors, such as ticks, gene flow will be defined in large part by the mobility of their hosts. However, tick behavior...

  11. Molecular characterization and population structure study of cambuci: strategy for conservation and genetic improvement.

    PubMed

    Santos, D N; Nunes, C F; Setotaw, T A; Pio, R; Pasqual, M; Cançado, G M A

    2016-12-19

    Cambuci (Campomanesia phaea) belongs to the Myrtaceae family and is native to the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. It has ecological and social appeal but is exposed to problems associated with environmental degradation and expansion of agricultural activities in the region. Comprehensive studies on this species are rare, making its conservation and genetic improvement difficult. Thus, it is important to develop research activities to understand the current situation of the species as well as to make recommendations for its conservation and use. This study was performed to characterize the cambuci accessions found in the germplasm bank of Coordenadoria de Assistência Técnica Integral using inter-simple sequence repeat markers, with the goal of understanding the plant's population structure. The results showed the existence of some level of genetic diversity among the cambuci accessions that could be exploited for the genetic improvement of the species. Principal coordinate analysis and discriminant analysis clustered the 80 accessions into three groups, whereas Bayesian model-based clustering analysis clustered them into two groups. The formation of two cluster groups and the high membership coefficients within the groups pointed out the importance of further collection to cover more areas and more genetic variability within the species. The study also showed the lack of conservation activities; therefore, more attention from the appropriate organizations is needed to plan and implement natural and ex situ conservation activities.

  12. Heritability and molecular genetic basis of electrodermal activity: A genome-wide ssociation study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Isen, Joshua D.; Malone, Stephen M.; Miller, Michael B.; McGue, Matthew; Iacono, William G.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular genetic basis of electrodermal activity (EDA) was analyzed using 527,829 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large population-representative sample of twins and parents (N = 4,424) in relation to various EDA indices. Biometric analyses suggested that approximately 50% or more of variance in all EDA indices was heritable. The combined effect of all SNPs together accounted for a significant amount of variance in each index, affirming their polygenic basis and heritability. However, none of the SNPs were genome-wide significant for any EDA index. Previously reported SNP associations with disorders such as substance dependence or schizophrenia, which have been linked to EDA abnormalities, were not significant; nor were associations between EDA and genes in specific neurotransmitter systems. These results suggest that EDA is influenced by multiple genes rather than by polymorphisms with large effects. PMID:25387706

  13. Study Of Genetic Diversity Between Grasspea Landraces Using Morphological And Molecular Marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedehi, Abbasali Vahabi; Lotfi, Asefeh; Solooki, Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    Grass pea is a beneficial crop to Iran since it has some major advantageous such as high grain and forage quality, high drought tolerance and medium level of salinity tolerance and a good native germplasm variation which accessible for breeding programs. This study was carried out to evaluate morphological traits of the grass pea landraces using a randomized complete block design with 3 replications at Research Farm of Isfahan University of Technology. To evaluate genetic diversity of 14 grass pea landraces from various locations in Iran were investigated using 32 RAPD & ISJ primers at Biocenter of University of Zabol. Analysis of variance indicated a highly significant differences among 14 grass pea landrace for the morphological traits. Average of polymorphism percentage of RAPD primer was 73.9%. Among used primer, 12 random primers showed polymorphism and a total of 56 different bands were observed in the genotypes. Jafar-abad and Sar-chahan genotypes with similarity coefficient of 66% and Khoram-abad 2 and Khoram-abad 7 genotypes with similarity coefficient of 3% were the most related and the most distinct genotypes, respectively. Fourteen primers out of 17 semi random primers produced 70 polymorphic bands which included 56% of the total 126 produced bands. Genetic relatedness among population was investigated using Jacard coefficient and unweighted pair group mean analysis (UPGMA) algorithm. The result of this research verified possibility of use of RAPD & ISJ markers for estimation of genetic diversity, management of genetic resources and determination of repetitive accessions in grass pea.

  14. A decade of molecular genetic testing for MODY: a retrospective study of utilization in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Stephanie S; Bosma, Astrid; Henneman, Lidewij; Rigter, Tessel; Spruijt, Carla M J; Grimbergen, Anneliese J E M A; Breuning, Martijn H; de Koning, Eelco J P; Losekoot, Monique; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    Genetic testing for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) may be relevant for treatment and prognosis in patients with usually early-onset, non-ketotic, insulin-sensitive diabetes and for monitoring strategies in non-diabetic mutation carriers. This study describes the first 10 years of genetic testing for MODY in The Netherlands in terms of volume and test positive rate, medical setting, purpose of the test and age of patients tested. Some analyses focus on the most prevalent subtype, HNF1A MODY. Data were retrospectively extracted from a laboratory database. In total, 502 individuals were identified with a pathogenic mutation in HNF4A, GCK or HNF1A between 2001 and 2010. Although mutation scanning for MODY was used at an increasing rate, cascade testing was only used for one relative, on average, per positive index patient. Testing for HNF1A MODY was mostly requested by internists and paediatricians, often from regional hospitals. Primary care physicians and clinical geneticists rarely requested genetic testing for HNF1A MODY. Clinical geneticists requested cascade testing relatively more often than other health professionals. A substantial proportion (currently 29%) of HNF1A MODY probands was at least 40 years old at the time of testing. In conclusion, the number of individuals genetically tested for MODY so far in The Netherlands is low compared with previously predicted numbers of patients. Doctors' valuation of the test and patients' and family members' response to (an offer of) genetic testing on the other hand need to be investigated. Efforts may be needed to develop and implement translational guidelines.

  15. A decade of molecular genetic testing for MODY: a retrospective study of utilization in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Stephanie S; Bosma, Astrid; Henneman, Lidewij; Rigter, Tessel; Spruijt, Carla MJ; Grimbergen, Anneliese JEMA; Breuning, Martijn H; de Koning, Eelco JP; Losekoot, Monique; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    Genetic testing for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) may be relevant for treatment and prognosis in patients with usually early-onset, non-ketotic, insulin-sensitive diabetes and for monitoring strategies in non-diabetic mutation carriers. This study describes the first 10 years of genetic testing for MODY in The Netherlands in terms of volume and test positive rate, medical setting, purpose of the test and age of patients tested. Some analyses focus on the most prevalent subtype, HNF1A MODY. Data were retrospectively extracted from a laboratory database. In total, 502 individuals were identified with a pathogenic mutation in HNF4A, GCK or HNF1A between 2001 and 2010. Although mutation scanning for MODY was used at an increasing rate, cascade testing was only used for one relative, on average, per positive index patient. Testing for HNF1A MODY was mostly requested by internists and paediatricians, often from regional hospitals. Primary care physicians and clinical geneticists rarely requested genetic testing for HNF1A MODY. Clinical geneticists requested cascade testing relatively more often than other health professionals. A substantial proportion (currently 29%) of HNF1A MODY probands was at least 40 years old at the time of testing. In conclusion, the number of individuals genetically tested for MODY so far in The Netherlands is low compared with previously predicted numbers of patients. Doctors' valuation of the test and patients' and family members' response to (an offer of) genetic testing on the other hand need to be investigated. Efforts may be needed to develop and implement translational guidelines. PMID:24736738

  16. Molecular genetic studies in black families with sickle cell anemia and unusually high levels of fetal hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, W K; Abshire, T C; Lane, P A; Roloff, J S; Githens, J H

    1992-01-01

    Clinical, hematologic, and molecular genetic studies are reported for five families with SS patients having unusually high fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) levels (mean 28.3%, range 19-42%). Some of the individuals were symptom-free and one was not anemic. However, some were symptomatic despite a very high Hb F. Neither the Hb F level nor the F cell distribution entirely explained the variation in clinical severity. Molecular genetic studies identified the Senegal haplotype with the associated -158 G gamma (C----T) mutation in two of the five families. The -202 G gamma (C----G) mutation was not found in any of the individuals studied. Sequencing of the gamma-globin gene promoters to detect genetic high F determinants not detectable by restriction digestion was not performed. All AS parents and AS siblings demonstrated elevated F cells when the Senegal/-158 G gamma (C----T) mutation was present with either the beta S or beta A allele. Double heterozygosity for two different high F determinants in some SS patients is suggested by the studies in at least one family. Discordance among siblings in clinical and hematologic manifestations in two families provides additional evidence for loci regulating Hb F cell production which are not linked to the beta-globin gene clusters.

  17. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint ( Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4 S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general “allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction” scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1 R, 3 R, 4 S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  18. Molecular genetics of human chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P C; Tanzi, R E; Cheng, S V; Gusella, J F

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome 21 is the smallest autosome, comprising only about 1.9% of human DNA, but represents one of the most intensively studied regions of the genome. Much of the interest in chromosome 21 can be attributed to its association with Down's syndrome, a genetic disorder that afflicts one in every 700 to 1000 newborns. Although only 17 genes have been assigned to chromosome 21, a very large number of cloned DNA segments of unknown function have been isolated and regionally mapped. The majority of these segments detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and therefore represent useful genetic markers. Continued molecular genetic investigation of chromosome 21 will be central to elucidating molecular events leading to meiotic non-disjunction and consequent trisomy, the contribution of specific genes to the pathology of Down's syndrome, and the possible role of chromosome 21 in Alzheimer's disease and other as yet unmapped genetic defects. PMID:2884319

  19. Simulating a base population in honey bee for molecular genetic studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the past years, reports have indicated that honey bee populations are declining and that infestation by an ecto-parasitic mite (Varroa destructor) is one of the main causes. Selective breeding of resistant bees can help to prevent losses due to the parasite, but it requires that a robust breeding program and genetic evaluation are implemented. Genomic selection has emerged as an important tool in animal breeding programs and simulation studies have shown that it yields more accurate breeding value estimates, higher genetic gain and low rates of inbreeding. Since genomic selection relies on marker data, simulations conducted on a genomic dataset are a pre-requisite before selection can be implemented. Although genomic datasets have been simulated in other species undergoing genetic evaluation, simulation of a genomic dataset specific to the honey bee is required since this species has a distinct genetic and reproductive biology. Our software program was aimed at constructing a base population by simulating a random mating honey bee population. A forward-time population simulation approach was applied since it allows modeling of genetic characteristics and reproductive behavior specific to the honey bee. Results Our software program yielded a genomic dataset for a base population in linkage disequilibrium. In addition, information was obtained on (1) the position of markers on each chromosome, (2) allele frequency, (3) χ2 statistics for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, (4) a sorted list of markers with a minor allele frequency less than or equal to the input value, (5) average r2 values of linkage disequilibrium between all simulated marker loci pair for all generations and (6) average r2 value of linkage disequilibrium in the last generation for selected markers with the highest minor allele frequency. Conclusion We developed a software program that takes into account the genetic and reproductive biology specific to the honey bee and that can be used to

  20. Molecular studies of influenza B virus in the reverse genetics era.

    PubMed

    Jackson, David; Elderfield, Ruth A; Barclay, Wendy S

    2011-01-01

    Recovery of an infectious virus of defined genetic structure entirely from cDNA and the deduction of information about the virus resulting from phenotypic characterization of the mutant is the process of reverse genetics. This approach has been possible for a number of negative-strand RNA viruses since the recovery of rabies virus in 1994. However, the recovery of recombinant orthomyxoviruses posed a greater challenge due to the segmented nature of the genome. It was not until 1999 that such a system was reported for influenza A viruses, but since that time our knowledge of influenza A virus biology has grown dramatically. Annual influenza epidemics are caused not only by influenza A viruses but also by influenza B viruses. In 2002, two groups reported the successful recovery of influenza B virus entirely from cDNA. This has allowed greater depth of study into the biology of these viruses. This review will highlight the advances made in various areas of influenza B virus biology as a result of the development of reverse genetics techniques for these viruses, including (i) the importance of the non-coding regions of the influenza B virus genome; (ii) the generation of novel vaccine strains; (iii) studies into the mechanisms of drug resistance; (iv) the function(s) of viral proteins, both those analogous to influenza A virus proteins and those unique to influenza B viruses. The information generated by the application of influenza B virus reverse genetics systems will continue to contribute to our improved surveillance and control of human influenza.

  1. A molecular genetic study of autism and related phenotypes in extended pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Efforts to uncover the risk genotypes associated with the familial nature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have had limited success. The study of extended pedigrees, incorporating additional ASD-related phenotypes into linkage analysis, offers an alternative approach to the search for inherited ASD susceptibility variants that complements traditional methods used to study the genetics of ASD. Methods We examined evidence for linkage in 19 extended pedigrees ascertained through ASD cases spread across at least two (and in most cases three) nuclear families. Both compound phenotypes (i.e., ASD and, in non-ASD individuals, the broad autism phenotype) and more narrowly defined components of these phenotypes, e.g., social and repetitive behavior, pragmatic language, and anxiety, were examined. The overarching goal was to maximize the aggregate information available on the maximum number of individuals and to disaggregate syndromic phenotypes in order to examine the genetic underpinnings of more narrowly defined aspects of ASD behavior. Results Results reveal substantial between-family locus heterogeneity and support the importance of previously reported ASD loci in inherited, familial, forms of ASD. Additional loci, not seen in the ASD analyses, show evidence for linkage to the broad autism phenotype (BAP). BAP peaks are well supported by multiple subphenotypes (including anxiety, pragmatic language, and social behavior) showing linkage to regions overlapping with the compound BAP phenotype. Whereas 'repetitive behavior’, showing the strongest evidence for linkage (Posterior Probability of Linkage = 62% at 6p25.2-24.3, and 69% at 19p13.3), appears to be linked to novel regions not detected with other compound or narrow phenotypes examined in this study. Conclusions These results provide support for the presence of key features underlying the complexity of the genetic architecture of ASD: substantial between-family locus heterogeneity, that the BAP appears

  2. A twin and molecular genetics study of sleep paralysis and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Denis, Dan; French, Christopher C; Rowe, Richard; Zavos, Helena M S; Nolan, Patrick M; Parsons, Michael J; Gregory, Alice M

    2015-08-01

    Sleep paralysis is a relatively common but under-researched phenomenon. In this paper we examine prevalence in a UK sample and associations with candidate risk factors. This is the first study to investigate the heritability of sleep paralysis in a twin sample and to explore genetic associations between sleep paralysis and a number of circadian expressed single nucleotide polymorphisms. Analyses are based on data from the Genesis1219 twin/sibling study, a community sample of twins/siblings from England and Wales. In total, data from 862 participants aged 22-32 years (34% male) were used in the study. This sample consisted of monozygotic and dizygotic twins and siblings. It was found that self-reports of general sleep quality, anxiety symptoms and exposure to threatening events were all associated independently with sleep paralysis. There was moderate genetic influence on sleep paralysis (53%). Polymorphisms in the PER2 gene were associated with sleep paralysis in additive and dominant models of inheritance-although significance was not reached once a Bonferroni correction was applied. It is concluded that factors associated with disrupted sleep cycles appear to be associated with sleep paralysis. In this sample of young adults, sleep paralysis was moderately heritable. Future work should examine specific polymorphisms associated with differences in circadian rhythms and sleep homeostasis further in association with sleep paralysis.

  3. Molecular genetic study of novel biomarkers for early diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yong-Deok, Kim; Eun-Hyoung, Jeon; Yeon-Sun, Kim; Kang-Mi, Pang; Jin-Yong, Lee; Sung-Hwan, Cho; Tae-Yun, Kim; Tae-Sung, Park; Soung-Min, Kim; Myung-Jin, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Early detection and treatment of an oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is critical because of its rapid growth, frequent lymph-node metastasis, and poor prognosis. However, no clinically-valuable methods of early diagnosis exist, and genetic analysis of OSCCs has yielded no biomarkers. Study Design: We investigated the expression of genes associated with inflammation in OSCCs via a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of microarray data. Tumor and normal tissues from five patients with an OSCC were used for microarray analysis. Differentially-expressed genes, identified using permutation, local pooled error (LPE), t-tests, and significance analysis of microarrays (SAM), were selected as candidate genetic markers. Results: Two groups corresponding to tissue identity were evident, implying that their differentially-expressed genes represented biological differences between tissues. Fifteen genes were identified using the Student’s paired t-test (p<0.05) and the SAM, with a false discovery rate of less than 0.02. Based on gene expression, these 15 genes can be used to classify an OSCC. A genetic analysis of functional networks and ontologies, validated by using a qRT-PCR analysis of the tissue samples, identified four genes, ADAM15, CDC7, IL12RB2 and TNFRSF8, that demonstrated excellent concordance with the microarray data. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that four genes (ADAM15, CDC7, IL12RB2 and TNFRSF8) had potential as novel biomarkers for the diagnosis and the treatment of an OSCC. Key words:Biomarker, microarray, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, oral squamous cell carcinoma, gene expression profiling. PMID:25475780

  4. Molecular genetics of dyslexia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Carrion-Castillo, Amaia; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E

    2013-11-01

    Dyslexia is a highly heritable learning disorder with a complex underlying genetic architecture. Over the past decade, researchers have pinpointed a number of candidate genes that may contribute to dyslexia susceptibility. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art, describing how studies have moved from mapping potential risk loci, through identification of associated gene variants, to characterization of gene function in cellular and animal model systems. Work thus far has highlighted some intriguing mechanistic pathways, such as neuronal migration, axon guidance, and ciliary biology, but it is clear that we still have much to learn about the molecular networks that are involved. We end the review by highlighting the past, present, and future contributions of the Dutch Dyslexia Programme to studies of genetic factors. In particular, we emphasize the importance of relating genetic information to intermediate neurobiological measures, as well as the value of incorporating longitudinal and developmental data into molecular designs.

  5. Traditional Approaches to Molecular Genetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher J; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    Molecular studies of endometrial cancer have evolved with the tools available to researchers: the methods for measuring nucleic acids, protein expression, and combinations thereof. Today "molecular genetic analysis" implies a broad range of indirect and direct tests that yield molecular phenotypes or genotypes, immunotypes, or signatures that were not conceived of when the histologic and biologic heterogeneity was first fully acknowledged.We will provide a historical perspective on molecular genetic studies of endometrial cancers focusing on candidate genes and how early foundational research shaped both our understanding of the disease and current research directions. Examples of direct tests (mutation, DNA methylation, and/or protein expression) will be provided along with examples of indirect tests that have been and continue to be central to endometrial cancer molecular biology, such as DNA content or microsatellite instability analysis. We will highlight clinically relevant examples of molecular phenotyping and direct evaluation of candidate genes that integrate direct and indirect testing as part of routine patient care. This is not intended to be an exhaustive review but rather an overview of the progress that has been made and how early work is shaping current molecular, clinical, and biologic studies of endometrial cancer.

  6. Is lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia a cancerous precursor of minimal deviation adenocarcinoma?: a comparative molecular-genetic and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Shigeto; Kusuda, Tomoko; Liu, Xu-Ping; Suehiro, Yutaka; Kaku, Tsunehisa; Mikami, Yoshiki; Takeshita, Morishige; Nakao, Motonao; Chochi, Yasuyo; Sasaki, Kohsuke

    2008-12-01

    Although lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia (LEGH) was originally described as a distinct hyperplastic glandular lesion of the uterine cervix, recent studies have raised a question that LEGH may be a cancerous precursor of minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) and other mucinous adenocarcinomas (MACs) of the uterine cervix. In the present study, we studied LEGH, MDA, and MAC by using molecular-genetic and immunohistochemical methods for chromosomal imbalance, microsatellite instability, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and gastric pyloric-type mucin secretion to clarify their relationship. Comparative genomic hybridization revealed recurrent chromosomal imbalances, that is, gains of chromosome 3q and a loss of 1p, which were common to MDA and MAC, in 3 of 14 LEGHs analyzed (21%). LEGHs with chromosomal imbalances showed a degree of cellular atypia in the hyperplastic glandular epithelium. Dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed a gain of chromosome 3 fragment in these cervical glandular lesions. HPV in situ hybridization revealed that high-risk HPV (types 16 and 18) was positive in over 80% of MACs, but negative in all LEGHs and MDAs examined. Microsatellite instability was rarely detected in these cervical glandular lesions. Our present study results demonstrated a molecular-genetic link between LEGH and cervical mucinous glandular malignancies including MDA and MAC, and are thought to support the hypothesis that a proportion of LEGHs are cancerous precursors of MDA and/or MAC.

  7. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with apparent incomplete penetrance: a clinical, electrophysiological, psychophysical, and molecular genetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A T; Fitzke, F; Jay, M; Arden, G B; Inglehearn, C F; Keen, T J; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1993-01-01

    Twenty five symptomatic individuals and six asymptomatic obligate gene carriers from four families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) showing apparent incomplete penetrance have been studied. Symptomatic individuals from three families showed early onset of night blindness, non-recordable rod electroretinograms, and marked elevation of both rod and cone thresholds in all subjects tested. In the fourth family, there was more variation in the age of onset of night blindness and some symptomatic individuals showed well preserved rod and cone function in some retinal areas. All asymptomatic individuals tested had evidence of mild abnormalities of rod and cone function, indicating that these families show marked variation in expressivity rather than true non-penetrance of the adRP gene. No mutations of the rhodopsin or RDS genes were found in these families and the precise genetic mutation(s) remain to be identified. PMID:8025041

  8. Phylogenetic and Molecular Variability Studies Reveal a New Genetic Clade of Citrus leprosis virus C

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-González, Pedro Luis; Chabi-Jesus, Camila; Guerra-Peraza, Orlene; Breton, Michèle Claire; Arena, Gabriella Dias; Nunes, Maria Andreia; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C) causes a severe disease affecting citrus orchards in the Western hemisphere. This study reveals the molecular variability of the virus by analyzing four genomic regions (p29, p15, MP and RNA2-intergenic region) distributed over its two RNAs. Nucleotide diversity (π) values were relatively low but statistically different over the analyzed genes and subpopulations, indicating their distinct evolutionary history. Values of πp29 and πMP were higher than those of πp15 and πRNA2–IR, whereas πMP was increased due to novel discovered isolates phylogenetically clustered in a divergent clade that we called SJP. Isolate BR_SP_SJP_01 RNA1 and RNA2 sequences, clade SJP, showed an identity of 85.6% and 88.4%, respectively, with those corresponding to CiLV-C, the type member of the genus Cilevirus, and its RNA2 5′-proximal region was revealed as a minor donor in a putative inter-clade recombination event. In addition to citrus, BR_SP_SJP_01 naturally infects the weed Commelina benghalensis and is efficiently transmitted by Brevipalpus yothersi mites. Our data demonstrated that negative selection was the major force operating in the evaluated viral coding regions and defined amino acids putatively relevant for the biological function of cilevirus proteins. This work provides molecular tools and sets up a framework for further epidemiological studies. PMID:27275832

  9. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John...encephalopathy (CTE), but the underlying molecular changes remain unclear. Here, biochemical and genetic studies that deepen our understanding of the

  10. Molecular genetics of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ichihara, Sahoko; Nishida, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial infarction (MI) is an important clinical problem because of its large contribution to mortality. The main causal and treatable risk factors for MI include hypertension, hypercholesterolemia or dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. In addition to these risk factors, recent studies have shown the importance of genetic factors and interactions between multiple genes and environmental factors. Disease prevention is an important strategy for reducing the overall burden of MI, with the identification of markers for disease risk being key both for risk prediction and for potential intervention to lower the chance of future events. Although genetic linkage analyses of families and sib-pairs as well as candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have implicated several loci and candidate genes in predisposition to coronary heart disease (CHD) or MI, the genes that contribute to genetic susceptibility to these conditions remain to be identified definitively. In this review, we summarize both candidate loci for CHD or MI identified by linkage analyses and candidate genes examined by association studies. We also review in more detail studies that have revealed the association with MI or CHD of polymorphisms in MTHFR, LPL, and APOE by the candidate gene approach and those in LTA and at chromosomal region 9p21.3 by genome-wide scans. Such studies may provide insight into the function of implicated genes as well as into the role of genetic factors in the development of CHD and MI. PMID:18704761

  11. Lethal carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency in newborns: A molecular-genetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Taroni, F.; Gellera, C.; Cavadini, P.

    1994-09-01

    Classically, CPT II deficiency presents in young adults with recurrent episodes of paroxysmal myoglobinuria triggered by prolonged exercise, cold, or fever. More severe forms of CPT II deficiency have recently been observed in children and newborns. Here, were present biochemical and molecular studies of lethal neonatal CPT II deficiency in a premature Haitian infant of nonconsanguineous parents. He presented at birth with severe respiratory distress, cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure. His condition worsened and he died on the 4th day of life. Postmortem examination showed hypertrophied, dilated heart, and lipid storage in liver, heart and kidney. An older sibling had died unexpectantly at 4 days of age with postmortem evidence of fatty infiltration of liver, kidney, heart and muscle. Biochemical study of cultured fibroblasts demonstrated dramatic reduction of palmitate oxidation (to < 3%) and very low residual CPT II activity ({le}15%). No CPT II protein was detected by Western blot analysis of fibroblasts. However, immunoprecitation of cells pulse-labeled with L-[{sup 35}S] methionine demonstrated normal amounts of newly synthesized CPT II, thus suggesting altered stability of the enzyme. To identify the molecular defect in his patient, individual CPT II exons were amplified by genomic PCR and directly sequenced. A missense mutation was found in exon 4, resulting in the nonconservative amino acid substitution at codon 227 (Pro227Leu). SSCP analysis of a genomic PCR fragment encompassing the mutation demonstrated that the patient was homozygous and the parents were heterozygous for this mutation. The mutation was detected neither in a large number of controls nor in other CPT II deficient patients. Finally, CPT II activity in COS-1 cells transfected with mutated CPT II cDNA was <8% than that in cells transfected with wild-type cDNA, thus demonstrating the pathogenic role of this mutation.

  12. Fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy caused by fumarase deficiency: A molecular-genetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Gellera, C.; Cavadini, P.; Baratta, S.

    1994-09-01

    Fumarase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of the citric acid cycle resulting in severe organic aciduria and encephalopathy. Mammalian cells contain two fumarase isoenzymes, one mitochondrial and one cytosolic. In rat, the two proteins are encoded by the same gene and are synthesized by alternative initiation of translation at two in-phase AUG codons. One single fumarase gene locus has been identified on human chromosome 1. In most of the patients so far described, the activities of both isozymes are severely affected, suggesting that mutations within a single gene may underlie the disease. Here, we report the molecular study of fumarase deficiency in a patient exhibiting compound heterozygosity for two different allelic mutations affecting the amino acid composition of both isoforms. The proband, an Italian boy of nonconsanguineous parents, died at 7 months of age of a progressive encephalopathy. Immunoblot demonstrated absence of cross-reacting material in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fraction of all tissues examined. Molecular analysis of the patient`s fumarase cDNA amplified by RT-PCR showed the presence of two mutations affecting the amino acid composition of both isoforms, a missense mutation resulting in the nonconservative amino acid substitution at codon 190 (Arg190Cys) and an amino acid in-frame insertion at codon 434 (Lys434ins). SSCP analysis of genomic PCR fragments encompassing the mutations demonstrated that the patient was heterozygous for both mutations, having inherited the Arg-to-Cys substitution from the father and the in-frame insertion from the mother. Finally, the effects of the mutations on enzyme function were investigated by expressing both normal and mutated fumarase cDNAs in a fumarase-deficient ({delta}FUM1) S. cerevisiae strain.

  13. {open_quotes}Unspecific{close_quotes} X-linked mental retardation: Clinical, genetic and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ropers, H.H.; Maacel, S. van der; Knoers, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous linkage studies have assigned a gene for non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (XMR) to at least 8 different regions on the X-chromosome. The fragile X-syndrome (FRAXA) does not account for more than 40% of all cases; in most XMR families early diagnosis and prevention is not possible. As part of a systematic study into {open_quotes}unspecific{close_quotes} XMR involving more than 30 non-FRAXA families, linkage studies have enabled us to map the respective genes in 4 families to the Xp11.4-q12 interval with peak lod scores around the ALAS2 locus. In three other families, the gene defect could be assigned to the KAL-DMD, DXS424-FRAXAC2 and DSX52-Xqter intervals, respectively. In one of these families, small stature due to growth hormone deficiency was observed as a distinctive clinical feature. Molecular cloning of the breakpoint in a mentally retarded girl with a balanced t(Xq13;13q) translocation has enabled us to isolate an X-chromosomal gene which is disrupted in this patient and is highly expressed in brain. YAC cloning strategies are being employed to clone another XMR gene, which has been identified previously in the vicinity of the CHM locus and genes involved in mentally retarded patients with two different inversions, inv(X)(q21p11) and inv(X)(p21q24), respectively.

  14. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies.

  15. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies. PMID:26558925

  16. Alport syndrome. Molecular genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    2009-08-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a progressive renal disease that is characterised by hematuria and progressive renal failure, and often accompanied by progressive high-tone sensorineural hearing loss and ocular changes in form of macular flecks and lenticonus. AS is a genetic heterogenous disease, and X-linked dominant in about 85% of the families. The autosomal recessive and dominant forms constitute about 15% of the cases. In the first part of the study is a multipoint linkage analysis of 12 families suspected of X-linked AS. The aim of that part of the study was to map a number of X-chromosomal polymorphic markers in relation to the locus for AS, in order to be able to perform carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis in the families. In addition, a more precise map of the region could form the basis for positional cloning of the gene for X-linked AS. In 1990 it was found that the X-linked form of AS is caused by mutation in the COL4A5 gene located at Xq22, and encoding the alpha 5-chain of type IV-collagen. The COL4A5 gene is a very large gene spanning 257 kb with a transcript of 6.5 kb distributed on 51 exons. In addition, two alternatively transcribed exons have been identified. In the second part of the study methods were set up for detection and characterisation of mutations in the COL4A5 gene in 135 patients suspected of AS. The aims of that part of the study were to develop an efficient and reliable approach for mutation detection, and to implement the results of the mutation analysis in clinical practice for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis, in order to be able to offer a better genetic counselling to the families. Knowledge of a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype can be of help in predicting the prognosis. Samples from 135 probands suspected of AS and 359 of their relatives were collected, together with available clinical information. Southern blotting analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were used to

  17. Microbial Biofilms: from Ecology to Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Mary Ellen; O'toole, George A.

    2000-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms attached to surfaces or associated with interfaces. Despite the focus of modern microbiology research on pure culture, planktonic (free-swimming) bacteria, it is now widely recognized that most bacteria found in natural, clinical, and industrial settings persist in association with surfaces. Furthermore, these microbial communities are often composed of multiple species that interact with each other and their environment. The determination of biofilm architecture, particularly the spatial arrangement of microcolonies (clusters of cells) relative to one another, has profound implications for the function of these complex communities. Numerous new experimental approaches and methodologies have been developed in order to explore metabolic interactions, phylogenetic groupings, and competition among members of the biofilm. To complement this broad view of biofilm ecology, individual organisms have been studied using molecular genetics in order to identify the genes required for biofilm development and to dissect the regulatory pathways that control the plankton-to-biofilm transition. These molecular genetic studies have led to the emergence of the concept of biofilm formation as a novel system for the study of bacterial development. The recent explosion in the field of biofilm research has led to exciting progress in the development of new technologies for studying these communities, advanced our understanding of the ecological significance of surface-attached bacteria, and provided new insights into the molecular genetic basis of biofilm development. PMID:11104821

  18. Heritability and molecular genetic basis of antisaccade eye tracking error rate: A genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Malone, Stephen M.; Donnelly, Jennifer M.; Hammer, Micah A.; Miller, Michael B.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Antisaccade deficits reflect abnormalities in executive function linked to various disorders including schizophrenia, externalizing psychopathology, and neurological conditions. We examined the genetic bases of antisaccade error in a sample of community-based twins and parents (N = 4,469). Biometric models showed that about half of the variance in the antisaccade response was due to genetic factors and half due to nonshared environmental factors. Molecular genetic analyses supported these results, showing that the heritability accounted for by common molecular genetic variants approximated biometric estimates. Genome-wide analyses revealed several SNPs as well as two genes—B3GNT7 and NCL—on Chromosome 2 associated with antisaccade error. SNPs and genes hypothesized to be associated with antisaccade error based on prior work, although generating some suggestive findings for MIR137, GRM8, and CACNG2, could not be confirmed. PMID:25387707

  19. Molecular Marker Systems for Oenothera Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Rauwolf, Uwe; Golczyk, Hieronim; Meurer, Jörg; Herrmann, Reinhold G.; Greiner, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The genus Oenothera has an outstanding scientific tradition. It has been a model for studying aspects of chromosome evolution and speciation, including the impact of plastid nuclear co-evolution. A large collection of strains analyzed during a century of experimental work and unique genetic possibilities allow the exchange of genetically definable plastids, individual or multiple chromosomes, and/or entire haploid genomes (Renner complexes) between species. However, molecular genetic approaches for the genus are largely lacking. In this study, we describe the development of efficient PCR-based marker systems for both the nuclear genome and the plastome. They allow distinguishing individual chromosomes, Renner complexes, plastomes, and subplastomes. We demonstrate their application by monitoring interspecific exchanges of genomes, chromosome pairs, and/or plastids during crossing programs, e.g., to produce plastome–genome incompatible hybrids. Using an appropriate partial permanent translocation heterozygous hybrid, linkage group 7 of the molecular map could be assigned to chromosome 9·8 of the classical Oenothera map. Finally, we provide the first direct molecular evidence that homologous recombination and free segregation of chromosomes in permanent translocation heterozygous strains is suppressed. PMID:18791241

  20. Single-copy gene based 50 K SNP chip for genetic studies and molecular breeding in rice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nisha; Jayaswal, Pawan Kumar; Panda, Kabita; Mandal, Paritra; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Balwant; Mishra, Shefali; Singh, Yashi; Singh, Renu; Rai, Vandna; Gupta, Anita; Raj Sharma, Tilak; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is the most abundant DNA sequence variation present in plant genomes. Here, we report the design and validation of a unique genic-SNP genotyping chip for genetic and evolutionary studies as well as molecular breeding applications in rice. The chip incorporates 50,051 SNPs from 18,980 different genes spanning 12 rice chromosomes, including 3,710 single-copy (SC) genes conserved between wheat and rice, 14,959 SC genes unique to rice, 194 agronomically important cloned rice genes and 117 multi-copy rice genes. Assays with this chip showed high success rate and reproducibility because of the SC gene based array with no sequence redundancy and cross-hybridisation problems. The usefulness of the chip in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies of cultivated and wild rice germplasm was demonstrated. Furthermore, its efficacy was validated for analysing background recovery in improved mega rice varieties with submergence tolerance developed through marker-assisted backcross breeding. PMID:26111882

  1. Genetic and epigenetic studies for determining molecular targets of natural product anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujiong; Li, Yong; Liu, Xiaoming; Cho, William C S

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a disease caused by a series of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Therefore, agents targeting the genetic and/or epigenetic machinery offer potential for the development of anticancer drugs. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that some common natural products [such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), curcumin, genistein, sulforaphane (SFN) and resveratrol] have anticancer properties through the mechanisms of altering epigenetic processes [including DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, microRNA (miRNA) regulation] and targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs). These bioactive compounds are able to revert epigenetic alterations in a variety of cancers in vitro and in vivo. They exert anticancer effects by targeting various signaling pathways related to the initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer. It appears that natural products hold great promise for cancer prevention and treatment by altering various epigenetic modifications. This review aims to discuss our current understanding of genetic and epigenetic targets of natural products and the effects of some common natural products on cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

  2. Teaching molecular genetics: chapter 4-positional cloning of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Puliti, Aldamaria; Caridi, Gianluca; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2007-12-01

    Positional cloning is the approach of choice for the identification of genetic mutations underlying the pathological development of diseases with simple Mendelian inheritance. It consists of different consecutive steps, starting with recruitment of patients and DNA collection, that are critical to the overall process. A genetic analysis of the enrolled patients and their families is performed, based on genetic recombination frequencies generated by meiotic cross-overs and on genome-wide molecular studies, to define a critical DNA region of interest. This analysis culminates in a statistical estimate of the probability that disease features may segregate in the families independently or in association with specific molecular markers located in known regions. In this latter case, a marker can be defined as being linked to the disease manifestations. The genetic markers define an interval that is a function of their recombination frequencies with the disease, in which the disease gene is localised. The identification and characterisation of chromosome abnormalities as translocations, deletions and duplications by classical cytogenetic methods or by the newly developed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) technique may define extensions and borders of the genomic regions involved. The step following the definition of a critical genomic region is the identification of candidate genes that is based on the analysis of available databases from genome browsers. Positional cloning culminates in the identification of the causative gene mutation, and the definition of its functional role in the pathogenesis of the disorder, by the use of cell-based or animal-based experiments. More often, positional cloning ends with the generation of mice with homologous mutations reproducing the human clinical phenotype. Altogether, positional cloning has represented a fundamental step in the research on genetic renal disorders, leading to the definition of several

  3. Molecular Genetic of Atopic dermatitis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Alnomair, Naief; Alobead, Zeiad Abdulaziz; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory skin disease. The pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, but the disease results from dysfunctions of skin barrier and immune response, where both genetic and environmental factors play a key role. Recent studies demonstrate the substantial evidences that show a strong genetic association with AD. As for example, AD patients have a positive family history and have a concordance rate in twins. Moreover, several candidate genes have now been suspected that play a central role in the genetic background of AD. In last decade advanced procedures similar to genome-wide association (GWA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been applied on different population and now it has been clarified that AD is significantly associated with genes of innate/adaptive immune systems, human leukocyte antigens (HLA), cytokines, chemokines, drug-metabolizing genes or various other genes. In this review, we will highlight the recent advancements in the molecular genetics of AD, especially on possible functional relevance of genetic variants discovered to date. PMID:27004062

  4. [Genetics and molecular medicine in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Rojas Martínez, A; Ortiz López, R; Delgado Enciso, I

    2001-01-01

    The discoveries on molecular aspects of cellular function are changing the concepts of health and disease. All medical fields, including cardiology, have been enriched with several diagnostic test to determine predisposition and to detect molecular dysfunctions. This review on the genetic and molecular aspects of cardiovascular diseases is written at the Centenary of the rediscovery of Mendel's principles on heredity and at the time of the announcement of the end of the human genome sequencing task. The review starts with considerations on the pluricellular constitution of the human body, and the principles of genetics with their molecular bases; including a short description of the methods for gene mapping. The following sections give a historic synopsis on the concepts of medical genetics, molecular medicine, and the Human Genome Project. The review ends with a brief description of the spectrum of genetic diseases, using examples of cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Molecular genetic heterogeneity in undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Rosa, Juan M; Leskelä, Susanna; Cristóbal-Lana, Eva; Santón, Almudena; López-García, Ma Ángeles; Muñoz, Gloria; Pérez-Mies, Belen; Biscuola, Michele; Prat, Jaime; Esther, Oliva E; Soslow, Robert A; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Palacios, Jose

    2016-11-01

    Undifferentiated and dedifferentiated endometrial carcinomas are rare and highly aggressive subtypes of uterine cancer, not well characterized at a molecular level. To investigate whether dedifferentiated carcinomas carry molecular genetic alterations similar to those of pure undifferentiated carcinomas, and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of these tumors, we selected a cohort of 18 undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas, 8 of them with a well-differentiated endometrioid carcinoma component (dedifferentiated endometrioid carcinomas), and studied them by immunohistochemistry and massive parallel and Sanger sequencing. Whole-exome sequencing of the endometrioid and undifferentiated components, as well as normal myometrium, was also carried out in one case. According to The Cancer Genome Atlas classification, we distributed 95% of the undifferentiated carcinomas in this series as follows: (a) hypermutated tumors with loss of any mismatch repair protein expression and microsatellite instability (eight cases, 45%); (b) ultramutated carcinomas carrying mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE (two cases, 11%); (c) high copy number alterations (copy-number high) tumors group exhibiting only TP53 mutations and high number of alterations detected by FISH (two cases, 11%); and (d) low copy number alterations (copy-number low) tumors with molecular alterations typical of endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (five cases, 28%). Two of the latter cases, however, also had TP53 mutations and higher number of alterations detected by FISH and could have progressed to a copy-number high phenotype. Most dedifferentiated carcinomas belonged to the hypermutated group, whereas pure undifferentiated carcinomas shared molecular genetic alterations with copy-number low or copy-number high tumors. These results indicate that undifferentiated and dedifferentiated endometrial carcinomas are molecularly heterogeneous tumors, which may have prognostic value.

  6. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  7. Molecular Genetic and Genomic Approaches to Study Flowering and Early Fruit Development in Cucumis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have utilized a transgenic approach to study sex expression in melon as regulated by ethylene production and perception. These studies have indicated dual roles for ethylene in sex determination and maturation of the carpel bearing flower, as well as involvement of ethylene in fruit set and resou...

  8. Molecular genetics in affective illness

    SciTech Connect

    Mendlewicz, J.; Sevy, S.; Mendelbaum, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Genetic transmission in manic depressive illness (MDI) has been explored in twins, adoption, association, and linkage studies. The X-linked transmission hypothesis has been tested by using several markers on chromosome X: Xg blood group, color blindness, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), factor IX (hemophilia B), and DNA probes such as DXS15, DXS52, F8C, ST14. The hypothesis of autosomal transmission has been tested by association studies with the O blood group located on chromosome 9, as well as linkage studies on chromosome 6 with the Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA) haplotypes and on Chromosome 11 with DNA markers for the following genes: D2 dopamine receptor, tyrosinase, C-Harvey-Ras-A (HRAS) oncogene, insuline (ins), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Although linkage studies support the hypothesis of a major locus for the transmission of MDI in the Xq27-28 region, several factors are limiting the results, and are discussed in the present review. 105 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Studies on the genetic variation of the green unicellular alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae) obtained from different geographical locations using ISSR and RAPD molecular marker.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Noroozi; Omar, Hishamuddin; Tan, Soon Guan; Napis, Suhaimi

    2011-03-22

    Haematococcus pluvialis (Flotow) is a unicellular green alga, which is considered to be the best astaxanthin-producing organism. Molecular markers are suitable tools for the purpose of finding out genetic variations in organisms; however there have been no studies conducted on ISSR or RAPD molecular markers for this organism. The DNA of 10 different strains of H. pluvialis (four strains from Iran, two strains from Finland, one strain from Switzerland and three strains from the USA) was extracted. A genetic similarity study was carried out using 14 ISSR and 12 RAPD primers. Moreover, the molecular weights of the bands produced ranged from 0.14 to 3.4 Kb. The PCA and dendrogram clustered the H. pluvialis strains into various groups according to their geographical origin. The lowest genetic similarity was between the Iran2 and USA2 strains (0.08) and the highest genetic similarity was between Finland1 and Finland2 (0.64). The maximum numbers of bands produced by the ISSR and RAPD primers were 35 and 6 bands, respectively. The results showed that ISSR and RAPD markers are useful for genetic diversity studies of Haematococcus as they showed geographical discrimination.

  10. Pathways to false positive diagnoses using molecular genetic detection methods; Phytophthora cinnamomi a case study.

    PubMed

    Kunadiya, Manisha; White, Diane; Dunstan, William A; St, Giles E; Hardy, J; Andjic, Vera; Burgess, Treena I

    2017-01-12

    Phytophthora cinnamomi is one of the world's most invasive plant pathogens affecting ornamental plants, horticultural crops and natural ecosystems. Accurate diagnosis is very important to determine the presence or absence of this pathogen in diseased and asymptomatic plants. In previous studies, P. cinnamomi species-specific primers were designed and tested using various polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques including conventional PCR, nested PCR, and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). In all cases, the primers were stated to be highly specific and sensitive to P. cinnamomi However, few of these studies tested their primers against closely related Phytophthora species (Phytophthora clade 7). In this study, we tested these purported P. cinnamomi specific primer sets with eleven other species from clade 7 and determined their specificity; of the eight tested primer sets only three were specific to P. cinnamomi This study demonstrated the importance of testing primers against closely related species within the same clade, and not just other species within the same genus. The findings of this study are relevant to all species-specific microbial diagnosis.

  11. The molecular basis of genetic dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1994-01-01

    Studies of mutagenesis in many organisms indicate that the majority (over 90%) of mutations are recessive to wild type. If recessiveness represents the 'default' state, what are the distinguishing features that make a minority of mutations give rise to dominant or semidominant characters? This review draws on the rapid expansion in knowledge of molecular and cellular biology to classify the molecular mechanisms of dominant mutation. The categories discussed include (1) reduced gene dosage, expression, or protein activity (haploinsufficiency); (2) increased gene dosage; (3) ectopic or temporally altered mRNA expression; (4) increased or constitutive protein activity; (5) dominant negative effects; (6) altered structural proteins; (7) toxic protein alterations; and (8) new protein functions. This provides a framework for understanding the basis of dominant genetic phenomena in humans and other organisms. Images PMID:8182727

  12. Molecular genetic study of the frequency of monosomy 22q11 in DiGeorge syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, A.H.; Kelly, D.; Halford, S.; Wadey, R.; Williamson, R.; Scambler, P.J. ); Wilson, D.; Goodship, J.; Burn, J. ); Paul, T. )

    1992-11-01

    It is well established that DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) may be associated with monosomy of 22q11-pter. More recently, DNA probes have been used to detect hemizygosity for this region in patients with no visible karyotypic abnormality. However, DGS has also been described in cases where the cytogenetic abnormality does not involve 22q11; for instance, four cases of 10p- have been reported. In this study the authors have prospectively analyzed patients, but using DNA markers from 22q11, to assess the frequency of 22q11 rearrangements in DGS. Twenty-one of 22 cases had demonstrable hemizygosity for 22q11. Cytogenetic analysis had identified interstitial deletion in 6 of 16 cases tested; in 6 other cases no karyotype was available. When these results are combined with those of previous studies, 33 of 35 DGS patients had chromosome 22q11 deletions detectable by DNA probes. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Molecular Genetic Studies of Bone Mechanical Strain and of Pedigrees with Very High Bone Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    that an identical amount of mechanical strain applied to both mouse models produces a greater increase in the bone formation [ periosteal and endosteal...studies using this model on rats and mice have shown greater increase in the periosteal bone formation; 2) In the four-point bending method, the...area, total mineral content, periosteal circumference, and endosteal circumference in the loaded vs. unloaded bones. A 730- 730-mg/cm 3 threshold was

  14. Genetic and Molecular Studies of the Phlebotomus Fever Group of Viruses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    spec’ies). The viruses studied includejunta Toro (P’ , iarimabad .i AA), Chagres (CHG), Sandfly fever Siaili[h (SFS Tesh and/Sabin isolates), S-a *fly fever... sandfly fever virus isolates, Sicilian and Naples (SFN, SFS), originally were recovered from American troops in 1943-1944 during epidemics of sandfly fever...ICO, PHL 3, Itaporanga (ITP), Buenaventura (BUE), and the Sicilian and Naples sandfly fever (SFS, SFN) viruses, each has a tripartite RNA genome and

  15. Clinical and molecular studies in two families with Fraser syndrome: a new FRAS1 gene mutation, prenatal ultrasound findings and implications for genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Ogur, G; Zenker, M; Tosun, M; Ekici, F; Schanze, D; Ozyilmaz, B; Malatyalioglu, E

    2011-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by cryptophthalmus, variable expression of cutaneous syndactyly of fingers and toes, genital ambiguity and renal agenesis/dysgenesis. We present here molecular and clinical findings of four fetuses with FS from two families. Molecular genetic studies in the two families revealed mutations in FRAS1 gene allowing better genetic counselling and subsequent prenatal diagnosis in one of the two families. In family one, a nonsense mutation (c.3730C>T, p.R1244X) previously described in a Polish patient was found. In family two a novel nonsense mutation previously not known was detected (c.370C>T, p.R124X). PGD is planned for family 1.

  16. Heritability and molecular genetic basis of acoustic startle eye blink and affectively modulated startle response: A genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    VAIDYANATHAN, UMA; MALONE, STEPHEN M.; MILLER, MICHAEL B.; McGUE, MATT; IACONO, WILLIAM G.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic startle responses have been studied extensively in relation to individual differences and psychopathology. We examined three indices of the blink response in a picture-viewing paradigm—overall startle magnitude across all picture types, and aversive and pleasant modulation scores—in 3,323 twins and parents. Biometric models and molecular genetic analyses showed that half the variance in overall startle was due to additive genetic effects. No single nucleotide polymorphism was genome-wide significant, but GRIK3 did produce a significant effect when examined as part of a candidate gene set. In contrast, emotion modulation scores showed little evidence of heritability in either biometric or molecular genetic analyses. However, in a genome-wide scan, PARP14 did produce a significant effect for aversive modulation. We conclude that, although overall startle retains potential as an endophenotype, emotion-modulated startle does not. PMID:25387708

  17. Analysis of Molecular Genetics Content in Spanish Secondary School Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Gracia, M. V.; Gil-Quilez, M. J.; Osada, J.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of molecular biology in thirty-four Spanish high school biology textbooks has been analysed using a check-list made up of twenty-three items. The study showed a tendency to confuse the genetic code with genetic information. The treatment of DNA transcription, regulation of gene expression and translation were presented as masses of…

  18. Studies of Resurgent Bed Bugs: Population Genetic Structure, Impact of Aggregation on Development and Molecular Screening for Bartonella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Virna Lisa

    The recent resurgence of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) has created an unprecedented demand for research on its biology. The main objectives of this dissertation research were to investigate several aspects of bed bug biology: infestation and dispersal dynamics at a large and small geographical scale using molecular markers, to determine the impact of aggregation on bed bug development and to screen bed bug populations for a re-emergent pathogen. First, we studied the infestation and dispersal dynamics of bed bugs at large geographical scale (e.g., across cities, states). Although bed bug infestations are on the rise, there is a poor understanding of their dispersal patterns and sources of infestation. We conducted a genetic study of 21 bed bug infestations from the eastern United States. We genotyped samples comprised of 8 - 10 individuals per infestation at nine polymorphic microsatellite loci. Despite high genetic diversity across all infestations, with 5 -- 17 alleles per locus (mean = 10.3), we found low genetic diversity (1 -- 4 alleles per locus) within all but one of the infestations. These results suggest that nearly all the studied infestations were started by a small propagule possibly consisting of a singly mated female and/or her progeny. All infestations were strongly genetically differentiated from each other (mean pairwise FST between populations = 0.68) and we did not find strong evidence of a geographic pattern of structuring. The high level of genetic diversity across infestations from the eastern United States together with the lack of geographically organized structure is consistent with multiple introductions into the United States from foreign sources. This work is described in Chapter 2 and was published in the Journal of Medical Entomology in 2012. Second, we investigated dispersal and infestation dynamics of bed bugs at a fine geographical scale within three multistory apartment buildings: one from Raleigh, NC and two from Jersey City, NJ

  19. Chemical Kinetic and Molecular Genetic Study of Selenium Oxyanion Reduction by Enterobactor cloacae SLD1a-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,J.; Kobayashi, D.; Yee, N.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial processes play an important role in the redox transformations of toxic selenium oxyanions. In this study, we employed chemical kinetic and molecular genetic techniques to investigate the mechanisms of Se(IV) and Se(VI) reduction by the facultative anaerobe Enterobacter cloacae SLD1a-1. The rates of microbial selenium oxyanion reduction were measured as a function of initial selenium oxyanion concentration (0-1.0 mM) and temperature (10-40 C), and mutagenesis studies were performed to identify the genes involved in the selenium oxyanion reduction pathway. The results indicate that Se(IV) reduction is significantly more rapid than the reduction of Se(VI). The kinetics of the reduction reactions were successfully quantified using the Michaelis-Menten kinetic equation. Both the rates of Se(VI) and Se(IV) reduction displayed strong temperature-dependence with Ea values of 121 and 71.2 kJ/mol, respectively. X-ray absorption near-edge spectra collected for the precipitates formed by Se(VI) and Se(IV) reduction confirmed the formation of Se(0). A miniTn5 transposon mutant of E. cloacae SLD1a-1 was isolated that had lost the ability to reduce Se(VI) but was not affected in Se(IV) reduction activity. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the transposon was inserted within a tatC gene, which encodes for a central protein in the twin arginine translocation system. Complementation by the wild-type tatC sequence restored the ability of mutant strains to reduce Se(VI). The results suggest that Se(VI) reduction activity is dependent on enzyme export across the cytoplasmic membrane and that reduction of Se(VI) and Se(IV) are catalyzed by different enzymatic systems.

  20. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  1. Testing for the mediating role of endophenotypes using molecular genetic data in a twin study of ADHD traits

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rebecca; Asherson, Philip; Ilott, Nicholas; Cheung, Celeste H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Family and twin studies have identified endophenotypes that capture familial and genetic risk in attention‐deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but it remains unclear if they lie on the causal pathway. Here, we illustrate a stepwise approach to identifying intermediate phenotypes. First, we use previous quantitative genetic findings to delineate the expected pattern of genetically correlated phenotypes. Second, we identify overlapping genetic associations with ADHD‐related quantitative traits. Finally, we test for the mediating role of associated endophenotypes. We applied this approach to a sample of 1,312 twins aged 7–10. Based on previous twin model‐fitting analyses, we selected hyperactivity–impulsivity, inattention, reading difficulties (RD), reaction time variability (RTV) and commission errors (CE), and tested for association with selected ADHD risk alleles. For nominally significant associations with both a symptom and a cognitive variable, matching the expected pattern based on previous genetic correlations, we performed mediation analysis to distinguish pleiotropic from mediating effects. The strongest association was observed for the rs7984966 SNP in the serotonin receptor gene (HTR2A), and RTV (P = 0.007; unadjusted for multiple testing). Mediation analysis suggested that CE (38%) and RTV (44%) substantially mediated the association between inattention and the T‐allele of SNP rs3785157 in the norepinephrine transporter gene (SLC6A2) and the T‐allele of SNP rs7984966 in HTR2A, respectively. The SNPs tag risk‐haplotypes but are not thought to be functionally significant. While these exploratory findings are preliminary, requiring replication, this study demonstrates the value of this approach that can be adapted to the investigation of multiple genetic markers and polygenic risk scores. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27230021

  2. Aeschynomene evenia, a model plant for studying the molecular genetics of the nod-independent rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Brown, Spencer C; Rodier-Goud, Marguerite; Boursot, Marc; Fardoux, Joel; Patrel, Delphine; Gully, Djamel; Fabre, Sandrine; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Giraud, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Research on the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis has been focused, thus far, on two model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, which use a sophisticated infection process involving infection thread formation. However, in 25% of the legumes, the bacterial entry occurs more simply in an intercellular fashion. Among them, some Aeschynomene spp. are nodulated by photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium spp. that do not produce Nod factors. This interaction is believed to represent a living testimony of the ancestral state of the rhizobium-legume symbiosis. To decipher the mechanisms of this Nod-independent process, we propose Aeschynomene evenia as a model legume because it presents all the characteristics required for genetic and molecular analysis. It is a short-perennial and autogamous species, with a diploid and relatively small genome (2n=20; 460 Mb/1C). A. evenia 'IRFL6945' is nodulated by the well-characterized photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS278 and is efficiently transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Aeschynomene evenia is genetically homozygous but polymorphic accessions were found. A manual hybridization procedure has been set up, allowing directed crosses. Therefore, it should be relatively straightforward to unravel the molecular determinants of the Nod-independent process in A. evenia. This should shed new light on the evolution of rhizobium-legume symbiosis and could have important agronomic implications.

  3. Molecular marker-based genetic diversity analysis of scantly studied Brazilian accessions of a medicinal plant, Morinda citrifolia L. (noni).

    PubMed

    Bordallo, P N; Monteiro, A M R; Sousa, J A; Aragão, F A S

    2017-02-23

    Morinda citrifolia L., commonly known as noni, has been used for the treatment of various diseases for over two centuries. It was introduced and widely disseminated in Brazil because of its high market value and ease of adaptation to the soil and climatic conditions of the country. The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic variability of noni accessions from the collection of Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical in Brazil. We evaluated 36 plants of the 13 accessions of noni from the germplasm collection of M. citrifolia. Several methods of DNA extraction were tested. After definition of the method, the DNA of each sample was subjected to polymerase chain reactions using 20 random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. The band patterns on agarose gel were converted into a binary data matrix, which was used to estimate the genetic distances between the plants and to perform the cluster analyses. Of the total number of markers used in this study, 125 (81.1%) were polymorphic. The genetic distances between the genotypes ranged from 0.04 to 0.49. Regardless of the high number of polymorphic bands, the genetic variability of the noni plants evaluated was low since most of the genotypes belonged to the same cluster as shown by the dendrogram and Tocher's cluster analysis. The low genetic diversity among the studied noni individuals indicates that additional variability should be introduced in the germplasm collection of noni by gathering new individuals and/or by hybridizing contrasting individuals.

  4. [The research-study of pneumococci transformation in the laboratory, and the rise of bacterial genetics and molecular biology].

    PubMed

    Carrada-Bravo, Teodoro

    2016-02-01

    The virulence of pneumococci for mice depends on the production of a polysaccharide-capsule, which encloses the bacteria and protects it against phagocytosis. Capsulated pneumococci yield smooth, brilliant colonies designated S, but mutant strains arise frequently which have lost the capacity to sinthetise the capsule, are avirulent and rough designated R. F. Griffith discovery of bacterial "transformation" in 1928, is a landmark in the history of genetics, because hereditary determinants could be transferred from one bacteria to another, and laid the foundation for the subsequent recognition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as the hereditary material. A systematic analysis of the chemical nature of the "transforming principle", by O. T. Avery and his colleagues during next 10 years, culminated in a formidable weight of evidence that it possessed all properties of DNA. In 1953, J. D. Watson and F. H. C Crick by a brilliant synthesis, fitted the chemical X-ray diffraction data together into a symmetrical double-helix structure, which possessed the inherent properties of genetic material, and carries the information necessary to direct all biochemical-cellular activities and self-replications. This paper describes de early rise and development of bacterial genetics and molecular biology.

  5. Genetic recombination and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, B; Betancourt, A J; Kaiser, V B; Gordo, I

    2009-01-01

    Reduced rates of genetic recombination are often associated with reduced genetic variability and levels of adaptation. Several different evolutionary processes, collectively known as Hill-Robertson (HR) effects, have been proposed as causes of these correlates of recombination. Here, we use DNA sequence polymorphism and divergence data from the noncrossing over dot chromosome of Drosophila to discriminate between two of the major forms of HR effects: selective sweeps and background selection. This chromosome shows reduced levels of silent variability and reduced effectiveness of selection. We show that neither model fits the data on variability. We propose that, in large genomic regions with restricted recombination, HR effects among nonsynonymous mutations undermine the effective strength of selection, so that their background selection effects are weakened. This modified model fits the data on variability and also explains why variability in very large nonrecombining genomes is not completely wiped out. We also show that HR effects of this type can produce an individual selection advantage to recombination, as well as greatly reduce the mean fitness of nonrecombining genomes and genomic regions.

  6. Molecular genetics and pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Rood, J I; Cole, S T

    1991-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the causative agent of a number of human diseases, such as gas gangrene and food poisoning, and many diseases of animals. Recently significant advances have been made in the development of C. perfringens genetics. Studies on bacteriocin plasmids and conjugative R plasmids have led to the cloning and analysis of many C. perfringens genes and the construction of shuttle plasmids. The relationship of antibiotic resistance genes to similar genes from other bacteria has been elucidated. A detailed physical map of the C. perfringens chromosome has been prepared, and numerous genes have been located on that map. Reproducible transformation methods for the introduction of plasmids into C. perfringens have been developed, and several genes coding for the production of extracellular toxins and enzymes have been cloned. Now that it is possible to freely move genetic information back and forth between C. perfringens and Escherichia coli, it will be possible to apply modern molecular methods to studies on the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infections. PMID:1779929

  7. Quantitative Genetics in the Era of Molecular Genetics: Learning Abilities and Disabilities as an Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Plomin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To consider recent findings from quantitative genetic research in the context of molecular genetic research, especially genome-wide association studies. We focus on findings that go beyond merely estimating heritability. We use learning abilities and disabilities as examples. Method: Recent twin research in the area of learning…

  8. Molecular biology and genetic engineering in nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Patricia C

    2011-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is a complex and tightly regulated process limited to a group of prokaryotic species known as diazotrophs. Among well-studied diazotrophs, Azotobacter vinelandii is the best studied for its convenience of aerobic growth, its high levels of nitrogenase expression, and its genetic tractability. This chapter includes protocols and strategies in the molecular biology and genetic engineering of A. vinelandii that have been used as valuable tools for advancing studies on the biosynthesis, mechanism, and regulation of nitrogen fixation.

  9. Molecular and comparative genetics of mental retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Inlow, Jennifer K; Restifo, Linda L

    2004-01-01

    Affecting 1-3% of the population, mental retardation (MR) poses significant challenges for clinicians and scientists. Understanding the biology of MR is complicated by the extraordinary heterogeneity of genetic MR disorders. Detailed analyses of >1000 Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database entries and literature searches through September 2003 revealed 282 molecularly identified MR genes. We estimate that hundreds more MR genes remain to be identified. A novel test, in which we distributed unmapped MR disorders proportionately across the autosomes, failed to eliminate the well-known X-chromosome overrepresentation of MR genes and candidate genes. This evidence argues against ascertainment bias as the main cause of the skewed distribution. On the basis of a synthesis of clinical and laboratory data, we developed a biological functions classification scheme for MR genes. Metabolic pathways, signaling pathways, and transcription are the most common functions, but numerous other aspects of neuronal and glial biology are controlled by MR genes as well. Using protein sequence and domain-organization comparisons, we found a striking conservation of MR genes and genetic pathways across the approximately 700 million years that separate Homo sapiens and Drosophila melanogaster. Eighty-seven percent have one or more fruit fly homologs and 76% have at least one candidate functional ortholog. We propose that D. melanogaster can be used in a systematic manner to study MR and possibly to develop bioassays for therapeutic drug discovery. We selected 42 Drosophila orthologs as most likely to reveal molecular and cellular mechanisms of nervous system development or plasticity relevant to MR. PMID:15020472

  10. Molecular Analyses Reveal Unexpected Genetic Structure in Iberian Ibex Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Jesús M.; Soriguer, Ramón C.; Granados, José E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Genetic differentiation in historically connected populations could be the result of genetic drift or adaptation, two processes that imply a need for differing strategies in population management. The aim of our study was to use neutral genetic markers to characterize C. pyrenaica populations genetically and examine results in terms of (i) demographic history, (ii) subspecific classification and (iii) the implications for the management of Iberian ibex. Methodology/Principal Findings We used 30 neutral microsatellite markers from 333 Iberian ibex to explore genetic diversity in the three main Iberian ibex populations in Spain corresponding to the two persisting subspecies (victoria and hispanica). Our molecular analyses detected recent genetic bottlenecks in all the studied populations, a finding that coincides with the documented demographic decline in C. pyrenaica in recent decades. Genetic divergence between the two C. pyrenaica subspecies (hispanica and victoriae) was substantial (FST between 0.39 and 0.47). Unexpectedly, we found similarly high genetic differentiation between two populations (Sierra Nevada and Maestrazgo) belonging to the subspecies hispanica. The genetic pattern identified in our study could be the result of strong genetic drift due to the severe genetic bottlenecks in the studied populations, caused in turn by the progressive destruction of natural habitat, disease epidemics and/or uncontrolled hunting. Conclusions Previous Capra pyrenaica conservation decision-making was based on the clear distinction between the two subspecies (victoriae and hispanica); yet our paper raises questions about the usefulness for conservation plans of the distinction between these subspecies. PMID:28135293

  11. Heart failure: molecular, genetic and epigenetic features of the disease.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, R; Roselli, T; Valente, F; Iannaccone, M; Capogrosso, C; Petti, G; Alfano, G; Masarone, D; Ziello, B; Fimiani, F; Pacileo, G; Russo, M G; Calabrò, P; Limongelli, G; Maddaloni, V; Calabrò, R

    2012-12-01

    Factors that compete to establish heart failure (HF) are not completely known. In the last years the several technological improvements allowed us to deeply study the molecular and genetic aspects of this complex syndrome. This new approach to HF based on molecular biology new discoveries shows us more clearly the pathophysiological bases of this disease, and a future scenery where the genetics may be useful in the clinical practice, as screening of high risk populations, as well as in the diagnosis and therapy of underlying myocardial diseases. The purpose of this review was to analyse the molecular, genetic and epigenetic factors of HF. We described the molecular anatomy of the sarcomere and the pathogenesis of the heart muscle diseases, abandoning the previous monogenic theory for the concept of a polygenic disease. Different actors play a role to cause the illness by themselves, modifying the expression of the disease and, eventually, the prognosis of the patient.

  12. Universality and predictability in molecular quantitative genetics.

    PubMed

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Held, Torsten; Lässig, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Molecular traits, such as gene expression levels or protein binding affinities, are increasingly accessible to quantitative measurement by modern high-throughput techniques. Such traits measure molecular functions and, from an evolutionary point of view, are important as targets of natural selection. We review recent developments in evolutionary theory and experiments that are expected to become building blocks of a quantitative genetics of molecular traits. We focus on universal evolutionary characteristics: these are largely independent of a trait's genetic basis, which is often at least partially unknown. We show that universal measurements can be used to infer selection on a quantitative trait, which determines its evolutionary mode of conservation or adaptation. Furthermore, universality is closely linked to predictability of trait evolution across lineages. We argue that universal trait statistics extends over a range of cellular scales and opens new avenues of quantitative evolutionary systems biology.

  13. Genetics and molecular biology of deafness. Update.

    PubMed

    Grundfast, K M; Siparsky, N; Chuong, D

    2000-12-01

    This article discusses the latest research in the molecular biology and genetics of hearing impairment and its importance to otolaryngologists. Recent research has led to the discovery of many of the genes and gene products that are responsible for hereditary hearing impairment. State mandated screening of newborn infants for hearing loss ensures that a large number of hearing-impaired children will be detected at a very early age. Additionally, these children often will be referred to the otolaryngologist for evaluation of the hearing impairment. It is the otolaryngologist who must gather a detailed family history and perform a thorough physical examination to fully assess the cause of the hearing impairment. In taking the family history, it is important to note that the diagnosis of a hereditary hearing impairment often involves the evaluation of a large-sized family that has a history of hearing disorders. A history of an affected individual in a small family does not necessarily support a diagnosis of hearing impairment in later affected offspring because of the small sample size. Often, a hearing impairment that is part of a syndrome may not be detected because the physical findings associated with a syndrome are subtle in a young infant. For example, the white forelock seen in patients with Waardenburg's syndrome type I cannot be visualized in the infant who lacks hair. Additionally, some patients with syndromic hearing impairment do not present with physical findings, but rather they exhibit abnormal laboratory studies. Additional points to remember include the following: As infectious iatrogenic causes of hearing impairment decrease, the relative incidence of hereditary hearing impairment will increase. Hereditary hearing impairment can present as an isolated finding, or in association with a number of anomalies recognizable as a syndrome. The study of genetics and molecular biology has led to the identification of genes associated with hearing impairment

  14. Integrating evolutionary and molecular genetics of aging.

    PubMed

    Flatt, Thomas; Schmidt, Paul S

    2009-10-01

    Aging or senescence is an age-dependent decline in physiological function, demographically manifest as decreased survival and fecundity with increasing age. Since aging is disadvantageous it should not evolve by natural selection. So why do organisms age and die? In the 1940s and 1950s evolutionary geneticists resolved this paradox by positing that aging evolves because selection is inefficient at maintaining function late in life. By the 1980s and 1990s this evolutionary theory of aging had received firm empirical support, but little was known about the mechanisms of aging. Around the same time biologists began to apply the tools of molecular genetics to aging and successfully identified mutations that affect longevity. Today, the molecular genetics of aging is a burgeoning field, but progress in evolutionary genetics of aging has largely stalled. Here we argue that some of the most exciting and unresolved questions about aging require an integration of molecular and evolutionary approaches. Is aging a universal process? Why do species age at different rates? Are the mechanisms of aging conserved or lineage-specific? Are longevity genes identified in the laboratory under selection in natural populations? What is the genetic basis of plasticity in aging in response to environmental cues and is this plasticity adaptive? What are the mechanisms underlying trade-offs between early fitness traits and life span? To answer these questions evolutionary biologists must adopt the tools of molecular biology, while molecular biologists must put their experiments into an evolutionary framework. The time is ripe for a synthesis of molecular biogerontology and the evolutionary biology of aging.

  15. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease - molecular and brain network approaches.

    PubMed

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher J; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care of AD. However, owing to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extraction of actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this Review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of these omic data sets into multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Furthermore, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models.

  16. Molecular Genetic Investigations of Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestrini, Elena; Marlow, Angela J.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Monaco, Anthony P.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a current research study which is attempting to identify autism susceptibility loci by a systematic screening of the whole human genome by using multiplex families. It reviews the resources and methods used in the study including extensive collection of family data, semiautomated genotyping technology, and specialized statistical…

  17. Application of Molecular Genetics and Transformation to Barley Improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter of the new barley monograph summarizes current applications of molecular genetics and transformation to barley improvement. The chapter describes recent applications of molecular markers including association genetics, QTL mapping and marker assisted selection in barley programs, and in...

  18. A Preliminary Study of Genetic Variation in Populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae) from North-East Brazil, Estimated with AFLP Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, I. M.; Mayo, S. J.; van den Berg, C.; Fay, M. F.; Chester, M.; Lexer, C.; Kirkup, D.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims This study sought genetic evidence of long-term isolation in populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae), a herbaceous, probably outbreeding, humid forest hemi-epiphyte, in the brejo forests of Ceará (north-east Brazil), and clarification of their relationships with populations in Amazonia and the Atlantic forest of Brazil. Methods Within-population genetic diversity and between-population dissimilarity were estimated using AFLP molecular markers in 75 individuals from eight populations located in Ceará, the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and Amazonia. Key Results The populations showed a clinal pattern of weak genetic differentiation over a large geographical region (FST = 0·1896). A strong correlation between genetic and geographical distance (Mantel test: r = 0·6903, P = 0·002) suggests a historical pattern of isolation by distance. Genetic structure analysis revealed at least two distinct gene pools in the data. The two isolated Ceará populations are significantly different from each other (pairwise ΦPT = 0·137, P = 0·003) and as diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·1832, 0·1706) as those in the Atlantic and Amazon forest regions. The population in southern Brazil is less diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·127) than the rest. The Ceará populations are related to those of the Atlantic forest rather than those from Amazonia (AMOVA, among-groups variation = 11·95 %, P = 0·037). Conclusions The gene pools detected within an overall pattern of clinal variation suggest distinct episodes of gene flow, possibly correlated with past humid forest expansions. The Ceará populations show no evidence of erosion of genetic diversity, although this was expected because of their isolation. Their genetic differentiation and relatively high diversity reinforce the importance of conserving the endangered brejo forests. PMID:17823112

  19. Molecular genetics of ADHD: prospects for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Levy, Florence

    2002-07-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder has been shown to be a highly heritable disorder, leading to an increasing interest in genetic studies. While multiple genes may be involved, the candidate gene approach is based on postulated neurotransmitter mechanisms. Molecular genetic advances in relation to dopaminergic (dopamine transporter, dopamine D4 receptor and dopamine D5 receptor) genes, adrenergic, serotonergic and nicotinic receptor genes are reviewed. Comorbidity of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder with learning disability is discussed and possible genetic influences briefly reviewed. Recent pharmacogenomic studies of ADHD are reviewed and promising pathways suggested. Treatments 5 years from now may be more individually tailored in terms of gene/phenotype relationships.

  20. Overview of molecular, cellular, and genetic neurotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Wallace, David R

    2005-05-01

    It has become increasingly evident that the field of neurotoxicology is not only rapidly growing but also rapidly evolving, especially over the last 20 years. As the number of drugs and environmental and bacterial/viral agents with potential neurotoxic properties has grown, the need for additional testing has increased. Only recently has the technology advanced to a level that neurotoxicologic studies can be performed without operating in a "black box." Examination of the effects of agents that are suspected of being toxic can occur on the molecular (protein-protein), cellular (biomarkers, neuronal function), and genetic (polymorphisms) level. Together, these areas help to elucidate the potential toxic profiles of unknown (and in some cases, known) agents. The area of proteomics is one of the fastest growing areas in science and particularly applicable to neurotoxicology. Lubec et al, provide a review of the potential and limitations of proteomics. Proteomics focuses on a more comprehensive view of cellular proteins and provides considerably more information about the effects of toxins on the CNS. Proteomics can be classified into three different focuses: post-translational modification, protein-expression profiling, and protein-network mapping. Together, these methods represent a more complete and powerful image of protein modifications following potential toxin exposure. Cellular neurotoxicology involves many cellular processes including alterations in cellular energy homeostasis, ion homeostasis, intracellular signaling function, and neurotransmitter release, uptake, and storage. The greatest hurdle in cellular neurotoxicology has been the discovery of appropriate biomarkers that are reliable, reproducible, and easy to obtain. There are biomarkers of exposure effect, and susceptibility. Finding the appropriate biomarker for a particular toxin is a daunting task. The appropriate biomarker for a particular toxin is a daunting task. The advantage to biomarker

  1. ACOG Technology Assessment No. 11: Genetics and molecular diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Human genetics and molecular testing are playing an increasingly important role in medicine, including obstetric and gynecologic practice. As the genetic basis for reproductive disorders, common diseases, and cancer is elucidated with improved molecular technology, genetic testing opportunities are expanding and influencing treatment options and prevention strategies. It is essential that obstetrician-gynecologists be aware of advances in the understanding of genetic disease and the fundamental principles of genetic screening and molecular testing as genetics becomes a more integral part of routine medical practice. This document reviews the basics of genetic transmission and genetic technologies in current use.

  2. [Molecular genetic investigation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)].

    PubMed

    Butorina, A K; Kornienko, A V

    2011-10-01

    Molecular genetic studies of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) are reviewed as a basis for the development of genomics of this species. The methods used to study structural and functional genomics are considered. The results and their application to increase the efficiency of sugar beet breeding are discussed.

  3. Central pattern generators deciphered by molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Kiehn, Ole; Kullander, Klas

    2004-02-05

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are localized neuronal networks that have the ability to produce rhythmic movements even in the absence of movement-related sensory feedback. They are found in all animals, including man, and serve as informative model systems for understanding how neuronal networks produce behavior. Traditionally, CPGs have been investigated with electrophysiological techniques. Here we review recent molecular and genetic approaches for dissecting the organization and development of CPGs.

  4. Molecular genetics of neuronal migration disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Judy S

    2011-04-01

    Cortical malformations associated with defects in neuronal migration result in severe developmental consequences including intractable epilepsy and intellectual disability. Genetic causes of migration defects have been identified with the advent and widespread use of high-resolution MRI and genetic techniques. Thus, the full phenotypic range of these genetic disorders is becoming apparent. Genes that cause lissencephaly, pachygyria, subcortical band heterotopia, and periventricular nodular heterotopias have been defined. Many of these genes are involved in cytoskeletal regulation including the function of microtubules (LIS1, TUBA1A,TUBB3, and DCX) and of actin (FilaminA). Thus, the molecular pathways regulating neuronal migration including the cytoskeletal pathways appear to be defined by human mutation syndromes. Basic science, including cell biology and animal models of these disorders, has informed our understanding of the pathogenesis of neuronal migration disorders and further progress depends on the continued integration of the clinical and basic sciences.

  5. Molecular genetic analysis of giant cell glioblastomas.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Puttlitz, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Waha, A.; Rollbrocker, B.; Boström, J.; Wiestler, O. D.; Louis, D. N.; Reifenberger, G.; von Deimling, A.

    1997-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Recently, distinct molecular genetic alterations have been linked to subgroups of patients with GBM. Giant cell (gc)GBMs are a rare variant of GBM characterized by a marked preponderance of multinucleated giant cells. Several reports have associated this entity with a more favorable prognosis than the majority of GBMs. To evaluate whether gcGBM may also represent a genetically defined subgroup of GBM, we analyzed a series of 19 gcGBMs for mutations in the TP53 gene for amplification of the EGFR and CDK4 genes and for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A (p16/MTS1) gene. Seventeen of nineteen gcGBMs carried TP53 mutations whereas EGFR and CDK4 gene amplification was seen in only one tumor each and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was not observed at all. The strikingly high incidence of TP53 mutations and the relative absence of other genetic alterations groups gcGBM together with a previously recognized molecular genetic variant of GBM (type 1 GBM). It is tempting to speculate that the better prognosis of gcGBM patients may result from the low incidence of EGFR amplification and CDKN2A deletion, changes known for their growth-promoting potential. Images Figure 1 PMID:9284834

  6. Heritability and molecular-genetic basis of the P3 event-related brain potential: A genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    MALONE, STEPHEN M.; VAIDYANATHAN, UMA; BASU, SAONLI; MILLER, MICHAEL B.; MCGUE, MATT; IACONO, WILLIAM G.

    2014-01-01

    P3 amplitude is a candidate endophenotype for disinhibitory psychopathology, psychosis, and other disorders. The present study is a comprehensive analysis of the behavioral- and molecular-genetic basis of P3 amplitude and a P3 genetic factor score in a large community sample (N = 4,211) of adolescent twins and their parents, genotyped for 527,829 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Biometric models indicated that as much as 65% of the variance in each measure was due to additive genes. All SNPs in aggregate accounted for approximately 40% to 50% of the heritable variance. However, analyses of individual SNPs did not yield any significant associations. Analyses of individual genes did not confirm previous associations between P3 amplitude and candidate genes but did yield a novel association with myelin expression factor 2 (MYEF2). Main effects of individual variants may be too small to be detected by GWAS without larger samples. PMID:25387705

  7. Molecular genetics of human obesity: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajan Kumar; Kumar, Permendra; Mahalingam, Kulandaivelu

    2017-02-01

    Obesity and its related health complications is a major problem worldwide. Hypothalamus and their signalling molecules play a critical role in the intervening and coordination with energy balance and homeostasis. Genetic factors play a crucial role in determining an individual's predisposition to the weight gain and being obese. In the past few years, several genetic variants were identified as monogenic forms of human obesity having success over common polygenic forms. In the context of molecular genetics, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) approach and their findings signified a number of genetic variants predisposing to obesity. However, the last couple of years, it has also been noticed that alterations in the environmental and epigenetic factors are one of the key causes of obesity. Hence, this review might be helpful in the current scenario of molecular genetics of human obesity, obesity-related health complications (ORHC), and energy homeostasis. Future work based on the clinical discoveries may play a role in the molecular dissection of genetic approaches to find more obesity-susceptible gene loci.

  8. Genetic variation and dopamine D2 receptor availability: a systematic review and meta-analysis of human in vivo molecular imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Gluskin, B S; Mickey, B J

    2016-01-01

    The D2 dopamine receptor mediates neuropsychiatric symptoms and is a target of pharmacotherapy. Inter-individual variation of D2 receptor density is thought to influence disease risk and pharmacological response. Numerous molecular imaging studies have tested whether common genetic variants influence D2 receptor binding potential (BP) in humans, but demonstration of robust effects has been limited by small sample sizes. We performed a systematic search of published human in vivo molecular imaging studies to estimate effect sizes of common genetic variants on striatal D2 receptor BP. We identified 21 studies examining 19 variants in 11 genes. The most commonly studied variant was a single-nucleotide polymorphism in ANKK1 (rs1800497, Glu713Lys, also called ‘Taq1A'). Fixed- and random-effects meta-analyses of this variant (5 studies, 194 subjects total) revealed that striatal BP was significantly and robustly lower among carriers of the minor allele (Lys713) relative to major allele homozygotes. The weighted standardized mean difference was −0.57 under the fixed-effect model (95% confidence interval=(−0.87, −0.27), P=0.0002). The normal relationship between rs1800497 and BP was not apparent among subjects with neuropsychiatric diseases. Significant associations with baseline striatal D2 receptor BP have been reported for four DRD2 variants (rs1079597, rs1076560, rs6277 and rs1799732) and a PER2 repeat polymorphism, but none have yet been tested in more than two independent samples. Our findings resolve apparent discrepancies in the literature and establish that rs1800497 robustly influences striatal D2 receptor availability. This genetic variant is likely to contribute to important individual differences in human striatal function, neuropsychiatric disease risk and pharmacological response. PMID:26926883

  9. Searching for non-genetic molecular and imaging PTSD risk and resilience markers: Systematic review of literature and design of the German Armed Forces PTSD biomarker study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulrike; Willmund, Gerd-Dieter; Holsboer, Florian; Wotjak, Carsten T; Gallinat, Jürgen; Kowalski, Jens T; Zimmermann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers allowing the identification of individuals with an above average vulnerability or resilience for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) would especially serve populations at high risk for trauma exposure like firefighters, police officers and combat soldiers. Aiming to identify the most promising putative PTSD vulnerability markers, we conducted the first systematic review on potential imaging and non-genetic molecular markers for PTSD risk and resilience. Following the PRISMA guidelines, we systematically screened the PubMed database for prospective longitudinal clinical studies and twin studies reporting on pre-trauma and post-trauma PTSD risk and resilience biomarkers. Using 25 different combinations of search terms, we retrieved 8151 articles of which we finally included and evaluated 9 imaging and 27 molecular studies. In addition, we briefly illustrate the design of the ongoing prospective German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) PTSD biomarker study (Bw-BioPTSD) which not only aims to validate these previous findings but also to identify novel and clinically applicable molecular, psychological and imaging risk, resilience and disease markers for deployment-related psychopathology in a cohort of German soldiers who served in Afghanistan.

  10. Genetics and molecular biology of hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Major strides in the molecular biology of essential hypertension are currently underway. This has tended to obscure the fact that a number of inherited disorders associated with low blood pressure exist and that these diseases may have milder and underrecognized phenotypes that contribute importantly to blood pressure variation in the general population. This review highlights some of the gene products that, if abnormal, could cause hypotension in some individuals. Diseases due to abnormalities in the catecholamine enzymes are discussed in detail. It is likely that genetic abnormalities with hypotensive phenotypes will be as interesting and diverse as those that give rise to hypertensive disorders.

  11. Molecular genetics of human lactase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Irma; Torniainen, Suvi; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2009-01-01

    Lactase non-persistence (adult-type hypolactasia) is present in more than half of the human population and is caused by the down-regulation of lactase enzyme activity during childhood. Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a rare severe gastrointestinal disorder of new-borns enriched in the Finnish population. Both lactase deficiencies are autosomal recessive traits and characterized by diminished expression of lactase activity in the intestine. Genetic variants underlying both forms have been identified. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular defects of human lactase deficiencies and their phenotype-genotype correlation, the implications on clinical practice, and the understanding of their function and role in human evolution.

  12. Genetic diversity and molecular phylogeny of Anaplasma marginale studied longitudinally under natural transmission conditions in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jenevaldo Barbosa; Gonçalves, Luiz Ricardo; Varani, Alessandro de Mello; André, Marcos Rogério; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias

    2015-06-01

    Anaplasma marginale is the most prevalent tick-borne pathogen in cattle in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Major Surface Protein 1a (MSP1a) has been found to be a stable genetic marker for identifying A. marginale isolates within geographical regions. It is conserved in cattle during infection and tick-borne transmission of the pathogen. The aim of the present longitudinal study was to determine occurrences of genetic diversity associated with high prevalence of A. marginale under natural transmission conditions. Twenty calves were evaluated every 3 months during the first year of life. Rickettsemia levels due to A. marginale, measured as the number of msp1αcopies/ml in the blood of positive calves, ranged from 2.06×10(3) to 4.36×10(12). The numbers of MSP1a tandem repeats among MSP1a tandem repeats were 3 and 6. The predominant msp1α microsatellite was E, and another MSP1a tandem repeat was found that presented genotype G. Nineteen different MSP1a tandem repeats of A. marginale were found circulating in animals. The MSP1a tandem repeats 4-63-27 (27.5%), 78-24(2)-25-31 (n=21.6%) and τ-10(2)-15 (n=17.6%) were the ones most commonly observed. Twenty-two MSP1a tandem repeats resulted in new sequences with amino acid changes, as shown in this study. Thirty sequences were found for the first time in Brazil. Glycine, glutamate, serine and alanine amino acids were found at position 20. During the study, 80% (16/20) of the animals were infected by more than one genotype. Three animals were born infected, with MSP1a tandem repeats 4-63-27, 78-24(2)-25-31 and τ-10(2)-15, thus indicating occurrence of transplacental transmission. In the phylogenetic analysis, 19 different MSP1a tandem repeats of A. marginale were found in the cattle, which suggested that many MSP1a tandem repeats and high variation in MSP1a were occurring.

  13. Of mice and men: molecular genetics of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1 % of the population. It is a complex disease, which may be caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studies in human genetics have led to the identification of more than 50 human genes, involved in isolated CHD or genetic syndromes, where CHD is part of the phenotype. Furthermore, mapping of genomic copy number variants and exome sequencing of CHD patients have led to the identification of a large number of candidate disease genes. Experiments in animal models, particularly in mice, have been used to verify human disease genes and to gain further insight into the molecular pathology behind CHD. The picture emerging from these studies suggest that genetic lesions associated with CHD affect a broad range of cellular signaling components, from ligands and receptors, across down-stream effector molecules to transcription factors and co-factors, including chromatin modifiers.

  14. The Cohesive Population Genetics of Molecular Drive

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Tomoko; Dover, Gabriel A.

    1984-01-01

    The long-term population genetics of multigene families is influenced by several biased and unbiased mechanisms of nonreciprocal exchanges (gene conversion, unequal exchanges, transposition) between member genes, often distributed on several chromosomes. These mechanisms cause fluctuations in the copy number of variant genes in an individual and lead to a gradual replacement of an original family of n genes (A) in N number of individuals by a variant gene (a). The process for spreading a variant gene through a family and through a population is called molecular drive. Consideration of the known slow rates of nonreciprocal exchanges predicts that the population variance in the copy number of gene a per individual is small at any given generation during molecular drive. Genotypes at a given generation are expected only to range over a small section of all possible genotypes from one extreme (n number of A) to the other (n number of a). A theory is developed for estimating the size of the population variance by using the concept of identity coefficients. In particular, the variance in the course of spreading of a single mutant gene of a multigene family was investigated in detail, and the theory of identity coefficients at the state of steady decay of genetic variability proved to be useful. Monte Carlo simulations and numerical analysis based on realistic rates of exchange in families of known size reveal the correctness of the theoretical prediction and also assess the effect of bias in turnover. The population dynamics of molecular drive in gradually increasing the mean copy number of a variant gene without the generation of a large variance (population cohesion) is of significance regarding potential interactions between natural selection and molecular drive. PMID:6500260

  15. Molecular population genetic analysis of emerged bacterial pathogens: selected insights.

    PubMed Central

    Musser, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Research in bacterial population genetics has increased in the last 10 years. Population genetic theory and tools and related strategies have been used to investigate bacterial pathogens that have contributed to recent episodes of temporal variation in disease frequency and severity. A common theme demonstrated by these analyses is that distinct bacterial clones are responsible for disease outbreaks and increases in infection frequency. Many of these clones are characterized by unique combinations of virulence genes or alleles of virulence genes. Because substantial interclonal variance exists in relative virulence, molecular population genetic studies have led to the concept that the unit of bacterial pathogenicity is the clone or cell line. Continued new insights into host parasite interactions at the molecular level will be achieved by combining clonal analysis of bacterial pathogens with large-scale comparative sequencing of virulence genes. PMID:8903193

  16. Molecular and genetic ecotoxicologic approaches to aquatic environmental bioreporting.

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, B J; Black, W C; Carlson, J O; Clements, W H; DuTeau, N; Harrahy, E; Nuckols, J; Kenneth, E; Olson, K E; Rayms-Keller, A

    1998-01-01

    Molecular and population genetic ecotoxicologic approaches are being developed for the utilization of arthropods as bioreporters of heavy metal mixtures in the environment. The explosion of knowledge in molecular biology, molecular genetics, and biotechnology provides an unparalleled opportunity to use arthropods as bioreporter organisms. Interspecific differences in aquatic arthropod populations have been previously demonstrated in response to heavy metal insult in the Arkansas River (AR) California Gulch Superfund site (CGSS). Population genetic analyses were conducted on the mayfly Baetis tricaudatus. Genetic polymorphisms were detected in polymerase chain reaction amplified 16S mitochondrial rDNA (a selectively neutral gene) of B tricaudatus using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Genetic differences may have resulted from impediments to gene flow in the population caused by mortality arising from exposure to heavy metal mixture pollution. In laboratory studies a candidate metal-responsive mucinlike gene, which is metal and dose specific, has been identified in Chironomus tentans and other potential AR-CGSS bioreporter species. Population genetic analyses using the mucinlike gene may provide insight into the role of this selectable gene in determining the breeding structure of B. tricaudatus in the AR-CGSS and may provide mechanistic insight into determinants of aquatic arthropod response to heavy metal insult. Metal-responsive (MR) genes and regulatory sequences are being isolated, characterized, and assayed for differential gene expression in response to heavy metal mixture pollution in the AR-CGSS. Identified promoter sequences can then be engineered into previously developed MR constructs to provide sensitive in vitro assays for environmental bioreporting of heavy metal mixtures. The results of the population genetic studies are being entered into an AR geographic information system that contains substantial biological, chemical, and

  17. Functional genomics bridges the gap between quantitative genetics and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-10-01

    Deep characterization of molecular function of genetic variants in the human genome is becoming increasingly important for understanding genetic associations to disease and for learning to read the regulatory code of the genome. In this paper, I discuss how recent advances in both quantitative genetics and molecular biology have contributed to understanding functional effects of genetic variants, lessons learned from eQTL studies, and future challenges in this field.

  18. Impact of molecular genetic research on peanut cultivar development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) has lagged other crops on use of molecular genetic technology for cultivar development in part due to lack of investment, but also because of low levels of molecular polymorphism among cultivated varieties. Recent advances in molecular genetic technology have allowed res...

  19. [Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Panduro Cerda, A; Lima González, G; Villalobos, J J

    1993-01-01

    Genetic and environmental aspects play an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. However, the common molecular alteration in both hereditary and sporadic colon cancer is localized in the APC gene. the APC gene maps in the long arm of chromosome 5 and was discovered in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). The search for the APC gene led to the identification of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in FAP patients. Using these RFLPs in relatives of FAP patients it is possible to make the presymptomatic and prenatal diagnosis. The FAP syndrome is an interesting model of carcinogenesis in vivo. Thus the different stages involved in the FAP syndrome which include hyperproliferative epithelium, adenoma, adenocarcinoma and metastases, have allowed the analysis of molecular alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The APC gene alteration if not inherited, occurs as the earliest molecular alteration in the development of colorectal cancer whereas structural alterations of the genes myc, ras, p53, MCC and DCC are considered to be late events. All these investigations have lead to 1) a better understanding of the ethiology of cancer and 2) early diagnosis of colorectal cancer in both the hereditary and sporadic forms of the disease.

  20. Molecular phylogenetic study on few morphotypes of a patellogastropod Cellana karachiensis from northern Arabian Sea reveals unexpected genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sneha; Vakani, Bhavik; Kundu, Rahul

    2016-12-26

    A group of limpets, Cellana karachiensis, exhibiting phenotypic plasticity were examined from Gujarat coastline India, using molecular phylogeny. Previous examination of the COI genes established the presence of three different haplotypes X, Y and Z, while present study showed three more haplotypes X1, X2 and Z1. Thus, a total of six COI gene haplotypes, having 99.23% to 99.85% sequence similarity, were observed with variations at six sites. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis shows divergence of lineages X-Y, X1-X2 and Z-Z1. Careful observation of nucleotide alterations showed a nonrandom mutation with more A↔G and C↔T transitions between closely related species of the genus Cellana. A stretch of 17 base pair, within COI region, was marked as region with high degree of variability between species of Cellana. Results suggest that this could be the beginning of speciation, with partial or complete reproductive barrier or these are already distinct species in different stages of evolution.

  1. Molecular patterns in deficient mismatch repair colorectal tumours: results from a French prospective multicentric biological and genetic study

    PubMed Central

    Etienne-Grimaldi, M-C; Mahamat, A; Chazal, M; Laurent-Puig, P; Olschwang, S; Gaub, M-P; Formento, J-L; Formento, P; Sudaka, A; Boige, V; Abderrahim-Ferkoune, A; Benchimol, D; André, T; Houry, S; Faucheron, J-L; Letoublon, C; Gilly, F-N; Delpero, J-R; Lasser, P; Pradere, B; Pezet, D; Penault-Llorca, F; Milano, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: To test the prognostic value of tumour protein and genetic markers in colorectal cancer (CRC) and examine whether deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) tumours had a distinct profile relative to proficient mismatch repair (pMMR) tumours. Methods: This prospective multicentric study involved 251 stage I–III CRC patients. Analysed biomarkers were EGFR (binding assay), VEGFA, thymidylate synthase (TS), thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) expressions, MMR status, mutations of KRAS (codons 12–13), BRAF (V600E), PIK3CA (exons 9 and 20), APC (exon 15) and P53 (exons 4–9), CpG island methylation phenotype status, ploidy, S-phase, LOH. Results: The only significant predictor of relapse-free survival (RFS) was tumour staging. Analyses restricted to stage III showed a trend towards a shorter RFS in KRAS-mutated (P=0.005), BRAF wt (P=0.009) and pMMR tumours (P=0.036). Deficient mismatch repair tumours significantly demonstrated higher TS (median 3.1 vs 1.4) and TP (median 5.8 vs 3.5) expression relative to pMMR (P<0.001) and show higher DPD expression (median 14.9 vs 7.9, P=0.027) and EGFR content (median 69 vs 38, P=0.037) relative to pMMR. Conclusions: Present data suggesting that both TS and DPD are overexpressed in dMMR tumours as compared with pMMR tumours provide a strong rationale that may explain the resistance of dMMR tumours to 5FU-based therapy. PMID:24800948

  2. SITVITWEB--a publicly available international multimarker database for studying Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Demay, Christophe; Liens, Benjamin; Burguière, Thomas; Hill, Véronique; Couvin, David; Millet, Julie; Mokrousov, Igor; Sola, Christophe; Zozio, Thierry; Rastogi, Nalin

    2012-06-01

    Among various genotyping methods to study Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) genotypic polymorphism, spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of DNA tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs) have recently gained international approval as robust, fast, and reproducible typing methods generating data in a portable format. Spoligotyping constituted the backbone of a publicly available database SpolDB4 released in 2006; nonetheless this method possesses a low discriminatory power when used alone and should be ideally used in conjunction with a second typing method such as MIRU-VNTRs for high-resolution epidemiological studies. We hereby describe a publicly available international database named SITVITWEB which incorporates such multimarker data allowing to have a global vision of MTC genetic diversity worldwide based on 62,582 clinical isolates corresponding to 153 countries of patient origin (105 countries of isolation). We report a total of 7105 spoligotype patterns (corresponding to 58,180 clinical isolates) - grouped into 2740 shared-types or spoligotype international types (SIT) containing 53,816 clinical isolates and 4364 orphan patterns. Interestingly, only 7% of the MTC isolates worldwide were orphans whereas more than half of SITed isolates (n=27,059) were restricted to only 24 most prevalent SITs. The database also contains a total of 2379 MIRU patterns (from 8161 clinical isolates) from 87 countries of patient origin (35 countries of isolation); these were grouped in 847 shared-types or MIRU international types (MIT) containing 6626 isolates and 1533 orphan patterns. Lastly, data on 5-locus exact tandem repeats (ETRs) were available on 4626 isolates from 59 countries of patient origin (22 countries of isolation); a total of 458 different VNTR patterns were observed - split into 245 shared-types or VNTR International Types (VIT) containing 4413 isolates) and 213 orphan patterns. Datamining of SITVITWEB further allowed to update

  3. An inbred line of the diploid strawberry Fragaria vesca f. semperflorens for genomic and molecular genetic studies in the Rosaceae

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    a small genome, a seed to seed cycle of 3.0 - 3.5 months, and produce fruit in 7.5 cm pots in a growth chamber. YW5AF7 is runnerless and therefore easy to maintain in the greenhouse, forms abundant branch crowns for vegetative propagation, and produces highly aromatic yellow fruit throughout the year in the greenhouse. F. vesca can be transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens, making these plants suitable for insertional mutagenesis, RNAi and overexpression studies that can be compared against a stable baseline of phenotypic descriptors and can be readily genetically substantiated. PMID:19878589

  4. Empirical Refinements of a Molecular Genetics Learning Progression: The Molecular Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Amber; Kenyon, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article describes revisions to four of the eight constructs of the Duncan molecular genetics learning progression [Duncan, Rogat, & Yarden, (2009)]. As learning progressions remain hypothetical models until validated by multiple rounds of empirical studies, these revisions are an important step toward validating the progression. Our…

  5. Update on the Molecular Genetics of Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QING K.

    2006-01-01

    Genetic factors play a critical role in the pathogenesis of vascular anomalies. Significant advances have been made in recent years in identifying the genetic and molecular determinants of a variety of vascular anomalies using a molecular genetic approach. Several genes for vascular anomalies have been identified. These genes include AGGF1 for Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, RASA1 for capillary malformations, KRIT1, MGC4607, PDCD10 for cerebral cavernous malformations, glomulin for glomuvenous malformations, TIE2 for multiple cutaneous and mucosal venous malformations, VEGFR-3, FOXC2, NEMO, SOX18 for lymphedema or related syndromes, ENG, ACVRLK1, MADH4 for HHT or related syndromes, NDP for Coats’ disease, Notch3 for CADASIL, and PTEN for Proteus Syndrome. These findings have made genetic testing possible in some clinical cases, and may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for vascular anomalies. Furthermore, these studies have identified critical genes involved in vascular morphogenesis, and provided fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. PMID:16379592

  6. Update on the molecular genetics of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing K

    2005-01-01

    Genetic factors play a critical role in the pathogenesis of vascular anomalies. Significant advances have been made in recent years in identifying the genetic and molecular determinants of a variety of vascular anomalies using a molecular genetic approach. Several genes for vascular anomalies have been identified. These genes include AGGF1 for Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, RASA1 for capillary malformations, KRIT1, MGC4607, PDCD10 for cerebral cavernous malformations, glomulin for glomuvenous malformations, TIE2 for multiple cutaneous and mucosal venous malformations, VEGFR-3, FOXC2, NEMO, SOX18 for lymphedema or related syndromes, ENG, ACVRLK1, MADH4 for HHT or related syndromes, NDP for Coats' disease, Notch3 for CADASIL, and PTEN for Proteus Syndrome. These findings have made genetic testing possible in some clinical cases, and may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for vascular anomalies. Furthermore, these studies have identified critical genes involved in vascular morphogenesis, and provided fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.

  7. Chondrosarcoma: with updates on molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Jung; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2011-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma (CHS) is a malignant cartilage-forming tumor and usually occurs within the medullary canal of long bones and pelvic bones. Based on the morphologic feature alone, a correct diangosis of CHS may be difficult, Therefore, correlation of radiological and clinicopathological features is mandatory in the diagnosis of CHS. The prognosis of CHS is closely related to histologic grading, however, histologic grading may be subjective with high inter-observer variability. In this paper, we present histologic grading system and clinicopathological and radiological findings of conventional CHS. Subtypes of CHSs, such as dedifferentiated, mesenchymal, and clear cell CHSs are also presented. In addition, we introduce updated cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings to expand our understanding of CHS biology. New markers of cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell signaling might offer important therapeutic and prognostic information in near future.

  8. Obesity: genetic, molecular, and environmental aspects.

    PubMed

    Barness, Lewis A; Opitz, John M; Gilbert-Barness, Enid

    2007-12-15

    Obesity has emerged as one of the most serious public health concerns in the 21st century. Obese children tend to become obese adults. The dramatic rise in pediatric obesity closely parallels the rapid increase in the prevalence of adult obesity. As overweight children become adults they face the multitude of health problems associated with obesity at younger ages. The morbidity and mortality associated with obesity continue to increase. Obesity is one of the leading causes of preventable death. Complications of obesity include cardiovascular risks, hypertension, dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction, type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance, acanthosis nigricans, hepatic steatosis, premature puberty, hypogonadism and polycystic ovary syndrome, obstructive sleep disorder, orthopedic complications, cholelithiasis and pseudotumor cerebri. Genetic and molecular and environmental factors play an important role in the assessment and management of obesity.

  9. Molecular genetics and subjective well-being.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Cornelius A; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J; Koellinger, Philipp D; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Tiemeier, Henning; Johannesson, Magnus; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Krueger, Robert F; Bartels, Meike

    2013-06-11

    Subjective well-being (SWB) is a major topic of research across the social sciences. Twin and family studies have found that genetic factors may account for as much as 30-40% of the variance in SWB. Here, we study genetic contributions to SWB in a pooled sample of ≈ 11,500 unrelated, comprehensively-genotyped Swedish and Dutch individuals. We apply a recently developed method to estimate "common narrow heritability": the fraction of variance in SWB that can be explained by the cumulative additive effects of genetic polymorphisms that are common in the population. Our estimates are 5-10% for single-question survey measures of SWB, and 12-18% after correction for measurement error in the SWB measures. Our results suggest guarded optimism about the prospects of using genetic data in SWB research because, although the common narrow heritability is not large, the polymorphisms that contribute to it could feasibly be discovered with a sufficiently large sample of individuals.

  10. Molecular genetics and subjective well-being

    PubMed Central

    Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Koellinger, Philipp D.; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Tiemeier, Henning; Johannesson, Magnus; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Krueger, Robert F.; Bartels, Meike

    2013-01-01

    Subjective well-being (SWB) is a major topic of research across the social sciences. Twin and family studies have found that genetic factors may account for as much as 30–40% of the variance in SWB. Here, we study genetic contributions to SWB in a pooled sample of ≈11,500 unrelated, comprehensively-genotyped Swedish and Dutch individuals. We apply a recently developed method to estimate “common narrow heritability”: the fraction of variance in SWB that can be explained by the cumulative additive effects of genetic polymorphisms that are common in the population. Our estimates are 5–10% for single-question survey measures of SWB, and 12–18% after correction for measurement error in the SWB measures. Our results suggest guarded optimism about the prospects of using genetic data in SWB research because, although the common narrow heritability is not large, the polymorphisms that contribute to it could feasibly be discovered with a sufficiently large sample of individuals. PMID:23708117

  11. Molecular Genetic Tools and Techniques for Marchantia polymorpha Research.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    Liverworts occupy a basal position in the evolution of land plants, and are a key group to address a wide variety of questions in plant biology. Marchantia polymorpha is a common, easily cultivated, dioecious liverwort species, and is emerging as an experimental model organism. The haploid gametophytic generation dominates the diploid sporophytic generation in its life cycle. Genetically homogeneous lines in the gametophyte generation can be established easily and propagated through asexual reproduction, which aids genetic and biochemical experiments. Owing to its dioecy, male and female sexual organs are formed in separate individuals, which enables crossing in a fully controlled manner. Reproductive growth can be induced at the desired times under laboratory conditions, which helps genetic analysis. The developmental process from a single-celled spore to a multicellular body can be observed directly in detail. As a model organism, molecular techniques for M. polymorpha are well developed; for example, simple and efficient protocols of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation have been established. Based on them, various strategies for molecular genetics, such as introduction of reporter constructs, overexpression, gene silencing and targeted gene modification, are available. Herein, we describe the technologies and resources for reverse and forward genetics in M. polymorpha, which offer an excellent experimental platform to study the evolution and diversity of regulatory systems in land plants.

  12. Biosynthesis and Molecular Genetics of Polyketides in Marine Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Kellmann, Ralf; Stüken, Anke; Orr, Russell J. S.; Svendsen, Helene M.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.

    2010-01-01

    Marine dinoflagellates are the single most important group of algae that produce toxins, which have a global impact on human activities. The toxins are chemically diverse, and include macrolides, cyclic polyethers, spirolides and purine alkaloids. Whereas there is a multitude of studies describing the pharmacology of these toxins, there is limited or no knowledge regarding the biochemistry and molecular genetics involved in their biosynthesis. Recently, however, exciting advances have been made. Expressed sequence tag sequencing studies have revealed important insights into the transcriptomes of dinoflagellates, whereas other studies have implicated polyketide synthase genes in the biosynthesis of cyclic polyether toxins, and the molecular genetic basis for the biosynthesis of paralytic shellfish toxins has been elucidated in cyanobacteria. This review summarises the recent progress that has been made regarding the unusual genomes of dinoflagellates, the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of dinoflagellate toxins. In addition, the evolution of these metabolic pathways will be discussed, and an outlook for future research and possible applications is provided. PMID:20479965

  13. Molecular genetic analysis of archival gliomas using diagnostic smears.

    PubMed

    Walker, C; Joyce, K; Du Plessis, D; MacHell, Y; Sibson, D R; Broome, J

    2000-10-01

    Investigation of the clinical significance of genetic alterations in gliomas requires molecular genetic analysis using samples from retrospective or prospective clinical studies. However, diagnostic tissue is often severely limited and because of fixation, paraffin-embedded tissues (PET) contain degraded DNA. Intra-operative cytological preparations (smears) archived after diagnosis may represent an additional source of clinical material for genetic analysis. In this study, tissue samples were obtained by precision microdissection of archived diagnostic smears from 20 cases (1961-1999). All samples produced polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products for the beta globin gene, but the most recent samples amplified best and gave longer amplimers. For six cases, direct comparison was made between samples microdissected from smears and the corresponding PET. Samples from smears showed improved PCR performance and similar alleles on microsatellite marker analysis. One case, with smears of uninvolved cortex and tumour tissue available for microdissection, showed allelic imbalance at 10q23 on the basis of the smear results alone. PCR products from smears were shown to be suitable for direct sequence analysis (p53 gene). A PTEN mutation, found previously in an anaplastic astrocytoma by analysis of PET, was detected in the corresponding diagnostic smear. The results of this study indicate that tissue samples microdissected from diagnostic intra-operative cytological preparations may be suitable for molecular genetic analysis of gliomas.

  14. Myeloproliferative neoplasms: Current molecular biology and genetics.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Kolsoum

    2016-02-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal disorders characterized by increased production of mature blood cells. Philadelphia chromosome-negative MPNs (Ph-MPNs) consist of polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). A number of stem cell derived mutations have been identified in the past 10 years. These findings showed that JAK2V617F, as a diagnostic marker involving JAK2 exon 14 with a high frequency, is the best molecular characterization of Ph-MPNs. Somatic mutations in an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, named calreticulin (CALR), is the second most common mutation in patients with ET and PMF after JAK2 V617F mutation. Discovery of CALR mutations led to the increased molecular diagnostic of ET and PMF up to 90%. It has been shown that JAK2V617F is not the unique event in disease pathogenesis. Some other genes' location such as TET oncogene family member 2 (TET2), additional sex combs-like 1 (ASXL1), casitas B-lineage lymphoma proto-oncogene (CBL), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH1/IDH2), IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1), DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS), enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), tumor protein p53 (TP53), runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) and high mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) have also identified to be involved in MPNs phenotypes. Here, current molecular biology and genetic mechanisms involved in MNPs with a focus on the aforementioned factors is presented.

  15. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-08-19

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients.

  16. Molecular genetics of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Shastry, Barkur S

    2003-01-01

    Autistic disorder belongs to a broad spectrum of pervasive developmental disorders. Autism is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition. It is characterized by impairment in a broad range of social interactions, communication, and repetitive patterns of behavior and interest. Although the exact etiology of the condition is not known, family and twin studies strongly support genetic factors in autism. Genome-wide scans suggest several susceptibility loci that may contain one or more predisposing genes. However, no such genes have been identified so far that predispose patients to autism. The condition is over 90% heritable, but the mode of inheritance is not clear. Moreover, it does not seem to be a single gene disorder. There is no cure for autism. Individualized structured education, family support services, and antipsychotic drugs are recommended. These may alleviate some behavioral problems. The identification of autism genes, an understanding of the neurobiology of the condition, and additional clinical studies may help to develop pharmacological interventions in the future.

  17. Familial renal cell carcinoma: clinical and molecular genetic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Maher, E.R.; Yates, J.R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2% of all human cancer, but familial cases are infrequent. Riches (1963) and Griffin et al. (1984) in a population-based case-control study found a family history of renal cell carcinoma in 2.4% of affected patients compared to 1.4% of controls. Nevertheless the importance of inherited tumours in clinical practice and medical research is disproportionate to their frequency. In clinical practice recognition of familial RCC can provide opportunities to prevent morbidity and mortality by appropriate screening. In medical research recent advances in molecular genetics offer the prospect of isolating the genes involved in the pathogenesis of familial RCC and of the more common sporadic cases. In this article we review the clinical and molecular genetics of inherited renal cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma). PMID:1997093

  18. Molecular Genetics of Beauveria bassiana Infection of Insects.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Urquiza, A; Keyhani, N O

    2016-01-01

    Research on the insect pathogenic filamentous fungus, Beauveria bassiana has witnessed significant growth in recent years from mainly physiological studies related to its insect biological control potential, to addressing fundamental questions regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms of fungal development and virulence. This has been in part due to a confluence of robust genetic tools and genomic resources for the fungus, and recognition of expanded ecological interactions with which the fungus engages. Beauveria bassiana is a broad host range insect pathogen that has the ability to form intimate symbiotic relationships with plants. Indeed, there is an increasing realization that the latter may be the predominant environmental interaction in which the fungus participates, and that insect parasitism may be an opportunist lifestyle evolved due to the carbon- and nitrogen-rich resources present in insect bodies. Here, we will review progress on the molecular genetics of B. bassiana, which has largely been directed toward identifying genetic pathways involved in stress response and virulence assumed to have practical applications in improving the insect control potential of the fungus. Important strides have also been made in understanding aspects of B. bassiana development. Finally, although increasingly apparent in a number of studies, there is a need for progressing beyond phenotypic mutant characterization to sufficiently investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying B. bassiana's unique and diverse lifestyles as saprophyte, insect pathogen, and plant mutualist.

  19. Child Development and Molecular Genetics: 14 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen years ago, the first article on molecular genetics was published in this journal: "Child Development, Molecular Genetics, and What to Do With Genes Once They Are Found" (R. Plomin & M. Rutter, 1998). The goal of the article was to outline what developmentalists can do with genes once they are found. These new directions for developmental…

  20. Reasoning across Ontologically Distinct Levels: Students' Understandings of Molecular Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Ravit Golan; Reiser, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we apply a novel analytical framework to explore students' difficulties in understanding molecular genetics--a domain that is particularly challenging to learn. Our analytical framework posits that reasoning in molecular genetics entails mapping across ontologically distinct levels--an information level containing the genetic…

  1. Improved Student Linkage of Mendelian and Molecular Genetic Concepts through a Yeast-Based Laboratory Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolyniak, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A study of modern genetics requires students to successfully unite the principles of Mendelian genetics with the functions of DNA. Traditional means of teaching genetics are often successful in teaching Mendelian and molecular ideas but not in allowing students to see how the two subjects relate. The laboratory module presented here attempts to…

  2. Molecular genetics of childhood, adolescent and young adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Rodney R.; Shah, Rikin K.; Frazer, J. Kimble

    2017-01-01

    Summary Molecular genetic abnormalities are ubiquitous in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but genetic changes are not yet used to define specific lymphoma subtypes. Certain recurrent molecular genetic abnormalities in NHL underlie molecular pathogenesis and/or are associated with prognosis or represent potential therapeutic targets. Most molecular genetic studies of B- and T-NHL have been performed on adult patient samples, and the relevance of many of these findings for childhood, adolescent and young adult NHL remains to be demonstrated. In this review, we focus on NHL subtypes that are most common in young patients and emphasize features actually studied in younger NHL patients. This approach highlights what is known about NHL genetics in young patients but also points to gaps that remain, which will require cooperative efforts to collect and share biological specimens for genomic and genetic analyses in order to help predict outcomes and guide therapy in the future. PMID:26969846

  3. Molecular genetics of left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Towbin, J A; Bowles, N E

    2001-03-01

    The left ventricle (LV) plays a central role in the maintenance of health of children and adults due to its role as the major pump of the heart. In cases of LV dysfunction, a significant percentage of affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure (CHF), leading to the need for therapeutic intervention. Therapy for these patients include anticongestive medications and, in some, placement of devices such as aortic balloon pump or left ventricular assist device (LVAD), or cardiac transplantation. In the majority of patients the etiology is unknown, leading to the term idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). During the past decade, the basis of LV dysfunction has begun to unravel. In approximately 30-40% of cases, the disorder is inherited; autosomal dominant inheritance is most common (although X-linked, autosomal recessive and mitochondrial inheritance occurs). In the remaining patients, the disorder is presumed to be acquired, with inflammatory heart disease playing an important role. In the case of familial dilated cardiomyopathy (FDCM), the genetic basis is beginning to unfold. To date, two genes for X-linked FDCM (dystrophin, G4.5) have been identified and four genes for the autosomal dominant form (actin, desmin, lamin A/C, delta-sarcoglycan) have been described. In one form of inflammatory heart disease, coxsackievirus myocarditis, inflammatory mediators and dystrophin cleavage play a role in the development of LV dysfunction. In this review, we will describe the molecular genetics of LV dysfunction and provide evidence for a "final common pathway" responsible for the phenotype.

  4. Molecular genetics at the Fort Collins Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, S.J.; Stevens, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Fort Collins Science Center operates a molecular genetic and systematics research facility (FORT Molecular Ecology Laboratory) that uses molecular genetic tools to provide genetic information needed to inform natural resource management decisions. For many wildlife species, the data generated have become increasingly important in the development of their long-term management strategies, leading to a better understanding of species diversity, population dynamics and ecology, and future conservation and management needs. The Molecular Ecology Lab serves Federal research and resource management agencies by developing scientifically rigorous research programs using nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA to help address many of today's conservation biology and natural resource management issues.

  5. [Molecular genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai-Xian

    2005-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major type of primary liver cancer and one of the most frequent human malignant neoplasms. Common risk factors of human HCC include chronic hepatitis virus (HBV and HCV) infection, dietary aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) ingestion, chronic alcohol abuse, and cirrhosis associated with genetic liver diseases. Hepatocarcinogenesis is the result of interaction between hereditary and environmental factors. Inheritance determines individual susceptibility to cancer; environment determines which susceptible individuals express cancer. Studies of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis showed that HCC development is a complex polygene and multipathway process; the activation of proto-oncogenes and the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes induced by genetic and epigenetic alterations are core biological processes of hepatocarcinogenesis; RB1, p53, and Wnt pathways are commonly affected in HCCs of different etiologies, which may reflect common pathologic sequence of HCC: chronic liver injury, cirrhosis, atypical hyperplastic nodules, and HCC of early stages. Hepatitis virus infection-associated HCCs have frequent alterations in RB1 pathway, including methylation of p16INK4a and RB1 genes and amplification of Cyclin D1. AFB1 exposure-associated HCCs have frequent alterations in p53 pathway; the G-->T mutation of p53 gene at codon 249 has been identified as a genetic hallmark of HCC caused by AFB1. Alcoholism-associated HCCs have frequent alterations in both RB1 and p53 pathways. The roles of some important genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA repair, drug metabolism, and tumor metastasis in hepatocarcinogenesis had been discussed.

  6. Molecular Regulation of Sexual Preference Revealed by Genetic Studies of 5-HT in the Brain of Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Jiang, Yun’ai; Si, Yunxia; Kim, Ji-Young; Chen, Zhou-Feng; Rao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    To whom should a male directs his mating? While it is a critical social interaction, little is known about molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling mammalian sexual preference. Here we report that the neurotransmitter 5-HT is required for male sexual preference. Male mice lacking central serotonergic neurons lost sexual preference but were not generally defective in olfaction. A role for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) was demonstrated by the phenotype of mice unable to synthesize 5-HT in the brain when lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2). 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) injection rescued the phenotype of adult Tph2 knockout mice within 35 minutes. These results indicate that 5-HT and serotonergic neurons in the adult brain regulate mammalian sexual preference. PMID:21441904

  7. Classification and genetic features of neonatal haemochromatosis: a study of 27 affected pedigrees and molecular analysis of genes implicated in iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, A.; Lunt, P.; Rodrigues, F.; Berry, P; Flynn, D.; McKiernan, P.; Kelly, D.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Cox, T.

    2001-01-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis (NH) is a severe and newly recognised syndrome of uncertain aetiology, characterised by congenital cirrhosis or fulminant hepatitis and widespread tissue iron deposition. NH occurs in the context of maternal disease including viral infection, as a complication of metabolic disease in the fetus, and sporadically or recurrently, without overt cause, in sibs. Although an underlying genetic basis for NH has been suspected, no test is available for predictive analysis in at risk pregnancies.
  As a first step towards an understanding of the putative genetic basis for neonatal haemochromatosis, we have conducted a systematic study of the mode of transmission of this disorder in a total of 40 infants born to 27 families. We have moreover carried out a molecular analysis of candidate genes (β2-microglobulin, HFE, and haem oxygenases 1 and 2) implicated in iron metabolism. No pathogenic mutations in these genes were identified that segregate consistently with the disease phenotype in multiplex pedigrees. However, excluding four pedigrees with clear evidence of maternal infection associated with NH, a pedigree showing transmission of maternal antinuclear factor and ribonucleoprotein antibodies to the affected infants, and two families with possible matrilineal inheritance of disease in maternal half sibs, a large subgroup of the affected pedigrees point to the inheritance of an autosomal recessive trait. This included 14 pedigrees with affected and unaffected infants and a single pedigree where all four affected infants were the sole offspring of consanguineous but otherwise healthy parents.
  We thus report three distinct patterns of disease transmission in neonatal haemochromatosis. In the differentiation of a large subgroup showing transmission of disease in a manner suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance, we also provide the basis for further genome wide studies to define chromosomal determinants of iron storage disease in the

  8. Interaction of genetic counselors with molecular genetic testing laboratories: implications for non-geneticist health care providers.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Margaret M; Benach, Marta; Zinberg, Randi

    2003-06-15

    The availability of molecular genetic tests for the identification of mutant gene carriers, and for assessing individual genetic response to pharmacologic agents, infectious agents, and other environmental exposures, is expected to result in the increased use of the molecular genetic testing laboratory by primary care physicians. However, a number of concerns have been raised about such testing including the need for safeguards to protect patient privacy, and if the interface between genetic testing laboratories and the ordering physician facilitates the appropriate clinical use of the test result. In this study, genetic counselors were surveyed to determine their practices with regard to the clinical issues of informed consent and confidentiality in the context of genetic testing, and to assess their level of satisfaction with the reporting practices of molecular genetic testing laboratories. The results of this survey revealed that there is variability in the practices of genetic counselors with regard to obtaining informed consent, and that there are areas for improvement with regard to molecular genetic test reports, particularly in terms of interpretation of results.

  9. Molecular regulation of sexual preference revealed by genetic studies of 5-HT in the brains of male mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Jiang, Yun'ai; Si, Yunxia; Kim, Ji-Young; Chen, Zhou-Feng; Rao, Yi

    2011-04-07

    Although the question of to whom a male directs his mating attempts is a critical one in social interactions, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling mammalian sexual preference. Here we report that the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is required for male sexual preference. Wild-type male mice preferred females over males, but males lacking central serotonergic neurons lost sexual preference although they were not generally defective in olfaction or in pheromone sensing. A role for 5-HT was demonstrated by the phenotype of mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2), which is required for the first step of 5-HT synthesis in the brain. Thirty-five minutes after the injection of the intermediate 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), which circumvented Tph2 to restore 5-HT to the wild-type level, adult Tph2 knockout mice also preferred females over males. These results indicate that 5-HT and serotonergic neurons in the adult brain regulate mammalian sexual preference.

  10. The Molecular Genetic Architecture of Self-Employment

    PubMed Central

    van der Loos, Matthijs J. H. M.; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Eklund, Niina; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Ankra-Badu, Georgina A.; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Biffar, Reiner; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cesarini, David; Cucca, Francesco; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Eiriksdottir, Guðny; Eriksson, Johan; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Höhne, Birgit; Holle, Rolf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Isaacs, Aaron; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johannesson, Magnus; Kaakinen, Marika; Kähönen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Laaksonen, Maarit A.; Lahti, Jari; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Loitfelder, Marisa; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Naitza, Silvia; Oostra, Ben A.; Perola, Markus; Petrovic, Katja; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Ripatti, Samuli; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Senft, Andrea; Smith, Albert V.; Spector, Timothy D.; Surakka, Ida; Svento, Rauli; Terracciano, Antonio; Tikkanen, Emmi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Viikari, Jorma; Völzke, Henry; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Wild, Philipp S.; Willems, Sara M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Thurik, A. Roy

    2013-01-01

    Economic variables such as income, education, and occupation are known to affect mortality and morbidity, such as cardiovascular disease, and have also been shown to be partly heritable. However, very little is known about which genes influence economic variables, although these genes may have both a direct and an indirect effect on health. We report results from the first large-scale collaboration that studies the molecular genetic architecture of an economic variable–entrepreneurship–that was operationalized using self-employment, a widely-available proxy. Our results suggest that common SNPs when considered jointly explain about half of the narrow-sense heritability of self-employment estimated in twin data (σg2/σP2 = 25%, h2 = 55%). However, a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies across sixteen studies comprising 50,627 participants did not identify genome-wide significant SNPs. 58 SNPs with p<10−5 were tested in a replication sample (n = 3,271), but none replicated. Furthermore, a gene-based test shows that none of the genes that were previously suggested in the literature to influence entrepreneurship reveal significant associations. Finally, SNP-based genetic scores that use results from the meta-analysis capture less than 0.2% of the variance in self-employment in an independent sample (p≥0.039). Our results are consistent with a highly polygenic molecular genetic architecture of self-employment, with many genetic variants of small effect. Although self-employment is a multi-faceted, heavily environmentally influenced, and biologically distal trait, our results are similar to those for other genetically complex and biologically more proximate outcomes, such as height, intelligence, personality, and several diseases. PMID:23593239

  11. Reliable prediction of adsorption isotherms via genetic algorithm molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    LoftiKatooli, L; Shahsavand, A

    2017-01-01

    Conventional molecular simulation techniques such as grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) strictly rely on purely random search inside the simulation box for predicting the adsorption isotherms. This blind search is usually extremely time demanding for providing a faithful approximation of the real isotherm and in some cases may lead to non-optimal solutions. A novel approach is presented in this article which does not use any of the classical steps of the standard GCMC method, such as displacement, insertation, and removal. The new approach is based on the well-known genetic algorithm to find the optimal configuration for adsorption of any adsorbate on a structured adsorbent under prevailing pressure and temperature. The proposed approach considers the molecular simulation problem as a global optimization challenge. A detailed flow chart of our so-called genetic algorithm molecular simulation (GAMS) method is presented, which is entirely different from traditions molecular simulation approaches. Three real case studies (for adsorption of CO2 and H2 over various zeolites) are borrowed from literature to clearly illustrate the superior performances of the proposed method over the standard GCMC technique. For the present method, the average absolute values of percentage errors are around 11% (RHO-H2), 5% (CHA-CO2), and 16% (BEA-CO2), while they were about 70%, 15%, and 40% for the standard GCMC technique, respectively.

  12. Study of intra-varietal genetic variability in grapevine cultivars by PCR-derived molecular markers and correlations with the geographic origins.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Stefano; Costacurta, Angelo; Morreale, Giacomo; Calò, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The genetic grapevine intravarietal variability will be analyzed by PCR-derived marker systems. In particular, the object of the investigation will be the clonal variations of Malvasia nera di Brindisi/Lecce, Negroamaro and Primitivo, also known as Zinfandel, which are three grapevine varieties cultivated in Apulia region (Italy). In order to assess varietal identity of the samples, 132 DNA tests were performed by amplifying 16 SSR loci. The study of the intravarietal variability was performed using AFLPs, SAMPLs, ISSRs, and M-AFLPs. The application of the above-mentioned techniques allowed both to discriminate all genotypes of the three cultivars and to distinguish the accessions of each cultivar sampled from different geographic cultivation areas. Furthermore, the study of biotypes cultivated in different geographical environments of Salento (i.e., Apulia region) allowed important correlations between molecular marker variability and phenotypic traits. These results are suggesting both to focus our attention on the effects of the environment on the genotype and to consider, as a practical consequence, the importance of preserving autochthon grapevine biotypes found in different areas to truly preserve the richness of the germplasm. Thus, more accurate DNA studies give new information that can be extremely useful to the vine nurseries for the correct choice (i.e., supported by more accurate intravarietal variability analysis) of the grape multiplication materials.

  13. Genetic Counselling for Schizophrenia in the Era of Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Kathleen A; Murphy, Jillian; O’Neill, Sheri; Brzustowicz, Linda; Bassett, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the role of genetic counselling for individuals with psychiatric illnesses. Method Using schizophrenia as an example and including updated information about a genetic subtype (22q deletion syndrome), we discuss the value of the genetic counselling process in psychiatry, with support from the literature and our clinical experience. Results Genetic counselling, the process through which knowledge about the genetics of illnesses is shared, provides information on the inheritance of illnesses and their recurrence risks; addresses the concerns of patients, their families, and their health care providers; and supports patients and their families dealing with these illnesses. For comprehensive medical management, this service should be available to all individuals with schizophrenia and their families. Conclusions New findings in the genetics of psychiatric illness may have important clinical implications for patients and their families. PMID:11280080

  14. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tromp, Gerard; Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-12-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%-6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms.

  15. Molecular Population Genetic Structure in the Piping Plover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mark P.; Haig, Susan M.; Gratto-Trevor, Cheri L.; Mullins, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    The Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) is a migratory shorebird currently listed as Endangered in Canada and the U.S. Great Lakes, and threatened throughout the remainder of its U.S. breeding and winter range. In this study, we undertook the first comprehensive molecular genetic-based investigation of Piping Plovers. Our primary goals were to (1) address higher level subspecific taxonomic issues, (2) characterize population genetic structure, and (3) make inferences regarding past bottlenecks or population expansions that have occurred within this species. Our analyses included samples of individuals from 23 U.S. States and Canadian Provinces, and were based on mitochondrial DNA sequences (580 bp, n = 245 individuals) and eight nuclear microsatellite loci (n = 229 individuals). Our findings illustrate strong support for separate Atlantic and Interior Piping Plover subspecies (C. m. melodus and C. m. circumcinctus, respectively). Birds from the Great Lakes region were allied with the Interior subspecies group and should be taxonomically referred to as C. m. circumcinctus. Population genetic analyses suggested that genetic structure was stronger among Atlantic birds relative to the Interior group. This pattern indicates that natal and breeding site fidelity may be reduced among Interior birds. Furthermore, analyses suggested that Interior birds have previously experienced genetic bottlenecks, whereas no evidence for such patterns existed among the Atlantic subspecies. Likewise, genetic analyses indicated that the Great Lakes region has experienced a population expansion. This finding may be interpreted as population growth following a previous bottleneck event. No genetic evidence for population expansions was found for Atlantic, Prairie Canada, or U.S. Northern Great Plains individuals. We interpret our population history insights in light of 25 years of Piping Plover census data. Overall, differences observed between Interior and Atlantic birds may reflect

  16. [Ontogenetic clock: molecular-genetic mechanism].

    PubMed

    Pisaruk, A V

    2010-01-01

    Proposed is a hypothesis of the mechanism providing for the cell to count out the time of life and to change (according to the set program) the expression of chromosomal genes in order to control ontogenesis ("ontogenetic clock"). This mechanism represents an autonomous molecular-genetic oscillator, which memorizes the number of cycles of own oscillations through cutting the terminal tau-segment of chrono-DNA using special restrictase. The latter is formed at this segment out of two sub-units (proteins) in each cycle of oscillator operation. These proteins are alternately synthesized on ribosomes, since each inhibits the synthesis of the other, thus ensuring successive binding of restrictase sub-units at the terminal segment of chrono-DNA and its single section in one cycle. In addition, each of these proteins is a repressor of own gene and activator of the gene of the other protein, thus ensuring efficiency and reliability of oscillator operation. The design of oscillator of ontogenetic clock is similar to that of circadian oscillator, but its frequency is not synchronized with the nature's physical rhythms and depends on body temperature. Therefore, it is physical rather than biological time that is measured. The chrono-DNA consists of short repetitive sequences of nucleotides (tau-segments) and temporal (regulatory) genes inserted over specified number of these segments. The shortening of chrono-DNA leads to uncovering the next gene and to its destruction by exonuclease. As a result, the synthesis of activator (repressor) stops and the expression of some chromosomal genes changes, initiating the next stage of ontogenesis.

  17. Molecular genetics of speciation and human origins.

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, F J; Escalante, A; O'Huigin, C; Klein, J

    1994-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a cardinal role in the defense of vertebrates against parasites and other pathogens. In some genes there are extensive and ancient polymorphisms that have passed from ancestral to descendant species and are shared among contemporary species. The polymorphism at the DRB1 locus, represented by 58 known alleles in humans, has existed for at least 30 million years and is shared by humans, apes, and other primates. The coalescence theory of populations genetics leads to the conclusion that the DRB1 polymorphism requires that the population ancestral to modern humans has maintained a mean effective size of 100,000 individuals over the 30-million-year persistence of this polymorphism. We explore the possibility of occasional population bottlenecks and conclude that the ancestral population could not have at any time consisted of fewer than several thousand individuals. The MHC polymorphisms exclude the theory claiming, on the basis of mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms, that a constriction down to one or few women occurred in Africa, at the transition from archaic to anatomically modern humans, some 200,000 years ago. The data are consistent with, but do not provide specific support for, the claim that human populations throughout the World were at that time replaced by populations migrating from Africa. The MHC and other molecular polymorphisms are consistent with a "multiregional" theory of Pleistocene human evolution that proposes regional continuity of human populations since the time of migrations of Homo erectus to the present, with distinctive regional selective pressures and occasional migrations between populations. PMID:8041698

  18. Predation on larval suckers in the Williamson River Delta revealed by molecular genetic assays—A pilot study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hereford, Danielle M.; Ostberg, Carl O.; Burdick, Summer M.

    2016-06-13

    Predation of endangered Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) during larval egress to Upper Klamath Lake from the Williamson River is poorly understood but may be an important factor limiting recruitment into adult spawning populations. Native and non-native piscivores are abundant in nursery wetland habitat, but larval predation has not been directly studied for all species. Larvae lack hard body structures and digest rapidly in predator digestive systems. Therefore, traditional visual methods for diet analysis may fail to identify the extent of predation on larvae. The goals of this study were to (1) use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays developed for Lost River and shortnose suckers to assay predator stomach contents for sucker DNA, and (2) to assess our ability to use this technique to study predation. Predators were captured opportunistically during larval sucker egress. Concurrent feeding trials indicate that most predators—yellow perch (Perca flaverscens), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), blue chub (Gila coerulea), Klamath tui chub (Siphatales bicolor bicolor), Klamath Lake sculpin (Cottus princeps), slender sculpin (Cottus tenuis)—preyed on sucker larvae in the laboratory. However, sucker DNA was not detected in fathead minnow stomachs. Of the stomachs screened from fish captured in the Williamson River Delta, 15.6 percent of yellow perch contained sucker DNA. This study has demonstrated that the application of qPCR and SNP assays is effective for studying predation on larval suckers. We suggest that techniques associated with dissection or detection of sucker DNA from fathead minnow stomachs need improvement.

  19. Molecular genetics research in ADHD: ethical considerations concerning patients' benefit and resource allocation.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Lillian Geza

    2012-12-01

    Immense resource allocations have led to great data output in genetic research. Concerning ADHD resources spent on genetic research are less than those spent on clinical research. But there are successful efforts made to increase support for molecular genetics research in ADHD. Concerning genetics no evidence based conclusive results have significant impact on prevention, diagnosis or treatment yet. With regard to ethical aspects like the patients' benefit and limited resources the question arises if it is indicated to think about a new balance of resource allocation between molecular genetics and non-genetics research in ADHD. An ethical reflection was performed focusing on recent genetic studies and reviews based on a selective literature search. There are plausible reasons why genetic research results in ADHD are somehow disappointing for clinical practice so far. Researchers try to overcome these gaps systematically, without knowing what the potential future benefits for the patients might be. Non-genetic diagnostic/therapeutic research may lead to clinically relevant findings within a shorter period of time. On the other hand, non-genetic research in ADHD may be nurtured by genetic approaches. But, with the latter there exist significant risks of harm like stigmatization and concerns regarding data protection. Isolated speeding up resources of genetic research in ADHD seems questionable from an ethical point of view. There is a need to find a new balance of resource allocation between genetic and non-genetic research in ADHD, probably by integrating genetics more systematically into clinical research. A transdisciplinary debate is recommended.

  20. Molecular characterization of 39 de novo sSMC: contribution to prognosis and genetic counselling, a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Marle, N; Martinet, D; Aboura, A; Joly-Helas, G; Andrieux, J; Flori, E; Puechberty, J; Vialard, F; Sanlaville, D; Fert Ferrer, S; Bourrouillou, G; Tabet, A C; Quilichini, B; Simon-Bouy, B; Bazin, A; Becker, M; Stora, H; Amblard, S; Doco-Fenzy, M; Molina Gomes, D; Girard-Lemaire, F; Cordier, M P; Satre, V; Schneider, A; Lemeur, N; Chambon, P; Jacquemont, S; Fellmann, F; Vigouroux-Castera, A; Molignier, R; Delaye, A; Pipiras, E; Liquier, A; Rousseau, T; Mosca, A L; Kremer, V; Payet, M; Rangon, C; Mugneret, F; Aho, S; Faivre, L; Callier, P

    2014-03-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be characterized by karyotype. In many prenatal cases of de novo sSMC, the outcome of pregnancy is difficult to predict because the euchromatin content is unclear. This study aimed to determine the presence or absence of euchromatin material of 39 de novo prenatally ascertained sSMC by array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Cases were prospectively ascertained from the study of 65,000 prenatal samples [0.060%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.042-0.082]. Array-CGH showed that 22 markers were derived from non-acrocentric markers (56.4%) and 7 from acrocentic markers (18%). The 10 additional cases remained unidentified (25.6%), but 7 of 10 could be further identified using fluorescence in situ hybridization; 69% of de novo sSMC contained euchromatin material, 95.4% of which for non-acrocentric markers. Some sSMC containing euchromatin had a normal phenotype (31% for non-acrocentric and 75% for acrocentric markers). Statistical differences between normal and abnormal phenotypes were shown for the size of the euchromatin material (more or less than 1 Mb, p = 0.0006) and number of genes (more or less than 10, p = 0.0009). This study is the largest to date and shows the utility of array-CGH or SNP array in the detection and characterization of de novo sSMC in a prenatal context.

  1. Molecular genetics to inform spatial management in benthic invertebrate fisheries: a case study using the Australian greenlip abalone.

    PubMed

    Miller, K J; Mundy, C N; Mayfield, S

    2014-10-01

    Hierarchical sampling and subsequent microsatellite genotyping of >2300 Haliotis laevigata (greenlip abalone) from 19 locations distributed across five biogeographic regions have substantially advanced our knowledge of population structure and connectivity in this commercially important species. The study has found key differences in stock structure of H. laevigata compared with the sympatric and congeneric Haliotis rubra (blacklip abalone) and yielded valuable insights into the management of fisheries targeting species characterized by spatial structure at small scales (i.e. S-fisheries). As with H. rubra, H. laevigata comprise a series of metapopulations with strong self-recruitment. However, the spatial extent of H. laevigata metapopulations (reefal areas around 30 km(2) ; distances of up to 135 km are effective barriers to larval dispersal) was substantially greater than that identified for H. rubra (Miller et al. 2009). Differences in the dynamics and scale of population processes, even between congeneric haliotids as made evident in this study, imply that for S-fisheries, it is difficult to generalize about the potential consequences of life history commonalities. Consequently, species-specific management reflective of the population structure of the target species remains particularly important. This will likely require integration of information about stock structure and connectivity with data on life history and population dynamics to determine the necessary input (e.g. number of fishers, fishing effort) and output (e.g. minimum legal size, total allowable catch) controls to underpin their sustainable management.

  2. Impairment of Colour Vision in Diabetes with No Retinopathy: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SNDREAMS- II, Report 3)

    PubMed Central

    Gella, Laxmi; Raman, Rajiv; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran; Pal, Swakshyar Saumya; Ganesan, Suganeswari; Sharma, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess impairment of colour vision in type 2 diabetics with no diabetic retinopathy and elucidate associated risk factors in a population-based cross-sectional study. Methods This is part of Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular-genetics Study (SN-DREAMS II) which was conducted between 2007–2010. FM 100 hue-test was performed in 253 subjects with no clinical evidence of diabetic retinopathy. All subjects underwent detailed ophthalmic evaluation including cataract grading using LOCS III and 45° 4-field stereoscopic fundus photography. Various ocular and systemic risk factors for impairment of colour vision (ICV) were assessed in subjects with diabetes but no retinopathy. P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The mean age of the study sample was 57.08 ± 9.21 (range: 44–86 years). Gender adjusted prevalence of ICV among subjects with diabetes with no retinopathy was 39.5% (CI: 33.5–45.5). The mean total error score in the study sample was 197.77 ± 100 (range: 19–583). The risk factors for ICV in the study were women OR: 1.79 (1.00–3.18), increased resting heart rate OR: 1.04 (1.01–1.07) and increased intraocular pressure OR: 1.12 (1.00–1.24). Significant protective factor was serum high-density lipoprotein OR: 0.96 (0.93–0.99). Conclusions Acquired ICV is an early indicator of neurodegenerative changes in the retina. ICV found in diabetic subjects without retinopathy may be of non-vascular etiology. PMID:26053017

  3. Workshop on molecular methods for genetic diagnosis. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rinchik, E.M.

    1997-07-01

    The Sarah Lawrence College Human Genetics Program received Department of Energy funding to offer a continuing medical education workshop for genetic counselors in the New York metropolitan area. According to statistics from the National Society of Genetic Counselors, there are approximately 160 genetic counselors working in the tri-state area (New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut), and many of them had been working in the field for more than 10 years. Thus, there was a real need to offer these counselors an in-depth opportunity to learn the specifics of the major advances in molecular genetics, and, in particular, the new approaches to diagnostic testing for genetic disease. As a result of the DOE Award DE-FG02-95ER62048 ($20,583), in July 1995 we offered the {open_quotes}Workshop on Molecular Methods for Genetic Diagnosis{close_quotes} for 24 genetic counselors in the New York metropolitan area. The workshop included an initial review session on the basics of molecular biology, lectures and discussions on past and current topics in molecular genetics and diagnostic procedures, and, importantly, daily laboratory exercises. Each counselor gained not only background, but also firsthand experience, in the major techniques of biochemical and molecular methods for diagnosing genetic diseases as well as in mathematical and computational techniques involved in human genetics analyses. Our goal in offering this workshop was not to make genetic counselors experts in these laboratory diagnostic techniques, but to acquaint them, by hands-on experience, about some of the techniques currently in use. We also wanted to provide them a technical foundation upon which they can understand and appreciate new technical developments arising in the near future.

  4. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy genetics: Molecular diagnostics and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Alica M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Semsarian, Christopher; Bagnall, Richard D.; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Cooper, Paul N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Epidemiologic studies clearly document the public health burden of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Clinical and experimental studies have uncovered dynamic cardiorespiratory dysfunction, both interictally and at the time of sudden death due to epilepsy. Genetic analyses in humans and in model systems have facilitated our current molecular understanding of SUDEP. Many discoveries have been informed by progress in the field of sudden cardiac death and sudden infant death syndrome. It is becoming apparent that SUDEP genomic complexity parallels that of sudden cardiac death, and that there is a pauci1ty of analytically useful postmortem material. Because many challenges remain, future progress in SUDEP research, molecular diagnostics, and prevention rests in international, collaborative, and transdisciplinary dialogue in human and experimental translational research of sudden death. PMID:26749013

  5. Wntless in Wnt secretion: molecular, cellular and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Das, Soumyashree; Yu, Shiyan; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Stypulkowski, Ewa; Gao, Nan

    2012-12-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, Wnt-triggered signal transduction pathways play fundamental roles in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Wnt proteins are modified as glycolipoproteins and are secreted into the extracellular environment as morphogens. Recent studies on the intracellular trafficking of Wnt proteins demonstrate multiple layers of regulation along its secretory pathway. These findings have propelled a great deal of interest among researchers to further investigate the molecular mechanisms that control the release of Wnts and hence the level of Wnt signaling. This review is dedicated to Wntless, a putative G-protein coupled receptor that transports Wnts intracellularly for secretion. Here, we highlight the conclusions drawn from the most recent cellular, molecular and genetic studies that affirm the role of Wntless in the secretion of Wnt proteins.

  6. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-28

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract.

  7. Genetics of the Framingham Heart Study Population

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraju, Diddahally R.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kannel, William B.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Atwood, Larry D.; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Fox, Caroline S.; Larson, Marty; Levy, Daniel; Morabito, Joanne; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Splansky, Greta Lee; Wolf, Philip A.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and the genetic research related to cardiovascular diseases conducted in this unique population1. It briefly describes the origins of the study, the risk factors that contribute to heart disease and the approaches taken to discover the genetic basis of some of these risk factors. The genetic architecture of several biological risk factors has been explained using family studies, segregation analysis, heritability, phenotypic and genetic correlations. Many quantitative trait loci underlying cardiovascular diseases have been discovered using different molecular markers. Additionally, results from genome-wide association studies using 100,000 markers, and the prospects of using 550,000 markers for association studies are presented. Finally, the use of this unique sample in genotype and environment interaction is described. PMID:19010253

  8. A genetic study of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in south-western Ontario. II. A PCR based approach to molecular and prenatal diagnosis using linkage.

    PubMed Central

    Rodenhiser, D I; Ainsworth, P J; Coulter-Mackie, M B; Singh, S M; Jung, J H

    1993-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common, autosomal dominant genetic disorder with a variety of highly variable symptoms including cutaneous manifestations (such as café au lait spots), Lisch nodules, plexiform neurofibromas, skeletal abnormalities, an increased risk for malignancy, and the development of learning disabilities. The wide clinical variability of expression of the disease phenotype and high (spontaneous) mutation rate of the NF1 gene indicate that careful clinical examination of patients and family members is necessary to provide an accurate diagnosis of the disease. Since very few NF1 mutations have been identified, and with the apparent lack of a predominant mutation in this large, highly mutable gene, molecular diagnosis of NF1 will continue to be based on haplotypes using linkage analysis. Here we report our experiences while providing a molecular diagnostic service for NF1 in the ethnically diverse region of south-western Ontario. Molecular diagnoses with at least one informative probe/enzyme combination are reported for 19 families including two families requesting prenatal diagnosis for NF1. We have augmented the classical Southern based approach to linkage analysis with the use of PCR based assays for molecular linkage. Furthermore, criteria have been established in our laboratory for executing molecular linkage based on heterozygosity values, recombination fractions, and the use of intragenic probes/markers. Images PMID:8320697

  9. Molecular genetics of chromosome 21 and Down Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, C.; Patterson, D.

    1990-01-01

    This book explores the fundamental nature of Down Syndrome pathology as related to the structure and expression of the genes that are known to be critical in its development. It offers a comprehensive account of the most up-to-date research and an overview of the advances in molecular analysis techniques that are revolutionizing the entire field of chromosome mapping. The book discusses how individual genes in this chromosome have been isolated and studied in both cellular and in vivo models, and chapters cover a variety of specific topics including patterns of recombination according to age and sex seen in genetic linkage mapping of chromosome 21; the possible role of centromere and chromosome structure in nondisjunction; molecular mapping of the down syndrome phenotype; the interferon receptor and inducer genes; and more.

  10. Genetic variation in polyploid forage grass: Assessing the molecular genetic variability in the Paspalum genus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paspalum (Poaceae) is an important genus of the tribe Paniceae, which includes several species of economic importance for foraging, turf and ornamental purposes, and has a complex taxonomical classification. Because of the widespread interest in several species of this genus, many accessions have been conserved in germplasm banks and distributed throughout various countries around the world, mainly for the purposes of cultivar development and cytogenetic studies. Correct identification of germplasms and quantification of their variability are necessary for the proper development of conservation and breeding programs. Evaluation of microsatellite markers in different species of Paspalum conserved in a germplasm bank allowed assessment of the genetic differences among them and assisted in their proper botanical classification. Results Seventeen new polymorphic microsatellites were developed for Paspalum atratum Swallen and Paspalum notatum Flüggé, twelve of which were transferred to 35 Paspalum species and used to evaluate their variability. Variable degrees of polymorphism were observed within the species. Based on distance-based methods and a Bayesian clustering approach, the accessions were divided into three main species groups, two of which corresponded to the previously described Plicatula and Notata Paspalum groups. In more accurate analyses of P. notatum accessions, the genetic variation that was evaluated used thirty simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci and revealed seven distinct genetic groups and a correspondence of these groups to the three botanical varieties of the species (P. notatum var. notatum, P. notatum var. saurae and P. notatum var. latiflorum). Conclusions The molecular genetic approach employed in this study was able to distinguish many of the different taxa examined, except for species that belong to the Plicatula group, which has historically been recognized as a highly complex group. Our molecular genetic approach represents a

  11. [Diagnosis of the peripheral hereditary neuropathies and its molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Arenas-Sordo, María de la Luz

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies include a wide range of pathological disorders characterized by damage of peripheral nerves. Among them, peripheral hereditary neuropathies are a group of frequent illnesses and early evolution. They have been named hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) or peripheral hereditary neuropathies type Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). The most frequent types are CMT1, CMT2 and CMTX. Approximately 70% of the cases correspond to subtype CMT1A, associated with tandem duplication of a 1.5 Mb DNA fragment on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 that codifies the peripheral myelin protein PMP22. So far, there five different types of CMT (1,2,3,4,X) with approximately 32 subtypes, associated with more than 30 genes. Have been reported genetic heterogeneity and expression variability of the illness makes it necessary to carry on diagnostic strategies that integrate clinical study for determining genetic clinical history, family history, complete physical exploration, muscular strength, physical deformities, reflexes and sensitivity, and molecular studies allow detection of different types of mutations and help establish a correct diagnosis and an adequate genetic counseling.

  12. Molecular Genetics of Plant Disease Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staskawicz, Brian J.; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Baker, Barbara J.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    1995-05-01

    Plant breeders have used disease resistance genes (R genes) to control plant disease since the turn of the century. Molecular cloning of R genes that enable plants to resist a diverse range of pathogens has revealed that the proteins encoded by these genes have several features in common. These findings suggest that plants may have evolved common signal transduction mechanisms for the expression of resistance to a wide range of unrelated pathogens. Characterization of the molecular signals involved in pathogen recognition and of the molecular events that specify the expression of resistance may lead to novel strategies for plant disease control.

  13. Novel Therapeutic Strategies in MDS: Do Molecular Genetics Help?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review Many studies over the past decade have together identified genes that are recurrently mutated in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We will summarize how this information has informed our understanding of disease pathogenesis and behavior, with an emphasis on how this information may inform therapeutic strategies. Recent findings Genomic sequencing techniques have allowed for the identification of many recurrently mutated genes in MDS, with the most common mutations being found in epigenetic modifiers and components of the splicing machinery. While many mutations are associated with clinical outcomes and disease phenotypes, at the current time they add relatively little to already robust clinical prognostic algorithms. However, as molecular genetic data is accumulated in larger numbers of patients, it is likely that the clinical significance of co-occurring mutations and less common mutations will come to light. Finally, mutated genes may identify biologically distinct subgroups of MDS that may benefit from novel therapies, and a subset of these genes may themselves serve as therapeutic targets. Summary Advances in our knowledge of the molecular genetics of MDS have significantly improved our understanding of the disease biology and promise to improve tools for clinical decision-making and identify new therapies for patients. PMID:26825694

  14. Genetics and molecular biology of brain calcification.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; Zheng, Wen; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Brain calcification is a common neuroimaging finding in patients with neurological, metabolic, or developmental disorders, mitochondrial diseases, infectious diseases, traumatic or toxic history, as well as in otherwise normal older people. Patients with brain calcification may exhibit movement disorders, seizures, cognitive impairment, and a variety of other neurologic and psychiatric symptoms. Brain calcification may also present as a single, isolated neuroimaging finding. When no specific cause is evident, a genetic etiology should be considered. The aim of the review is to highlight clinical disorders associated with brain calcification and provide summary of current knowledge of diagnosis, genetics, and pathogenesis of brain calcification.

  15. Molecular phylogeny and genetic diversity of Lygus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inter- and intraspecific genetic diversity in North American Lygus was using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. DNA sequences have been obtained from the mitochondrial cox1 and cox2 genes, the nuclear ITS1 spacer, and regions flanking microsatellites (MSFR). The Fargo lab sequenced a region overlapp...

  16. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic).

    PubMed

    Claustres, Mireille; Kožich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J; Barton, David E

    2014-02-01

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report should therefore provide a clear, concise, accurate, fully interpretative and authoritative answer to the clinical question. The need for harmonizing reporting practice of genetic tests has been recognised by the External Quality Assessment (EQA), providers and laboratories. The ESHG Genetic Services Quality Committee has produced reporting guidelines for the genetic disciplines (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic). These guidelines give assistance on report content, including the interpretation of results. Selected examples of genetic test reports for all three disciplines are provided in an annexe.

  17. Molecular population genetics and selection in the glycolytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Eanes, Walter F

    2011-01-15

    In this review, I discuss the evidence for differential natural selection acting across enzymes in the glycolytic pathway in Drosophila. Across the genome, genes evolve at very different rates and possess markedly varying levels of molecular polymorphism, codon bias and expression variation. Discovering the underlying causes of this variation has been a challenge in evolutionary biology. It has been proposed that both the intrinsic properties of enzymes and their pathway position have direct effects on their molecular evolution, and with the genomic era the study of adaptation has been taken to the level of pathways and networks of genes and their products. Of special interest have been the energy-producing pathways. Using both population genetic and experimental approaches, our laboratory has been engaged in a study of molecular variation across the glycolytic pathway in Drosophila melanogaster and its close relatives. We have observed a pervasive pattern in which genes at the top of the pathway, especially around the intersection at glucose 6-phosphate, show evidence for both contemporary selection, in the form of latitudinal allele clines, and inter-specific selection, in the form of elevated levels of amino acid substitutions between species. To further explore this question, future work will require corroboration in other species, expansion into tangential pathways, and experimental work to better characterize metabolic control through the pathway and to examine the pleiotropic effects of these genes on other traits and fitness components.

  18. Association of obesity with diabetic retinopathy: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SN-DREAMS Report no. 8).

    PubMed

    Raman, Rajiv; Rani, Padmaja Kumari; Gnanamoorthy, Perumal; Sudhir, R R; Kumaramanikavel, Govindasamy; Sharma, Tarun

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study was to report the prevalence of obesity indices in individuals with diabetes and find out their association with diabetic retinopathy in the urban Indian population. Subjects (n = 1,414) were recruited from Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology And Molecular Genetics Study (SN-DREAMS-I), a cross-sectional study between 2003 and 2006. Anthropometric measurements were carried out, and all patients' fundi were photographed using 45 degrees four-field stereoscopic digital photography. The diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy was based on the modified Klein classification. Generalized obesity and abdominal obesity were defined using WHO Asia Pacific guidelines with the BMI (body mass index) cutoff as > or =23 kg/m(2), WC (waist circumference) cutoffs as > or =90 cm in men and > or =80 cm in women and WHO guidelines using WHR (waist-to-hip ratio) cutoffs as > or =0.90 for men and > or =0.85 for women. Prevalence of obesity defined by BMI and WC was more in women compared to men, and that defined by WHR was more in men compared to women (P < 0.001). The prevalence of isolated generalized obesity, isolated abdominal obesity and combined obesity were 5.4, 10.1 and 58% in men and 4.5, 10.8 and 74.4% in women, respectively. The prevalence of any diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy was more in the isolated abdominal obesity group (26.35 and 6.08%, respectively) than in other subgroups. On logistic regression analysis, isolated abdominal obesity (OR 2.02, 95% CI: 1.06-3.86) and increased WHR in women (OR 1.48 95% CI: 1.10-2.38) were associated with diabetic retinopathy; BMI > or = 23 (OR 0.66, 95% CI: 0.48-0.90) and combined obesity (OR 0.72, 95% CI: 0.53-0.99) had a protective role for any diabetic retinopathy in the overall group. In the urban south Indian population, isolated abdominal obesity and higher WHR in women were associated with diabetic retinopathy, but not with the severity of diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Molecular biomimetics: nanotechnology and bionanotechnology using genetically engineered peptides.

    PubMed

    Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2009-05-13

    Nature provides inspiration for designing materials and systems that derive their functions from highly organized structures. Biological hard tissues are hybrid materials having inorganics within a complex organic matrix, the molecular scaffold controlling the inorganic structures. Biocomposites incorporate both biomacromolecules such as proteins, lipids and polysaccharides, and inorganic materials, such as hydroxyapatite, silica, magnetite and calcite. The ordered organization of hierarchical structures in organisms begins via the molecular recognition of inorganics by proteins that control interactions and is followed by the highly efficient self-assembly across scales. Following the molecular biological principle, proteins could also be used in controlling materials formation in practical engineering via self-assembled, hybrid, functional materials structures. In molecular biomimetics, material-specific peptides could be the key in the molecular engineering of biology-inspired materials. With the recent developments of nanoscale engineering in physical sciences and the advances in molecular biology, we now combine genetic tools with synthetic nanoscale constructs to create a novel methodology. We first genetically select and/or design peptides with specific binding to functional solids, tailor their binding and assembly characteristics, develop bifunctional peptide/protein genetic constructs with both material binding and biological activity, and use these as molecular synthesizers, erectors and assemblers. Here, we give an overview of solid-binding peptides as novel molecular agents coupling bio- and nanotechnology.

  20. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, Joachim

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to

  1. Molecular genetics of alkaloid biosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Ralph E; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-10-01

    Alkaloids represent an extensive group of nitrogen-containing secondary metabolites that are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. The pyridine alkaloids of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) have been the subject of particularly intensive investigation, driven largely due to the widespread use of tobacco products by society and the role that nicotine (16) (see Fig. 1) plays as the primary compound responsible for making the consumption of these products both pleasurable and addictive. In a typical commercial tobacco plant, nicotine (16) comprises about 90% of the total alkaloid pool, with the alkaloids nornicotine (17) (a demethylated derivative of nicotine), anatabine (15) and anabasine (5) making up most of the remainder. Advances in molecular biology have led to the characterization of the majority of the genes encoding the enzymes directly responsible the biosynthesis of nicotine (16) and nornicotine (17), while notable gaps remain within the anatabine (15) and anabasine (5) biosynthetic pathways. Several of the genes involved in the transcriptional regulation and transport of nicotine (16) have also been elucidated. Investigations of the molecular genetics of tobacco alkaloids have not only provided plant biologists with insights into the mechanisms underlying the synthesis and accumulation of this important class of plant alkaloids, they have also yielded tools and strategies for modifying the tobacco alkaloid composition in a manner that can result in changing the levels of nicotine (16) within the leaf, or reducing the levels of a potent carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamine (TSNA). This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of alkaloid biosynthesis in tobacco, and discusses the potential for applying information accrued from these studies toward efforts designed to help mitigate some of the negative health consequences associated with the use of tobacco products.

  2. Molecular genetics of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Fisher, J; Upadhyaya, M

    1997-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD; MIM 158900), is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder. The disease is characterized by the weakness of the muscles of the face, upper-arm and shoulder girdle. The gene for FSHD has been mapped to 4q35 (FSHD1A) and is closely linked to D4F1O4S1, which detects two highly polymorphic loci (located at 4q35 and 10q26), with restriction enzyme EcoRI. The polymorphic EcoRI fragment detected with D4F1O4S1 is composed almost entirely of D4Z4 (3.3 kb) tandem repeats. In FSHD patients a deletion of the integral number of D4Z4 repeats generates a fragment which is usually smaller than 35 kb, whereas in normal controls, the size usually ranges from 50 to 300 kb. These 'small' EcoRI fragments segregate with FSHD in families but appear as de novo deletions in the majority of sporadic cases. Each 3.3 kb repeat contains two homeobox domains neither of which has yet been proven to encode a protein. D4Z4 is located adjacent to the 4q telomere and cross hybridizes to several different regions of the genome. Although D4Z4 probably does not encode a protein with any direct association to FSHD, a clear correlation has been shown between the deletion size at this locus and the age at onset of the disease in FSHD patients. In approximately 5-10% of FSHD families the disease locus is unlinked to 4q35 (locus designated FSHD1B), however, none of the non 4q35 loci for FSHD have yet been chromosomally located. Thus so far, only one gene, FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1) has been identified from the FSHD candidate region on 4q35. The apparent low level of expressed sequences from within this region, the integral deletions of D4Z4 repeats observed in FSHD patients and the close proximity of these repeats to the 4q telomere, all suggest that the disease may be the result of position effect variegation. To date, the molecular diagnosis of FSHD with D4F104S1 has been most secure in those families which are linked to other 4q35 markers. Recent studies

  3. Genetic diversity assessment of summer squash landraces using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Mady, Emad A; Helaly, Alaa Al-Din; Abu El-Hamd, Abdel Naem; Abdou, Arafa; Shanan, Shamel A; Craker, Lyle E

    2013-07-01

    Plant identification, classification, and genotyping within a germplasm collection are essential elements for establishing a breeding program that enhances the probability of plants with desirable characteristics in the market place. In this study, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used as a molecular tool to assess the diversity and relationship among 20 summer squash (Curcubita pepo L.) landraces traditionally used to treat hypertension and prostate hyperplasia. A total of 10 RAPD primers produced 65 reproducible bands of which 46 (70.77 %) were polymorphic, indicating a large number of genotypes within the summer squash lines. Cluster analysis divided the summer squash germplasm into two groups, one including one landrace and a second containing 19 landraces that could be divided into five sub-groups. Results of this study indicate the potential of RAPD markers for the identification and assessment of genetic variations among squash landraces and provide a number of choices for developing a successful breeding program to improve summer squash.

  4. [The development of molecular human genetics and its significance for perspectives of modern medicine].

    PubMed

    Coutelle, C; Speer, A; Grade, K; Rosenthal, A; Hunger, H D

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of molecular human genetics has become a paradigma for the application of genetic engineering in medicine. The main principles of this technology are the isolation of molecular probes, their application in hybridization reactions, specific gene-amplification by the polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing reactions. These methods are used for the analysis of monogenic diseases by linkage studies and the elucidation of the molecular defect causing these conditions, respectively. They are also the basis for genomic diagnosis of monogenic diseases, introduced into the health care system of the GDR by a national project on Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy, Cystic Fibrosis and Phenylketonuria. The rapid development of basic research on the molecular analysis of the human genome and genomic diagnosis indicates, that human molecular genetics is becoming a decisive basic discipline of modern medicine.

  5. The etiology and molecular genetics of human pigmentation disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Laura L.; Pavan, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Pigmentation, defined as the placement of pigment in skin, hair, and eyes for coloration, is distinctive because the location, amount, and type of pigmentation provides a visual manifestation of genetic heterogeneity in pathways regulating the pigment-producing cells, melanocytes. The scope of this genetic heterogeneity in humans ranges from normal to pathological pigmentation phenotypes. Clinically normal human pigmentation encompasses a variety of skin and hair color as well as with punctate pigmentation such as melanocytic nevi (moles) or ephelides (freckles), while clinically abnormal human pigmentation exhibits markedly reduced or increased pigment levels, known as hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation, respectively. Elucidation of the molecular genetics underlying pigmentation has revealed genes important for melanocyte development and function. Furthermore, many pigmentation disorders show additional defects in cells other than melanocytes, and identification of the genetic insults in these disorders has revealed pleiotropic genes, where a single gene is required for various functions, often in different cell types. Thus unravelling the genetics of easily visualized pigmentation disorders has identified molecular similarities between melanocytes and less visible cell types/tissues, revealing a common cellular origin and/or common genetic regulatory pathways. Herein we discuss notable human pigmentation disorders and their associated genetic alterations, focusing on the fact that the developmental genetics of pigmentation abnormalities is instructive for understanding normal pathways governing development and function of melanocytes. PMID:23799582

  6. [Research progress on molecular genetics of forest musk deer].

    PubMed

    Jie, Hang; Zheng, Cheng-li; Wang, Jian-ming; Feng, Xiao-lan; Zeng, De-jun; Zhao, Gui-jun

    2015-11-01

    Forest musk deer is one of the large-scale farming musk deer animals with the largest population at the same time. The male musk deer can secrete valuable medicines, which has high medicinal and economic value. Due to the loss of habitat and indiscriminate hunting, the numbers of wild population specie and the distribution have been drastically reduced. Therefore, in-depth understanding of the molecular genetics progress of forest musk deer will pave a way for musk deer protection and breeding. In this review, the progress associated with the molecular marker, genetic classification, artificial breeding, musk secretion and disease in past decades were reviewed, in order to provide a theoretical basis for subsequent molecular genetic researches in forest musk deer.

  7. Japanese Dent disease has a wider clinical spectrum than Dent disease in Europe/USA: genetic and clinical studies of 86 unrelated patients with low-molecular-weight proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Takashi; Komoda, Fusako; Miura, Kenichiro; Takita, Junko; Shimadzu, Mitsunobu; Matsuyama, Takeshi; Ashida, Akira; Igarashi, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Dent disease is an X-linked disorder characterized by low-molecular-weight (LMW) proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, urolithiasis and renal dysfunction. Dent disease is caused by mutations in at least two genes, i.e. CLCN5 and OCRL1, and its genetic background and phenotypes are common among European countries and the USA. However, only few studies on Dent disease in Japan, which was originally called 'low-molecular-weight proteinuric disease', have been reported thus far. In this study, we analysed genetic background and clinical phenotype and laboratory data of 86 unrelated Japanese Dent disease patients. The results demonstrated that the genetic basis of Japanese Dent disease was nearly identical to those of Dent disease in other countries. Of 86 unrelated Japanese Dent patients, 61 possessed mutations in CLCN5 (Dent-1), of which 27 were novel mutations; 11 showed mutations in OCRL1 (Dent-2), six of which were novel, and the remaining 14 patients showed no mutations in CLCN5 or OCRL1 (Dent-NI). Despite the similarity in genetic background, hypercalciuria was detected in only 51%, rickets in 2% and nephrocalcinosis in 35%. Although the patients were relatively young, six patients (8%) showed apparent renal dysfunction. Japanese Dent disease has a wider clinical spectrum than Dent disease in Europe and the USA.

  8. SMARCB1/INI1-deficient sinonasal carcinoma shows methylation of RASSF1 gene: A clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and molecular genetic study of a recently described entity.

    PubMed

    Laco, Jan; Chmelařová, Marcela; Vošmiková, Hana; Sieglová, Kateřina; Bubancová, Ivana; Dundr, Pavel; Němejcová, Kristýna; Michálek, Jaroslav; Čelakovský, Petr; Mottl, Radovan; Sirák, Igor; Vošmik, Milan; Ryška, Aleš

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was detailed clinicopathological investigation of SMARCB1/INI1-deficient sinonasal carcinomas, including molecular genetic analysis of mutational status and DNA methylation of selected protooncogenes and tumor suppressor genes by means of next generation sequencing (NGS) and methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA). A total of 4/56 (7%) cases of SMARCB1/INI1-deficient carcinomas were detected among 56 sinonasal carcinomas diagnosed over a 19year period using immunohistochemical screening. The series comprised 3 males and 1 female, aged 27-76 years (median 64 years). All tumors arose in the nasal cavity. Three neoplasms were diagnosed in advanced stage pT4. During the follow-up period (range 14-111 months (median 72 months)), three tumors recurred locally, but none of the patients developed regional or distant metastases. Ultimately, two patients died due to the tumor. Microscopically, all tumors consisted of infiltrating nests of polygonal basaloid cells with a variable component of rhabdoid cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, there was almost diffuse expression of cytokeratins (CK), p16, p40 and p63 in all cases, while expression of CK5/6, CK7 and vimentin was only focal or absent. The detection of NUT gave negative results. In three cases, the absence of SMARCB1/INI1 expression was due to deletion of SMARCB1/INI1 gene. Methylation of SMARCB1/INI1 gene was not found. One tumor harbored HPV18 E6/E7 mRNA. All 12 genes (BRAF, BRCA1, BRCA2, KIT, EGFR, KRAS, NRAS, PDGFRA, PIK3CA, PTEN, RET, and ROS1) tested for mutations using NGS were wild-type. Regarding DNA methylation, all four SMARCB1/INI1-deficient tumors showed methylation of RASSF1 gene by means of MS-MLPA. There was a statistically significant difference in RASSF1 gene methylation between SMARCB1/INI1-deficient and SMARCB1/INI1-positive tumors (p=0.0095). All other examined genes (ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, CADM1, CASP8, CD44, CDKN1B

  9. Primer on molecular genetics. DOE Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  10. Molecular evolution and genetics of postzygotic reproductive isolation in plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In just the last few years, plant geneticists have made tremendous progress in identifying the molecular genetic basis of postzygotic reproductive isolation. With more than a dozen genes now cloned, it is clear that plant hybrid incompatibilities usually evolve via two or more mutational steps, as is predicted by the Dobzhansky-Muller model. There is evidence that natural selection or random genetic drift can be responsible for these incompatibilities. PMID:23236340

  11. Primer on Molecular Genetics; DOE Human Genome Program

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  12. Molecular genetics of sarcomas: applications to diagnoses and therapy.

    PubMed

    Toguchida, Junya; Nakayama, Tomitaka

    2009-09-01

    Sarcomas are mesenchymal cancers consisting of tumors with various clinical and pathological features. Some of them compel affected individuals to lose important musculoskeletal functions, and some of them are highly malignant and life-threatening. A great amount of genetic information for sarcomas has accumulated during the past two decades, contributing diagnoses and treatments. From the standpoint of molecular genetics, sarcomas are classified into two groups: those with defined genetic alterations and those with various genetic alterations. The genetic alterations in the first group include reciprocal translocations resulting in fusion oncoproteins and oncogenic mutations of defined genes such as those of the c-kit gene in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The function of fusion proteins includes transcription regulator, signal transducer, chromatic remodeling factor, and growth factor, some of which are suitable targets for the molecular therapy. In tumors belonging to the second group, the number of which is far larger than those of the first group, considerable genetic heterogeneity was found even among tumors with same pathological diagnosis. The disruption of the RB and p53 pathways was frequently found, resulting in the dysregulation of cell cycle and the genomic instability. The application of molecular target therapy for tumors in this group requires novel strategies to overcome cross talk between different signal pathways. Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments has indicated that the cells of origin of sarcomas are tissue stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells, and the application of stem cell biology holds the promise of novel treatment options.

  13. The molecular genetics of cervical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, P A

    1999-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma there are three major components, two of them related to the role of human papillomaviruses (HPV). First, the effect of viral E6 and E7 proteins. Second, the integration of viral DNA in chromosomal regions associated with well known tumour phenotypes. Some of these viral integrations occur recurrently at specific chromosomal locations, such as 8q24 and 12q15, both harbouring HPV18 and HPV16. And third, there are other recurrent genetic alterations not linked to HPV. Recurrent losses of heterozygosity (LOH) have been detected in chromosome regions 3p14–22, 4p16, 5p15, 6p21–22, 11q23, 17p13.3 without effect on p53, 18q12–22 and 19q13, all of them suggesting the alteration of putative tumour suppressor genes not yet identified. Recurrent amplification has been mapped to 3q+ arm, with the common region in 3q24–28 in 90% of invasive carcinomas. The mutator phenotype, microsatellite instability, plays a minor role and is detected in only 7% of cervical carcinomas. The development of cervical carcinoma requires the sequential occurrence and selection of several genetic alterations. The identification of the specific genes involved, and their correlation with specific tumour properties and stages could improve the understanding and perhaps the management of cervical carcinoma. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471054

  14. Molecular genetics and antisocial behavior: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Iofrida, Caterina; Palumbo, Sara; Pellegrini, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    Over the last two decades, it has become increasingly evident that control of aggressive behavior is modulated by the individual genetic profile as well. Several candidate genes have been proposed to play a role in the risk to develop antisocial behavior, and distinct brain imaging studies have shown that specific cortical areas may be functionally and/or structurally impaired in impulsive violent subjects on the basis of their genotypes. In this paper, we review the findings regarding four polymorphisms-MAOA (Monoamine oxidase A) uVNTR, SLC6A4 (solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 4) 5HTTLPR, COMT (Catechol-O-methyltransferase) Val158Met and DRD4 (dopamine D4 receptor) VNTR 1-11-that all have been found to be associated with an increased vulnerability for antisocial and impulsive behavior in response to aversive environmental conditions. These results, however, have not been replicated by other studies, likely because of crucial methodological discrepancies, including variability in the criteria used to define antisocial behavior and assessment of environmental factors. Finally, it has been recently proposed that these genetic variants may actually increase the individual susceptibility not merely to the negative environmental factors, but to the positive ones as well. In this view, such alleles would play a wider modulatory role, by acting as "plasticity" rather than "vulnerability" genes. Overall, these findings have potential important implications that span well outside of neuroscience and psychiatry, to embrace ethics, philosophy, and the law itself, as they pose new challenges to the very notion of Free Will. Novel properly controlled studies that examine multi-allelic genetic profiles, rather than focusing on distinct single variants, will make it possible to achieve a clearer understanding of the molecular underpinnings of the nature by nurture interaction.

  15. Opiate addiction and cocaine addiction: underlying molecular neurobiology and genetics.

    PubMed

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Levran, Orna; Reed, Brian; Schlussman, Stefan D; Zhou, Yan; Butelman, Eduardo R

    2012-10-01

    Addictive diseases, including addiction to heroin, prescription opioids, or cocaine, pose massive personal and public health costs. Addictions are chronic relapsing diseases of the brain caused by drug-induced direct effects and persisting neuroadaptations at the epigenetic, mRNA, neuropeptide, neurotransmitter, or protein levels. These neuroadaptations, which can be specific to drug type, and their resultant behaviors are modified by various internal and external environmental factors, including stress responsivity, addict mindset, and social setting. Specific gene variants, including variants encoding pharmacological target proteins or genes mediating neuroadaptations, also modify vulnerability at particular stages of addiction. Greater understanding of these interacting factors through laboratory-based and translational studies have the potential to optimize early interventions for the therapy of chronic addictive diseases and to reduce the burden of relapse. Here, we review the molecular neurobiology and genetics of opiate addiction, including heroin and prescription opioids, and cocaine addiction.

  16. A role for molecular genetics in biological conservation.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, S J

    1994-01-01

    The recognition of recent accelerated depletion of species as a consequence of human industrial development has spawned a wide interest in identifying threats to endangered species. In addition to ecological and demographic perils, it has become clear that small populations that narrowly survive demographic contraction may undergo close inbreeding, genetic drift, and loss of overall genomic variation due to allelic loss or reduction to homozygosity. I review here the consequences of such genetic depletion revealed by applying molecular population genetic analysis to four endangered mammals: African cheetah, lion, Florida panther, and humpback whale. The accumulated genetic results, combined with physiological, ecological, and ethological data, provide a multifaceted perspective of the process of species diminution. An emerging role of population genetics, phylogenetics, and phylogeography as indicators of a population's natural history and its future prognosis provides valuable data of use in the development of conservation management plans for endangered species. PMID:7912434

  17. Molecular Darwinism: the contingency of spontaneous genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Arber, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The availability of spontaneously occurring genetic variants is an important driving force of biological evolution. Largely thanks to experimental investigations by microbial geneticists, we know today that several different molecular mechanisms contribute to the overall genetic variations. These mechanisms can be assigned to three natural strategies to generate genetic variants: 1) local sequence changes, 2) intragenomic reshuffling of DNA segments, and 3) acquisition of a segment of foreign DNA. In these processes, specific gene products are involved in cooperation with different nongenetic elements. Some genetic variations occur fully at random along the DNA filaments, others rather with a statistical reproducibility, although at many possible sites. We have to be aware that evolution in natural ecosystems is of higher complexity than under most laboratory conditions, not at least in view of symbiotic associations and the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer. The encountered contingency of genetic variation can possibly best ensure a long-term persistence of life under steadily changing living conditions.

  18. A role for molecular genetics in biological conservation.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S J

    1994-06-21

    The recognition of recent accelerated depletion of species as a consequence of human industrial development has spawned a wide interest in identifying threats to endangered species. In addition to ecological and demographic perils, it has become clear that small populations that narrowly survive demographic contraction may undergo close inbreeding, genetic drift, and loss of overall genomic variation due to allelic loss or reduction to homozygosity. I review here the consequences of such genetic depletion revealed by applying molecular population genetic analysis to four endangered mammals: African cheetah, lion, Florida panther, and humpback whale. The accumulated genetic results, combined with physiological, ecological, and ethological data, provide a multifaceted perspective of the process of species diminution. An emerging role of population genetics, phylogenetics, and phylogeography as indicators of a population's natural history and its future prognosis provides valuable data of use in the development of conservation management plans for endangered species.

  19. Molecular genetics and industrial microbiology--30 years of marriage.

    PubMed

    Demain, A L

    2001-12-01

    Thirty years ago, molecular genetics and industrial microbiology joined their hands in marriage. The event took place in Prague at the first Symposium on the Genetics of Industrial Microorganisms. My closing plenary lecture, titled "The Marriage of Genetics and Industrial Microbiology--After a long Engagement, a Bright Future," dealt with industrial uses of mutants, the lack of success with genetic recombination, control of branched and unbranched pathways and thoughts about the future, e.g., identifying the biochemical sites of beneficial mutations, exploitation of recombination and genetic means to increase production of enzymes. It is quite amazing that the Symposium was held 3 years before the advent of recombinant DNA technology. This important meeting was followed in 1976 by the first Genetics and Molecular Biology of Industrial Microorganisms (GMBIM) meeting in Orlando, all of the six subsequent GMBIM meetings being held in Bloomington, Indiana. Today, thousands of biotechnology companies are in existence making great progress in the pharmaceutical and agricultural sectors. Hundreds of new genetically engineered compounds, produced in microbial, mammalian or insect cells, are in clinical trails and many are already being marketed. The field is booming with new technologies such as transgenic animals and plants, site-directed mutagenesis, combinatorial biosynthesis, gene therapy, antisense, abzymes, high-throughput screening, monoclonal antibodies, PCR and many more. Agricultural biotechnology has made great strides but unfortunately its progress is being delayed by political controversy.

  20. Molecular approaches in the prenatal diagnosis and therapy of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Myrianthopoulos, N C

    1987-01-01

    During the last decade a new class of DNA markers, the restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), has been developed by molecular genetic techniques. Genetic linkage studies using RFLPs have resulted in a large number of chromosome assignments of genes, making possible prenatal diagnosis and presymptomatic testing in many genetic disorders. Even so, of the estimated 100,000 genes that comprise the human genome fewer than 2,000, or 2%, have been mapped. Studies of the molecular basis of some of these mutant genes have brought to light a remarkable multiplicity and diversity of mutations that produce relatively few clinical phenotypes. Many genetic disorders including the thalassemias, familial hypercholesterolemia, Tay-Sachs disease, cystic fibrosis, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia, have been shown to be genetically heterogeneous. It is necessary, therefore, to know the precise mutation in order to make accurate diagnosis and restore proper enzyme or gene function.

  1. Molecular genetics of ligninase expression. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this research for the past three years have been to (1) elucidate the structure and genomic organization of genes involved in lignin degradation; and (2) investigate the expression of these genes in Phanerochaete chrysosporium and in heterologous hosts. Major accomplishments include the following: (1) the P. chrysosporium gene encoding glyoxal oxidase has been cloned, sequenced, and efficiently expressed in Aspergillus; (2) mapping methods were developed allowing the integration of genetic and physical maps of P. chrysosporium; (3) highly specific and sensitive PCR techniques were developed for discriminating closely related mRNAs. Application of this technique will help to identify specific genes involved in degradation of lignin and organopollutants; (4) investigations have revealed a novel insertional mutation in lignin peroxidase gene lipI.

  2. Genetics and molecular biology of deafness.

    PubMed

    Grundfast, K M; Atwood, J L; Chuong, D

    1999-12-01

    With increased emphasis on early detection of hearing impairment, more babies are likely to be referred at younger ages to otolaryngologists for evaluation. With a diminution in the number of infants who have hearing impairment as a result of such factors as maternal infection, neonatal sepsis, or ototoxicity, the relative importance of detecting a genetic cause of newborn hearing impairment is likely to increase. Therefore, the otolaryngologist must become familiar with common causes of hereditary hearing impairment and the ways in which the newborn should be evaluated for hereditary hearing impairment. Advancements are rapidly being made in the ability to detect genes that cause hearing impairment, and we are now on the threshold of discovering ways to use gene therapy to prevent or treat hereditary deafness.

  3. Molecular Diagnostics and Genetic Counseling in Primary Congenital Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Faiq, Muneeb; Mohanty, Kuldeep; Dada, Rima; Dada, Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is a childhood irreversible blinding disorder with onset at birth or in the first year of life. It is characterized by the classical traid of symptoms viz. epiphora (excessive tearing), photophobia (hypersensitivity to light) and blepharospasm (inflammation of eyelids). The only anatomical defect seen in PCG is trabecular meshwork dysgenesis. PCG shows autosomal recessive mode of inheritance with considerable number of sporadic cases. The etiology of this disease has not been fully understood but some genes like CYP1B1, MYOC, FOXC1, LTBP2 have been implicated. Various chromosomal aberrations and mutations in mitochondrial genome have also been reported. Molecular biology has developed novel techniques in order to do genetic and biochemical characterization of many genetic disorders including PCG. Techniques like polymerase chain reaction, single strand conformational polymorphism and sequencing are already in use for diagnosis of PCG and other techniques like protein truncation testing and functional genomics are beginning to find their way into molecular workout of this disorder. In the light of its genetic etiology, it is important to develop methods for genetic counseling for the patients and their families so as to bring down its incidence. In this review, we ought to develop a genetic insight into PCG with possible use of molecular biology and functional genomics in understanding the disease etiology, pathogenesis, pathology and mechanism of inheritance. We will also discuss the possibilities and use of genetic counseling in this disease. How to cite this article: Faiq M, Mohanty K, Dada R, Dada T. Molecular Diagnostics and Genetic Counseling in Primary Congenital Glaucoma. J Current Glau Prac 2013;7(1):25-35.

  4. Study Points to Genetic Subtypes of Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A Cancer Currents blog post about a study by The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network that identified distinct genetic and molecular changes in esophageal cancers that could improve their classification and identify potential new treatments.

  5. The molecular genetics of the corneal dystrophies--current status.

    PubMed

    Klintworth, Gordon K

    2003-05-01

    The pertinent literature on inherited corneal diseases is reviewed in terms of the chromosomal localization and identification of the responsible genes. Disorders affecting the cornea have been mapped to human chromosome 1 (central crystalline corneal dystrophy, familial subepithelial corneal amyloidosis, early onset Fuchs dystrophy, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy), chromosome 4 (Bietti marginal crystalline dystrophy), chromosome 5 (lattice dystrophy types 1 and IIIA, granular corneal dystrophy types 1, 2 and 3, Thiel-Behnke corneal dystrophy), chromosome 9 (lattice dystrophy type II), chromosome 10 (Thiel-Behnke corneal dystrophy), chromosome 12 (Meesmann dystrophy), chromosome 16 (macular corneal dystrophy, fish eye disease, LCAT disease, tyrosinemia type II), chromosome 17 (Meesmann dystrophy, Stocker-Holt dystrophy), chromosome 20 (congenital hereditary endothelial corneal dystrophy types I and II, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy), chromosome 21 (autosomal dominant keratoconus) and the X chromosome (cornea verticillata, cornea farinata, deep filiform corneal dystrophy, keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans, Lisch corneal dystrophy). Mutations in nine genes (ARSC1, CHST6, COL8A2, GLA, GSN, KRT3, KRT12, M1S1and TGFBI [BIGH3]) account for some of the corneal diseases and three of them are associated with amyloid deposition in the cornea (GSN, M1S1, TGFBI) including most of the lattice corneal dystrophies (LCDs) [LCD types I, IA, II, IIIA, IIIB, IV, V, VI and VII] recognized by their lattice pattern of linear opacities. Genetic studies on inherited diseases affecting the cornea have provided insight into some of these disorders at a basic molecular level and it has become recognized that distinct clinicopathologic phenotypes can result from specific mutations in a particular gene, as well as some different mutations in the same gene. A molecular genetic understanding of inherited corneal diseases is leading to a better appreciation of the

  6. Unmet Needs in Dystonia: Genetics and Molecular Biology—How Many Dystonias?

    PubMed Central

    Verbeek, Dineke S.; Gasser, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Genetic findings of the past years have provided ample evidence for a substantial etiologic heterogeneity of dystonic syndromes. While an increasing number of genes are being identified for Mendelian forms of isolated and combined dystonias using classical genetic mapping and whole-exome sequencing techniques, their precise role in the molecular pathogenesis is still largely unknown. Also, the role of genetic risk factors in the etiology of sporadic dystonias is still enigmatic. Only the systematic ascertainment and precise clinical characterization of very large cohorts with dystonia, combined with systematic genetic studies, will be able to unravel the complex network of factors that determine disease risk and phenotypic expression. PMID:28138320

  7. Genomics, molecular genetics and the food industry.

    PubMed

    Pridmore, R D; Crouzillat, D; Walker, C; Foley, S; Zink, R; Zwahlen, M C; Brüssow, H; Pétiard, V; Mollet, B

    2000-03-31

    The production of foods for an increasingly informed and selective consumer requires the coordinated activities of the various branches of the food chain in order to provide convenient, wholesome, tasty, safe and affordable foods. Also, the size and complexity of the food sector ensures that no single player can control a single process from seed production, through farming and processing to a final product marketed in a retail outlet. Furthermore, the scientific advances in genome research and their exploitation via biotechnology is leading to a technology driven revolution that will have advantages for the consumer and food industry alike. The segment of food processing aids, namely industrial enzymes which have been enhanced by the use of biotechnology, has proven invaluable in the production of enzymes with greater purity and flexibility while ensuring a sustainable and cheap supply. Such enzymes produced in safe GRAS microorganisms are available today and are being used in the production of foods. A second rapidly evolving segment that is already having an impact on our foods may be found in the new genetically modified crops. While the most notorious examples today were developed by the seed companies for the agro-industry directed at the farming sector for cost saving production of the main agronomical products like soya and maize, its benefits are also being seen in the reduced use of herbicides and pesticides which will have long term benefits for the environment. Technology-driven advances for the food processing industry and the consumer are being developed and may be divided into two separate sectors that will be presented in greater detail: 1. The application of genome research and biotechnology to the breeding and development of improved plants. This may be as an aid for the cataloging of industrially important plant varieties, the rapid identification of key quality traits for enhanced classical breeding programs, or the genetic modification of

  8. Genetics and molecular biology in laboratory medicine, 1963-2013.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, John B

    2013-01-01

    The past 50 years have seen many changes in laboratory medicine, either as causes or consequences of increases in productivity and expansion of the range of information which can be provided. The drivers and facilitators of change in relation to clinical applications of molecular biology included the need for diagnostic tools for genetic diseases and technical advances such as PCR and sequencing. However, molecular biology techniques have proved to have far wider applications, from detection of infectious agents to molecular characterization of tumors. Journals such as Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine play an important role in communication of these advances to the laboratory medicine community and in publishing evaluations of their practical value.

  9. Editorial: The Advent of a Molecular Genetics of General Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Volkmar

    1995-01-01

    Raw IQ scores do not demonstrate the bell curve created by normalized scores, even the bell-shaped distribution does not require large numbers of underlying genes. Family data support a major gene locus of IQ. The correlation between glutathione peroxidase and IQ should be investigated through molecular genetics. (SLD)

  10. Molecular genetic testing of patients with monogenic diabetes and hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James T; Vasta, Valeria; Zhang, Min; Narayanan, Jaya; Gerrits, Peter; Hahn, Si Houn

    2015-03-01

    Genetic sequencing has become a critical part of the diagnosis of certain forms of pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. Despite great advances in the speed and cost of DNA sequencing, determining the pathogenicity of variants remains a challenge, and requires sharing of sequence and phenotypic data between laboratories. We reviewed all diabetes and hyperinsulinism-associated molecular testing done at the Seattle Children's Molecular Genetics Laboratory from 2009 to 2013. 331 probands were referred to us for molecular genetic sequencing for Neonatal Diabetes (NDM), Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY), or Congenital Hyperinsulinism (CHI) during this period. Reportable variants were identified in 115 (35%) patients with 91 variants in one of 6 genes: HNF1A, GCK, HNF4A, ABCC8, KCNJ11, or INS. In addition to identifying 23 novel variants, we identified unusual mechanisms of inheritance, including mosaic and digenic MODY presentations. Re-analysis of all reported variants using more recently available databases led to a change in variant interpretation from the original report in 30% of cases. These results represent a resource for molecular testing of monogenic forms of diabetes and hyperinsulinism, providing a mutation spectrum for these disorders in a large North American cohort. In addition, they highlight the importance of periodic review of molecular testing results.

  11. [Clinical implications of molecular genetic research in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    Gürtler, N

    2003-08-01

    Molecular-genetic research in Otolaryngology has seen a rapid advancement during the last ten years, especially in the fields of otology and head and neck tumors. The results of this basic research have now started to be implemented in the clinic. In otology the understanding of auditive function has dramatically improved. The syndromic and non-syndromic forms of hereditary hearing impairment can be subdivided into their underlying genetic defects, as more and more genes are identified. Diagnostic of syndromic hearing loss has been improved and can be done earlier. But the molecular-genetic analysis is still time-consuming and difficult. Currently, in our clinic, only patients with suspected Pendred-syndrome, representing the most frequent syndrome with hearing impairment, undergo a routine search for mutation detection in the corresponding gene SLC26A4. A multitude of genes and mutations are seen in the non-syndromic forms of hereditary hearing impairment. The gene gap-junction-protein beta2, encoding connexin 26, is encountered most frequently. Its prevalence in Switzerland is high with about 20% in the non-syndromic group. A molecular-genetic analysis of connexin 26 is offered in cases of congenital hearing loss. Another analysis, which has been implemented in the clinic, is the sequencing of Wolfram-syndrome gene 1 in familial low-frequency hearing loss. This gene seems to be involved in the majority of families with this type of hearing loss. Gene therapy for hearing loss is currently not an option in the clinical field. The different steps in carcinogenesis of head and neck cancer have further been elucidated by molecular-genetic research. Clinical applications are the establishment of risk-profiles for tumor-development and defining prognostic markers as well as the development of new treatment strategies based on genetic therapy.

  12. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  13. Molecular delivery of plasmids for genetic vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mazid, Romiza; Tan, Melvin X; Danquah, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid vaccination is a smart gene delivery application mostly achieved through the utilisation of viral or copolymeric systems as surrogated carriers in micro or nano formulations. A common polymeric protocol for plasmid vaccine formulation, which as somewhat been successful, is via the complexation of the DNA molecules with a cationic polymer, and encapsulating in a vehicular carrier polymer. Even though plasmid vaccination research has not witnessed the much anticipated success, due a number of cellular and physicochemical reasons, application of copolymeric carriers with tight functionalities is a promising strategy to optimally deliver the DNA molecules; in view of the available chemistries and physical properties that could be tuned to enable enhanced targeted delivery, uptake and specific transfection. This also enables the targeting of specific epitopes and antigen presenting cells for the treatment of many pathogenic infections and cancer. This paper provides a brief critical review of the current state of plasmid vaccines formulation and molecular delivery with analysis of performance data obtained from clinical trials.

  14. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease – molecular and brain network approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher; De Jager, Philip L.; Bennett, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care for AD. However, due to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extracting actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effect of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of omic data types in multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effect of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Further, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models. PMID:27282653

  15. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  16. Molecular Genetics of Root Thigmoresponsiveness in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, Patrick H.

    2002-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow plant roots to use gravity and touch as growth guides are investigated. We are using a molecular genetic strategy in Arabidopsis thaliana to study these processes. When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow on tilted hard-agar surfaces, their roots develop a wavy pattern of growth which appears to derive from a succession of left-handed and right-handed circumnutation-like processes triggered by gravity and touch stimulation (Okada and Shimura, 1990; Rutherford et al., 1998; Rutherford and Masson, 1996). Interestingly, mutations that affect root waving on tilted hard-agar surfaces can be identified and characterized. Some of these mutations affect root gravitropism, while others appear to be responsible for the production of abnormal waves (no waves, compressed or square waves, coils) without affecting gravitropism. The specific objectives of this project were to functionally characterize two genes (WVD2 and WVD6) which are required for root waving on tilted agar surfaces, but not for root gravitropism. Specific objectives included a physiological and cytological analysis of the mutants, and molecular cloning and characterization of the corresponding genes. As summarized in this paper, we have reached these objectives. We have also identified and partially characterized other mutations that affect root skewing on hard-agar surfaces (sku5-1 and ago1), and have completed our work on the root-wave phenotype associated with mutations in genes of the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway (Lynn et al., 1999; Rutherford et al., 1998; Sedbrook et al., 2000, 2002). We briefly describe our progress on the cloning and characterization of WVD6, WVD2 and SKU5, and provide a list of papers (published, or in preparation) that derived from this grant. We also discuss the biological implications of our findings, with special emphasis on the analysis of WVD2.

  17. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    PubMed Central

    Küpper Cardoso Perseguini, Juliana Morini; Chioratto, Alisson Fernando; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Moraes; Costa Mondego, Jorge Mauricio; Gazaffi, Rodrigo; Franco Garcia, Antonio Augusto; de Campos, Tatiana; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Rubiano, Luciana Benchimol

    2011-01-01

    A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats – SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms – AFLPs) for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger’s modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively) than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm. PMID:21637550

  18. [Prospect of application of molecular phylogeography in study of geoherbs].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qingjun; Huang, Luqi; Guo, Lanping; Shao, Aijuan

    2009-08-01

    This paper firstly introduces the concept, method and current research of molecular phylogeography and then discusses its application in the study of geoherbs. The relativity between three genetic differentiation patterns of plant inferred by molecular phylogeography (i.e. allopatric fragmentation, restricted gene flow with isolation by distance and range expansion) and the formation of genuine character is analysed. Molecular authentication of geoherbs based on molecular phylogeography has the advantage of former molecular identification at technology and knowing genetic differentiation of geoherbs. Using molecular phylogeography for study on changing history of geoherbs habitat is also explicated. The problem of germplasm degeneration in cultural geoherbs could be effectively resolved by molecular phylogeography method. The application of molecular phylogeography in these subjects opens up prospects for study on geoherbs by using the principle and method of molecular phylogeography.

  19. Molecular scissors and their application in genetically modified farm animals.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bjoern; Niemann, Heiner

    2015-06-01

    Molecular scissors (MS), incl. Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFN), Transcription-activator like endoncleases (TALENS) and meganucleases possess long recognition sites and are thus capable of cutting DNA in a very specific manner. These molecular scissors mediate targeted genetic alterations by enhancing the DNA mutation rate via induction of double-strand breaks at a predetermined genomic site. Compared to conventional homologous recombination based gene targeting, MS can increase the targeting rate 10,000-fold, and gene disruption via mutagenic DNA repair is stimulated at a similar frequency. The successful application of different MS has been shown in different organisms, including insects, amphibians, plants, nematodes, and mammals, including humans. Recently, another novel class of molecular scissors was described that uses RNAs to target a specific genomic site. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is capable of targeting even multiple genomic sites in one shot and thus could be superior to ZFNs or TALEN, especially by its easy design. MS can be successfully employed for improving the understanding of complex physiological systems, producing transgenic animals, incl. creating large animal models for human diseases, creating specific cell lines, and plants, and even for treating human genetic diseases. This review provides an update on molecular scissors, their underlying mechanism and focuses on new opportunities for generating genetically modified farm animals.

  20. Objectives, criteria and methods for using molecular genetic data in priority setting for conservation of animal genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, P J; Tixier-Boichard, M; Toro, M A; Simianer, H; Eding, H; Gandini, G; Joost, S; Garcia, D; Colli, L; Ajmone-Marsan, P

    2010-05-01

    The genetic diversity of the world's livestock populations is decreasing, both within and across breeds. A wide variety of factors has contributed to the loss, replacement or genetic dilution of many local breeds. Genetic variability within the more common commercial breeds has been greatly decreased by selectively intense breeding programmes. Conservation of livestock genetic variability is thus important, especially when considering possible future changes in production environments. The world has more than 7500 livestock breeds and conservation of all of them is not feasible. Therefore, prioritization is needed. The objective of this article is to review the state of the art in approaches for prioritization of breeds for conservation, particularly those approaches that consider molecular genetic information, and to identify any shortcomings that may restrict their application. The Weitzman method was among the first and most well-known approaches for utilization of molecular genetic information in conservation prioritization. This approach balances diversity and extinction probability to yield an objective measure of conservation potential. However, this approach was designed for decision making across species and measures diversity as distinctiveness. For livestock, prioritization will most commonly be performed among breeds within species, so alternatives that measure diversity as co-ancestry (i.e. also within-breed variability) have been proposed. Although these methods are technically sound, their application has generally been limited to research studies; most existing conservation programmes have effectively primarily based decisions on extinction risk. The development of user-friendly software incorporating these approaches may increase their rate of utilization.

  1. Molecular genetics of DNA viruses: recombinant virus technology.

    PubMed

    Neuhierl, Bernhard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant viral genomes cloned onto BAC vectors can be subjected to extensive molecular genetic analysis in the context of E. coli. Thus, the recombinant virus technology exploits the power of prokaryotic genetics to introduce all kinds of mutations into the recombinant genome. All available techniques are based on homologous recombination between a targeting vector carrying the mutated version of the gene of interest and the recombinant virus. After modification, the mutant viral genome is stably introduced into eukaryotic cells permissive for viral lytic replication. In these cells, mutant viral genomes can be packaged into infectious particles to evaluate the effect of these mutations in the context of the complete genome.

  2. Genetic approaches to the molecular/neuronal mechanisms underlying learning and memory in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akira; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2005-09-01

    Learning and memory is an essential component of human intelligence. To understand its underlying molecular and neuronal mechanisms is currently an extensive focus in the field of cognitive neuroscience. We have employed advanced mouse genetic approaches to analyze the molecular and neuronal bases for learning and memory, and our results showed that brain region-specific genetic manipulations (including transgenic and knockout), inducible/reversible knockout, genetic/chemical kinase inactivation, and neuronal-based genetic approach are very powerful tools for studying the involvements of various molecules or neuronal substrates in the processes of learning and memory. Studies using these techniques may eventually lead to the understanding of how new information is acquired and how learned information is memorized in the brain.

  3. Genetic studies in alcohol research

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, R.W.

    1994-12-15

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) supports research to elucidate the specific genetic factors, now largely unknown, which underlie susceptibility to alcoholism and its medical complications (including fetal alcohol syndrome). Because of the genetic complexity and heterogeneity of alcoholism, identification of the multiple underlying factors will require the development of new study designs and methods of analysis of data from human families. While techniques of genetic analysis of animal behavioral traits (e.g., targeted gene disruption, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping) are more powerful that those applicable to humans (e.g., linkage and allelic association studies), the validation of animal behaviors as models of aspects of human alcoholism has been problematic. Newly developed methods for mapping QTL influencing animal behavioral traits can not only permit analyses of human family data to be directly informed by the results of animal studies, but can also serve as a novel means of validating animal models of aspects of alcoholism. 55 refs.

  4. Molecular characterization of genetically-modified crops: Challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Quan, Sheng; Yan, Xiaofang; Biswas, Sukumar; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin

    Molecular characterization lays a foundation for safety assessment and subsequent monitoring of genetically modified (GM) crops. Due to the target-specific nature, conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods cannot comprehensively detect unintended gene insertions, let alone unknown GM events. As more and more new developed GM crops including new plant breeding technology (NPBT) generated crops are in the pipeline for commercialization, alternative -omics approaches, particularly next generation sequencing, have been developed for molecular characterization of authorized or unauthorized GM (UGM) crops. This review summarizes first those methods, addresses their challenges, and discusses possible strategies for molecular characterization of engineered crops generated by NPBT, highlighting needs for a global information-sharing database and cost-effective, accurate and comprehensive molecular characterization approaches.

  5. Clinical, molecular, and genetic evaluation of galactosemia in Turkish children

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Sezen Ugan; Gürsoy, Semra; Koçkar, Tuba; Önal, Hasan; Adal, Servet Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Aim Galactosemia is a carbohydrate metabolism disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance. The most frequent enzyme deficiency is galactose-1-phosphate-uridylytransferase, which causes classic galactosemia. When the enzyme is absent, an infant cannot metabolize galactose-1-phosphate and it cumulates in liver, kidney, brain, tongue, lens, and skin. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and molecular characteristics of patients with galactosemia, which is observed more frequently in our country than anywhere else in the world. Material and Methods This is a retrospective study that includes the moleculer and genetic charcteristics of 14 patient who were diagnosed as having galactosemia between January 2009 and January 2011. Results Nine patients were male and 5 female. Consanguineous marriage was detected in the family history of 7 patients. One patient had a history of a deceased sibling with a confirmed diagnosis of galactosemia. The main reasons for admission to the hospital were jaundice in 9, hypoglycemia in 2, sepsis in 2, and elevated liver enzymes in 1 patient. The Beutler test was positive in all patients. The mean enzyme activity was 0.36±0.26 μmol/mL. Only 6 of our cases were diagnosed in the early period (first 15 days). Cataract was present in four patients. Q188R mutation was observed in 13 patients, and homozygote N314D and homozygote E340X mutations were observed in one patient. Three patients had impaired neurologic development according to the Denver Developmental Screening Test II. Conclusion The most common genetic abnormality was Q188R mutation. Only 43% of our patients’s disease could be diagnosed at an early stage. We suggest that galactosemia should be included in the national newborn screening program in order to make earlier diagnoses. PMID:28123333

  6. [Molecular genetic diversity of Fujian domestic duck breeds].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-fang; Li, Bi-chun; Ma, Yue-hui; Tang, Qing-ping; Chen, Kuan-wei; Tu, Yun-jie

    2007-02-01

    By using 28 micro-satellite markers with better polymorphism, this paper studied the genetic diversity of four Fujian provincial domestic duck breeds Jinding, Putian black, Liancheng white, and Shanma. According to the alleles frequencies, the polymorphic information content, average heterozygosity, anaqular genetic distance (DA) and Nei' s standard genetic distance (DS) for each breed were calculated. Based on DA and DS, four dendrograms were obtained by neighbor-joining (NJ) and UPGMA methods. The results showed that the average heterozygosity of the four duck breeds was 0. 5353, indicating that the protection of the genetic diversity of these breeds should be strengthened. The orders of the two types of genetic distances among the breeds were accordant, and the dendrograms were the same, reflecting that much more micro-satellite loci should be adopted to obtain more universal conclusions when the genetic diversity was analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships among the four duck breeds were in accordance with their economic types and ecological localities.

  7. The complex genetic and molecular basis of a model quantitative trait.

    PubMed

    Linder, Robert A; Seidl, Fabian; Ha, Kimberly; Ehrenreich, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative traits are often influenced by many loci with small effects. Identifying most of these loci and resolving them to specific genes or genetic variants is challenging. Yet, achieving such a detailed understanding of quantitative traits is important, as it can improve our knowledge of the genetic and molecular basis of heritable phenotypic variation. In this study, we use a genetic mapping strategy that involves recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection to obtain new insights into an ecologically, industrially, and medically relevant quantitative trait-tolerance of oxidative stress, as measured based on resistance to hydrogen peroxide. We examine the genetic basis of hydrogen peroxide resistance in three related yeast crosses and detect 64 distinct genomic loci that likely influence the trait. By precisely resolving or cloning a number of these loci, we demonstrate that a broad spectrum of cellular processes contribute to hydrogen peroxide resistance, including DNA repair, scavenging of reactive oxygen species, stress-induced MAPK signaling, translation, and water transport. Consistent with the complex genetic and molecular basis of hydrogen peroxide resistance, we show two examples where multiple distinct causal genetic variants underlie what appears to be a single locus. Our results improve understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of a highly complex, model quantitative trait.

  8. Genetic characterization of fig tree mutants with molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M G F; Martins, A B G; Desidério, J A; Bertoni, B W; Alves, M C

    2012-08-06

    The fig (Ficus carica L.) is a fruit tree of great world importance and, therefore, the genetic improvement becomes an important field of research for better crops, being necessary to gather information on this species, mainly regarding its genetic variability so that appropriate propagation projects and management are made. The improvement programs of fig trees using conventional procedures in order to obtain new cultivars are rare in many countries, such as Brazil, especially due to the little genetic variability and to the difficulties in obtaining plants from gamete fusion once the wasp Blastophaga psenes, responsible for the natural pollinating, is not found in Brazil. In this way, the mutagenic genetic improvement becomes a solution of it. For this reason, in an experiment conducted earlier, fig plants formed by cuttings treated with gamma ray were selected based on their agronomic characteristics of interest. We determined the genetic variability in these fig tree selections, using RAPD and AFLP molecular markers, comparing them to each other and to the Roxo-de-Valinhos, used as the standard. For the reactions of DNA amplification, 140 RAPD primers and 12 primer combinations for AFLP analysis were used. The selections did not differ genetically between themselves and between them and the Roxo-de-Valinhos cultivar. Techniques that can detect polymorphism between treatments, such as DNA sequencing, must be tested. The phenotypic variation of plants may be due to epigenetic variation, necessitating the use of techniques with methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes.

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of plant gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of mutants is a powerful approach for elucidating the components of complex biological processes. A growing number of mutants have been isolated which affect plant gravitropism and the classes of mutants found thus far provide important information about the gravity response mechanism. The wide variety of mutants isolated, especially in Arabidopsis, indicates that gravitropism is a complex, multi-step process. The existence of mutants altered in either root gravitropism alone, shoot gravitropism alone, or both indicates that the root and shoot gravitropic mechanisms have both separate and common steps. Reduced starch mutants have confirmed the role of amyloplasts in sensing the gravity signal. The hormone auxin is thought to act as the transducing signal between the sites of gravity perception (the starch parenchyma cells surrounding the vascular tissue in shoots and the columella cells of root caps) and asymmetric growth (the epidermal cells of the elongation zone(s) of each organ). To date, all mutants that are resistant to high concentrations of auxin have also been found to exhibit a reduced gravitropic response, thus supporting the role of auxin. Not all gravitropic mutants are auxin-resistant, however, indicating that there are additional steps which do not involve auxin. Studies with mutants of tomato which exhibit either reduced or reversed gravitropic responses further support the role of auxin redistribution in gravitropism and suggest that both red light and cytokinin interact with gravitropism through controlling lateral auxin transport. Plant responses to gravity thus likely involve changes in both auxin transport and sensitivity.

  10. Molecular genetic analysis of plant gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Lomax, T L

    1997-06-01

    The analysis of mutants is a powerful approach for elucidating the components of complex biological processes. A growing number of mutants have been isolated which affect plant gravitropism and the classes of mutants found thus far provide important information about the gravity response mechanism. The wide variety of mutants isolated, especially in Arabidopsis, indicates that gravitropism is a complex, multi-step process. The existence of mutants altered in either root gravitropism alone, shoot gravitropism alone, or both indicates that the root and shoot gravitropic mechanisms have both separate and common steps. Reduced starch mutants have confirmed the role of amyloplasts in sensing the gravity signal. The hormone auxin is thought to act as the transducing signal between the sites of gravity perception (the starch parenchyma cells surrounding the vascular tissue in shoots and the columella cells of root caps) and asymmetric growth (the epidermal cells of the elongation zone(s) of each organ). To date, all mutants that are resistant to high concentrations of auxin have also been found to exhibit a reduced gravitropic response, thus supporting the role of auxin. Not all gravitropic mutants are auxin-resistant, however, indicating that there are additional steps which do not involve auxin. Studies with mutants of tomato which exhibit either reduced or reversed gravitropic responses further support the role of auxin redistribution in gravitropism and suggest that both red light and cytokinin interact with gravitropism through controlling lateral auxin transport. Plant responses to gravity thus likely involve changes in both auxin transport and sensitivity.

  11. Child Development and Molecular Genetics: 14 Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Plomin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen years ago, the first article on molecular genetics was published in this journal: Child Development, Molecular Genetics, andWhat to Do With Genes Once They Are Found (R. Plomin & M. Rutter, 1998). The goal of the article was to outline what developmentalists can do with genes once they are found. These new directions for developmental research are still relevant today. The problem lies with the phrase “once they are found”: It has been much more difficult than expected to identify genes responsible for the heritability of complex traits and common disorders, the so-called missing heritability problem. The present article considers reasons for the missing heritability problem and possible solutions. PMID:22469254

  12. Molecular genetic testing and the future of clinical genomics.

    PubMed

    Katsanis, Sara Huston; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    Genomic technologies are reaching the point of being able to detect genetic variation in patients at high accuracy and reduced cost, offering the promise of fundamentally altering medicine. Still, although scientists and policy advisers grapple with how to interpret and how to handle the onslaught and ambiguity of genome-wide data, established and well-validated molecular technologies continue to have an important role, especially in regions of the world that have more limited access to next-generation sequencing capabilities. Here we review the range of methods currently available in a clinical setting as well as emerging approaches in clinical molecular diagnostics. In parallel, we outline implementation challenges that will be necessary to address to ensure the future of genetic medicine.

  13. Molecular genetic testing and the future of clinical genomics

    PubMed Central

    Katsanis, Sara Huston; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Genomic technologies are reaching the point of being able to detect genetic variation in patients at high accuracy and reduced cost, offering the promise of fundamentally altering medicine. Still, although scientists and policy advisers grapple with how to interpret and how to handle the onslaught and ambiguity of genome-wide data, established and well-validated molecular technologies continue to have an important role, especially in regions of the world that have more limited access to next-generation sequencing capabilities. Here we review the range of methods currently available in a clinical setting as well as emerging approaches in clinical molecular diagnostics. In parallel, we outline implementation challenges that will be necessary to address to ensure the future of genetic medicine. PMID:23681062

  14. Cytogenetics and molecular genetics of childhood brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Biegel, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made toward improving survival for children with brain tumors, and yet there is still relatively little known regarding the molecular genetic events that contribute to tumor initiation or progression. Nonrandom patterns of chromosomal deletions in several types of childhood brain tumors suggest that the loss or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes are critical events in tumorigenesis. Deletions of chromosomal regions 10q, 11 and 17p, and example, are frequent events in medulloblastoma, whereas loss of a region within 22q11.2, which contains the INI1 gene, is involved in the development of atypical teratoid and rhabdoid tumors. A review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic changes identified to date in childhood brain tumors will be presented. PMID:11550309

  15. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  16. Molecular basis of telomere dysfunction in human genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sarek, Grzegorz; Marzec, Paulina; Margalef, Pol; Boulton, Simon J

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in genes encoding proteins required for telomere structure, replication, repair and length maintenance are associated with several debilitating human genetic disorders. These complex telomere biology disorders (TBDs) give rise to critically short telomeres that affect the homeostasis of multiple organs. Furthermore, genome instability is often a hallmark of telomere syndromes, which are associated with increased cancer risk. Here, we summarize the molecular causes and cellular consequences of disease-causing mutations associated with telomere dysfunction.

  17. 76 FR 18227 - Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices... Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel (the panel) of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee that published... meeting of the Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee, and...

  18. Molecular genetics of RecQ helicase disorders.

    PubMed

    Hanada, K; Hickson, I D

    2007-09-01

    The RecQ helicases belong to the Superfamily II group of DNA helicases, and are defined by amino acid motifs that show sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of Escherichia coli RecQ. RecQ helicases have crucial roles in the maintenance of genome stability. In humans, there are five RecQ helicases and deficiencies in three of them cause genetic disorders characterised by cancer predisposition, premature aging and/or developmental abnormalities. RecQ helicase-deficient cells exhibit aberrant genetic recombination and/or DNA replication, which result in chromosomal instability and a decreased potential for proliferation. Here, we review the current knowledge of the molecular genetics of RecQ helicases, focusing on the human RecQ helicase disorders and mouse models of these conditions.

  19. Genetic and Molecular Mapping of Chromosome Region 85a in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jones, W. K.; Rawls-Jr., J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome region 85A contains at least 12 genetic complementation groups, including the genes dhod, pink and hunchback. In order to better understand the organization of this chromosomal segment and to permit molecular studies of these genes, we have carried out a genetic analysis coupled with a chromosome walk to isolate the DNA containing these genes. Complementation tests with chromosomal deficiencies permitted unambiguous ordering of most of the complementation groups identified within the 85A region. Recombinant bacteriophage clones were isolated that collectively span over 120 kb of 85A DNA and these were used to produce a molecular map of the region. The breakpoint sites of a number of 85A chromosome rearrangements were localized on the molecular map, thereby delimiting regions of the DNA that contain the various genetic complementation groups. PMID:2852138

  20. Genetic, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Underlying the J Wave Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Antzelevitch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    An early repolarization (ER) pattern in the ECG, distinguished by J-point elevation, slurring of the terminal part of the QRS and ST-segment elevation has long been recognized and considered to be a benign electrocardiographic manifestation. Experimental studies conducted over a decade ago suggested that some cases of ER may be associated with malignant arrhythmias. Validation of this hypothesis was provided by recent studies demonstrating that an ER pattern in the inferior or inferolateral leads is associated with increased risk for life-threatening arrhythmias, termed ER syndrome (ERS). Because accentuated J waves characterize both Brugada syndrome (BS) and ERS, these syndromes have been grouped under the term “J wave syndromes”. ERS and BS share similar ECG characteristics, clinical outcomes and risk factors, as well as a common arrhythmic platform related to amplification of Ito-mediated J waves. Although BS and ERS differ with respect to the magnitude and lead location of abnormal J wave manifestation, they can be considered to represent a continuous spectrum of phenotypic expression. Although most subjects exhibiting an ER pattern are at minimal to no risk, mounting evidence suggests that careful attention should be paid to subjects with “high risk” ER. The challenge ahead is to be able to identify those at risk for sudden cardiac death. Here I review the clinical and genetic aspects as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the J wave syndromes. PMID:22498570

  1. Molecular genetic transfection of the coccidian parasite Sarcocystis neurona.

    PubMed

    Gaji, Rajshekhar Y; Zhang, Deqing; Breathnach, Cormac C; Vaishnava, Shipra; Striepen, Boris; Howe, Daniel K

    2006-11-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that is the major cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). The biology of this pathogen remains poorly understood in part due to unavailability of molecular genetic tools. Hence, with an objective to develop DNA transfection capabilities for S. neurona, the 5' flanking region of the SnSAG1 gene was isolated from a genomic library and used to construct expression plasmids. In transient assays, the reporter molecules beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) could be detected in electroporated S. neurona, thereby confirming the feasibility of transgene expression in this organism. Stable transformation of S. neurona was achieved using a mutant dihydrofolate reductase thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene of Toxoplasma gondii that confers resistance to pyrimethamine. This selection system was used to create transgenic S. neurona that stably express beta-gal and YFP. As shown in this study, these transgenic clones can be useful for analyzing growth rate of parasites in vitro and for assessing drug sensitivities. More importantly, the DNA transfection methods described herein should greatly facilitate studies examining intracellular parasitism by this important coccidian pathogen.

  2. Pseudomonas viridiflava, a Multi Host Plant Pathogen with Significant Genetic Variation at the Molecular Level

    PubMed Central

    Mpalantinaki, Evaggelia; Ververidis, Filippos; Goumas, Dimitrios E.

    2012-01-01

    The pectinolytic species Pseudomonas viridiflava has a wide host range among plants, causing foliar and stem necrotic lesions and basal stem and root rots. However, little is known about the molecular evolution of this species. In this study we investigated the intraspecies genetic variation of P. viridiflava amongst local (Cretan), as well as international isolates of the pathogen. The genetic and phenotypic variability were investigated by molecular fingerprinting (rep-PCR) and partial sequencing of three housekeeping genes (gyrB, rpoD and rpoB), and by biochemical and pathogenicity profiling. The biochemical tests and pathogenicity profiling did not reveal any variability among the isolates studied. However, the molecular fingerprinting patterns and housekeeping gene sequences clearly differentiated them. In a broader phylogenetic comparison of housekeeping gene sequences deposited in GenBank, significant genetic variability at the molecular level was found between isolates of P. viridiflava originated from different host species as well as among isolates from the same host. Our results provide a basis for more comprehensive understanding of the biology, sources and shifts in genetic diversity and evolution of P. viridiflava populations and should support the development of molecular identification tools and epidemiological studies in diseases caused by this species. PMID:22558343

  3. Human molecular genetics research at the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Falaschi, P A

    1997-01-01

    The ICGEB started its activity in 1987 as a special project of UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization) and operates now as a fully autonomous International Organization, of which 40 countries are members at present. The mandate of ICGEB is to become a Centre of excellence for research and training in modern biology addressed to the needs of the developing world. The ICGEB consists of two main laboratories, one in Trieste (where the direction of the Centre is also located) and one in New Delhi, plus a network of 30 Affiliated Centres. The Centre operates through: 1) specific research programs of hish scientific content at the Trieste and New Delhi laboratories; 2) long term training through post-doctoral and pre-doctoral fellowships; 3) short term training; 4) collaborative research program, through which the Centre finances research projects of major impact to the need of the Member States; 5) scientific services, namely consultation for scientific programs, distribution of reagents and a bioinformatics network particularly geared to the human genome research. The research on human molecular genetics in particularly active in the Trieste Component and concerns the study at the molecular level of several genes important for human health: control of DNA replication, response to infectious diseases, cardiocirculatory diseases, cystic fibrosis and cancer. The methodologies for developing new diagnostic methods and for developing gene therapy protocols are actively pursued. Through these programs, the member countries have access to state-of-the-art technologies anf know-how essential for the development of the molecular approaches to medicine brought forward by the study of the human genome.

  4. Molecular Genetic Tools and Techniques in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-05-02

    The molecular genetic tools used in fission yeast have generally been adapted from methods and approaches developed for use in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Initially, the molecular genetics of Schizosaccharomyces pombe was developed to aid gene identification, but it is now applied extensively to the analysis of gene function and the manipulation of noncoding sequences that affect chromosome dynamics. Much current research using fission yeast thus relies on the basic processes of introducing DNA into the organism and the extraction of DNA for subsequent analysis. Targeted integration into specific genomic loci is often used to create site-specific mutants or changes to noncoding regulatory elements for subsequent phenotypic analysis. It is also regularly used to introduce additional sequences that generate tagged proteins or to create strains in which the levels of wild-type protein can be manipulated through transcriptional regulation and/or protein degradation. Here, we draw together a collection of core molecular genetic techniques that underpin much of modern research using S. pombe We summarize the most useful methods that are routinely used and provide guidance, learned from experience, for the successful application of these methods.

  5. Recent insights into the molecular genetics of the homocysteine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Födinger, M; Wagner, O F; Hörl, W H; Sunder-Plassmann, G

    2001-02-01

    The homocysteine plasma level is determined by non-genetic and genetic factors. In recent years evidence has accumulated that the total homocysteine plasma level of patients under different forms of renal replacement therapy is influenced by a common mutation at nucleotide position 677 of the gene coding for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C-->T). Furthermore, compound heterozygosity for the 677T allele and a novel A-->C polymorphism at nucleotide position 1298 of MTHFR is suggested to correlate with a decrease of folate plasma concentrations. Because polymorphisms of genes coding for proteins involved in the metabolism of homocysteine may contribute to elevated total homocysteine plasma concentrations, molecular genetic analyses of the homocysteine pathways experienced a drift towards screening for candidate genes with a putative relationship to total homocysteine plasma levels. One example is the cloning of the FOLR1 gene coding for the folate-binding protein (Folbp1), which has recently been inactivated in mice, thus representing an elegant model to investigate the consequence on the homocysteine metabolism. Furthermore, the recent characterization of the CUBN gene encoding the intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor (cubilin) provides a basis to identify the causative mutations in patients suffering from a hereditary syndrome of hyperhomocysteinemia that presents with megaloblastic anemia and proteinuria. This review focuses on recent insights into the molecular genetics of MTHFR, FOLR1, and CUBN, and their relationships to the metabolism of the amino acid homocysteine.

  6. [Molecular genetic detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Koehler, R; Bartram, C R

    2013-05-01

    The treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in childhood and adolescence achieves nowadays cure rates of more than 80%. The detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) via molecular genetic methods provides - in comparison with conventional clinical and biological parameters - much more sensitive approaches to monitor individual treatment response. Here we will discuss the molecular background and technical developments in the framework of the BFM-study group.

  7. Genetics of Tinnitus: An Emerging Area for Molecular Diagnosis and Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.; Bibas, Thanos; Cima, Rilana F. F.; Van de Heyning, Paul; Knipper, Marlies; Mazurek, Birgit; Szczepek, Agnieszka J.; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of external or bodily-generated sounds. Chronic tinnitus is a highly prevalent condition affecting over 70 million people in Europe. A wide variety of comorbidities, including hearing loss, psychiatric disorders, neurodegenerative disorders, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, have been suggested to contribute to the onset or progression of tinnitus; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of tinnitus are not well understood and the contribution of genetic and epigenetic factors remains unknown. Human genetic studies could enable the identification of novel molecular therapeutic targets, possibly leading to the development of novel pharmaceutical therapeutics. In this article, we briefly discuss the available evidence for a role of genetics in tinnitus and consider potential hurdles in designing genetic studies for tinnitus. Since multiple diseases have tinnitus as a symptom and the supporting genetic evidence is sparse, we propose various strategies to investigate the genetic underpinnings of tinnitus, first by showing evidence of heritability using concordance studies in twins, and second by improving patient selection according to phenotype and/or etiology in order to control potential biases and optimize genetic data output. The increased knowledge resulting from this endeavor could ultimately improve the drug development process and lead to the preventive or curative treatment of tinnitus. PMID:27594824

  8. Molecular ecology of social behaviour: analyses of breeding systems and genetic structure.

    PubMed

    Ross, K G

    2001-02-01

    Molecular genetic studies of group kin composition and local genetic structure in social organisms are becoming increasingly common. A conceptual and mathematical framework that links attributes of the breeding system to group composition and genetic structure is presented here, and recent empirical studies are reviewed in the context of this framework. Breeding system properties, including the number of breeders in a social group, their genetic relatedness, and skew in their parentage, determine group composition and the distribution of genetic variation within and between social units. This group genetic structure in turn influences the opportunities for conflict and cooperation to evolve within groups and for selection to occur among groups or clusters of groups. Thus, molecular studies of social groups provide the starting point for analyses of the selective forces involved in social evolution, as well as for analyses of other fundamental evolutionary problems related to sex allocation, reproductive skew, life history evolution, and the nature of selection in hierarchically structured populations. The framework presented here provides a standard system for interpreting and integrating genetic and natural history data from social organisms for application to a broad range of evolutionary questions.

  9. Molecular road ecology: exploring the potential of genetics for investigating transportation impacts on wildlife.

    PubMed

    Balkenhol, Niko; Waits, Lisette P

    2009-10-01

    Transportation infrastructures such as roads, railroads and canals can have major environmental impacts. Ecological road effects include the destruction and fragmentation of habitat, the interruption of ecological processes and increased erosion and pollution. Growing concern about these ecological road effects has led to the emergence of a new scientific discipline called road ecology. The goal of road ecology is to provide planners with scientific advice on how to avoid, minimize or mitigate negative environmental impacts of transportation. In this review, we explore the potential of molecular genetics to contribute to road ecology. First, we summarize general findings from road ecology and review studies that investigate road effects using genetic data. These studies generally focus only on barrier effects of roads on local genetic diversity and structure and only use a fraction of available molecular approaches. Thus, we propose additional molecular applications that can be used to evaluate road effects across multiple scales and dimensions of the biodiversity hierarchy. Finally, we make recommendations for future research questions and study designs that would advance molecular road ecology. Our review demonstrates that molecular approaches can substantially contribute to road ecology research and that interdisciplinary, long-term collaborations will be particularly important for realizing the full potential of molecular road ecology.

  10. Molecular genetics and genomics progress in urothelial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Netto, George J

    2013-11-01

    The clinical management of solid tumor patients has recently undergone a paradigm shift as the result of the accelerated advances in cancer genetics and genomics. Molecular diagnostics is now an integral part of routine clinical management in lung, colon, and breast cancer patients. In a disappointing contrast, molecular biomarkers remain largely excluded from current management algorithms of urologic malignancies. The need for new treatment alternatives and validated prognostic molecular biomarkers that can help clinicians identify patients in need of early aggressive management is pressing. Identifying robust predictive biomarkers that can stratify response to newly introduced targeted therapeutics is another crucially needed development. The following is a brief discussion of some promising candidate biomarkers that may soon become a part of clinical management of bladder cancers.

  11. [Molecular Genetics as Best Evidence in Glioma Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Komori, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    The development of a genomic landscape of gliomas has led to the internally consistent, molecularly-based classifiers. However, development of a biologically insightful classification to guide therapy is still ongoing. Further, tumors are heterogeneous, and they change and adapt in response to drugs. The challenge of developing molecular classifiers that provide meaningful ways to stratify patients for therapy remains a major challenge for the field. Therefore, by incorporating molecular markers into the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system, the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria will be replaced by a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis", to define tumor entities as narrowly as possible. We herein review the current status of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on IDH mutation, ATRX mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, and TERT promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as BRAF and H3F3A aberrations in pediatric gliomas, the combination of which will be a promising endeavor to render molecular genetics as a best evidence in the glioma diagnositics.

  12. [Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)--molecular and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Migdalska, Anna; Nawara, Magdalena; Bal, Jerzy; Mazurczak, Tadeusz

    2006-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurobehavioral disorder of childhood, affecting approximately 5-10% of children. ADHD is considered to be a multifactorial disorder because both genetic and environmental components may contribute to its progress. The etiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is unknown, however family, twin and adoption studies have suggested that genetic factors are very important in its etiopathogenesis. The research of genetic basis of ADHD consists of linkage analysis, candidate gene approach and association studies. These analyses and also investigations on animal models of disease suggest that mutations in genes involved in dopaminergic, serotonergic and adrenergic systems are likely to be responsible for ADHD.

  13. High volume molecular genetic identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms using Genetic Bit Analysis Application to human genetic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce-Jacino, M.T.; Reynolds, J.; Nikiforov, T.

    1994-09-01

    The most common type of genetic disease-associated mutation is the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Because most genetic diseases can be caused by multiple SNPs in the same gene, effective routine diagnosis of complex genetic diseases is dependent on a simple and reliable method of interrogating SNP sites. Molecular Tool`s solid phase assay capable of direct genotyping (single base sequencing) of SNP sites, Genetic Bit Analysis (GBA), involves hybridization-capture of a single-stranded PCR product to a sequence-specific, microtiter plate-bound oligonucleotide primer. The captured PCR product then acts as template for single-base extension of the capture primer across the polymorphic site, enabling direct determination of the base composition of the polymorphism through a simple colormetric assay. Genotyping in a high volume, semi-automated, processing system with a current capacity of 100 SNP interrogations per technician per day enables the screening of candidate mutations rapidly and cost-effectively, critically important to comprehensive genetic diagnosis. Using this gel-free technology, we have developed prototype diagnostic tests for CFTR and ApoE polymorphisms which enable direct sequencing of the polymorphic base at each site of interest. Routine clinical diagnosis of genetically complex diseases such as cystic fibrosis is dependent on this combination of robust biochemistry and simple format. Additionally, the ability to transfer the format and biochemistry to any disease gene of interest enables the broad application of this technology to clinical diagnostics, especially for genetically complex diseases.

  14. Molecular Approaches to Genetically Improve the Accumulation of Health-Promoting Secondary Metabolites in Staple Crops—A Case Study: The Lipoxygenase-B1 Genes and Regulation of the Carotenoid Content in Pasta Products

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Grazia M.; Trono, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites, also known as phytochemicals, represent a large subset of plant molecules that include compounds with health-promoting effects. Indeed, a number of epidemiological studies have shown that, when taken regularly and in adequate amounts, these molecules can have long-term beneficial effects on human health, through reduction of the incidence of degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, obesity, diabetes, and cancer. As the dietary intake of these phytochemicals is often inadequate, various strategies are in use to improve their content in staple crops, and the end-products thereof. One of the most effective strategies is crop improvement through genetic approaches, as this is the only way to generate new cultivars in which the high accumulation of a given phytochemical is stably fixed. Efforts to genetically improve quality traits are rapidly evolving, from classical breeding to molecular-assisted approaches; these require sound understanding of the molecular bases underlying the traits, to identify the genes/alleles that control them. This can be achieved through global analysis of the metabolic pathway responsible for phytochemical accumulation, to identify the link between phytochemical content and the activities of key enzymes that regulate the metabolic pathway, and between the key enzymes and their encoding genes/alleles. Once these have been identified, they can be used as markers for selection of new improved genotypes through biotechnological approaches. This review provides an overview of the major health-promoting properties shown to be associated with the dietary intake of phytochemicals, and describes how molecular approaches provide means for improving the health quality of edible crops. Finally, a case study is illustrated, of the identification in durum wheat of the Lipoxygenase-B1 genes that control the final carotenoid content in semolina-based foods, such as pasta products. PMID:27455242

  15. Molecular genetic studies of natives on Easter Island: evidence of an early European and Amerindian contribution to the Polynesian gene pool.

    PubMed

    Lie, B A; Dupuy, B M; Spurkland, A; Fernández-Viña, M A; Hagelberg, E; Thorsby, E

    2007-01-01

    Most archaeological and linguistic evidence suggest a Polynesian origin of the population of Easter Island (Rapanui), and this view has been supported by the identification of Polynesian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms in prehistoric skeletal remains. However, some evidence of an early South American contact also exists (the sweet potato, bottle gourd etc.), but genetic studies have so far failed to show an early Amerindian contribution to the gene pool on Easter Island. To address this issue, we analyzed mtDNA and Y chromosome markers and performed high-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping of DNA harvested from previously collected sera of 48 reputedly nonadmixed native Easter Islanders. All individuals carried mtDNA types and HLA alleles previously found in Polynesia, and most men carried Y chromosome markers of Polynesian origin, providing further evidence of a Polynesian origin of the population of Easter Island. A few individuals carried HLA alleles and/or Y chromosome markers of European origin. More interestingly, some individuals carried the HLA alleles A*0212 and B*3905, which are of typical Amerindian origin. The genealogy of some of the individuals carrying these non-Polynesian HLA alleles and their haplotypic backgrounds suggest an introduction into Easter Island in the early 1800s, or earlier. Thus, there may have been an early European and Amerindian contribution to the Polynesian gene pool of Easter Island.

  16. Advances in the Molecular Genetics of Non-syndromic Syndactyly

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hao; Tan, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Syndactyly, webbing of adjacent digits with or without bony fusion, is one of the most common hereditary limb malformations. It occurs either as an isolated abnormality or as a component of more than 300 syndromic anomalies. There are currently nine types of phenotypically diverse nonsyndromic syndactyly. Non-syndromic syndactyly is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, although the more severe presenting types and subtypes may show autosomal recessive or X-linked pattern of inheritance. The phenotype appears to be not only caused by a main gene, but also dependant on genetic background and subsequent signaling pathways involved in limb formation. So far, the principal genes identified to be involved in congenital syndactyly are mainly involved in the zone of polarizing activity and sonic hedgehog pathway. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the molecular genetics, including known genes and loci responsible for non-syndromic syndactyly, and the signaling pathways those genetic factors involved in, as well as clinical features and animal models. We hope our review will contribute to the understanding of underlying pathogenesis of this complicated disorder and have implication on genetic counseling. PMID:26069458

  17. Molecular characterization of GPR50 gene and study of its comparative genetic variability in sheep breeds adapted to different thermo-contrasting climatic regimens.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Vijay Kumar; Kumar, Davendra; Naqvi, S M K

    2017-04-01

    GPR50, formerly known as a melatonin-related receptor, is one of the three subtypes of melatonin receptor subfamily, together with MTNR1A and MTNR1B. GPR50, despite its high identity with the melatonin receptor family, does not bind melatonin and is considered to be an ortholog of MTNR1C in mammals. GPR50-expressing cells have been found in the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, the periventricular nucleus, and the median eminence. Genetic and functional evidence have been recently investigated linking GPR50 to adaptive thermogenesis and torpor, but still, it is an orphan receptor and is yet to be studied conclusively. The aims of the study were to characterize the GPR50 gene of sheep and to study the sequence variability of the gene in Indian sheep breeds of two different thermo-varied agroclimatic conditions. Genomic DNA isolation was done and a 791-bp sequence was amplified using self-designed primers and SNP profiling done out of samples of all the breeds to study the relative frequency of SNPs in each of the breed. Five important non-synonymous mutations were observed in the various breeds studied. T698G, G1097A, G1270A, G1318A, and C1334G lead to the following substitution: valine by glycine, arginine by glutamine, threonine by alanine, isoleucine by valine, and serine by cytosine, respectively. Two synonymous mutations (T663G and C888T) were also observed in some of the studied breeds. G1270A and C888T were the most prevalent SNPs observed in nearly all of the breeds. C888T SNPs were observed in higher prevalence in Chokla, Marwari, and Magra in comparison to Gaddi and Bharat Merino. A PolyPhen-2 analysis, which is used to assess the potential damaging nature of an SNP, revealed that mutation T698G and G1270A were benign while G1097A, G1318A, and C1334G were damaging with a score of 0.987, 0.993, and 0.739, respectively. A 3-D homology model of the protein was prepared using c4zwjA (UniProt sequence ID) as a template using the online version of Phyre2

  18. Molecular characterization of GPR50 gene and study of its comparative genetic variability in sheep breeds adapted to different thermo-contrasting climatic regimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Vijay Kumar; Kumar, Davendra; Naqvi, S. M. K.

    2016-09-01

    GPR50, formerly known as a melatonin-related receptor, is one of the three subtypes of melatonin receptor subfamily, together with MTNR1A and MTNR1B. GPR50, despite its high identity with the melatonin receptor family, does not bind melatonin and is considered to be an ortholog of MTNR1C in mammals. GPR50-expressing cells have been found in the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, the periventricular nucleus, and the median eminence. Genetic and functional evidence have been recently investigated linking GPR50 to adaptive thermogenesis and torpor, but still, it is an orphan receptor and is yet to be studied conclusively. The aims of the study were to characterize the GPR50 gene of sheep and to study the sequence variability of the gene in Indian sheep breeds of two different thermo-varied agroclimatic conditions. Genomic DNA isolation was done and a 791-bp sequence was amplified using self-designed primers and SNP profiling done out of samples of all the breeds to study the relative frequency of SNPs in each of the breed. Five important non-synonymous mutations were observed in the various breeds studied. T698G, G1097A, G1270A, G1318A, and C1334G lead to the following substitution: valine by glycine, arginine by glutamine, threonine by alanine, isoleucine by valine, and serine by cytosine, respectively. Two synonymous mutations (T663G and C888T) were also observed in some of the studied breeds. G1270A and C888T were the most prevalent SNPs observed in nearly all of the breeds. C888T SNPs were observed in higher prevalence in Chokla, Marwari, and Magra in comparison to Gaddi and Bharat Merino. A PolyPhen-2 analysis, which is used to assess the potential damaging nature of an SNP, revealed that mutation T698G and G1270A were benign while G1097A, G1318A, and C1334G were damaging with a score of 0.987, 0.993, and 0.739, respectively. A 3-D homology model of the protein was prepared using c4zwjA (UniProt sequence ID) as a template using the online version of Phyre2

  19. Molecular genetics of glioblastomas: defining subtypes and understanding the biology.

    PubMed

    Renault, Ilana Zalcberg; Golgher, Denise

    2015-02-01

    Despite comprehensive therapy, which includes surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme is very poor. Diagnosed individuals present an average of 12 to 18 months of life. This article provides an overview of the molecular genetics of these tumors. Despite the overwhelming amount of data available, so far little has been translated into real benefits for the patient. Because this is such a complex topic, the goal is to point out the main alterations in the biological pathways that lead to tumor formation, and how this can contribute to the development of better therapies and clinical care.

  20. Competency-Based Education for the Molecular Genetic Pathology Fellow

    PubMed Central

    Talbert, Michael L.; Dunn, S. Terence; Hunt, Jennifer; Hillyard, David R.; Mirza, Imran; Nowak, Jan A.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L.

    2009-01-01

    The following report represents guidelines for competency-based fellowship training in Molecular Genetic Pathology (MGP) developed by the Association for Molecular Pathology Training and Education Committee and Directors of MGP Programs in the United States. The goals of the effort were to describe each of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies as they apply to MGP fellowship training, provide a summary of goals and objectives, and recommend assessment tools. These guidelines are particularly pertinent to MGP training, which is a relatively new specialty that operates within a rapidly changing scientific and technological arena. It is hoped that this document will provide additional material for directors of existing MGP programs to consider for improvement of program objectives and enhancement of evaluation tools already in place. In addition, the guidelines should provide a valuable framework for the development of new MGP programs. PMID:19797613

  1. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors. PMID:26221475

  2. Genetic and molecular characterization of genomic regions surrounding specific loci of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations detected by the mouse specific-locus test (SLT) include multilocus deletions as well as intragenic lesions. Genetic analyses have characterized sets of presumed overlapping deletions and have mapped previously unrecognized genes to the regions surrounding each of several specific loci. Molecular entry to one of these regions, d se, was achieved by utilizing a viral integration at, or near, a marker locus. Presumed deletions were shown to be, in fact deleted for DNA sequences, and the physical map was oriented relative to the earlier functional map. Presently, a random-clone approach is being used for initiating molecular characterization of regions, which, in aggregate, span a minimum of 9 cM. Mapping to subregions already identified by functional units will facilitate the generation of comprehensive molecular maps and the identification of numerous structure-function correlations for the regions. Results of the genetic and molecular analyses of multilocus deletions have enhanced the value of the SLT by adding qualitative to quantitative capabilities. Studies of the heterozygous effects of deletions (which are the predominant lesions induced by many mutagens) provide information important to assessment of genetic risk. Long deletions are, further, providing tools for targeted mutagenesis studies that will generate information on the number of loci within segments of defined length that are capable of mutating to detectable alleles, as well as providing new mutations important for strategies of refining molecular and functional maps. 28 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. The importance of molecular analyses for understanding the genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum: an overview.

    PubMed

    Vite-Garín, Tania; Estrada-Bárcenas, Daniel Alfonso; Cifuentes, Joaquín; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the classification of the human pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum (H. capsulatum) (ascomycete) are sustained by the results of several genetic analyses that support the high diversity of this dimorphic fungus. The present mini-review highlights the great genetic plasticity of H. capsulatum. Important records with different molecular tools, mainly single- or multi-locus sequence analyses developed with this fungus, are discussed. Recent phylogenetic data with a multi-locus sequence analysis using 5 polymorphic loci support a new clade and/or phylogenetic species of H. capsulatum for the Americas, which was associated with fungal isolates obtained from the migratory bat Tadarida brasiliensis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  4. [Molecular-genetic forensic expert investigations in the Russian Federation: problems and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P L

    2006-01-01

    Introduction of molecular-genetic technology into forensic-medical expert practice in Russia took place in unfavourable conditions of poor financial support and, consequently, the results appeared unsatisfactory. Organisation and functioning of genetic laboratories must be controlled and provided with an adequate system of training personnel and professional control. Application of molecular-genetic methods in forensic medicine meets the needs of expert practice if it is based on the systemic approach. The system is proposed to be headed by Russian Center for Forensic-Medical Expert Examination. This center is to update and control the activity of all institutions involved in forensic medical expert examination in Russia and conduct monitoring of the studies and training of specialists for the system.

  5. Improved student linkage of Mendelian and molecular genetic concepts through a yeast-based laboratory module.

    PubMed

    Wolyniak, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    A study of modern genetics requires students to successfully unite the principles of Mendelian genetics with the functions of DNA. Traditional means of teaching genetics are often successful in teaching Mendelian and molecular ideas but not in allowing students to see how the two subjects relate. The laboratory module presented here attempts to present classical and molecular genetic concepts together as an inquiry-based exploration appropriate for high school or introductory undergraduate students. Using the non-essential APQ12 gene in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, students perform PCR, selective growth, and sporulation experiments to establish the ploidy and APQ12 zygosity of a series of unknown strains. Each experiment contributes data to characterize the unknown strains, but complete characterization is not possible without assimilating the data from all of the experiments. The module allows students to consider concepts normally introduced and emphasized in Mendelian genetics and explore them using molecular and experimental tools. Comparison of pre-module and post-module assessment surveys show an increase in student ability to link Mendelian concepts to experimental procedures relying on DNA analysis. The development of modules such as these provides students of all backgrounds with the tools to engage the complexities and issues that constitute modern principles of inheritance.

  6. Classical against molecular-genetic methods for susceptibility testing of antituberculotics.

    PubMed

    Porvaznik, I; Mokry, J; Solovic, I

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis currently belongs to rare respiratory diseases in Slovakia. However, the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) are major challenges for global tuberculosis control, since the treatment of resistant forms creates both medical and financial problems. Cultivation methods of diagnosis are time-consuming, many times exceeding the time of the initial phase of tuberculosis treatment. Therefore, in the presented study we compared the standard procedures, based on the cultivation of mycobacteria and subsequent drug susceptibility testing to antituberculotics, with molecular-genetic methods using PCR diagnostic kits. The molecular-genetic testing enables to obtain direct and fast evidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with genomic verification of resistance to the most important anti-tuberculosis drugs - isoniazid and rifampicin in MDR-TB, and ethambutol, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones in XDR-TB. In 2012-2013, we confirmed 19 cases of drug-resistant tuberculosis in Slovakia. The resistance to rifampicin was confirmed in all strains with both methods. In two cases, the molecular-genetic testing did not show resistance to isoniazid, as confirmed by conventional cultivation. Furthermore, two strains demonstrating susceptibility in conventional microbiological testing to ethambutol and five strains to fluoroquinolones were verified as actually being resistant using a PCR method. Rapid diagnosis and identification of MDR-TB or XDR-TB strains using molecular-genetic testing is an essential tool for the timely and appropriate drug treatment and prevention of spread of drug resistant strains.

  7. Genetic Optimization of Training Sets for Improved Machine Learning Models of Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Browning, Nicholas J; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Roethlisberger, Ursula

    2017-04-06

    The training of molecular models of quantum mechanical properties based on statistical machine learning requires large data sets which exemplify the map from chemical structure to molecular property. Intelligent a priori selection of training examples is often difficult or impossible to achieve, as prior knowledge may be unavailable. Ordinarily representative selection of training molecules from such data sets is achieved through random sampling. We use genetic algorithms for the optimization of training set composition consisting of tens of thousands of small organic molecules. The resulting machine learning models are considerably more accurate: in the limit of small training sets, mean absolute errors for out-of-sample predictions are reduced by up to ∼75%. We discuss and present optimized training sets consisting of 10 molecular classes for all molecular properties studied. We show that these classes can be used to design improved training sets for the generation of machine learning models of the same properties in similar but unrelated molecular sets.

  8. Antimicrobial agent resistance in mycobacteria: molecular genetic insights.

    PubMed Central

    Musser, J M

    1995-01-01

    The primary theme emerging from molecular genetic work conducted with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and several other mycobacterial species is that resistance is commonly associated with simple nucleotide alterations in target chromosomal genes rather than with acquisition of new genetic elements encoding antibiotic-altering enzymes. Mutations in an 81-bp region of the gene (rpoB) encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase account for rifampin resistance in 96% of M. tuberculosis and many Mycobacterium leprae isolates. Streptomycin resistance in about one-half of M. tuberculosis isolates is associated with missense mutations in the rpsL gene coding for ribosomal protein S12 or nucleotide substitutions in the 16S rRNA gene (rrs). Mutations in the katG gene resulting in catalase-peroxidase amino acid alterations nad nucleotide substitutions in the presumed regulatory region of the inhA locus are repeatedly associated with isoniazid-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates. A majority of fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates have amino acid substitutions in a region of the DNA gyrase A subunit homologous to a conserved fluoroquinolone resistance-determining region. Multidrug-resistant isolates of M. tuberculosis arise as a consequence of sequential accumulation of mutations conferring resistance to single therapeutic agents. Molecular strategies show considerable promise for rapid detection of mutations associated with antimicrobial resistance. These approaches are now amenable to utilization in an appropriately equipped clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:8665467

  9. [Acute myeloid leukemia. Genetic diagnostics and molecular therapy].

    PubMed

    Schlenk, R F; Döhner, K; Döhner, H

    2013-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The genetic diagnostics have become an essential component in the initial work-up for disease classification, prognostication and prediction. More and more promising molecular targeted therapeutics are becoming available. A prerequisite for individualized treatment strategies is a fast pretherapeutic molecular screening including the fusion genes PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1 and CBFB-MYH11 as well as mutations in the genes NPM1, FLT3 and CEBPA. Promising new therapeutic approaches include the combination of all- trans retinoic acid and arsentrioxid in acute promyelocytic leukemia, the combination of intensive chemotherapy with KIT inhibitors in core-binding factor AML and FLT3 inhibitors in AML with FLT3 mutation, as well as gemtuzumab ozogamicin therapy in patients with low and intermediate cytogenetic risk profiles. With the advent of the next generation sequencing technologies it is expected that new therapeutic targets will be identified. These insights will lead to a further individualization of AML therapy.

  10. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Molecular Genetics, Pathology, Management, and Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Henry T.; Casey, Murray Joseph; Snyder, Carrie L.; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Jane F.; Butts, Matthew; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary ovarian cancer accounts for at least 5% of the estimated 22,000 new cases of this disease during 2009. During this same time, over 15,000 will die from malignancy ascribed to ovarian origin. The bulk of these hereditary cases fit the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome, while virtually all of the remainder will be consonant with the Lynch syndrome, disorders which are autosomal dominantly inherited. Advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations which predispose to the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome, and mutations in mismatch repair genes, the most common of which are MSH2 and MLH1, which predispose to Lynch syndrome. These discoveries enable relative certainty limited only by their variable penetrance, so that early diagnosis through a comprehensive cancer family history might be possible. This paper reviews the subject of hereditary ovarian cancer, with particular attention given to its molecular genetic basis, its pathology, and its phenotypic/genotypic heterogeneity. PMID:19383374

  11. Advances in the molecular genetics of non-syndromic polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; Tan, Ting; Yuan, Lamei

    2015-10-30

    Polydactyly is one of the most common inherited limb abnormalities, characterised by supernumerary fingers or toes. It results from disturbances in the normal programme of the anterior-posterior axis of the developing limb, with diverse aetiology and variable inter- and intra-familial clinical features. Polydactyly can occur as an isolated disorder (non-syndromic polydactyly) or as a part of an anomaly syndrome (syndromic polydactyly). On the basis of the anatomic location of the duplicated digits, non-syndromic polydactyly is divided into three kinds, including preaxial polydactyly, axial polydactyly and postaxial polydactyly. Non-syndromic polydactyly frequently exhibits an autosomal dominant inheritance with variable penetrance. To date, in human, at least ten loci and four disease-causing genes, including the GLI3 gene, the ZNF141 gene, the MIPOL1 gene and the PITX1 gene, have been identified. In this paper, we review clinical features of non-syndromic polydactyly and summarise the recent progress in the molecular genetics, including loci and genes that are responsible for the disorder, the signalling pathways that these genetic factors are involved in, as well as animal models of the disorder. These progresses will improve our understanding of the complex disorder and have implications on genetic counselling such as prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Molecular diversity analysis of eggplant (Solanum melongena) genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z; Xu, Z L; Zhang, D Y; He, X L; Bahadur, S; Yi, J X

    2011-06-14

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena), a vegetable that is cultivated worldwide, is of considerable importance to agriculture in China. We analyzed the diversity of this plant using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and RAPD procedures to subdivide 143 Chinese-cultivated eggplants based on coefficient of parentage, genetic diversity index (GDI) and canonical discriminant analysis. ISSR markers were more effective than RAPD markers for detecting genetic diversity, which ranged from 0.10-0.51, slightly lower than what is known from other crops. Our ISSR/RAPD data provide molecular evidence that coincides with morphological-based classification into three varieties and further subdivision into eight groups, except for two groups. Intensive use of elite parents and extensive crossing within groups have resulted in increased coefficient of parentage and proportional contribution but decreased GDI during the past decades. The mean coefficient of parentage and proportional contribution increased from 0.05 to 0.10% and from 3.22 to 6.46% during 1980-1991 and 1992-2003, respectively. The GDI of landraces was 0.21, higher than the 0.09 and 0.08 calculated for the hybrid cultivars released during the two periods. The recent introduction of alien genotypes into eggplant breeding programs may broaden the genetic base.

  13. Integration of molecular genetics and proteomics with cell metabolism: how to proceed; how not to proceed!

    PubMed

    Costello, Leslie C; Franklin, Renty B

    2011-10-15

    There now exists a resurgence of interest in the role of intermediary metabolism in medicine; especially in relation to medical disorders. Coupled with this is the contemporary focus on molecular biology, genetics and proteomics and their integration into studies of regulation and alterations in cellular metabolism in health and disease. This is a marriage that has vast potential for elucidation of the factors and conditions that are involved in cellular metabolic and functional changes, which heretofore could not be addressed by the earlier generations of biochemists who established the major pathways of intermediary metabolism. The achievement of this present potential requires the appropriate application and interpretation of genetic and proteomic studies relating to cell metabolism and cell function. This requires knowledge and understanding of the principles, relationships, and methodology, such as biochemistry and enzymology, which are involved in the elucidation of cellular regulatory enzymes and metabolic pathways. Unfortunately, many and possibly most contemporary molecular biologists are not adequately trained and knowledgeable in these areas of cell metabolism. This has resulted in much too common inappropriate application and misinformation from genetic/proteomic studies of cell metabolism and function. This presentation describes important relationships of cellular intermediary metabolism, and provides examples of the appropriate and inappropriate application of genetics and proteomics. It calls for the inclusion of biochemistry, enzymology, cell metabolism and cell physiology in the graduate and postgraduate training of molecular biology and other biomedical researchers.

  14. Monogenec Arrhythmic Syndromes: From Molecular and Genetic Aspects to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    E.Z., Golukhova; O.I., Gromova; R.A., Shomahov; N.I., Bulaeva; L.A., Bockeria

    2016-01-01

    The abrupt cessation of effective cardiac function that is generally due to heart rhythm disorders can cause sudden and unexpected death at any age and is referred to as a syndrome called “sudden cardiac death” (SCD). Annually, about 400,000 cases of SCD occur in the United States alone. Less than 5% of the resuscitation techniques are effective. The prevalence of SCD in a population rises with age according to the prevalence of coronary artery disease, which is the most common cause of sudden cardiac arrest. However, there is a peak in SCD incidence for the age below 5 years, which is equal to 17 cases per 100,000 of the population. This peak is due to congenital monogenic arrhythmic canalopathies. Despite their relative rarity, these cases are obviously the most tragic. The immediate causes, or mechanisms, of SCD are comprehensive. Generally, it is arrhythmic death due to ventricular tachyarrythmias – sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Bradyarrhythmias and pulseless electrical activity account for no more than 40% of all registered cardiac arrests, and they are more often the outcome of the abovementioned arrhythmias. Our current understanding of the mechanisms responsible for SCD has emerged from decades of basic science investigation into the normal electrophysiology of the heart, the molecular physiology of cardiac ion channels, the fundamental cellular and tissue events associated with cardiac arrhythmias, and the molecular genetics of monogenic disorders of the heart rhythm (for example, the long QT syndrome). This review presents an overview of the molecular and genetic basis of SCD in the long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, short QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, and sudden cardiac death prevention strategies by modern techniques (including implantable cardioverter-defibrillator) PMID:27437140

  15. [Inherited colour vision deficiencies--from Dalton to molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Dragana; Cvetković, Dobrosav

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, great advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular basis of colour vision defects, as well as of the patterns of genetic variation in individuals with normal colour vision. Molecular genetic analyses have explained the diversity of types and degrees of severity in colour vision anomalies, their frequencies, pronounced individual variations in test results, etc. New techniques have even enabled the determination of John Dalton's real colour vision defect, 150 years after his death. Inherited colour vision deficiencies most often result from the mutations of genes that encode cone opsins. Cone opsin genes are linked to chromosomes 7 (the S or "blue" gene) and X (the L or "red" gene and the M or "green" gene). The L and M genes are located on the q arm of the X chromosome in a head-to-tail array, composed of 2 to 6 (typically 3) genes--a single L is followed by one or more M genes. Only the first two genes of the array are expressed and contribute to the colour vision phenotype. The high degree of homology (96%) between the L and M genes predisposes them to unequal recombination, leading to gene deletion or the formation of hybrid genes (comprising portions of both the L and M genes), explaining the majority of the common red-green colour vision deficiencies. The severity of any deficiency is influenced by the difference in spectral sensitivity between the opsins encoded by the first two genes of the array. A rare defect, S monochromacy, is caused either by the deletion of the regulatory region of the array or by mutations that inactivate the L and M genes. Most recent research concerns the molecular basis of complete achromatopsia, a rare disorder that involves the complete loss of all cone function. This is not caused by mutations in opsin genes, but in other genes that encode cone-specific proteins, e.g. channel proteins and transducin.

  16. Genetic diversity of spineless Cereus jamacaru accessions using morphological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, F I C; Bordallo, P N; Castro, A C R; Correia, D

    2013-10-17

    This is the first study to examine the genetic diversity of mandacaru cactus (Cereus jamacaru P. DC.). Plants of spineless mandacaru are commonly found in gardens and parks of urban areas in northeastern Brazil. In addition to exploring their ornamental potential, morphological, and genetic characterization may contribute to the development of plant materials that can be used as a source of macromolecules of potential economic interest. The goal of this study was to estimate the genetic variability of spineless mandacaru accessions using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers, and to characterize their morphology. Ten samples of newly emitted shoots with differentiated areolas and ribs were collected from each accession from the Cactaceous Germplasm Collection of Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical, in Fortaleza, CE. Shoot shape and aspects of spine primordia (presence, location, grouping, and size of spines) were evaluated. The morphological analysis showed that the spineless mandacaru presented spine primordia. Twenty-six RAPD and 15 ISSR primers were polymorphic. A total of 262 markers were obtained, 129 of which were polymorphic. The average polymorphism of ISSR markers was higher than that of RAPD markers. The dendrograms for both analyses showed differentiation between accessions. Nevertheless, the molecular markers detected higher levels of diversity and a different pattern of diversity than those found using morphological markers. The molecular results revealed significant genetic variability both within and between groups.

  17. Synthesis and assessment of date palm genetic diversity studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thorough assessment of genetic diversity and population differentiation of Phoenix dactylifera are critical for its dynamic conservation and sustainable utilization of its genetic diversity. Estimates of genetic diversity based on phenotypic, biochemical and molecular markers; and fruit quality tr...

  18. Studies in genetic discrimination. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    We have screened 1006 respondents in a study of genetic discrimination. Analysis of these responses has produced evidence of the range of institutions engaged in genetic discrimination and demonstrates the impact of this discrimination on the respondents to the study. We have found that both ignorance and policy underlie genetic discrimination and that anti-discrimination laws are being violated.

  19. The use of genetic markers in the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, L S; Leitão, T M J S; Taylor, M L; Muniz, M M; Zancopé-Oliveira, R M

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum, a dimorphic fungal pathogen that can infect both humans and animals. This disease has worldwide distribution and affects mainly immunocompromised individuals. In the environment, H. capsulatum grows as mold but undergoes a morphologic transition to the yeast morphotype under special conditions. Molecular techniques are important tools to conduct epidemiologic investigations for fungal detection, identification of infection sources, and determination of different fungal genotypes associated to a particular disease symptom. In this study, we performed a systematic review in the PubMed database to improve the understanding about the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis. This search was restricted to English and Spanish articles. We included a combination of specific keywords: molecular typing [OR] genetic diversity [OR] polymorphism [AND] H. capsulatum; molecular epidemiology [AND] histoplasmosis; and molecular epidemiology [AND] Histoplasma. In addition, we used the specific terms: histoplasmosis [AND] outbreaks. Non-English or non-Spanish articles, dead links, and duplicate results were excluded from the review. The results reached show that the main methods used for molecular typing of H. capsulatum were: restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, microsatellites polymorphism, sequencing of internal transcribed spacers region, and multilocus sequence typing. Different genetic profiles were identified among H. capsulatum isolates, which can be grouped according to their source, geographical origin, and clinical manifestations.

  20. Exploring human brain lateralization with molecular genetics and genomics.

    PubMed

    Francks, Clyde

    2015-11-01

    Lateralizations of brain structure and motor behavior have been observed in humans as early as the first trimester of gestation, and are likely to arise from asymmetrical genetic-developmental programs, as in other animals. Studies of gene expression levels in postmortem tissue samples, comparing the left and right sides of the human cerebral cortex, have generally not revealed striking transcriptional differences between the hemispheres. This is likely due to lateralization of gene expression being subtle and quantitative. However, a recent re-analysis and meta-analysis of gene expression data from the adult superior temporal and auditory cortex found lateralization of transcription of genes involved in synaptic transmission and neuronal electrophysiology. Meanwhile, human subcortical mid- and hindbrain structures have not been well studied in relation to lateralization of gene activity, despite being potentially important developmental origins of asymmetry. Genetic polymorphisms with small effects on adult brain and behavioral asymmetries are beginning to be identified through studies of large datasets, but the core genetic mechanisms of lateralized human brain development remain unknown. Identifying subtly lateralized genetic networks in the brain will lead to a new understanding of how neuronal circuits on the left and right are differently fine-tuned to preferentially support particular cognitive and behavioral functions.

  1. Community genetics in the time of next-generation molecular technologies.

    PubMed

    Gugerli, Felix; Brandl, Roland; Castagneyrol, Bastien; Franc, Alain; Jactel, Hervé; Koelewijn, Hans-Peter; Martin, Francis; Peter, Martina; Pritsch, Karin; Schröder, Hilke; Smulders, Marinus J M; Kremer, Antoine; Ziegenhagen, Birgit

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the interactions of co-occurring species within and across trophic levels provides key information needed for understanding the ecological and evolutionary processes that underlie biological diversity. As genetics has only recently been integrated into the study of community-level interactions, the time is right for a critical evaluation of potential new, gene-based approaches to studying communities. Next-generation molecular techniques, used in parallel with field-based observations and manipulative experiments across spatio-temporal gradients, are key to expanding our understanding of community-level processes. Here, we introduce a variety of '-omics' tools, with recent studies of plant-insect herbivores and of ectomycorrhizal systems providing detailed examples of how next-generation approaches can revolutionize our understanding of interspecific interactions. We suggest ways that novel technologies may convert community genetics from a field that relies on correlative inference to one that reveals causal mechanisms of genetic co-variation and adaptations within communities.

  2. Wrinkled Peas and White-Eyed Fruit Flies: The Molecular Basis of Two Classical Genetic Traits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoile, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on bridging the gap between classical and molecular genetics for two traits: wrinkled seeds in garden peas and white eye color in fruit flies. Discusses the molecular details of the underlying basis of these traits. Contains 15 references. (JRH)

  3. [Molecular genetic methods of identification of infectious bacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Kibirev, Ia A; Isupov, S G; Chukhlantsev, D A

    2014-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of modern molecular genetic methods for identification of pathogenic bacteria. One of the main current methods is the polymerase chain reaction and its modifications. Agarose gel electrophoresis is used for PCR analysis. The authors presented the advantages of the real-time fluorescent tag on this stage (quantitative PCR, Quantitative PCR, Q-PCR, Real-Time PCR) and Flash PCR. Real-Time PCR permits quantitative analysis of a test sample and reduces analysis time. Simplified version of the PCR detection of the fluorescent signal is Flash PCR. In addition to PCR, there are other methods based on the amplification of DNA, in particular, the ligase chain reaction. Considered sophisticated methods of identification of pathogenic bacteria--multilocus sequence typing, the analysis of variable nucleotide tandem repeats. One of the most convenient methods for the complete identification of pathogenic bacteria can be sequenced bacterial genome.

  4. A Molecular Genetic Basis Explaining Altered Bacterial Behavior in Space

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Nripesh; Levy, Shawn E.; Stodieck, Louis; Jones, Angela; Shrestha, Shristi; Klaus, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria behave differently in space, as indicated by reports of reduced lag phase, higher final cell counts, enhanced biofilm formation, increased virulence, and reduced susceptibility to antibiotics. These phenomena are theorized, at least in part, to result from reduced mass transport in the local extracellular environment, where movement of molecules consumed and excreted by the cell is limited to diffusion in the absence of gravity-dependent convection. However, to date neither empirical nor computational approaches have been able to provide sufficient evidence to confirm this explanation. Molecular genetic analysis findings, conducted as part of a recent spaceflight investigation, support the proposed model. This investigation indicated an overexpression of genes associated with starvation, the search for alternative energy sources, increased metabolism, enhanced acetate production, and other systematic responses to acidity—all of which can be associated with reduced extracellular mass transport. PMID:27806055

  5. Molecular genetic and endocrine mechanisms of hair growth.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Laura C; Rosenfield, Robert L

    2003-01-01

    The prenatal morphogenesis of hair follicles depends upon a precisely regulated series of molecular genetic processes. Hormones and their receptors play prominent roles in modulating postnatal hair cycling, which recapitulates some aspects of morphogenesis. The responses to androgen are the most obvious of these. The postnatal androgen sensitivity of pilosebaceous units in different skin areas is programmed during prenatal development to permit clinical outcomes such as hirsutism and pattern baldness. Thyroid hormone, glucocorticoids, insulin-like growth factor-I, and prolactin have clinically significant effects on specific aspects of hair growth. The nuclear receptors vitamin D receptor and retinoid X receptor are essential for postnatal hair cycling. Other hormones have less clear effects on hair growth. Advances in research on the interaction of hormone target genes with the biological processes involved in hair morphogenesis and cycling can be expected to improve management of hirsutism and alopecia.

  6. Between destiny and disease: genetics and molecular pathways of human central nervous system aging

    PubMed Central

    Glorioso, Christin; Sibille, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    Aging of the human brain is associated with “normal” functional, structural, and molecular changes that underlie alterations in cognition, memory, mood and motor function, amongst other processes. Normal aging also imposes a robust constraint on the onset of many neurological diseases, ranging from late onset neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s (AD) and Parkinson’s diseases (PD), to early onset psychiatric disorders, such as bipolar disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia (SCZ). The molecular mechanisms and genetic underpinnings of age-related changes in the brain are understudied, and, while they share some overlap with peripheral mechanisms of aging, many are unique to the largely non-mitotic brain. Hence, understanding mechanisms of brain aging and identifying associated modulators may have profound consequences for the prevention and treatment of age-related impairments and diseases. Here we review current knowledge on age-related functional and structural changes, their molecular and genetic underpinnings, and discuss how these pathways may contribute to the vulnerability to develop age-related neurological diseases. We highlight recent findings from human postmortem brain microarray studies, which we hypothesize, point to a potential genetically-controlled transcriptional program underlying molecular changes and age-gating of neurological diseases. Finally, we discuss the implications of this model for understanding basic mechanisms of brain aging and for the future investigation of therapeutic approaches. PMID:21130140

  7. Genetic and molecular characterization of multiflorous spikelet in oat.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, C M; Ubert, I P; Pellizzaro, K; Federizzi, L C; Nava, I C

    2017-03-30

    Multiflorous spikelets are found in several grass species of agricultural and economic interest. In oat, this morphological characteristic is associated with the production of naked grains. Although many genetic studies have been performed over the past century, the inheritance of the multiflorous spikelet trait is not fully understood in oat. The objectives of this study were to evaluate environmental effects on the multiflorous spikelet trait, to estimate the number of genes controlling the trait, and to clone and characterize sequences of the AP2 gene in oat. Two genetic populations of recombinant inbreed lines were screened for the multiflorous spikelet trait from different years and sowing dates under field experiments. Normal, multiflorous, and mosaic spikelets were analyzed in the whole panicle for both years and sowing dates. Specific primer pairs for the AP2 gene was utilized to amplify and clone oat sequences. The results demonstrate that under higher temperature and day-length conditions, the variable expressivity of the multiflorous spikelet trait was less pronounced in both populations. Genetic analyses indicated the action of one major gene and two or three modifying genes controlling the expression of the multiflorous spikelet trait in oat, depending on the genetic background. Sequences with similarity to the AP2 gene were isolated from the oat lines UFRGS 017004-2 and URS Taura, and genetic polymorphisms were identified, which are valuable to confirm the action of AP2 on the multiflorous spikelet trait. Our results provide information to assist in the development of future studies of the multiflorous spikelet trait in oat.

  8. Can clues to the molecular defects in chronic myelogenous leukemia come from genetic studies on the Abelson tyrosine kinase in fruit flies?

    PubMed

    Comer, A R; Liebl, E C; Hoffmann, F M

    1995-06-01

    Translocations affecting the structure of the c-abl proto-oncogene are involved in the development or progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Leukemic cells from patients with CML show alterations in adhesive properties that may play a part in the pathology of these diseases. Mutations in the Drosophila Abl homolog are lethal and indicate that Abl may mediate processes involving differential cell adhesion. These observations suggest that Abl may regulate similar adhesive processes in human beings and Drosophila. Genetic analysis of Abl function in Drosophila has identified novel proteins that function in Abl-related processes. Analysis of the functions of these new molecules may provide insight into mechanisms by which oncogenic abl proteins participate in the etiology of CML and ALL.

  9. [Research progress on molecular genetics of male homosexuality].

    PubMed

    Tu, Dan; Xu, Ruiwei; Zhao, Guanglu; Wang, Binbin; Feng, Tiejian

    2016-08-01

    Sexual orientation is influenced by both environmental factors and biological factors. Family and twin studies have shown that genetic factors play an important role in the formation of male homosexuality. Genome-wide scan also revealed candidate chromosomal regions which may be associated with male homosexuality, but so far no clearly related genes have been found. This article reviews the progress of relevant studies and candidate genes which are related to male homosexuality.

  10. Impact of molecular genetics on congenital adrenal hyperplasia management.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, A; Baldazzi, L; Menabò, S; Cicognani, A

    2010-09-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a family of autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding the enzymes involved in one of the 5 steps of adrenal steroid synthesis or the electron donor P450 oxidoreductase (POR) enzyme. Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD), the principal focus of this review, accounts for about 90-95% of all CAH cases, and its biochemical and clinical severity depends on the underlying CYP21A2 gene disruption. Molecular genetic advancements have been achieved in recent years, and the aim of this review is to attempt to highlight its contribution to the comprehension and management of the disease. When possible, we will try to achieve this goal also by providing some results from our personal experience regarding: some aspects of CYP21A2 gene analysis, with basic genotype/phenotype relationships; its crucial role in both genetic counselling and in prenatal diagnosis and treatment in families at risk for 21-OHD; its help in the comprehension of the severity of the disease in patients diagnosed by neonatal screening and possibly treated before an evident salt-loss crisis or before performing adequate blood sampling; its usefulness in the definition of post ACTH 17-hydroxyprogesterone values, discriminating between non-classic, heterozygote and normal subjects; and finally the contribution of genes other than CYP21A2 whose function or dysfunction could influence 21-hydroxylase activity and modify the presentation or management of the disease.

  11. Bardet–Biedl syndrome: Genetics, molecular pathophysiology, and disease management

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Sathya; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Sen, Parveen; Sripriya, S

    2016-01-01

    Primary cilia play a key role in sensory perception and various signaling pathways. Any defect in them leads to group of disorders called ciliopathies, and Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS, OMIM 209900) is one among them. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with various primary and secondary clinical manifestations, and shows autosomal recessive inheritance and highly prevalent in inbred/consanguineous populations. The disease mapped to at least twenty different genes (BBS1-BBS20), follow oligogenic inheritance pattern. BBS proteins localizes to the centerosome and regulates the biogenesis and functions of the cilia. In BBS, the functioning of various systemic organs (with ciliated cells) gets deranged and results in systemic manifestations. Certain components of the disease (such as obesity, diabetes, and renal problems) when noticed earlier offer a disease management benefit to the patients. However, the awareness of the disease is comparatively low and most often noticed only after severe vision loss in patients, which is usually in the first decade of the patient's age. In the current review, we have provided the recent updates retrieved from various types of scientific literature through journals, on the genetics, its molecular relevance, and the clinical outcome in BBS. The review in nutshell would provide the basic awareness of the disease that will have an impact in disease management and counseling benefits to the patients and their families. PMID:27853007

  12. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Genetics, molecular pathophysiology, and disease management.

    PubMed

    Priya, Sathya; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Sen, Parveen; Sripriya, S

    2016-09-01

    Primary cilia play a key role in sensory perception and various signaling pathways. Any defect in them leads to group of disorders called ciliopathies, and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS, OMIM 209900) is one among them. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with various primary and secondary clinical manifestations, and shows autosomal recessive inheritance and highly prevalent in inbred/consanguineous populations. The disease mapped to at least twenty different genes (BBS1-BBS20), follow oligogenic inheritance pattern. BBS proteins localizes to the centerosome and regulates the biogenesis and functions of the cilia. In BBS, the functioning of various systemic organs (with ciliated cells) gets deranged and results in systemic manifestations. Certain components of the disease (such as obesity, diabetes, and renal problems) when noticed earlier offer a disease management benefit to the patients. However, the awareness of the disease is comparatively low and most often noticed only after severe vision loss in patients, which is usually in the first decade of the patient's age. In the current review, we have provided the recent updates retrieved from various types of scientific literature through journals, on the genetics, its molecular relevance, and the clinical outcome in BBS. The review in nutshell would provide the basic awareness of the disease that will have an impact in disease management and counseling benefits to the patients and their families.

  13. The molecular population genetics of HIV-1 group O.

    PubMed Central

    Lemey, Philippe; Pybus, Oliver G; Rambaut, Andrew; Drummond, Alexei J; Robertson, David L; Roques, Pierre; Worobey, Michael; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke

    2004-01-01

    HIV-1 group O originated through cross-species transmission of SIV from chimpanzees to humans and has established a relatively low prevalence in Central Africa. Here, we infer the population genetics and epidemic history of HIV-1 group O from viral gene sequence data and evaluate the effect of variable evolutionary rates and recombination on our estimates. First, model selection tools were used to specify suitable evolutionary and coalescent models for HIV group O. Second, divergence times and population genetic parameters were estimated in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling, under both strict and relaxed molecular clock methods. Our results date the origin of the group O radiation to around 1920 (1890-1940), a time frame similar to that estimated for HIV-1 group M. However, group O infections, which remain almost wholly restricted to Cameroon, show a slower rate of exponential growth during the twentieth century, explaining their lower current prevalence. To explore the effect of recombination, the Bayesian framework is extended to incorporate multiple unlinked loci. Although recombination can bias estimates of the time to the most recent common ancestor, this effect does not appear to be important for HIV-1 group O. In addition, we show that evolutionary rate estimates for different HIV genes accurately reflect differential selective constraints along the HIV genome. PMID:15280223

  14. Genetic tools for wildlife management: New TWS Working Group focuses on molecular ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latch, Emily; Crowhurst, Rachel S.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Robinson, Stacie

    2014-01-01

    Granted interim status in November, 2013, The Wildlife Society’s (TWS) Molecular Ecology Working Group aims to promote scientific advancement by applying molecular techniques to wildlife ecology, management, and conservation. The working group—composed of sci - entists from diverse backgrounds—met for the first time in Pittsburgh at the TWS Annual Conference held in October. Our overarching goal is to enhance awareness of molecular ecology and genetic applica - tions to wildlife biology and act as an informational and networking resource. During the group’s interim status, which runs for three years, we intend to focus on a broad scope of molecular ecology that is applicable to wildlife including genetic and ge - nomic methods, conservation genetics, non-invasive genetic population monitoring, landscape genetics, evolutionary genetics, and molecular forensics

  15. Genetically modified animal models recapitulating molecular events altered in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Aránzazu; Fabregat, Isabel

    2009-04-01

    New advancements have been made in recent years in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern human liver tumorigenesis. Experimental animal models have been widely used, especially mouse models. In this review we highlight some of the genetically engineered mouse models that have proved to be excellent tools to study the intracellular signalling pathways altered in hepatocarcinogenesis and establish potential correlations with data from humans, with special focus on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of primary liver cancer. Information obtained from these animal models will help to design future therapeutic approaches to HCC, particularly those that explore drugs that specifically target the altered molecular pathways.

  16. [SOME RESULTS OF MOLECULAR GENETIC RESEARCHES OF AGING AND LONGEVITY].

    PubMed

    Mustafina, O E; Somova, R Sh

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the description of research achievements in genetics of aging and longevity. It represents a certain interest for understanding of a problems of aging as a whole. There is a huge amount of results of diverse genetic studies of aging and longevity. Studies were performed with using different experimental strategies on model organisms or samples from different human populations of the world. The search for aging and longevity genes was carried out within international consortiums. The first results of whole genome sequences of super-centenarians were received. The genes influencing life expectancy were revealed in organisms of different systematic groups. Many of these genes are evolutionarily conservative. Associations between APOE, FOXO1A, FOXO3A, AKT1 gene polymorphisms and human longevity were confirmed in independent studies.

  17. Narrative review: harnessing molecular genetics for the diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Libin; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seidman, Christine E

    2010-04-20

    Unexplained cardiac hypertrophy, the diagnostic criterion for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), occurs in 1 in 500 adults. Insights into the genetic cause and molecular pathophysiology of HCM are reshaping clinical paradigms for diagnosis and treatment of this common myocardial disorder. Human genetic studies have established that dominant mutations in the proteins that make up the contractile apparatus (the sarcomere) cause HCM. With the current availability of clinical gene-based diagnostics, pathogenic mutations in affected patients can be defined, which can suggest a clinical course and allow definitive preclinical identification of family members at risk for HCM. Genetic discoveries have also fostered mechanistic investigations in model organisms that are engineered to carry human HCM mutations. Novel therapeutic targets have emerged from these fundamental studies and are currently under clinical assessment in humans. The combination of contemporary gene-based diagnosis with new strategies to attenuate disease development and progression is changing the natural history of lifelong cardiac symptoms, arrhythmias, and heart failure from HCM.

  18. Toward understanding the molecular basis of atherosclerosis with genetics and genomics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaoyu; Rollins, Jarod; Paigen, Beverly; Wang, Xiaosong

    2007-01-01

    Summary Atherosclerosis is a very complex disease involving both genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interactions. In the general population, genetic polymorphisms of many genes in the pathways of lipid metabolism, inflammation, and thrombogenesis are likely responsible for the wide range of susceptibilities to myocardial infarction, the most deadly consequence of atherosclerosis. To identify these polymorphisms, genetic linkage studies have been carried out in both humans and mouse models. Approximately 40 quantitative trait loci for atherosclerotic disease have been found in humans, and approximately 30 in mice. Recently, genome-wide association studies have been used to identify atherosclerosis-susceptibility polymorphisms. Although finding new atherosclerosis genes through these approaches remains challenging, the pace of finding these polymorphisms is accelerating due to the rapidly improving bioinformatics resources and biotechnologies. The results from these efforts will not only reveal the molecular basis of, but will facilitate finding drug targets and individualized medicine for, atherosclerotic disease. PMID:17767904

  19. Proceedings of the SMBE Tri-National Young Investigators' Workshop 2005. Molecular genetics of natural populations.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Anthony J; Wu, Chung-I

    2006-05-01

    Significant progress in evolutionary genetics has been made by studying, on the one hand, patterns of DNA sequence polymorphism and, on the other, genetic architecture of complex adaptive traits. However, connections between nucleotide variants under selection and adaptively relevant phenotypes are missing. Such connections can be established using precise gene replacement. We review the recent successful introduction of this technique to the analysis of two evolutionarily interesting loci--Odysseus and desaturase2. Both genes have subtle phenotypes that nevertheless could be identified using gene replacement, demonstrating that effects of naturally occurring alleles can be measured in the laboratory. This is an important first step in connecting statistical signatures of selection with adaptation in nature. More candidate genes involved in adaptation, for example, through cloning of genes responsible for reproductive isolation, now need to be identified. Molecular genetic manipulation, DNA polymorphism analysis, and field studies then have to be integrated to provide fresh insights into the mechanisms of evolutionary change.

  20. Molecular genetic defect underlying {alpha}-L-iduronidase pseudodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Aronovich, E.L.; Pan, D.; Whitley, C.B.

    1996-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (i.e., Hurler, Hurler-Scheie, and Scheie syndromes) and type II (i.e., Hunter syndrome) are lysosomal storage disorders resulting from {alpha}-L-iduronidase (IDUA) deficiency and iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) deficiency, respectively. The a priori probability that both disorders would occur in a single individual is {approximately}1 in 5 billion. Nevertheless, such a proband was referred for whom clinical findings (i.e., a male with characteristic facies, dysostosis multiplex, and mental retardation) and biochemical tests indicated these concomitant diagnoses. Multiple techniques, including automated sequencing of the entire IDS and IDUA coding regions, were employed to unravel the molecular genetic basis of these intriguing observations. The common IDS mutation R468W was identified in the proband, his mother, and his sister, thus explaining their biochemical phenotypes. Additionally, the proband, his sister, and his father were found to be heterozygous for a common IDUA mutation, W402X. Notably, a new IDUA mutation A300T was also identified in the proband, his sister, and his mother, accounting for reduced IDUA activity in these individuals; the asymptomatic sister, whose cells demonstrated normal glycosaminoglycan metabolism, is thus a compound heterozygote for W402X and the new allele. This A300T mutation is the first IDUA pseudodeficiency gene to be elucidated at the molecular level. 37 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Developmental genetics in emerging rodent models: case studies and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mallarino, Ricardo; Hoekstra, Hopi E; Manceau, Marie

    2016-08-01

    For decades, mammalian developmental genetic studies have focused almost entirely on two laboratory models: Mus and Rattus, species that breed readily in the laboratory and for which a wealth of molecular and genetic resources exist. These species alone, however, do not capture the remarkable diversity of morphological, behavioural and physiological traits seen across rodents, a group that represents >40% of all mammal species. Due to new advances in molecular tools and genomic technologies, studying the developmental events underlying natural variation in a wide range of species for a wide range of traits has become increasingly feasible. Here we review several recent studies and discuss how they not only provided technical resources for newly emerging rodent models in developmental genetics but also are instrumental in further encouraging scientists, from a wide range of research fields, to capitalize on the great diversity in development that has evolved among rodents.

  2. A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Final report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S.I.

    1998-11-01

    The ultimate goal of this research is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which the complex interactions between sources and sinks of fixed carbon are controlled in plants. As soluble sugar levels have been shown to play a vital role in a variety of source-sink interactions, a key aspect of the authors research is to determine the role of sugar-regulated gene expression in mediating source-sink interactions. In addition, as a critical aspect of source-sink interactions is the channeling of fixed carbon into different storage forms, they have pursued the findings that fumaric acid represents a significant form of storage carbon in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. In the future, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which interactions between sources and sinks of fixed carbon are coordinated will be a pre-requisite to developing more rationale approaches to improving harvest indices in crop species.

  3. Molecular and Genetic Characterization of Depression: Overlap with other Psychiatric Disorders and Aging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Chang, Lun-Ching; Wang, Xingbin; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; Parrish, Jenna; Oh, Hyunjung; French, Beverly J; Lewis, David A; Tseng, George C; Sibille, Etienne

    2015-05-01

    Genome-wide expression and genotyping technologies have uncovered the genetic bases of complex diseases at unprecedented rates; However despite its heavy burden and high prevalence, the molecular characterization of major depressive disorder (MDD) has lagged behind. Transcriptome studies report multiple brain disturbances but are limited by small sample sizes. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) report weak results but suggest overlapping genetic risk with other neuropsychiatric disorders. We performed systematic molecular characterization of altered brain function in MDD, using meta-analysis of differential expression in eight gene array studies in three corticolimbic brain regions in 101 subjects. The identified "metaA-MDD" genes suggest altered neurotrophic support, brain plasticity and neuronal signaling in MDD. Notably, metaA-MDD genes display low connectivity and hubness in coexpression networks, and uniform genomic distribution, consistent with diffuse polygenic mechanisms. We next integrated these findings with results from over 1800 published GWAS and show that genetic variations nearby metaA-MDD genes predict greater risk for neuropsychiatric disorders and notably for age-related phenotypes, but not for other medical illnesses, including those frequently co-morbid with depression, or body characteristics. Collectively, the intersection of unbiased investigations of gene function (transcriptome) and structure (GWAS) provides novel leads to investigate molecular mechanisms of MDD and suggest common biological pathways between depression, other neuropsychiatric diseases, and brain aging.

  4. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers (SSR).

    PubMed

    Hasnaoui, Nejib; Buonamici, Anna; Sebastiani, Federico; Mars, Messaoud; Zhang, Dapeng; Vendramin, Giovanni G

    2012-02-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In the present study, we report the development of 4 new polymorphic SSR markers. They have been used in addition to 11 SSRs previously published to investigate molecular diversity of 33 P. granatum ecotypes. Based on the multi-locus profiles, twenty-two distinctive genotypes were identified. Globally, quite low genetic diversity has been revealed, as measured by allele richness (2.83 per locus) and heterozygosity (He=0.245; Ho=0.243), reflecting the narrow genetic background of the plant material. Four synonymous groups could be detected involving 15 accessions. Results of ordination and cluster analysis suggested that almost all the Tunisian cultivars share similar genetic background, and are likely derived from a small number of introductions in ancient times. Results issued from this study provide essential information to project a pomegranate core-collection without plant material duplication and for sustainable management of pomegranate landraces at national and international level. Furthermore, these SSR markers are powerful tool for marker assisted selection (MAS) program and for QTL studies.

  5. Molecular phylogenetic study in genus Hydra.

    PubMed

    Kawaida, Hitomi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Tachida, Hidenori; Kobayakawa, Yoshitaka

    2010-11-15

    Among 8000-9000 species of Cnidaria, only several dozens of species of Hydrozoa have been found in the fresh water. Hydra is such a fresh water polyp and has been used as a good material for research in developmental biology, regeneration and pattern formation. Although the genus Hydra has only a few ten species, its distribution is cosmopolitan. The phylogenetic relationship between hydra species is fascinating from the aspect of evolutionary biology and biogeography. However, only a few molecular phylogenetic studies have been reported on hydra. Therefore, we conducted a molecular phylogenetic study of the genus Hydra based on mitochondrial and nuclear nucleotide sequences using a hydra collection that has been kept in the National Institute of Genetics (NIG) of Japan. The results support the idea that four species groups comprise the genus Hydra. Within the viridissima group (green hydra) and braueri group, genetic distances between strains were relatively large. In contrast, genetic distances between strains among the vulgaris and oligactis groups were small irrespective of their geographic distribution. The vulgaris group strains were classified at least (as far as our investigated samples) into three sub-groups, vulgaris sub-group, carnea sub-group, and H. sp. (K5 and K6) sub-group. All of the vulgaris sub-group and H. sp. (K5 and K6) sub-group strains were collected in Eurasia. The carnea sub-group strains in NIG collection were all collected in North America. A few newly collected samples in Japan, however, suggested belonging to the carnea sub-group according to the molecular phylogenic analysis. This suggests a trans-Pacific distribution of the carnea sub-group hydra.

  6. Molecular genetic studies of the arginine vasopressin 1a receptor (AVPR1a) and the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) in human behaviour: from autism to altruism with some notes in between.

    PubMed

    Israel, Salomon; Lerer, Elad; Shalev, Idan; Uzefovsky, Florina; Reibold, Mathias; Bachner-Melman, Rachel; Granot, Roni; Bornstein, Gary; Knafo, Ariel; Yirmiya, Nurit; Ebstein, Richard P

    2008-01-01

    Converging evidence from both human and animal studies has highlighted the pervasive role of two neuropeptides, oxytocin (OXT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP), in mammalian social behaviours. Recent molecular genetic studies of the human arginine vasopressin 1a (AVPR1a) and oxytocin (OXTR) receptors have strengthened the evidence regarding the role of these two neuropeptides in a range of normal and pathological behaviours. Significant association between both AVPR1a repeat regions and OXTR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with risk for autism has been provisionally shown which was mediated by socialization skills in our study. AVPR1a has also been linked to eating behaviour in both clinical and non-clinical groups, perhaps reflecting the social and ritualistic side of eating behaviour. Evidence also suggests that repeat variations in AVPR1a are associated with two other social domains in Homo sapiens: music and altruism. AVPR1a was associated with dance and musical cognition which we theorize as reflecting the ancient role of this hormone in social interactions executed by vocalization, ritual movement and dyadic (mother-offspring) and group communication. Finally, we have shown that individual differences in allocation of funds in the dictator game, a laboratory game of pure altruism, is predicted by length of the AVPR1a RS3 promoter-region repeat echoing the mechanism of this hormone's action in the vole model of affiliative behaviours and facilitation of positive group interactions. While still in its infancy, the current outlook for molecular genetic investigations of AVP-OXT continues to be fascinating. Future studies should profitably focus on pharmacogenomic and genomic imaging strategies facilitated by the ease and efficacy of manipulating AVP-OXT neurotransmission by intranasal administration. Importantly, physiological measures, behavioural paradigms and brain activation can be informed by considering between-group and also within-group individual

  7. Disentangling the molecular genetic basis of personality: from monoamines to neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin

    2014-06-01

    The present review/perspectives article provides a short overview of our current understanding of the molecular genetics of personality. In the first part, the most important gene candidates such as COMT or SLC6A4 gene are presented. Since several seminal review studies have recently been published on different facets of molecular genetics and personality/emotionality, we focus the second half of the present article on new relevant research directions. This includes a stronger focus on animal research based testing of candidate genes (e.g. neuropeptides such as oxytocin and vasopressin) and the use of á priori genotyping to increase statistical power. Moreover, we stress the importance of integrating cross-cultural data in future research designs and of inclusion of epigenetic measures in neuroscientifically oriented personality research. Finally, the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales are introduced as a new promising tool for biologically oriented psychology/psychiatry research.

  8. Genetic and molecular dosimetry of HZE radiation (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to determine the kinetics of production and to characterize the unique aspects of genetic and developmental lesion induced in animal cells by radiation present in the space environment. Special attention is given to heavy charged particles. The organism Caenorhabditis elegans, a simple nematode, is used as a model system for a coordinated set of ground-based and flight experiments.

  9. Molecular variability and genetic relationship among Brazilian strains of the sugarcane smut fungus.

    PubMed

    Benevenuto, Juliana; Longatto, Daniel P; Reis, Gislaine V; Mielnichuk, Natalia; Palhares, Alessandra C; Carvalho, Giselle; Saito, Suzane; Quecine, Maria C; Sanguino, Alvaro; Vieira, Maria Lucia C; Camargo, Luis Eduardo A; Creste, Silvana; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B

    2016-12-01

    Sporisorium scitamineum is the fungus that causes sugarcane smut disease. Despite of the importance of sugarcane for Brazilian agribusiness and the persistence of the pathogen in most cropping areas, genetic variation studies are still missing for Brazilian isolates. In this study, sets of isolates were analyzed using two molecular markers (AFLP and telRFLP) and ITS sequencing. Twenty-two whips were collected from symptomatic plants in cultivated sugarcane fields of Brazil. A total of 41 haploid strains of compatible mating types were selected from individual teliospores and used for molecular genetic analyses. telRFLP and ITS analyses were expanded to six Argentine isolates, where the sugarcane smut was first recorded in America. Genetic relationship among strains suggests the human-mediated dispersal of S. scitamineum within the Brazilian territory and between the two neighboring countries. Two genetically distinct groups were defined by the combined analysis of AFLP and telRFLP. The opposite mating-type strains derived from single teliospores were clustered together into these main groups, but had not always identical haplotypes. telRFLP markers analyzed over two generations of selfing and controlled outcrossing confirmed the potential for emergence of new variants and occurrence of recombination, which are relevant events for evolution of virulence and environmental adaptation.

  10. Plasmid vectors and molecular building blocks for the development of genetic manipulation tools for Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, León A; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Canepa, Gaspar E; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2013-01-01

    The post genomic era revealed the need for developing better performing, easier to use and more sophisticated genetic manipulation tools for the study of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In this work a series of plasmids that allow genetic manipulation of this protozoan parasite were developed. First of all we focused on useful tools to establish selection strategies for different strains and which can be employed as expression vectors. On the other hand molecular building blocks in the form of diverse selectable markers, modifiable fluorescent protein and epitope-tag coding sequences were produced. Both types of modules were harboured in backbone molecules conceived to offer multiple construction and sub-cloning strategies. These can be used to confer new properties to already available genetic manipulation tools or as starting points for whole novel designs. The performance of each plasmid and building block was determined independently. For illustration purposes, some simple direct practical applications were conducted.

  11. Genetic and Molecular Basis of Quantitative Trait Loci of Arthritis in Rat: Genes and Polymorphisms1

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qing; Jiao, Yan; Hasty, Karen A.; Stuart, John M.; Postlethwaite, Arnold; Kang, Andrew H.; Gu, Weikuan

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, the pathogenesis of which is affected by multiple genetic and environmental factors. To understand the genetic and molecular basis of RA, a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) that regulate experimental autoimmune arthritis have been identified using various rat models for RA. However, identifying the particular responsible genes within these QTL remains a major challenge. Using currently available genome data and gene annotation information, we systematically examined RA-associated genes and polymorphisms within and outside QTL over the whole rat genome. By the whole genome analysis of genes and polymorphisms, we found that there are significantly more RA-associated genes in QTL regions as contrasted with non-QTL regions. Further experimental studies are necessary to determine whether these known RA-associated genes or polymorphisms are genetic components causing the QTL effect. PMID:18606636

  12. Teaching Applied Genetics and Molecular Biology to Agriculture Engineers. Application of the European Credit Transfer System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, J.; Egea-Cortines, M.

    2008-01-01

    We have been teaching applied molecular genetics to engineers and adapted the teaching methodology to the European Credit Transfer System. We teach core principles of genetics that are universal and form the conceptual basis of most molecular technologies. The course then teaches widely used techniques and finally shows how different techniques…

  13. Determining the Molecular and Genetic Basis for Diabetes in Navy Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-12

    3. DATES COVERED (From Jul 2012-Sep 2013 To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Determining the molecular and genetic basis for diabetes in Navy bottlenose...thereby reduces hepatic glucose production. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Gluconeogenesis, CREB ZF, Fasting, Diabetes 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a...Number: N000141210617 Award Title: Determining the molecular and genetic basis for diabetes in Navy bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncates

  14. Hierarchical Naive Bayes for genetic association studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome Wide Association Studies represent powerful approaches that aim at disentangling the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying complex traits. The usual "one-SNP-at-the-time" testing strategy cannot capture the multi-factorial nature of this kind of disorders. We propose a Hierarchical Naïve Bayes classification model for taking into account associations in SNPs data characterized by Linkage Disequilibrium. Validation shows that our model reaches classification performances superior to those obtained by the standard Naïve Bayes classifier for simulated and real datasets. Methods In the Hierarchical Naïve Bayes implemented, the SNPs mapping to the same region of Linkage Disequilibrium are considered as "details" or "replicates" of the locus, each contributing to the overall effect of the region on the phenotype. A latent variable for each block, which models the "population" of correlated SNPs, can be then used to summarize the available information. The classification is thus performed relying on the latent variables conditional probability distributions and on the SNPs data available. Results The developed methodology has been tested on simulated datasets, each composed by 300 cases, 300 controls and a variable number of SNPs. Our approach has been also applied to two real datasets on the genetic bases of Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Conclusions The approach proposed in this paper, called Hierarchical Naïve Bayes, allows dealing with classification of examples for which genetic information of structurally correlated SNPs are available. It improves the Naïve Bayes performances by properly handling the within-loci variability. PMID:23095471

  15. Population genetic structure of rare and endangered plants using molecular markers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raji, Jennifer; Atkinson, Carter T.

    2013-01-01

    This study was initiated to assess the levels of genetic diversity and differentiation in the remaining populations of Phyllostegia stachyoides and Melicope zahlbruckneri in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and determine the extent of gene flow to identify genetically distinct individuals or groups for conservation purposes. Thirty-six Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphic (AFLP) primer combinations generated a total of 3,242 polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments in the P. stachyoides population with a percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB) ranging from 39.3 to 65.7% and 2,780 for the M. zahlbruckneri population with a PPB of 18.8 to 64.6%. Population differentiation (Fst) of AFLP loci between subpopulations of P. stachyoides was low (0.043) across populations. Analysis of molecular variance of P. stachyoides showed that 4% of the observed genetic differentiation occurred between populations in different kīpuka and 96% when individuals were pooled from all kīpuka. Moderate genetic diversity was detected within the M. zahlbruckneri population. Bayesian and multivariate analyses both classified the P. stachyoides and M. zahlbruckneri populations into genetic groups with considerable sub-structuring detected in the P. stachyoides population. The proportion of genetic differentiation among populations explained by geographical distance was estimated by Mantel tests. No spatial correlation was found between genetic and geographic distances in both populations. Finally, a moderate but significant gene flow that could be attributed to insect or bird-mediated dispersal of pollen across the different kīpuka was observed. The results of this study highlight the utility of a multi-allelic DNA-based marker in screening a large number of polymorphic loci in small and closely related endangered populations and revealed the presence of genetically unique groups of individuals in both M. zahlbruckneri and P. stachyoides populations. Based on these findings

  16. Molecular phylogeography and genetic diversity of East Asian goats.

    PubMed

    Lin, B Z; Odahara, S; Ishida, M; Kato, T; Sasazaki, S; Nozawa, K; Mannen, H

    2013-02-01

    The domestic goat is one of the most important livestock species, but its origins and genetic diversity still remain uncertain. Multiple highly divergent maternal lineages of goat have been reported in previous studies. Although one of the mitochondrial DNA lineages, lineage B, was detected only in eastern and southern Asia, the geographic distribution of these lineages was previously unclear. Here, we examine the genetic diversity and phylogeographic structure of Asian goats by mitochondrial DNA sequences and morphological characteristics. The analyses of a total of 1661 Asian goats from 12 countries revealed a high frequency of lineage B in Southeast Asia. The frequency of this lineage tended to be higher in mountain areas than in plain areas in Southeast Asian countries, and there was a significant correlation between its frequency and morphological traits. The results suggest an original predominance of lineage B in Southeast Asia and the recent infiltration of lineage A into Southeast Asian goats.

  17. Clinical and molecular genetic features of hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Laura; Chung, Wendy K

    2011-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder that may be hereditary (HPAH), idiopathic (IPAH), or associated with either drug-toxin exposures or other medical conditions. Familial cases have long been recognised and are usually due to mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 gene (BMPR2), or, much less commonly, two other members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, activin-like kinase-type 1 (ALK1), and endoglin (ENG), which are associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In addition, approximately 20% of patients with IPAH carry mutations in BMPR2. Clinical testing for BMPR2 mutations is available and may be offered to HPAH and IPAH patients but should be preceded by genetic counselling, since lifetime penetrance is only 10% to 20%, and there are currently no known effective preventative measures. Identification of a familial mutation can be valuable in reproductive planning and identifying family members who are not mutation carriers and thus will not require lifelong surveillance. With advances in genomic technology and with international collaborative efforts, genome-wide association studies will be conducted to identify additional genes for HPAH, genetic modifiers for BMPR2 penetrance, and genetic susceptibility to IPAH. In addition, collaborative studies of BMPR2 mutation carriers should enable identification of environmental modifiers, biomarkers for disease development and progression, and surrogate markers for efficacy end points in clinical drug development, thereby providing an invaluable resource for trials of PAH prevention.

  18. Tracing the origin of 'blue Weimaraner' dogs by molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Gerding, W M; Schreiber, S; Dekomien, G; Epplen, J T

    2011-04-01

    Weimaraner dogs are defined by light brown coat colour termed grey including several shadings ranging from silver and deer to mouse grey. In contrast, the so-called blue Weimaraners (BW) with lightened black-pigmented coat have been proposed to represent spontaneous revertants in the Weimaraner breed. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the characteristic grey coat colour versus those of BW, known variation in coat colour genes including TYRP1 and MLPH were analysed in a number of grey and blue dogs. Variations at the B locus cause grey coat colour in Weimaraners via two non-functional TYRP1 copies (bb) including the b(s), b(d) and b(c) alleles. In all BW, at least one functional TYRP1 allele (Bb or BB genotype) was identified. Defined microsatellite alleles in TYRP1 intron 4 are linked to this functional B allele in BW. These alleles were also detected in various other dog breeds, but not in grey Weimaraners. The combination of a dominant trait for blue versus grey together with a specific TYRP1 haplotype in BW suggests that blue coat colour is not the result of spontaneous (back-) mutation in grey Weimaraners. This inference is even emphasized by the presence of a unique Y-chomosomal haplotype in a male offspring of the supposed ancestor of the BW population which - according to pedigree information - carries a copy of the original Y chromosome. Thus, molecular genetic analyses of coat colours combined with Y-chromosomal haplotypes allow tracing the origin of atypical dogs in respective canine populations.

  19. Identification of genetic causes of congenital neurodevelopmental disorders using genome wide molecular technologies

    PubMed Central

    Eglė, Preikšaitienė; Laima, Ambrozaitytė; Živilė, Maldžienė; Aušra, Morkūnienė,; Loreta, Cimbalistienė; Tautvydas, Rančelis; Algirdas, Utkus; Vaidutis, Kučinskas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intellectual disability affects about 1–2% of the general population worldwide, and this is the leading socio-economic problem of health care. The evaluation of the genetic causes of intellectual disability is challenging because these conditions are genetically heterogeneous with many different genetic alterations resulting in clinically indistinguishable phenotypes. Genome wide molecular technologies are effective in a research setting for establishing the new genetic basis of a disease. We describe the first Lithuanian experience in genome-wide CNV detection and whole exome sequencing, presenting the results obtained in the research project UNIGENE. Materials and methods. The patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability have been investigated (n = 66). Diagnostic screening was performed using array-CGH technology. FISH and real time-PCR were used for the confirmation of gene-dose imbalances and investigation of parental samples. Whole exome sequencing using the next generation high throughput NGS technique was used to sequence the samples of 12 selected families. Results. 14 out of 66 patients had pathogenic copy number variants, and one patient had novel likely pathogenic aberration (microdeletion at 4p15.2). Twelve families have been processed for whole exome sequencing. Two identified sequence variants could be classified as pathogenic (in MECP2, CREBBP genes). The other families had several candidate intellectual disability gene variants that are of unclear clinical significance and must be further investigated for possible effect on the molecular pathways of intellectual disability. Conclusions. The genetic heterogeneity of intellectual disability requires genome wide approaches, including detection of chromosomal aberrations by chromosomal microarrays and whole exome sequencing capable of uncovering single gene mutations. This study demonstrates the benefits and challenges that accompany the use of genome wide molecular

  20. NACE: A web-based tool for prediction of intercompartmental efficiency of human molecular genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Popik, Olga V; Ivanisenko, Timofey V; Saik, Olga V; Petrovskiy, Evgeny D; Lavrik, Inna N; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2016-06-15

    Molecular genetic processes generally involve proteins from distinct intracellular localisations. Reactions that follow the same process are distributed among various compartments within the cell. In this regard, the reaction rate and the efficiency of biological processes can depend on the subcellular localisation of proteins. Previously, the authors proposed a method of evaluating the efficiency of biological processes based on the analysis of the distribution of protein subcellular localisation (Popik et al., 2014). Here, NACE is presented, which is an open access web-oriented program that implements this method and allows the user to evaluate the intercompartmental efficiency of human molecular genetic networks. The method has been extended by a new feature that provides the evaluation of the tissue-specific efficiency of networks for more than 2800 anatomical structures. Such assessments are important in cases when molecular genetic pathways in different tissues proceed with the participation of various proteins with a number of intracellular localisations. For example, an analysis of KEGG pathways, conducted using the developed program, showed that the efficiencies of many KEGG pathways are tissue-specific. Analysis of efficiencies of regulatory pathways in the liver, linking proteins of the hepatitis C virus with human proteins involved in the KEGG apoptosis pathway, showed that intercompartmental efficiency might play an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Thus, the developed tool can be useful in the study of the effectiveness of functioning of various molecular genetic networks, including metabolic, regulatory, host-pathogen interactions and others taking into account tissue-specific gene expression. The tool is available via the following link: http://www-bionet.sscc.ru/nace/.

  1. Molecular stripping in the NFκB / IκB / DNA genetic regulatory network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoyan, Davit; Wolynes, Peter

    Genetic switches based on the NFκB / IκB / DNA system are master regulators of an array of cellular responses. Recent kinetic experiments have shown that IκB can actively remove NF κB bound to its genetic sites via a process called ''molecular stripping''. This allows the NFκB / IκB / DNA switch to function under kinetic control rather than the thermodynamic control contemplated in the traditional models of gene switches. Using molecular dynamics simulations of coarse grained predictive energy landscape models for the constituent proteins by themselves and interacting with the DNA we explore the functional motions of the transcription factor NFκB and its various binary and ternary complexes with DNA and the inhibitor I κB. These studies show that the function of the NFκB / IκB / DNA genetic switch is realized via an allosteric mechanism. Molecular stripping occurs through the activation of a domain twist mode by the binding of IκB which occurs through conformational selection. Free energy calculations for DNA binding show that the binding of IκB not only results in a significant decrease of the affinity of the transcription factor for the DNA but also kinetically speeds DNA release. Projections of the

  2. Molecular toolbox for the identification of unknown genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Ruttink, Tom; Demeyer, Rolinde; Van Gulck, Elke; Van Droogenbroeck, Bart; Querci, Maddalena; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2010-03-01

    Competent laboratories monitor genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and products derived thereof in the food and feed chain in the framework of labeling and traceability legislation. In addition, screening is performed to detect the unauthorized presence of GMOs including asynchronously authorized GMOs or GMOs that are not officially registered for commercialization (unknown GMOs). Currently, unauthorized or unknown events are detected by screening blind samples for commonly used transgenic elements, such as p35S or t-nos. If (1) positive detection of such screening elements shows the presence of transgenic material and (2) all known GMOs are tested by event-specific methods but are not detected, then the presence of an unknown GMO is inferred. However, such evidence is indirect because it is based on negative observations and inconclusive because the procedure does not identify the causative event per se. In addition, detection of unknown events is hampered in products that also contain known authorized events. Here, we outline alternative approaches for analytical detection and GMO identification and develop new methods to complement the existing routine screening procedure. We developed a fluorescent anchor-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for the identification of the sequences flanking the p35S and t-nos screening elements. Thus, anchor-PCR fingerprinting allows the detection of unique discriminative signals per event. In addition, we established a collection of in silico calculated fingerprints of known events to support interpretation of experimentally generated anchor-PCR GM fingerprints of blind samples. Here, we first describe the molecular characterization of a novel GMO, which expresses recombinant human intrinsic factor in Arabidopsis thaliana. Next, we purposefully treated the novel GMO as a blind sample to simulate how the new methods lead to the molecular identification of a novel unknown event without prior knowledge of its transgene

  3. Molecular genetic analysis of circadian timekeeping in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    A genetic screen for mutants that alter circadian rhythms in Drosophila identified the first clock gene-the period (per) gene. The per gene is a central player within a transcriptional feedback loop that represents the core mechanism for keeping circadian time in Drosophila and other animals. The per feedback loop, or core loop, is interlocked with the Clock (Clk) feedback loop, but whether the Clk feedback loop contributes to circadian timekeeping is not known. A series of distinct molecular events are thought to control transcriptional feedback in the core loop. The time it takes to complete these events should take much less than 24h, thus delays must be imposed at different steps within the core loop. As new clock genes are identified, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these delays have been revealed in ever-increasing detail and provide an in-depth accounting of how transcriptional feedback loops keep circadian time. The phase of these feedback loops shifts to maintain synchrony with environmental cycles, the most reliable of which is light. Although a great deal is known about cell-autonomous mechanisms of light-induced phase shifting by CRYPTOCHROME (CRY), much less is known about non-cell autonomous mechanisms. CRY mediates phase shifts through an uncharacterized mechanism in certain brain oscillator neurons and carries out a dual role as a photoreceptor and transcription factor in other tissues. Here, I review how transcriptional feedback loops function to keep time in Drosophila, how they impose delays to maintain a 24-h cycle, and how they maintain synchrony with environmental light:dark cycles. The transcriptional feedback loops that keep time in Drosophila are well conserved in other animals, thus what we learn about these loops in Drosophila should continue to provide insight into the operation of analogous transcriptional feedback loops in other animals.

  4. Multivariate analysis in a genetic divergence study of Psidium guajava.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, A M; Ferreira, M F S; Guilhen, J H S; Ferreira, A

    2014-12-18

    The family Myrtaceae is widespread in the Atlantic Forest and is well-represented in the Espírito Santo State in Brazil. In the genus Psidium of this family, guava (Psidium guajava L.) is the most economically important species. Guava is widely cultivated in tropical and subtropical countries; however, the widespread cultivation of only a small number of guava tree cultivars may cause the genetic vulnerability of this crop, making the search for promising genotypes in natural populations important for breeding programs and conservation. In this study, the genetic diversity of 66 guava trees sampled in the southern region of Espírito Santo and in Caparaó, MG, Brazil were evaluated. A total of 28 morphological descriptors (11 quantitative and 17 multicategorical) and 18 microsatellite markers were used. Principal component, discriminant and cluster analyses, descriptive analyses, and genetic diversity analyses using simple sequence repeats were performed. Discrimination of accessions using molecular markers resulted in clustering of genotypes of the same origin, which was not observed using morphological data. Genetic diversity was detected between and within the localities evaluated, regardless of the methodology used. Genetic differentiation among the populations using morphological and molecular data indicated the importance of the study area for species conservation, genetic erosion estimation, and exploitation in breeding programs.

  5. [Recent advances in molecular genetics of GM2 gangliosidosis].

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, N

    1995-12-01

    Recent advances in molecular genetics of GM2 gangliosidosis are reviewed. GM2 gangliosidosis is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative disease caused by a deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase (Hex, EC 3.2.1.52) A activity, resulting in accumulation of GM2 ganglioside in the lysosomes of neuronal cells. There are two catalytically active forms of this enzyme: Hex A, composed of one alpha and one beta subunits. Three forms of this disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Sandhoff disease, and GM2 activator deficiency, have been recognized according to whether the defect involves the alpha subunit, beta subunit, or GM2 activator protein, respectively. A number of gene abnormalities responsible for the disease have been identified and mutations specific for phenotypes and racial backgrounds are summarized. Recently, the murine models of human Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease have been produced. With the finding of dramatically clinical phenotypes in these mice, these models could be useful for research on the pathogenesis or therapy of these diseases.

  6. A genetic algorithm for flexible molecular overlay and pharmacophore elucidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Gareth; Willett, Peter; Glen, Robert C.

    1995-12-01

    A genetic algorithm (GA) has been developed for the superimposition of sets of flexible molecules. Molecules are represented by a chromosome that encodes angles of rotation about flexible bonds and mappings between hydrogen-bond donor proton, acceptor lone pair and ring centre features in pairs of molecules. The molecule with the smallest number of features in the data set is used as a template, onto which the remaining molecules are fitted with the objective of maximising structural equivalences. The fitness function of the GA is a weighted combination of: (i) the number and the similarity of the features that have been overlaid in this way; (ii) the volume integral of the overlay; and (iii) the van der Waals energy of the molecular conformations defined by the torsion angles encoded in the chromosomes. The algorithm has been applied to a number of pharmacophore elucidation problems, i.e., angiotensin II receptor antagonists, Leu-enkephalin and a hybrid morphine molecule, 5-HT1D agonists, benzodiazepine receptor ligands, 5-HT3 antagonists, dopamine D2 antagonists, dopamine reuptake blockers and FKBP12 ligands. The resulting pharmacophores are generated rapidly and are in good agreement with those derived from alternative means.

  7. [Molecular, genetic and physiological analysis of photoinhibition and photosynthetic

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to use a combined molecular genetic, biochemical and physiological approach to understand the relationship between photosynthetic performance and the structure of the multifunctional D1 reaction center protein of Photosystem II encoded by the chloroplast psbA gene. Relative to other chloroplast proteins, turover of D1 is rapid and highly light dependent and de novo synthesis of D1 is required for a plant's recovery from short term exposure to irradiances which induce photoinhibitory damage. These observations have led to models for a damage/repair cycle of PSII involving the targeted degradation and replacement of photodamaged D1. To investigate the effects of perturbing the D1 cycle on photosynthesis and autotrophic growth under high and low irradiance, we have examined the consequences of site-specific mutations of the psbA and 16S rRNA genes affecting synthesis, maturation and function/stability of the D1 protein introduced into the chloroplast genome of wildtype strain of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using biolistic transformation.

  8. Inflammation in Alzheimer's Disease and Molecular Genetics: Recent Update.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yan; Ng, Cheung Toa; Song, You-Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex age-related neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Since the first description of AD in 1907, many hypotheses have been established to explain its causes. The inflammation theory is one of them. Pathological and biochemical studies of brains from AD individuals have provided solid evidence of the activation of inflammatory pathways. Furthermore, people with long-term medication of anti-inflammatory drugs have shown a reduced risk to develop the disease. After three decades of genetic study in AD, dozens of loci harboring genetic variants influencing inflammatory pathways in AD patients has been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The most well-known GWAS risk factor that is responsible for immune response and inflammation in AD development should be APOE ε4 allele. However, a growing number of other GWAS risk AD candidate genes in inflammation have recently been discovered. In the present study, we try to review the inflammation in AD and immunity-associated GWAS risk genes like HLA-DRB5/DRB1, INPP5D, MEF2C, CR1, CLU and TREM2.

  9. A de novo convergence of autism genetics and molecular neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Niklas; O’Roak, Brian J.; Shendure, Jay; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) are neurodevelopmental disorders with large genetic components, but identification of pathogenic genes has proceeded slowly because hundreds of loci are involved. New exome sequencing technology has identified novel rare variants and has found that sporadic cases of ASD/ID are enriched for disruptive de novo mutations. Targeted large-scale resequencing studies have confirmed the significance of specific loci, including chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 8 (CHD8), sodium channel, voltage-gated, type II, alpha subunit (SCN2A), dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), and catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1, 88 kDa (CTNNB1, beta-catenin). We review recent studies and suggest that they have led to a convergence on three functional pathways: (i) chromatin remodeling; (ii) wnt signaling during development; and (iii) synaptic function. These pathways and genes significantly expand the neurobiological targets for study, and suggest a path for future genetic and functional studies. PMID:24387789

  10. Molecular marker development and genetic diversity exploration by RNA-seq in Platycodon grandiflorum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Jung, Jungsu; Kim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Je Min; Choi, Doil; Yeam, Inhwa

    2015-10-01

    Platycodon grandiflorum, generally known as the bellflower or balloon flower, is the only species in the genus Platycodon of the family Campanulaceae. Platycodon plants have been traditionally used as a medicinal crop in East Asia for their antiphlogistic, antitussive, and expectorant properties. Despite these practical uses, marker-assisted selection and molecular breeding in platycodons have lagged due to the lack of genetic information on this genus. In this study, we performed RNA-seq analysis of three platycodon accessions to develop molecular markers and explore genetic diversity. First, genic simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were retrieved and compared; dinucleotide motifs were the most abundant repeats (39%-40%) followed by trinucleotide (25%-31%), tetranucleotide (1.5%-1.9%), and pentanucleotide (0.3%-1.0%) repeats. The result of in silico SSR analysis, three SSR markers were detected and showed possibility to distinguish three platycodon accessions. After several filtering procedures, 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to design 40 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers. Twelve of these PCR-based markers were validated as highly polymorphic and utilized to investigate genetic diversity in 21 platycodon accessions collected from various regions of South Korea. Collectively, the 12 markers yielded 35 alleles, with an average of 3 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.087 to 0.693, averaging 0.373 per locus. Since platycodon genetics have not been actively studied, the sequence information and the DNA markers generated from our research have the potential to contribute to further genetic improvements, genomic studies, and gene discovery in this genus.

  11. Molecular study of patients with auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Guilherme Machado De; Ramos, Priscila Zonzini; Castilho, Arthur Menino; Guimarães, Alexandre Caixeta; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2016-07-01

    Auditory neuropathy is a type of hearing loss that constitutes a change in the conduct of the auditory stimulus by the involvement of inner hair cells or auditory nerve synapses. It is characterized by the absence or alteration of waves in the examination of brainstem auditory evoked potentials, with otoacoustic and/or cochlear microphonic issues. At present, four loci associated with non‑syndromic auditory neuropathy have been mapped: Autosomal recessive deafness‑9 [DFNB9; the otoferlin (OTOF) gene] and autosomal recessive deafness‑59 [DFNB59; the pejvakin (PJVK) gene], associated with autosomal recessive inheritance; the autosomal dominant auditory neuropathy gene [AUNA1; the diaphanous‑3 (DIAPH3) gene]; and AUNX1, linked to chromosome X. Furthermore, mutations of connexin 26 [the gap junction β2 (GJB2) gene] have also been associated with the disease. OTOF gene mutations exert a significant role in auditory neuropathy. In excess of 80 pathogenic mutations have been identified in individuals with non‑syndromic deafness in populations of different origins, with an emphasis on the p.Q829X mutation, which was found in ~3% of cases of deafness in the Spanish population. The identification of genetic alterations responsible for auditory neuropathy is one of the challenges contributing to understand the molecular bases of the different phenotypes of hearing loss. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate molecular changes in the OTOF gene in patients with auditory neuropathy, and to develop a DNA chip for the molecular diagnosis of auditory neuropathy using mass spectrometry for genotyping. Genetic alterations were investigated in 47 patients with hearing loss and clinical diagnosis of auditory neuropathy, and the c.35delG mutation in the GJB2 gene was identified in three homozygous patients, and the heterozygous parents of one of these cases. Additionally, OTOF gene mutations were tracked by complete sequencing of 48 exons, although these results

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Natural Leishmania Populations Vary with Genetic Background

    PubMed Central

    Decuypere, Saskia; Vanaerschot, Manu; Brunker, Kirstyn; Imamura, Hideo; Müller, Sylke; Khanal, Basudha; Rijal, Suman; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Coombs, Graham H.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of drug-resistance in pathogens is a major global health threat. Elucidating the molecular basis of pathogen drug-resistance has been the focus of many studies but rarely is it known whether a drug-resistance mechanism identified is universal for the studied pathogen; it has seldom been clarified whether drug-resistance mechanisms vary with the pathogen's genotype. Nevertheless this is of critical importance in gaining an understanding of the complexity of this global threat and in underpinning epidemiological surveillance of pathogen drug resistance in the field. This study aimed to assess the molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity that emerges in natural parasite populations under drug treatment pressure. We studied lines of the protozoan parasite Leishmania (L.) donovani with differential susceptibility to antimonial drugs; the lines being derived from clinical isolates belonging to two distinct genetic populations that circulate in the leishmaniasis endemic region of Nepal. Parasite pathways known to be affected by antimonial drugs were characterised on five experimental levels in the lines of the two populations. Characterisation of DNA sequence, gene expression, protein expression and thiol levels revealed a number of molecular features that mark antimonial-resistant parasites in only one of the two populations studied. A final series of in vitro stress phenotyping experiments confirmed this heterogeneity amongst drug-resistant parasites from the two populations. These data provide evidence that the molecular changes associated with antimonial-resistance in natural Leishmania populations depend on the genetic background of the Leishmania population, which has resulted in a divergent set of resistance markers in the Leishmania populations. This heterogeneity of parasite adaptations provides severe challenges for the control of drug resistance in the field and the design of molecular surveillance tools for widespread applicability. PMID:22389733

  13. Robust inference of genetic architecture in mapping studies.

    PubMed

    Slate, Jon

    2017-03-01

    The genetic architecture of a trait usually refers to the number and magnitude of loci that explain phenotypic variation. A description of genetic architecture can help us to understand how genetic variation is maintained, how traits have evolved and how phenotypes might respond to selection. However, linkage mapping and association studies can suffer from problems of bias, especially when conducted in natural populations where the opportunity to perform studies with very large sample sizes can be limited. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Li and colleagues perform an association study of brain traits in ninespine sticklebacks Pungitius pungitius. They use a sophisticated approach that models all of the genotyped markers simultaneously; conventional approaches fit each marker individually. Although the single-marker and multi-marker approaches find similar regions of the genome that explain phenotypic variation, the overall conclusions about trait architecture are somewhat different, depending on the approach used. Single-marker methods identify regions that explain quite large proportions of genetic variation, whereas the multi-marker approach suggests the traits are far more polygenic. Simulations suggest the multi-marker approach is robust. This study highlights how molecular quantitative genetics in wild populations can be used to address hypothesis-driven questions, without making unrealistic assumptions about effect sizes of individual quantitative trait loci.

  14. Foveal slope measurements in diabetic retinopathy: Can it predict development of sight-threatening retinopathy? Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SN-DREAMS II, Report no 8)

    PubMed Central

    Gella, Laxmi; Pal, Swakshyar Saumya; Ganesan, Suganeswari; Sharma, Tarun; Raman, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to assess the foveal slope configuration in subjects with type 2 diabetes in a population-based study. Materials and Methods: A subset of 668 subjects from Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study II, a population-based study, were included in the current study. All the subjects underwent comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation including spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Foveal thickness was assessed in five central early treatment DR study quadrants from the three-dimensional scan and foveal slope was calculated in all the four quadrants. Results: Subjects with sight-threatening DR (STDR) had significantly shallow foveal slope in inferior quadrant (STDR: 7.33 ± 6.26 vs. controls: 10.31 ± 3.44; P = 0.021) when compared to controls and in superior (STDR: 7.62 ± 5.81 vs. no DR: 9.11 ± 2.82; P = 0.033), inferior (STDR: 7.33 ± 6.26 vs. no DR: 8.81 ± 2.81; P = 0.048), and temporal quadrants (STDR: 6.69 ± 5.70 vs. no DR: 7.97 ± 2.33; P = 0.030) when compared to subjects with no DR. Foveal slope was significantly shallow among the older age groups in subjects with no DR (P < 0.001) and non-STDR (P = 0.027). Average foveal slope in the diabetic subjects was independently and significantly correlated with increase in age (r = −0.241; P < 0.001) and central subfield thickness (r = −0.542; P < 0.001). Conclusion: Changes in foveal slope were seen with increasing age; however, in diabetes these segmental slope changes can be seen in late DR (STDR). PMID:26265635

  15. Alleles versus mutations: Understanding the evolution of genetic architecture requires a molecular perspective on allelic origins.

    PubMed

    Remington, David L

    2015-12-01

    Perspectives on the role of large-effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the evolution of complex traits have shifted back and forth over the past few decades. Different sets of studies have produced contradictory insights on the evolution of genetic architecture. I argue that much of the confusion results from a failure to distinguish mutational and allelic effects, a limitation of using the Fisherian model of adaptive evolution as the lens through which the evolution of adaptive variation is examined. A molecular-based perspective reveals that allelic differences can involve the cumulative effects of many mutations plus intragenic recombination, a model that is supported by extensive empirical evidence. I discuss how different selection regimes could produce very different architectures of allelic effects under a molecular-based model, which may explain conflicting insights on genetic architecture from studies of variation within populations versus between divergently selected populations. I address shortcomings of genome-wide association study (GWAS) practices in light of more suitable models of allelic evolution, and suggest alternate GWAS strategies to generate more valid inferences about genetic architecture. Finally, I discuss how adopting more suitable models of allelic evolution could help redirect research on complex trait evolution toward addressing more meaningful questions in evolutionary biology.

  16. [The problem of molecular-genetic identification of sweat and grease deposits in the human fingerprints].

    PubMed

    Faleeva, T G; Ivanov, I N; Mishin, E S; Vnukova, N V; Kornienko, I V

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present experimental molecular-genetic study of DNA contained in of human fingerprints was to establish the relationship between the reference genetic profiles and the genotypes of the individuals leaving their fingerprints on a smooth metal object. The biological material for the purpose of the investigation was sampled at different time intervals. The were taken using a scotch tape and used to obtain the complete genetic profile immediately after the fingerprints had been left as well as within the next 24 hours and one week. It proved impossible to identify the complete genetic profile one month after the fingerprints had been left. The alleles not typical for reference samples were identified within one week after swabbing the material from the metal surface. The results of the sudy can be explained by the decrease of the concentration of the initial DNA-matrix in the samples due to its degradation in the course of time. It is concluded that the parallel genetic analysis is needed if reliable evidence of identity of the profiles of interest or its absence is to be obtained.

  17. MOLECULAR GENETIC APPROACHES TO PEST AND NONTARGET POPULATION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has interest in a number of applications of genetic monitoring methodologies. Genetic monitoring in agroecosystems can provide valuable environmental information regarding both traditional and novel pesticides. One group of pesticides of...

  18. Applications of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) to taxonomy, diagnosis, population genetics and molecular evolution of parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Gasser, R B; Chilton, N B

    2001-11-22

    The analysis of genetic variation in parasitic nematodes has important implications for studying aspects of taxonomy, diagnosis, population genetics, drug resistance and molecular evolution. This article highlights some applications of PCR-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for the analysis of sequence variation in individual parasites (and their populations) to address some of these areas. It also describes the principles and advantages of SSCP, and provides some examples for future applications in parasitology.

  19. Molecular biology and genetics of the acetate-utilizing methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsalus, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    Acetate conversion to methane and C0{sub 2} by the methanogenic archaebacteria is a primary rate limiting step in anaerobic biodegradative processes in nature. However, the genetic study of these organisms has not been experimentally tractable due to the inability to grow and plate the organisms as single cells, and to extract high molecular weight DNA and RNA without shearing. The acetate-utilizing species, Methanosarcina thermolphila TM-1, is being used for the proposed genetic and molecular studies because, unlike previously described acetotrophic methanosarcina that have a thick heteropolysaccharide cell wall, this species can be cultured in a unicellular form that has a protein cell wall lacking the heteropolysaccharide layer. These cells can be gently disrupted to obtain protoplasts or lysed to yield intact genomic DNA and RNA. Experiments are in progress to develop a gene transfer system in this bacterial species. Methods are being developed and refined for the efficient plating of M. thermophila on defined media, for chemical mutagenesis, and for the isolation of mutants defective in acetate utilization. Chromosomal DNA libraries have been constructed from M. thermophila and are being used to clone genes involved in the acetate utilization pathway (e.g. carbon monoxide dehydrogenase). Once cloned, analysis of the molecular mechanisms responsible for their regulatory control will be performed. These studies should aid our understanding of the pathway for acetate utilization in M. thermophila and serve as a model for elucidating regulatory mechanisms in the acetotrophic methanogens.

  20. Molecular Genetic and Epigenetic Basis of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hojati, Zohreh

    2017-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of spinal cord and brain. The initial event in MS occurs when activated CD4(+) T cells in periphery exacerbates immune responses by stimulating immune cells such as B cells, CD8(+) cells, mast cells, granulocytes and monocytes. These proinflammatory cells pass blood brain barrier by secreting proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and INF-γ which activate adhesion factors. APCs (antigen-presenting cells) reactivate CD4(+) T cells after infiltrating the CNS and CD4(+) T cells produce cytokines and chemokines. These proinflammatory cytokines aggravate inflammation by inducing myelin phagocytosis through microglia and astrocytes activation. MS is believed to have a multifactorial origin that includes a combination of multiple genetic, environmental and stochastic factors. Although the exact component of MS risks that can be explained by these factors is difficult to determine, estimates based on genetic and epidemiological studies suggest that up to 60-70 % of the total risk of MS may be contribute to genetic factors. In continue, firstly we provide an overview of the current understanding of epigenetic mechanisms, and so present evidence of how the epigenetic modifications contribute to increased susceptibility of MS. We also explain how specified epigenetic modifications may influence the pathophysiology and key aspects of disease in MS (demyelination, remyelination, inflammation, and neurodegeneration). Finally, we tend to discuss how environmental factors and epigenetic mechanisms may interact to have an effect on MS risk and clinical outcome and recommend new therapeutic interventions that might modulate patients' epigenetic profiles.

  1. Molecular genetic analysis of patients with sporadic and X-linked infantile nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Deng, Wen-Li; Lei, Xin-Lan; Xing, Dong-Jun; Ye, Liang; Xu, Su-Zhong; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Fang; Yu, Xin-Ping; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Infantile nystagmus (IN) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterised by involuntary rhythmic oscillations of the eyes accompanied by different degrees of vision impairment. Two genes have been identified as mainly causing IN: FRMD7 and GPR143. The aim of our study was to identify the genetic basis of both sporadic IN and X-linked IN. Design Prospective analysis. Patients Twenty Chinese patients, including 15 sporadic IN cases and 5 from X-linked IN families, were recruited and underwent molecular genetic analysis. We first performed PCR-based DNA sequencing of the entire coding region and the splice junctions of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes in participants. Mutational analysis and co-segregation confirmation were then performed. Setting All clinical examinations and genetic experiments were performed in the Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. Results Two mutations in the FRMD7 gene, including one novel nonsense mutation (c.1090C>T, p.Q364X) and one reported missense mutation (c.781C>G, p.R261G), were identified in two of the five (40%) X-linked IN families. However, none of putative mutations were identified in FRMD7 or GPR143 in any of the sporadic cases. Conclusions The results suggest that mutations in FRMD7 appeared to be the major genetic cause of X-linked IN, but not of sporadic IN. Our findings provide further insights into FRMD7 mutations, which could be helpful for future genetic diagnosis and genetic counselling of Chinese patients with nystagmus. PMID:27036142

  2. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Final report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.

    1997-02-01

    The normal growth and development of plant cells depends on the precise organization and distribution of the cellular contents. The basic goal of this investigation was to define a group of the molecules that are involved in organizing and transporting plant cell components. Based largely on studies of animal and fungal cells, one of the molecules thought to be involved in intracellular trafficking in plants is the actin-based motor protein myosin. Therefore, the major aim of this study was to isolate and analyze plant genes encoding myosin proteins. The plant of choice for these experiments was Arabidopsis thaliana, which offers numerous advantages for molecular genetics research.

  3. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  4. Molecular Genetic Study of Human Esophageal Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-16

    activating transmembrane mutations in the c- erbB2 proto-oncogene in human breast cancer. Oncogene, 5:237-239, 1990. Levine, A.J., & Monard, J. Tumor...have demonstrated susceptibility to mutations in different types of neoplasia. In the present investigation, two approaches were undertaken in the...search for such genes which might be mutated during the development of esophageal carcinoma. In the first, the human HER2 oncogene, encoding a

  5. Molecular tools for studying plant genetic diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitous nature of DNA is a central theme for all biology. The nucleus of each cell that makes up an organism contains genomic DNA, which is the blueprint for life. The differential expression of genes within each cell gives rise to different tissues, organs and, ultimately, different organi...

  6. Characterizing the ADHD Phenotype for Genetic Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jim; Asherson, Phil; Hay, David; Levy, Florence; Swanson, Jim; Thapar, Anita; Willcutt, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The genetic study of ADHD has made considerable progress. Further developments in the field will be reliant in part on identifying the most appropriate phenotypes for genetic analysis. The use of both categorical and dimensional measures of symptoms related to ADHD has been productive. The use of multiple reporters is a valuable feature of the…

  7. Genetic and molecular dosimetry of HZE radiation (US-1 RADIAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Schubert, W. W.; Kazarians, G. A.; Richards, G. F.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Henke, R. P.

    1995-01-01

    In order to estimate radiation exposure in space, experiments were conducted during the 1st International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) mission in order to isolate genetic changes in animal cells caused by cosmic rays. The space measurements were evaluated against results from synthetic cosmic rays produced by particle accelerators on the ground. The biological material used was the tiny soil nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. The measurements were made by thermoluminescent detectors and plastic nuclear track detectors. The development and the chromosome mechanics in microgravity were studied, and the mutagenesis induced by radiation exposure was analyzed. The results showed that there are no obvious differences in the development, behavior and chromosome mechanics, as a function of gravity unloading (reproduction, self-fertilization and mating of males with hermaphrodites, gross anatomy, symmetry and gametogenesis, pairing, disjoining and recombination of chromosomes). A variety of mutants were isolated, and it was noted that mutants isolated from regions of identified high particles were more severely affected than those isolated by random screening. Linear energy transfer particles seem to favor large scale genetic lesions.

  8. Brugada Syndrome: Clinical, Genetic, Molecular, Cellular, and Ionic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Antzelevitch, Charles; Patocskai, Bence

    2016-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia syndrome first described as a new clinical entity in 1992. Electrocardiographically characterized by distinct coved type ST segment elevation in the right-precordial leads, the syndrome is associated with a high risk for sudden cardiac death in young adults, and less frequently in infants and children. The electrocardiographic manifestations of BrS are often concealed and may be unmasked or aggravated by sodium channel blockers, a febrile state, vagotonic agents, as well as by tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the most widely accepted approach to therapy. Pharmacologic therapy is designed to produce an inward shift in the balance of currents active during the early phases of the right ventricular action potential (AP) and can be used to abort electrical storms or as an adjunct or alternative to device therapy when use of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator is not possible. Isoproterenol, cilostazol, and milrinone boost calcium channel current and drugs like quinidine, bepridil, and the Chinese herb extract Wenxin Keli inhibit the transient outward current, acting to diminish the AP notch and thus to suppress the substrate and trigger for ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Radiofrequency ablation of the right ventricular outflow tract epicardium of patients with BrS has recently been shown to reduce arrhythmia vulnerability and the electrocardiographic manifestation of the disease, presumably by destroying the cells with more prominent AP notch. This review provides an overview of the clinical, genetic, molecular, and cellular aspects of BrS as well as the approach to therapy.

  9. Brugada Syndrome. Clinical, Genetic, Molecular, Cellular and Ionic Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Antzelevitch, Charles; Patocskai, Bence

    2015-01-01

    The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia syndrome first described as a new clinical entity in 1992. Electrocardiographically characterized by distinct coved type ST segment elevation in the right precordial leads, the syndrome is associated with a high risk for sudden cardiac death in young adults, and less frequently in infants and children. The ECG manifestations of the BrS are often concealed and may be unmasked or aggravated by sodium channel blockers, a febrile state, vagotonic agents, as well as by tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the most widely accepted approach to therapy. Pharmacological therapy is designed to produce an inward shift in the balance of currents active during the early phases of the right ventricular action potential and can be used to abort electrical storms or as an adjunct or alternative to device therapy when use of an ICD is not possible. Isoproterenol, cilostazol and milrinone boost calcium channel current and drugs like quinidine, bepridil and the Chinese herb extract Wenxin Keli inhibit the transient outward current, acting to diminish the action potential (AP) notch and thus to suppress the substrate and trigger for VT/VF. Radiofrequency ablation of the right ventricular outflow tract epicardium of BrS patients has recently been shown to reduce arrhythmia-vulnerability and the ECG-manifestation of the disease, presumably by destroying the cells with more prominent AP notch. This review provides an overview of the clinical, genetic, molecular and cellular aspects of the BrS as well as the approach to therapy. PMID:26671757

  10. Molecular genetics of human cancer predisposition and progression.

    PubMed

    Cavenee, W K; Scrable, H J; James, C D

    1991-04-01

    The development of human cancer is generally thought to entail a series of events that cause a progressively more malignant phenotype. Such a hypothesis predicts that tumor cells of the ultimate stage will carry each of the events, cells of the penultimate stage will carry each of the events less the last one and so on. A dissection of the pathway from a normal cell to a fully malignant tumor may thus be viewed as the unraveling of a nested set of aberrations. In experiments designed to elucidate these events we have compared genotypic combinations at genomic loci defined by restriction endonuclease recognition site variation in normal and tumor tissues from patients with various forms and stages of cancer. The first step, inherited predisposition, is best described for retinoblastoma in which a recessive mutation of a locus residing in the 13q14 region of the genome is unmasked by aberrant, but specific, mitotic chromosomal segregation. Similar mechanisms involving the distal short arm of chromosome 17 are apparent in astrocytic tumors and the events are shared by cells in each malignancy state. DNA sequencing indicates that these events accomplish the homozygosis of mutant alleles of the p53 gene. Copy number amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene occurs in intermediate and late-stage tumors whereas loss of heterozygosity for loci on chromosome 10 is restricted to the ultimate stage, glioblastoma multiforme. These results suggest a genetic approach to defining degrees of tumor progression and the locations of genes involved in the pathway as a prelude to their molecular isolation and characterization.

  11. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification

    PubMed Central

    Offergeld, Christian; Brase, Christoph; Yaremchuk, Svetlana; Mader, Irina; Rischke, Hans Christian; Gläsker, Sven; Schmid, Kurt W; Wiech, Thorsten; Preuss, Simon F; Suárez, Carlos; Kopeć, Tomasz; Patocs, Attila; Wohllk, Nelson; Malekpour, Mahdi; Boedeker, Carsten C; Neumann, Hartmut PH

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom release catecholamines and are hence rarely vasoactive. Petrous bone, jugular, and tympanic head and neck paragangliomas may cause hearing loss. The internationally accepted clinical classifications for carotid body tumors are based on the Shamblin Class I–III stages, which correspond to postoperative permanent side effects. For petrous-bone paragangliomas in the head and neck, the Fisch classification is used. Regarding the molecular genetics, head and neck paragangliomas have been associated with nine susceptibility genes: NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2 (SDH5), and TMEM127. Hereditary HNPs are mostly caused by mutations of the SDHD gene, but SDHB and SDHC mutations are not uncommon in such patients. Head and neck paragangliomas are rarely associated with mutations of VHL, RET, or NF1. The research on SDHA, SDHAF2 and TMEM127 is ongoing. Multiple head and neck paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHD mutations, while malignant head and neck paraganglioma is mostly seen in patients with SDHB mutations. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. Good postoperative results can be expected in carotid body tumors of Shamblin Class I and II, whereas operations on other carotid body tumors and other head and neck paragangliomas frequently result in deficits of the cranial nerves adjacent to the tumors. Slow growth and the tendency of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas to be multifocal may justify less aggressive treatment strategies. PMID:22584701

  12. Incorporating personalized gene sequence variants, molecular genetics knowledge, and health knowledge into an EHR prototype based on the Continuity of Care Record standard

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xia; Kay, Stephen; Marley, Tom; Hardiker, Nicholas R.; Cimino, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objectives The current volume and complexity of genetic tests, and the molecular genetics knowledge and health knowledge related to interpretation of the results of those tests, are rapidly outstripping the ability of individual clinicians to recall, understand and convey to their patients information relevant to their care. The tailoring of molecular genetics knowledge and health knowledge in clinical settings is important both for the provision of personalized medicine and to reduce clinician information overload. In this paper we describe the incorporation, customization and demonstration of molecular genetic data (mainly sequence variants), molecular genetics knowledge and health knowledge into a standards-based electronic health record (EHR) prototype developed specifically for this study. Methods We extended the CCR (Continuity of Care Record), an existing EHR standard for representing clinical data, to include molecular genetic data. An EHR prototype was built based on the extended CCR and designed to display relevant molecular genetics knowledge and health knowledge from an existing knowledge base for cystic fibrosis (OntoKBCF). We reconstructed test records from published case reports and represented them in the CCR schema. We then used the EHR to dynamically filter molecular genetics knowledge and health knowledge from OntoKBCF using molecular genetic data and clinical data from the test cases. Results The molecular genetic data were successfully incorporated in the CCR by creating a category of laboratory results called “Molecular Genetics ” and specifying a particular class of test (“Gene Mutation Test”) in this category. Unlike other laboratory tests reported in the CCR, results of tests in this class required additional attributes (“Molecular Structure” and “Molecular Position”) to support interpretation by clinicians. These results, along with clinical data (age, sex, ethnicity, diagnostic procedures, and therapies) were used

  13. The Molecular Genetics of Bacteriophage: The Work of Norton Zinder

    PubMed Central

    Kresge, Nicole; Simoni, Robert D.; Hill, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    In 1966, Norton Zinder and Joshua Lederberg discovered that Salmonella could exchange genes via bacteriophages. They named this phenomenon “genetic transduction.” This discovery set Zinder on a lifelong journey researching bacteriophage. In the two Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC) Classic papers reprinted here, Zinder and Nina Fedoroff present their findings on the phage f2 replicase. Properties of the Phage f2 Replicase. I. Optimal Conditions for Replicase Activity and Analysis of the Polynucleotide Product Synthesized in Vitro (Fedoroff, N. V., and Zinder, N. D. (1972) J. Biol. Chem. 247, 4577–4585) Properties of the Phage f2 Replicase. II. Comparative Studies on the Ribonucleic Acid-dependent and Poly(C)-dependent Activities of the Replicase (Fedoroff, N. V., and Zinder, N. D. (1972) J. Biol. Chem. 247, 4586–4592) PMID:21830328

  14. Molecular reconstruction of a fungal genetic code alteration.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Denisa D; Paredes, João A; Español, Yaiza; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís; Moura, Gabriela R; Santos, Manuel A S

    2013-06-01

    Fungi of the CTG clade translate the Leu CUG codon as Ser. This genetic code alteration is the only eukaryotic sense-to-sense codon reassignment known to date, is mediated by an ambiguous serine tRNA (tRNACAG(Ser)), exposes unanticipated flexibility of the genetic code and raises major questions about its selection and fixation in this fungal lineage. In particular, the origin of the tRNACAG(Ser) and the evolutionary mechanism of CUG reassignment from Leu to Ser remain poorly understood. In this study, we have traced the origin of the tDNACAG(Ser) gene and studied critical mutations in the tRNACAG(Ser) anticodon-loop that modulated CUG reassignment. Our data show that the tRNACAG(Ser) emerged from insertion of an adenosine in the middle position of the 5'-CGA-3'anticodon of a tRNACGA(Ser) ancestor, producing the 5'-CAG-3' anticodon of the tRNACAG(Ser), without altering its aminoacylation properties. This mutation initiated CUG reassignment while two additional mutations in the anticodon-loop resolved a structural conflict produced by incorporation of the Leu 5'-CAG-3'anticodon in the anticodon-arm of a tRNA(Ser). Expression of the mutant tRNACAG(Ser) in yeast showed that it cannot be expressed at physiological levels and we postulate that such downregulation was essential to maintain Ser misincorporation at sub-lethal levels during the initial stages of CUG reassignment. We demonstrate here that such low level CUG ambiguity is advantageous in specific ecological niches and we propose that misreading tRNAs are targeted for degradation by an unidentified tRNA quality control pathway.

  15. Molecular reconstruction of a fungal genetic code alteration

    PubMed Central

    Mateus, Denisa D.; Paredes, João A.; Español, Yaiza; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís; Moura, Gabriela R.; Santos, Manuel A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi of the CTG clade translate the Leu CUG codon as Ser. This genetic code alteration is the only eukaryotic sense-to-sense codon reassignment known to date, is mediated by an ambiguous serine tRNA (tRNACAGSer), exposes unanticipated flexibility of the genetic code and raises major questions about its selection and fixation in this fungal lineage. In particular, the origin of the tRNACAGSer and the evolutionary mechanism of CUG reassignment from Leu to Ser remain poorly understood. In this study, we have traced the origin of the tDNACAGSer gene and studied critical mutations in the tRNACAGSer anticodon-loop that modulated CUG reassignment. Our data show that the tRNACAGSer emerged from insertion of an adenosine in the middle position of the 5′-CGA-3′anticodon of a tRNACGASer ancestor, producing the 5′-CAG-3′ anticodon of the tRNACAGSer, without altering its aminoacylation properties. This mutation initiated CUG reassignment while two additional mutations in the anticodon-loop resolved a structural conflict produced by incorporation of the Leu 5′-CAG-3′anticodon in the anticodon-arm of a tRNASer. Expression of the mutant tRNACAGSer in yeast showed that it cannot be expressed at physiological levels and we postulate that such downregulation was essential to maintain Ser misincorporation at sub-lethal levels during the initial stages of CUG reassignment. We demonstrate here that such low level CUG ambiguity is advantageous in specific ecological niches and we propose that misreading tRNAs are targeted for degradation by an unidentified tRNA quality control pathway. PMID:23619021

  16. [Update in radiation-induced neoplasms: genetic studies].

    PubMed

    Chauveinc, Laurent; Lefevre, Sandrine; Malfoy, Bernard; Dutrillaux, Bernard

    2002-02-01

    Radiation induced tumors are a possible (very) late complications of radiotherapy. The evaluation of the risks of radiation-induced tumors has been presented in different epidemiological studies, with the evaluation of the relative risk for different tissues. But, the genetic studies are rare, and no global theory exists. Two cytogenetic profiles are described, one with translocations and one with genetic material losses, evoking two different genetic evolutions. Two questions are stated. What are the radiation-induced genetic mechanisms? Is it possible to differentiate the radiation-induced and spontaneous tumors with genetic approaches? With 37 cytogenetic cases, 12 analyzed in our laboratory, the radiation-induced tumors were characterized by genetic material losses. An anti-oncogenic evolution is probable. A new molecularly study confirm these results. Only thyroid tumors do not have this evolution. For tumors with simple karyotype, like meningioma, radiation-induced tumors seem to be more complex than spontaneous tumors. But for the others, the differentiation is impossible to be done with cytogenetic. The mechanism of the chromosomic material losses in unknown, but some hypothesis are discussed.

  17. Tumor cell metabolism: the marriage of molecular genetics and proteomics with cellular intermediary metabolism; proceed with caution!

    PubMed

    Costello, Leslie C; Franklin, Renty B

    2006-11-07

    Metabolic transformations of malignant cells are essential to the development and progression of all cancers. The understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of cancer requires the establishment of the altered genetic/metabolic factors that are essential to the development, growth, and proliferation of the malignant cells. Recognition of this important relationship has resulted in a resurgence of interest in the intermediary metabolism of tumor cells. The role of molecular genetics and proteomics and the application of molecular technology in assessing altered cellular metabolism has become a major area of biomedical research. The contemporary generation of biomedical scientists is exceptionally well trained in all areas of molecular biology and molecular technology, which are now important tools to be applied to the regulation of cellular intermediary metabolism. Simultaneously, the didactic and methodological training associated with the principles and operation of metabolic pathways, enzymology, cellular enzyme activity, and associated biochemical implications has been diminished and often eliminated from the pre- and post-doctoral programs. Interpretations and conclusions of alterations in cellular enzyme activity and associated metabolic pathways based on genetic/proteomic changes can and will result in misrepresentation of important metabolic implications in malignancy and other diseases. It is essential that the genetic/proteomic studies be coupled to biochemical/metabolic cellular events to satisfy the axiom: "genetic transformations and proteomic alterations will have little relevancy to disease processes if the genetic/proteomic alterations are not manifested in altered and impaired cellular and metabolic function". The appropriate marriage of molecular genetics/proteomics with the regulation of cellular intermediary metabolism will provide new revelations and understanding of malignancy that could not be achieved in earlier generations.

  18. Molecular genetics and genomics of the Rosoideae: state of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, Sara; Giongo, Lara; Buti, Matteo; Surbanovski, Nada; Viola, Roberto; Velasco, Riccardo; Ward, Judson A; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The Rosoideae is a subfamily of the Rosaceae that contains a number of species of economic importance, including the soft fruit species strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa), red (Rubus idaeus) and black (Rubus occidentalis) raspberries, blackberries (Rubus spp.) and one of the most economically important cut flower genera, the roses (Rosa spp.). Molecular genetics and genomics resources for the Rosoideae have developed rapidly over the past two decades, beginning with the development and application of a number of molecular marker types including restriction fragment length polymorphisms, amplified fragment length polymorphisms and microsatellites, and culminating in the recent publication of the genome sequence of the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca, and the development of high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping resources for Fragaria, Rosa and Rubus. These tools have been used to identify genes and other functional elements that control traits of economic importance, to study the evolution of plant genome structure within the subfamily, and are beginning to facilitate genomic-assisted breeding through the development and deployment of markers linked to traits such as aspects of fruit quality, disease resistance and the timing of flowering. In this review, we report on the developments that have been made over the last 20 years in the field of molecular genetics and structural genomics within the Rosoideae, comment on how the knowledge gained will improve the efficiency of cultivar development and discuss how these advances will enhance our understanding of the biological processes determining agronomically important traits in all Rosoideae species. PMID:26504527

  19. Molecular Biology and Genetic Mechanisms in the Progression of the Malignant Skin Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Pejkova, Sofija; Dzokic, Gjorgje; Tudzarova-Gjorgova, Smilja; Panov, Sasho

    2016-11-01

    Malignant skin melanoma is a tumor deriving from transformed skin melanocytes as a result of complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. This melanoma has a potential to metastasize early and very often it is resistant to the existing modalities of the systemic therapy. As in any other neoplasms, certain types of melanoma may skip certain stages of progression. The progression from one stage to another is accompanied by specific biological changes. Several key changes in the melanoma tumorogenesis influence the regulation of the cell proliferation and vitality, including the RAS-RAF-ERK, PI3K-AKT, and p16INK4/CDK4/RB pathways. A key role in the dissreguarity of the RAS-RAF-ERK (MAPK) pathway in the malignant melanoma development have been demonstrated by many studies. To date, the molecular genetic alterations during melanoma development have been partially known. In the pathogenesis of the malignant melanoma, there are mutations of various genes such as NRAS, BRAF, and PTEN and mutations and deletions of CDKN2A. In the past years, great advance has been made in the insights of the molecular aspects of the melanoma pathogenesis. However, this field yet poses a challenge to discover new details about the melanoma molecular characteristics. The research results are focused towards the improvement of the melanoma patients prognosis by introducing personalized targeted therapy.

  20. Molecular genetic structure-function analysis of translation initiation factor eIF5B.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Dever, Thomas E

    2007-01-01

    Recently, significant progress has been made in obtaining three-dimensional (3-D) structures of the factors that promote translation initiation, elongation, and termination. These structures, when interpreted in light of previous biochemical characterizations of the factors, provide significant insight into the function of the factors and the molecular mechanism of specific steps in the translation process. In addition, genetic analyses in yeast have helped elucidate the in vivo roles of the factors in various steps of the translation pathway. We have combined these two approaches and use molecular genetic studies to define the structure-function properties of translation initiation factors in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this chapter, we describe our multistep approach in which we first characterize a site-directed mutant of the factor of interest using in vivo and in vitro assays of protein synthesis. Next, we subject the mutant gene to random mutagenesis and screen for second-site mutations that restore the factor's function in vivo. Following biochemical and in vivo characterization of the suppressor mutant, we interpret the results in light of the 3-D structure of the factor to define the structure-function properties of the factor and to provide new molecular insights into the mechanism of translation.

  1. Genetic characterization, molecular epidemiology, and phylogenetic relationships of insect-specific viruses in the taxon Negevirus.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marcio R T; Contreras-Gutierrez, María Angélica; Guzman, Hilda; Martins, Livia C; Barbirato, Mayla Feitoza; Savit, Chelsea; Balta, Victoria; Uribe, Sandra; Vivero, Rafael; Suaza, Juan David; Oliveira, Hamilton; Nunes Neto, Joaquin P; Carvalho, Valeria L; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; Cardoso, Jedson F; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Santo; da Silva Lemos, Poliana; Wood, Thomas G; Widen, Steven G; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Fish, Durland; Vasilakis, Nikos; Tesh, Robert B

    2017-04-01

    The recently described taxon Negevirus is comprised of a diverse group of insect-specific viruses isolated from mosquitoes and phlebotomine sandflies. In this study, a comprehensive genetic characterization, molecular, epidemiological and evolutionary analyses were conducted on nearly full-length sequences of 91 new negevirus isolates obtained in Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Panama, USA and Nepal. We demonstrated that these arthropod restricted viruses are clustered in two major phylogenetic groups with origins related to three plant virus genera (Cilevirus, Higrevirus and Blunevirus). Molecular analyses demonstrated that specific host correlations are not present with most negeviruses; instead, high genetic variability, wide host-range, and cross-species transmission were noted. The data presented here also revealed the existence of five novel insect-specific viruses falling into two arthropod-restrictive virus taxa, previously proposed as distinct genera, designated Nelorpivirus and Sandewavirus. Our results provide a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology, evolution, taxonomy and stability of this group of insect-restricted viruses.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms in Genetically Defined Autoinflammatory Diseases: Disorders of Amplified Danger Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Canna, Scott W.; Liu, Yin; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-01-01

    Patients with autoinflammatory diseases present with noninfectious fever flares and systemic and/or disease-specific organ inflammation. Their excessive proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses can be life threatening and lead to organ damage over time. Studying such patients has revealed genetic defects that have helped unravel key innate immune pathways, including excessive IL-1 signaling, constitutive NF-κB activation, and, more recently, chronic type I IFN signaling. Discoveries of monogenic defects that lead to activation of proinflammatory cytokines have inspired the use of anticytokine-directed treatment approaches that have been life changing for many patients and have led to the approval of IL-1-blocking agents for a number of autoinflammatory conditions. In this review, we describe the genetically characterized autoinflammatory diseases, we summarize our understanding of the molecular pathways that drive clinical phenotypes and that continue to inspire the search for novel treatment targets, and we provide a conceptual framework for classification. PMID:25706096

  3. Molecular evidence and high genetic diversity of shrew-borne Seewis virus in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Resman, Katarina; Korva, Miša; Fajs, Luka; Zidarič, Tanja; Trilar, Tomi; Zupanc, Tatjana Avšič

    2013-10-01

    Seewis virus, the shrew-borne hantavirus from Sorex araneus, has been molecularly detected in reservoir hosts in many different central European countries and Russia. Slovenia is a known endemic country for rodent-borne hantaviruses, therefore the aim of the study was to investigate the presence of shrew-borne hantaviruses in insectivores. Viral L, S and M segment have been recovered only from tissue samples of 7 S. araneus, despite several shrew species were tested. Phylogenetic analysis showed high genetic diversity of SWSV in Slovenia, ranging from 3 to 19.4% for different viral segments. The most divergent were M segment sequences, with 19.4% nucleotide divergence among Slovenian strains. Above that, different SWSV strains from Slovenia do not group into separate geographic clusters. While three separate genetic clades were determined, two of them were simultaneously present in one location at the same time.

  4. Genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity of epithelial ovarian cancer and the clinical implications for molecular targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Huimin; Cao, Dongyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Shen, Keng

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynaecological malignancy, and tumoural heterogeneity (TH) has been blamed for treatment failure. The genomic and epigenomic atlas of EOC varies significantly with tumour histotype, grade, stage, sensitivity to chemotherapy and prognosis. Rapidly accumulating knowledge about the genetic and epigenetic events that control TH in EOC has facilitated the development of molecular-targeted therapy. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, designed to target homologous recombination, are poised to change how breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA)-related ovarian cancer is treated. Epigenetic treatment regimens being tested in clinical or preclinical studies could provide promising novel treatment approaches and hope for improving patient survival.

  5. A review of the application of molecular genetics for fisheries management and conservation of sharks and rays.

    PubMed

    Dudgeon, C L; Blower, D C; Broderick, D; Giles, J L; Holmes, B J; Kashiwagi, T; Krück, N C; Morgan, J A T; Tillett, B J; Ovenden, J R

    2012-04-01

    Since the first investigation 25 years ago, the application of genetic tools to address ecological and evolutionary questions in elasmobranch studies has greatly expanded. Major developments in genetic theory as well as in the availability, cost effectiveness and resolution of genetic markers were instrumental for particularly rapid progress over the last 10 years. Genetic studies of elasmobranchs are of direct importance and have application to fisheries management and conservation issues such as the definition of management units and identification of species from fins. In the future, increased application of the most recent and emerging technologies will enable accelerated genetic data production and the development of new markers at reduced costs, paving the way for a paradigm shift from gene to genome-scale research, and more focus on adaptive rather than just neutral variation. Current literature is reviewed in six fields of elasmobranch molecular genetics relevant to fisheries and conservation management (species identification, phylogeography, philopatry, genetic effective population size, molecular evolutionary rate and emerging methods). Where possible, examples from the Indo-Pacific region, which has been underrepresented in previous reviews, are emphasized within a global perspective.

  6. Sequencing cDNAs: An Introduction to DNA Sequence Analysis in the Undergraduate Molecular Genetics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galewsky, Samuel

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a series of molecular genetics laboratories where students pick a single colony from a Drosophila melanogester embryo cDNA library and purify the plasmid, then analyze the insert through restriction digests and gel electrophoresis. (Author/YDS)

  7. A quest to understand molecular mechanisms for genetic stability.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

    2006-06-10

    In the midst of the post-war turmoil in Japan, I fortunately followed a path to become a scientist. Sometime at an early stage of my career, I encountered the problem of the cellular response to DNA damage and had the chance to discover a DNA repair enzyme. This event greatly influenced the subsequent course of my research, and I extended my studies toward elucidating the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis as well as of carcinogenesis. Through these studies I came to understand the importance of mechanisms for dealing with the actions of reactive oxygen species to the living systems. These recollections deal with these endeavors with emphasis on the early part of my scientific career.

  8. WONOEP appraisal: new genetic approaches to study epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Elsa; Kobow, Katja; Simonato, Michele; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Grisar, Thierry; Gilby, Krista L.; Vinet, Jonathan; Kadam, Shilpa D.; Becker, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective New genetic investigation techniques, including next-generation sequencing, epigenetic profiling, cell lineage mapping, targeted genetic manipulation of specific neuronal cell types, stem cell reprogramming and optogenetic manipulations within epileptic networks are progressively unravelling the mysteries of epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. These techniques have opened new avenues to discover the molecular basis of epileptogenesis and to study the physiological impacts of mutations in epilepsy-associated genes on a multilayer level, from cells to circuits. Methods This manuscript reviews recently published applications of these new genetic technologies in the study of epilepsy, as well as work presented by the authors at the genetic session of the XII Workshop on the Neurobiology of Epilepsy in Quebec, Canada. Results Next-generation sequencing is providing investigators with an unbiased means to assess the molecular causes of sporadic forms of epilepsy and have revealed the complexity and genetic heterogeneity of sporadic epilepsy disorders. To assess the functional impact of mutations in these newly identified genes on specific neuronal cell-types during brain development, new modeling strategies in animals, including conditional genetics in mice and in utero knockdown approaches, are enabling functional validation with exquisite cell-type and temporal specificity. In addition, optogenetics, using cell-type specific Cre recombinase driver lines, is enabling investigators to dissect networks involved in epilepsy. Genetically-encoded cell-type labeling is also providing new means to assess the role of the non-neuronal components of epileptic networks such as glial cells. Furthermore, beyond its role in revealing coding variants involved in epileptogenesis, next-generation sequencing can be used to assess the epigenetic modifications that lead to sustained network hyperexcitability in epilepsy, including methylation changes in gene promoters and non

  9. Molecular Genetics of Metal Detoxification: Prospects for Phytoremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Ow, David W. ow@pgec.ams.usda.gov

    2000-09-01

    Unlike compounds that can be broken down, the remediation of most heavy metals and radionuclides requires physical extraction from contaminated sources. Plants can extract inorganics, but effective phytoextraction requires plants that produce high biomass, grow rapidly and possess high capacity-uptake for the inorganic substance. Either hyperaccumulator plants must be bred for increased growth and biomass or hyperaccumulation traits must be engineered into fast growing, high biomass plants. This latter approach requires fundamental knowledge of the molecular mechanisms in the uptake and storage of inorganics. Much has been learned in recent years on how plants and certain fungi chelate and transport selected heavy metals. This progress has been facilitated by the use of Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model system. The use of a model organism for study permits rapid characterization of the molecular process. As target genes are identified in a model organism, their sequences can be modified for expression in a heterologous host or aid in the search of homologous genes in more complex organisms. Moreover, as plant nutrient uptake is intrinsically linked to the association with rhizospheric fungi, elucidating metal sequestration in this fungus permits additional opportunities for engineering rhizospheric microbes to assist in phytoextraction.

  10. Domestication of Plants in the Americas: Insights from Mendelian and Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Pickersgill, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Background Plant domestication occurred independently in four different regions of the Americas. In general, different species were domesticated in each area, though a few species were domesticated independently in more than one area. The changes resulting from human selection conform to the familiar domestication syndrome, though different traits making up this syndrome, for example loss of dispersal, are achieved by different routes in crops belonging to different families. Genetic and Molecular Analyses of Domestication Understanding of the genetic control of elements of the domestication syndrome is improving as a result of the development of saturated linkage maps for major crops, identification and mapping of quantitative trait loci, cloning and sequencing of genes or parts of genes, and discoveries of widespread orthologies in genes and linkage groups within and between families. As the modes of action of the genes involved in domestication and the metabolic pathways leading to particular phenotypes become better understood, it should be possible to determine whether similar phenotypes have similar underlying genetic controls, or whether human selection in genetically related but independently domesticated taxa has fixed different mutants with similar phenotypic effects. Conclusions Such studies will permit more critical analysis of possible examples of multiple domestications and of the origin(s) and spread of distinctive variants within crops. They also offer the possibility of improving existing crops, not only major food staples but also minor crops that are potential export crops for developing countries or alternative crops for marginal areas. PMID:17766847

  11. Use of Computer Simulations in Microbial and Molecular Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Describes five computer programs: four simulations of genetic and physical mapping experiments and one interactive learning program on the genetic coding mechanism. The programs were originally written in BASIC for the VAX-11/750 V.3. mainframe computer and have been translated into Applesoft BASIC for Apple IIe microcomputers. (JN)

  12. Learning Molecular Genetics in Teacher-Led Outreach Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Nun, Michal Stolarsky; Yarden, Anat

    2009-01-01

    Learning modern genetics is challenging and students have difficulty acquiring a coherent cognitive mental model of abstract concepts such as DNA, bacteria and enzymes. Here we investigated students' mental models of genetics through analysis and interpretation of the discourse that took place while high-school students practised hands-on…

  13. Impact of yeast genetics and molecular biology on traditional and new biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Maráz, A

    1999-01-01

    Developments in yeast genetics, biochemistry, physiology and process engineering provided bases of rapid development in modern biotechnology. Elaboration of the recombinant DNA technique is far the most important milestone in this field. Other molecular genetic techniques, as molecular genotyping of yeast strains proved also very beneficial in yeast fermentation technologies. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most exploited eukaryotic microorganism in biotechnology but non-Saccharomyces species are becoming more and more important in the production of perfectly translated heterologous proteins.

  14. Molecular genetics and animal models in autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Andres, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Autistic disorder is a behavioural syndrome beginning before the age of 3 years and lasting over the whole lifetime. It is characterised by impaired communication, impaired social interactions, and repetitive interests and behaviour. The prevalence is about 7/10,000 taking a restrictive definition and more than 1/500 with a broader definition, including all the pervasive developmental disorders. The importance of genetic factors has been highlighted by epidemiological studies showing that autistic disorder is one of the most genetic neuropsychiatric diseases. The relative risk of first relatives is about 100-fold higher than the risk in the normal population and the concordance in monozygotic twin is about 60%. Different strategies have been applied on the track of susceptibility genes. The systematic search of linked loci led to contradictory results, in part due to the heterogeneity of the clinical definitions, to the differences in the DNA markers, and to the different methods of analysis used. An oversimplification of the inferred model is probably also cause of our disappointment. More work is necessary to give a clearer picture. One region emerges more frequently: the long arm of chromosome 7. Several candidate genes have been studied and some gave indications of association: the Reelin gene and the Wnt2 gene. Cytogenetical abnormalities are frequent at 15q11-13, the region of the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome. Imprinting plays an important role in this region, no candidate gene has been identified in autism. Biochemical abnormalities have been found in the serotonin system. Association and linkage studies gave no consistent results with some serotonin receptors and in the transporter, although it seems interesting to go further in the biochemical characterisation of the serotonin transporter activity, particularly in platelets, easily accessible. Two monogenic diseases have been associated with autistic disorder: tuberous sclerosis and fragile X. A

  15. Molecular genetic and genetic correlations in sodium channelopathies: Lack of founder effect and evidence for a second gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhou, J.; Feero, W.G.; Conwit, R.; Galloway, G.; Hoffman, E.P. ); Wessel, H.B. Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA ); Todorovic, S.M. ); Barany, F. ); Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I.; Fidzianska, A. ); Arahata, K. ); Sillen, A. ); Marks, H.G. ); Hartlage, P. ); Ricker, K. ); Lehmann-Horn, F. ); Hayakawa, H. )

    1993-06-01

    The authors present a correlation of molecular genetic data (mutations) and genetic data (dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms) for a cohort of seven hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP) and two paramyotonia congenita (PC) families from diverse ethnic backgrounds. They found that each of three previously identified point mutations of the adult skeletal muscle sodium-channel gene occurred on two different dinucleotide-repeat haplotypes. These results indicate that dinucleotide-repeat haplotypes are not predictive of allelic heterogeneity in sodium channelopathies, contrary to previous suggestions. In addition, they identified a HyperPP pedigree in which the dominant disorder was not linked to the sodium-channel gene. Thus, a second locus can give rise to a similar clinical phenotype. Some individuals in this pedigree exhibited a base change causing the nonconservative substitution of an evolutionarily conserved amino acid. Because this change was not present in 240 normal chromosomes and was near another HyperPP mutation, it fulfilled the most commonly used criteria for being a mutation rather than a polymorphism. However, linkage studies using single-strand conformation polymorphism-derived and sequence-derived haplotypes excluded this base change as a causative mutation: these data serve as a cautionary example of potential pitfalls in the delineation of change-of-function point mutations. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Molecular genetic variation in cultivated peanuts germplasm of Henan and detection of their elite allelic variations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundnut or peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an economically important crop worldwide as a source of protein and cooking oil, particularly in developing countries. Because of its narrow genetic background and shortage of polymorphic genetic markers, molecular characterization of cultivated peanuts i...

  17. Molecular genetic variation in cultivated peanut cultivars and breeding lines revealed by highly informative SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundnut or peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an economically important crop worldwide as a source of protein and cooking oil, particularly in developing countries. Because of its narrow genetic background and shortage of polymorphic genetic markers, molecular characterization of cultivated peanuts e...

  18. Molecular detection of altered X-inactivation patterns in the diagnosis of genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, S

    1992-01-01

    It is widely assumed that when a female carrier of a genetic disorder exhibits clinical signs of the disorder it is due to chance non-random X-inactivation in particular tissues. Recently molecular methods have become available for the analysis of X-chromosome inactivation status. These are based either on the methylation patterns of DNA from the active and inactive chromosomes or on the rescue of active X chromosomes in somatic cell hybrids. As a consequence of the molecular studies, it has become obvious that there are some special cases of non-random X-inactivation patterns. These include females carrying X-linked immunodeficiencies and, sometimes, one of a pair of identical female twins.

  19. [Molecular genetics of familial tumour syndromes of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Murnyák, Balázs; Szepesi, Rita; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2015-02-01

    Although most of the central nervous system tumours are sporadic, rarely they are associated with familial tumour syndromes. These disorders usually present with an autosomal dominant inheritance and neoplasia develops at younger age than in sporadic cases. Most of these tumours are bilateral, multiplex or multifocal. The causative mutations occur in genes involved in cell cycle regulation, cell growth, differentiation and DNA repair. Studying these hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes associated with nervous system tumours can facilitate the deeper understanding of the molecular background of sporadic tumours and the development of novel therapeutic agents. This review is an update on hereditary tumour syndromes with nervous system involvement with emphasis on molecular genetic characteristics and their clinical implications.

  20. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: molecular genetics and animal models.

    PubMed

    Pekarsky, Y; Calin, G A; Aqeilan, R

    2005-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia accounts for almost 30% of all adult leukemia cases in the United States and Western Europe. Although several common genomic abnormalities in CLL have been identified, mutational and functional analysis of corresponding genes so far have not proved their involvement in CLL. Our latest studies demonstrated functional involvement of Tcl1 oncoprotein and microRNA genes in the pathogenesis of CLL. Deregulated expression of Tcl1 in transgenic mice resulted in CLL. These CLL tumors showed abnormalities in expression of murine microRNA genes mmu-mir-15a and mmu-mir-16-1. Interestingly, human homologs of these genes, mir-15a and mir-16-1, located at the chromosome 13q14 are also deleted in human CLL samples. In this review we summarize and discuss these new developments. These recently emerged insights into the molecular mechanisms of CLL will allow for the development of new approaches to treat this disease.

  1. Assessment of genetic diversity among faba bean genotypes using agro-morphological and molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Megahed H.; Alghamdi, Salem S.; Migdadi, Hussein M.; Khan, Muhammad A.; El-Harty, Ehab H.; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A.

    2015-01-01

    Forty faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes were evaluated for their agro-morphological performance and molecular diversity under Central Region of Saudi Arabia conditions during 2010–11 and 2011–12 seasons. Field performance results showed that faba genotypes exhibited a significant amount of variation for their agro-morphological studied parameters. Giza40 recorded the tallest genotype (139.5 cm), highest number of seeds per plants (100.8), and the highest seed yield per plant (70.8 g). The best performing genotypes were Giza40, FLIP03-014FB, Gazira1 and Goff1. Genetic variability among genotypes was determined using Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 183 amplified fragments (alleles) and 1758 polymorphic fragments (bands) in SRAP and 202 alleles and 716 bands in AFLP were obtained using six SRAP and four AFLP primer combinations respectively. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for AFLP and SRAP markers were higher than 0.8, indicating the existence of a considerable amount of genetic diversity among faba tested genotypes. The UPGMA based clustering of faba genotypes was largely based on origin and/or genetic background. Result of cluster analysis based on SRAP showed weak and not significant correlation while, it was highly significant based on AFLP analysis with agro-morphological characters (r = 0.01, p > 0.54 and r = 0.26, p < 0.004 respectively). Combined SRAP and AFLP markers proved to be significantly useful for genetic diversity assessment at molecular level. They exhibited high discrimination power, and were able to distinguish the faba bean genotypes with high efficiency and accuracy levels. PMID:25972757

  2. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, Garry R.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethalautosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the d iscove1y of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  3. Advances in genetic studies of substance abuse in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Meng, Shiqiu; Li, Jiali; Shi, Jie; Lu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Summary The importance of genetic factors in substance addiction has long been established. The rationale for this work is that understanding of the function of addiction genes and delineation of the key molecular pathways of these genes would enhance the development of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers that could be used in the prevention and management of substance abuse. Over the past few years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of genetic studies conducted on addiction in China; these studies have primarily focused on heroin, alcohol, and nicotine dependence. Most studies of candidate genes have concentrated on the dopamine, opioid, and serotonin systems. A number of genes associated with substance abuse in Caucasians are also risk factors in Chinese, but several novel genes and genetic risk factors associated with substance abuse in Chinese subjects have also been identified. This paper reviews the genetic studies of substance abuse performed by Chinese researchers. Genotypes and alleles related to addictive behavior in Chinese individuals are discussed and the contributions of Chinese researchers to the international corpus of knowledge about the genetic understanding of substance abuse are described. PMID:24991158

  4. The Human as an Experimental System in Molecular Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Ray; Caskey, C. Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Discusses insights discovered from research into human biology that are raising possibilities for therapy, prevention of disease, and challenges to society in the form of ethical decisions about the appropriate application of genetic information. (Author/RT)

  5. Developmental psychopathology in an era of molecular genetics and neuroimaging: A developmental neurogenetics approach.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Luke W

    2015-05-01

    The emerging field of neurogenetics seeks to model the complex pathways from gene to brain to behavior. This field has focused on imaging genetics techniques that examine how variability in common genetic polymorphisms predict differences in brain structure and function. These studies are informed by other complimentary techniques (e.g., animal models and multimodal imaging) and have recently begun to incorporate the environment through examination of Imaging Gene × Environment interactions. Though neurogenetics has the potential to inform our understanding of the development of psychopathology, there has been little integration between principles of neurogenetics and developmental psychopathology. The paper describes a neurogenetics and Imaging Gene × Environment approach and how these approaches have been usefully applied to the study of psychopathology. Six tenets of developmental psychopathology (the structure of phenotypes, the importance of exploring mechanisms, the conditional nature of risk, the complexity of multilevel pathways, the role of development, and the importance of who is studied) are identified, and how these principles can further neurogenetics applications to understanding the development of psychopathology is discussed. A major issue of this piece is how neurogenetics and current imaging and molecular genetics approaches can be incorporated into developmental psychopathology perspectives with a goal of providing models for better understanding pathways from among genes, environments, the brain, and behavior.

  6. Molecular approaches for genetic improvement of seed quality and characterization of genetic diversity in soybean: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Niraj; Khare, Dhirendra

    2016-10-01

    Soybean is an economically important leguminous crop. Genetic improvements of soybeans have focused on enhancement of seed and oil yield, development of varieties suited to different cropping systems, and breeding resistant/tolerant varieties for various biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant breeders have used conventional breeding techniques for the improvement of these traits in soybean. The conventional breeding process can be greatly accelerated through the application of molecular and genomic approaches. Molecular markers have proved to be a new tool in soybean breeding by enhancing selection efficiency in a rapid and time-bound manner. An overview of molecular approaches for the genetic improvement of soybean seed quality parameters, considering recent applications of marker-assisted selection and 'omics' research, is provided in this article.

  7. Molecular control of transgene escape from genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Kuvshinov, V; Koivu, K; Kanerva, A; Pehu, E

    2001-02-05

    Potential risks of gene escape from transgenic crops through pollen and seed dispersal are being actively discussed and have slowed down full utilization of gene technology in crop improvement. To ban the transgene flow, barren zones and 'terminator' technology were developed as GMO risk management technologies in transgenic crops. Unfortunately, the technologies have not protected reliably the transgene migration to wild relatives. The present study offers a novel molecular technique to eliminate gene flow from transgenic plants to wild relatives by recoverable block of function (RBF). The RBF consists of a blocking sequence linked to the gene of interest and a recovering sequence, all in one transformable construct. The blocking sequence blocks a certain molecular or physiological function of the host plant. Action of the blocking sequence leads to the death of the host plant or to an alteration in its phenotype resulting in inability for sexual reproduction in nature. The recovering construct recovers the blocked function of the host plant. The recovering construct is regulated externally by a specific chemical or physical treatment of the plants and does not act under natural conditions. In nature, hybrids of the transgenic plants with its wild relatives carrying the RBF will die or be unable to reproduce because of the blocking construct action. A working model of RBF is described in this report as one example of the RBF concept. This RBF example is based on barnase (the blocking construct) and barstar (the recovering construct) gene expression in tobacco under sulfhydryl endopeptidase (SH-EP) and a heat shock (HS) promoter, respectively.

  8. [Genetic Diagnosis and Molecular Therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of inherited muscle disease and is characterized by progressive muscle wasting, ultimately resulting in the death of patients in their twenties or thirties. DMD is characterized by a deficiency of the muscle dystrophin as a result of mutations in the dystrophin gene. Currently, no effective treatment for DMD is available. Promising molecular therapies which are mutation-specific have been developed. Transformation of an out-of-frame mRNA into an in-frame dystrophin message by inducing exon skipping is considered one of the approaches most likely to lead to success. We demonstrated that the intravenous administration of the antisense oligonucleotide against the splicing enhancer sequence results in exon skipping and production of the dystrophin protein in DMD case for the first time. After extensive studies, anti-sense oligonucleotides comprising different monomers have undergone clinical trials and provided favorable results, enabling improvements in ambulation of DMD patients. Induction of the read-through of nonsense mutations is expected to produce dystrophin in DMD patients with nonsense mutations, which are detected in 19% of DMD cases. The clinical effectiveness of gentamicin and PTC124 has been reported. We have demonstrated that arbekacin-mediated read-through can markedly ameliorate muscular dystrophy in vitro. We have already begun a clinical trial of nonsense mutation read-through therapy using arbekacin. Some of these drug candidates are planned to undergo submission for approval to regulatory agencies in the US and EU. We hope that these molecular therapies will contribute towards DMD treatment.

  9. Theoretical studies of molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) total integral reactive cross sections and vibrationally resolved reaction probabilities for F + H2 = HF + H; (2) a theoretical study of inelastic O + N2 collisions; (3) body frame close coupling wave packet approach to gas phase atom-rigit rotor inelastic collisions; (4) wave packet study of gas phase atom-rigit motor scattering; (5) the application of optical potentials for reactive scattering; (6) time dependent, three dimensional body frame quantal wave packet treatment of the H + H2 exchange reaction; (7) a time dependent wave packet approach to atom-diatom reactive collision probabilities; (8) time dependent wave packet for the complete determination of s-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions; (9) a comparison of three time dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron-atom elastic scattering cross sections; and (10) a numerically exact full wave packet approach to molecule-surface scattering.

  10. Scientific standards for studies in forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Peter M

    2007-01-17

    Forensic molecular genetics has evolved from a rapidly developing field with changing technologies into a highly recognized and generally accepted forensic science, leading to the establishment of national DNA databases with DNA profiles from suspects and convicted offenders. DNA evidence has taken a central role by carrying a significant weight for convictions, as well as by excluding innocent suspects early on in a criminal investigation. Due to this impact on the criminal justice system, guidelines for research in forensic genetics have been introduced already since many years. The most important issues regarding the selection and definition of typing systems both for paternity testing and for forensic identification, the criteria for technical and biostatistical validation, as well as the use of mitochondrial DNA analysis are summarized and discussed.

  11. Molecular Genetics Techniques to Develop New Treatments for Brain Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Jacob; Fathallan-Shaykh, Hassan

    2006-09-22

    The objectives of this report are: (1) to devise novel molecular gene therapies for malignant brain tumors, (2) advance our understanding of the immune system in the central nervous system; and (3) apply genomics to find molecular probes to diagnose brain tumors, predict prognosis, biological behavior and their response to treatment.

  12. Molecular Evaluation of Genetic Diversity in Wild-Type Mastic Tree (Pistacia lentiscus L.).

    PubMed

    Abuduli, Alimu; Aydin, Yıldız; Sakiroglu, Muhammet; Onay, Ahmet; Ercisli, Sezai; Uncuoglu, Ahu Altinkut

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the patterns of genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus L.) genotypes including 12 males and 12 females were evaluated using SSR, RAPD, ISSR, and ITS markers yielding 40, 703, 929 alleles, and 260-292 base pairs for ITS1 region, respectively. The average number of alleles produced from SSR, RAPD, and ISSR primers were 5.7, 14, and 18, respectively. The grouping pattern obtained from Bayesian clustering method based on each marker dataset was produced. Principal component analyses (PCA) of molecular data was investigated and neighbor joining dendrograms were subsequently created. Overall, the results indicated that ISSR and RAPD markers were the most powerful to differentiate the genotypes in comparison with other types of molecular markers used in this study. The ISSR results indicated that male and female genotypes were distinctly separated from each other. In this frame, M9 (Alaçatı) and M10 (Mesta Sakız Adası-Chios) were the closest genotypes and while F11 (Seferihisar) and F12 (Bornova/Gökdere) genotypes fall into same cluster and showing closer genetic relation. The RAPD pattern indicated that M8 (Urla) and M10 (Mesta Sakız Adası-Chios), and F10 (Mesta Sakız Adası-Chios) and F11 (Seferihisar) genotypes were the closest male and female genotypes, respectively.

  13. Generalized Glucocorticoid Resistance: Clinical Aspects, Molecular Mechanisms, and Implications of a Rare Genetic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Kino, Tomoshige; Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Primary generalized glucocorticoid resistance is a rare genetic condition characterized by generalized, partial, target-tissue insensitivity to glucocorticoids. We review the clinical aspects, molecular mechanisms, and implications of this disorder. Evidence Acquisition: We conducted a systematic review of the published, peer-reviewed medical literature using MEDLINE (1975 through February 2008) to identify original articles and reviews on this topic. Evidence Synthesis: We have relied on the experience of a number of experts in the field, including our extensive personal experience. Conclusions: The clinical spectrum of primary generalized glucocorticoid resistance is broad, ranging from asymptomatic to severe cases of hyperandrogenism, fatigue, and/or mineralocorticoid excess. The molecular basis of the condition has been ascribed to mutations in the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR) gene, which impair glucocorticoid signal transduction and reduce tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. A consequent increase in the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis compensates for the reduced sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids at the expense of ACTH hypersecretion-related pathology. The study of functional defects of natural hGR mutants enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of hGR action and highlights the importance of integrated cellular and molecular signaling mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis and preserving normal physiology. PMID:18319312

  14. Ecology has contrasting effects on genetic variation within species versus rates of molecular evolution across species in water beetles

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Tomochika; Vogler, Alfried P.; Barraclough, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analysis is a potentially powerful approach to study the effects of ecological traits on genetic variation and rate of evolution across species. However, the lack of suitable datasets means that comparative studies of correlates of genetic traits across an entire clade have been rare. Here, we use a large DNA-barcode dataset (5062 sequences) of water beetles to test the effects of species ecology and geographical distribution on genetic variation within species and rates of molecular evolution across species. We investigated species traits predicted to influence their genetic characteristics, such as surrogate measures of species population size, latitudinal distribution and habitat types, taking phylogeny into account. Genetic variation of cytochrome oxidase I in water beetles was positively correlated with occupancy (numbers of sites of species presence) and negatively with latitude, whereas substitution rates across species depended mainly on habitat types, and running water specialists had the highest rate. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions from nearly-neutral theories of evolution, and suggest that the comparative analysis using large databases can give insights into correlates of genetic variation and molecular evolution. PMID:25621335

  15. Ecology has contrasting effects on genetic variation within species versus rates of molecular evolution across species in water beetles.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Tomochika; Vogler, Alfried P; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2015-01-22

    Comparative analysis is a potentially powerful approach to study the effects of ecological traits on genetic variation and rate of evolution across species. However, the lack of suitable datasets means that comparative studies of correlates of genetic traits across an entire clade have been rare. Here, we use a large DNA-barcode dataset (5062 sequences) of water beetles to test the effects of species ecology and geographical distribution on genetic variation within species and rates of molecular evolution across species. We investigated species traits predicted to influence their genetic characteristics, such as surrogate measures of species population size, latitudinal distribution and habitat types, taking phylogeny into account. Genetic variation of cytochrome oxidase I in water beetles was positively correlated with occupancy (numbers of sites of species presence) and negatively with latitude, whereas substitution rates across species depended mainly on habitat types, and running water specialists had the highest rate. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions from nearly-neutral theories of evolution, and suggest that the comparative analysis using large databases can give insights into correlates of genetic variation and molecular evolution.

  16. Comparative analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers for the molecular identification of Rhipicephalus spp.

    PubMed

    Latrofa, Maria S; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Annoscia, Giada; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-12-01

    The genus Rhipicephalus (Acari: Ixodidae) comprises a large number of vectors of pathogens of substantial medical and veterinary concern; however, species identification based solely on morphological features is often challenging. In the present study, genetic distance within selected Rhipicephalus species (i.e., Rhipicephalus bursa, Rhipicephalus guilhoni, Rhipicephalus muhsamae, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and Rhipicephalus turanicus), were investigated based on molecular and phylogenetic analyses of fragments of the mitochondrial 16S, 12S and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) genes, as well as of the whole sequences of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS-2) region. Mean values of inter-specific genetic distance (e.g., up to 12.6%, 11.1% and 15.2%), as well as of intra-specific genetic distance (e.g., 0.9%, 0.9% and 1%), calculated using the Kimura-2 parameter substitution model with uniform rates among sites for 16S, 12S and cox1 genes, respectively, confirmed the differentiation of the rhipicephaline species herein examined. The molecular identification was also supported by the distinct separation of species-specific clades inferred from the phylogenetic analyses of all mitochondrial sequences. Conversely, little interspecific divergence was detected amongst ribosomal ITS-2 sequences (i.e., up to 2.8%) for species belonging to the R. sanguineus complex, which resulted in the ambiguous placement of selected R. sanguineus s.l. and R. turanicus sequences in the corresponding phylogenetic tree. Results from this study confirm the suitability of mtDNA markers for the reliable identification of ticks within the Rhipicephalus genus and provide a framework for future studies of taxonomy, speciation history and evolution of this group of ticks.

  17. Improving human forensics through advances in genetics, genomics and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Manfred; de Knijff, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Forensic DNA profiling currently allows the identification of persons already known to investigating authorities. Recent advances have produced new types of genetic markers with the potential to overcome some important limitations of current DNA profiling methods. Moreover, other developments are enabling completely new kinds of forensically relevant information to be extracted from biological samples. These include new molecular approaches for finding individuals previously unknown to investigators, and new molecular methods to support links between forensic sample donors and criminal acts. Such advances in genetics, genomics and molecular biology are likely to improve human forensic case work in the near future.

  18. 59. Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology: Molecular genetics of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Investigation of the mechanistic aspects of cancer has its roots in the studies on tumor viruses and their effects on cell proliferation, function, and growth. This outstanding progress was well documented in previous Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. In the early to mid 1980s, progress on the development of chromosome mapping strategies and the accumulation of DNA probes that identified polymorphisms, encouraged by the international Human Genome Project, enabled the identification of other genes that contributed to familial inheritance of high susceptibility to specific cancers. This approach was very successful and led to a degree of optimism that one aspect of cancer, the multistep genetic process from early neoplasia to metastatic tumors, was beginning to be understood. It therefore seemed appropriate that the 59th Symposium on Quantitative Biology focus attention on the Molecular Genetics of Cancer. The concept was to combine the exciting progress on the identification of new genetic alterations in human tumor cells with studies on the function of the cancer gene products and how they go awry in tumor cells.

  19. Advances in molecular identification, taxonomy, genetic variation and diagnosis of Toxocara spp.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Xu, Min-Jun; Huang, Si-Yang; Li, Ming-Wei; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-10-01

    The genus Toxocara contains parasitic nematodes of human and animal health significance, such as Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxocara vitulorum. T. canis and T. cati are among the most prevalent parasites of dogs and cats with a worldwide distribution. Human infection with T. canis and T. cati, which can cause a number of clinical manifestations such as visceral larva migrans (VLMs), ocular larva migrans (OLMs), eosinophilic meningoencephalitis (EME), covert toxocariasis (CT) and neurotoxocariasis, is considered the most prevalent neglected helminthiasis in industrialized countries. The accurate identification Toxocara spp. and their unequivocal differentiation from each other and from other ascaridoid nematodes causing VLMs and OLMs has important implications for studying their taxonomy, epidemiology, population genetics, diagnosis and control. Due to the limitations of traditional (morphological) approaches for identification and diagnosis of Toxocara spp., PCR-based techniques utilizing a range of genetic markers in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes have been developed as useful alternative approaches because of their high sensitivity, specificity, rapidity and utility. In this article, we summarize the current state of knowledge and advances in molecular identification, taxonomy, genetic variation and diagnosis of Toxocara spp. with prospects for further studies.

  20. Molecular genetic insights on cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) ecology and conservation in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Marker, Laurie L; Pearks Wilkerson, Alison J; Sarno, Ronald J; Martenson, Janice; Breitenmoser-Würsten, Christian; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E

    2008-01-01

    The extent and geographic patterns of molecular genetic diversity of the largest remaining free-ranging cheetah population were described in a survey of 313 individuals from throughout Namibia. Levels of relatedness, including paternity/maternity (parentage), were assessed across all individuals using 19 polymorphic microsatellite loci, and unrelated cheetahs (n = 89) from 7 regions were genotyped at 38 loci to document broad geographical patterns. There was limited differentiation among regions, evidence that this is a generally panmictic population. Measures of genetic variation were similar among all regions and were comparable with Eastern African cheetah populations. Parentage analyses confirmed several observations based on field studies, including 21 of 23 previously hypothesized family groups, 40 probable parent/offspring pairs, and 8 sibling groups. These results also verified the successful integration and reproduction of several cheetahs following natural dispersal or translocation. Animals within social groups (family groups, male coalitions, or sibling groups) were generally related. Within the main study area, radio-collared female cheetahs were more closely interrelated than similarly compared males, a pattern consistent with greater male dispersal. The long-term maintenance of current patterns of genetic variation in Namibia depends on retaining habitat characteristics that promote natural dispersal and gene flow of cheetahs.

  1. Molecular detection and genetic diversity of Babesia gibsoni in dogs in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Terao, Masashi; Akter, Shirin; Yasin, Md Golam; Nakao, Ryo; Kato, Hirotomo; Alam, Mohammad Zahangir; Katakura, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Babesia gibsoni is a tick-borne hemoprotozoan parasite of dogs that often causes fever and hemolytic illness. Detection of B. gibsoni has been predominantly reported in Asian countries, including Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia, Bangladesh and India. The present study shows the first molecular characterization of B. gibsoni detected from dogs in Bangladesh. Blood samples were collected on FTA® Elute cards from 50 stray dogs in Mymensingh District in Bangladesh. DNA eluted from the cards was subjected to nested PCR for the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia species. Approximately 800bp PCR products were detected in 15 of 50 dogs (30%). Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and direct sequencing of the PCR products, all parasite isolates were identified as B. gibsoni. Furthermore, the BgTRAP (B. gibsoni thrombospondin-related adhesive protein) gene fragments were detected in 13 of 15 18S rRNA gene PCR positive blood samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the BgTRAP gene revealed that B. gibsoni parasites in Bangladesh formed a cluster, which was genetically different from other Asian B. gibsoni isolates. In addition, tandem repeat analysis of the BgTRAP gene clearly showed considerable genetic variation among Bangladeshi isolates. These results suggested that B. gibsoni parasites in a different genetic clade are endemic in dogs in Bangladesh. Further studies are required to elucidate the origin, distribution, vector and pathogenesis of B. gibsoni parasites circulating in dogs in Bangladesh.

  2. The molecular genetic background of familial hypercholesterolemia: data from the Slovak nation-wide survey.

    PubMed

    Gabčová, D; Vohnout, B; Staníková, D; Hučkova, M; Kadurová, M; Debreová, M; Kozárová, M; Fábryová, Ľ; Staník, J; Klimeš, I; Rašlová, K; Gašperiková, D

    2016-11-08

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is most frequently caused by LDLR or APOB mutations. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the genetic background of Slovak patients suspected of FH. Patients with clinical suspicion of FH (235 unrelated probands and 124 family relatives) were recruited throughout Slovakia during the years 2011-2015. The order of DNA analyses in probands was as follows: 1. APOB mutation p.Arg3527Gln by real-time PCR method, 2. direct sequencing of the LDLR gene 3. MLPA analysis of the LDLR gene. We have identified 14 probands and 2 relatives with an APOB mutation p.Arg3527Gln, and 89 probands and 75 relatives with 54 different LDLR mutations. Nine of LDLR mutations were novel (i.e. p.Asp90Glu, c.314-2A>G, p.Asp136Tyr, p.Ser177Pro, p.Lys225_Glu228delinsCysLys, p.Gly478Glu, p.Gly675Trpfs*42, p.Leu680Pro, p.Thr832Argfs*3). In conclusions, this is the first study on molecular genetics of FH in Slovakia encompassing the analysis of whole LDLR gene. Genetic etiology of FH was confirmed in 103 probands (43.8%). Out of them, 86.4% of probands carried the LDLR gene mutation and remaining 13.6% probands carried the p.Arg3527Gln APOB mutation.

  3. The history of Old World camelids in the light of molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Burger, Pamela Anna

    2016-06-01

    Old World camels have come into the focus as sustainable livestock species, unique in their morphological and physiological characteristics and capable of providing vital products even under extreme environmental conditions. The evolutionary history of dromedary and Bactrian camels traces back to the middle Eocene (around 40 million years ago, mya), when the ancestors of Camelus emerged on the North American continent. While the genetic status of the two domestic species has long been established, the wild two-humped camel has only recently been recognized as a separate species, Camelus ferus, based on molecular genetic data. The demographic history established from genome drafts of Old World camels shows the independent development of the three species over the last 100,000 years with severe bottlenecks occurring during the last glacial period and in the recent past. Ongoing studies involve the immune system, relevant production traits, and the global population structure and domestication of Old World camels. Based on the now available whole genome drafts, specific metabolic pathways have been described shedding new light on the camels' ability to adapt to desert environments. These new data will also be at the origin for genome-wide association studies to link economically relevant phenotypes to genotypes and to conserve the diverse genetic resources in Old World camelids.

  4. Probabilistic graphical models for genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Raphaël; Sinoquet, Christine; Leray, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Probabilistic graphical models have been widely recognized as a powerful formalism in the bioinformatics field, especially in gene expression studies and linkage analysis. Although less well known in association genetics, many successful methods have recently emerged to dissect the genetic architecture of complex diseases. In this review article, we cover the applications of these models to the population association studies' context, such as linkage disequilibrium modeling, fine mapping and candidate gene studies, and genome-scale association studies. Significant breakthroughs of the corresponding methods are highlighted, but emphasis is also given to their current limitations, in particular, to the issue of scalability. Finally, we give promising directions for future research in this field.

  5. Genetic Divergence in Mandible Form in Relation to Molecular Divergence in Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Atchley, W. R.; Newman, S.; Cowley, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic divergence in the form of the mandible is examined in ten inbred strains of mice. Several univariate and multivariate genetic distance estimates are given for the morphological data and these estimates are compared to measures of genealogical and molecular divergence. Highly significant divergence occurs among the ten strains in all 11 mandible traits considered individually and simultaneously. Genealogical relationship among strains is highly correlated with genetic divergence in single locus molecular traits. However, the concordance between genealogical relationship and multivariate genetic divergence in morphology is much more complex. Whether there is a significant correlation between morphological divergence and genealogy depends upon the method of analysis and the particular genetic distance statistic being employed. PMID:3220250

  6. Molecular population genetics of inversion breakpoint regions in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andre G; Detweiler, Don; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2013-07-08

    Paracentric inversions in populations can have a profound effect on the pattern and organization of nucleotide variability along a chromosome. Regions near inversion breakpoints are expected to have greater levels of differentiation because of reduced genetic exchange between different gene arrangements whereas central regions in the inverted segments are predicted to have lower levels of nucleotide differentiation due to greater levels of genetic flux among different karyotypes. We used the inversion polymorphism on the third chromosome of Drosophila pseudoobscura to test these predictions with an analysis of nucleotide diversity of 18 genetic markers near and away from inversion breakpoints. We tested hypotheses about how the presence of different chromosomal arrangements affects the pattern and organization of nucleotide variation. Overall, markers in the distal segment of the chromosome had greater levels of nucleotide heterozygosity than markers within the proximal segment of the chromosome. In addition, our results rejected the hypothesis that the breakpoints of derived inversions will have lower levels of nucleotide variability than breakpoints of ancestral inversions, even when strains with gene conversion events were removed. High levels of linkage disequilibrium were observed within all 11 breakpoint regions as well as between the ends of most proximal and distal breakpoints. The central region of the chromosome had the greatest levels of linkage disequilibrium compared with the proximal and distal regions because this is the region that experiences the highest level of recombination suppression. These data do not fully support the idea that genetic exchange is the sole force that influences genetic variation on inverted chromosomes.

  7. Integration of biological networks and pathways with genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan V

    2012-10-01

    Millions of genetic variants have been assessed for their effects on the trait of interest in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The complex traits are affected by a set of inter-related genes. However, the typical GWAS only examine the association of a single genetic variant at a time. The individual effects of a complex trait are usually small, and the simple sum of these individual effects may not reflect the holistic effect of the genetic system. High-throughput methods enable genomic studies to produce a large amount of data to expand the knowledge base of the biological systems. Biological networks and pathways are built to represent the functional or physical connectivity among genes. Integrated with GWAS data, the network- and pathway-based methods complement the approach of single genetic variant analysis, and may improve the power to identify trait-associated genes. Taking advantage of the biological knowledge, these approaches are valuable to interpret the functional role of the genetic variants, and to further understand the molecular mechanism influencing the traits. The network- and pathway-based methods have demonstrated their utilities, and will be increasingly important to address a number of challenges facing the mainstream GWAS.

  8. Long noncoding RNAs and tumorigenesis: genetic associations, molecular mechanisms, and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Caiguo

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains a large number of nonprotein-coding sequences. Recently, new discoveries in the functions of nonprotein-coding sequences have demonstrated that the "Dark Genome" significantly contributes to human diseases, especially with regard to cancer. Of particular interest in this review are long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which comprise a class of nonprotein-coding transcripts that are longer than 200 nucleotides. Accumulating evidence indicates that a large number of lncRNAs exhibit genetic associations with tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis. Our current understanding of the molecular bases of these lncRNAs that are associated with cancer indicate that they play critical roles in gene transcription, translation, and chromatin modification. Therapeutic strategies based on the targeting of lncRNAs to disrupt their expression or their functions are being developed. In this review, we briefly summarize and discuss the genetic associations and the aberrant expression of lncRNAs in cancer, with a particular focus on studies that have revealed the molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in tumorigenesis. In addition, we also discuss different therapeutic strategies that involve the targeting of lncRNAs.

  9. Molecular biology and genetic diversity of Rift Valley fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus, is the causative agent of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a mosquito-borne disease of ruminant animals and humans. The generation of a large sequence database has facilitated studies of the evolution and spread of the virus. Bayesian analyses indicate that currently circulating strains of RVFV are descended from an ancestral species that emerged from a natural reservoir in Africa when large-scale cattle and sheep farming were introduced during the 19th century. Viruses descended from multiple lineages persist in that region, through infection of reservoir animals and vertical transmission in mosquitoes, emerging in years of heavy rainfall to cause epizootics and epidemics. On a number of occasions, viruses from these lineages have been transported outside the enzootic region through the movement of infected animals or mosquitoes, triggering outbreaks in countries such as Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Mauritania and Madagascar, where RVF had not previously been seen. Such viruses could potentially become established in their new environments through infection of wild and domestic ruminants and other animals and vertical transmission in local mosquito species. Despite their extensive geographic dispersion, all strains of RVFV remain closely related at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The high degree of conservation of genes encoding the virion surface glycoproteins suggests that a single vaccine should protect against all currently circulating RVFV strains. Similarly, preservation of the sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase across viral lineages implies that antiviral drugs targeting the enzyme should be effective against all strains. Researchers should be encouraged to collect additional RVFV isolates and perform whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, so as to enhance our understanding of the continuing evolution of this important virus. This review forms part of a series

  10. Molecular biology and genetic diversity of Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2012-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus, is the causative agent of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a mosquito-borne disease of ruminant animals and humans. The generation of a large sequence database has facilitated studies of the evolution and spread of the virus. Bayesian analyses indicate that currently circulating strains of RVFV are descended from an ancestral species that emerged from a natural reservoir in Africa when large-scale cattle and sheep farming were introduced during the 19th century. Viruses descended from multiple lineages persist in that region, through infection of reservoir animals and vertical transmission in mosquitoes, emerging in years of heavy rainfall to cause epizootics and epidemics. On a number of occasions, viruses from these lineages have been transported outside the enzootic region through the movement of infected animals or mosquitoes, triggering outbreaks in countries such as Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Mauritania and Madagascar, where RVF had not previously been seen. Such viruses could potentially become established in their new environments through infection of wild and domestic ruminants and other animals and vertical transmission in local mosquito species. Despite their extensive geographic dispersion, all strains of RVFV remain closely related at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The high degree of conservation of genes encoding the virion surface glycoproteins suggests that a single vaccine should protect against all currently circulating RVFV strains. Similarly, preservation of the sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase across viral lineages implies that antiviral drugs targeting the enzyme should be effective against all strains. Researchers should be encouraged to collect additional RVFV isolates and perform whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, so as to enhance our understanding of the continuing evolution of this important virus. This review forms part of a series

  11. Genetic and genomic analyses for economically important traits and their applications in molecular breeding of cultured fish.

    PubMed

    Tong, JinGou; Sun, XiaoWen

    2015-02-01

    The traits of cultured fish must continually be genetically improved to supply high-quality animal protein for human consumption. Economically important fish traits are controlled by multiple gene quantitative trait loci (QTL), most of which have minor effects, but a few genes may have major effects useful for molecular breeding. In this review, we chose relevant studies on some of the most intensively cultured fish and concisely summarize progress on identifying and verifying QTLs for such traits as growth, disease and stress resistance and sex in recent decades. The potential applications of these major-effect genes and their associated markers in marker-assisted selection and molecular breeding, as well as future research directions are also discussed. These genetic and genomic analyses will be valuable for elucidating the mechanisms modulating economically important traits and to establish more effective molecular breeding techniques in fish.

  12. Molecular Genetic Response to Varied Wavelengths of Light in Xiphophorus maculatus Skin

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jordan; Lu, Yuan; Boswell, William T.; Boswell, Mikki; Caballero, Kaela L.; Walter, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    Xiphophorus fishes represent a model often utilized to study UVB induced tumorigenesis. Recently, varied genetic responses to UVB exposure has been documented in the skin of female and male Xiphophorus, as have differences in UVB response in the skin of different parental species and for interspecies hybrids produced from crossing them. Additionally, it has been shown that exposure to “cool white” fluorescent light induces a shift in the genetic profiles of Xiphophorus skin that is nearly as robust as the UVB response, but involves a fundamentally different set of genes. Given these results and the use of Xiphophorus interspecies hybrids as an experimental model for UVB inducible melanoma, it is of interest to characterize genes that may be transcriptionally modulated in a wavelength specific manner. The global molecular genetic response of skin upon exposure of the intact animal to specific wavelengths of light has not been investigated. Herein, we report results of RNA-Seq experiments from the skin of male Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 B following exposure to varied 50 nm wavelengths of light ranging from 300–600 nm. We identify two specific wavelength regions, 350–400 nm (88 genes) and 500–550 nm (276 genes) that exhibit transcriptional modulation of a significantly greater number of transcripts than any of the other 50 nm regions in the 300–600 nm range. Observed functional sets of genes modulated within these two transcriptionally active light regions suggest different mechanisms of gene modulation. PMID:26460196

  13. Molecular genetic response to varied wavelengths of light in Xiphophorus maculatus skin.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jordan; Lu, Yuan; Boswell, William T; Boswell, Mikki; Caballero, Kaela L; Walter, Ronald B

    2015-12-01

    Xiphophorus fishes represent a model often utilized to study UVB induced tumorigenesis. Recently, varied genetic responses to UVB exposure have been documented in the skin of female and male Xiphophorus, as have differences in UVB response in the skin of different parental species and for interspecies hybrids produced from crossing them. Additionally, it has been shown that exposure to "cool white" fluorescent light induces a shift in the genetic profiles of Xiphophorus skin that is nearly as robust as the UVB response, but involves a fundamentally different set of genes. Given these results and the use of Xiphophorus interspecies hybrids as an experimental model for UVB inducible melanoma, it is of interest to characterize genes that may be transcriptionally modulated in a wavelength specific manner. The global molecular genetic response of skin upon exposure of the intact animal to specific wavelengths of light has not been investigated. Herein, we report results of RNA-Seq experiments from the skin of male Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 B following exposure to varied 50nm wavelengths of light ranging from 300-600nm. We identify two specific wavelength regions, 350-400nm (88 genes) and 500-550nm (276 genes), that exhibit transcriptional modulation of a significantly greater number of transcripts than any of the other 50nm regions in the 300-600nm range. Observed functional sets of genes modulated within these two transcriptionally active light regions suggest different mechanisms of gene modulation.

  14. Genetic diversity analysis of Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. using AFLP molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Pereira, A M S; Coppede, J S; França, S C; Ming, L C; Bertoni, B W

    2016-02-19

    Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. is a medicinal plant native to Cerrado vegetation in Brazil, and it is popularly used to treat urogenital tract infections. The objective of the present study was to assess the genetic variability of natural C. antisyphiliticus populations using AFLP molecular markers. Accessions were collected in the states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo, and Goiás. The genotyping of individuals was performed using a LI-COR® DNA Analyzer 4300. The variability within populations was found to be greater than the variability between them. The F(ST) value was 0.3830, which indicated that the populations were highly structured. A higher percentage of polymorphic loci (92.16%) and greater genetic diversity were found in the population accessions from Pratinha-MG. Gene flow was considered restricted (N(m) = 1.18), and there was no correlation between genetic and geographic distances. The populations of C. antisyphiliticus exhibited an island-model structure, which demonstrates the vulnerability of the species.

  15. [Monogenic obesity - current status of molecular genetic research and clinical importance].

    PubMed

    Aldhoon-Hainerová, Irena; Včelák, Josef; Zamrazilová, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and its comorbidities represent one of the major health problems worldwide. A positive energy balance due to inappropriate life-style changes plays a key role in the current obesity epidemic. The influence of genetic factors is also significant - several studies concluded that genes contribute to the development of obesity by 40-70%. Genetic variability predisposes an individual to tendency or resistance to increase body weight in obesogenic environment. Polygenic type of inheritance is responsible in most of obese individuals. However, an intensive research of the past 20 years has led to an identification of several genes causing monogenic forms of obesity. To date, several monogenic genes (leptin, leptin receptor, prohormon convertase 1, proopiomelanocortin, melanocortin 4 receptor, single-minded homolog 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2) that are either involved in the neuronal differentiation of the paraventricular nucleus or in the leptin-melanocortin pathway are known to cause obesity. Mutation carriers apart from severe early onset obesity manifest with additional phenotypic characteristics as adrenal insufficiency, impaired immunity and impaired fertility. This review provides an overview of molecular-genetic and clinical research in the field of monogenic obesities including therapeutical approaches.

  16. Classification of rare missense substitutions, using risk surfaces, with genetic- and molecular-epidemiology applications.

    PubMed

    Tavtigian, Sean V; Byrnes, Graham B; Goldgar, David E; Thomas, Alun

    2008-11-01

    Many individually rare missense substitutions are encountered during deep resequencing of candidate susceptibility genes and clinical mutation screening of known susceptibility genes. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are among the most resequenced of all genes, and clinical mutation screening of these genes provides an extensive data set for analysis of rare missense substitutions. Align-GVGD is a mathematically simple missense substitution analysis algorithm, based on the Grantham difference, which has already contributed to classification of missense substitutions in BRCA1, BRCA2, and CHEK2. However, the distribution of genetic risk as a function of Align-GVGD's output variables Grantham variation (GV) and Grantham deviation (GD) has not been well characterized. Here, we used data from the Myriad Genetic Laboratories database of nearly 70,000 full-sequence tests plus two risk estimates, one approximating the odds ratio and the other reflecting strength of selection, to display the distribution of risk in the GV-GD plane as a series of surfaces. We abstracted contours from the surfaces and used the contours to define a sequence of missense substitution grades ordered from greatest risk to least risk. The grades were validated internally using a third, personal and family history-based, measure of risk. The Align-GVGD grades defined here are applicable to both the genetic epidemiology problem of classifying rare missense substitutions observed in known susceptibility genes and the molecular epidemiology problem of analyzing rare missense substitutions observed during case-control mutation screening studies of candidate susceptibility genes.

  17. Systems Genetics Reveals the Functional Context of PCOS Loci and Identifies Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michelle R; Brower, Meredith A; Xu, Ning; Cui, Jinrui; Mengesha, Emebet; Chen, Yii-Der I; Taylor, Kent D; Azziz, Ricardo; Goodarzi, Mark O

    2015-08-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 11 independent risk loci for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common disorder in young women characterized by androgen excess and oligomenorrhea. To put these risk loci and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) therein into functional context, we measured DNA methylation and gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies to identify PCOS-specific alterations. Two genes from the LHCGR region, STON1-GTF2A1L and LHCGR, were overexpressed in PCOS. In analysis stratified by obesity, LHCGR was overexpressed only in non-obese PCOS women. Although not differentially expressed in the entire PCOS group, INSR was underexpressed in obese PCOS subjects only. Alterations in gene expression in the LHCGR, RAB5B and INSR regions suggest that SNPs in these loci may be functional and could affect gene expression directly or indirectly via epigenetic alterations. We identified reduced methylation in the LHCGR locus and increased methylation in the INSR locus, changes that are concordant with the altered gene expression profiles. Complex patterns of meQTL and eQTL were identified in these loci, suggesting that local genetic variation plays an important role in gene regulation. We propose that non-obese PCOS women possess significant alterations in LH receptor expression, which drives excess androgen secretion from the ovary. Alternatively, obese women with PCOS possess alterations in insulin receptor expression, with underexpression in metabolic tissues and overexpression in the ovary, resulting in peripheral insulin resistance and excess ovarian androgen production. These studies provide a genetic and molecular basis for the reported clinical heterogeneity of PCOS.

  18. Genetic association studies in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Harvest F; Brismar, Kerstin

    2012-09-01

    Clinical observations and epidemiological studies have shown that there is familial aggregation of diabetic nephropathy in many ethnic groups, indicating the strong contribution of inherited factors in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Identification of the genes involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy may provide better knowledge of its pathophysiology and future therapies. To search for the genes involved in susceptibility, resistance or progression to diabetic nephropathy, candidate gene population association, family-based association and genome wide association studies have been widely used. This article reviews genetic polymorphisms, summarizes the data from genetic association studies of diabetic nephropathy in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and discusses about the future genetic analyses in the complex diseases.

  19. Recent advances in molecular genetic linkage maps of cultivated peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The competitiveness of peanuts in domestic and global markets has been threatened by losses in productivity and quality that are attributed to diseases, pests, environmental stresses and allergy or food safety issues. Narrow genetic diversity and deficiency of polymorphic DNA markers had severely hi...

  20. Linguini Models of Molecular Genetic Mapping and Fingerprinting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, James N., Jr.; Gray, Stanton B.; Hellack, Jenna J.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an exercise using linguini noodles to demonstrate an aspect of DNA fingerprinting. DNA maps that show genetic differences can be produced by digesting a certain piece of DNA with two or more restriction enzymes both individually and in combination. By rearranging and matching linguini fragments, students can recreate the original pattern…

  1. Molecular and genetic regulation of tree branch orientation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to genetically manipulate tree form can significantly benefit orchard and tree plantation management by enabling higher density plantings, mechanized harvesting, and reduce both chemical use and costly manual labor. Using both Prunus persica and Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified an an...

  2. Molecular genetic differentiation of avian Escherichia coli by RAPD-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Taghi Zahraei; Madani, Seyed Ahmad; Karimi, Vahid; Khazaeli, Fatemeh Arab

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most important bacterial avian pathogens and a common inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract of animals. Most pathogenic E. coli can not be differentiated biochemically or by classic microbiologic methods. Molecular typing methods, particularly PCR, facilitated epidemiological and ecological studies of bacteria. Here we describe the application of a random amplified polymorphic DNA- polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) for molecular genetic differentiation of E. coli isolates in Iran. In this study 58 E. coli isolates including 4 standard strains, 3 food originated isolates, 33 avian isolates, 8 isolates form diarrheic calves and 10 isolates from unweaned diarrheic lambs were analyzed by RAPD-PCR using primer 1247(5/-AAG AGC CCG T-3/). The RAPD analysis showed that these isolates could be grouped into 33 RAPD types and avian isolates were discriminated into 29 genotypes. It was shown that the primer could not differentiate E. coli isolated from lambs. Discriminatory index for entire isolates was 0.912 and for avian isolates was 0.990. We concluded that RAPD-PCR can be used as a method for molecular differentiation of E. coli isolates. PMID:24031252

  3. Current review of genetics of human obesity: from molecular mechanisms to an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, David; Stice, Eric; Rodríguez-López, Raquel; Manco, Licíno; Nóbrega, Clévio

    2015-08-01

    It is well-known that obesity is a complex multifactorial and heterogeneous condition with an important genetic component. Recently, major advances in obesity research emerged concerning the molecular mechanisms contributing to the obese condition. This review outlines several studies and data concerning the genetics and other important factors in the susceptibility risk to develop obesity. Based in the genetic etiology three main categories of obesity are considered: monogenic, syndromic, and common obesity. For the monogenic forms of obesity, the gene causing the phenotype is clearly identified, whereas for the common obesity the loci architecture underlying the phenotype is still being characterized. Given that, in this review we focus mainly in this obesity form, reviewing loci found until now by genome-wide association studies related with the susceptibility risk to develop obesity. Moreover, we also detail the obesity-related loci identified in children and in different ethnic groups, trying to highlight the complexity of the genetics underlying the common obese phenotype. Importantly, we also focus in the evolutionary hypotheses that have been proposed trying to explain how natural selection favored the spread of genes that increase the risk for an obese phenotype and how this predisposition to obesity evolved. Other factors are important in the obesity condition, and thus, we also discuss the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the susceptibility and development of obesity. Covering all these topics we expect to provide a complete and recent perspective about the underlying mechanisms involved in the development and origin of obesity. Only with a full understanding of the factors and mechanisms contributing to obesity, it will be possible to provide and allow the development of new therapeutic approaches to this condition.

  4. Molecular genetics of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).

    PubMed Central

    Shen, M H; Harper, P S; Upadhyaya, M

    1996-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also called von Recklinghausen disease or peripheral neurofibromatosis, is a common autosomal dominant disorder characterised by multiple neurofibromas, café au lait spots, and Lisch nodules of the iris, with a variable clinical expression. The gene responsible for this condition, NF1, has been isolated by positional cloning. It spans over 350 kb of genomic DNA in chromosomal region 17q11.2 and encodes an mRNA of 11-13 kb containing at least 59 exons. NF1 is widely expressed in a variety of human and rat tissues. Four alternatively spliced NF1 transcripts have been identified. Three of these transcript isoforms (each with an extra exon: 9br, 23a, and 48a, respectively) show differential expression to some extent in various tissues, while the fourth isoform (2.9 kb in length) remains to be examined. The protein encoded by NF1, neurofibromin, has a domain homologous to the GTPase activating protein (GAP) family, and downregulates ras activity. The identification of somatic mutations in NF1 from tumour tissues strongly supports the speculation that NF1 is a member of the tumour suppressor gene family. Although the search for mutations in the gene has proved difficult, germline mutation analysis has shown that around 82% of all the fully characterised NF1 specific mutations so far predict severe truncation of neurofibromin. Further extensive studies are required to elucidate the gene function and the mutation spectrum. This should then facilitate the molecular diagnosis and the development of new therapy for the disease. PMID:8825042

  5. The future for genetic studies in reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, G.W.; Zondervan, K.T.; Nyholt, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute to risk of many common diseases affecting reproduction and fertility. In recent years, methods for genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revolutionized gene discovery for common traits and diseases. Results of GWAS are documented in the Catalog of Published Genome-Wide Association Studies at the National Human Genome Research Institute and report over 70 publications for 32 traits and diseases associated with reproduction. These include endometriosis, uterine fibroids, age at menarche and age at menopause. Results that pass appropriate stringent levels of significance are generally well replicated in independent studies. Examples of genetic variation affecting twinning rate, infertility, endometriosis and age at menarche demonstrate that the spectrum of disease-related variants for reproductive traits is similar to most other common diseases. GWAS ‘hits’ provide novel insights into biological pathways and the translational value of these studies lies in discovery of novel gene targets for biomarkers, drug development and greater understanding of environmental factors contributing to disease risk. Results also show that genetic data can help define sub-types of disease and co-morbidity with other traits and diseases. To date, many studies on reproductive traits have used relatively small samples. Future genetic marker studies in large samples with detailed phenotypic and clinical information will yield new insights into disease risk, disease classification and co-morbidity for many diseases associated with reproduction and infertility. PMID:23982303

  6. [Molecular genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, É V; Churashov, S V; Kamilova, T A

    2013-01-01

    Visual loss due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is caused by one or both forms of advanced disease: "wet" (neovascular) or "dry" (geographic atrophy). Immune system plays a central role in pathogenesis and progression of both AMD forms. Main genetic polymorphisms associated with risk of AMD development and progression were found to be genes that regulate inflammation especially in complement factor H gen (1q31 locus) and 10q26 locus (PLEKHAI/ARMS2/HTRA1). Association of response to treatment and genotype was shown in patients with AMD. Complete characterization of both common and rare alleles that influence AMD risk is necessary for accurate determination of individual genetic risk as well as identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. MAJOR MOLECULAR GENETIC DRIVERS IN SPORADIC PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM

    PubMed Central

    ARNOLD, ANDREW

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is primarily due to a solitary parathyroid adenoma but multi-gland disease, parathyroid carcinoma, and ectopic parathyroid hormone production can occur. Although primary hyperparathyroidism mostly presents sporadically, strong familial predispositions also exist. Much is known about heritable genetic mutations responsible for these syndromes, including multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2A, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome, and familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia. Acquired mutations in common sporadic hyperparathyroidism have also been discovered. Here we focus on the most common and well-established genetic drivers: 1) involvement of the oncogene cyclin D1 in human neoplasia was first established in parathyroid adenomas, followed by recognition of its importance in other tumor types including breast cancer and B-lymphoid malignancy; and 2) somatic mutation of the MEN1 gene, first identified as the source of pathogenic germline mutations in patients with familial endocrinopathies, is found in a substantial fraction of non-familial parathyroid adenomas. PMID:28066056

  8. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) Molecular Genetic Markers1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Burkart-Waco, Diana; Kuppu, Sundaram; Britt, Anne; Chetelat, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Genetic markers are essential when developing or working with genetically variable populations. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) markers are primer pairs that amplify single-locus sequences that differ in size for two or more alleles. They are attractive for their ease of use for rapid genotyping and their codominant nature. Here, we describe a heuristic algorithm that uses a k-mer-based approach to search two or more genome sequences to locate polymorphic regions suitable for designing candidate IGG marker primers. As input to the IGG pipeline software, the user provides genome sequences and the desired amplicon sizes and size differences. Primer sequences flanking polymorphic insertions/deletions are produced as output. IGG marker files for three sets of genomes, Solanum lycopersicum/Solanum pennellii, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Columbia-0/Landsberg erecta-0 accessions, and S. lycopersicum/S. pennellii/Solanum tuberosum (three-way polymorphic) are included. PMID:27436831

  9. Molecular genetic approaches to developing quality protein maize.

    PubMed

    Gibbon, Bryan C; Larkins, Brian A

    2005-04-01

    Since its development more than two decades ago, Quality Protein Maize (QPM) has been adopted for cultivation in many regions of the developing world. Given the potential benefits of widespread use of QPM, research to better understand the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible for its altered kernel texture and protein quality is important. Recent investigations into the improved protein quality of the opaque2 mutant and the genetic mechanisms that can suppress its starchy kernel phenotype provide new insights to support the continued improvement of QPM. Chief among these developments are the use of transgenic approaches to improve nutritional quality and the discovery that an important component of modified endosperm texture in QPM is related to altered starch granule structure.

  10. The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2012-01-01

    Genomic profiling has transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent years have seen a shift from microarray analysis and candidate gene sequencing to next-generation sequencing. Together, these approaches have shown that many ALL subtypes are characterized by constellations of structural rearrangements, submicroscopic DNA copy number alterations, and sequence mutations, several of which have clear implications for risk stratification and targeted therapeutic intervention. Mutations in genes regulating lymphoid development are a hallmark of ALL, and alterations of the lymphoid transcription factor gene IKZF1 (IKAROS) are associated with a high risk of treatment failure in B-ALL. Approximately 20% of B-ALL cases harbor genetic alterations that activate kinase signaling that may be amenable to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including rearrangements of the cytokine receptor gene CRLF2; rearrangements of ABL1, JAK2, and PDGFRB; and mutations of JAK1 and JAK2. Whole-genome sequencing has also identified novel targets of mutation in aggressive T-lineage ALL, including hematopoietic regulators (ETV6 and RUNX1), tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic regulators. Challenges for the future are to comprehensively identify and experimentally validate all genetic alterations driving leukemogenesis and treatment failure in childhood and adult ALL and to implement genomic profiling into the clinical setting to guide risk stratification and targeted therapy.

  11. The Fragile X Syndrome: From Molecular Genetics to Neurobiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willemsen, Rob; Oostra, Ben A.; Bassell, Gary J.; Dictenberg, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Since the identification of the FMR1 gene basic research has been focused on the molecular characterization of the FMR1 gene product, the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Recent developments in fragile X research have provided new insights and knowledge about the physiological function of FMRP in the cell and the nerve cell in…

  12. Introductory Guide to the Statistics of Molecular Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Thalia C.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling

    2005-01-01

    Background: This introductory guide presents the main two analytical approaches used by molecular geneticists: linkage and association. Methods: Traditional linkage and association methods are described, along with more recent advances in methodologies such as those using a variance components approach. Results: New methods are being developed all…

  13. Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Elizabeth A.; Hokanson, John E.; Murphy, James R.; Make, Barry; Lynch, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Background COPDGeneis a multicenter observational study designed to identify genetic factors associated with COPD. It will also characterize chest CT phenotypes in COPD subjects, including assessment of emphysema, gas trapping, and airway wall thickening. Finally, subtypes of COPD based on these phenotypes will be used in a comprehensive genome-wide study to identify COPD susceptibility genes. Methods/Results COPDGene will enroll 10,000 smokers with and without COPD across the GOLD stages. Both Non-Hispanic white and African-American subjects are included in the cohort. Inspiratory and expiratory chest CT scans will be obtained on all participants. In addition to the cross-sectional enrollment process, these subjects will be followed regularly for longitudinal studies. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) will be done on an initial group of 4000 subjects to identify genetic variants associated with case-control status and several quantitative phenotypes related to COPD. The initial findings will be verified in an additional 2000 COPD cases and 2000 smoking control subjects, and further validation association studies will be carried out. Conclusions COPDGene will provide important new information about genetic factors in COPD, and will characterize the disease process using high resolution CT scans. Understanding genetic factors and CT phenotypes that define COPD will potentially permit earlier diagnosis of this disease and may lead to the development of treatments to modify progression. PMID:20214461

  14. Genetic and molecular alterations in olfactory neuroblastoma: implications for pathogenesis, prognosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Czapiewski, Piotr; Kunc, Michał; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB, Esthesioneuroblastoma) is an infrequent neoplasm of the head and neck area derived from olfactory neuroepithelium. Despite relatively good prognosis a subset of patients shows recurrence, progression and/or metastatic disease, which requires additional treatment. However, neither prognostic nor predictive factors are well specified. Thus, we performed a literature search for the currently available data on disturbances in molecular pathways, cytogenetic changes and results gained by next generation sequencing (NGS) approaches in ONB in order to gain an overview of genetic alterations which might be useful for treating patients with ONB. We present briefly ONB molecular pathogenesis and propose potential therapeutic targets and prognostic factors. Possible therapeutic targets in ONB include: receptor tyrosine kinases (c-kit, PDGFR-b, TrkB; EGFR); somatostatin receptor; FGF-FGFR1 signaling; Sonic hedgehog pathway; apoptosis-related pathways (Bcl-2, TRAIL) and neoangiogenesis (VEGF; KDR). Furthermore, we compare high- and low-grade ONB, and describe its frequent mimicker: sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinoma. ONB is often a therapeutic challenge, so our goal should be the implementation of acquired knowledge into clinical practice, especially at pretreated, recurrent and metastatic stages. Moreover, the multicenter molecular studies are needed to increase the amount of available data. PMID:27256979

  15. Molecular weight-dependent genetic information transfer with disulfide-linked polyethylenimine-based nonviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Parhiz, Hamideh; Hashemi, Maryam; Hatefi, Arash; Shier, Wayne Thomas; Farzad, Sara Amel; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    One strategy for improving gene vector properties of polyethylenimine is to facilitate individual transfection mechanism steps. This study investigates (i) improving transfection efficiency by attaching peptide nuclear localization signals (nuclear localization signals: SV40 large T antigen nuclear localization signal or C-terminus of histone H1) to polyethylenimine (10 kDa) and (ii) using disulfide linkages, which are expected to be stable during polyplex formation, but cleaved inside cells giving improved gene release. Nuclear localization signal-containing polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity, whereas transfection efficiency with high molecular weight plasmid DNA increased up to 3.6 times that of underivatized polyethylenimine in Neuro2A cells at higher molar ratio of polyethylenimine-nitrogen to DNA-phosphate (N/P) ratios. However, with luciferase-specific low molecular weight small interfering RNA in Neuro2A/EGFPLuc cells, nuclear localization signal-containing polyplexes with disulfide linkages caused substantial cytotoxicity at N/P ratios >15 and no consistent significant reduction in luciferase expression. Possible explanations for molecular weight-dependent differences in genetic information transfer by polyplexes containing disulfide-linked nuclear localization signals are discussed.

  16. Australian endemic pest tephritids: genetic, molecular and microbial tools for improved Sterile Insect Technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among Australian endemic tephritid fruit flies, the sibling species Bactrocera tryoni and Bactrocera neohumeralis have been serious horticultural pests since the introduction of horticulture in the nineteenth century. More recently, Bactrocera jarvisi has also been declared a pest in northern Australia. After several decades of genetic research there is now a range of classical and molecular genetic tools that can be used to develop improved Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) strains for control of these pests. Four-way crossing strategies have the potential to overcome the problem of inbreeding in mass-reared strains of B. tryoni. The ability to produce hybrids between B. tryoni and the other two species in the laboratory has proved useful for the development of genetically marked strains. The identification of Y-chromosome markers in B. jarvisi means that male and female embryos can be distinguished in any strain that carries a B. jarvisi Y chromosome. This has enabled the study of homologues of the sex-determination genes during development of B jarvisi and B. tryoni, which is necessary for the generation of genetic-sexing strains. Germ-line transformation has been established and a draft genome sequence for B. tryoni released. Transcriptomes from various species, tissues and developmental stages, to aid in identification of manipulation targets for improving SIT, have been assembled and are in the pipeline. Broad analyses of the microbiome have revealed a metagenome that is highly variable within and across species and defined by the environment. More specific analyses detected Wolbachia at low prevalence in the tropics but absent in temperate regions, suggesting a possible role for this endosymbiont in future control strategies. PMID:25470996

  17. Genetic loadings in schizophrenia: a dermatoglyphic study.

    PubMed

    Balgir, R S; Murthy, R S; Wig, N N

    1993-05-01

    Finger and palmar dermatoglyphics of 120 male and 120 female schizophrenics with and without a family history of schizophrenia in first-degree relatives were studied in the northwestern part of India. Patients were selected according to specific diagnostic criteria. Significant dermatoglyphic differences were observed for fingerprint patterns, total finger ridge counts and 'atd' angle between the schizophrenics with and those without a positive family history of schizophrenia, suggesting a strong "genetic loading" (i.e., hereditary factors) in familial cases of schizophrenia. Dermatoglyphic features of isolated schizophrenics also significantly differed from those of controls, thus indicating the involvement of genetic factors in the etiology of schizophrenia.

  18. Genetic diversity in Tunisian populations of faba bean (Vicia faba L.) based on morphological traits and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Backouchi, I Z; Aouida, M; Khemiri, N; Jebara, M

    2015-07-13

    Genetic diversity within Vicia faba L. is key to the genetic improvement of this important species. In this study, morphological traits and RAPD molecular markers were used to assess the levels of polymorphism across 12 Tunisian populations, three major and nine minor from different locations. Analysis of morphological traits indicated that the three major populations showed significant differences and the nine minor populations exhibited considerable variation for most traits. The grain yield of the Alia population could be increased by inoculation. Of the seven primers tested, it was clear that the Cs12 primer would be recommend for genetic diversity analysis of V. faba.Within population genetic diversity exhibited 94% of total diversity. Intra-population genetic diversity (HS) was 0.16, which was clearly higher than between population genetic diversity (DST = 0.06) UPG-MA showed a high level of genetic variation between major and minor populations of V. faba L. Particularly the minor populations showed a high level of diversity and was divided into two subclusters. Ltaifia was separated from the other populations. In addition to a high grain yield, these populations showed the lowest Nei and Shannon indices (H = 0.08 and I = 0.13) justifying their homogeneity. For these reasons, these cultivars can be considered a selected population. However, the Takelsa population showed the highest Nei and Shannon indices (H = 0.13 and I = 0.21), indicating that this population was the most heterogeneous, which is interesting for breeding programs.

  19. The genetic and molecular regulation of sleep: from fruit flies to humans

    PubMed Central

    Cirelli, Chiara

    2009-01-01

    It has been known for a long time that genetic factors affect sleep quantity and quality. Genetic screens identified several mutations that affect sleep across species, pointing to an evolutionary conserved regulation of sleep. Moreover, it has also been recognized that sleep affects the expression of genes. These findings have given valuable clues about the molecular underpinnings of sleep regulation and function that might lead the way to more efficient treatments for sleep disorders. PMID:19617891

  20. MILLIMETER-SCALE GENETIC GRADIENTS AND COMMUNITY-LEVEL MOLECULAR CONVERGENCE IN A HYPERSALINE MICROBIAL MAT

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, Marsha W; Kunin, Victor; Raes, Jeroen; Harris, J. Kirk; Spear, John R.; Walker, Jeffrey J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Mering, Christian von; Bebout, Brad M.; Pace, Norman R.; Bork, Peer; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-04-30

    To investigate the extent of genetic stratification in structured microbial communities, we compared the metagenomes of 10 successive layers of a phylogenetically complex hypersaline mat from Guerrero Negro, Mexico. We found pronounced millimeter-scale genetic gradients that are consistent with the physicochemical profile of the mat. Despite these gradients, all layers displayed near identical and acid-shifted isoelectric point profiles due to a molecular convergence of amino acid usage indicating that hypersalinity enforces an overriding selective pressure on the mat community.

  1. Modern molecular genetic approaches to complex traits: implications for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Owen, M J; Craddock, N

    1996-03-01

    The majority of common psychiatric disorders pose problems for geneticists because of their complex and non-Mendelian modes of inheritance. Early attempts to map genes for mental illness have so far largely overlooked this and sought genes of major effect in multiplex families using the lod score method of linkage analysis. However it seems that major genes are likely to be at best rare causes of common mental disorders, and the majority of cases probably reflect the interaction of several and perhaps many genes of comparatively small effect. There are two complementary sets of strategies that allow such genes to be identified. The first is to perform linkage analysis based on allele sharing in pairs of affected relatives. The second is to carry out association studies on samples of unrelated individuals. These methods and their applicability to psychiatric disorders are described. Psychiatric genetics has traditionally focussed on categorical phenotypes, but if valid continuous measures can be developed, powerful quantitative trait loci (QTL) approaches may also become feasible. Another important area is likely to be the study of relevant models in animals such as rodents in which genetic studies have many advantages. Finally we should not overlook the possibility that there are molecular explanations for irregular patterns of transmission such as mitochondrial inheritance, genomic imprinting and dynamic mutations.

  2. Genetic characterisation and molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. from humans and pigs in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez, Alena M; Leles, Daniela; Jaeger, Lauren H; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Araújo, Adauto

    2012-10-01

    The molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. of human and pig origin has been studied as a means to assess the potential of pigs as reservoirs for human ascariasis. In this study, human (H) and pig (P) Ascaris spp. haplotypes from two Brazilian regions were characterised based on two mitochondrial genes, nad1 and cox1. The results show six haplotypes of the cox1 gene, with two haplotypes (H9P9 and P3) corresponding to haplotypes previously characterised in China. Because P3 was found in humans in this study, it was designated as H14P3. Furthermore, five new Ascaris spp. nad1 haplotypes from humans (H12-H16) and five from pigs (P16-P20) were observed, with one being highly frequent and present in both hosts, here designated as H12P17. Phylogenetic and network analysis demonstrated that the molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. in Brazil is driven by the globally distributed haplotypes cox1 H14P3 and nad1 H12P17. In conclusion, in this study genetic characterisation of Ascaris spp. showed that humans and pigs share common haplotypes that are also present in two widely separated geographical regions of Brazil.

  3. Genetic and Molecular Basis of Kingella kingae Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Kimberly F.; Porsch, Eric A.; Seed, Patrick C.

    2016-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a common cause of invasive disease in young children and was recently found to produce a polysaccharide capsule containing N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and β-3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (βKdo). Given the role of capsules as important virulence factors and effective vaccine antigens, we set out to determine the genetic determinants of K. kingae encapsulation. Using a transposon library and a screen for nonencapsulated mutants, we identified the previously identified ctrABCD (ABC transporter) operon, a lipA (kpsC)-like gene, a lipB (kpsS)-like gene, and a putative glycosyltransferase gene designated csaA (capsule synthesis type a gene A). These genes were found to be present at unlinked locations scattered throughout the genome, an atypical genetic arrangement for Gram-negative bacteria that elaborate a capsule dependent on an ABC-type transporter for surface localization. The csaA gene product contains a predicted glycosyltransferase domain with structural homology to GalNAc transferases and a predicted capsule synthesis domain with structural homology to Kdo transferases, raising the possibility that this enzyme is responsible for alternately linking GalNAc to βKdo and βKdo to GalNAc. Consistent with this conclusion, mutation of the DXD motif in the GalNAc transferase domain and of the HP motif in the Kdo transferase domain resulted in a loss of encapsulation. Examination of intracellular and surface-associated capsule in deletion mutants and complemented strains further implicated the lipA (kpsC)-like gene, the lipB (kpsS)-like gene, and the csaA gene in K. kingae capsule production. These data define the genetic requirements for encapsulation in K. kingae and demonstrate an atypical organization of capsule synthesis, assembly, and export genes. PMID:27045037

  4. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  5. The fragile X syndrome: from molecular genetics to neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Rob; Oostra, Ben A; Bassell, Gary J; Dictenberg, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Since the identification of the FMR1 gene basic research has been focused on the molecular characterization of the FMR1 gene product, the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Recent developments in fragile X research have provided new insights and knowledge about the physiological function of FMRP in the cell and the nerve cell in particular. Currently, compelling evidence suggests a role for FMRP in the transport/translation of dendritically localized mRNAs. In addition, the identification of some of the target mRNAs of FMRP have led to an increased interest in the neurobiology of the syndrome. This review highlights the role of FMRP in dendritic mRNA transport/translation in relation to synaptic plasticity, a molecular mechanism implicated in learning and memory.

  6. Molecular genetics and diagnosis of phenylketonuria: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Blau, Nenad; Shen, Nan; Carducci, Carla

    2014-07-01

    Detection of individuals with phenylketonuria (PKU), an autosomal recessively inherited disorder in phenylalanine degradation, is straightforward and efficient due to newborn screening programs. A recent introduction of the pharmacological treatment option emerged rapid development of molecular testing. However, variants responsible for PKU do not all suppress enzyme activity to the same extent. A spectrum of over 850 variants, gives rise to a continuum of hyperphenylalaninemia from very mild, requiring no intervention, to severe classical PKU, requiring urgent intervention. Locus-specific and genotypes database are today an invaluable resource of information for more efficient classification and management of patients. The high-tech molecular methods allow patients' genotype to be obtained in a few days, especially if each laboratory develops a panel for the most frequent variants in the corresponding population.

  7. The molecular genetics of Marfan syndrome and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, P N; Arteaga‐Solis, E; Baldock, C; Collod‐Béroud, G; Booms, P; De Paepe, A; Dietz, H C; Guo, G; Handford, P A; Judge, D P; Kielty, C M; Loeys, B; Milewicz, D M; Ney, A; Ramirez, F; Reinhardt, D P; Tiedemann, K; Whiteman, P; Godfrey, M

    2006-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the gene for fibrillin‐1 (FBN1). The leading cause of premature death in untreated individuals with MFS is acute aortic dissection, which often follows a period of progressive dilatation of the ascending aorta. Recent research on the molecular physiology of fibrillin and the pathophysiology of MFS and related disorders has changed our understanding of this disorder by demonstrating changes in growth factor signalling and in matrix‐cell interactions. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the molecular biology of fibrillin and fibrillin‐rich microfibrils. Mutations in FBN1 and other genes found in MFS and related disorders will be discussed, and novel concepts concerning the complex and multiple mechanisms of the pathogenesis of MFS will be explained. PMID:16571647

  8. Clinical, Molecular, and Genetic Characteristics of PAPA Syndrome: A Review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elisabeth J; Allantaz, Florence; Bennett, Lynda; Zhang, Dongping; Gao, Xiaochong; Wood, Geryl; Kastner, Daniel L; Punaro, Marilynn; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Pascual, Virginia; Wise, Carol A

    2010-11-01

    PAPA syndrome (Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum, and Acne) is an autosomal dominant, hereditary auto-inflammatory disease arising from mutations in the PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 gene on chromosome 15q. These mutations produce a hyper-phosphorylated PSTPIP1 protein and alter its participation in activation of the "inflammasome" involved in interleukin-1 (IL-1β) production. Overproduction of IL-1β is a clear molecular feature of PAPA syndrome. Ongoing research is implicating other biochemical pathways that may be relevant to the distinct pyogenic inflammation of the skin and joints characteristic of this disease. This review summarizes the recent and rapidly accumulating knowledge on these molecular aspects of PAPA syndrome and related disorders.

  9. Molecular genetic predictive testing for Alzheimer's disease: deliberations and preliminary recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lennox, A; Karlinsky, H; Meschino, W; Buchanan, J A; Percy, M E; Berg, J M

    1994-01-01

    Forty-one participants representing diverse professional back-grounds attended a workshop on genetic predictive testing for familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) on January 23, 1993 at Surrey Place Centre in Toronto, Canada. Rapidly emerging molecular genetic findings in AD indicate that predictive testing is now technologically feasible for selected individuals, although defining eligibility criteria remains problematic. Legal, ethical, biomedical, and psychosocial issues related to establishing predictive testing programs for AD were discussed at the workshop. This article reflects these discussions, provides the current biomedical background for them and examines the Huntington's disease (HD) predictive testing experience. Observations concerning molecular genetic predictive testing for AD in light of its genetic heterogeneity and clinical characteristics, such as usual later age of onset than HD, are presented. It is proposed that predictive testing for AD can now be cautiously offered in a research setting primarily according to the recommendations contained within the Ethical Issues Policy Statement on Huntington's Disease Molecular Genetics Predictive Test. However, in their application to AD, some points in the statement are considered to require emphasis, modification, or currently to be of uncertain applicability. This represents an initial step in an on-going process of debate concerning AD that will be required as new advances occur in genetic and clinical research and in bioethics.

  10. Parkinson’s Disease in Saudi Patients: A Genetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mubarak, Bashayer R.; Bohlega, Saeed A.; Alkhairallah, Thamer S.; Magrashi, Amna I.; AlTurki, Maha I.; Khalil, Dania S.; AlAbdulaziz, Basma S.; Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; Mustafa, Abeer E.; Alyemni, Eman A.; Alsaffar, Bashayer A.; Tahir, Asma I.; Al Tassan, Nada A.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the major causes of parkinsonism syndrome. Its characteristic motor symptoms are attributable to dopaminergic neurons loss in the midbrain. Genetic advances have highlighted underlying molecular mechanisms and provided clues to potential therapies. However, most of the studies focusing on the genetic component of PD have been performed on American, European and Asian populations, whereas Arab populations (excluding North African Arabs), particularly Saudis remain to be explored. Here we investigated the genetic causes of PD in Saudis by recruiting 98 PD-cases (sporadic and familial) and screening them for potential pathogenic mutations in PD-established genes; SNCA, PARKIN, PINK1, PARK7/DJ1, LRRK2 and other PD-associated genes using direct sequencing. To our surprise, the screening revealed only three pathogenic point mutations; two in PINK1 and one in PARKIN. In addition to mutational analysis, CNV and cDNA analysis was performed on a subset of patients. Exon/intron dosage alterations in PARKIN were detected and confirmed in 2 cases. Our study suggests that mutations in the ORF of the screened genes are not a common cause of PD in Saudi population; however, these findings by no means exclude the possibility that other genetic events such as gene expression/dosage alteration may be more common nor does it eliminate the possibility of the involvement of novel genes. PMID:26274610

  11. Strengthening molecular genetics and training in craniosynostosis: The need of the hour

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Mayadhar; Bajpai, Minu; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar; Malhotra, Arun; Samantaray, Jyotish Chandra; Dwivedi, Sada Nanda

    2014-01-01

    Craniosynostosis (CS) is premature fusion of skull. It is divided into two groups: Syndromic craniosynostosis (SCS) and non-syndromic craniosynostosis (NSC). Its incidence in Indian population is 1:1000 live births where as in the USA it is 1:2500 live births. Its incidence varies from country to country. Molecular genetics having great interest and relevance in medical students, faculty, scientist, pediatric neurosurgeon and staff nurses, our objective was to educate the medical students, residents, researchers, clinicians, pediatric neurosurgeon, anesthetists, pediatricians, staff nurses and paramedics. We summarized here including with diagnosis, investigations, surgical therapy, induction therapy, and molecular therapy. Molecular genetics training is needed to know the information regarding development of skull, cranial connective tissue, craniofacial dysplasia, frame work, network of receptors and its etiopathogenesis. The important part is clinically with molecular therapy (MT) how to manage CS in rural sector and metropolitan cities need a special attention. PMID:25288859

  12. [Certification system for technological professionals towards standardization of molecular-genetic testing].

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Hayato

    2012-06-01

    The College of Laboratory Medicine of Japan, in collaboration with the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine, has developed a certification examination for technological professionals for the purpose of nurturing professionals possessing a high level of competency in the field of molecular analysis or molecular-genetic testing, and thus providing the quality health care services. Certification levels are separated into two levels: molecular analysis technologist and specialist. The former measures basic knowledge and skills. The latter measures the competencies defined in the statement, which includes compliance with the standards or guidelines for quality assurance of molecular-genetic testing. The former began in 2007, and 398 professionals have been certified in 5 years. The latter is beginning in 2012. Personnel qualification linked with the standards is expected to be an efficient and effective approach to providing the quality service.

  13. Molecular genetics and evolution of melanism in the cat family.

    PubMed

    Eizirik, Eduardo; Yuhki, Naoya; Johnson, Warren E; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Hannah, Steven S; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2003-03-04

    Melanistic coat coloration occurs as a common polymorphism in 11 of 37 felid species and reaches high population frequency in some cases but never achieves complete fixation. To investigate the genetic basis, adaptive significance, and evolutionary history of melanistic variants in the Felidae, we mapped, cloned, and sequenced the cat homologs of two putative candidate genes for melanism (ASIP [agouti] and MC1R) and identified three independent deletions associated with dark coloration in three different felid species. Association and transmission analyses revealed that a 2 bp deletion in the ASIP gene specifies black coloration in domestic cats, and two different "in-frame" deletions in the MC1R gene are implicated in melanism in jaguars and jaguarundis. Melanistic individuals from five other felid species did not carry any of these mutations, implying that there are at least four independent genetic origins for melanism in the cat family. The inferred multiple origins and independent historical elevation in population frequency of felid melanistic mutations suggest the occurrence of adaptive evolution of this visible phenotype in a group of related free-ranging species.

  14. [Genetic and molecular background in autoimmune diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kantárová, D; Prídavková, D; Ságová, I; Vrlík, M; Mikler, J; Buc, M

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1 DM) is caused by autoimmune-mediated and idiopathic beta-cell destruction of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans resulting in absolute insulin deficiency. Susceptibility to T1 DM is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. It is generally believed that in genetically susceptible individuals, the disease is triggered by environmental agents, such as viral infections, dietary factors in early infancy, or climatic influences. Many candidate genes for diabetes have been reported; those within the Major Histocompatibility Complex being among the most important. The most common autoantigens are insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insuloma-associated antigen 2, and zinc transporter ZnT8. The destruction of beta-cells is mediated mainly by cellular mechanisms; antibodies only seem to reflect the ongoing autoimmune processes and are not directly involved in the tissue damage. They, however, appear prior to the onset of insulin deficiency which makes them suitable for use in the prevention of the disease.

  15. Patterns of molecular genetic variation among cat breeds.

    PubMed

    Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; David, Victor A; Pflueger, Solveig M; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Wade, Claire M; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variation in cat breeds was assessed utilizing a panel of short tandem repeat (STR) loci genotyped in 38 cat breeds and 284 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 24 breeds. Population structure in cat breeds generally reflects their recent ancestry and absence of strong breed barriers between some breeds. There is a wide range in the robustness of population definition, from breeds demonstrating high definition to breeds with as little as a third of their genetic variation partitioning into a single population. Utilizing the STRUCTURE algorithm, there was no clear demarcation of the number of population subdivisions; 16 breeds could not be resolved into independent populations, the consequence of outcrossing in established breeds to recently developed breeds with common ancestry. These 16 breeds were divided into 6 populations. Ninety-six percent of cats in a sample set of 1040 were correctly assigned to their classified breed or breed group/population. Average breed STR heterozygosities ranged from moderate (0.53; Havana, Korat) to high (0.85; Norwegian Forest Cat, Manx). Most of the variation in cat breeds was observed within a breed population (83.7%), versus 16.3% of the variation observed between populations. The hierarchical relationships of cat breeds is poorly defined as demonstrated by phylogenetic trees generated from both STR and SNP data, though phylogeographic grouping of breeds derived completely or in part from Southeast Asian ancestors was apparent.

  16. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  17. Non-invasive genetic sampling for molecular sexing and microsatellite genotyping of hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus)

    PubMed Central

    Presti, Flavia T.; Meyer, Janaína; Antas, Paulo T.Z.; Guedes, Neiva M.R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.

    2013-01-01

    Molted feather sampling is a useful tool for genetic analyses of endangered species, but it is often very laborious due to the low quality and quantity of the DNA obtained. In the present study we show the parts of feathers that resulted in better yield of DNA. In descending order these were: blood clot outside the umbilicus, umbilicus (without blood clot), tip, inner membrane, and small calamus. Compared to DNA extracted from blood samples, DNA extracted from feathers produced microsatellite alleles of poorer quality and had to be processed immediately after extraction. As expected due to the level of DNA degradation, molecular sexing protocols that result in shorter PCR products were more efficient. PMID:23569419

  18. Inherited cardiomyopathies: molecular genetics and clinical genetic testing in the postgenomic era.

    PubMed

    Teekakirikul, Polakit; Kelly, Melissa A; Rehm, Heidi L; Lakdawala, Neal K; Funke, Birgit H

    2013-03-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and restrictive cardiomyopathy. These diseases have a substantial genetic component and predispose to sudden cardiac death, which provides a high incentive to identify and sequence disease genes in affected individuals to identify pathogenic variants. Clinical genetic testing, which is now widely available, can be a powerful tool for identifying presymptomatic individuals. However, locus and allelic heterogeneity are the rule, as are clinical variability and reduced penetrance of disease in carriers of pathogenic variants. These factors, combined with genetic and phenotypic overlap between different cardiomyopathies, have made clinical genetic testing a lengthy and costly process. Next-generation sequencing technologies have removed many limitations such that comprehensive testing is now feasible, shortening diagnostic odysseys for clinically complex cases. Remaining challenges include the incomplete understanding of the spectrum of benign and pathogenic variants in the cardiomyopathy genes, which is a source of inconclusive results. This review provides an overview of inherited cardiomyopathies with a focus on their genetic etiology and diagnostic testing in the postgenomic era.

  19. "Mucin"-secreting papillary renal cell carcinoma: clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic analysis of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Pivovarcikova, Kristyna; Peckova, Kvetoslava; Martinek, Petr; Montiel, Delia Perez; Kalusova, Kristyna; Pitra, Tomas; Hora, Milan; Skenderi, Faruk; Ulamec, Monika; Daum, Ondrej; Rotterova, Pavla; Ondic, Ondrej; Dubova, Magdalena; Curik, Romuald; Dunatov, Ana; Svoboda, Tomas; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2016-07-01

    Mucin and mucin-like material are features of mucinous tubular and spindle renal cell carcinoma (MTS RCC) but are rarely seen in papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC). We reviewed 1311 PRCC and identified 7 tumors containing extracellular and/or intracellular mucinous/mucin-like material (labeled as PRCCM). We analyzed these using morphological, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic methods (arrayCGH, FISH). Clinical data were available for six of the seven patients (five males and one female, age range 61-78 years). Follow-up was available for four patients (2-4 years); one patient died of widespread metastases. Tumor size ranged from 3 to 5 cm (mean 3.8). Of all cases, histological architecture showed a predominantly papillary pattern. Mucin or mucin-like was extracellular in one, intracellular in three, and both intra/extracellular in three cases. All tumors were positive for AMACR, vimentin, and OSCAR, while CK7 was positive in four. Mucicarmine stain was positive in all cases, PAS in six and Alcian blue in three cases. Five tumors were positive for MUC 1, but none were positive for MUC 2, MUC 4, or MUC 6. In only four cases, genetic analysis could be performed. Gain of chromosomes 7 and 17 was found in two cases; gain of 17 only was found in one case. Loss of heterozygosity of 3p was found in one case together with polysomy of chromosomes 7 and 17. No abnormalities of VHL, fumarate dehydrogenase, and TFE3 genes were detected. We conclude that PRCCM is a rare but challenging subtype of RCC that deserves to be further studied. In all the tumors, the mucin-like material was found in those stained with mucicarmin, but other conventional and immunohistochemical stains did not reveal consistent features of a single mucin. The molecular-genetic profile of these tumors was most consistent with that of typical papillary RCC, although one case had mixed genetic features of papillary and clear RCC. PRCCM has metastatic potential, as evidenced by

  20. Molecular Genetic Evidence for Genetic Overlap between General Cognitive Ability and Risk for Schizophrenia: A Report from the Cognitive Genomics Consortium (COGENT)

    PubMed Central

    Lencz, Todd; Knowles, Emma; Davies, Gail; Guha, Saurav; Liewald, David C; Starr, John M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Melle, Ingrid; Sundet, Kjetil; Christoforou, Andrea; Reinvang, Ivar; Mukherjee, Semanti; Lundervold, Astri; Steen, Vidar M.; John, Majnu; Espeseth, Thomas; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G; Giegling, Ina; Konte, Bettina; Ikeda, Masashi; Roussos, Panos; Giakoumaki, Stella; Burdick, Katherine E.; Payton, Antony; Ollier, William; Horan, Mike; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek; Corvin, Aiden; Gill, Michael; Pendleton, Neil; Iwata, Nakao; Darvasi, Ariel; Bitsios, Panos; Rujescu, Dan; Lahti, Jari; Hellard, Stephanie Le; Keller, Matthew C.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Deary, Ian J; Glahn, David C.; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that generalized deficits in cognitive ability represent a core component of schizophrenia, evident prior to full illness onset and independent of medication. The possibility of genetic overlap between risk for schizophrenia and cognitive phenotypes has been suggested by the presence of cognitive deficits in first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia; however, until recently, molecular genetic approaches to test this overlap have been lacking. Within the last few years, large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia have demonstrated that a substantial proportion of the heritability of the disorder is explained by a polygenic component consisting of many common SNPs of extremely small effect. Similar results have been reported in GWAS of general cognitive ability. The primary aim of the present study is to provide the first molecular genetic test of the classic endophenotype hypothesis, which states that alleles associated with reduced cognitive ability should also serve to increase risk for schizophrenia. We tested the endophenotype hypothesis by applying polygenic SNP scores derived from a large-scale cognitive GWAS meta-analysis (~5000 individuals from 9 non-clinical cohorts comprising the COGENT consortium) to four schizophrenia case-control cohorts. As predicted, cases had significantly lower cognitive polygenic scores compared to controls. In parallel, polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia were associated with lower general cognitive ability. Additionally, using our large cognitive meta-analytic dataset, we identified nominally significant cognitive associations for several SNPs that have previously been robustly associated with schizophrenia susceptibility. Results provide molecular confirmation of the genetic overlap between schizophrenia and general cognitive ability, and may provide additional insight into pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:24342994

  1. Rhabdoid glioblastoma is distinguishable from classical glioblastoma by cytogenetics and molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Sun-Ju; Cho, Hwa Jin; Baek, Hae Woon; Park, Chul-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hong; Kim, Se-Hoon; Kim, Hee Kyung; Park, Sung-Hye

    2014-03-01

    The clinicopathologic and molecular genetic features of 5 cases of rhabdoid glioblastoma, an extremely rare variant of glioblastoma that tends to affect patients at a young age, were investigated by immunohistochemical analysis and focused molecular genetic studies including array-based comparative genomic hybridization. All 5 cases had supratentorial tumors that immunohistochemical analysis revealed to be robustly positive for epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, p53, and PDGFRα (platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide) but only focally positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Although complete retention of SMARCB1 (INI1) was observed in all 5 cases, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) loss, homozygous deletion of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A, 1p/19q codeletion, and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132/IDH2 R172 mutation were not observed in any case, although a high level of EGFR polysomy was detected in 1 recurrent tumor. Although c-MET (MET protein) expression was focal but robustly positive in 3 cases, met proto-oncogene (MET) fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed low polysomy but not MET amplification. MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyl-40 transferase) methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed MGMT methylation in only 1 case. Furthermore, array-based comparative genomic hybridization revealed gain of chromosome 7 and loss of 1p, 6, 8p, 11, 13q, and 18q but no deletion of chromosome 22. In contrast to the classical subtype of primary glioblastoma, the cases studied here were characterized by the absence of EGFR amplification, PTEN loss, and 9p homozygous deletion and overexpression of p53, PDGFRα, and c-MET, suggesting that they can be classified as the proneural or mesenchymal subtype of glioblastoma and benefit from intensive therapy that includes temozolomide.

  2. Radiation mutagenesis from molecular and genetic points of view

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Park, M.S.; Okinaka, R.T.; Jaberaboansari, A.

    1993-01-01

    An important biological effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms is mutation induction. Mutation is also a primary event in the etiology of cancer. The chain events, from induction of DNA damage by ionizing radiation to processing of these damages by the cellular repair/replication machinery, that lead to mutation are not well understood. The development of quantitative methods for measuring mutation-induction, such as the HPRT system, in cultured mammalian cells has provided an estimate of the mutagenic effects of x- and [gamma]-rays as wen as of high LET radiation in both rodent and human cells. A major conclusion from these mutagenesis data is that high LET radiation induces mutations more efficiently than g-rays. Molecular analysis of mutations induced by sparsely ionizing radiation have detected major structural alterations at the gene level. Our molecular results based on analysis of human HPRT deficient mutants induced by [gamma]-rays, [alpha]-particles and high energy charged particles indicate that higher LET radiation induce more total and large deletion mutations than [gamma]-rays. Utilizing molecular techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Direct DNA sequencing, mutational spectra induced by ionizing radiation have been compared in different cell systems. Attempts have also been made to determine the mutagenic potential and the nature of mutation induced by low dose rate [gamma]-rays. Defective repair, in the form of either a diminished capability for repair or inaccurate repair, can lead to increased risk of heritable mutations from radiation exposure. Therefore, the effects of DNA repair deficiency on the mutation induction in mammalian cells is reviewed.

  3. Radiation mutagenesis from molecular and genetic points of view

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Park, M.S.; Okinaka, R.T.; Jaberaboansari, A.

    1993-02-01

    An important biological effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms is mutation induction. Mutation is also a primary event in the etiology of cancer. The chain events, from induction of DNA damage by ionizing radiation to processing of these damages by the cellular repair/replication machinery, that lead to mutation are not well understood. The development of quantitative methods for measuring mutation-induction, such as the HPRT system, in cultured mammalian cells has provided an estimate of the mutagenic effects of x- and {gamma}-rays as wen as of high LET radiation in both rodent and human cells. A major conclusion from these mutagenesis data is that high LET radiation induces mutations more efficiently than g-rays. Molecular analysis of mutations induced by sparsely ionizing radiation have detected major structural alterations at the gene level. Our molecular results based on analysis of human HPRT deficient mutants induced by {gamma}-rays, {alpha}-particles