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Sample records for molecular marker-based estimation

  1. Testing marker-based estimates of heritability in the wild.

    PubMed

    Coltman, David W

    2005-07-01

    Marker-based estimates of heritability are an attractive alternative to pedigree-based methods for estimating quantitative genetic parameters in field studies where it is difficult or impossible to determine relationships and pedigrees. Here I test the ability of the marker-based method to estimate heritability of a suite of traits in a wild population of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) using marker data from 32 microsatellite loci. I compared marker-based estimates with estimates obtained using a pedigree and the animal model. Marker-based estimates of heritability were imprecise and downwardly biased. The high degree of uncertainty in marker-based estimates suggests that the method may be sufficient to detect the presence of genetic variance for highly heritable traits, but not sufficiently reliable to estimate genetic parameters.

  2. Marker-Based Estimation of Genetic Parameters in Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiqiu; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2014-01-01

    Linear mixed model (LMM) analysis has been recently used extensively for estimating additive genetic variances and narrow-sense heritability in many genomic studies. While the LMM analysis is computationally less intensive than the Bayesian algorithms, it remains infeasible for large-scale genomic data sets. In this paper, we advocate the use of a statistical procedure known as symmetric differences squared (SDS) as it may serve as a viable alternative when the LMM methods have difficulty or fail to work with large datasets. The SDS procedure is a general and computationally simple method based only on the least squares regression analysis. We carry out computer simulations and empirical analyses to compare the SDS procedure with two commonly used LMM-based procedures. Our results show that the SDS method is not as good as the LMM methods for small data sets, but it becomes progressively better and can match well with the precision of estimation by the LMM methods for data sets with large sample sizes. Its major advantage is that with larger and larger samples, it continues to work with the increasing precision of estimation while the commonly used LMM methods are no longer able to work under our current typical computing capacity. Thus, these results suggest that the SDS method can serve as a viable alternative particularly when analyzing ‘big’ genomic data sets. PMID:25025305

  3. The use and abuse of genetic marker-based estimates of relatedness and inbreeding.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Helen R

    2015-08-01

    Genetic marker-based estimators remain a popular tool for measuring relatedness (r xy ) and inbreeding (F) coefficients at both the population and individual level. The performance of these estimators fluctuates with the number and variability of markers available, and the relatedness composition and demographic history of a population. Several methods are available to evaluate the reliability of the estimates of r xy and F, some of which are implemented in the program COANCESTRY. I used the simulation module in COANCESTRY since assess the performance of marker-based estimators of r xy and F in a species with very low genetic diversity, New Zealand's little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii). I also conducted a review of published papers that have used COANCESTRY as its release to assess whether and how the reliability of the estimates of r xy and F produced by genetic markers are being measured and reported in published studies. My simulation results show that even when the correlation between true (simulated) and estimated r xy or F is relatively high (Pearson's r = 0.66-0.72 and 0.81-0.85, respectively) the imprecision of the estimates renders them highly unreliable on an individual basis. The literature review demonstrates that the majority of studies do not report the reliability of marker-based estimates of r xy and F. There is currently no standard practice for selecting the best estimator for a given data set or reporting an estimator's performance. This could lead to experimental results being interpreted out of context and render the robustness of conclusions based on measures of r xy and F debatable.

  4. The use and abuse of genetic marker-based estimates of relatedness and inbreeding

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Helen R

    2015-01-01

    Genetic marker-based estimators remain a popular tool for measuring relatedness (rxy) and inbreeding (F) coefficients at both the population and individual level. The performance of these estimators fluctuates with the number and variability of markers available, and the relatedness composition and demographic history of a population. Several methods are available to evaluate the reliability of the estimates of rxy and F, some of which are implemented in the program COANCESTRY. I used the simulation module in COANCESTRY since assess the performance of marker-based estimators of rxy and F in a species with very low genetic diversity, New Zealand’s little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii). I also conducted a review of published papers that have used COANCESTRY as its release to assess whether and how the reliability of the estimates of rxy and F produced by genetic markers are being measured and reported in published studies. My simulation results show that even when the correlation between true (simulated) and estimated rxy or F is relatively high (Pearson’s r = 0.66–0.72 and 0.81–0.85, respectively) the imprecision of the estimates renders them highly unreliable on an individual basis. The literature review demonstrates that the majority of studies do not report the reliability of marker-based estimates of rxy and F. There is currently no standard practice for selecting the best estimator for a given data set or reporting an estimator’s performance. This could lead to experimental results being interpreted out of context and render the robustness of conclusions based on measures of rxy and F debatable. PMID:26357542

  5. Molecular marker-based prediction of hybrid performance in maize using unbalanced data from multiple experiments with factorial crosses.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Tobias A; Möhring, Jens; Maurer, Hans Peter; Dhillon, Baldev S; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Sørensen, Anker P; Frisch, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    In hybrid breeding, the prediction of hybrid performance (HP) is extremely important as it is difficult to evaluate inbred lines in numerous cross combinations. Recent developments such as doubled haploid production and molecular marker technologies have enhanced the prospects of marker-based HP prediction to accelerate the breeding process. Our objectives were to (1) predict HP using a combined analysis of hybrids and parental lines from a breeding program, (2) evaluate the use of molecular markers in addition to phenotypic and pedigree data, (3) evaluate the combination of line per se data with marker-based estimates, (4) study the effect of the number of tested parents, and (5) assess the advantage of haplotype blocks. An unbalanced dataset of 400 hybrids from 9 factorial crosses tested in different experiments and data of 79 inbred parents were subjected to combined analyses with a mixed linear model. Marker data of the inbreds were obtained with 20 AFLP primer-enzyme combinations. Cross-validation was used to assess the performance prediction of hybrids of which no or only one parental line was testcross evaluated. For HP prediction, the highest proportion of explained variance (R (2)), 46% for grain yield (GY) and 70% for grain dry matter content (GDMC), was obtained from line per se best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) estimates plus marker effects associated with mid-parent heterosis (TEAM-LM). Our study demonstrated that HP was efficiently predicted using molecular markers even for GY when testcross data of both parents are not available. This can help in improving greatly the efficiency of commercial hybrid breeding programs.

  6. A molecular marker-based linkage map of diploid bananas (Musa acuminata).

    PubMed

    Fauré, S; Noyer, J L; Horry, J P; Bakry, F; Lanaud, C; Gońzalez de León, D

    1993-12-01

    A partial molecular linkage map of the Musa acuminata diploid genome is presented. This map is based on 58 RFLP, four isozyme and 28 RAPD markers segregating in an F2 population of 92 individuals. A total of 90 loci was detected, 77 of which were placed on 15 linkage groups while 13 segregated independently. Segregation distortions were shown by 36% of all loci, mostly favoring the male parent. Chromosome structural rearrangements were believed to be one of the main causes of these distortions. The use of genetic linkage data to further the genetic and evolutionary knowledge of the genus Musa, as well as to help improve the design of breeding strategies, is discussed.

  7. A Molecular Marker-Based Linkage Map of Phaseolus Vulgaris L

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, C. E.; Sakiyama, N. S.; Chase, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    A seed and flower color marker (P), nine seed protein, nine isozyme and 224 restriction fragment length polymorphism marker loci were used to construct a linkage map of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L. (n = 11). The mapping population consisted of a backcross progeny between the Mesoamerican breeding line `XR-235-1-1' and the Andean cultivar `Calima'; the former was used as the recurrent parent. A bean PstI genomic library enriched for single copy sequences (95%) was the source of DNA probes. Sixty percent of the probes tested detected polymorphisms betwen the parental genotypes with at least one of the four restriction enzymes used here (DraI, EcoRI, EcoRV and HindIII). The computer software Mapmaker was used to determine the linkage relationships and linear order of segregating markers. These markers assorted into 11 linkage groups covering 960 cM of the bean genome. Partial linkage data were used to estimate the total length of the genome at 1200 cM. This estimate and that for the physical size of the genome yield an average ratio of 530 kb/cM. The relatively small size of the genome makes this crop species a good candidate for the isolation of genes via chromosome walking techniques. PMID:1352759

  8. A molecular marker-based linkage map of Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, C E; Sakiyama, N S; Chase, C D

    1992-07-01

    A seed and flower color marker (P), nine seed protein, nine isozyme and 224 restriction fragment length polymorphism marker loci were used to construct a linkage map of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L. (n = 11). The mapping population consisted of a backcross progeny between the Mesoamerican breeding line 'XR-235-1-1' and the Andean cultivar 'Calima'; the former was used as the recurrent parent. A bean PstI genomic library enriched for single copy sequences (95%) was the source of DNA probes. Sixty percent of the probes tested detected polymorphisms between the parental genotypes with at least one of the four restriction enzymes used here (DraI, EcoRI, EcoRV and HindIII). The computer software Mapmaker was used to determine the linkage relationships and linear order of segregating markers. These markers assorted into 11 linkage groups covering 960 cM of the bean genome. Partial linkage data were used to estimate the total length of the genome at 1200 cM. This estimate and that for the physical size of the genome yield an average ratio of 530 kb/cM. The relatively small size of the genome makes this crop species a good candidate for the isolation of genes via chromosome walking techniques.

  9. Construction of an SSR and RAD-Marker Based Molecular Linkage Map of Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich

    PubMed Central

    Chankaew, Sompong; Kaga, Akito; Naito, Ken; Ehara, Hiroshi; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich. (tuber cowpea) is an underutilized crop for consuming its tuber and mature seeds. Wild form of V. vexillata is a pan-tropical perennial herbaceous plant which has been used by local people as a food. Wild V. vexillata has also been considered as useful gene(s) source for V. unguiculata (cowpea), since it was reported to have various resistance gene(s) for insects and diseases of cowpea. To exploit the potential of V. vexillata, an SSR-based linkage map of V. vexillata was developed. A total of 874 SSR markers successfully amplified single DNA fragment in V. vexillata among 1,336 SSR markers developed from Vigna angularis (azuki bean), V. unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean). An F2 population of 300 plants derived from a cross between salt resistant (V1) and susceptible (V5) accessions was used for mapping. A genetic linkage map was constructed using 82 polymorphic SSR markers loci, which could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 511.5 cM in length with a mean distance of 7.2 cM between adjacent markers. To develop higher density molecular linkage map and to confirm SSR markers position in a linkage map, RAD markers were developed and a combined SSR and RAD markers linkage map of V. vexillata was constructed. A total of 559 (84 SSR and 475 RAD) markers loci could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 973.9 cM in length with a mean distance of 1.8 cM between adjacent markers. Linkage and genetic position of all SSR markers in an SSR linkage map were confirmed. When an SSR genetic linkage map of V. vexillata was compared with those of V. radiata and V. unguiculata, it was suggested that the structure of V. vexillata chromosome was considerably differentiated. This map is the first SSR and RAD marker-based V. vexillata linkage map which can be used for the mapping of useful traits. PMID:26398819

  10. Kalman smoothing improves the estimation of joint kinematics and kinetics in marker-based human gait analysis.

    PubMed

    De Groote, F; De Laet, T; Jonkers, I; De Schutter, J

    2008-12-05

    We developed a Kalman smoothing algorithm to improve estimates of joint kinematics from measured marker trajectories during motion analysis. Kalman smoothing estimates are based on complete marker trajectories. This is an improvement over other techniques, such as the global optimisation method (GOM), Kalman filtering, and local marker estimation (LME), where the estimate at each time instant is only based on part of the marker trajectories. We applied GOM, Kalman filtering, LME, and Kalman smoothing to marker trajectories from both simulated and experimental gait motion, to estimate the joint kinematics of a ten segment biomechanical model, with 21 degrees of freedom. Three simulated marker trajectories were studied: without errors, with instrumental errors, and with soft tissue artefacts (STA). Two modelling errors were studied: increased thigh length and hip centre dislocation. We calculated estimation errors from the known joint kinematics in the simulation study. Compared with other techniques, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint positions, by more than 50% for the simulated marker trajectories without errors and with instrumental errors. Compared with GOM, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint moments by more than 35%. Compared with Kalman filtering and LME, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint accelerations by at least 50%. Our simulation results show that the use of Kalman smoothing substantially improves the estimates of joint kinematics and kinetics compared with previously proposed techniques (GOM, Kalman filtering, and LME) for both simulated, with and without modelling errors, and experimentally measured gait motion.

  11. A general unified framework to assess the sampling variance of heritability estimates using pedigree or marker-based relationships.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Peter M; Goddard, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Heritability is a population parameter of importance in evolution, plant and animal breeding, and human medical genetics. It can be estimated using pedigree designs and, more recently, using relationships estimated from markers. We derive the sampling variance of the estimate of heritability for a wide range of experimental designs, assuming that estimation is by maximum likelihood and that the resemblance between relatives is solely due to additive genetic variation. We show that well-known results for balanced designs are special cases of a more general unified framework. For pedigree designs, the sampling variance is inversely proportional to the variance of relationship in the pedigree and it is proportional to 1/N, whereas for population samples it is approximately proportional to 1/N(2), where N is the sample size. Variation in relatedness is a key parameter in the quantification of the sampling variance of heritability. Consequently, the sampling variance is high for populations with large recent effective population size (e.g., humans) because this causes low variation in relationship. However, even using human population samples, low sampling variance is possible with high N.

  12. Pedigree- and marker-based methods in the estimation of genetic diversity in small groups of Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Engelsma, K A; Veerkamp, R F; Calus, M P L; Bijma, P; Windig, J J

    2012-06-01

    Genetic diversity is often evaluated using pedigree information. Currently, diversity can be evaluated in more detail over the genome based on large numbers of SNP markers. Pedigree- and SNP-based diversity were compared for two small related groups of Holstein animals genotyped with the 50 k SNP chip, genome-wide, per chromosome and for part of the genome examined. Diversity was estimated with coefficient of kinship (pedigree) and expected heterozygosity (SNP). SNP-based diversity at chromosome regions was determined using 5-Mb sliding windows, and significance of difference between groups was determined by bootstrapping. Both pedigree- and SNP-based diversity indicated more diversity in one of the groups; 26 of the 30 chromosomes showed significantly more diversity for the same group, as did 25.9% of the chromosome regions. Even in small populations that are genetically close, differences in diversity can be detected. Pedigree- and SNP-based diversity give comparable differences, but SNP-based diversity shows on which chromosome regions these differences are based. For maintaining diversity in a gene bank, SNP-based diversity gives a more detailed picture than pedigree-based diversity.

  13. Molecular marker-based genetic diversity analysis of scantly studied Brazilian accessions of a medicinal plant, Morinda citrifolia L. (noni).

    PubMed

    Bordallo, P N; Monteiro, A M R; Sousa, J A; Aragão, F A S

    2017-02-23

    Morinda citrifolia L., commonly known as noni, has been used for the treatment of various diseases for over two centuries. It was introduced and widely disseminated in Brazil because of its high market value and ease of adaptation to the soil and climatic conditions of the country. The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic variability of noni accessions from the collection of Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical in Brazil. We evaluated 36 plants of the 13 accessions of noni from the germplasm collection of M. citrifolia. Several methods of DNA extraction were tested. After definition of the method, the DNA of each sample was subjected to polymerase chain reactions using 20 random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. The band patterns on agarose gel were converted into a binary data matrix, which was used to estimate the genetic distances between the plants and to perform the cluster analyses. Of the total number of markers used in this study, 125 (81.1%) were polymorphic. The genetic distances between the genotypes ranged from 0.04 to 0.49. Regardless of the high number of polymorphic bands, the genetic variability of the noni plants evaluated was low since most of the genotypes belonged to the same cluster as shown by the dendrogram and Tocher's cluster analysis. The low genetic diversity among the studied noni individuals indicates that additional variability should be introduced in the germplasm collection of noni by gathering new individuals and/or by hybridizing contrasting individuals.

  14. Sensitivity and bias of molecular marker-based aerosol source apportionment models to small conltibutions of coal combustion soot.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Andrew P; Snyder, David C; Schauer, James J; DeMinter, Jeff; Shelton, Brandon

    2009-10-15

    Carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM25) collected in the midwestern United States revealed that soot emissions from incomplete coal combustion were important sources of several organic molecular markers used in source apportionment studies. Despite not constituting a major source of organic carbon in the PM25, coal soot was an important source of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, hopanes, and elemental carbon. These marker compounds are becoming widely used for source apportionment of atmospheric organic PM, meaning that significant emissions of these marker compounds from unaccounted sources such as coal soot could bias apportionment results. This concept was demonstrated using measurements of atmospheric PM collected on a 1-in-6 day schedule at three monitoring sites in Ohio: Mingo Junction (near Steubenville), Cincinnati, and Cleveland. Impacts of coal sootwere measured to be significant at Mingo Junction and small at Cleveland and Cincinnati. As a result, biases in apportionment results were substantial at Mingo Junction and insignificant at Cleveland and Cincinnati. Misapportionments of organic carbon mass at Mingo Junction were significant when coal soot was detected in the particulate samples as identified bythe presence of picene, but when coal soot was not included in the model: gasoline engines (+8% to +58% of OC), smoking engines (0% to -17% of OC), biomass combustion (+1% to +11% of OC), diesel engines (-1% to -2% of OC), natural gas combustion (0% to -2% of OC), and unapportioned OC (0% to -47% of OC). These results suggest that the role of coal soot in source apportionment studies needs to be better examined in many parts of the United States and other parts of the world.

  15. The estimation of genetic relationships using molecular markers and their efficiency in estimating heritability in natural populations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Stuart C

    2005-01-01

    Molecular marker data collected from natural populations allows information on genetic relationships to be established without referencing an exact pedigree. Numerous methods have been developed to exploit the marker data. These fall into two main categories: method of moment estimators and likelihood estimators. Method of moment estimators are essentially unbiased, but utilise weighting schemes that are only optimal if the analysed pair is unrelated. Thus, they differ in their efficiency at estimating parameters for different relationship categories. Likelihood estimators show smaller mean squared errors but are much more biased. Both types of estimator have been used in variance component analysis to estimate heritability. All marker-based heritability estimators require that adequate levels of the true relationship be present in the population of interest and that adequate amounts of informative marker data are available. I review the different approaches to relationship estimation, with particular attention to optimizing the use of this relationship information in subsequent variance component estimation. PMID:16048788

  16. Development of SCAR Markers Based on Improved RAPD Amplification Fragments and Molecular Cloning for Authentication of Herbal Medicines Angelica sinensis, Angelica acutiloba and Levisticum officinale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Mei, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Jingliang; He, Yin; Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Luo, Peiyi; Imani, Saber; Fu, Junjiang

    2015-10-01

    Molecular cloning from DNA fragments of improved RAPD amplification of Angelica sinensis, Angelica acutiloba and Levisticum officinale, provided novel sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers A13, A23, A1-34 and A1-0 whose sequences were deposited in the GenBank database with the accession numbers KP641315, KP641316, KP641317 and KP641318, respectively. By optional PCR amplification, the SCAR markers A13 and A23 are Levisticum officinale-specific, whereas the SCAR marker A1-34 is Angelica acutiloba-specific, and the SCAR marker A1-0 is Angelica sinensis-specific. These diagnostic SCAR markers may be useful for genetic authentications, for ecological conservation of all three medicinal plants and as a helpful tool for the genetic authentication of adulterant samples.

  17. Citrus (Rutaceae) SNP markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR; transferability across the Aurantioideae subfamily1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lor, Andres; Ancillo, Gema; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR (KASPar) were developed from sequences of three Citrus species. Their transferability was tested in 63 Citrus genotypes and 19 relative genera of the subfamily Aurantioideae to estimate the potential of SNP markers, selected from a limited intrageneric discovery panel, for ongoing broader diversity analysis at the intra- and intergeneric levels and systematic germplasm bank characterization. • Methods and Results: Forty-two SNP markers were developed using KASPar technology. Forty-one were successfully genotyped in all of the Citrus germplasm, where intra- and interspecific polymorphisms were observed. The transferability and diversity decreased with increasing taxonomic distance. • Conclusions: SNP markers based on the KASPar method developed from sequence data of a limited intrageneric discovery panel provide a valuable molecular resource for genetic diversity analysis of germplasm within a genus and should be useful for germplasm fingerprinting at a much broader diversity level. PMID:25202535

  18. Marker-Based Estimates Reveal Significant Non-additive Effects in Clonally Propagated Cassava (Manihot esculenta): Implications for the Prediction of Total Genetic Value and the Selection of Varieties.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Marnin D; Kulakow, Peter; Rabbi, Ismail Y; Jannink, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-31

    In clonally propagated crops, non-additive genetic effects can be effectively exploited by the identification of superior genetic individuals as varieties. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a clonally propagated staple food crop that feeds hundreds of millions. We quantified the amount and nature of non-additive genetic variation for three key traits in a breeding population of cassava from sub-Saharan Africa using additive and non-additive genome-wide marker-based relationship matrices. We then assessed the accuracy of genomic prediction for total (additive plus non-additive) genetic value. We confirmed previous findings based on diallel populations, that non-additive genetic variation is significant for key cassava traits. Specifically, we found that dominance is particularly important for root yield and epistasis contributes strongly to variation in CMD resistance. Further, we showed that total genetic value predicted observed phenotypes more accurately than additive only models for root yield but not for dry matter content, which is mostly additive or for CMD resistance, which has high narrow-sense heritability. We address the implication of these results for cassava breeding and put our work in the context of previous results in cassava, and other plant and animal species.

  19. Expression Marker-Based Strategy to Improve Beef Quality

    PubMed Central

    Cassar-Malek, Isabelle; Picard, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    For beef cattle research, a main objective is to control concomitantly the development of muscles and the qualities of beef cuts. Beef quality is a complex phenotype that is only detectable after slaughter and is highly variable. The beef industry is in need of tools to estimate beef quality of live cattle or online in abattoirs, with specific attention towards sensory attributes (tenderness, juiciness, flavour, and colour). Identification of relevant genetic and genomic markers is ongoing, especially for tenderness—a top priority quality attribute. In this paper, we describe the steps of an expression marker-based strategy to improve beef sensory quality, from the discovery of biomarkers that identify consistent beef and the biological functions governing beef tenderness to the integration of the knowledge into detection tests for desirable animals. These tools should soon be available for the management of sensory quality in the beef production chain for meeting market's demands and assuring good quality standards. PMID:27066527

  20. Evaluation of a Phylogenetic Marker Based on Genomic Segment B of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus: Facilitating a Feasible Incorporation of this Segment to the Molecular Epidemiology Studies for this Viral Agent

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pérez, Orlando; Dolz, Roser; Valle, Rosa; Perera, Carmen L.; Bertran, Kateri; Frías, Maria T.; Ganges, Llilianne; Díaz de Arce, Heidy; Majó, Natàlia; Núñez, José I.; Pérez, Lester J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is a highly contagious and acute viral disease, which has caused high mortality rates in birds and considerable economic losses in different parts of the world for more than two decades and it still represents a considerable threat to poultry. The current study was designed to rigorously measure the reliability of a phylogenetic marker included into segment B. This marker can facilitate molecular epidemiology studies, incorporating this segment of the viral genome, to better explain the links between emergence, spreading and maintenance of the very virulent IBD virus (vvIBDV) strains worldwide. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences of the segment B gene from IBDV strains isolated from diverse geographic locations were obtained from the GenBank Database; Cuban sequences were obtained in the current work. A phylogenetic marker named B-marker was assessed by different phylogenetic principles such as saturation of substitution, phylogenetic noise and high consistency. This last parameter is based on the ability of B-marker to reconstruct the same topology as the complete segment B of the viral genome. From the results obtained from B-marker, demographic history for both main lineages of IBDV regarding segment B was performed by Bayesian skyline plot analysis. Phylogenetic analysis for both segments of IBDV genome was also performed, revealing the presence of a natural reassortant strain with segment A from vvIBDV strains and segment B from non-vvIBDV strains within Cuban IBDV population. Conclusions/Significance This study contributes to a better understanding of the emergence of vvIBDV strains, describing molecular epidemiology of IBDV using the state-of-the-art methodology concerning phylogenetic reconstruction. This study also revealed the presence of a novel natural reassorted strain as possible manifest of change in the genetic structure and stability of the vvIBDV strains. Therefore, it highlights the need to obtain

  1. A phylogenomic and molecular markers based analysis of the phylum Chlamydiae: proposal to divide the class Chlamydiia into two orders, Chlamydiales and Parachlamydiales ord. nov., and emended description of the class Chlamydiia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S; Naushad, Sohail; Chokshi, Chirayu; Griffiths, Emma; Adeolu, Mobolaji

    2015-09-01

    The phylum Chlamydiae contains nine ecologically and genetically diverse families all placed within a single order. In this work, we have completed a comprehensive comparative analysis of 36 sequenced Chlamydiae genomes in order to identify shared molecular characteristics, namely conserved signature insertions/deletions (CSIs) and conserved signature proteins (CSPs), which can serve as distinguishing characteristics of supra-familial clusters within the phylum Chlamydiae. Our analysis has led to the identification of 32 CSIs which are specific to clusters within the phylum Chlamydiae at various phylogenetic depths. Importantly, 17 CSIs and 98 CSPs were found to be specific for the family Chlamydiaceae while another 3 CSI variants and 15 CSPs were specific for a grouping of the families Criblamydiaceae, Parachlamydiaceae, Simkaniaceae and Waddliaceae. These two clusters were also found to be distinguishable in 16S rRNA based phylogenetic trees, concatenated protein based phylogenetic trees, character compatibility based phylogenetic analyses, and on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identity and average amino acid identity values. On the basis of the identified molecular characteristics, branching in phylogenetic trees, and the genetic distance between the two clusters within the phylum Chlamydiae we propose a division of the class Chlamydiia into two orders: an emended order Chlamydiales, containing the family Chlamydiaceae and the closely related Candidatus family Clavichlamydiaceae, and the novel order Parachlamydiales ord. nov. containing the families Parachlamydiaceae, Simkaniaceae and Waddliaceae and the Candidatus families Criblamydiaceae, Parilichlamydiaceae, Piscichlamydiaceae, and Rhabdochlamydiaceae. We also include a brief discussion of the reunification of the genera Chlamydia and Chlamydophila.

  2. Prolonged decay of molecular rate estimates for metazoan mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary timescales can be estimated from genetic data using the molecular clock, often calibrated by fossil or geological evidence. However, estimates of molecular rates in mitochondrial DNA appear to scale negatively with the age of the clock calibration. Although such a pattern has been observed in a limited range of data sets, it has not been studied on a large scale in metazoans. In addition, there is uncertainty over the temporal extent of the time-dependent pattern in rate estimates. Here we present a meta-analysis of 239 rate estimates from metazoans, representing a range of timescales and taxonomic groups. We found evidence of time-dependent rates in both coding and non-coding mitochondrial markers, in every group of animals that we studied. The negative relationship between the estimated rate and time persisted across a much wider range of calibration times than previously suggested. This indicates that, over long time frames, purifying selection gives way to mutational saturation as the main driver of time-dependent biases in rate estimates. The results of our study stress the importance of accounting for time-dependent biases in estimating mitochondrial rates regardless of the timescale over which they are inferred. PMID:25780773

  3. Orientational order parameter estimated from molecular polarizabilities - an optical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha Kumari, J.; Datta Prasad, P. V.; Madhavi Latha, D.; Pisipati, V. G. K. M.

    2012-01-01

    An optical study of N-(p-n-alkyloxybenzylidene)-p-n-butyloxyanilines, nO.O4 compounds with the alkoxy chain number n = 1, 3, 6, 7, and 10 has been carried out by measuring the refractive indices using modified spectrometer and direct measurement of birefringence employing the Newton's rings method. Further, the molecular polarizability anisotropies are evaluated using Lippincott δ-function model, the molecular vibration method, Haller's extrapolation method, and scaling factor method. The molecular polarizabilities α e and α 0 are calculated using Vuk's isotropic and Neugebauer anisotropic local field models. The order parameter S is estimated by employing the molecular polarizability values determined from experimental refractive indices and density data and the polarizability anisotropy values. Further, the order parameter S is also obtained directly from the birefringence data. A comparison has been carried out among the order parameter obtained from different ways and the results are compared with the body of the data available in the literature.

  4. Advances in Time Estimation Methods for Molecular Data.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Hedges, S Blair

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dating has become central to placing a temporal dimension on the tree of life. Methods for estimating divergence times have been developed for over 50 years, beginning with the proposal of molecular clock in 1962. We categorize the chronological development of these methods into four generations based on the timing of their origin. In the first generation approaches (1960s-1980s), a strict molecular clock was assumed to date divergences. In the second generation approaches (1990s), the equality of evolutionary rates between species was first tested and then a strict molecular clock applied to estimate divergence times. The third generation approaches (since ∼2000) account for differences in evolutionary rates across the tree by using a statistical model, obviating the need to assume a clock or to test the equality of evolutionary rates among species. Bayesian methods in the third generation require a specific or uniform prior on the speciation-process and enable the inclusion of uncertainty in clock calibrations. The fourth generation approaches (since 2012) allow rates to vary from branch to branch, but do not need prior selection of a statistical model to describe the rate variation or the specification of speciation model. With high accuracy, comparable to Bayesian approaches, and speeds that are orders of magnitude faster, fourth generation methods are able to produce reliable timetrees of thousands of species using genome scale data. We found that early time estimates from second generation studies are similar to those of third and fourth generation studies, indicating that methodological advances have not fundamentally altered the timetree of life, but rather have facilitated time estimation by enabling the inclusion of more species. Nonetheless, we feel an urgent need for testing the accuracy and precision of third and fourth generation methods, including their robustness to misspecification of priors in the analysis of large phylogenies and data

  5. A molecular marker based linkage map of Vitis.

    PubMed

    Lodhi, M A; Daly, M J; Ye, G N; Weeden, N F; Reisch, B I

    1995-08-01

    Genetic linkage maps of Vitis (2n = 38) have been constructed from a single interspecific hybrid grape population (60 seedlings) of 'Cayuga White' X 'Aurore'. The maps were primarily based on 422 RAPD markers but also included 16 RFLP and isozyme markers. These maps had an average distance of 6.1 cM between markers and were developed using a double-pseudotestcross strategy. The 'Cayuga White' map had 214 markers covering 1196 cM and that of 'Aurore' spanned over 1477 cM with 225 markers. The 'Cayuga White' map consisted of 20 linkage groups, whereas 22 linkage groups comprised the 'Aurore' map. The number of groups reduced to 19, as in some instances two or more groups from one parent showed homology with a single group from the other parent on the basis of markers heterozygous in both parents. Each linkage group ranged in size from 14 to 135 cM in 'Aurore' and from 14 to 124 cM in 'Cayuga White'. These maps provide enough coverage of the genome to allow quantitative trait locus analysis and map-based gene cloning.

  6. Improved estimates of coordinate error for molecular replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Oeffner, Robert D.; Bunkóczi, Gábor; McCoy, Airlie J.; Read, Randy J.

    2013-11-01

    A function for estimating the effective root-mean-square deviation in coordinates between two proteins has been developed that depends on both the sequence identity and the size of the protein and is optimized for use with molecular replacement in Phaser. A top peak translation-function Z-score of over 8 is found to be a reliable metric of when molecular replacement has succeeded. The estimate of the root-mean-square deviation (r.m.s.d.) in coordinates between the model and the target is an essential parameter for calibrating likelihood functions for molecular replacement (MR). Good estimates of the r.m.s.d. lead to good estimates of the variance term in the likelihood functions, which increases signal to noise and hence success rates in the MR search. Phaser has hitherto used an estimate of the r.m.s.d. that only depends on the sequence identity between the model and target and which was not optimized for the MR likelihood functions. Variance-refinement functionality was added to Phaser to enable determination of the effective r.m.s.d. that optimized the log-likelihood gain (LLG) for a correct MR solution. Variance refinement was subsequently performed on a database of over 21 000 MR problems that sampled a range of sequence identities, protein sizes and protein fold classes. Success was monitored using the translation-function Z-score (TFZ), where a TFZ of 8 or over for the top peak was found to be a reliable indicator that MR had succeeded for these cases with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Good estimates of the r.m.s.d. are correlated with the sequence identity and the protein size. A new estimate of the r.m.s.d. that uses these two parameters in a function optimized to fit the mean of the refined variance is implemented in Phaser and improves MR outcomes. Perturbing the initial estimate of the r.m.s.d. from the mean of the distribution in steps of standard deviations of the distribution further increases MR success rates.

  7. Utilizing Ion-Mobility Data to Estimate Molecular Masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan; Kanik, Isik

    2008-01-01

    A method is being developed for utilizing readings of an ion-mobility spectrometer (IMS) to estimate molecular masses of ions that have passed through the spectrometer. The method involves the use of (1) some feature-based descriptors of structures of molecules of interest and (2) reduced ion mobilities calculated from IMS readings as inputs to (3) a neural network. This development is part of a larger effort to enable the use of IMSs as relatively inexpensive, robust, lightweight instruments to identify, via molecular masses, individual compounds or groups of compounds (especially organic compounds) that may be present in specific environments or samples. Potential applications include detection of organic molecules as signs of life on remote planets, modeling and detection of biochemicals of interest in the pharmaceutical and agricultural industries, and detection of chemical and biological hazards in industrial, homeland-security, and industrial settings.

  8. Estimating Arrhenius parameters using temperature programmed molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imandi, Venkataramana; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    Kinetic rates at different temperatures and the associated Arrhenius parameters, whenever Arrhenius law is obeyed, are efficiently estimated by applying maximum likelihood analysis to waiting times collected using the temperature programmed molecular dynamics method. When transitions involving many activated pathways are available in the dataset, their rates may be calculated using the same collection of waiting times. Arrhenius behaviour is ascertained by comparing rates at the sampled temperatures with ones from the Arrhenius expression. Three prototype systems with corrugated energy landscapes, namely, solvated alanine dipeptide, diffusion at the metal-solvent interphase, and lithium diffusion in silicon, are studied to highlight various aspects of the method. The method becomes particularly appealing when the Arrhenius parameters can be used to find rates at low temperatures where transitions are rare. Systematic coarse-graining of states can further extend the time scales accessible to the method. Good estimates for the rate parameters are obtained with 500-1000 waiting times.

  9. Genome-wide association study and marker-based selection for seed weight in soybean (Glycine max)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed weight (SW) is important for the yield and quality in food/vegetable uses of soybean (Glycine max), a worldwide major crop. However, our knowledge of genes controlling SW remains limited. To better understand the molecular mechanism of the trait and identify DNA markers usable in marker-based b...

  10. Biomimetic estimation of glucose using non-molecular and molecular imprinted polymer nanosponges.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Kiran; Tanwar, Yuveraj Singh; Shende, Pravin; Cavalli, Roberta

    2015-10-15

    The aim of the present work was to develop biomimetics for glucose estimation using molecularly and non-molecularly imprinted polymers of pyromellitic dianhydride crosslinked β-cyclodextrin based nanosponges. The ionic association of glucose phosphate to nanosponges by polymerization reaction and removal of glucose created molecular imprinted polymer (MIP)-nanosponges with affinity for glucose binding. Particle size, zeta potential, glucose binding studies and FTIR were used to characterize molecular and non-molecular imprinted polymer (NIP) nanosponges. Particle size of the nanosponges was found in the range of 450.81±5.33 nm to 550.63±8.14 nm with low polydispersity index. MIP-nanosponges retained a relatively large population of pores in the nano-range, while NIP was related to the nonporous materials with weak interaction and had poor tendency to aggregate. Nanosponges showed the variation in binding capacities and specificities; and also exhibited a similar degree of swelling. Moreover electrostatic force of attraction and cavities specific fitting of glucose in MIP-nanosponges might be due to advance selectivity and affinity for glucose. FTIR study showed glucose molecules might be entered into the selective binding cavities, which were created by the extraction of template molecules It is concluded that nanosized MIP-nanosponges have advantages over conventional NIP due to diffusion of template in the formed cavity as of its high surface area.

  11. Estimating ancestry and heterozygosity of hybrids using molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hybridization, genetic mixture of distinct populations, gives rise to myriad recombinant genotypes. Characterizing the genomic composition of hybrids is critical for studies of hybrid zone dynamics, inheritance of traits, and consequences of hybridization for evolution and conservation. Hybrid genomes are often summarized either by an estimate of the proportion of alleles coming from each ancestral population or classification into discrete categories like F1, F2, backcross, or merely “hybrid” vs. “pure”. In most cases, it is not realistic to classify individuals into the restricted set of classes produced in the first two generations of admixture. However, the continuous ancestry index misses an important dimension of the genotype. Joint consideration of ancestry together with interclass heterozygosity (proportion of loci with alleles from both ancestral populations) captures all of the information in the discrete classification without the unrealistic assumption that only two generations of admixture have transpired. Methods I describe a maximum likelihood method for joint estimation of ancestry and interclass heterozygosity. I present two worked examples illustrating the value of the approach for describing variation among hybrid populations and evaluating the validity of the assumption underlying discrete classification. Results Naively classifying natural hybrids into the standard six line cross categories can be misleading, and false classification can be a serious problem for datasets with few molecular markers. My analysis underscores previous work showing that many (50 or more) ancestry informative markers are needed to avoid erroneous classification. Conclusion Although classification of hybrids might often be misleading, valuable inferences can be obtained by focusing directly on distributions of ancestry and heterozygosity. Estimating and visualizing the joint distribution of ancestry and interclass heterozygosity is an effective way

  12. Estimation of tangential momentum accommodation coefficient using molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, George Wayne

    The Tangential Momentum Accommodation Coefficient (TMAC) is used to improve the accuracy of fluid flow calculations in the slip flow regime. Under such conditions the continuum assumption that a fluid velocity at a solid surface is equal to the surface velocity is inaccurate because relatively significant fluid "slip" occurs at the surface. In this work, Molecular Dynamics techniques are used to study the impacts of individual gas atoms upon solid surfaces to understand how approach velocity, crystal geometry and interatomic forces affect the scattering of the gas atoms, specifically from the perspective of tangential momentum. The gas - solid impacts were modeled using Lennard Jones potentials. Solid surfaces were modeled with approximately 3 atoms wide by 3 atoms deep by 40 or more atoms long. The crystal surface was modeled as a Face Centered Cubic (100). The gas was modeled as individual free gas atoms. Gas approach angles were varied from 10° to 70° from normal. Gas speed was either specified directly or by way of a ratio relationship with the Lennard-Jones energy potential (Energy Ratio). For each impact the initial and final tangential momenta were determined and after a series of many impacts, a value of TMAC was calculated for those conditions. The modeling was validated with available experimental data for He gas atoms at 1770 m/s impacting Cu over angles ranging from 10° to 70°. The model agreed within 3% of the experimental values and correctly predicted that the coefficient changes with angle of approach. Molecular Dynamics results estimate TMAC values from a high of 1.2 to a low of 0.25, generally estimating a higher coefficient at the smaller angles. TMAC values above 1.0 indicate backscattering, which has been experimentally observed in numerous instances. Increasing the Energy Ratio above a value of 5 tends to decrease the coefficient at all angles. Adsorbed layers atop a surface influence the coefficient similar to their Energy Ratio. The

  13. Measuring individual inbreeding in the age of genomics: marker-based measures are better than pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Kardos, M; Luikart, G; Allendorf, F W

    2015-07-01

    Inbreeding (mating between relatives) can dramatically reduce the fitness of offspring by causing parts of the genome to be identical by descent. Thus, measuring individual inbreeding is crucial for ecology, evolution and conservation biology. We used computer simulations to test whether the realized proportion of the genome that is identical by descent (IBDG) is predicted better by the pedigree inbreeding coefficient (FP) or by genomic (marker-based) measures of inbreeding. Genomic estimators of IBDG included the increase in individual homozygosity relative to mean Hardy-Weinberg expected homozygosity (FH), and two measures (FROH and FE) that use mapped genetic markers to estimate IBDG. IBDG was more strongly correlated with FH, FE and FROH than with FP across a broad range of simulated scenarios when thousands of SNPs were used. For example, IBDG was more strongly correlated with FROH, FH and FE (estimated with ⩾10 000 SNPs) than with FP (estimated with 20 generations of complete pedigree) in populations with a recent reduction in the effective populations size (from Ne=500 to Ne=75). FROH, FH and FE generally explained >90% of the variance in IBDG (among individuals) when 35 K or more SNPs were used. FP explained <80% of the variation in IBDG on average in all simulated scenarios, even when pedigrees included 20 generations. Our results demonstrate that IBDG can be more precisely estimated with large numbers of genetic markers than with pedigrees. We encourage researchers to adopt genomic marker-based measures of IBDG as thousands of loci can now be genotyped in any species.

  14. Parameter estimation method for improper fractional models and its application to molecular biological systems.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li-Ping; Liu, Lizhi; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Derived from biochemical principles, molecular biological systems can be described by a group of differential equations. Generally these differential equations contain fractional functions plus polynomials (which we call improper fractional model) as reaction rates. As a result, molecular biological systems are nonlinear in both parameters and states. It is well known that it is challenging to estimate parameters nonlinear in a model. However, in fractional functions both the denominator and numerator are linear in the parameters while polynomials are also linear in parameters. Based on this observation, we develop an iterative linear least squares method for estimating parameters in biological systems modeled by improper fractional functions. The basic idea is to transfer optimizing a nonlinear least squares objective function into iteratively solving a sequence of linear least squares problems. The developed method is applied to the estimation of parameters in a metabolism system. The simulation results show the superior performance of the proposed method for estimating parameters in such molecular biological systems.

  15. Methods for the quantitative comparison of molecular estimates of clade age and the fossil record.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Julia A; Boyd, Clint A

    2015-01-01

    Approaches quantifying the relative congruence, or incongruence, of molecular divergence estimates and the fossil record have been limited. Previously proposed methods are largely node specific, assessing incongruence at particular nodes for which both fossil data and molecular divergence estimates are available. These existing metrics, and other methods that quantify incongruence across topologies including entirely extinct clades, have so far not taken into account uncertainty surrounding both the divergence estimates and the ages of fossils. They have also treated molecular divergence estimates younger than previously assessed fossil minimum estimates of clade age as if they were the same as cases in which they were older. However, these cases are not the same. Recovered divergence dates younger than compared oldest known occurrences require prior hypotheses regarding the phylogenetic position of the compared fossil record and standard assumptions about the relative timing of morphological and molecular change to be incorrect. Older molecular dates, by contrast, are consistent with an incomplete fossil record and do not require prior assessments of the fossil record to be unreliable in some way. Here, we compare previous approaches and introduce two new descriptive metrics. Both metrics explicitly incorporate information on uncertainty by utilizing the 95% confidence intervals on estimated divergence dates and data on stratigraphic uncertainty concerning the age of the compared fossils. Metric scores are maximized when these ranges are overlapping. MDI (minimum divergence incongruence) discriminates between situations where molecular estimates are younger or older than known fossils reporting both absolute fit values and a number score for incompatible nodes. DIG range (divergence implied gap range) allows quantification of the minimum increase in implied missing fossil record induced by enforcing a given set of molecular-based estimates. These metrics are used

  16. Fossil calibrations and molecular divergence time estimates in centrarchid fishes (Teleostei: Centrarchidae).

    PubMed

    Near, Thomas J; Bolnick, Daniel I; Wainwright, Peter C

    2005-08-01

    Molecular clock methods allow biologists to estimate divergence times, which in turn play an important role in comparative studies of many evolutionary processes. It is well known that molecular age estimates can be biased by heterogeneity in rates of molecular evolution, but less attention has been paid to the issue of potentially erroneous fossil calibrations. In this study we estimate the timing of diversification in Centrarchidae, an endemic major lineage of the diverse North American freshwater fish fauna, through a new approach to fossil calibration and molecular evolutionary model selection. Given a completely resolved multi-gene molecular phylogeny and a set of multiple fossil-inferred age estimates, we tested for potentially erroneous fossil calibrations using a recently developed fossil cross-validation. We also used fossil information to guide the selection of the optimal molecular evolutionary model with a new fossil jackknife method in a fossil-based model cross-validation. The centrarchid phylogeny resulted from a mixed-model Bayesian strategy that included 14 separate data partitions sampled from three mtDNA and four nuclear genes. Ten of the 31 interspecific nodes in the centrarchid phylogeny were assigned a minimal age estimate from the centrarchid fossil record. Our analyses identified four fossil dates that were inconsistent with the other fossils, and we removed them from the molecular dating analysis. Using fossil-based model cross-validation to determine the optimal smoothing value in penalized likelihood analysis, and six mutually consistent fossil calibrations, the age of the most recent common ancestor of Centrarchidae was 33.59 million years ago (mya). Penalized likelihood analyses of individual data partitions all converged on a very similar age estimate for this node, indicating that rate heterogeneity among data partitions is not confounding our analyses. These results place the origin of the centrarchid radiation at a time of major

  17. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratios of regioisomers of 74 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using HPLC and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lequerella oil. The ratios of relative abundances of the fragment ions fr...

  18. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratios of regioisomers of 72 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lesquerella oil. The ratios of ion signal intensities (or relative abundances) of ...

  19. Estimation of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of a packed bed of 13X molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, R.K.; Kumar, S.

    1995-11-01

    Modeling and simulation of packed bed systems operating non-isothermally require sufficiently accurate knowledge of thermal transport properties.Effective thermal conductivity (k) of packed bed of molecular sieves is rarely reported. In this paper, dependence of k on temperature for a packed bed of 13X molecular sieves has been determined. An electrical heater embedded coaxially in the bed was used to heat it, and the radical temperature profiles thus obtained under transient conditions were utilized for estimation. The estimated relationship is k = 8.17635 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} + 10.915427 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}(T {minus} T{sub 0}). Statistical analysis of the estimated parameters has also been carried out. The deviations between experimental and predicted temperatures are less than 5%.

  20. A phylogenomic and molecular marker based proposal for the division of the genus Borrelia into two genera: the emended genus Borrelia containing only the members of the relapsing fever Borrelia, and the genus Borreliella gen. nov. containing the members of the Lyme disease Borrelia (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex).

    PubMed

    Adeolu, Mobolaji; Gupta, Radhey S

    2014-06-01

    The genus Borrelia contains two groups of organisms: the causative agents of Lyme disease and their relatives and the causative agents of relapsing fever and their relatives. These two groups are morphologically indistinguishable and are difficult to distinguish biochemically. In this work, we have carried out detailed comparative genomic analyses on protein sequences from 38 Borrelia genomes to identify molecular markers in the forms of conserved signature inserts/deletions (CSIs) that are specifically found in the Borrelia homologues, and conserved signature proteins (CSPs) which are uniquely present in Borrelia species. Our analyses have identified 31 CSIs and 82 CSPs that are uniquely shared by all sequenced Borrelia species, providing molecular markers for this group of organisms. In addition, our work has identified 7 CSIs and 21 CSPs which are uniquely found in the Lyme disease Borrelia species and eight CSIs and four CSPs that are specific for members of the relapsing fever Borrelia group. Additionally, 38 other CSIs, in proteins which are uniquely found in Borrelia species, also distinguish these two groups of Borrelia. The identified CSIs and CSPs provide novel and highly specific molecular markers for identification and distinguishing between the Lyme disease Borrelia and the relapsing fever Borrelia species. We also report the results of average nucleotide identity (ANI) analysis on Borrelia genomes and phylogenetic analysis for these species based upon 16S rRNA sequences and concatenated sequences for 25 conserved proteins. These analyses also support the distinctness of the two Borrelia clades. On the basis of the identified molecular markers, the results from ANI and phylogenetic studies, and the distinct pathogenicity profiles and arthropod vectors used by different Borrelia spp. for their transmission, we are proposing a division of the genus Borrelia into two separate genera: an emended genus Borrelia, containing the causative agents of relapsing

  1. A multilocus timescale for oomycete evolution estimated under three distinct molecular clock models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular clock methodologies allow for the estimation of divergence times across a variety of organisms; this can be particularly useful for groups lacking robust fossil histories, such as microbial eukaryotes with few distinguishing morphological traits. Here we have used a Bayesian molecular clock method under three distinct clock models to estimate divergence times within oomycetes, a group of fungal-like eukaryotes that are ubiquitous in the environment and include a number of devastating pathogenic species. The earliest fossil evidence for oomycetes comes from the Lower Devonian (~400 Ma), however the taxonomic affinities of these fossils are unclear. Results Complete genome sequences were used to identify orthologous proteins among oomycetes, diatoms, and a brown alga, with a focus on conserved regulators of gene expression such as DNA and histone modifiers and transcription factors. Our molecular clock estimates place the origin of oomycetes by at least the mid-Paleozoic (~430-400 Ma), with the divergence between two major lineages, the peronosporaleans and saprolegnialeans, in the early Mesozoic (~225-190 Ma). Divergence times estimated under the three clock models were similar, although only the strict and random local clock models produced reliable estimates for most parameters. Conclusions Our molecular timescale suggests that modern pathogenic oomycetes diverged well after the origin of their respective hosts, indicating that environmental conditions or perhaps horizontal gene transfer events, rather than host availability, may have driven lineage diversification. Our findings also suggest that the last common ancestor of oomycetes possessed a full complement of eukaryotic regulatory proteins, including those involved in histone modification, RNA interference, and tRNA and rRNA methylation; interestingly no match to canonical DNA methyltransferases could be identified in the oomycete genomes studied here. PMID:24884411

  2. Heterogeneous Rates of Molecular Evolution and Diversification Could Explain the Triassic Age Estimate for Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jeremy M; O'Meara, Brian C; Crane, Peter; Donoghue, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Dating analyses based on molecular data imply that crown angiosperms existed in the Triassic, long before their undisputed appearance in the fossil record in the Early Cretaceous. Following a re-analysis of the age of angiosperms using updated sequences and fossil calibrations, we use a series of simulations to explore the possibility that the older age estimates are a consequence of (i) major shifts in the rate of sequence evolution near the base of the angiosperms and/or (ii) the representative taxon sampling strategy employed in such studies. We show that both of these factors do tend to yield substantially older age estimates. These analyses do not prove that younger age estimates based on the fossil record are correct, but they do suggest caution in accepting the older age estimates obtained using current relaxed-clock methods. Although we have focused here on the angiosperms, we suspect that these results will shed light on dating discrepancies in other major clades.

  3. Comparison of mode estimation methods and application in molecular clock analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedges, S. Blair; Shah, Prachi

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Distributions of time estimates in molecular clock studies are sometimes skewed or contain outliers. In those cases, the mode is a better estimator of the overall time of divergence than the mean or median. However, different methods are available for estimating the mode. We compared these methods in simulations to determine their strengths and weaknesses and further assessed their performance when applied to real data sets from a molecular clock study. RESULTS: We found that the half-range mode and robust parametric mode methods have a lower bias than other mode methods under a diversity of conditions. However, the half-range mode suffers from a relatively high variance and the robust parametric mode is more susceptible to bias by outliers. We determined that bootstrapping reduces the variance of both mode estimators. Application of the different methods to real data sets yielded results that were concordant with the simulations. CONCLUSION: Because the half-range mode is a simple and fast method, and produced less bias overall in our simulations, we recommend the bootstrapped version of it as a general-purpose mode estimator and suggest a bootstrap method for obtaining the standard error and 95% confidence interval of the mode.

  4. The estimation of tumor cell percentage for molecular testing by pathologists is not accurate.

    PubMed

    Smits, Alexander J J; Kummer, J Alain; de Bruin, Peter C; Bol, Mijke; van den Tweel, Jan G; Seldenrijk, Kees A; Willems, Stefan M; Offerhaus, G Johan A; de Weger, Roel A; van Diest, Paul J; Vink, Aryan

    2014-02-01

    Molecular pathology is becoming more and more important in present day pathology. A major challenge for any molecular test is its ability to reliably detect mutations in samples consisting of mixtures of tumor cells and normal cells, especially when the tumor content is low. The minimum percentage of tumor cells required to detect genetic abnormalities is a major variable. Information on tumor cell percentage is essential for a correct interpretation of the result. In daily practice, the percentage of tumor cells is estimated by pathologists on hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained slides, the reliability of which has been questioned. This study aimed to determine the reliability of estimated tumor cell percentages in tissue samples by pathologists. On 47 H&E-stained slides of lung tumors a tumor area was marked. The percentage of tumor cells within this area was estimated independently by nine pathologists, using categories of 0-5%, 6-10%, 11-20%, 21-30%, and so on, until 91-100%. As gold standard, the percentage of tumor cells was counted manually. On average, the range between the lowest and the highest estimate per sample was 6.3 categories. In 33% of estimates, the deviation from the gold standard was at least three categories. The mean absolute deviation was 2.0 categories (range between observers 1.5-3.1 categories). There was a significant difference between the observers (P<0.001). If 20% of tumor cells were considered the lower limit to detect a mutation, samples with an insufficient tumor cell percentage (<20%) would have been estimated to contain enough tumor cells in 27/72 (38%) observations, possibly causing false negative results. In conclusion, estimates of tumor cell percentages on H&E-stained slides are not accurate, which could result in misinterpretation of test results. Reliability could possibly be improved by using a training set with feedback.

  5. Building Proteins in a Day: Efficient 3D Molecular Structure Estimation with Electron Cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Punjani, Ali; Brubaker, Marcus A; Fleet, David J

    2017-04-01

    Discovering the 3D atomic-resolution structure of molecules such as proteins and viruses is one of the foremost research problems in biology and medicine. Electron Cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) is a promising vision-based technique for structure estimation which attempts to reconstruct 3D atomic structures from a large set of 2D transmission electron microscope images. This paper presents a new Bayesian framework for cryo-EM structure estimation that builds on modern stochastic optimization techniques to allow one to scale to very large datasets. We also introduce a novel Monte-Carlo technique that reduces the cost of evaluating the objective function during optimization by over five orders of magnitude. The net result is an approach capable of estimating 3D molecular structure from large-scale datasets in about a day on a single CPU workstation.

  6. Characterization of the uncertainty of divergence time estimation under relaxed molecular clock models using multiple loci.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tianqi; Dos Reis, Mario; Yang, Ziheng

    2015-03-01

    Genetic sequence data provide information about the distances between species or branch lengths in a phylogeny, but not about the absolute divergence times or the evolutionary rates directly. Bayesian methods for dating species divergences estimate times and rates by assigning priors on them. In particular, the prior on times (node ages on the phylogeny) incorporates information in the fossil record to calibrate the molecular tree. Because times and rates are confounded, our posterior time estimates will not approach point values even if an infinite amount of sequence data are used in the analysis. In a previous study we developed a finite-sites theory to characterize the uncertainty in Bayesian divergence time estimation in analysis of large but finite sequence data sets under a strict molecular clock. As most modern clock dating analyses use more than one locus and are conducted under relaxed clock models, here we extend the theory to the case of relaxed clock analysis of data from multiple loci (site partitions). Uncertainty in posterior time estimates is partitioned into three sources: Sampling errors in the estimates of branch lengths in the tree for each locus due to limited sequence length, variation of substitution rates among lineages and among loci, and uncertainty in fossil calibrations. Using a simple but analogous estimation problem involving the multivariate normal distribution, we predict that as the number of loci ([Formula: see text]) goes to infinity, the variance in posterior time estimates decreases and approaches the infinite-data limit at the rate of 1/[Formula: see text], and the limit is independent of the number of sites in the sequence alignment. We then confirmed the predictions by using computer simulation on phylogenies of two or three species, and by analyzing a real genomic data set for six primate species. Our results suggest that with the fossil calibrations fixed, analyzing multiple loci or site partitions is the most effective way

  7. Integrating fossil preservation biases in the selection of calibrations for molecular divergence time estimation.

    PubMed

    Dornburg, Alex; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Oliver, Jeffrey C; Near, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    The selection of fossil data to use as calibration age priors in molecular divergence time estimates inherently links neontological methods with paleontological theory. However, few neontological studies have taken into account the possibility of a taphonomic bias in the fossil record when developing approaches to fossil calibration selection. The Sppil-Rongis effect may bias the first appearance of a lineage toward the recent causing most objective calibration selection approaches to erroneously exclude appropriate calibrations or to incorporate multiple calibrations that are too young to accurately represent the divergence times of target lineages. Using turtles as a case study, we develop a Bayesian extension to the fossil selection approach developed by Marshall (2008. A simple method for bracketing absolute divergence times on molecular phylogenies using multiple fossil calibrations points. Am. Nat. 171:726-742) that takes into account this taphonomic bias. Our method has the advantage of identifying calibrations that may bias age estimates to be too recent while incorporating uncertainty in phylogenetic parameter estimates such as tree topology and branch lengths. Additionally, this method is easily adapted to assess the consistency of potential calibrations to any one calibration in the candidate pool.

  8. Molecular and pedigree measures of relatedness provide similar estimates of inbreeding depression in a bottlenecked population.

    PubMed

    Townsend, S M; Jamieson, I G

    2013-04-01

    Individual-based estimates of the degree of inbreeding or parental relatedness from pedigrees provide a critical starting point for studies of inbreeding depression, but in practice wild pedigrees are difficult to obtain. Because inbreeding increases the proportion of genomewide loci that are identical by descent, inbreeding variation within populations has the potential to generate observable correlations between heterozygosity measured using molecular markers and a variety of fitness related traits. Termed heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs), these correlations have been observed in a wide variety of taxa. The difficulty of obtaining wild pedigree data, however, means that empirical investigations of how pedigree inbreeding influences HFCs are rare. Here, we assess evidence for inbreeding depression in three life-history traits (hatching and fledging success and juvenile survival) in an isolated population of Stewart Island robins using both pedigree- and molecular-derived measures of relatedness. We found results from the two measures were highly correlated and supported evidence for significant but weak inbreeding depression. However, standardized effect sizes for inbreeding depression based on the pedigree-based kin coefficients (k) were greater and had smaller standard errors than those based on molecular genetic measures of relatedness (RI), particularly for hatching and fledging success. Nevertheless, the results presented here support the use of molecular-based measures of relatedness in bottlenecked populations when information regarding inbreeding depression is desired but pedigree data on relatedness are unavailable.

  9. Semiempirical molecular orbital estimation of the relative stability of bianthryls produced by anthracene pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, J.A.; Mukherjee, J.; Wornat, M.J.; Sarofim, A.F.; Rutledge, G.C. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The pyrolysis of pure anthracene at temperatures between 1,200 and 1,500 K produced all six bianthryl isomers whose relative yields appear to be related to steric factors. To evaluate the hypothesis that thermodynamic factors govern the product distribution of bianthryls in this system, the relative enthalpies and entropies of biaryl isomers were estimated by molecular orbital modeling, using the semiempirical AM1 (Austin Model 1). Computational analysis of several isomer sets demonstrates that the relative stabilities of a large number of biaryl isomers are determined largely by steric interactions caused by structural features defined as bays, coves, and fjords. These steric factors affect both the degree of biaryl twist in the preferred conformation and the freedom of internal rotation. Molecular orbital modeling supports the hypothesis that a thermodynamic distribution of bianthryl isomers is produced by anthracene pyrolysis.

  10. Size and shape of soil humic acids estimated by viscosity and molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Kawahigashi, Masayuki; Sumida, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2005-04-15

    Ultrafiltration fractions of three soil humic acids were characterized by viscometry and high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) in order to estimate shapes and hydrodynamic sizes. Intrinsic viscosities under given solute/solvent/temperature conditions were obtained by extrapolating the concentration dependence of reduced viscosities to zero concentration. Molecular mass (weight average molecular weight (M (w)) and number average molecular weight (M (n))) and hydrodynamic radius (R(H)) were determined by HPSEC using pullulan as calibrant. Values of M (w) and M (n) ranged from 15 to 118 x 10(3) and from 9 to 50 x 10(3) (g mol(-1)), respectively. Polydispersity, as indicated by M (w)/M (n), increased with increasing filter size from 1.5 to 2.4. The hydrodynamic radii (R(H)) ranged between 2.2 and 6.4 nm. For each humic acid, M (w) and [eta] were related. Mark-Houwink coefficients calculated on the basis of the M (w)-[eta] relationships suggested restricted flexible chains for two of the humic acids and a branched structure for the third humic acid. Those structures probably behave as hydrated sphere colloids in a good solvent. Hydrodynamic radii of fractions calculated from [eta] using Einstein's equation, which is applicable to hydrated sphere colloids, ranged from 2.2 to 7.1 nm. These dimensions are fit to the size of nanospaces on and between clay minerals and micropores in soil particle aggregates. On the other hand, the good agreement of R(H) values obtained by applying Einstein's equation with those directly determined by HPSEC suggests that pullulan is a suitable calibrant for estimation of molecular mass and size of humic acids by HPSEC.

  11. Estimation of molecular diffusivity in aqueous solution of acetonitrile by the Wilke-Chang equation.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Kanji

    2011-10-01

    It was tried to estimate the molecular diffusivity (D(m)) of solutes in the mixtures of acetonitrile (ACN) and water by the Wilke-Chang equation. Although the information about association coefficient (α) is necessary for the calculation, it has never been proposed for ACN. The value of α was estimated as 1.37 from D(m) of benzene in ACN at 303 K experimentally measured by the peak parking method. The values of α, i.e. 2.6, 1.9, 1.5, and 1.0, which have respectively been proposed for four solvents, i.e. water, methanol, ethanol, and benzene, were correlated with two physico-chemical parameters of the solvents, i.e. solubility parameter and E(T) value. The α value for ACN was plotted around the two correlations, indicating its appropriateness. The values of D(m) calculated by the Wilke-Chang equation using the α value for ACN were compared with those measured by the peak parking method and the Aris-Taylor method in aqueous solutions of ACN. The mean square deviation of the estimation of D(m) was calculated as 8.8 and 14%. It was demonstrated that the Wilke-Chang equation can be used for estimating D(m) with a reasonable accuracy in the mixtures consisting of ACN and water.

  12. Multiscale Estimation of Binding Kinetics Using Brownian Dynamics, Molecular Dynamics and Milestoning

    PubMed Central

    Votapka, Lane W.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic rate constants of binding were estimated for four biochemically relevant molecular systems by a method that uses milestoning theory to combine Brownian dynamics simulations with more detailed molecular dynamics simulations. The rate constants found using this method agreed well with experimentally and theoretically obtained values. We predicted the association rate of a small charged molecule toward both a charged and an uncharged spherical receptor and verified the estimated value with Smoluchowski theory. We also calculated the kon rate constant for superoxide dismutase with its natural substrate, O2 −, in a validation of a previous experiment using similar methods but with a number of important improvements. We also calculated the kon for a new system: the N-terminal domain of Troponin C with its natural substrate Ca2+. The kon calculated for the latter two systems closely resemble experimentally obtained values. This novel multiscale approach is computationally cheaper and more parallelizable when compared to other methods of similar accuracy. We anticipate that this methodology will be useful for predicting kinetic rate constants and for understanding the process of binding between a small molecule and a protein receptor. PMID:26505480

  13. Estimation of Molecular Acidity via Electrostatic Potential at the Nucleus and Valence Natural Atomic Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shubin; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2009-01-01

    An effective approach of estimating molecular pKa values from simple density functional calculations is proposed in this work. Both the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) at the nucleus of the acidic atom and the sum of valence natural atomic orbitals are employed for three categories of compounds, amines and anilines, carbonyl acids and alcohols, and sulfonic acids and thiols. A strong correlation between experimental pKa values and each of these two quantities for each of the three categories has been discovered. Moreover, if the MEP is subtracted by the isolated atomic MEP for each category of compounds, we observe a single unique linear relationship between the resultant MEP difference and experimental pKa data of amines, anilines, carbonyl acids, alcohols, sulfonic acids, thiols, and their substituents. These results can generally be utilized to simultaneously estimate pKa values at multiple sites with a single calculation for either relatively small molecules in drug design or amino acids in proteins and macromolecules. PMID:19317439

  14. A Bayesian Target Predictor Method based on Molecular Pairing Energies estimation.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Antoni; Canals, Vincent; Rosselló, Josep L

    2017-03-06

    Virtual screening (VS) is applied in the early drug discovery phases for the quick inspection of huge molecular databases to identify those compounds that most likely bind to a given drug target. In this context, there is the necessity of the use of compact molecular models for database screening and precise target prediction in reasonable times. In this work we present a new compact energy-based model that is tested for its application to Virtual Screening and target prediction. The model can be used to quickly identify active compounds in huge databases based on the estimation of the molecule's pairing energies. The greatest molecular polar regions along with its geometrical distribution are considered by using a short set of smart energy vectors. The model is tested using similarity searches within the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD) database. The results obtained are considerably better than previously published models. As a Target prediction methodology we propose the use of a Bayesian Classifier that uses a combination of different active compounds to build an energy-dependent probability distribution function for each target.

  15. A Bayesian Target Predictor Method based on Molecular Pairing Energies estimation

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Antoni; Canals, Vincent; Rosselló, Josep L.

    2017-01-01

    Virtual screening (VS) is applied in the early drug discovery phases for the quick inspection of huge molecular databases to identify those compounds that most likely bind to a given drug target. In this context, there is the necessity of the use of compact molecular models for database screening and precise target prediction in reasonable times. In this work we present a new compact energy-based model that is tested for its application to Virtual Screening and target prediction. The model can be used to quickly identify active compounds in huge databases based on the estimation of the molecule’s pairing energies. The greatest molecular polar regions along with its geometrical distribution are considered by using a short set of smart energy vectors. The model is tested using similarity searches within the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD) database. The results obtained are considerably better than previously published models. As a Target prediction methodology we propose the use of a Bayesian Classifier that uses a combination of different active compounds to build an energy-dependent probability distribution function for each target. PMID:28263323

  16. A Bayesian Target Predictor Method based on Molecular Pairing Energies estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Antoni; Canals, Vincent; Rosselló, Josep L.

    2017-03-01

    Virtual screening (VS) is applied in the early drug discovery phases for the quick inspection of huge molecular databases to identify those compounds that most likely bind to a given drug target. In this context, there is the necessity of the use of compact molecular models for database screening and precise target prediction in reasonable times. In this work we present a new compact energy-based model that is tested for its application to Virtual Screening and target prediction. The model can be used to quickly identify active compounds in huge databases based on the estimation of the molecule’s pairing energies. The greatest molecular polar regions along with its geometrical distribution are considered by using a short set of smart energy vectors. The model is tested using similarity searches within the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD) database. The results obtained are considerably better than previously published models. As a Target prediction methodology we propose the use of a Bayesian Classifier that uses a combination of different active compounds to build an energy-dependent probability distribution function for each target.

  17. Bond length estimates for oxide crystals with a molecular power law expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.

    2015-07-01

    A molecular power law bond length regression expression, R(M-O) = 1.39( s/ r)-0.22, defined in terms of the quotient, s/ r, where s is the averaged Pauling bond strength for the bonded interaction comprising a given molecular coordination polyhedron and r is the periodic table row number for the M atom, serves to replicate the bulk of the 470 individual experimental M-O average bond lengths estimated with Shannon's (Acta Crystallogr A 32(5):751-767, 1976) crystal radii for oxides to within 0.10 Å. The success of the molecular expression is ascribed to a one-to-one deep-seated connection that obtains between the electron density accumulated between bonded pairs of atoms and the average Pauling bond strength. It also implies that the bonded interactions that constitute oxide crystals are governed in large part by local forces. Although the expression reproduces the bond lengths involving rare earth atoms typically to within ~0.05 Å, it does not reproduce the lanthanide ionic radius contraction. It also fails to reproduce the experimental bond lengths for selected transition cations like Cu1+, Ag1+ and VILSFe2+ and for cations like IVK+, VIBa2+ and IIU6+.

  18. Molecular marker based characterization and genetic diversity of wheat genotypes in relation to boron efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron deficient soils pose a critical problem to wheat production in many areas of the world including Bangladesh and causes significant yield reduction. Therefore, in the present study, 21 diverse wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes collected from three different countries (Bangladesh, India, a...

  19. Molecular characterization and marker based chemotaxonomic studies of Podophyllum hexandrum Royle.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Phalisteen; Shawl, A S; Rehman, Suriya; Ahmed, S Fayaz; Ramteke, P W

    2010-06-01

    Detailed chemical studies and RAPD analysis were done in different populations of Podophyllum hexandrum collected from high altitude regions of North Western Himalayas. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis revealed a high degree of genetic diversity among the 12 collected accessions, attributed to their geographical and climatic conditions. HPLC analysis also revealed variation in the concentration of two major marker compounds which lead to the identification of a chemotype. The study demonstrated that RAPD and chemical markers are very useful tools to compare the genetic relationship and pattern of variation among such prioritized and endangered medicinal plants.

  20. A new estimation of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen budget using atmospheric observations and variational inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yver, C.; Pison, I.; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Schmidt, M.; Bousquet, P.; Ramonet, M.; Jordan, A.; Søvde, A.; Engel, A.; Fisher, R.; Lowry, D.; Nisbet, E.; Levin, I.; Hammer, S.; Necki, J.; Bartyzel, J.; Reimann, S.; Vollmer, M. K.; Steinbacher, M.; Aalto, T.; Maione, M.; Arduini, I.; O'Doherty, S.; Grant, A.; Sturges, W.; Lunder, C. R.; Privalov, V.; Paramonova, N.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen (H2) budget with a particular focus on soil uptake and surface emissions. A variational inversion scheme is combined with observations from the RAMCES and EUROHYDROS atmospheric networks, which include continuous measurements performed between mid-2006 and mid-2009. Net H2 surface flux, soil uptake distinct from surface emissions and finally, soil uptake, biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions and N2 fixation-related emissions separately were inverted in several scenarios. The various inversions generate an estimate for each term of the H2 budget. The net H2 flux per region (High Northern Hemisphere, Tropics and High Southern Hemisphere) varies between -8 and 8 Tg yr-1. The best inversion in terms of fit to the observations combines updated prior surface emissions and a soil deposition velocity map that is based on soil uptake measurements. Our estimate of global H2 soil uptake is -59 ± 4.0 Tg yr-1. Forty per cent of this uptake is located in the High Northern Hemisphere and 55% is located in the Tropics. In terms of surface emissions, seasonality is mainly driven by biomass burning emissions. The inferred European anthropogenic emissions are consistent with independent H2 emissions estimated using a H2/CO mass ratio of 0.034 and CO emissions considering their respective uncertainties. To constrain a more robust partition of H2 sources and sinks would need additional constraints, such as isotopic measurements.

  1. A new estimation of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen budget using atmospheric observations and variational inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yver, C. E.; Pison, I. C.; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Schmidt, M.; Chevallier, F.; Ramonet, M.; Jordan, A.; Søvde, O. A.; Engel, A.; Fisher, R. E.; Lowry, D.; Nisbet, E. G.; Levin, I.; Hammer, S.; Necki, J.; Bartyzel, J.; Reimann, S.; Vollmer, M. K.; Steinbacher, M.; Aalto, T.; Maione, M.; Arduini, J.; O'Doherty, S.; Grant, A.; Sturges, W. T.; Forster, G. L.; Lunder, C. R.; Privalov, V.; Paramonova, N.; Werner, A.; Bousquet, P.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen (H2) budget with a particular focus on soil uptake and European surface emissions. A variational inversion scheme is combined with observations from the RAMCES and EUROHYDROS atmospheric networks, which include continuous measurements performed between mid-2006 and mid-2009. Net H2 surface flux, then deposition velocity and surface emissions and finally, deposition velocity, biomass burning, anthropogenic and N2 fixation-related emissions were simultaneously inverted in several scenarios. These scenarios have focused on the sensibility of the soil uptake value to different spatio-temporal distributions. The range of variations of these diverse inversion sets generate an estimate of the uncertainty for each term of the H2 budget. The net H2 flux per region (High Northern Hemisphere, Tropics and High Southern Hemisphere) varies between -8 and +8 Tg yr-1. The best inversion in terms of fit to the observations combines updated prior surface emissions and a soil deposition velocity map that is based on bottom-up and top-down estimations. Our estimate of global H2 soil uptake is -59±9 Tg yr-1. Forty per cent of this uptake is located in the High Northern Hemisphere and 55% is located in the Tropics. In terms of surface emissions, seasonality is mainly driven by biomass burning emissions. The inferred European anthropogenic emissions are consistent with independent H2 emissions estimated using a H2/CO mass ratio of 0.034 and CO emissions within the range of their respective uncertainties. Additional constraints, such as isotopic measurements would be needed to infer a more robust partition of H2 sources and sinks.

  2. Molecular phylogeny, divergence time estimates and historical biogeography within one of the world's largest monocot genera

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin-Qin; Zhou, Song-Dong; Huang, De-Qing; He, Xing-Jin; Wei, Xian-Qin

    2016-01-01

    A primary aim of historical biogeography is to identify the causal factors or processes that have shaped the composition and distribution of biotas over time. Another is to infer the evolution of geographic ranges of species and clades in a phylogenetic context. To this end, historical biogeography addresses important questions such as: Where were ancestors distributed? Where did lineages originate? Which processes cause geographic ranges to evolve through time? Allium subgenus Anguinum comprises approximately twelve taxa with a disjunct distribution in the high mountains from south-western Europe to eastern Asia and in northeastern North America. Although both the systematic position and the geographical limits of Anguinum have been identified, to date no molecular systematic study has been performed utilizing a comprehensive sampling of these species. With an emphasis on the Anguinum eastern Asian geographical group, the goals of the present study were: (i) to infer species-level phylogenetic relationships within Anguinum, (ii) to assess molecular divergence and estimated the times of the major splits in Anguinum and (iii) to trace the biogeographic history of the subgenus. Four DNA sequences (ITS, matK, trnH-psbA, rps16) were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of Allium subgen. Anguinum. RbcL sequences were used to estimate divergences time for Allium, and sequences of ITS were used to estimate the divergence times for Anguinum and its main lineages and to provide implications for the evolutionary history of the subgenus. Phylogenetic analyses for all Allium corroborate that Anguinum is monophyletic and indicate that Anguinum is composed of two sister groups: one with a Eurasian–American distribution, and the other restricted to eastern Asia. In the eastern Asian geographical group, incongruence between gene trees and morphology-based taxonomies was recovered as was incongruence between data from plastid and nuclear sequences. This incongruence is likely due to

  3. The Theoretical Estimation of the Bioluminescent Efficiency of the Firefly via a Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ling; Lan, Zhenggang; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2015-02-05

    The firefly is famous for its high bioluminescent efficiency, which has attracted both scientific and public attention. The chemical origin of firefly bioluminescence is the thermolysis of the firefly dioxetanone anion (FDO(-)). Although considerable theoretical research has been conducted, and several mechanisms were proposed to elucidate the high efficiency of the chemi- and bioluminescence of FDO(-), there is a lack of direct experimental and theoretical evidence. For the first time, we performed a nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation on the chemiluminescent decomposition of FDO(-) under the framework of the trajectory surface hopping (TSH) method and theoretically estimated the chemiluminescent quantum yield. The TSH simulation reproduced the gradually reversible charge-transfer initiated luminescence mechanism proposed in our previous study. More importantly, the current study, for the first time, predicted the bioluminescence efficiency of the firefly from a theoretical viewpoint, and the theoretical prediction efficiency is in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  4. Molecular estimation of eulipotyphlan divergence times and the evolution of "Insectivora".

    PubMed

    Douady, Christophe J; Douzery, Emmanuel J P

    2003-08-01

    "Insectivores" are one of the key groups in understanding mammalian origins. For years, systematics of "Lipotyphla" taxa remained extremely unstable and challenged. Today, with the application of molecular techniques, "Lipotyphla" appears to be a paraphyletic assemblage that encompasses hedgehogs, shrews, and moles (i.e., Eulipotyphla-a member of Laurasiatheria), and golden moles and tenrecs (i.e., Afrosoricida-a member of Afrotheria). Based on nuclear genes and on this well-established phylogenetic framework, we estimated Bayesian relaxed molecular clock divergence times among major lineages of "Lipotyphla." Crown placental mammals are shown to diversify 102+/-6 million years ago (Mya; mean+/-one standard-deviation), followed by Boreoeutheria (94+/-6 Mya), Laurasiatheria (85+/-5 Mya), and Eulipotyphla (73+/-5), with moles separating from hedgehogs+shrews just at the K/T boundary (65+/-5 Mya). During the Early and Middle Eocene, all extant eulipotyphlan subfamilies originated: Uropsilinae (52+/-5 Mya), and Desmaninae, Talpinae, Erinaceinae, Hylomyinae, Soricinae, and Crocidurinae (38-42+/-5 Mya). Afrosoricida separated from Macroscelidae 69+/-5 Mya, golden moles from tenrecs 63+/-5 Mya, and the diversification within tenrecs occurred 43+/-5 Mya. Divergence times are shown to be in reasonably good agreement with the fossil record of eulipotyphlans, but not with the one of afrosoricid "insectivores." Eulipotyphlans diversification might have been sculpted by variations in paleoclimates of the cenozoic era.

  5. Direct estimation of entropy loss due to reduced translational and rotational motions upon molecular binding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Benzhuo; Wong, Chung F

    2005-12-05

    The entropic cost due to the loss of translational and rotational (T-R) degree of freedom upon binding has been well recognized for several decades. Tightly bound ligands have higher entropic costs than loosely bound ligands. Quantifying the ligand's residual T-R motions after binding, however, is not an easy task. We describe an approach that uses a reduced Hessian matrix to estimate the contributions due to translational and rotational degrees of freedom to entropy change upon molecular binding. The calculations use a harmonic model for the bound state but only include the T-R degrees of freedom. This approximation significantly speeds up entropy calculations because only 6 x 6 matrices need to be treated, which makes it easier to be used in computer-aided drug design for studying many ligands. The methodological connection with other methods is discussed as well. We tested this approximation by applying it to study the binding of ATP, peptide inhibitor (PKI), and several bound water molecules to protein kinase A (PKA). These ligands span a wide range in size. The model gave reasonable estimates of the residual T-R entropy of bound ligands or water molecules. The residual T-R entropy demonstrated a wide range of values, e.g., 4 to 16 cal/K.mol for the bound water molecules of PKA.

  6. Marker-Based Hierarchical Segmentation and Classification Approach for Hyperspectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Tilton, James C.; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    The Hierarchical SEGmentation (HSEG) algorithm, which is a combination of hierarchical step-wise optimization and spectral clustering, has given good performances for hyperspectral image analysis. This technique produces at its output a hierarchical set of image segmentations. The automated selection of a single segmentation level is often necessary. We propose and investigate the use of automatically selected markers for this purpose. In this paper, a novel Marker-based HSEG (M-HSEG) method for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. First, pixelwise classification is performed and the most reliably classified pixels are selected as markers, with the corresponding class labels. Then, a novel constrained marker-based HSEG algorithm is applied, resulting in a spectral-spatial classification map. The experimental results show that the proposed approach yields accurate segmentation and classification maps, and thus is attractive for hyperspectral image analysis.

  7. [Authorization of pathologists for the estimation of the tumor cell percentage on tissue sample for molecular analysis purpose].

    PubMed

    Luquain, Alexandra; Arbez-Gindre, Francine; Bedgedjian, Isabelle; Felix, Sophie; Harimenshi, Jean-Marie; Mihai, Ionela-Marcela; Monnien, Franck; Singeorzan, Cristina; Valmary-Degano, Séverine

    2016-08-01

    Before molecular analysis is performed, morphological control with an estimation of the tumour cell percentage (%TC) could have a major impact on mutation detection. Accreditation according to NF EN ISO 15189 commands an authorization through evaluation of skills. The objective of this work was to validate the empowerment of pathologists to estimate %TC in tissue sample prior to molecular analysis. The accreditation technical guidance methods in Medical biology and histopathology were taken as references. %TC was the ratio of tumour cell nuclei on all nuclei within the area selected for the DNA extraction. External evaluations quality scores were used for accuracy. In order to assess the intermediate precision, 35 %TC estimation were performed 15 days apart in 4 samples (biopsies, transparietal biopsies or surgical specimen, either fixed or frozen) by 7 pathologists. Three other cases with interference (inflammation, mucus, necrosis) were evaluated. A result was satisfactory if %TC were within ±20 % of expected percentage obtained by the average of 35 estimates. The performances were satisfactory since no estimate was made more than 20 % of the expected percentage. Low interpathologists reproducibility has been reported in the literature and can have a consequence on molecular analysis in samples with low %TC, where the value reach the analytical sensitivity thresholds of molecular techniques. The current report is an example of a step of the accreditation process, which is a challenge for pathologists' activity in the future.

  8. Cherenkov radiation fluence estimates in tissue for molecular imaging and therapy applications

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Adam K.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    Cherenkov radiation has recently emerged as an interesting phenomenon for a number of applications in the biomedical sciences. Its unique properties, including broadband emission spectrum, spectral weight in the ultraviolet and blue wavebands, and local generation of light within a given tissue, have made it an attractive new source of light within tissue for molecular imaging and phototherapy applications. While several studies have investigated the total Cherenkov light yield from radionuclides in units of [photons/decay], further consideration of the light propagation in tissue is necessary to fully consider the utility of this signal in vivo. Therefore, to help further guide the development of this novel field, quantitative estimates of the light fluence rate of Cherenkov radiation from both radionuclides and radiotherapy beams in a biological tissue are presented for the first time. Using Monte Carlo simulations, these values were found to be on the order of 0.01 – 1 nW/cm2 per MBq/g for radionuclides, and 1 – 100 µW/cm2 per Gy/sec for external radiotherapy beams, dependent on the given waveband, optical properties, and radiation source. For phototherapy applications, the total light fluence was found to be on the order of nJ/cm2 for radionuclides, and mJ/cm2 for radiotherapy beams. The results indicate that diagnostic potential is reasonable for Cherenkov excitation of molecular probes, but phototherapy may remain elusive at such exceedingly low fluence values. The simulation tools of this study are available upon request. PMID:26270125

  9. Estimating the Phanerozoic history of the Ascomycota lineages: combining fossil and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Beimforde, Christina; Feldberg, Kathrin; Nylinder, Stephan; Rikkinen, Jouko; Tuovila, Hanna; Dörfelt, Heinrich; Gube, Matthias; Jackson, Daniel J; Reitner, Joachim; Seyfullah, Leyla J; Schmidt, Alexander R

    2014-09-01

    The phylum Ascomycota is by far the largest group in the fungal kingdom. Ecologically important mutualistic associations such as mycorrhizae and lichens have evolved in this group, which are regarded as key innovations that supported the evolution of land plants. Only a few attempts have been made to date the origin of Ascomycota lineages by using molecular clock methods, which is primarily due to the lack of satisfactory fossil calibration data. For this reason we have evaluated all of the oldest available ascomycete fossils from amber (Albian to Miocene) and chert (Devonian and Maastrichtian). The fossils represent five major ascomycete classes (Coniocybomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Laboulbeniomycetes, and Lecanoromycetes). We have assembled a multi-gene data set (18SrDNA, 28SrDNA, RPB1 and RPB2) from a total of 145 taxa representing most groups of the Ascomycota and utilized fossil calibration points solely from within the ascomycetes to estimate divergence times of Ascomycota lineages with a Bayesian approach. Our results suggest an initial diversification of the Pezizomycotina in the Ordovician, followed by repeated splits of lineages throughout the Phanerozoic, and indicate that this continuous diversification was unaffected by mass extinctions. We suggest that the ecological diversity within each lineage ensured that at least some taxa of each group were able to survive global crises and rapidly recovered.

  10. Contribution of molecular analyses to the estimation of the risk of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cobo, A M; Poza, J J; Martorell, L; López de Munain, A; Emparanza, J I; Baiget, M

    1995-02-01

    A molecular analysis of the maternal and child CTG repeat size and intergenerational amplification was performed in order to estimate the risk of having a child with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CMD). In a study of 124 affected mother-child pairs (42 mother-CMD and 82 mother-non-CMD) the mean maternal CTG allele in CMD cases was three times higher (700 repeats) than in non-CMD cases (236 repeats). When the maternal allele was in the 50-300 repeats range, 90% of children were non-CMD. In contrast, when the maternal allele was greater than 300 repeats, 59% inherited the congenital form. Furthermore, the risk of having a CMD child is also related to the intergenerational amplification, which was significantly greater in the mother-CMD pairs than in the mother-non-CMD pairs. Although the risk of giving birth to a CMD child always exists for affected mothers, our data show that such a risk is considerably higher if the maternal allele is greater than 300 repeats.

  11. SEEKR: Simulation Enabled Estimation of Kinetic Rates, A Computational Tool to Estimate Molecular Kinetics and Its Application to Trypsin-Benzamidine Binding.

    PubMed

    Votapka, Lane W; Jagger, Benjamin R; Heyneman, Alexandra L; Amaro, Rommie E

    2017-03-03

    We present the Simulation Enabled Estimation of Kinetic Rates (SEEKR) package, a suite of open-source scripts and tools designed to enable researchers to perform multiscale computation of the kinetics of molecular binding, unbinding, and transport using a combination of molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, and milestoning theory. To demonstrate its utility, we compute the kon, koff, and ΔGbind for the protein trypsin with its noncovalent binder, benzamidine, and examine the kinetics and other results generated in the context of the new software, and compare our findings to previous studies performed on the same system. We compute a kon estimate of (2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), a koff estimate of 83 ± 14 s(-1), and a ΔGbind of -7.4 ± 0.1 kcal·mol(-1), all of which compare closely to the experimentally measured values of 2.9 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), 600 ± 300 s(-1), and -6.71 ± 0.05 kcal·mol(-1), respectively.

  12. Molecular size of the Na+-H+ antiport in renal brush border membranes, as estimated by radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Beliveau, R.; Demeule, M.; Potier, M.

    1988-04-15

    The radiation inactivation method was applied to brush border membrane vesicles from rat kidney, in order to estimate the molecular size of the Na+-H+ antiporter. Sodium influx (1mM) driven by an acid intravesicular pH was unaffected by the high osmolarity of the cryoprotective solution. Initial rate of influx was estimated by linear regression performed on the first 10 seconds of transport: 0.512 pmol/micrograms protein/s. There was no binding component involved. Incubation performed in the presence of 1 mM amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na+-H+ antiport gave an initial rate of only 0.071 pmol/microgram/s, an 82% inhibition. Membrane vesicles were irradiated at -78 degrees C in a Gammacel Model 220. Sodium influx was reduced, as the dose of radiation increased, but the influx remained linear for the period of time (10s) during which the initial rate was estimated, indicating no alteration of the proton driving force during this time period. Amiloride-insensitive flux remained totally unaffected by the radiation dose, indicating that the passive permeability of the membrane towards sodium was unaffected. The amiloride-sensitive pathway presented a monoexponential profile of inactivation, allowing the molecular size to be estimated at 321 kDa. Based on DCCD-binding studies suggesting the molecular size of the monomer to be around 65 kDa for rat kidney, our results suggest that the functional transporter in the membrane to be a multimer.

  13. Dynamic stability margin using a marker based system and Tekscan: a comparison of four gait conditions.

    PubMed

    Lugade, Vipul; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-01-01

    Stability during gait is maintained through control of the center of mass (CoM) position and velocity in relation to the base of support (BoS). The dynamic stability margin, or the interaction of the extrapolated center of mass with the closest boundary of the BoS, can reveal possible control errors during gait. The purpose of this study was to investigate a marker based method for defining the BoS, and compare the dynamic stability margin throughout gait in comparison to a BoS defined from foot pressure sensors. The root mean squared difference between these two methodologies ranged from 0.9 cm to 3.5 cm, when walking under four conditions: plantigrade, equinus, everted, and inverted. As the stability margin approaches -35 cm prior to contralateral heel strike, there was approximately 90% agreement between the two systems at this time point. Underestimation of the marker based dynamic stability margin or overestimation of the pressure based dynamic stability margin was due to inaccuracies in defining the medial boundary of the BoS. Overall, care must be taken to ensure similar definitions of the BoS are utilized when comparing the dynamic stability margin between participants and gait conditions.

  14. Marker based watershed to segment dim infrared target through image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fugen; Bai, Xiangzhi; Xie, Yongchun; Jin, Ting

    2008-10-01

    A novel marker based watershed through image enhancement is proposed to segment the dim infrared target. The dim infrared target is firstly enhanced by CB top-hat transformation and image quantization. Then, the accurate marker of the target can be easily obtained through image binarisation and marker filtering. To calculate an efficient gradient image of the dim target for the watershed segmentation, the gradient image is firstly calculated through Sobel operator and then efficiently enhanced through pseudo top-hat transformation and gradient quantization. Because of the enhancement of the dim target and the gradient image, the watershed can efficiently segment the dim infrared image. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is much efficient for dim infrared target segmentation.

  15. Adaptive Green-Kubo estimates of transport coefficients from molecular dynamics based on robust error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Reese E.; Mandadapu, Kranthi K.

    2012-04-01

    We present a rigorous Green-Kubo methodology for calculating transport coefficients based on on-the-fly estimates of: (a) statistical stationarity of the relevant process, and (b) error in the resulting coefficient. The methodology uses time samples efficiently across an ensemble of parallel replicas to yield accurate estimates, which is particularly useful for estimating the thermal conductivity of semi-conductors near their Debye temperatures where the characteristic decay times of the heat flux correlation functions are large. Employing and extending the error analysis of Zwanzig and Ailawadi [Phys. Rev. 182, 280 (1969)], 10.1103/PhysRev.182.280 and Frenkel [in Proceedings of the International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi", Course LXXV (North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1980)] to the integral of correlation, we are able to provide tight theoretical bounds for the error in the estimate of the transport coefficient. To demonstrate the performance of the method, four test cases of increasing computational cost and complexity are presented: the viscosity of Ar and water, and the thermal conductivity of Si and GaN. In addition to producing accurate estimates of the transport coefficients for these materials, this work demonstrates precise agreement of the computed variances in the estimates of the correlation and the transport coefficient with the extended theory based on the assumption that fluctuations follow a Gaussian process. The proposed algorithm in conjunction with the extended theory enables the calculation of transport coefficients with the Green-Kubo method accurately and efficiently.

  16. Adaptive Green-Kubo estimates of transport coefficients from molecular dynamics based on robust error analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Reese E; Mandadapu, Kranthi K

    2012-04-21

    We present a rigorous Green-Kubo methodology for calculating transport coefficients based on on-the-fly estimates of: (a) statistical stationarity of the relevant process, and (b) error in the resulting coefficient. The methodology uses time samples efficiently across an ensemble of parallel replicas to yield accurate estimates, which is particularly useful for estimating the thermal conductivity of semi-conductors near their Debye temperatures where the characteristic decay times of the heat flux correlation functions are large. Employing and extending the error analysis of Zwanzig and Ailawadi [Phys. Rev. 182, 280 (1969)] and Frenkel [in Proceedings of the International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi", Course LXXV (North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1980)] to the integral of correlation, we are able to provide tight theoretical bounds for the error in the estimate of the transport coefficient. To demonstrate the performance of the method, four test cases of increasing computational cost and complexity are presented: the viscosity of Ar and water, and the thermal conductivity of Si and GaN. In addition to producing accurate estimates of the transport coefficients for these materials, this work demonstrates precise agreement of the computed variances in the estimates of the correlation and the transport coefficient with the extended theory based on the assumption that fluctuations follow a Gaussian process. The proposed algorithm in conjunction with the extended theory enables the calculation of transport coefficients with the Green-Kubo method accurately and efficiently.

  17. Toward a "molecular thermometer" to estimate the charring temperature of wildland charcoals derived from different biomass sources.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Maximilian P W; Pyle, Lacey A; Clark, Kenneth L; Hockaday, William C; Masiello, Caroline A; Schmidt, Michael W I

    2013-10-15

    The maximum temperature experienced by biomass during combustion has a strong effect on chemical properties of the resulting charcoal, such as sorption capacity (water and nonpolar materials) and microbial degradability. However, information about the formation temperature of natural charcoal can be difficult to obtain in ecosystems that are not instrumented prior to fires. Benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA) are molecular markers specific for pyrogenic carbon (PyC) which can provide information on the degree of aromatic condensation in charcoals. Here we apply the BPCA molecular marker method to a set of 10 charcoals produced during an experimental fire in a Pitch pine-scrub oak forest from litter and bark of pitch pine and inkberry plants in the Pinelands National Reserve in New Jersey, USA. We deployed temperature-sensitive crayons throughout the burn site, which recorded the maximum air temperature and made comparisons to the degree of thermal alteration recorded by BPCA molecular markers. Our results show an increase of the degree of aromatic condensation with monitored temperatures for bark biomass, while for needles no clear trend could be observed. For leaf-derived charcoals at increasing monitored fire temperatures, decreasing degree of aromatic condensation was obtained. This suggests that molecular markers can be used to roughly estimate the maximum fire temperatures experienced by bark and wood materials, but not based on leaf- and needle-derived materials. Possible applications include verifying declared pyrolysis temperatures of biochars and evaluating ecosystem fire temperature postburn.

  18. Origin of the metazoan phyla: Molecular clocks confirm paleontological estimates

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Francisco José; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Ayala, Francisco J.

    1998-01-01

    The time of origin of the animal phyla is controversial. Abundant fossils from the major animal phyla are found in the Cambrian, starting 544 million years ago. Many paleontologists hold that these phyla originated in the late Neoproterozoic, during the 160 million years preceding the Cambrian fossil explosion. We have analyzed 18 protein-coding gene loci and estimated that protostomes (arthropods, annelids, and mollusks) diverged from deuterostomes (echinoderms and chordates) about 670 million years ago, and chordates from echinoderms about 600 million years ago. Both estimates are consistent with paleontological estimates. A published analysis of seven gene loci that concludes that the corresponding divergence times are 1,200 and 1,000 million years ago is shown to be flawed because it extrapolates from slow-evolving vertebrate rates to faster-evolving invertebrate rates, as well as in other ways. PMID:9435239

  19. Big and slow: phylogenetic estimates of molecular evolution in baleen whales (suborder mysticeti).

    PubMed

    Jackson, J A; Baker, C S; Vant, M; Steel, D J; Medrano-González, L; Palumbi, S R

    2009-11-01

    Baleen whales are the largest animals that have ever lived. To develop an improved estimation of substitution rate for nuclear and mitochondrial DNA for this taxon, we implemented a relaxed-clock phylogenetic approach using three fossil calibration dates: the divergence between odontocetes and mysticetes approximately 34 million years ago (Ma), between the balaenids and balaenopterids approximately 28 Ma, and the time to most recent common ancestor within the Balaenopteridae approximately 12 Ma. We examined seven mitochondrial genomes, a large number of mitochondrial control region sequences (219 haplotypes for 465 bp) and nine nuclear introns representing five species of whales, within which multiple species-specific alleles were sequenced to account for within-species diversity (1-15 for each locus). The total data set represents >1.65 Mbp of mitogenome and nuclear genomic sequence. The estimated substitution rate for the humpback whale control region (3.9%/million years, My) was higher than previous estimates for baleen whales but slow relative to other mammal species with similar generation times (e.g., human-chimp mean rate > 20%/My). The mitogenomic third codon position rate was also slow relative to other mammals (mean estimate 1%/My compared with a mammalian average of 9.8%/My for the cytochrome b gene). The mean nuclear genomic substitution rate (0.05%/My) was substantially slower than average synonymous estimates for other mammals (0.21-0.37%/My across a range of studies). The nuclear and mitogenome rate estimates for baleen whales were thus roughly consistent with an 8- to 10-fold slowing due to a combination of large body size and long generation times. Surprisingly, despite the large data set of nuclear intron sequences, there was only weak and conflicting support for alternate hypotheses about the phylogeny of balaenopterid whales, suggesting that interspecies introgressions or a rapid radiation has obscured species relationships in the nuclear genome.

  20. Estimate of ionicity of zeolite NaA using the frequency shift values of physisorbed molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Alexander V.

    1996-08-01

    An estimate of the ionicity of the zeolite NaA is given. It is based on the fitting of the frequency shift value of the fundamental vibrational transition in physisorbed molecular hydrogen. The interaction energy U is calculated by ion-molecule pairwise addition with the ions of the zeolite. Frequency shift values are calculated as a displacement of vibrational levels of the fundamental transition due to the interaction of hydrogen with the zeolite.The level positions are calculated by integration of the Schrodinger vibrational equation. The contributions to the total frequency shift value of a hindered rotation and of a centre of mass vibration are estimated. The influence of the zeolite parameters on the resulting ionicity is discussed.

  1. Estimation of Henry's Law Constant for a Diverse Set of Organic Compounds from Molecular Structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) vapor pressure and activity coefficient models were coupled to estimate Henry’s Law Constant (HLC) in water and in hexadecane for a wide range of non-polar and polar organic compounds without modification or additional p...

  2. A simple method for estimating informative node age priors for the fossil calibration of molecular divergence time analyses.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Michael D; Smith, Andrew B; Simpson, Carl; Zwickl, Derrick J

    2013-01-01

    Molecular divergence time analyses often rely on the age of fossil lineages to calibrate node age estimates. Most divergence time analyses are now performed in a Bayesian framework, where fossil calibrations are incorporated as parametric prior probabilities on node ages. It is widely accepted that an ideal parameterization of such node age prior probabilities should be based on a comprehensive analysis of the fossil record of the clade of interest, but there is currently no generally applicable approach for calculating such informative priors. We provide here a simple and easily implemented method that employs fossil data to estimate the likely amount of missing history prior to the oldest fossil occurrence of a clade, which can be used to fit an informative parametric prior probability distribution on a node age. Specifically, our method uses the extant diversity and the stratigraphic distribution of fossil lineages confidently assigned to a clade to fit a branching model of lineage diversification. Conditioning this on a simple model of fossil preservation, we estimate the likely amount of missing history prior to the oldest fossil occurrence of a clade. The likelihood surface of missing history can then be translated into a parametric prior probability distribution on the age of the clade of interest. We show that the method performs well with simulated fossil distribution data, but that the likelihood surface of missing history can at times be too complex for the distribution-fitting algorithm employed by our software tool. An empirical example of the application of our method is performed to estimate echinoid node ages. A simulation-based sensitivity analysis using the echinoid data set shows that node age prior distributions estimated under poor preservation rates are significantly less informative than those estimated under high preservation rates.

  3. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular diagnosis of Angelman syndrome: Estimated prevalence rate in a Danish country

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, M.B.; Brondum-Nielsen, K.; Hansen, L.K.; Wulff, K.

    1995-06-19

    Angelman syndrome (AS) was initially considered a rather rare abnormality, but in later years, with the possibilities for cytogenetic and molecular diagnosis an increasing number of patients have been reported. The incidence is quoted to be around 1:20,000. The etiology of AS is associated with the lack of maternal allele(s) of one or more loci at 15q11-q13, and is considered an effect of parental imprinting of that region, since a similar deficiency of paternal alleles leads to Prader-Willi syndrome. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  4. A comparative study of density functional models to estimate molecular atomization energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, Enrico; Chakravorty, Subhas J.

    1990-08-01

    In the present study the molecular atomization energies have been computed with some of the recent density functionals and with a semiempirical model developed in the IBM laboratory. In particular, the Lie-Clementi (LC), the Colle-Salvetti (CS), the Gunnarson-Lundqvist (GL), the Vosko, Wilk, and Nusair (VWN), the Perdew-Zunger (PZ), the Becke (B), and the Lee, Yang, and Parr (LYP) functionals have been considered. For GL and VWN the self-interaction correction of Stoll, Pavlidou, and Preuss (SPP) has been included. For the PZ the gradient correction of Perdew has been included. For the LYP a new and simpler form as proposed by Michlich et al. has been implemented. More than 50 small to fairly large molecules have been chosen at test cases. The results obtained with the present semiempirical model are gratifying and indicate that further improvement and calibration is still possible. From the computed data it is concluded that the density functionals in most cases do provide a pragmatic solution to the determination molecular atomization energy.

  5. Dating an impressive Neotropical radiation: Molecular time estimates for the Sigmodontinae (Rodentia) provide insights into its historical biogeography.

    PubMed

    Parada, Andrés; Pardiñas, Ulyses F J; Salazar-Bravo, Jorge; D'Elía, Guillermo; Palma, R Eduardo

    2013-03-01

    With about 400 living species and 82 genera, rodents of the subfamily Sigmodontinae comprise one of the most diverse and more broadly distributed Neotropical mammalian clades. There has been much debate on the origin of the lineage or the lineages of sigmodontines that entered South America, the timing of entrance and different aspects of further diversification within South America. The ages of divergence of the main lineages and the crown age of the subfamily were estimated by using sequences of the interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein and cytochrome b genes for a dense sigmodontine and muroid sampling. Bayesian inference using three fossil calibration points and a relaxed molecular clock estimated a middle Miocene origin for Sigmodontinae (∼12Ma), with most tribes diversifying throughout the Late Miocene (6.9-9.4Ma). These estimates together results of analyses of ancestral area reconstructions suggest a distribution for the most recent common ancestor of Sigmodontinae in Central-South America and a South American distribution for the most recent common ancestor of Oryzomyalia.

  6. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of Infidum similis, Including Morphological Data and Estimation of its Genome Size.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Salazar, Elizabeth A; Rosas-Valdez, Rogelio; Gregory, T Ryan; Violante-González, Juan

    2016-08-01

    :   Infidum similis Travassos, 1916 (Dicrocoeliidae: Leipertrematinae) was found in the gall bladder of Leptophis diplotropis Günther, 1872 from El Podrido, Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico. A phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of the 28S ribosomal RNA using maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) analyses was carried out to assess its phylogenetic position within suborder Xiphidiata, alongside members of the superfamilies Gorgoderoidea and Plagiorchoidea. The phylogenetic trees showed that the genus is most-closely related to the Plagiorchoidea rather than to the Gorgoderoidea, in keeping with previous taxonomic designations. Phylogenies obtained from ML and BI analysis of the 28S rDNA gene revealed a well supported clade in which Choledocystus hepaticus (Lutz, 1928) Sullivan, 1977 is sister to I. similis. On the other hand, a tree obtained using a partial sequence of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) mtDNA gene (ML and BI analysis), with species supposed to be closely related to I. similis according to 28S, does not support this relatedness. Based on the independence of Infidum from the subfamily Leipertrematinae Yamaguti, 1958 , our results clearly demonstrated that the genus corresponds to a different family and with species closely related to C. hepaticus within Plagiorchoidea. New data are presented about the tegumental surface of I. similis by scanning electron microscopy as well as the estimation of its haploid genome size using Feulgen Image Analysis Densitometry of sperm nuclei as part of the characterization of this species. This is the first genome size estimated for a member of Plagiorchiida, and these data will provide a new source of knowledge on helminth diversity and evolutionary studies. This constitutes the first host record, and new geographical distribution, for this species in Mexico.

  7. Molecular dynamics scheme for precise estimation of electrostatic interaction via zero-dipole summation principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Nakamura, Haruki

    2011-04-01

    We propose a novel idea, zero-dipole summation, for evaluating the electrostatic energy of a classical particle system, and have composed an algorithm for effectively utilizing the idea for molecular dynamics. It conceptually prevents the nonzero-charge and nonzero-dipole states artificially generated by a simple cutoff truncation. The resulting energy formula is nevertheless represented by a simple pairwise function sum, which enables facile application to high-performance computation. By following a heuristic approach to derive the current electrostatic energy formula, we developed an axiomatic approach to construct the method consistently. Explorations of the theoretical details of our method revealed the structure of the generated error, and we analyzed it by comparisons with other methods. A numerical simulation using liquid sodium chloride confirmed that the current method with a small damping factor yielded sufficient accuracy with a practical cutoff distance region. The current energy function also conducts stable numerical integration in a liquid MD simulation. Our method is an extension of the charge neutralized summation developed by Wolf et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 110, 8254 (1999)]. Furthermore, we found that the current method becomes a generalization of the preaveraged potential method proposed by Yakub and Ronchi [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11556 (2003)], which is based on a viewpoint different from the neutrality. The current study presents these relationships and suggests possibilities for their further applications.

  8. Residual Seminal Vesicle Displacement in Marker-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer and the Impact on Margin Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to quantify residual interfraction displacement of seminal vesicles (SV) and investigate the efficacy of rotation correction on SV displacement in marker-based prostate image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). We also determined the effect of marker registration on the measured SV displacement and its impact on margin design. Methods and Materials: SV displacement was determined relative to marker registration by using 296 cone beam computed tomography scans of 13 prostate cancer patients with implanted markers. SV were individually registered in the transverse plane, based on gray-value information. The target registration error (TRE) for the SV due to marker registration inaccuracies was estimated. Correlations between prostate gland rotations and SV displacement and between individual SV displacements were determined. Results: The SV registration success rate was 99%. Displacement amounts of both SVs were comparable. Systematic and random residual SV displacements were 1.6 mm and 2.0 mm in the left-right direction, respectively, and 2.8 mm and 3.1 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, respectively. Rotation correction did not reduce residual SV displacement. Prostate gland rotation around the left-right axis correlated with SV AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 42%); a correlation existed between both SVs for AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 62%); considerable correlation existed between random errors of SV displacement and TRE (R{sup 2} = 34%). Conclusions: Considerable residual SV displacement exists in marker-based IGRT. Rotation correction barely reduced SV displacement, rather, a larger SV displacement was shown relative to the prostate gland that was not captured by the marker position. Marker registration error partly explains SV displacement when correcting for rotations. Correcting for rotations, therefore, is not advisable when SV are part of the target volume. Margin design for SVs should take these uncertainties into

  9. A marker-based watershed method for X-ray image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Jia, Fucang; Luo, Suhuai; Liu, Guiying; Hu, Qingmao

    2014-03-01

    Digital X-ray images are the most frequent modality for both screening and diagnosis in hospitals. To facilitate subsequent analysis such as quantification and computer aided diagnosis (CAD), it is desirable to exclude image background. A marker-based watershed segmentation method was proposed to segment background of X-ray images. The method consisted of six modules: image preprocessing, gradient computation, marker extraction, watershed segmentation from markers, region merging and background extraction. One hundred clinical direct radiograph X-ray images were used to validate the method. Manual thresholding and multiscale gradient based watershed method were implemented for comparison. The proposed method yielded a dice coefficient of 0.964±0.069, which was better than that of the manual thresholding (0.937±0.119) and that of multiscale gradient based watershed method (0.942±0.098). Special means were adopted to decrease the computational cost, including getting rid of few pixels with highest grayscale via percentile, calculation of gradient magnitude through simple operations, decreasing the number of markers by appropriate thresholding, and merging regions based on simple grayscale statistics. As a result, the processing time was at most 6s even for a 3072×3072 image on a Pentium 4 PC with 2.4GHz CPU (4 cores) and 2G RAM, which was more than one time faster than that of the multiscale gradient based watershed method. The proposed method could be a potential tool for diagnosis and quantification of X-ray images.

  10. Optical coherence tomography in estimating molecular diffusion of drugs and analytes in ocular tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2009-02-01

    Aside from other ocular drug delivery methods, topical application and follow up drug diffusion through the cornea and sclera of the eye remain the favored method, as they impose the least pain and discomfort to the patient. However, this delivery route suffers from the low permeability of epithelial tissues and drug washout, thus reducing the effectiveness of the drug and ability to reach its target in effective concentrations. In order to better understand the behavioral characteristics of diffusion in ocular tissue, a method for noninvasive imaging of drug diffusion is needed. Due to its high resolution and depth-resolved imaging capabilities, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been utilized in quantifying the molecular transport of different drugs and analytes in vitro in the sclera and the cornea. Diffusion of Metronidazole (0.5%), Dexamethasone (0.2%), Ciprofloxacin (0.3%), Mannitol (20%), and glucose solution (20%) in rabbit sclera and cornea were examined. Their permeability coefficients were calculated by using OCT signal slope and depth-resolved amplitude methods as function of time and tissue depth. For instance, mannitol was found to have a permeability coefficient of (8.99 +/- 1.43) × 10-6 cm/s in cornea (n=4) and (6.18 +/- 1.08) × 10-6 cm/s in sclera (n=5). We also demonstrate the capability of OCT technique for depth-resolved monitoring and quantifying of glucose diffusion in different layers of the sclera. We found that the glucose diffusion rate is not uniform throughout the tissue and is increased from approximately (2.39 +/- 0.73) × 10-6 cm/s at the epithelial side to (8.63 +/- 0.27) × 10-6 cm/s close to the endothelial side of the sclera. In addition, discrepancy in the permeability rates of glucose solutions with different concentrations was observed. Such diffusion studies could enhance our knowledge and potentially pave the way for advancements of therapeutic and diagnostic techniques in the treatment of ocular diseases.

  11. An Estimation of Hybrid Quantum Mechanical Molecular Mechanical Polarization Energies for Small Molecules Using Polarizable Force-Field Approaches

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Jing; Mei, Ye; König, Gerhard; ...

    2017-01-24

    Here in this work, we report two polarizable molecular mechanics (polMM) force field models for estimating the polarization energy in hybrid quantum mechanical molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. These two models, named the potential of atomic charges (PAC) and potential of atomic dipoles (PAD), are formulated from the ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) response kernels for the prediction of the QM density response to an external molecular mechanical (MM) environment (as described by external point charges). The PAC model is similar to fluctuating charge (FQ) models because the energy depends on external electrostatic potential values at QM atomic sites; the PADmore » energy depends on external electrostatic field values at QM atomic sites, resembling induced dipole (ID) models. To demonstrate their uses, we apply the PAC and PAD models to 12 small molecules, which are solvated by TIP3P water. The PAC model reproduces the QM/MM polarization energy with a R2 value of 0.71 for aniline (in 10,000 TIP3P water configurations) and 0.87 or higher for other eleven solute molecules, while the PAD model has a much better performance with R2 values of 0.98 or higher. The PAC model reproduces reference QM/MM hydration free energies for 12 solute molecules with a RMSD of 0.59 kcal/mol. The PAD model is even more accurate, with a much smaller RMSD of 0.12 kcal/mol, with respect to the reference. Lastly, this suggests that polarization effects, including both local charge distortion and intramolecular charge transfer, can be well captured by induced dipole type models with proper parametrization.« less

  12. An Estimation of Hybrid Quantum Mechanical Molecular Mechanical Polarization Energies for Small Molecules Using Polarizable Force-Field Approaches.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Mei, Ye; König, Gerhard; Simmonett, Andrew C; Pickard, Frank C; Wu, Qin; Wang, Lee-Ping; MacKerell, Alexander D; Brooks, Bernard R; Shao, Yihan

    2017-02-14

    In this work, we report two polarizable molecular mechanics (polMM) force field models for estimating the polarization energy in hybrid quantum mechanical molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. These two models, named the potential of atomic charges (PAC) and potential of atomic dipoles (PAD), are formulated from the ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) response kernels for the prediction of the QM density response to an external molecular mechanical (MM) environment (as described by external point charges). The PAC model is similar to fluctuating charge (FQ) models because the energy depends on external electrostatic potential values at QM atomic sites; the PAD energy depends on external electrostatic field values at QM atomic sites, resembling induced dipole (ID) models. To demonstrate their uses, we apply the PAC and PAD models to 12 small molecules, which are solvated by TIP3P water. The PAC model reproduces the QM/MM polarization energy with a R(2) value of 0.71 for aniline (in 10,000 TIP3P water configurations) and 0.87 or higher for other 11 solute molecules, while the PAD model has a much better performance with R(2) values of 0.98 or higher. The PAC model reproduces reference QM/MM hydration free energies for 12 solute molecules with a RMSD of 0.59 kcal/mol. The PAD model is even more accurate, with a much smaller RMSD of 0.12 kcal/mol, with respect to the reference. This suggests that polarization effects, including both local charge distortion and intramolecular charge transfer, can be well captured by induced dipole type models with proper parametrization.

  13. Genome-wide conserved non-coding microsatellite (CNMS) marker-based integrative genetical genomics for quantitative dissection of seed weight in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Deepak; Saxena, Maneesha S; Kujur, Alice; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Tripathi, Shailesh; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2015-03-01

    Phylogenetic footprinting identified 666 genome-wide paralogous and orthologous CNMS (conserved non-coding microsatellite) markers from 5'-untranslated and regulatory regions (URRs) of 603 protein-coding chickpea genes. The (CT)n and (GA)n CNMS carrying CTRMCAMV35S and GAGA8BKN3 regulatory elements, respectively, are abundant in the chickpea genome. The mapped genic CNMS markers with robust amplification efficiencies (94.7%) detected higher intraspecific polymorphic potential (37.6%) among genotypes, implying their immense utility in chickpea breeding and genetic analyses. Seventeen differentially expressed CNMS marker-associated genes showing strong preferential and seed tissue/developmental stage-specific expression in contrasting genotypes were selected to narrow down the gene targets underlying seed weight quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/eQTLs (expression QTLs) through integrative genetical genomics. The integration of transcript profiling with seed weight QTL/eQTL mapping, molecular haplotyping, and association analyses identified potential molecular tags (GAGA8BKN3 and RAV1AAT regulatory elements and alleles/haplotypes) in the LOB-domain-containing protein- and KANADI protein-encoding transcription factor genes controlling the cis-regulated expression for seed weight in the chickpea. This emphasizes the potential of CNMS marker-based integrative genetical genomics for the quantitative genetic dissection of complex seed weight in chickpea.

  14. Molecular systematics of Middle American harvest mice Reithrodontomys (Muridae), estimated from mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Elizabeth; González-Cozátl, Francisco X; Rogers, Duke S

    2005-11-01

    We estimated phylogenetic relationships among 16 species of harvest mice using sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene. Gene phylogenies constructed using maximum parsimony (MP), maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) optimality criteria were largely congruent and arranged taxa into two groups corresponding to the two recognized subgenera (Aporodon and Reithrodontomys). All analyses also recovered R. mexicanus and R. microdon as polyphyletic, although greater resolution was obtained using ML and BI approaches. Within R. mexicanus, three clades were identified with high nodal support (MP and ML bootstrap, Bremer decay and Bayesian posterior probabilities). One represented a subspecies of R. mexicanus from Costa Rica (R. m. cherrii) and a second was distributed in the Sierra Madre Oriental of Mexico. The third R. mexicanus clade consisted of mice from southern Mexico southward to South America. Polyphyly between the two moieties of R. microdon corresponded to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in southern Mexico. Populations of R. microdon microdon to the east of the isthmus (Chiapas, Mexico) grouped with R. tenuirostris, whereas samples of R. m. albilabris to the west in Oaxaca, Mexico, formed a clade with R. bakeri. Within the subgenus Reithrodontomys, all analyses recovered R. montanus and R. raviventris as sister taxa, a finding consistent with earlier studies based on allozymes and cyt b data. There was also strong support (ML and BI criteria) for a clade consisting of ((R. megalotis, R. zacatecae) (R. sumichrasti)). In addition, cytb gene phylogenies (MP, ML, and BI) recovered R. fulvescens and R. hirsutus (ML and BI) as basal taxa within the subgenus Reithrodontomys. Constraint analyses demonstrated that tree topologies treating the two subgenera (Aporodon and Reithrodontomys) as monophyletic (ML criterion) was significantly better (p>0.036) and supported polyphyly of R. mexicanus (both ML and MP criteria - p>0.013) and R. microdon (MP

  15. Molecular and morphological phylogenetics of chelonine parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), with a critical assessment of divergence time estimations.

    PubMed

    Kittel, Rebecca N; Austin, Andrew D; Klopfstein, Seraina

    2016-08-01

    Parasitoid wasps of the subfamily Cheloninae are both species rich and poorly known. Although the taxonomy of Cheloninae appears to be relatively stable, there is no clear understanding of relationships among higher-level taxa. We here applied molecular phylogenetic analyses using three markers (COI, EF1α, 28S) and 37 morphological characters to elucidate the evolution and systematics of these wasps. Analyses were based on 83 specimens representing 13 genera. All genera except Ascogaster, Phanerotoma, and Pseudophanerotoma formed monophyletic groups; Furcidentia (stat. rev.) is raised to generic rank. Neither Chelonus (Chelonus) nor Chelonus (Microchelonus) were recovered as monophyletic, but together formed a monophyletic lineage. The tribes Chelonini and Odontosphaeropygini formed monophyletic groups, but the Phanerotomini sensu Zettel and Pseudophanerotomini were retrieved as either para- or polyphyletic. The genera comprising the former subfamily Adeliinae were confirmed as being nested within the Cheloninae. To estimate the age of the subfamily, we used 16 fossil taxa. Three approaches were compared: fixed-rate dating, node dating, and total-evidence dating, with age estimates differing greatly between the three methods. Shortcomings of each approach in relation to our dataset are discussed, and none of the age estimates is deemed sufficiently reliable. Given that most dating studies use a single method only, in most cases without presenting analyses on the sensitivity to priors, it is likely that numerous age estimates in the literature suffer from a similar lack of robustness. We argue for a more rigorous approach to dating analyses and for a faithful presentation of uncertainties in divergence time estimates. Given the results of the phylogenetic analysis the following taxonomic changes are proposed: Furcidentia Zettel (stat. rev.), previously treated as a subgenus of Pseudophanerotoma Zettel is raised to generic rank; Microchelonus Szépligeti (syn. nov

  16. Development of marker-based tracking methods for augmented reality applied to NPP maintenance work support and its experimental evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, H.; Fujino, H.; Bian, Z.; Sekiyama, T.; Shimoda, H.; Yoshikawa, H.

    2006-07-01

    In this study, two types of marker-based tracking methods for Augmented Reality have been developed. One is a method which employs line-shaped markers and the other is a method which employs circular-shaped markers. These two methods recognize the markers by means of image processing and calculate the relative position and orientation between the markers and the camera in real time. The line-shaped markers are suitable to be pasted in the buildings such as NPPs where many pipes and tanks exist. The circular-shaped markers are suitable for the case that there are many obstacles and it is difficult to use line-shaped markers because the obstacles hide the part of the line-shaped markers. Both methods can extend the maximum distance between the markers and the camera compared to the legacy marker-based tracking methods. (authors)

  17. NMR-based estimates of the molecular dimensions in wildfire charcoal: Implications for predictions of biochar residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockaday, William; Kane, Evan; Huang, Rixiang; Von Bargen, Justin; Davis, Rebecca; Ohlson, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    The thermochemical conversion of biomass to energy and fuels generates charcoal as a co-product. Charcoals derived from sustainable biomass sources—biochars—are an inherently stable form of carbon, relatively long residence times in the environment. Biochars can have potentially beneficial properties as soil fertility amendments, which has further stimulated research on the use of biochars for soil carbon sequestration as a climate change mitigation strategy. However, it is challenging to assess the long-term stability of biochar carbon using laboratory or field incubations because these are comprised of short-term observations. In this study, we make use of ancient charcoals from the boreal forests of Alaska and Scandanavia. We have deliberately selected charcoals from organic soil horizons, as to investigate the inherent biological and chemical stability of charcoal C without the protective influence of soil minerals. We use 14C radiocarbon dating to determine the age of the charcoals, differential scanning calorimetry to assess thermal stability, and solid-state 13C NMR to assess the chemical structure. Specifically, we employ C-H dipolar-dephasing NMR experiments to estimate the relative abundance and molecular dimensions of condensed aromatic domains and aliphatic structures. We test the hypothesis that the environmental stability, as determined by apparent 14C age and thermal stability, is related to the extent of ring condensation in the charcoal structure. Preliminary results suggest that the dimension of the condensed aromatic ring clusters may be an important molecular parameter to include in algorithms used to model/predict the residence time of charcoal and biochar C in soil.

  18. The mitochondrial genome of the sperm whale and a new molecular reference for estimating eutherian divergence dates.

    PubMed

    Arnason, U; Gullberg, A; Gretarsdottir, S; Ursing, B; Janke, A

    2000-06-01

    Extant cetaceans are systematically divided into two suborders: Mysticeti (baleen whales) and Odontoceti (toothed whales). In this study, we have sequenced the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of an odontocete, the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), and included it in phylogenetic analyses together with the previously sequenced complete mtDNAs of two mysticetes (the fin and blue whales) and a number of other mammals, including five artiodactyls (the hippopotamus, cow, sheep, alpaca, and pig). The most strongly supported cetartiodactyl relationship was: outgroup,((pig, alpaca), ((cow, sheep),(hippopotamus,(sperm whale,(baleen whales))))). As in previous analyses of complete mtDNAs, the sister-group relationship between the hippopotamus and the whales received strong support, making both Artiodactyla and Suiformes (pigs, peccaries, and hippopotamuses) paraphyletic. In addition, the analyses identified a sister-group relationship between Suina (the pig) and Tylopoda (the alpaca), although this relationship was not strongly supported. The paleontological records of both mysticetes and odontocetes extend into the Oligocene, suggesting that the mysticete and odontocete lineages diverged 32-34 million years before present (MYBP). Use of this divergence date and the complete mtDNAs of the sperm whale and the two baleen whales allowed the establishment of a new molecular reference, O/M-33, for dating other eutherian divergences. There was a general consistency between O/M-33 and the two previously established eutherian references, A/C-60 and E/R-50. Cetacean (whale) origin, i.e., the divergence between the hippopotamus and the cetaceans, was dated to approximately 55 MYBP, while basal artiodactyl divergences were dated to >/=65 MYBP. Molecular estimates of Tertiary eutherian divergences were consistent with the fossil record.

  19. Molecular techniques in ecohealth research toolkit: facilitating estimation of aggregate gastroenteritis burden in an irrigated periurban landscape.

    PubMed

    Tserendorj, Ariuntuya; Anceno, Alfredo J; Houpt, Eric R; Icenhour, Crystal R; Sethabutr, Orntipa; Mason, Carl S; Shipin, Oleg V

    2011-09-01

    Assessment of microbial hazards associated with certain environmental matrices, livelihood strategies, and food handling practices are constrained by time-consuming conventional microbiological techniques that lead to health risk assessments of narrow geographic or time scope, often targeting very few pathogens. Health risk assessment based on one or few indicator organisms underestimates true disease burden due a number of coexisting causative pathogens. Here, we employed molecular techniques in a survey of Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Vibrio cholera, and Rotavirus A densities in canal water with respect to seasonality and spatial distribution of point-nonpoint pollution sources. Three irrigational canals stretching across nearly a 150-km(2) periurban landscape, traditionally used for agricultural irrigation but function as vital part of municipal wastewater stabilization in recent years, were investigated. Compiled stochastic data (pathogen concentration, susceptible populations) and literature-obtained deterministic data (pathogen dose-response model parameter values) were used in estimating waterborne gastroenteritis burden. Exposure scenarios include swimming or fishing, consuming canal water-irrigated vegetables, and ingesting or inhaling water aerosols while working in canal water-irrigated fields. Estimated annual gastroenteritis burden due individual pathogens among the sampling points was -10.6log(10) to -2.2log(10) DALYs. Aggregated annual gastroenteritis burden due all the target pathogens per sampling point was -3.1log(10) to -1.9log(10) DALYs, far exceeding WHO acceptable limit of -6.0log(10) DALYs. The present approach will facilitate the comprehensive collection of surface water microbiological baseline data and setting of benchmarks for interventions aimed at reducing microbial hazards in similar landscapes worldwide.

  20. Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elkind, M.M.; Bedford, J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Waldren, C.A. ); Gotchy, R.L. )

    1990-10-01

    A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. Multiple environment single system quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (MESS-QM/MM) calculations. 1. Estimation of polarization energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sodt, Alexander J.; Mei, Ye; Konig, Gerhard; Tao, Peng; Steele, Ryan P.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Shao, Yihan

    2014-10-16

    In combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy calculations, it is often advantageous to have a frozen geometry for the quantum mechanical (QM) region. For such multiple-environment single-system (MESS) cases, two schemes are proposed here for estimating the polarization energy: the first scheme, termed MESS-E, involves a Roothaan step extrapolation of the self-consistent field (SCF) energy; whereas the other scheme, termed MESS-H, employs a Newton–Raphson correction using an approximate inverse electronic Hessian of the QM region (which is constructed only once). Both schemes are extremely efficient, because the expensive Fock updates and SCF iterations in standard QM/MM calculations are completely avoided at each configuration. Here, they produce reasonably accurate QM/MM polarization energies: MESS-E can predict the polarization energy within 0.25 kcal/mol in terms of the mean signed error for two of our test cases, solvated methanol and solvated β-alanine, using the M06-2X or ωB97X-D functionals; MESS-H can reproduce the polarization energy within 0.2 kcal/mol for these two cases and for the oxyluciferin–luciferase complex, if the approximate inverse electronic Hessians are constructed with sufficient accuracy.

  2. Multiple environment single system quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (MESS-QM/MM) calculations. 1. Estimation of polarization energies

    DOE PAGES

    Sodt, Alexander J.; Mei, Ye; Konig, Gerhard; ...

    2014-10-16

    In combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy calculations, it is often advantageous to have a frozen geometry for the quantum mechanical (QM) region. For such multiple-environment single-system (MESS) cases, two schemes are proposed here for estimating the polarization energy: the first scheme, termed MESS-E, involves a Roothaan step extrapolation of the self-consistent field (SCF) energy; whereas the other scheme, termed MESS-H, employs a Newton–Raphson correction using an approximate inverse electronic Hessian of the QM region (which is constructed only once). Both schemes are extremely efficient, because the expensive Fock updates and SCF iterations in standard QM/MM calculations are completelymore » avoided at each configuration. Here, they produce reasonably accurate QM/MM polarization energies: MESS-E can predict the polarization energy within 0.25 kcal/mol in terms of the mean signed error for two of our test cases, solvated methanol and solvated β-alanine, using the M06-2X or ωB97X-D functionals; MESS-H can reproduce the polarization energy within 0.2 kcal/mol for these two cases and for the oxyluciferin–luciferase complex, if the approximate inverse electronic Hessians are constructed with sufficient accuracy.« less

  3. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Approaches Estimate the Binding Energy of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors and Correlate with In Vitro Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Barry C.; Métifiot, Mathieu; Pommier, Yves

    2012-01-01

    The design of novel integrase (IN) inhibitors has been aided by recent crystal structures revealing the binding mode of these compounds with a full-length prototype foamy virus (PFV) IN and synthetic viral DNA ends. Earlier docking studies relied on incomplete structures and did not include the contribution of the viral DNA to inhibitor binding. Using the structure of PFV IN as the starting point, we generated a model of the corresponding HIV-1 complex and developed a molecular dynamics (MD)-based approach that correlates with the in vitro activities of novel compounds. Four well-characterized compounds (raltegravir, elvitegravir, MK-0536, and dolutegravir) were used as a training set, and the data for their in vitro activity against the Y143R, N155H, and G140S/Q148H mutants were used in addition to the wild-type (WT) IN data. Three additional compounds were docked into the IN-DNA complex model and subjected to MD simulations. All three gave interaction potentials within 1 standard deviation of values estimated from the training set, and the most active compound was identified. Additional MD analysis of the raltegravir- and dolutegravir-bound complexes gave internal and interaction energy values that closely match the experimental binding energy of a compound related to raltegravir that has similar activity. These approaches can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the interactions of the inhibitors with the HIV-1 intasome and to identify promising scaffolds for novel integrase inhibitors, in particular, compounds that retain activity against a range of drug-resistant mutants, making it possible to streamline synthesis and testing. PMID:22037850

  5. Compound-class specific estimation of solid organic compound vapour pressure and aqueous solubility from simple molecular structure descriptors and the temperature of melting.

    PubMed

    van Noort, Paul C M

    2009-10-01

    For many solid organic compounds, experimental data for their aqueous solubility and vapour pressure are lacking. Therefore, estimation procedures for these compound properties are needed. On theoretical grounds, this study derives a general compound-class specific estimation procedure for solid organic compound aqueous solubility and vapour pressure. The estimation procedure uses a linear combination of simple molecular descriptors for the molecular structure variation within the compound class and a polynomial for the temperature of melting. This procedure is applied to the vapour pressure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and biphenyls and to the aqueous solubility of PAHs, methylated PAHs, chlorinated benzenes, polychlorinated and polybrominated biphenyls, chlorinated phenols, cresols, and chlorinated 2-methoxyphenols. The standard error of the solid vapour pressure or aqueous solubility estimates from the various compound-class specific regression equations was about 0.2 log units. For PAHs, chlorobenzenes, and PCBs used in the present study, aqueous solubility estimated from the regression equations taking the temperature of melting equal to 298 K, i.e. assuming that the compounds are in a hypothetical liquid state, was equal, within 0.1-0.3 log units to the subcooled liquid solubility estimated from literature regression equations.

  6. A Cross-Species Gene Expression Marker-Based Genetic Map and QTL Analysis in Bambara Groundnut.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hui Hui; Ho, Wai Kuan; Graham, Neil; May, Sean; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2017-02-22

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an underutilised legume crop, which has long been recognised as a protein-rich and drought-tolerant crop, used extensively in Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in agronomic and drought-related traits using an expression marker-based genetic map based on major crop resources developed in soybean. The gene expression markers (GEMs) were generated at the (unmasked) probe-pair level after cross-hybridisation of bambara groundnut leaf RNA to the Affymetrix Soybean Genome GeneChip. A total of 753 markers grouped at an LOD (Logarithm of odds) of three, with 527 markers mapped into linkage groups. From this initial map, a spaced expression marker-based genetic map consisting of 13 linkage groups containing 218 GEMs, spanning 982.7 cM (centimorgan) of the bambara groundnut genome, was developed. Of the QTL detected, 46% were detected in both control and drought treatment populations, suggesting that they are the result of intrinsic trait differences between the parental lines used to construct the cross, with 31% detected in only one of the conditions. The present GEM map in bambara groundnut provides one technically feasible route for the translation of information and resources from major and model plant species to underutilised and resource-poor crops.

  7. A Marker-Based Approach for the Automated Selection of a Single Segmentation from a Hierarchical Set of Image Segmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Y.; Tilton, J. C.; Benediktsson, J. A.; Chanussot, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Hierarchical SEGmentation (HSEG) algorithm, which combines region object finding with region object clustering, has given good performances for multi- and hyperspectral image analysis. This technique produces at its output a hierarchical set of image segmentations. The automated selection of a single segmentation level is often necessary. We propose and investigate the use of automatically selected markers for this purpose. In this paper, a novel Marker-based HSEG (M-HSEG) method for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. Two classification-based approaches for automatic marker selection are adapted and compared for this purpose. Then, a novel constrained marker-based HSEG algorithm is applied, resulting in a spectral-spatial classification map. Three different implementations of the M-HSEG method are proposed and their performances in terms of classification accuracies are compared. The experimental results, presented for three hyperspectral airborne images, demonstrate that the proposed approach yields accurate segmentation and classification maps, and thus is attractive for remote sensing image analysis.

  8. A Cross-Species Gene Expression Marker-Based Genetic Map and QTL Analysis in Bambara Groundnut

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Hui Hui; Ho, Wai Kuan; Graham, Neil; May, Sean; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an underutilised legume crop, which has long been recognised as a protein-rich and drought-tolerant crop, used extensively in Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in agronomic and drought-related traits using an expression marker-based genetic map based on major crop resources developed in soybean. The gene expression markers (GEMs) were generated at the (unmasked) probe-pair level after cross-hybridisation of bambara groundnut leaf RNA to the Affymetrix Soybean Genome GeneChip. A total of 753 markers grouped at an LOD (Logarithm of odds) of three, with 527 markers mapped into linkage groups. From this initial map, a spaced expression marker-based genetic map consisting of 13 linkage groups containing 218 GEMs, spanning 982.7 cM (centimorgan) of the bambara groundnut genome, was developed. Of the QTL detected, 46% were detected in both control and drought treatment populations, suggesting that they are the result of intrinsic trait differences between the parental lines used to construct the cross, with 31% detected in only one of the conditions. The present GEM map in bambara groundnut provides one technically feasible route for the translation of information and resources from major and model plant species to underutilised and resource-poor crops. PMID:28241413

  9. Application of DNA barcoding in biodiversity studies of shallow-water octocorals: molecular proxies agree with morphological estimates of species richness in Palau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, C. S.; Brown, A. S.; Brayton, C.; Hunt, C. B.; van Ofwegen, L. P.

    2014-06-01

    The application of DNA barcoding to anthozoan cnidarians has been hindered by their slow rates of mitochondrial gene evolution and the failure to identify alternative molecular markers that distinguish species reliably. Among octocorals, however, multilocus barcodes can distinguish up to 70 % of morphospecies, thereby facilitating the identification of species that are ecologically important but still very poorly known taxonomically. We tested the ability of these imperfect DNA barcodes to estimate species richness in a biodiversity survey of the shallow-water octocoral fauna of Palau using multilocus ( COI, mtMutS, 28S rDNA) sequences obtained from 305 specimens representing 38 genera of octocorals. Numbers and identities of species were estimated independently (1) by a taxonomic expert using morphological criteria and (2) by assigning sequences to molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) using predefined genetic distance thresholds. Estimated numbers of MOTUs ranged from 73 to 128 depending on the barcode and distance threshold applied, bracketing the estimated number of 118 morphospecies. Concordance between morphospecies identifications and MOTUs ranged from 71 to 75 % and differed little among barcodes. For the speciose and ecologically dominant genus Sinularia, however, we were able to identify 95 % of specimens correctly simply by comparing mtMutS sequences and in situ photographs of colonies to an existing vouchered database. Because we lack a clear understanding of species boundaries in most of these taxa, numbers of morphospecies and MOTUs are both estimates of the true species diversity, and we cannot currently determine which is more accurate. Our results suggest, however, that the two methods provide comparable estimates of species richness for shallow-water Indo-Pacific octocorals. Use of molecular barcodes in biodiversity surveys will facilitate comparisons of species richness and composition among localities and over time, data that do not

  10. Pleistocene Speciation in North American Lichenized Fungi and the Impact of Alternative Species Circumscriptions and Rates of Molecular Evolution on Divergence Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Steven D.; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Stenroos, Soili; Clair, Larry L. St.

    2013-01-01

    Pleistocene climatic fluctuations influenced patterns of genetic variation and promoted speciation across a wide range of species groups. Lichens are commonly found in habitats that were directly impacted by glacial cycles; however, the role of Pleistocene climate in driving speciation in most lichen symbionts remains unclear. This uncertainty is due in part to limitations in our ability to accurately recognize independently evolving lichen-forming fungal lineages and a lack of relevant fossil calibrations. Using a coalescent-based species tree approach, we estimated divergence times for two sister clades in the genus Xanthoparmelia (Parmeliaceae) restricted to western North America. We assessed the influence of two different species circumscription scenarios and various locus-specific rates of molecular evolution on divergence estimates. Species circumscriptions were validated using the program BP&P. although speciation was generally supported in both scenarios, divergence times differed between traditional species circumscriptions and those based on genetic data, with more recent estimates resulting from the former. Similarly, rates of evolution for different loci resulted in variable divergence time estimates. However, our results unambiguously indicate that diversification in the sampled Xanthoparmelia clades occurred during the Pleistocene. Our study highlights the potential impact of ambiguous species circumscriptions and uncertain rates of molecular evolution on estimating divergence times within a multilocus species tree framework. PMID:24386465

  11. Pleistocene speciation in North American lichenized fungi and the impact of alternative species circumscriptions and rates of molecular evolution on divergence estimates.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, Steven D; Lumbsch, H Thorsten; Stenroos, Soili; St Clair, Larry L

    2013-01-01

    Pleistocene climatic fluctuations influenced patterns of genetic variation and promoted speciation across a wide range of species groups. Lichens are commonly found in habitats that were directly impacted by glacial cycles; however, the role of Pleistocene climate in driving speciation in most lichen symbionts remains unclear. This uncertainty is due in part to limitations in our ability to accurately recognize independently evolving lichen-forming fungal lineages and a lack of relevant fossil calibrations. Using a coalescent-based species tree approach, we estimated divergence times for two sister clades in the genus Xanthoparmelia (Parmeliaceae) restricted to western North America. We assessed the influence of two different species circumscription scenarios and various locus-specific rates of molecular evolution on divergence estimates. Species circumscriptions were validated using the program BP&P. although speciation was generally supported in both scenarios, divergence times differed between traditional species circumscriptions and those based on genetic data, with more recent estimates resulting from the former. Similarly, rates of evolution for different loci resulted in variable divergence time estimates. However, our results unambiguously indicate that diversification in the sampled Xanthoparmelia clades occurred during the Pleistocene. Our study highlights the potential impact of ambiguous species circumscriptions and uncertain rates of molecular evolution on estimating divergence times within a multilocus species tree framework.

  12. One-step zymogram method for the simultaneous detection of cellulase/xylanase activity and molecular weight estimation of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Cano-Ramírez, Claudia; Santiago-Hernández, Alejandro; Rivera-Orduña, Flor Nohemí; Pineda-Mendoza, Rosa María; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Hidalgo-Lara, María Eugenia

    2017-02-01

    Here, we describe a zymographic method for the simultaneous detection of enzymatic activity and molecular weight (MW) estimation, following a single electrophoresis step. This involved separating cellulase and xylanase activities from bacteria and fungi, obtained from different sources, such as commercial extracts, crude extract and purified proteins, under denaturing conditions, by 10% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, using polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with 1% (w/v) carboxymethylcellulose or beechwood xylan as substrates. Then, enzymes were refolded by treatment with 2.5% Triton X-100 in an appropriate buffer for each enzymatic activity, and visualized by Coomassie blue staining for MW estimation. Finally, Congo red staining revealed bio-active cellulase and xylanase bands after electrophoretic separation of the proteins in the preparations. This method may provide a useful additional tool for screening of particular cellulase and xylanase producers, identification and MW estimation of polypeptides that manifest these activities, and for monitoring and control of fungal and bacterial cellulase and xylanase production.

  13. Estimate of Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo for a Molecular Atmosphere over Ocean using Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.; Rutledge, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    The shortwave broadband albedo at the top of a molecular atmosphere over ocean between 40deg N and 40deg S is estimated using radiance measurements from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument and the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The albedo monotonically increases from 0.059 at a solar zenith angle of 10deg to 0.107 at a solar zenith angle of 60deg. The estimated uncertainty in the albedo is 3.5 x 10(exp -3) caused by the uncertainty in CERES-derived irradiances, uncertainty in VIRS-derived aerosol optical thicknesses, variations in ozone and water vapor, and variations in surface wind speed. The estimated uncertainty is similar in magnitude to the standard deviation of 0.003 that is derived from 72 areas divided by 20deg latitude by 20deg longitude grid boxes. The empirically estimated albedo is compared with the modeled albedo using a radiative transfer model combined with an ocean surface bidirectional reflectivity model. The modeled albedo with standard tropical atmosphere is 0.061 and 0.111 at the solar zenith angles of 10deg and 60deg, respectively. This empirically estimated albedo can be used to estimate the direct radiative effect of aerosols at the top of the atmosphere over oceans.

  14. Winding up the molecular clock in the genus Carabus (Coleoptera: Carabidae): assessment of methodological decisions on rate and node age estimation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rates of molecular evolution are known to vary across taxa and among genes, and this requires rate calibration for each specific dataset based on external information. Calibration is sensitive to evolutionary model parameters, partitioning schemes and clock model. However, the way in which these and other analytical aspects affect both the rates and the resulting clade ages from calibrated phylogenies are not yet well understood. To investigate these aspects we have conducted calibration analyses for the genus Carabus (Coleoptera, Carabidae) on five mitochondrial and four nuclear DNA fragments with 7888 nt total length, testing different clock models and partitioning schemes to select the most suitable using Bayes Factors comparisons. Results We used these data to investigate the effect of ambiguous character and outgroup inclusion on both the rates of molecular evolution and the TMRCA of Carabus. We found considerable variation in rates of molecular evolution depending on the fragment studied (ranging from 5.02% in cob to 0.26% divergence/My in LSU-A), but also on analytical conditions. Alternative choices of clock model, partitioning scheme, treatment of ambiguous characters, and outgroup inclusion resulted in rate increments ranging from 28% (HUWE1) to 1000% (LSU-B and ITS2) and increments in the TMRCA of Carabus ranging from 8.4% (cox1-A) to 540% (ITS2). Results support an origin of the genus Carabus during the Oligocene in the Eurasian continent followed by a Miocene differentiation that originated all main extant lineages. Conclusions The combination of several genes is proposed as the best strategy to minimise both the idiosyncratic behaviors of individual markers and the effect of analytical aspects in rate and age estimations. Our results highlight the importance of estimating rates of molecular evolution for each specific dataset, selecting for optimal clock and partitioning models as well as other methodological issues potentially affecting

  15. Effective one step-iterative fiducial marker-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Berger, Martin; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    We previously introduced three different fiducial marker-based correction methods (2D projection shifting, 2D projection warping, and 3D image warping) for patients' involuntary motion in the lower body during weight-bearing Carm CT scanning. The 3D warping method performed better than 2D methods since it could more accurately take into account the lower body motion in 3D. However, as the 3D warping method applies different rotational and translational movement to the reconstructed image for each projection frame, distance-related weightings were slightly twisted and thus result in overlaying background noise over the entire image. In order to suppress background noise and artifacts (e.g. metallic marker-caused streaks), the 3D warping method has been improved by incorporating bilateral filtering and a Landwebertype iteration in one step. A series of projection images of five healthy volunteers standing at various flexion angles were acquired using a C-arm cone-beam CT system with a flat panel. A horizontal scanning trajectory of the C-arm was calibrated to generate projection matrices. Using the projection matrices, the static reference marker coordinates in 3D were estimated and used for the improved 3D warping method. The improved 3D warping method effectively reduced background noise down below the noise level of 2D methods and also eliminated metal-generated streaks. Thus, improved visibility of soft tissue structures (e.g. fat and muscle) was achieved while maintaining sharp edges at bone-tissue interfaces. Any high resolution weight-bearing cone-beam CT system can apply this method for motion compensation.

  16. Breaking the bottleneck: Use of molecular tailoring approach for the estimation of binding energies at MP2/CBS limit for large water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurmeet; Nandi, Apurba; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2016-03-01

    A pragmatic method based on the molecular tailoring approach (MTA) for estimating the complete basis set (CBS) limit at Møller-Plesset second order perturbation (MP2) theory accurately for large molecular clusters with limited computational resources is developed. It is applied to water clusters, (H2O)n (n = 7, 8, 10, 16, 17, and 25) optimized employing aug-cc-pVDZ (aVDZ) basis-set. Binding energies (BEs) of these clusters are estimated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVNZ (aVNZ) [N = T, Q, and 5 (whenever possible)] levels of theory employing grafted MTA (GMTA) methodology and are found to lie within 0.2 kcal/mol of the corresponding full calculation MP2 BE, wherever available. The results are extrapolated to CBS limit using a three point formula. The GMTA-MP2 calculations are feasible on off-the-shelf hardware and show around 50%-65% saving of computational time. The methodology has a potential for application to molecular clusters containing ˜100 atoms.

  17. Statistical Estimation of the Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy Based On Direct Protein-Ligand Interaction Obtained by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a method for estimating protein-ligand binding free energy (ΔG) based on the direct protein-ligand interaction obtained by a molecular dynamics simulation. Using this method, we estimated the ΔG value statistically by the average values of the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between each amino acid of the target protein and the ligand molecule. In addition, we introduced fluctuations in the accessible surface area (ASA) and dihedral angles of the protein-ligand complex system as the entropy terms of the ΔG estimation. The present method included the fluctuation term of structural change of the protein and the effective dielectric constant. We applied this method to 34 protein-ligand complex structures. As a result, the correlation coefficient between the experimental and calculated ΔG values was 0.81, and the average error of ΔG was 1.2 kcal/mol with the use of the fixed parameters. These results were obtained from a 2 nsec molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:24281257

  18. Divergence time estimates of mammals from molecular clocks and fossils: relevance of new fossil finds from India.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G V R

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a brief review of recent advances in the classification of mammals at higher levels using fossils and molecular clocks. It also discusses latest fossil discoveries from the Cretaceous - Eocene (66-55 m.y.) rocks of India and their relevance to our current understanding of placental mammal origins and diversifications.

  19. Estimation of the molecular characteristics of polymers by the SPRT method and study of their influence on the properties of compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimel'blat, V. I.; Volfson, S. I.; Chebotareva, I. G.; Malysheva, T. V.

    1998-09-01

    Pressure relaxation was examined in the cylinder of an MPT Monsanto processability tester after stopping the piston. The experimental function of the pressure drop F(t) was smoothed over and approximated by cubic splines. The spectra of pressure relaxation times (SPRT) were obtained according to the method of Schwarzl-Staverman. The SPRT method served well for estimating the spectra of the molecular-mass distribution (MMD) of polymers close in their physical sense to the SPRT. The correlation of the characteristic relaxation times and average molecular mass of ethylene-propylene rubbers and polyethylenes obtained by gel permeation chromatography was approximated by optimum models used for calculating the the molecular mass of rubbers according to the measurement results of the relaxation pressure of melts. The SPRT and characteristic relaxation times were used to analyze the significant technical properties of compositions based on polyethylene and rubber. The SPRT method was used to examine the failure of the cure network of butyl rubber and the dependence of the mechanical properties of thermoplastic elastomers on the molecular features of the decomposite.

  20. Theoretical estimation of the vibrational perturbation of the molecular properties of hydrogen adsorbed within a zeolite A framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, A. V.; Jousse, F.; Leherte, L.; Vercauteren, D. P.

    1997-08-01

    An iterative numerical procedure is proposed to evaluate the variation of the dependence versus the internuclear distance of several molecular properties (polarizabilities, multipole moments) of hydrogen adsorbed within zeolite A. Dealing with a method which includes only the vibrational perturbation, it is shown that the dependence on internuclear distance of the properties of H 2 does not change upon adsorption in NaA as compared to the gas.

  1. Estimating the Gibbs energy of hydration from molecular dynamics trajectories obtained by integral equations of the theory of liquids in the RISM approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, D. A.; Sobolev, E. V.

    2011-04-01

    A method of integral equations of the theory of liquids in the reference interaction site model (RISM) approximation is used to estimate the Gibbs energy averaged over equilibrium trajectories computed by molecular mechanics. Peptide oxytocin is selected as the object of interest. The Gibbs energy is calculated using all chemical potential formulas introduced in the RISM approach for the excess chemical potential of solvation and is compared with estimates by the generalized Born model. Some formulas are shown to give the wrong sign of Gibbs energy changes when peptide passes from the gas phase into water environment; the other formulas give overestimated Gibbs energy changes with the right sign. Note that allowance for the repulsive correction in the approximate analytical expressions for the Gibbs energy derived by thermodynamic perturbation theory is not a remedy.

  2. Estimation of octanol/water partition coefficient and aqueous solubility of environmental chemicals using molecular fingerprints and machine learning methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Octanol/water partition coefficient (logP) and aqueous solubility (logS) are two important parameters in pharmacology and toxicology studies, and experimental measurements are usually time-consuming and expensive. In the present research, novel methods are presented for the estim...

  3. A Real-Time Marker-Based Visual Sensor Based on a FPGA and a Soft Core Processor

    PubMed Central

    Tayara, Hilal; Ham, Woonchul; Chong, Kil To

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a real-time marker-based visual sensor architecture for mobile robot localization and navigation. A hardware acceleration architecture for post video processing system was implemented on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The pose calculation algorithm was implemented in a System on Chip (SoC) with an Altera Nios II soft-core processor. For every frame, single pass image segmentation and Feature Accelerated Segment Test (FAST) corner detection were used for extracting the predefined markers with known geometries in FPGA. Coplanar PosIT algorithm was implemented on the Nios II soft-core processor supplied with floating point hardware for accelerating floating point operations. Trigonometric functions have been approximated using Taylor series and cubic approximation using Lagrange polynomials. Inverse square root method has been implemented for approximating square root computations. Real time results have been achieved and pixel streams have been processed on the fly without any need to buffer the input frame for further implementation. PMID:27983714

  4. Quality assurance and commissioning of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system for frameless extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tejpal; Phurailatpam, Reena; Ajay, Mishra; Rajeshri, Pai; Pranshu, Mohindra; Supriya, Chopra

    2007-12-01

    Rapid advancements in imaging technology have led to remarkable improvements in identification and localization of tumors, ushering the era of high-precision techniques in contemporary radiotherapy practice. However, uncertainties in patient set-up and organ motion during a course of fractionated radiotherapy can compromise precision of radiation therapy. Excellent accuracy has been achieved with invasive and non-invasive fixation systems for stereotactic radiotherapy. This report describes the commissioning procedure and Quality Assurance studies done to evaluate the accuracy of isocenter localization by an infrared marker-based positioning system (ExacTrac). The ExacTrac has two infrared cameras that emit and detect infrared rays from reflective markers and construct three-dimensional coordinates of each marker. It detects the difference of the actual isocenter position from the planned isocenter coordinates in three translational (lateral, longitudinal, vertical, or x,y,z axes) and three rotational axes (six degree of freedom). This study performed on a flat and static phantom shows excellent accuracy achieved by the ExacTrac system. The positioning accuracy of ExacTrac (± 1 mm translational displacement and ± 1° rotational errors) can be a valuable tool in implementing frameless extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Nevertheless, it needs to be further evaluated on patients with inherent motion and greater positional uncertainty before being adopted in clinical practice.

  5. A Real-Time Marker-Based Visual Sensor Based on a FPGA and a Soft Core Processor.

    PubMed

    Tayara, Hilal; Ham, Woonchul; Chong, Kil To

    2016-12-15

    This paper introduces a real-time marker-based visual sensor architecture for mobile robot localization and navigation. A hardware acceleration architecture for post video processing system was implemented on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The pose calculation algorithm was implemented in a System on Chip (SoC) with an Altera Nios II soft-core processor. For every frame, single pass image segmentation and Feature Accelerated Segment Test (FAST) corner detection were used for extracting the predefined markers with known geometries in FPGA. Coplanar PosIT algorithm was implemented on the Nios II soft-core processor supplied with floating point hardware for accelerating floating point operations. Trigonometric functions have been approximated using Taylor series and cubic approximation using Lagrange polynomials. Inverse square root method has been implemented for approximating square root computations. Real time results have been achieved and pixel streams have been processed on the fly without any need to buffer the input frame for further implementation.

  6. Temporal-spatial reach parameters derived from inertial sensors: Comparison to 3D marker-based motion capture.

    PubMed

    Cahill-Rowley, Katelyn; Rose, Jessica

    2017-02-08

    Reaching is a well-practiced functional task crucial to daily living activities, and temporal-spatial measures of reaching reflect function for both adult and pediatric populations with upper-extremity motor impairments. Inertial sensors offer a mobile and inexpensive tool for clinical assessment of movement. This research outlines a method for measuring temporal-spatial reach parameters using inertial sensors, and validates these measures with traditional marker-based motion capture. 140 reaches from 10 adults, and 30 reaches from nine children aged 18-20 months, were recorded and analyzed using both inertial-sensor and motion-capture methods. Inertial sensors contained three-axis accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers. Gravitational offset of accelerometer data was measured when the sensor was at rest, and removed using sensor orientation measured at rest and throughout the reach. Velocity was calculated by numeric integration of acceleration, using a null-velocity assumption at reach start. Sensor drift was neglected given the 1-2s required for a reach. Temporal-spatial reach parameters were calculated independently for each data acquisition method. Reach path length and distance, peak velocity magnitude and timing, and acceleration at contact demonstrated consistent agreement between sensor- and motion-capture-based methods, for both adult and toddler reaches, as evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficients from 0.61 to 1.00. Taken together with actual difference between method measures, results indicate that these functional reach parameters may be reliably measured with inertial sensors.

  7. Molecular statics calculations of proton binding to goethite surfaces: A new approach to estimation of stability constants for multisite surface complexation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    1996-05-01

    A new approach to estimating stability constants for proton binding in multisite surface complexation models is presented. The method is based on molecular statics computation of energies for the formation of proton vacancies and interstitials in ideal periodic slabs representing the (100), (110), (010), (001), and (021) surfaces of goethite. Gas-phase energies of clusters representing the hydrolysis products of ferric iron are calculated using the same potential energy functions used for the surface. These energies are linearly related to the hydrolysis constants for ferric iron in aqueous solution. Stability constants for proton binding at goethite surfaces are estimated by assuming the same log K- Δ E relationship for goethite surface protonation reactions. These stability constants predict a pH of zero charge of 8.9, in adequate agreement with measurements on CO 2-free goethite. The estimated stability constants differ significantly from previous estimations based on Pauling bond strength. We find that nearly all the surface oxide ions are reactive; nineteen of the twenty-six surface sites investigated have log Kint between 7.7 and 9.4. This implies a site density between fifteen and sixteen reactive sites/nm for crystals dominated by (110) and (021) crystal faces.

  8. Potential for bias and low precision in molecular divergence time estimation of the Canopy of Life: an example from aquatic bird families

    PubMed Central

    van Tuinen, Marcel; Torres, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in divergence time estimation is frequently studied from many angles but rarely from the perspective of phylogenetic node age. If appropriate molecular models and fossil priors are used, a multi-locus, partitioned analysis is expected to equally minimize error in accuracy and precision across all nodes of a given phylogeny. In contrast, if available models fail to completely account for rate heterogeneity, substitution saturation and incompleteness of the fossil record, uncertainty in divergence time estimation may increase with node age. While many studies have stressed this concern with regard to deep nodes in the Tree of Life, the inference that molecular divergence time estimation of shallow nodes is less sensitive to erroneous model choice has not been tested explicitly in a Bayesian framework. Because of available divergence time estimation methods that permit fossil priors across any phylogenetic node and the present increase in efficient, cheap collection of species-level genomic data, insight is needed into the performance of divergence time estimation of shallow (<10 MY) nodes. Here, we performed multiple sensitivity analyses in a multi-locus data set of aquatic birds with six fossil constraints. Comparison across divergence time analyses that varied taxon and locus sampling, number and position of fossil constraint and shape of prior distribution showed various insights. Deviation from node ages obtained from a reference analysis was generally highest for the shallowest nodes but determined more by temporal placement than number of fossil constraints. Calibration with only the shallowest nodes significantly underestimated the aquatic bird fossil record, indicating the presence of saturation. Although joint calibration with all six priors yielded ages most consistent with the fossil record, ages of shallow nodes were overestimated. This bias was found in both mtDNA and nDNA regions. Thus, divergence time estimation of shallow nodes may suffer

  9. The relative ages of ectomycorrhizal mushrooms and their plant hosts estimated using Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hibbett, David S; Matheny, P Brandon

    2009-01-01

    Background Ectomycorrhizae (ECM) are symbioses formed by polyphyletic assemblages of fungi (mostly Agaricomycetes) and plants (mostly Pinaceae and angiosperms in the rosid clade). Efforts to reconstruct the evolution of the ECM habit in Agaricomycetes have yielded vastly different results, ranging from scenarios with many relatively recent origins of the symbiosis and no reversals to the free-living condition; a single ancient origin of ECM and many subsequent transitions to the free-living condition; or multiple gains and losses of the association. To test the plausibility of these scenarios, we performed Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses including fungi, plants, and other eukaryotes, based on the principle that a symbiosis cannot evolve prior to the origin of both partners. As we were primarily interested in the relative ages of the plants and fungi, we did not attempt to calibrate the molecular clock using the very limited fossil record of Agaricomycetes. Results Topologically constrained and unconstrained analyses suggest that the root node of the Agaricomycetes is much older than either the rosids or Pinaceae. The Agaricomycetidae, a large clade containing the Agaricales and Boletales (collectively representing 70% of Agaricomycetes), is also significantly older than the rosids. The relative age of Agaricomycetidae and Pinaceae, however, is sensitive to tree topology, and the inclusion or exclusion of the gnetophyte Welwitschia mirabilis. Conclusion The ancestor of the Agaricomycetes could not have been an ECM species because it existed long before any of its potential hosts. Within more derived clades of Agaricomycetes, there have been at least eight independent origins of ECM associations involving angiosperms, and at least six to eight origins of associations with gymnosperms. The first ECM symbioses may have involved Pinaceae, which are older than rosids, but several major clades of Agaricomycetes, such as the Boletales and Russulales, are young

  10. Molecular genetic variation of boll weevil populations in North America estimated with microsatellites: implications for patterns of dispersal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Seok; Sappington, Thomas W

    2006-05-01

    The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boheman) is an insect pest of cotton that underwent a well-documented range expansion across the southeastern U.S. from Mexico beginning about 110 years ago. Eleven microsatellite loci were surveyed to infer the magnitude and pattern of genetic differentiation among boll weevil populations from 18 locations across eight U.S. states and northeast Mexico. Estimates of genetic diversity (allelic diversity and heterozygosity) were greater in Southern than Northern populations, and were greater in the west than the east among Northern populations. Boll weevil populations were genetically structured as a whole across the geographic range sampled, with a global F (ST) of 0.241. South-central populations exhibit classic isolation by distance, but evidence suggests that populations within the Eastern and Western regions have not yet reached genetic equilibrium. Gene flow appears to be relatively high among populations within the Eastern region. Population assignment data and estimates of gene flow indicate that migration between locations separated by < 300 km is frequent. The database of microsatellite genotypes generated in this study now makes it possible, through population assignment techniques, to identify the most likely geographic source of a boll weevil reintroduced to an eradication zone, which will help action agencies decide the most appropriate mitigation response.

  11. Cryptic diversity in vertebrates: molecular data double estimates of species diversity in a radiation of Australian lizards (Diplodactylus, Gekkota)

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Paul M.; Adams, Mark; Lee, Michael S.Y.; Hutchinson, Mark N.; Doughty, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A major problem for biodiversity conservation and management is that a significant portion of species diversity remains undocumented (the ‘taxonomic impediment’). This problem is widely acknowledged to be dire among invertebrates and in developing countries; here, we demonstrate that it can be acute even in conspicuous animals (reptiles) and in developed nations (Australia). A survey of mtDNA, allozyme and chromosomal variation in the Australian gecko, genus Diplodactylus, increases overall species diversity estimates from 13 to 29. Four nominal species each actually represent multi-species complexes; three of these species complexes are not even monophyletic. The high proportion of cryptic species discovered emphasizes the importance of continuing detailed assessments of species diversity, even in apparently well-known taxa from industrialized countries. PMID:19324781

  12. [The estimation of possibilities for the application of the laser capture microdissection technology for the molecular-genetic expert analysis (genotyping) of human chromosomal DNA].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P L; Leonov, S N; Zemskova, E Iu

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to estimate the possibilities of application of the laser capture microdissection (LCM) technology for the molecular-genetic expert analysis (genotyping) of human chromosomal DNA. The experimental method employed for the purpose was the multiplex multilocus analysis of autosomal DNA polymorphism in the preparations of buccal epitheliocytes obtained by LCM. The key principles of the study were the application of physical methods for contrast enhancement of the micropreparations (such as phase-contrast microscopy and dark-field microscopy) and PCR-compatible cell lysis. Genotyping was carried out with the use of AmpFISTR Minifiler TM PCR Amplification Kits ("Applied Biosynthesis", USA). It was shown that the technique employed in the present study ensures reliable genotyping of human chromosomal DNA in the pooled preparations containing 10-20 dissected diploid cells each. This result fairly well agrees with the calculated sensitivity of the method. A few practical recommendations are offered.

  13. Study of ExacTrac X-ray 6D IGRT setup uncertainty for marker-based prostate IMRT treatment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chengyu; Tazi, Adam; Fang, Deborah Xiangdong; Iannuzzi, Christopher

    2012-05-10

    Novalis Tx ExacTrac X-ray system has the 6D adjustment ability for patient setup. Limited studies exist about the setup uncertainty with ExacTrac X-ray system for IMRT prostate treatment with fiducial markers implanted. The purpose of this study is to investigate the marker-based prostate IMRT treatment setup uncertainty using ExacTrac 6D IGRT ability for patient setup. Forty-three patients with prostate cancers and markers implanted have been treated on the Novalis Tx machine. The ExacTrac X-ray system has been used for the patient pretreatment setup and intratreatment verification. In total, the shifts data for 1261 fractions and 3504 correction times (the numbers of X-ray images were taken from tube 1 and tube 2) have been analyzed. The setup uncertainty has been separated into uncertainties in 6D. Marker matching uncertainty was also analyzed. Correction frequency probability density function was plotted, and the radiation dose for imaging was calculated. The minimum, average, and maximum translation shifts were: -5.12 ± 3.89 mm, 0.20 ± 2.21 mm, and 6.07 ± 4.44 mm, respectively, in the lateral direction; -6.80 ± 3.21 mm, -1.09 ± 2.21 mm, and 3.12 ± 2.62 mm, respectively, in the longitudinal direction; and -7.33 ± 3.46 mm, -0.93 ± 2.70 mm, and 5.93 ± 4.85mm, respectively, in the vertical direction. The minimum, average, and maximum rotation shifts were: -1.23° ± 1.95°, 0.25° ± 1.30°, and 2.38° ± 2.91°, respectively, along lateral direction; -0.67° ± 0.91°, 0.10° ± 0.61°, and 1.51° ± 2.04°, respectively, along longitudinal direction; and -0.75° ± 1.01°, 0.02° ± 0.50°, and 0.82° ± 1.13°, respectively, along vertical direction. On average, each patient had three correction times during one fraction treatment. The radiation dose is about 3 mSv per fraction. With the ExacTrac 6D X-ray system, the prostate IMRT treatment with marker implanted can achieve less than 2 mm setup uncertainty in translations, and less than 0.25° in

  14. Unraveling the evolutionary radiation of the thoracican barnacles using molecular and morphological evidence: a comparison of several divergence time estimation approaches.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Høeg, Jens T; Crandall, Keith A

    2004-04-01

    The Thoracica includes the ordinary barnacles found along the sea shore and is the most diverse and well-studied superorder of Cirripedia. However, although the literature abounds with scenarios explaining the evolution of these barnacles, very few studies have attempted to test these hypotheses in a phylogenetic context. The few attempts at phylogenetic analyses have suffered from a lack of phylogenetic signal and small numbers of taxa. We collected DNA sequences from the nuclear 18S, 28S, and histone H3 genes and the mitochondrial 12S and 16S genes (4,871 bp total) and data for 37 adult and 53 larval morphological characters from 43 taxa representing all the extant thoracican suborders (except the monospecific Brachylepadomorpha). Four Rhizocephala (highly modified parasitic barnacles) taxa and a Rhizocephala + Acrothoracica (burrowing barnacles) hypothetical ancestor were used as the outgroup for the molecular and morphological analyses, respectively. We analyzed these data separately and combined using maximum likelihood (ML) under "hill-climbing" and genetic algorithm heuristic searches, maximum parsimony procedures, and Bayesian inference coupled with Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques under mixed and homogeneous models of nucleotide substitution. The resulting phylogenetic trees answered key questions in barnacle evolution. The four-plated Iblomorpha were shown as the most primitive thoracican, and the plateless Heteralepadomorpha were placed as the sister group of the Lepadomorpha. These relationships suggest for the first time in an invertebrate that exoskeleton biomineralization may have evolved from phosphatic to calcitic. Sessilia (nonpedunculate) barnacles were depicted as monophyletic and appear to have evolved from a stalked (pedunculate) multiplated (5+) scalpelloidlike ancestor rather than a five-plated lepadomorphan ancestor. The Balanomorpha (symmetric sessile barnacles) appear to have the following relationship: (Chthamaloidea

  15. Evolution on a volcanic conveyor belt: using phylogeographic reconstructions and K-Ar-based ages of the Hawaiian Islands to estimate molecular evolutionary rates.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, R C; McIntosh, C E; Tarr, C L

    1998-04-01

    The Hawaiian Islands form as the Pacific Plate moves over a 'hot spot' in the earth's mantle where magma extrudes through the crust to build huge shield volcanos. The islands subside and erode as the plate carries them to the north-west, eventually to become coral atolls and seamounts. Thus islands are ordered linearly by age, with the oldest islands in the north-west (e.g. Kauai at 5.1 Ma) and the youngest in the south-east (e.g. Hawaii at 0.43 Ma). K-Ar estimates of the date of an island's formation provide a maximum age for the taxa inhabiting the island. These ages can be used to calibrate rates of molecular change under the following assumptions: (i) K-Ar dates are accurate; (ii) tree topologies show that derivation of taxa parallels the timing of island formation; (iii) populations do not colonize long after island emergence; (iv) the coalescent point for sister taxa does not greatly predate the formation of the colonized younger island; (v) saturation effects and (vi) among-lineage rate variation are minimal or correctable; and (vii) unbiased standard errors of distances and regressions can be estimated from multiple pairwise comparisons. We use the approach to obtain overall corrected rate calibrations for: (i) part of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in Hawaiian drepanidines (0.016 sequence divergence/Myr); (ii) the Yp1 gene in Hawaiian Drosophila (0.019/Myr Kambysellis et al. 1995); and (iii) parts of the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA and tRNAval in Laupala crickets (0.024-0.102/Myr, Shaw 1996). We discuss the reliability of the estimates given the assumptions (i-vii) above and contrast the results with previous calibrations of Adh in Hawaiian Drosophila and chloroplast DNA in lobeliods.

  16. Improvement of marker-based predictability of Apparent Amylose Content in japonica rice through GBSSI allele mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apparent Amylose Content (AAC), regulated by the Waxy gene, represents the key determinant of rice cooking properties. In occidental countries high AAC rice represents the most requested market class but the availability of molecular markers allowing specific selection of high AAC varieties is limited. Results In this study, the effectiveness of available molecular markers in predicting AAC was evaluated in a collection of 127 rice accessions (125 japonica ssp. and 2 indica ssp.) characterized by AAC values from glutinous to 26%. The analyses highlighted the presence of several different allelic patterns identifiable by a few molecular markers, and two of them, i.e., the SNPs at intron1 and exon 6, were able to explain a maximum of 79.5% of AAC variation. However, the available molecular markers haplotypes did not provide tools for predicting accessions with AAC higher than 24.5%. To identify additional polymorphisms, the re-sequencing of the Waxy gene and 1kbp of the putative upstream regulatory region was performed in 21 genotypes representing all the AAC classes identified. Several previously un-characterized SNPs were identified and four of them were used to develop dCAPS markers. Conclusions The addition of the SNPs newly identified slightly increased the AAC explained variation and allowed the identification of a haplotype almost unequivocally associated to AAC higher than 24.5%. Haplotypes at the waxy locus were also associated to grain length and length/width (L/W) ratio. In particular, the SNP at the first intron, which identifies the Wx a and Wx b alleles, was associated with differences in the width of the grain, the L/W ratio and the length of the kernel, most likely as a result of human selection. PMID:24383761

  17. Estimation of activation energy for electroporation and pore growth rate in liquid crystalline and gel phases of lipid bilayers using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Amit Kumar; Kanchi, Subbarao; Venkataraman, V; Ayappa, K G; Maiti, Prabal K

    2015-11-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of electroporation in POPC and DPPC lipid bilayers have been carried out at different temperatures ranging from 230 K to 350 K for varying electric fields. The dynamics of pore formation, including threshold field, pore initiation time, pore growth rate, and pore closure rate after the field is switched off, was studied in both the gel and liquid crystalline (Lα) phases of the bilayers. Using an Arrhenius model of pore initiation kinetics, the activation energy for pore opening was estimated to be 25.6 kJ mol(-1) and 32.6 kJ mol(-1) in the Lα phase of POPC and DPPC lipids respectively at a field strength of 0.32 V nm(-1). The activation energy decreases to 24.2 kJ mol(-1) and 23.7 kJ mol(-1) respectively at a higher field strength of 1.1 V nm(-1). At temperatures below the melting point, the activation energy in the gel phase of POPC and DPPC increases to 28.8 kJ mol(-1) and 34.4 kJ mol(-1) respectively at the same field of 1.1 V nm(-1). The pore closing time was found to be higher in the gel than in the Lα phase. The pore growth rate increases linearly with temperature and quadratically with field, consistent with viscosity limited growth models.

  18. Molecular-based estimate of species number, phylogenetic relationships and divergence times for the genus Stenotaenia (Chilopoda, Geophilomorpha) in the Italian region

    PubMed Central

    Del Latte, Laura; Bortolin, Francesca; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Fusco, Giuseppe; Bonato, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Stenotaenia is one of the largest and most widespread genera of geophilid centipedes in the Western Palearctic, with a very uniform morphology and about fifteen species provisionally recognized. For a better understanding of Stenotaenia species-level taxonomy, we have explored the possibility of using molecular data. As a preliminary assay, we sampled twelve populations, mainly from the Italian region, and analyzed partial sequences of the two genes COI and 28S. We employed a DNA-barcoding approach, complemented by a phylogenetic analysis coupled with divergence time estimation. Assuming a barcoding gap of 10–16% K2P pairwise distances, we found evidence for the presence of at least six Stenotaenia species in the Italian region, which started diverging about 50 million years ago, only partially matching with previously recognized species. We found that small-sized oligopodous species belong to a single clade that originated about 33 million years ago, and obtained some preliminary evidence of the related genus Tuoba being nested within Stenotaenia. PMID:26257533

  19. Alternative methods for estimating common descriptors for QSAR studies of dyes and fluorescent probes using molecular modeling software. 2. Correlations between log P and the hydrophilic/lipophilic index, and new methods for estimating degrees of amphiphilicity.

    PubMed

    Dapson, Richard W; Horobin, Richard W

    2013-11-01

    The log P descriptor, despite its usefulness, can be difficult to use, especially for researchers lacking skills in physical chemistry. Moreover this classic measure has been determined in numerous ways, which can result in inconsistant estimates of log P values, especially for relatively complex molecules such as fluorescent probes. Novel measures of hydrophilicity/lipophilicity (the Hydrophilic/Lipophilic Index, HLI) and amphiphilicity (hydrophilic/lipophilic indices for the head group and tail, HLIT and HLIHG, respectively) therefore have been devised. We compare these descriptors with measures based on log P, the standard method for quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) studies. HLI can be determined using widely available molecular modeling software, coupled with simple arithmetic calculations. It is based on partial atomic charges and is intended to be a stand-alone measure of hydrophilicity/lipophilicity. Given the wide application of log P, however, we investigated the correlation between HLI and log P using a test set of 56 fluorescent probes of widely different physicochemical character. Overall correlation was poor; however, correlation of HLI and log P for probes of narrowly specified charge types, i.e., non-ionic compounds, anions, conjugated cations, or zwitterions, was excellent. Values for probes with additional nonconjugated quaternary cations, however, were less well correlated. The newly devised HLI can be divided into domain-specific descriptors, HLIT and HLIHG in amphiphilic probes. Determinations of amphiphilicity, made independently by the authors using their respective methods, showed excellent agreement. Quantifying amphiphilicity from partial log P values of the head group (head group hydrophilicity; HGH) and tail (amphiphilicity index; AI) has proved useful for understanding fluorescent probe action. The same limitations of log P apply to HGH and AI, however. The novel descriptors, HLIT and HLIHG, offer analogous advantages

  20. SU-E-J-24: Can Fiducial Marker-Based Setup Using ExacTrac Be An Alternative to Soft Tissue-Based Setup Using Cone-Beam CT for Prostate IMRT?

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, S; Utsunomiya, S; Abe, E; Aoyama, H; Satou, H; Sakai, H; Yamada, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess an accuracy of fiducial maker-based setup using ExacTrac (ExT-based setup) as compared with soft tissue-based setup using Cone-beam CT (CBCT-based setup) for patients with prostate cancer receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the purpose of investigating whether ExT-based setup can be an alternative to CBCT-based setup. Methods: The setup accuracy was analyzed prospectively for 7 prostate cancer patients with implanted three fiducial markers received IMRT. All patients were treated after CBCT-based setup was performed and corresponding shifts were recorded. ExacTrac images were obtained before and after CBCT-based setup. The fiducial marker-based shifts were calculated based on those two images and recorded on the assumption that the setup correction was carried out by fiducial marker-based auto correction. Mean and standard deviation of absolute differences and the correlation between CBCT and ExT shifts were estimated. Results: A total of 178 image dataset were analyzed. On the differences between CBCT and ExT shifts, 133 (75%) of 178 image dataset resulted in smaller differences than 3 mm in all dimensions. Mean differences in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) dimensions were 1.8 ± 1.9 mm, 0.7 ± 1.9 mm, and 0.6 ± 0.8 mm, respectively. The percentages of shift agreements within ±3 mm were 76% for AP, 90% for SI, and 100% for LR. The Pearson coefficient of correlation for CBCT and ExT shifts were 0.80 for AP, 0.80 for SI, and 0.65 for LR. Conclusion: This work showed that the accuracy of ExT-based setup was correlated with that of CBCT-based setup, implying that ExT-based setup has a potential ability to be an alternative to CBCT-based setup. The further work is to specify the conditions that ExT-based setup can provide the accuracy comparable to CBCT-based setup.

  1. Comparison of 3D Joint Angles Measured With the Kinect 2.0 Skeletal Tracker Versus a Marker-Based Motion Capture System.

    PubMed

    Guess, Trent M; Razu, Swithin; Jahandar, Amirhossein; Skubic, Marjorie; Huo, Zhiyu

    2017-04-01

    The Microsoft Kinect is becoming a widely used tool for inexpensive, portable measurement of human motion, with the potential to support clinical assessments of performance and function. In this study, the relative osteokinematic Cardan joint angles of the hip and knee were calculated using the Kinect 2.0 skeletal tracker. The pelvis segments of the default skeletal model were reoriented and 3-dimensional joint angles were compared with a marker-based system during a drop vertical jump and a hip abduction motion. Good agreement between the Kinect and marker-based system were found for knee (correlation coefficient = 0.96, cycle RMS error = 11°, peak flexion difference = 3°) and hip (correlation coefficient = 0.97, cycle RMS = 12°, peak flexion difference = 12°) flexion during the landing phase of the drop vertical jump and for hip abduction/adduction (correlation coefficient = 0.99, cycle RMS error = 7°, peak flexion difference = 8°) during isolated hip motion. Nonsagittal hip and knee angles did not correlate well for the drop vertical jump. When limited to activities in the optimal capture volume and with simple modifications to the skeletal model, the Kinect 2.0 skeletal tracker can provide limited 3-dimensional kinematic information of the lower limbs that may be useful for functional movement assessment.

  2. Comparison between low-cost marker-less and high-end marker-based motion capture systems for the computer-aided assessment of working ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, Alfredo; Pennestrì, Ettore; Valentini, Pier Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the comparison between a high-end marker-based acquisition system and a low-cost marker-less methodology for the assessment of the human posture during working tasks. The low-cost methodology is based on the use of a single Microsoft Kinect V1 device. The high-end acquisition system is the BTS SMART that requires the use of reflective markers to be placed on the subject's body. Three practical working activities involving object lifting and displacement have been investigated. The operational risk has been evaluated according to the lifting equation proposed by the American National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The results of the study show that the risk multipliers computed from the two acquisition methodologies are very close for all the analysed activities. In agreement to this outcome, the marker-less methodology based on the Microsoft Kinect V1 device seems very promising to promote the dissemination of computer-aided assessment of ergonomics while maintaining good accuracy and affordable costs. PRACTITIONER’S SUMMARY: The study is motivated by the increasing interest for on-site working ergonomics assessment. We compared a low-cost marker-less methodology with a high-end marker-based system. We tested them on three different working tasks, assessing the working risk of lifting loads. The two methodologies showed comparable precision in all the investigations.

  3. No Gold Standard Estimation of the Sensitivity and Specificity of Two Molecular Diagnostic Protocols for Trypanosoma brucei spp. in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    de Clare Bronsvoort, Barend Mark; von Wissmann, Beatrix; Fèvre, Eric Maurice; Handel, Ian Graham; Picozzi, Kim; Welburn, Sue Christina

    2010-01-01

    African animal trypanosomiasis is caused by a range of tsetse transmitted protozoan parasites includingTrypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma congolense and Trypansoma brucei. In Western Kenya and other parts of East Africa two subspecies of T. brucei, T.b. brucei and the zoonoticT.b. rhodesiense, co-circulate in livestock. A range of polymerase chain reactions (PCR) have been developed as important molecular diagnostic tools for epidemiological investigations of T. brucei s.l. in the animal reservoir and of its zoonotic potential. Quantification of the relative performance of different diagnostic PCRs is essential to ensure comparability of studies. This paper describes an evaluation of two diagnostic test systems for T. brucei using a T. brucei s.l. specific PCR [1] and a single nested PCR targeting the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of trypanosome ribosomal DNA [2]. A Bayesian formulation of the Hui-Walter latent class model was employed to estimate their test performance in the absence of a gold standard test for detecting T.brucei s.l. infections in ear-vein blood samples from cattle, pig, sheep and goat populations in Western Kenya, stored on Whatman FTA cards. The results indicate that the system employing the T. brucei s.l. specific PCR (Se1 = 0.760) had a higher sensitivity than the ITS-PCR (Se2 = 0.640); both have high specificity (Sp1 = 0.998; Sp2 = 0.997). The true prevalences for livestock populations were estimated (pcattle = 0.091, ppigs = 0.066, pgoats = 0.005, psheep = 0.006), taking into account the uncertainties in the specificity and sensitivity of the two test systems. Implications of test performance include the required survey sample size; due to its higher sensitivity and specificity, the T. brucei s.l. specific PCR requires a consistently smaller sample size than the ITS-PCR for the detection of T. brucei s.l. However the ITS-PCR is able to simultaneously screen samples for other pathogenic trypanosomes

  4. A Preliminary Study of Genetic Variation in Populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae) from North-East Brazil, Estimated with AFLP Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, I. M.; Mayo, S. J.; van den Berg, C.; Fay, M. F.; Chester, M.; Lexer, C.; Kirkup, D.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims This study sought genetic evidence of long-term isolation in populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae), a herbaceous, probably outbreeding, humid forest hemi-epiphyte, in the brejo forests of Ceará (north-east Brazil), and clarification of their relationships with populations in Amazonia and the Atlantic forest of Brazil. Methods Within-population genetic diversity and between-population dissimilarity were estimated using AFLP molecular markers in 75 individuals from eight populations located in Ceará, the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and Amazonia. Key Results The populations showed a clinal pattern of weak genetic differentiation over a large geographical region (FST = 0·1896). A strong correlation between genetic and geographical distance (Mantel test: r = 0·6903, P = 0·002) suggests a historical pattern of isolation by distance. Genetic structure analysis revealed at least two distinct gene pools in the data. The two isolated Ceará populations are significantly different from each other (pairwise ΦPT = 0·137, P = 0·003) and as diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·1832, 0·1706) as those in the Atlantic and Amazon forest regions. The population in southern Brazil is less diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·127) than the rest. The Ceará populations are related to those of the Atlantic forest rather than those from Amazonia (AMOVA, among-groups variation = 11·95 %, P = 0·037). Conclusions The gene pools detected within an overall pattern of clinal variation suggest distinct episodes of gene flow, possibly correlated with past humid forest expansions. The Ceará populations show no evidence of erosion of genetic diversity, although this was expected because of their isolation. Their genetic differentiation and relatively high diversity reinforce the importance of conserving the endangered brejo forests. PMID:17823112

  5. Molecular sizes of amino acid transporters in the luminal membrane from the kidney cortex, estimated by the radiation-inactivation method.

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, R; Demeule, M; Jetté, M; Potier, M

    1990-01-01

    Renal brush-border membrane vesicles from rat kidney cortex were irradiated in frozen state with a gamma-radiation source. Initial rates of influx into these vesicles were estimated for substrates such as L-glutamic acid, L-alanine, L-proline and L-leucine to establish the molecular sizes of their carriers. Transport was measured in initial-rate conditions to avoid artifacts arising from a decrease in the driving force caused by a modification of membrane permeability. Initial rates of Na(+)-independent uptakes for those four substrates appeared unaffected in the dose range used (0-6 Mrad), indicating that the passive permeability of the membrane towards these substrates was unaffected. However, at higher doses of irradiation the Na+ influx and the intravesicular volume evaluated by the uptake of glucose at equilibrium were altered by radiation. Thus Na(+)-dependent influx values were corrected for volume changes, and the corrected values were used to compute radiation-inactivation sizes of the transport systems. Their respective values for L-glutamic acid, L-proline, L-leucine and L-alanine carriers were 250, 224, 293 and 274 kDa. The presence of the free-radicals scavenger benzoic acid in the frozen samples during irradiation did not affect the uptake of glucose, phosphate and alkaline phosphatase activity. These results indicate that freezing samples in a cryoprotective medium was enough to prevent secondary inactivation of transporters by free radicals. Uptakes of beta-alanine and L-lysine were much less affected by radiation. The radiation-inactivation size of the Na(+)-dependent beta-alanine carrier was 127 kDa and that of the L-lysine carrier was 90 kDa. PMID:1971509

  6. Use of an exchange method to estimate the association and dissociation rate constants of cadmium complexes formed with low-molecular-weight organic acids commonly exuded by plant roots.

    PubMed

    Schneider, André; Nguyen, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Organic acids released from plant roots can form complexes with cadmium (Cd) in the soil solution and influence metal bioavailability not only due to the nature and concentration of the complexes but also due to their lability. The lability of a complex influences its ability to buffer changes in the concentration of free ions (Cd); it depends on the association (, m mol s) and dissociation (, s) rate constants. A resin exchange method was used to estimate and (m mol s), which is the conditional estimate of depending on the calcium (Ca) concentration in solution. The constants were estimated for oxalate, citrate, and malate, three low-molecular-weight organic acids commonly exuded by plant roots and expected to strongly influence Cd uptake by plants. For all three organic acids, the and estimates were around 2.5 10 m mol s and 1.3 × 10 s, respectively. Based on the literature, these values indicate that the Cd- low-molecular-weight organic acids complexes formed between Cd and low-molecular-weight organic acids may be less labile than complexes formed with soil soluble organic matter but more labile than those formed with aminopolycarboxylic chelates.

  7. Molecular dynamics estimates for the thermodynamic properties of the Fe-S liquid cores of the Moon, Io, Europa, and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, O. L.; Belashchenko, D. K.

    2016-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed for the physical and chemical properties of solid and liquid Fe-S solutions using the embedded atom model (EAM) potential as applied to the internal structure of the Moon, Io, Europa, and Ganymede under the assumption that the satellites' cores can be described by a two-component iron-sulfur system. Calculated results are presented for the thermodynamic parameters including the caloric, thermal, and elastic properties (specific heat, thermal expansion, Grüneisen parameter, density, compression module, velocity of sound, and adiabatic gradient) of the Fe-S solutions at sulfur concentrations of 0-18 at %, temperatures of up to 2500 K, and pressures of up to 14 GPa. The velocity of sound, which increases as pressure rises, is weakly dependent on sulfur concentration and temperature. For the Moon's outer Fe-S core (~5 GPa/2000 K), which contains 6-16 at % (3.5-10 wt %) sulfur, the density and the velocity of sound are estimated at 6.3-7.0 g/cm3 and 4000 ± 50 m/s, respectively. The MD calculations are compared with the interpretation of the Apollo observations (Weber et al., 2011) to show a good consistency of the velocity of P-waves in the Moon's liquid core whereas the thermodynamic density of the Fe-S core is not consistent with the seismic models with ρ = 5.1-5.2 g/cm3 (Garcia et al., 2011; Weber et al., 2011). The revision the density values for the core leads to the revision of its size and mass. At sulfur concentrations of 3.5-10 wt %, the density of the Fe-S melt is 20-30% higher that the seismic density of the core. Therefore, the most likely radius of the Moon's outer core must be less than 330 km (Weber et al., 2011) because, provided that the constraint on the Moon's mass and moment of inertia is satisfied, an increase in the density of the core must lead to a reduction of its radius. For Jupiter's Galilean moons Io, Europa, and Ganymede, constraints are obtained on the size, density, and sound velocity of

  8. The zero-multipole summation method for estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics: analysis of the accuracy and application to liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2014-05-21

    In the preceding paper [I. Fukuda, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174107 (2013)], the zero-multipole (ZM) summation method was proposed for efficiently evaluating the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a classical point charge system. The summation takes a simple pairwise form, but prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large energetic noises and significant artifacts. The purpose of this paper is to judge the ability of the ZM method by investigating the accuracy, parameter dependencies, and stability in applications to liquid systems. To conduct this, first, the energy-functional error was divided into three terms and each term was analyzed by a theoretical error-bound estimation. This estimation gave us a clear basis of the discussions on the numerical investigations. It also gave a new viewpoint between the excess energy error and the damping effect by the damping parameter. Second, with the aid of these analyses, the ZM method was evaluated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two fundamental liquid systems, a molten sodium-chlorine ion system and a pure water molecule system. In the ion system, the energy accuracy, compared with the Ewald summation, was better for a larger value of multipole moment l currently induced until l ≲ 3 on average. This accuracy improvement with increasing l is due to the enhancement of the excess-energy accuracy. However, this improvement is wholly effective in the total accuracy if the theoretical moment l is smaller than or equal to a system intrinsic moment L. The simulation results thus indicate L ∼ 3 in this system, and we observed less accuracy in l = 4. We demonstrated the origins of parameter dependencies appearing in the crossing behavior and the oscillations of the energy error curves. With raising the moment l we observed, smaller values of the damping parameter provided more accurate results and smoother

  9. SU-E-J-39: Dosimetric Benefit of Implanted Marker-Based CBCT Setup for Definitive Prostatic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, H; Wu, Z; Bluemenfeld, P; Chu, J; Wang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Daily setup for definitive prostatic radiotherapy is challenged by suboptimal visibility of the prostate boundary and daily variation of rectum shape and position. For patients with improved bowel preparation, we conducted a dosimetric comparison between prostate implanted marker (IM)-based daily setup and anterior rectal wall (ARW)-based setup, with the hypothesis that the former leads to adequate target coverage with better rectal sparing. Methods Five IMRT/VMAT prostate cases with implanted markers were selected for analysis. Daily CBCT showed improvement of the rectal volume compared to planning CT. For each patient, the prostate and rectum were contoured on three CBCT images (fraction 5/15/25) with subsequent physician review. The CBCTs were then registered to a planning CT using IM-based registration. The deviation of ARW positions from planning CT to CBCT were analyzed at various sup-inf levels (−1.8 cm to 1.8 cm from level of prostate center). To estimate the potential dosimetric impact from ARW-based setup, the treatment plans were recalculated using A-P shifts ranging from −1mm to +6mm. Clinically important rectum DVH values including Dmax, D3cc and Dmean were computed. Results For the studied patients, we observed on average 32% rectum volume reduction from planning CT to CBCT. As a Results, the ARW on average shifts posteriorly by −1mm to +5mm, depending on the sup-inf level of observation, with larger shifts observed at more superior levels. Recalculation shows that when ARW shifts 1mm posteriorly, ARW-based CBCT setup leads to a 1.0%, 4.2%, and 3.2% increase in rectum Dmax, D3cc, and Dmean, respectively, compared to IM-based setup. The dosimetric deviations increase to 4.7%, 25.8% and 24.7% when ARW shifts 6mm posteriorly. No significant prostate-only dose difference was observed. Conclusion For patients with improved bowel preparation, IM-based CBCT setup leads to accurate prostate coverage along with significantly lower rectal dose

  10. ESTIMATION OF HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER AND PHOSPHATE ESTER COMPOUNDS IN AQUEOUS SYSTEMS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE BY SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid ester and phosphate ester compounds in aqueous non- aqueous and systems strictly from molecular structure. The energy diffe...

  11. An evaluation of atomic and molecular mixture rules and group additivity concepts for the estimation of radiation absorption by long-chained, saturated hydrocarbons at vacuum UV and soft X-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Jennifer W.; Cooper, Glyn; Burton, Gordon R.; Brion, C. E.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of using atomic and molecular mixture rules as well as group additivity concepts for predicting valence shell photoabsorption oscillator strengths (cross sections) for long-chained alkane molecules has been investigated over a wide energy range from 18 to 220 eV. The predictions are discussed with reference to recently reported experimental measurements (Chem. Phys. 173 (1993) 209) for normal alkanes, C nH 2 n+2 ( n=1-8). Atomic mixture rules based on either theoretical or experimental atomic oscillator strength sums are found to be unsatisfactory, giving very large errors at most photon energies. A wide range of molecular mixture rules based on linear combinations of measured oscillator strength values for small 'component' alkane molecules and molecular hydrogen have also been evaluated. Although good agreement with experiment is obtained with some linear combinations, many others result in substantial errors. Molecular mixture rules constructed using oscillator strength for larger component alkanes generally give better estimates of the experimentally measured data; however, since no other a priori physical or chemical reasons can be advanced for any particular choice of molecular mixture rule, this procedure is unsatisfactory for general application. In contrast, a group additivity procedure based on oscillator strength estimates for the methylene (CH 2) and methyl (CH 3) alkane group fragments, derived entirely from the photoabsorption measurements for lower alkanes, provides excellent agreement with the measured oscillator strengths for C 8H 18 over the entire energy range studied (18-220 eV). The absolute photoabsorption group oscillator strengths derived for the CH 2 and CH 3 fragments should be applicable to assessing the contributions from saturated hydrocarbon groupings to vacuum UV and soft X-ray absorption in larger chemical and biochemical systems.

  12. Ghost marker detection and elimination in marker-based optical tracking systems for real-time tracking in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Guanghua Li, Jonathan; Huang, Yin; Mittauer, Kathryn; Lu, Bo; Liu, Chihray

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To propose a simple model to explain the origin of ghost markers in marker-based optical tracking systems (OTS) and to develop retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. Methods: In marker-based OTS, ghost markers are virtual markers created due to the cross-talk between the two camera sensors, which can lead to system execution failure or inaccuracy in patient tracking. As a result, the users have to limit the number of markers and avoid certain marker configurations to reduce the chances of ghost markers. In this work, the authors propose retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. The two camera sensors were treated as mathematical points in space. The authors identified the coplanar within limit (CWL) condition as the necessary condition for ghost marker occurrence. A simple ghost marker detection method was proposed based on the model. Ghost marker elimination was achieved through pattern matching: a ghost marker-free reference set was matched with the optical marker set observed by the OTS; unmatched optical markers were eliminated as either ghost markers or misplaced markers. The pattern matching problem was formulated as a constraint satisfaction problem (using pairwise distances as constraints) and solved with an iterative backtracking algorithm. Wildcard markers were introduced to address missing or misplaced markers. An experiment was designed to measure the sensor positions and the limit for the CWL condition. The ghost marker detection and elimination algorithms were verified with samples collected from a five-marker jig and a nine-marker anthropomorphic phantom, rotated with the treatment couch from −60° to +60°. The accuracy of the pattern matching algorithm was further validated with marker patterns from 40 patients who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). For this purpose, a synthetic optical marker pattern was created for each patient by introducing ghost markers, marker position

  13. Performing gait analysis within the timed up & go assessment test: comparison of aTUG to a marker-based tracking system.

    PubMed

    Frenken, Thomas; Lohmann, Okko; Frenken, Melina; Steen, Enno-Edzard; Hein, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Results from a technical validation of the aTUG (ambient Timed Up & Go) system are presented. The approach's gait analysis capabilities were compared to a gold standard: SIMI Motion, a marker-based motion tracking system. Seven people participated and computation of step length and step duration happened with a median error of 3 cm (IQR 3 cm) respectively 0.08 s (IQR 0.07 s). These results show that aTUG has a measurement precision which is sufficient for use in clinical gait analysis and enables the use of the device without a gold standard, i.e. in hospitals outside laboratories or in the homes of patients. aTUG is an approach and system that utilizes only ambient sensor technologies to support the execution of geriatric mobility assessment tests and to perform a gait analysis simultaneously. Such capabilities are strongly demanded in order to support physicians in executing the geriatric assessment tests frequently and objectively in professional and domestic environments. The latter may enable more early prevention and more sustainable rehabilitation.

  14. Minimum Cost Estimation of a Baseline Survey for a Molecular Epidemiology Cohort Study: Collecting Participants in a Model Region in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ohashi, Kayo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Some recent molecular epidemiology studies of the effects of genetic and environmental factors on human health have required the enrollment of more than 100 000 participants and the involvement of regional study offices across the country. Although regional study office investigators play a critical role in these studies, including the acquisition of funds, this role is rarely discussed. Methods We first differentiated the functions of the regional and central study offices. We then investigated the minimum number of items required and approximate cost of a molecular epidemiology study enrolling 7400 participants from a model region with a population of 100 000 for a 4-year baseline survey using a standard protocol developed based on the protocol of Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation. Results The functions of the regional study office were identified, and individual expenses were itemized. The total cost of the 4-year baseline survey was 153 million yen, excluding consumption tax. Accounting difficulties in conducting the survey were clarified. Conclusions We investigated a standardized example of the tasks and total actual costs of a regional study office. Our approach is easy to utilize and will help improve the management of regional study offices in future molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:27001116

  15. Accuracy of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system (ExacTrac®) for stereotactic body radiotherapy in localizing the planned isocenter using fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Montes-Rodríguez, María de los Ángeles Mitsoura, Eleni; Hernández-Bojórquez, Mariana; Martínez-Gómez, Alma Angélica; Contreras-Pérez, Agustín; Negrete-Hernández, Ingrid Mireya; Hernández-Oviedo, Jorge Omar; Santiago-Concha, Bernardino Gabriel

    2014-11-07

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) requires a controlled immobilization and position monitoring of patient and target. The purpose of this work is to analyze the performance of the imaging system ExacTrac® (ETX) using infrared and fiducial markers. Materials and methods: In order to assure the accuracy of isocenter localization, a Quality Assurance procedure was applied using an infrared marker-based positioning system. Scans were acquired of an inhouse-agar gel and solid water phantom with infrared spheres. In the inner part of the phantom, three reference markers were delineated as reference and one pellet was place internally; which was assigned as the isocenter. The iPlan® RT Dose treatment planning system. Images were exported to the ETX console. Images were acquired with the ETX to check the correctness of the isocenter placement. Adjustments were made in 6D the reference markers were used to fuse the images. Couch shifts were registered. The procedure was repeated for verification purposes. Results: The data recorded of the verifications in translational and rotational movements showed averaged 3D spatial uncertainties of 0.31 ± 0.42 mm respectively 0.82° ± 0.46° in the phantom and the first correction of these uncertainties were of 1.51 ± 1.14 mm respectively and 1.37° ± 0.61°. Conclusions: This study shows a high accuracy and repeatability in positioning the selected isocenter. The ETX-system for verifying the treatment isocenter position has the ability to monitor the tracing position of interest, making it possible to be used for SBRT positioning within uncertainty ≤1mm.

  16. Accuracy of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system (ExacTrac®) for stereotactic body radiotherapy in localizing the planned isocenter using fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Rodríguez, María de los Ángeles; Hernández-Bojórquez, Mariana; Martínez-Gómez, Alma Angélica; Contreras-Pérez, Agustín; Negrete-Hernández, Ingrid Mireya; Hernández-Oviedo, Jorge Omar; Mitsoura, Eleni; Santiago-Concha, Bernardino Gabriel

    2014-11-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) requires a controlled immobilization and position monitoring of patient and target. The purpose of this work is to analyze the performance of the imaging system ExacTrac® (ETX) using infrared and fiducial markers. Materials and methods: In order to assure the accuracy of isocenter localization, a Quality Assurance procedure was applied using an infrared marker-based positioning system. Scans were acquired of an inhouse-agar gel and solid water phantom with infrared spheres. In the inner part of the phantom, three reference markers were delineated as reference and one pellet was place internally; which was assigned as the isocenter. The iPlan® RT Dose treatment planning system. Images were exported to the ETX console. Images were acquired with the ETX to check the correctness of the isocenter placement. Adjustments were made in 6D the reference markers were used to fuse the images. Couch shifts were registered. The procedure was repeated for verification purposes. Results: The data recorded of the verifications in translational and rotational movements showed averaged 3D spatial uncertainties of 0.31 ± 0.42 mm respectively 0.82° ± 0.46° in the phantom and the first correction of these uncertainties were of 1.51 ± 1.14 mm respectively and 1.37° ± 0.61°. Conclusions: This study shows a high accuracy and repeatability in positioning the selected isocenter. The ETX-system for verifying the treatment isocenter position has the ability to monitor the tracing position of interest, making it possible to be used for SBRT positioning within uncertainty ≤1mm.

  17. Incorporating molecular phylogenetics with larval morphology while mitigating the effects of substitution saturation on phylogeny estimation: A new hypothesis of relationships for the flatfish family Pleuronectidae (Percomorpha: Pleuronectiformes).

    PubMed

    Roje, Dawn M

    2010-08-01

    The family Pleuronectidae contains 23 genera and 60 species of primarily dextral flatfishes that maintain a broad distribution, inhabiting all oceans of the Northern Hemisphere. Adults are asymmetrical fishes that are mostly benthic; however, pre-transformation larvae are symmetrical, swimming upright in the water column. A previous phylogenetic analysis, utilizing characters of adult morphology, recovered four major lineages of Pleuronectidae. Evidence from external larval morphology, however, indicates an alternative hypothesis. To resolve intergeneric relationships, DNA sequences (totaling 2391 bp) from the nuclear recombination activating gene 2 (RAG2), and the mitochondrial genes, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) and 16S, for 22 pleuronectid genera, were analyzed using Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood methods. The markers were partitioned and analyzed for substitution saturation and only the third codon position of ND1 (ND1-3) was found to have reached saturation. Two datasets, one with the saturated data and one without, were analyzed and compared to assess the effects of the saturated data on topology and clade support. Change-point analysis was carried out on saturated transitions and was used to determine the first point where the saturation curve began behaving non-linearly. The level 1 change point was then treated as a threshold pairwise genetic distance. Those clades whose members all had a pairwise distance less than this value were treated as inferred from unsaturated data. Ancestral state reconstruction, utilizing parsimony with unordered states, was carried out on the molecular phylogenies and was used to determine the distribution of character states of larval morphology within the family. The presence of postanal ventral melanophores, distal finfold pigment, preopercular and otic spines, and the pattern of melanophores in the median finfolds of larvae maintain strong phylogenetic signals in the context of these new molecular phylogenies. These

  18. Age estimation for the genus Cymbidium (Orchidaceae: Epidendroideae) with implementation of fossil data calibration using molecular markers (ITS2 & matK) and phylogeographic inference from ancestral area reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Konhar, Ruchishree; Debnath, Manish; Marbaniang, Jean Valrie; Biswal, Devendra Kumar; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-12-01

    Intercontinental dislocations between tropical regions harboring two-thirds of the flowering plants have always drawn attention from taxonomists and biogeographers. One such family belonging to angiosperms is Orchidaceae with an herbaceous habit and high species diversity in the tropics. Here, we investigate the evolutionary and biogeographical history of the genus Cymbidium, which represents a monophyletic subfamily (Epidendroideae) of the orchids and comprises 50 odd species that are distinctly distributed in tropical to temperate regions. Much is not known about correlations among the level of CAM activity (one of the photosynthetic pathways often regarded as an adaptation to water stress in land plants), habitat, life forms, and phylogenetic relationships of orchids from an evolutionary perspective. A relatively well-resolved and highly supported phylogeny for Cymbidium orchids is reconstructed based on sequence analysis of ITS2 and matK regions from the chloroplast DNA available in public repositories viz. GenBank at NCBI. This study examines a genus level analysis by integrating different molecular matrices to existing fossil data on orchids in a molecular Bayesian relaxed clock employed in BEAST and assessed divergence times for the genus Cymbidium with a focus on evolutionary history of photosynthetic characters. Our study has enabled age estimations (45Ma) as well as ancestral area reconstruction for the genus Cymbidium using BEAST by addition of previously analyzed two internal calibration points.

  19. Improved Estimates of Thermodynamic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques refined for estimating heat of vaporization and other parameters from molecular structure. Using parabolic equation with three adjustable parameters, heat of vaporization can be used to estimate boiling point, and vice versa. Boiling points and vapor pressures for some nonpolar liquids were estimated by improved method and compared with previously reported values. Technique for estimating thermodynamic parameters should make it easier for engineers to choose among candidate heat-exchange fluids for thermochemical cycles.

  20. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. Part I. Numerical model-based optimization

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Fahrig, Rebecca; Keil, Andreas; Besier, Thor F.; Pal, Saikat; McWalter, Emily J.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Maier, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Human subjects in standing positions are apt to show much more involuntary motion than in supine positions. The authors aimed to simulate a complicated realistic lower body movement using the four-dimensional (4D) digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom. The authors also investigated fiducial marker-based motion compensation methods in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) space. The level of involuntary movement-induced artifacts and image quality improvement were investigated after applying each method. Methods: An optical tracking system with eight cameras and seven retroreflective markers enabled us to track involuntary motion of the lower body of nine healthy subjects holding a squat position at 60° of flexion. The XCAT-based knee model was developed using the 4D XCAT phantom and the optical tracking data acquired at 120 Hz. The authors divided the lower body in the XCAT into six parts and applied unique affine transforms to each so that the motion (6 degrees of freedom) could be synchronized with the optical markers’ location at each time frame. The control points of the XCAT were tessellated into triangles and 248 projection images were created based on intersections of each ray and monochromatic absorption. The tracking data sets with the largest motion (Subject 2) and the smallest motion (Subject 5) among the nine data sets were used to animate the XCAT knee model. The authors defined eight skin control points well distributed around the knees as pseudo-fiducial markers which functioned as a reference in motion correction. Motion compensation was done in the following ways: (1) simple projection shifting in 2D, (2) deformable projection warping in 2D, and (3) rigid body warping in 3D. Graphics hardware accelerated filtered backprojection was implemented and combined with the three correction methods in order to speed up the simulation process. Correction fidelity was evaluated as a function of number of markers used (4–12) and

  1. New STS molecular markers for assessment of genetic diversity and DNA fingerprinting in hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Patzak, Josef; Vrba, Lukás; Matousek, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Molecular markers have been increasingly used in genetic studies of crop species for their applicability in breeding programs. In this work, we report on the development of new sequence-tagged site (STS) markers based on sequence information from several identified hop (Humulus lupulus L.) genes. We demonstrate the usefulness of these STS markers and compare them to SSRs for identifying hop genotypes and estimating genetic diversity in a collection of 68 hop cultivars from around the world. We found 3 individual gene variants (A, B, C) of the chs_H1 gene in this collection. The most frequent gene variant, B (AJ304877), was not detected in Mt. Hood, Glacier, and Horizon (US) cultivars. Gene variant A came from an American germplasm through wild hops. We found length polymorphism in intron 1 of the chs2 gene, and 4 different amplified markers were detected in PCRs. The chs3 gene was found in only one third of the cultivars. None of the variants of the studied CHS genes were found in Humulus japonicus. We detected 5 major gene variants of DNA-binding protein in the collection of H. lupulus cultivars and 2 others in H. japonicus. We also found 3 individual gene variants of an endochitinase gene. The distribution of gene variants did not correlate with any resistance. We proved that developed STS markers can be successfully used for the analysis of genetic diversity and can substitute and supplement SSR markers in hop.

  2. Nearby Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebrun, F.

    1984-01-01

    If the gas-to-dust ratio is sufficiently uniform throughout the local interstellar medium, galaxy counts may provide a useful probe of the large scale structure of the interstellar gas. This idea substantiated by gamma ray observations led to the discovery of nearby molecular cloud complexes. The reddening studies indicate that one of them lies between 80 and 140 pc from the Sun. From CO observations, its molecular mass is estimated to be a few 1000 stellar mass units.

  3. RAPD and ISSR Marker-Based Comparative Evaluation of Genetic Diversity Among Indian Germplasms of Euryale ferox: an Aquatic Food Plant.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hemant; Priya, Priti; Singh, Nena; Kumar, Mukesh; Choudhary, Binod Kumar; Kumar, Lokendra; Singh, Indu Shekhar; Kumar, Nitish

    2016-12-01

    Euryale ferox Salisbury is an important aquatic food plant cultivated largely in eastern India. E. ferox is a monotypic genus, and breeding programmes have mostly relied on the variability present in the primary gene pool. Knowledge of the genetic structure of the population is limited, and there are very few reports available on the genetic diversity of E. ferox. In this study, comprehensive research on the genetic diversity of 16 germplasms of E. ferox was carried out using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Out of 320 RAPD and 95 ISSR primers screened initially, 61 primers (40 RAPD and 21 ISSR) gave reproducible bands and were selected for further work. Amplification of the 40 RAPD primers gave 533 polymorphic bands with an average of 13.32 polymorphic bands per primer. The percentage of polymorphism ranged from 37.5 to 100, with an average of 88.3 %. The 21 ISSR primers produced 259 bands, of which 214 were polymorphic, with an average of 10.19 polymorphic bands per primer. The percentage of polymorphism using ISSR primers ranged from 50 to 100, with a mean of 82.6 %. Jaccard's coefficient ranged from 0.45 to 0.69 (RAPD), 0.50 to 0.77 (ISSR) and 0.48 to 0.71 (RAPD and ISSR). Molecular characterization of different germplasms of E. ferox not only is essential for its conservation but also can be used in further breeding programmes.

  4. ISSR Marker Based Population Genetic Study of Melocanna baccifera (Roxb.) Kurz: A Commercially Important Bamboo of Manipur, North-East India.

    PubMed

    Nilkanta, Heikrujam; Amom, Thoungamba; Tikendra, Leimapokpam; Rahaman, Hamidur; Nongdam, Potshangbam

    2017-01-01

    Melocanna baccifera (Roxb.) Kurz is an economically important bamboo of North-East India experiencing population depletion in its natural habitats. Genetic variation studies were conducted in 7 populations sampled from 5 districts of Manipur using ISSR molecular markers. The investigation was carried out as a primary step towards developing effective conservation strategies for the protection of bamboo germplasm. ISSR marker analysis showed significant level of genetic variation within the populations as revealed by moderately high average values of Nei's genetic diversity (H 0.1639), Shannon's diversity index (I 0.2563), percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB 59.18), total genetic variation (Ht 0.1961), and genetic diversity within population (Hs 0.1639). The study also divulged a high genetic variation at species level with Shannon's diversity index (I), Nei's genetic diversity (H), and percentage of polymorphic band (PPB%) recorded at 0.3218, 0.1939, and 88.37, respectively. Genetic differentiation among the populations (Gst) was merely 19.42% leaving 80.58% of genetic variation exhibited within the populations. The low genetic diversity between populations was consistent with AMOVA. The low genetic differentiation among populations coupled with existence of significantly high genetic diversity at species level indicated the urgent necessity of preserving and protecting all the existing natural bamboo populations in the region.

  5. ISSR Marker Based Population Genetic Study of Melocanna baccifera (Roxb.) Kurz: A Commercially Important Bamboo of Manipur, North-East India

    PubMed Central

    Nilkanta, Heikrujam; Amom, Thoungamba; Rahaman, Hamidur

    2017-01-01

    Melocanna baccifera (Roxb.) Kurz is an economically important bamboo of North-East India experiencing population depletion in its natural habitats. Genetic variation studies were conducted in 7 populations sampled from 5 districts of Manipur using ISSR molecular markers. The investigation was carried out as a primary step towards developing effective conservation strategies for the protection of bamboo germplasm. ISSR marker analysis showed significant level of genetic variation within the populations as revealed by moderately high average values of Nei's genetic diversity (H 0.1639), Shannon's diversity index (I 0.2563), percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB 59.18), total genetic variation (Ht 0.1961), and genetic diversity within population (Hs 0.1639). The study also divulged a high genetic variation at species level with Shannon's diversity index (I), Nei's genetic diversity (H), and percentage of polymorphic band (PPB%) recorded at 0.3218, 0.1939, and 88.37, respectively. Genetic differentiation among the populations (Gst) was merely 19.42% leaving 80.58% of genetic variation exhibited within the populations. The low genetic diversity between populations was consistent with AMOVA. The low genetic differentiation among populations coupled with existence of significantly high genetic diversity at species level indicated the urgent necessity of preserving and protecting all the existing natural bamboo populations in the region. PMID:28168084

  6. Marker-based cloning of the region containing the UhAvr1 avirulence gene from the basidiomycete barley pathogen Ustilago hordei.

    PubMed Central

    Linning, R; Lin, D; Lee, N; Abdennadher, M; Gaudet, D; Thomas, P; Mills, D; Kronstad, J W; Bakkeren, G

    2004-01-01

    Race-cultivar specialization during the interaction of the basidiomycete smut pathogen Ustilago hordei with its barley host was described in the 1940s. Subsequent genetic analyses revealed the presence of dominant avirulence genes in the pathogen that conform to the gene-for-gene theory. This pathosystem therefore presents an opportunity for the molecular genetic characterization of fungal genes controlling avirulence. We performed a cross between U. hordei strains to obtain 54 progeny segregating for three dominant avirulence genes on three differential barley cultivars. Bulked segregant analysis was used to identify RAPD and AFLP markers tightly linked to the avirulence gene UhAvr1. The UhAvr1 gene is located in an area containing repetitive DNA and this region is undetectable in cosmid libraries prepared from the avirulent parental strain. PCR and hybridization probes developed from the linked markers were therefore used to identify cosmid clones from the virulent (Uhavr1) parent. By walking on Uhavr1-linked cosmid clones, a nonrepetitive, nearby probe was found that recognized five overlapping BAC clones spanning 170 kb from the UhAvr1 parent. A contig of the clones in the UhAvr1 region was constructed and selected probes were used for RFLP analysis of the segregating population. This approach genetically defined an approximately 80-kb region that carries the UhAvr1 gene and provided cloned sequences for subsequent genetic analysis. UhAvr1 represents the first avirulence gene cloned from a basidiomycete plant pathogen. PMID:15020410

  7. Discussion of “Sensitivity of a molecular marker based positive matrix factorization model to the number of receptor observations” by YuanXun Zhang, Rebecca J. Sheesley, Min-Suk Bae and James J. Schauer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopke, Philip K.

    2010-03-01

    There is no specific number of samples that ensure a satisfactory PMF analysis. The statement made in this paper with respect to a specific number of samples is only applicable to this data set and should not be applied to any other data set.

  8. Attitude Estimation or Quaternion Estimation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    2003-01-01

    The attitude of spacecraft is represented by a 3x3 orthogonal matrix with unity determinant, which belongs to the three-dimensional special orthogonal group SO(3). The fact that all three-parameter representations of SO(3) are singular or discontinuous for certain attitudes has led to the use of higher-dimensional nonsingular parameterizations, especially the four-component quaternion. In attitude estimation, we are faced with the alternatives of using an attitude representation that is either singular or redundant. Estimation procedures fall into three broad classes. The first estimates a three-dimensional representation of attitude deviations from a reference attitude parameterized by a higher-dimensional nonsingular parameterization. The deviations from the reference are assumed to be small enough to avoid any singularity or discontinuity of the three-dimensional parameterization. The second class, which estimates a higher-dimensional representation subject to enough constraints to leave only three degrees of freedom, is difficult to formulate and apply consistently. The third class estimates a representation of SO(3) with more than three dimensions, treating the parameters as independent. We refer to the most common member of this class as quaternion estimation, to contrast it with attitude estimation. We analyze the first and third of these approaches in the context of an extended Kalman filter with simplified kinematics and measurement models.

  9. Letter regarding 'Comparison between low-cost marker-less and high-end marker-based motion capture systems for the computer-aided assessment of working ergonomics' by Patrizi et al. and research reproducibility.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    The reporting of research in a manner that allows reproduction in subsequent investigations is important for scientific progress. Several details of the recent study by Patrizi et al., 'Comparison between low-cost marker-less and high-end marker-based motion capture systems for the computer-aided assessment of working ergonomics', are absent from the published manuscript and make reproduction of findings impossible. As new and complex technologies with great promise for ergonomics develop, new but surmountable challenges for reporting investigations using these technologies in a reproducible manner arise. Practitioner Summary: As with traditional methods, scientific reporting of new and complex ergonomics technologies should be performed in a manner that allows reproduction in subsequent investigations and supports scientific advancement.

  10. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR.

  11. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E.; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  12. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; Pal, Saikat; McWalter, Emily J.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjects in vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D

  13. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pal, Saikat; Beaupré, Gary S.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjectsin vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D

  14. Computational Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Maria G.; Latulippe, Christine L.

    2010-01-01

    Elementary school teachers are responsible for constructing the foundation of number sense in youngsters, and so it is recommended that teacher-training programs include an emphasis on number sense to ensure the development of dynamic, productive computation and estimation skills in students. To better prepare preservice elementary school teachers…

  15. Estimation Destinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threewit, Fran

    This book leads students through a journey of hands-on investigations of skill-based estimation. The 30 lessons in the book are grouped into four units: Holding Hands, The Real Scoop, Container Calculations, and Estimeasurements. In each unit children work with unique, real materials intended to build an awareness of number, quantity, and…

  16. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Mario S; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  17. Molecular breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of molecular and genomic tools to assist selection of parents or progeny has become an integral part of modern cotton breeding. In this chapter, the basic components of molecular cotton breeding are described. These components include: molecular marker development, genetic and physical map const...

  18. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Willets, Katherine A

    2016-06-12

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  19. Molecular pharmacognosy.

    PubMed

    Huang, LuQi; Xiao, PeiGen; Guo, LanPing; Gao, WenYuan

    2010-06-01

    This article analyzes the background and significance of molecular pharmacognosy, including the molecular identification of medicinal raw materials, phylogenetic evolution of medicinal plants and animals, evaluation and preservation of germplasm resources for medicinal plants and animals, etiology of endangerment and protection of endangered medicinal plants and animals, biosynthesis and bioregulation of active components in medicinal plants, and characteristics and the molecular bases of top-geoherbs.

  20. Estimates of missing heritability for complex traits in Brown Swiss cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic selection estimates genetic merit based on dense SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotypes and phenotypes. This requires that SNPs explain a large fraction of the genetic variance. The objectives of this work were: (1) to estimate the fraction of genetic variance explained by dense genome-wide markers using 54 K SNP chip genotyping, and (2) to evaluate the effect of alternative marker-based relationship matrices and corrections for the base population on the fraction of the genetic variance explained by markers. Methods Two alternative marker-based relationship matrices were estimated using 35 706 SNPs on 1086 dairy bulls. Both pedigree- and marker-based relationship matrices were fitted simultaneously or separately in an animal model to estimate the fraction of variance not explained by the markers, i.e. the fraction explained by the pedigree. The phenotypes considered in the analysis were the deregressed estimated breeding values (dEBV) for milk, fat and protein yield and for somatic cell score (SCS). Results When dEBV were not sufficiently accurate (50 or 70%), the estimated fraction of the genetic variance explained by the markers was around 65% for yield traits and 45% for SCS. Scaling marker genotypes with locus-specific frequencies of heterozygotes slightly increased the variance explained by markers, compared with scaling with the average frequency of heterozygotes across loci. The estimated fraction of the genetic variance explained by the markers using separately both relationships matrices followed the same trends but the results were underestimated. With less accurate dEBV estimates, the fraction of the genetic variance explained by markers was underestimated, which is probably an artifact due to the dEBV being estimated by a pedigree-based animal model. Conclusions When using only highly accurate dEBV, the proportion of the genetic variance explained by the Illumina 54 K SNP chip was approximately 80% for Brown Swiss cattle

  1. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  2. Molecular Descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto

    In the last decades, several scientific researches have been focused on studying how to encompass and convert - by a theoretical pathway - the information encoded in the molecular structure into one or more numbers used to establish quantitative relationships between structures and properties, biological activities, or other experimental properties. Molecular descriptors are formally mathematical representations of a molecule obtained by a well-specified algorithm applied to a defined molecular representation or a well-specified experimental procedure. They play a fundamental role in chemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, environmental protection policy, toxicology, ecotoxicology, health research, and quality control. Evidence of the interest of the scientific community in the molecular descriptors is provided by the huge number of descriptors proposed up today: more than 5000 descriptors derived from different theories and approaches are defined in the literature and most of them can be calculated by means of dedicated software applications. Molecular descriptors are of outstanding importance in the research fields of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) and quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs), where they are the independent chemical information used to predict the properties of interest. Along with the definition of appropriate molecular descriptors, the molecular structure representation and the mathematical tools for deriving and assessing models are other fundamental components of the QSAR/QSPR approach. The remarkable progress during the last few years in chemometrics and chemoinformatics has led to new strategies for finding mathematical meaningful relationships between the molecular structure and biological activities, physico-chemical, toxicological, and environmental properties of chemicals. Different approaches for deriving molecular descriptors here reviewed and some of the most relevant descriptors are presented in

  3. Molecular Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.

    2005-07-01

    Part I. Molecular Clouds and the Distribution of Molecules in the Milky Way and Other Galaxies: 1. Molecular clouds in the Milky Way P. Friberg and A. Hjalmarson; 2. Molecules in galaxies L. Blitz; Part II. Diffuse Molecular Clouds: 3. Diffuse cloud chemistry E. F. Van Dishoeck; 4. Observations of velocity and density structure in diffuse clouds W. D. Langer; 5. Shock chemistry in diffuse clouds T. W. Hartquist, D. R. Flower and G. Pineau des Forets; Part III. Quiescent Dense Clouds: 6. Chemical modelling of quiescent dense interstellar clouds T. J. Millar; 7. Interstellar grain chemistry V. Buch; 8. Large molecules and small grains in astrophysics S. H. Lepp; Part IV. Studies of Molecular Processes: 9. Molecular photoabsorption processes K. P. Kirby; 10. Interstellar ion chemistry: laboratory studies D. Smith, N. G. Adams and E. E. Ferguson; 11. Theoretical considerations on some collisional processes D. R. Bates; 12. Collisional excitation processes E. Roueff; 13. Neutral reactions at Low and High Temperatures M. M. Graff; Part V. Atomic Species in Dense Clouds: 14. Observations of atomic species in dense clouds G. J. Melnick; 15. Ultraviolet radiation in molecular clouds W. G. Roberge; 16. Cosmic ray induced photodissociation and photoionization of interstellar molecules R. Gredel; 17. Chemistry in the molecular cloud Barnard 5 S. B. Charnley and D. A. Williams; 18. Molecular cloud structure, motions, and evolution P. C. Myers; Part VI. H in Regions of Massive Star Formation: 19. Infrared observations of line emission from molecular hydrogen T. R. Geballe; 20. Shocks in dense molecular clouds D. F. Chernoff and C. F. McKee; 21. Dissociative shocks D. A. Neufeld; 22. Infrared molecular hydrogen emission from interstellar photodissociation regions A. Sternberg; Part VII. Molecules Near Stars and in Stellar Ejecta: 23. Masers J. M. Moran; 24. Chemistry in the circumstellar envelopes around mass-losing red giants M. Jura; 25. Atoms and molecules in supernova 1987a R

  4. Exploring the diploid wheat ancestral A genome through sequence comparison at the high-molecular-weight glutenin locus region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Daowen; Anderson, Olin D; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The polyploid nature of hexaploid wheat (T. aestivum, AABBDD) often represents a great challenge in various aspects of research including genetic mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and sequencing and accurately assembly of its genome. To explore the utility of ancestral diploid species of polyploid wheat, sequence variation of T. urartu (A(u)A(u)) was analyzed by comparing its 277-kb large genomic region carrying the important Glu-1 locus with the homologous regions from the A genomes of the diploid T. monococcum (A(m)A(m)), tetraploid T. turgidum (AABB), and hexaploid T. aestivum (AABBDD). Our results revealed that in addition to a high degree of the gene collinearity, nested retroelement structures were also considerably conserved among the A(u) genome and the A genomes in polyploid wheats, suggesting that the majority of the repetitive sequences in the A genomes of polyploid wheats originated from the diploid A(u) genome. The difference in the compared region between A(u) and A is mainly caused by four differential TE insertion and two deletion events between these genomes. The estimated divergence time of A genomes calculated on nucleotide substitution rate in both shared TEs and collinear genes further supports the closer evolutionary relationship of A to A(u) than to A(m). The structure conservation in the repetitive regions promoted us to develop repeat junction markers based on the A(u) sequence for mapping the A genome in hexaploid wheat. Eighty percent of these repeat junction markers were successfully mapped to the corresponding region in hexaploid wheat, suggesting that T. urartu could serve as a useful resource for developing molecular markers for genetic and breeding studies in hexaploid wheat.

  5. Using molecular markers with high mutation rates to obtain estimates of relative population size and to distinguish the effects of gene flow and mutation: a demonstration using data from endemic Mauritian skinks.

    PubMed

    Nichols, R A; Freeman, K L M

    2004-04-01

    We propose a method of analysing genetic data to obtain separate estimates of the size (N(p)) and migration rate (m(p)) for the sampled populations, without precise prior knowledge of mutation rates at each locus ( micro(L)). The effects of migration and mutation can be distinguished because high migration has the effect of reducing genetic differentiation across all loci, whereas a high mutation rate will only affect the locus in question. The method also takes account of any differences between the spectra of immigrant alleles and of new mutant alleles. If the genetic data come from a range of population sizes, and the loci have a range of mutation rates, it is possible to estimate the relative sizes of the different N(p) values, and likewise the m(p) and the micro(L). Microsatellite loci may also be particularly appropriate because loci with a high mutation rate can reach mutation-drift-migration equilibrium more quickly, and because the spectra of mutants arriving in a population can be particularly distinct from the immigrants. We demonstrate this principle using a microsatellite data set from Mauritian skinks. The method identifies low gene flow between a putative new species and populations of its sister species, whereas the differentiation of two other populations is attributed to small population size. These distinct interpretations were not readily apparent from conventional measures of genetic differentiation and gene diversity. When the method is evaluated using simulated data sets, it correctly distinguishes low gene flow from small population size. Loci that are not at mutation-migration-drift equilibrium can distort the parameter estimates slightly. We discuss strategies for detecting and overcoming this effect.

  6. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  7. The Application of Classification and Regression Trees for the Triage of Women for Referral to Colposcopy and the Estimation of Risk for Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A Study Based on 1625 Cases with Incomplete Data from Molecular Tests

    PubMed Central

    Pouliakis, Abraham; Karakitsou, Efrossyni; Chrelias, Charalampos; Pappas, Asimakis; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Valasoulis, George; Kyrgiou, Maria; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Karakitsos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Nowadays numerous ancillary techniques detecting HPV DNA and mRNA compete with cytology; however no perfect test exists; in this study we evaluated classification and regression trees (CARTs) for the production of triage rules and estimate the risk for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in cases with ASCUS+ in cytology. Study Design. We used 1625 cases. In contrast to other approaches we used missing data to increase the data volume, obtain more accurate results, and simulate real conditions in the everyday practice of gynecologic clinics and laboratories. The proposed CART was based on the cytological result, HPV DNA typing, HPV mRNA detection based on NASBA and flow cytometry, p16 immunocytochemical expression, and finally age and parous status. Results. Algorithms useful for the triage of women were produced; gynecologists could apply these in conjunction with available examination results and conclude to an estimation of the risk for a woman to harbor CIN expressed as a probability. Conclusions. The most important test was the cytological examination; however the CART handled cases with inadequate cytological outcome and increased the diagnostic accuracy by exploiting the results of ancillary techniques even if there were inadequate missing data. The CART performance was better than any other single test involved in this study. PMID:26339651

  8. Molecular approaches to the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: clinical molecular and genetic studies on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Mikio

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in clinical molecular and genetic studies on Alzheimer's disease (AD) are summarized here. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42 and tau are the most sensitive biomarkers for the diagnosis of AD and prediction of its onset following mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Based on this progress, new diagnostic criteria for AD dementia, MCI due to AD, and preclinical AD were proposed by the National Institute of Aging (NIA) and Alzheimer's Association (AA) in April 2011. In these new criteria, progress in CSF biomarker and amyloid imaging studies over the past 10 years has added to critical information. The marked contributions of basic and clinical studies have established clinical evidence supporting these markers. Based on this progress, essential curative therapy for AD is urgently expected.

  9. Variance estimation for stratified propensity score estimators.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E J; Morley, R; Lucas, A; Carpenter, J R

    2012-07-10

    Propensity score methods are increasingly used to estimate the effect of a treatment or exposure on an outcome in non-randomised studies. We focus on one such method, stratification on the propensity score, comparing it with the method of inverse-probability weighting by the propensity score. The propensity score--the conditional probability of receiving the treatment given observed covariates--is usually an unknown probability estimated from the data. Estimators for the variance of treatment effect estimates typically used in practice, however, do not take into account that the propensity score itself has been estimated from the data. By deriving the asymptotic marginal variance of the stratified estimate of treatment effect, correctly taking into account the estimation of the propensity score, we show that routinely used variance estimators are likely to produce confidence intervals that are too conservative when the propensity score model includes variables that predict (cause) the outcome, but only weakly predict the treatment. In contrast, a comparison with the analogous marginal variance for the inverse probability weighted (IPW) estimator shows that routinely used variance estimators for the IPW estimator are likely to produce confidence intervals that are almost always too conservative. Because exact calculation of the asymptotic marginal variance is likely to be complex, particularly for the stratified estimator, we suggest that bootstrap estimates of variance should be used in practice.

  10. Estimating potential evapotranspiration with improved radiation estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is of great importance to estimation of surface energy budget and water balance calculation. The accurate estimation of PET will facilitate efficient irrigation scheduling, drainage design, and other agricultural and meteorological applications. However, accuracy o...

  11. FORT Molecular Ecology Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Stevens, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the Fort Collins Science Center Molecular Ecology Laboratory is to use the tools and concepts of molecular genetics to address a variety of complex management questions and conservation issues facing the management of the Nation's fish and wildlife resources. Together with our partners, we design and implement studies to document genetic diversity and the distribution of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species. Information from these studies is used to support wildlife-management planning and conservation actions. Current and past studies have provided information to assess taxonomic boundaries, inform listing decisions made under the Endangered Species Act, identify unique or genetically depauperate populations, estimate population size or survival rates, develop management or recovery plans, breed wildlife in captivity, relocate wildlife from one location to another, and assess the effects of environmental change.

  12. Ensemble estimators for multivariate entropy estimation.

    PubMed

    Sricharan, Kumar; Wei, Dennis; Hero, Alfred O

    2013-07-01

    The problem of estimation of density functionals like entropy and mutual information has received much attention in the statistics and information theory communities. A large class of estimators of functionals of the probability density suffer from the curse of dimensionality, wherein the mean squared error (MSE) decays increasingly slowly as a function of the sample size T as the dimension d of the samples increases. In particular, the rate is often glacially slow of order O(T(-)(γ)(/)(d) ), where γ > 0 is a rate parameter. Examples of such estimators include kernel density estimators, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) density estimators, k-NN entropy estimators, intrinsic dimension estimators and other examples. In this paper, we propose a weighted affine combination of an ensemble of such estimators, where optimal weights can be chosen such that the weighted estimator converges at a much faster dimension invariant rate of O(T(-1)). Furthermore, we show that these optimal weights can be determined by solving a convex optimization problem which can be performed offline and does not require training data. We illustrate the superior performance of our weighted estimator for two important applications: (i) estimating the Panter-Dite distortion-rate factor and (ii) estimating the Shannon entropy for testing the probability distribution of a random sample.

  13. Molecular gastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, cooks have been applying recipes without looking for the mechanisms of the culinary transformations. A scientific discipline that explores these changes from raw ingredients to eating the final dish, is developing into its own field, termed molecular gastronomy. Here, one of the founders of the discipline discusses its aims and importance.

  14. Molecular thermodynamics for chemical process design.

    PubMed

    Prausnitz, J M

    1979-08-24

    Chemical process design requires quantitative information on the equilibrium properties of a variety of fluid mixtures. Since the experimental effort needed to provide this information is often prohibitive in cost and time, chemical engineers must utilize rational estimation techniques based on limited experimental data. The basis for such techniques is molecular thermodynamics, a synthesis of classical and statistical thermodynamics, molecular physics, and physical chemistry.

  15. Price and cost estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Price and Cost Estimating Program (PACE II) was developed to prepare man-hour and material cost estimates. Versatile and flexible tool significantly reduces computation time and errors and reduces typing and reproduction time involved in preparation of cost estimates.

  16. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for the treatment of numerous ailments and improvement of body functions. It may be used in combination with prescribed drugs. The coadministration of ginger with therapeutic drugs raises a concern of potential deleterious drug interactions via the modulation of the expression and/or activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, resulting in unfavorable therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to determine the molecular interactions between 12 main active ginger components (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene, β-sesquiphelandrene, 6-gingerdione, (-)-zingiberene, and methyl-6-isogingerol) and human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) of the 12 ginger components using computational approaches and comprehensive literature search. Docking studies showed that ginger components interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π-π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki ] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood-brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited a

  17. Molecular Thermometry

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kevin M.; Hernandez, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Conventional temperature measurements rely on material responses to heat, which can be detected visually. When Galileo developed an air expansion based device to detect temperature changes, Santorio, a contemporary physician, added a scale to create the first thermometer. With this instrument, patients’ temperatures could be measured, recorded and related to changing health conditions. Today, advances in materials science and bioengineering provide new ways to report temperature at the molecular level in real time. In this review the scientific foundations and history of thermometry underpin a discussion of the discoveries emerging from the field of molecular thermometry. Intracellular nanogels and heat sensing biomolecules have been shown to accurately report temperature changes at the nano-scale. Various systems will soon provide the ability to accurately measure temperature changes at the tissue, cellular, and even sub-cellular level, allowing for detection and monitoring of very small changes in local temperature. In the clinic this will lead to enhanced detection of tumors and localized infection, and accurate and precise monitoring of hyperthermia based therapies. Some nanomaterial systems have even demonstrated a theranostic capacity for heat-sensitive, local delivery of chemotherapeutics. Just as early thermometry moved into the clinic, so too will these molecular thermometers. PMID:20139796

  18. Molecular Imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaud, V.; Bonneviot, L.

    Our senses of smell and taste are able to recognise molecules selectively, to the point where they can even discriminate between different chiral states. This property, called molecular recognition, is essential to all forms of life [1]. It is based on the principle of a specific interaction between a receptor or host and a target molecule, which will be identified among a multitude of others, then selectively adsorbed. If the host is endowed with reactive functions, the attached molecule may be transported or transformed. Enzymes are the archetypal host molecules exploiting the idea of molecular recognition. Their complexation sites comprise a hydrophobic pocket with definite shape within which amino acid residues are located in a precisely defined way. The combined effect of these different characteristics underlies not only the affinity for some specific substrate, but also the transformation of this substrate into the desired product [2]. In fact, the phenomena actually brought into play are much more involved, being made up of an ensemble of physicochemical events that act together in a cooperative way, either simultaneously or sequentially, and in which the molecular processes are difficult to follow in detail.

  19. Estimating tail probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.B.; Tolley, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    This paper investigates procedures for univariate nonparametric estimation of tail probabilities. Extrapolated values for tail probabilities beyond the data are also obtained based on the shape of the density in the tail. Several estimators which use exponential weighting are described. These are compared in a Monte Carlo study to nonweighted estimators, to the empirical cdf, to an integrated kernel, to a Fourier series estimate, to a penalized likelihood estimate and a maximum likelihood estimate. Selected weighted estimators are shown to compare favorably to many of these standard estimators for the sampling distributions investigated.

  20. Estimating avian population size using Bowden's estimator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Avian researchers often uniquely mark birds, and multiple estimators could be used to estimate population size using individually identified birds. However, most estimators of population size require that all sightings of marked birds be uniquely identified, and many assume homogeneous detection probabilities. Bowden's estimator can incorporate sightings of marked birds that are not uniquely identified and relax assumptions required of other estimators. I used computer simulation to evaluate the performance of Bowden's estimator for situations likely to be encountered in bird studies. When the assumptions of the estimator were met, abundance and variance estimates and confidence-interval coverage were accurate. However, precision was poor for small population sizes (N ??? 50) unless a large percentage of the population was marked (>75%) and multiple (???8) sighting surveys were conducted. If additional birds are marked after sighting surveys begin, it is important to initially mark a large proportion of the population (pm ??? 0.5 if N ??? 100 or pm > 0.1 if N ??? 250) and minimize sightings in which birds are not uniquely identified; otherwise, most population estimates will be overestimated by >10%. Bowden's estimator can be useful for avian studies because birds can be resighted multiple times during a single survey, not all sightings of marked birds have to uniquely identify individuals, detection probabilities among birds can vary, and the complete study area does not have to be surveyed. I provide computer code for use with pilot data to design mark-resight surveys to meet desired precision for abundance estimates. ?? 2009 by The American Ornithologists' Union. All rights reserved.

  1. Fundamental considerations for multiwavelength photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemp, Roger J.; Li, Li; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-02-01

    Photoacoustic technology offers great promise for molecular imaging in vivo since it offers significant penetration, and optical contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution. In this article we examine fundamental technical issues impacting capabilities of photoacoustic tomography for molecular imaging. First we examine how reconstructed photoacoustic tomography images are related to true absorber distributions by studying the modulation transfer function of a circular scanning tomographic system employing a modified filtered backprojection algorithm. We then study factors influencing quantitative estimation by developing a forward model of photoacoustic signal generation, and show conditions for which the system of equations can be inverted. Errors in the estimated optical fluence are shown to be a source of bias in estimates of molecular agent concentration. Finally we discuss noise propagation through the matrix inversion procedure and discuss implications for molecular imaging sensitivity and system design.

  2. Implicit solvent methods for free energy estimation

    PubMed Central

    Decherchi, Sergio; Masetti, Matteo; Vyalov, Ivan; Rocchia, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is a fundamental contribution in many biological processes and especially in molecular binding. Its estimation can be performed by means of several computational approaches. The aim of this review is to give an overview of existing theories and methods to estimate solvent effects giving a specific focus on the category of implicit solvent models and their use in Molecular Dynamics. In many of these models, the solvent is considered as a continuum homogenous medium, while the solute can be represented at the atomic detail and at different levels of theory. Despite their degree of approximation, implicit methods are still widely employed due to their trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. Their derivation is rooted in the statistical mechanics and integral equations disciplines, some of the related details being provided here. Finally, methods that combine implicit solvent models and molecular dynamics simulation, are briefly described. PMID:25193298

  3. Water in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Frerking, M. A.; Gulkis, S.; Pickett, H. M.; Wilson, W. J.; Pagani, L.; Lecacheux, A.; Encrenaz, P.

    1991-01-01

    The G.P. Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) was used to make initial observations of the half-millimeter ground-state transition of water in seven giant molecular clouds and in two late-type stars. No significant detections were made, and the resulting upper limits are significantly below those expected from other, indirect observations and from several theoretical models. The implied interstellar H2O/CO abundance is less than 0.003 in the cores of three giant molecular clouds. This value is less than expected from cloud chemistry models and also than estimates based on HDO and H3O(+) observations.

  4. Electrostatics at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zürcher, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    In molecular systems, positive and negative charges are separated, making them ideal systems to examine electrostatic interactions. The attractive force between positive and negative charges is balanced by repulsive ‘forces’ that are quantum-mechanical in origin. We introduce an ‘effective’ potential energy that captures the repulsion; it allows us to obtain fairly accurate estimates of the bonding properties of molecular systems. We use units (e.g., kcal mol-1 for energy) that emphasize the relevance of electrostatics to macroscopic behavior.

  5. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Lauchner, Adam; Schlather, Andrea E; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Cui, Yao; McClain, Michael J; Stec, Grant J; García de Abajo, F Javier; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-09-09

    Graphene supports surface plasmons that have been observed to be both electrically and geometrically tunable in the mid- to far-infrared spectral regions. In particular, it has been demonstrated that graphene plasmons can be tuned across a wide spectral range spanning from the mid-infrared to the terahertz. The identification of a general class of plasmonic excitations in systems containing only a few dozen atoms permits us to extend this versatility into the visible and ultraviolet. As appealing as this extension might be for active nanoscale manipulation of visible light, its realization constitutes a formidable technical challenge. We experimentally demonstrate the existence of molecular plasmon resonances in the visible for ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which we reversibly switch by adding, then removing, a single electron from the molecule. The charged PAHs display intense absorption in the visible regime with electrical and geometrical tunability analogous to the plasmonic resonances of much larger nanographene systems. Finally, we also use the switchable molecular plasmon in anthracene to demonstrate a proof-of-concept low-voltage electrochromic device.

  6. Molecular spintronics.

    PubMed

    Sanvito, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    The electron spin made its debut in the device world only two decades ago but today our ability of detecting the spin state of a moving electron underpins the entire magnetic data storage industry. This technological revolution has been driven by a constant improvement in our understanding on how spins can be injected, manipulated and detected in the solid state, a field which is collectively named Spintronics. Recently a number of pioneering experiments and theoretical works suggest that organic materials can offer similar and perhaps superior performances in making spin-devices than the more conventional inorganic metals and semiconductors. Furthermore they can pave the way for radically new device concepts. This is Molecular Spintronics, a blossoming research area aimed at exploring how the unique properties of the organic world can marry the requirements of spin-devices. Importantly, after a first phase, where most of the research was focussed on exporting the concepts of inorganic spintronics to organic materials, the field has moved to a more mature age, where the exploitation of the unique properties of molecules has begun to emerge. Molecular spintronics now collects a diverse and interdisciplinary community ranging from device physicists to synthetic chemists to surface scientists. In this critical review, I will survey this fascinating, rapidly evolving, field with a particular eye on new directions and opportunities. The main differences and challenges with respect to standard spintronics will be discussed and so will be the potential cross-fertilization with other fields (177 references).

  7. Molecular paleontology.

    PubMed

    Marota, I; Rollo, F

    2002-01-01

    Molecular paleontology, i.e., the recovery of DNA from ancient human, animal, and plant remains is an innovative research field that has received progressively more attention from the scientific community since the 1980s. In the last decade, the field was punctuated by claims which aroused great interest but eventually turned out to be fakes--the most famous being the sequence of dinosaur DNA later shown to be of human origin. At present, the discipline is characterized by some certainties and many doubts. We know, for example, that we have reasonable chances to recover authentic DNA from a mammoth carcass, while our chances are negligible (or nonexistent) in the case of a dynastic mummy from Egypt. On the other hand, though we are developing convincing models of DNA decay in bone, we are not yet able to predict whether a certain paleontological or archeological site will yield material amenable to DNA analysis. This article reviews some of the most important and promising investigations using molecular paleontology approaches, such as studies on the conservation of DNA in human bone, the quest for ancient DNA in permafrost-frozen fauna, the Tyrolean iceman, and the Neandertals.

  8. Molecular Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cunfeng; van der Poel, Aernout P. P.; Jansen, Paul; Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Wall, Thomas E.; Ubachs, Wim; Bethlem, Hendrick L.

    2016-12-01

    The resolution of any spectroscopic or interferometric experiment is ultimately limited by the total time a particle is interrogated. Here we demonstrate the first molecular fountain, a development which permits hitherto unattainably long interrogation times with molecules. In our experiments, ammonia molecules are decelerated and cooled using electric fields, launched upwards with a velocity between 1.4 and 1.9 m/s and observed as they fall back under gravity. A combination of quadrupole lenses and bunching elements is used to shape the beam such that it has a large position spread and a small velocity spread (corresponding to a transverse temperature of <10 μ K and a longitudinal temperature of <1 μ K ) when the molecules are in free fall, while being strongly focused at the detection region. The molecules are in free fall for up to 266 ms, making it possible, in principle, to perform sub-Hz measurements in molecular systems and paving the way for stringent tests of fundamental physics theories.

  9. ESTIMATION OF PHYSIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  10. Dating Tips for Divergence-Time Estimation.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Joseph E; dos Reis, Mario; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2015-11-01

    The molecular clock is the only viable means of establishing an accurate timescale for Life on Earth, but it remains reliant on a capricious fossil record for calibration. 'Tip-dating' promises a conceptual advance, integrating fossil species among their living relatives using molecular/morphological datasets and evolutionary models. Fossil species of known age establish calibration directly, and their phylogenetic uncertainty is accommodated through the co-estimation of time and topology. However, challenges remain, including a dearth of effective models of morphological evolution, rate correlation, the non-random nature of missing characters in fossil data, and, most importantly, accommodating uncertainty in fossil age. We show uncertainty in fossil-dating propagates to divergence-time estimates, yielding estimates that are older and less precise than those based on traditional node calibration. Ultimately, node and tip calibrations are not mutually incompatible and may be integrated to achieve more accurate and precise evolutionary timescales.

  11. Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When

  12. Molecular Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summons, Roger E.; Albrecht, Pierre; McDonald, Gene; Moldowan, J. Michael

    2008-03-01

    Life, as we know it, is based on carbon chemistry operating in an aqueous environment. Living organisms process chemicals, make copies of themselves, are autonomous and evolve in concert with the environment. All these characteristics are driven by, and operate through, carbon chemistry. The carbon chemistry of living systems is an exact branch of science and we have detailed knowledge of the basic metabolic and reproductive machinery of living organisms. We can recognise the residual biochemicals long after life has expired and otherwise lost most life-defining features. Carbon chemistry provides a tool for identifying extant and extinct life on Earth and, potentially, throughout the Universe. In recognizing that certain distinctive compounds isolable from living systems had related fossil derivatives, organic geochemists coined the term biological marker compound or biomarker (e.g. Eglinton et al. in Science 145:263-264, 1964) to describe them. In this terminology, biomarkers are metabolites or biochemicals by which we can identify particular kinds of living organisms as well as the molecular fossil derivatives by which we identify defunct counterparts. The terms biomarker and molecular biosignature are synonymous. A defining characteristic of terrestrial life is its metabolic versatility and adaptability and it is reasonable to expect that this is universal. Different physiologies operate for carbon acquisition, the garnering of energy and the storage and processing of information. As well as having a range of metabolisms, organisms build biomass suited to specific physical environments, habitats and their ecological imperatives. This overall ‘metabolic diversity’ manifests itself in an enormous variety of accompanying product molecules (i.e. natural products). The whole field of organic chemistry grew from their study and now provides tools to link metabolism (i.e. physiology) to the occurrence of biomarkers specific to, and diagnostic for, particular kinds

  13. 40 CFR 98.165 - Procedures for estimating missing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... procedures used for all such estimates. (b) For each missing value of the carbon content or molecular weight...-assured values of carbon contents or molecular weight of the fuel and feedstock immediately preceding and immediately following the missing data incident. If no quality-assured data on carbon contents or...

  14. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  15. Molecular morphology of cyanobacterial phycobilisomes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H.W.; Kycia, J.H.

    1982-09-01

    Phycobilisomes were isolated from several cyanobacteria following cell lysis with Triton X-100. They were purified by phosphate precipitation and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. Their phycobiliprotein compositions were quantitatively determined by application of sets of simultaneous absorbance equations to gel chromatographic separations of the chromoproteins. Phycobilisomes purified from several cyanobacteria had characteristic elution times on agarose gel chromatography. Combining electron microscope observations of phycobilisome structure, phycobiliprotein composition, and agarose gel chromatography estimates of molecular weight permitted the calculation of many details of phycobilisome molecular structure. Complementary chromatic adaptation resulted in a change of phycobilisome composition and structure. The polypeptide compositions of phycobilisomes were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose gel chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The phycobilisomes were composed of phycobilipeptides derived from the constituent phycobiliproteins. Higher molecular-weight phycobilipeptide aggregates were also observed. The dominant forces responsible for the maintenance of phycobilisome structure are concluded to be hydropohobic interactions.

  16. Information geometric density estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Marchand-Maillet, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We investigate kernel density estimation where the kernel function varies from point to point. Density estimation in the input space means to find a set of coordinates on a statistical manifold. This novel perspective helps to combine efforts from information geometry and machine learning to spawn a family of density estimators. We present example models with simulations. We discuss the principle and theory of such density estimation.

  17. Fuel Burn Estimation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterji, Gano

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Validated the fuel estimation procedure using flight test data. A good fuel model can be created if weight and fuel data are available. Error in assumed takeoff weight results in similar amount of error in the fuel estimate. Fuel estimation error bounds can be determined.

  18. Making Connections with Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobato, Joanne E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes four methods to structure estimation activities that enable students to make connections between their understanding of numbers and extensions of those concepts to estimating. Presents activities that connect estimation with other curricular areas, other mathematical topics, and real-world applications. (MDH)

  19. Price Estimation Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Aster, R. W.; Firnett, P. J.; Miller, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Improved Price Estimation Guidelines, IPEG4, program provides comparatively simple, yet relatively accurate estimate of price of manufactured product. IPEG4 processes user supplied input data to determine estimate of price per unit of production. Input data include equipment cost, space required, labor cost, materials and supplies cost, utility expenses, and production volume on industry wide or process wide basis.

  20. Biogeographic calibrations for the molecular clock

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y. W.; Tong, K. Jun; Foster, Charles S. P.; Ritchie, Andrew M.; Lo, Nathan; Crisp, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular estimates of evolutionary timescales have an important role in a range of biological studies. Such estimates can be made using methods based on molecular clocks, including models that are able to account for rate variation across lineages. All clock models share a dependence on calibrations, which enable estimates to be given in absolute time units. There are many available methods for incorporating fossil calibrations, but geological and climatic data can also provide useful calibrations for molecular clocks. However, a number of strong assumptions need to be made when using these biogeographic calibrations, leading to wide variation in their reliability and precision. In this review, we describe the nature of biogeographic calibrations and the assumptions that they involve. We present an overview of the different geological and climatic events that can provide informative calibrations, and explain how such temporal information can be incorporated into dating analyses. PMID:26333662

  1. Molecular Spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanvito, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    In organic molecules and molecular solids the weak spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions result in extremely long spin-lifetimes reaching up to the second mark. However the same are characterized by a generally poor mobility, so that the spin-diffusion lengths are rather short. These peculiar characteristics position organic molecules in a unique space within Spintronics and one should envision applications where the spins are manipulated close to where they are injected [1]. In this contribution I will review the current state of the art of the theory of spin-transport and manipulation in organic molecules. I will start the discussion by presenting a new mechanism, the electrostatic spin crossover effect, for manipulating electrically the magnetic state of a molecules without calling for current-driven spin-transfer torques [2]. This is based on the fact that the different spin states of a molecule Stark-shift differently and it is mostly effective when inversion symmetry is broken. Then I will move to discuss the consequences of such an effect on the transport properties of a molecule presenting two magnetic centers and demonstrate that there exist a critical voltage at which the current becomes temperature-independent [3]. Finally I will present results for spin-transport in Mn12 and demonstrate that the magnetic state of the molecule can be read electrically with a single I-V read-out obtained by using non-magnetic electrodes [4]. [4pt] [1] G. Szulczewski, S. Sanvito and J.M.D. Coey, Nature Materials 8, 693 (2009).[0pt] [2] N. Baadji, M. Piacenza, T. Tugsuz, F. Della Sala, G. Maruccio and S. Sanvito, Nature Materials 8, 813 (2009).[0pt] [3] S.K. Shukla and S. Sanvito, Phys. Rev. B, in press; also at arXiv:0905.1607.[0pt] [4] C.D. Pemmaraju, I. Rungger and S. Sanvito, Phys. Rev. B 80, 104422 (2009).

  2. Boundary effect correction in k-nearest-neighbor estimation.

    PubMed

    Alizad Rahvar, A R; Ardakani, M

    2011-05-01

    The problem of the boundary effect for the k-nearest-neighbor (kNN) estimation is addressed, and a correction method is suggested. The correction is proposed for bounded distributions, but it can be used for any set of bounded samples. We apply the proposed correction to entropy estimation of multidimensional distributions and time series, and this correction reduces considerably the bias and statistical errors in the estimation. For a small sample size or high-dimensional data, the corrected estimator outperforms the uncorrected estimator significantly. This advantage makes the kNN method applicable to more real-life situations, e.g., the analysis of biological and molecular data.

  3. Boundary effect correction in k-nearest-neighbor estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizad Rahvar, A. R.; Ardakani, M.

    2011-05-01

    The problem of the boundary effect for the k-nearest-neighbor (kNN) estimation is addressed, and a correction method is suggested. The correction is proposed for bounded distributions, but it can be used for any set of bounded samples. We apply the proposed correction to entropy estimation of multidimensional distributions and time series, and this correction reduces considerably the bias and statistical errors in the estimation. For a small sample size or high-dimensional data, the corrected estimator outperforms the uncorrected estimator significantly. This advantage makes the kNN method applicable to more real-life situations, e.g., the analysis of biological and molecular data.

  4. Molecular Electronic Terms and Molecular Orbital Configurations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazo, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the molecular electronic terms which can arise from a given electronic configuration. Considered are simple cases, molecular states, direct products, closed shells, and open shells. Two examples are provided. (CW)

  5. Phylogenetic informativeness reconciles ray-finned fish molecular divergence times

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Discordance among individual molecular age estimates, or between molecular age estimates and the fossil record, is observed in many clades across the Tree of Life. This discordance is attributed to a variety of variables including calibration age uncertainty, calibration placement, nucleotide substitution rate heterogeneity, or the specified molecular clock model. However, the impact of changes in phylogenetic informativeness of individual genes over time on phylogenetic inferences is rarely analyzed. Using nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data for ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) as an example, we extend the utility of phylogenetic informativeness profiles to predict the time intervals when nucleotide substitution saturation results in discordance among molecular ages estimated. Results We demonstrate that even with identical calibration regimes and molecular clock methods, mitochondrial based molecular age estimates are systematically older than those estimated from nuclear sequences. This discordance is most severe for highly nested nodes corresponding to more recent (i.e., Jurassic-Recent) divergences. By removing data deemed saturated, we reconcile the competing age estimates and highlight that the older mtDNA based ages were driven by nucleotide saturation. Conclusions Homoplasious site patterns in a DNA sequence alignment can systematically bias molecular divergence time estimates. Our study demonstrates that PI profiles can provide a non-arbitrary criterion for data exclusion to mitigate the influence of homoplasy on time calibrated branch length estimates. Analyses of actinopterygian molecular clocks demonstrate that scrutiny of the time scale on which sequence data is informative is a fundamental, but generally overlooked, step in molecular divergence time estimation. PMID:25103329

  6. Estimation in satellite control.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debra, D. B.

    1971-01-01

    The use of estimators or observers is discussed as applied to satellite attitude control and the control of drag-free satellites. The practical problems of implementation are discussed, and the relative advantages of full and reduced state estimators are compared, particularly in terms of their effectiveness and bandwidth as filters. Three applications are used to illustrate the principles. They are: (1) a reaction wheel control system, (2) a spinning attitude control system, and (3) a drag-free satellite translational control system. Fixed estimator gains are shown to be adequate for these (and many other) applications. Our experience in the hardware realization of estimators has led to categorize the error sources in terms of those that improve with increased estimator gains and those that get worse with increased estimator gains.

  7. Multitaper Spectrum Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, I. K.; Stark, P. B.

    Multitapering is a statistical technique developed to improve on the notorious periodogram estimate of the power spectrum (Thomson, 1982; Percival, Walden 1993). We show how to obtain orthogonal tapers for time series observed with gaps, and how to use statistical resampling techniques (Efron, Tibshirani 1993) to calculate realistic uncertainty estimates for multitaper estimates. We introduce multisegment multitapering. Multitapering can also be extended to the 2D case. We indicate how to construct tapers that minimize the spatial leakage in estimates of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the velocity images. Spatial multitapering followed by the temporal tapering of the estimated spherical harmonic time series is expected to result in improved spectrum and subsequent solar oscillation mode parameter estimates.

  8. The molecular matching problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular chemistry contains many difficult optimization problems that have begun to attract the attention of optimizers in the Operations Research community. Problems including protein folding, molecular conformation, molecular similarity, and molecular matching have been addressed. Minimum energy conformations for simple molecular structures such as water clusters, Lennard-Jones microclusters, and short polypeptides have dominated the literature to date. However, a variety of interesting problems exist and we focus here on a molecular structure matching (MSM) problem.

  9. Estimating Airline Operating Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    The factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs were used to develop an airline operating cost model which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model permits estimates of aircraft related costs, i.e., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees. A method for estimating the costs of certain types of airline delay is also described.

  10. Estimating Prices of Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aster, R. W.; Chamberlain, R. G.; Zendejas, S. C.; Lee, T. S.; Malhotra, S.

    1986-01-01

    Company-wide or process-wide production simulated. Price Estimation Guidelines (IPEG) program provides simple, accurate estimates of prices of manufactured products. Simplification of SAMIS allows analyst with limited time and computing resources to perform greater number of sensitivity studies. Although developed for photovoltaic industry, readily adaptable to standard assembly-line type of manufacturing industry. IPEG program estimates annual production price per unit. IPEG/PC program written in TURBO PASCAL.

  11. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Carl D.

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of the weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.

  12. Parameter estimating state reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Parameter estimation is considered for systems whose entire state cannot be measured. Linear observers are designed to recover the unmeasured states to a sufficient accuracy to permit the estimation process. There are three distinct dynamics that must be accommodated in the system design: the dynamics of the plant, the dynamics of the observer, and the system updating of the parameter estimation. The latter two are designed to minimize interaction of the involved systems. These techniques are extended to weakly nonlinear systems. The application to a simulation of a space shuttle POGO system test is of particular interest. A nonlinear simulation of the system is developed, observers designed, and the parameters estimated.

  13. Estimation and Testing of Gene Expression Heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Nettleton, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Heterosis, also known as the hybrid vigor, occurs when the mean phenotype of hybrid off-spring is superior to that of its two inbred parents. The heterosis phenomenon is extensively utilized in agriculture though the molecular basis is still unknown. In an effort to understand phenotypic heterosis at the molecular level, researchers have begun to compare expression levels of thousands of genes between parental inbred lines and their hybrid offspring to search for evidence of gene expression heterosis. Standard statistical approaches for separately analyzing expression data for each gene can produce biased and highly variable estimates and unreliable tests of heterosis. To address these shortcomings, we develop a hierarchical model to borrow information across genes. Using our modeling framework, we derive empirical Bayes estimators and an inference strategy to identify gene expression heterosis. Simulation results show that our proposed method outperforms the more traditional strategy used to detect gene expression heterosis. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:25435758

  14. Estimation and Testing of Gene Expression Heterosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Tieming; Liu, Peng; Nettleton, Dan

    2014-09-01

    Heterosis, also known as the hybrid vigor, occurs when the mean phenotype of hybrid off-spring is superior to that of its two inbred parents. The heterosis phenomenon is extensively utilized in agriculture though the molecular basis is still unknown. In an effort to understand phenotypic heterosis at the molecular level, researchers have begun to compare expression levels of thousands of genes between parental inbred lines and their hybrid offspring to search for evidence of gene expression heterosis. Standard statistical approaches for separately analyzing expression data for each gene can produce biased and highly variable estimates and unreliable tests of heterosis. To address these shortcomings, we develop a hierarchical model to borrow information across genes. Using our modeling framework, we derive empirical Bayes estimators and an inference strategy to identify gene expression heterosis. Simulation results show that our proposed method outperforms the more traditional strategy used to detect gene expression heterosis. This article has supplementary material online.

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats and Efficient Development of Polymorphic SSR Markers Based on Whole Genome Re-Sequencing of Multiple Isolates of the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huaiyong; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhan, Gangming; Wei, Guorong; Zhou, Xinli; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    The biotrophic parasitic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) causes stripe rust, a devastating disease of wheat, endangering global food security. Because the Pst population is highly dynamic, it is difficult to develop wheat cultivars with durable and highly effective resistance. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widely used as molecular markers in genetic studies to determine population structure in many organisms. However, only a small number of SSR markers have been developed for Pst. In this study, a total of 4,792 SSR loci were identified using the whole genome sequences of six isolates from different regions of the world, with a marker density of one SSR per 22.95 kb. The majority of the SSRs were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. A database containing 1,113 SSR markers were established. Through in silico comparison, the previously reported SSR markers were found mainly in exons, whereas the SSR markers in the database were mostly in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 105 polymorphic SSR markers were confirmed in silico by their identical positions and nucleotide variations with INDELs identified among the six isolates. When 104 in silico polymorphic SSR markers were used to genotype 21 Pst isolates, 84 produced the target bands, and 82 of them were polymorphic and revealed the genetic relationships among the isolates. The results show that whole genome re-sequencing of multiple isolates provides an ideal resource for developing SSR markers, and the newly developed SSR markers are useful for genetic and population studies of the wheat stripe rust fungus. PMID:26068192

  16. Molecular Tracers of Turbulent Shocks in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pon, Andy; Johnstone, D. I.; Kaufman, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular clouds exhibit large linewidths, which are usually interpreted as being due to supersonic turbulence. This turbulence plays a key role in many theories of star formation, as it is believed to help support and fragment molecular clouds. Current numerical MHD simulations show that the turbulent energy of a molecular cloud dissipates on the order of a crossing time, but do not explicitly follow how this energy is released. We have run models of C-type shocks, based on Kaufman & Neufeld (1996), propagating into gas with densities near 1000 cm3 at velocities of a few km/s, appropriate for the ambient conditions inside of a molecular cloud, to determine which species and transitions dominate the cooling and radiative energy release associated with the dissipation of turbulent energy in shocks within molecular clouds. Combining these shock models and estimates for the rate of turbulent energy dissipation (Basu & Murali 2001), we produce synthetic CO spectra and predict those line emissions that will be observable with current and upcoming observational facilities, such as Herschel, SOFIA, ALMA, and CCAT. We compare our synthetic shock spectra to the photodissociation region (PDR) models of Kaufman et al. (1999) and show that mid-J CO lines (e.g., CO J = 7 to 6) from molecular clouds illuminated by standard interstellar radiation fields are dominated by emission from shocked gas. We also present Herschel observations of these shock tracing lines. References: Basu, S. & Murali, C. 2001, ApJ, 551, 743 Kaufman, M. J. & Neufeld, D. A. 1996, ApJ, 456, 250 Kaufman, M. J., Wolfire, M. G., Hollenbach, D. J., & Luhman, M. L. 1999, ApJ, 527, 795

  17. Estimating Latent Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.

    1984-01-01

    Assuming vectors of item responses depend on ability through a fully specified item response model, this paper presents maximum likelihood equations for estimating the population parameters without estimating an ability parameter for each subject. Asymptotic standard errors, tests of fit, computing approximations, and details of four special cases…

  18. Estimating mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    We present two classes of improved estimators for mutual information M(X,Y) , from samples of random points distributed according to some joint probability density μ(x,y) . In contrast to conventional estimators based on binnings, they are based on entropy estimates from k -nearest neighbor distances. This means that they are data efficient (with k=1 we resolve structures down to the smallest possible scales), adaptive (the resolution is higher where data are more numerous), and have minimal bias. Indeed, the bias of the underlying entropy estimates is mainly due to nonuniformity of the density at the smallest resolved scale, giving typically systematic errors which scale as functions of k/N for N points. Numerically, we find that both families become exact for independent distributions, i.e. the estimator M̂ (X,Y) vanishes (up to statistical fluctuations) if μ(x,y)=μ(x)μ(y) . This holds for all tested marginal distributions and for all dimensions of x and y . In addition, we give estimators for redundancies between more than two random variables. We compare our algorithms in detail with existing algorithms. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our estimators for assessing the actual independence of components obtained from independent component analysis (ICA), for improving ICA, and for estimating the reliability of blind source separation.

  19. Fano factor estimation.

    PubMed

    Rajdl, Kamil; Lansky, Petr

    2014-02-01

    Fano factor is one of the most widely used measures of variability of spike trains. Its standard estimator is the ratio of sample variance to sample mean of spike counts observed in a time window and the quality of the estimator strongly depends on the length of the window. We investigate this dependence under the assumption that the spike train behaves as an equilibrium renewal process. It is shown what characteristics of the spike train have large effect on the estimator bias. Namely, the effect of refractory period is analytically evaluated. Next, we create an approximate asymptotic formula for the mean square error of the estimator, which can also be used to find minimum of the error in estimation from single spike trains. The accuracy of the Fano factor estimator is compared with the accuracy of the estimator based on the squared coefficient of variation. All the results are illustrated for spike trains with gamma and inverse Gaussian probability distributions of interspike intervals. Finally, we discuss possibilities of how to select a suitable observation window for the Fano factor estimation.

  20. Time Delay Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    investigate the possibility of exploiting the properties of a detected Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) signal waveform to estimate time delay, and by...ratios, namely 10 dB and less. We also examine the minimum time –delay estimate error – the Cramer–Rao bound. The results indicate that the method

  1. Robust incremental condition estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Tang, P.T.P.

    1991-03-29

    This paper presents an improved version of incremental condition estimation, a technique for tracking the extremal singular values of a triangular matrix as it is being constructed one column at a time. We present a new motivation for this estimation technique using orthogonal projections. The paper focuses on an implementation of this estimation scheme in an accurate and consistent fashion. In particular, we address the subtle numerical issues arising in the computation of the eigensystem of a symmetric rank-one perturbed diagonal 2 {times} 2 matrix. Experimental results show that the resulting scheme does a good job in estimating the extremal singular values of triangular matrices, independent of matrix size and matrix condition number, and that it performs qualitatively in the same fashion as some of the commonly used nonincremental condition estimation schemes.

  2. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  3. On molecular graph comparison.

    PubMed

    Melo, Jenny A; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Since the last half of the nineteenth century, molecular graphs have been present in several branches of chemistry. When used for molecular structure representation, they have been compared after mapping the corresponding graphs into mathematical objects. However, direct molecular comparison of molecular graphs is a research field less explored. The goal of this mini-review is to show some distance and similarity coefficients which were proposed to directly compare molecular graphs or which could be useful to do so.

  4. Estimating airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    A review was made of the factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs. From this work, an airline operating cost model was developed which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model, similar in some respects to the standard Air Transport Association of America (ATA) Direct Operating Cost Model, permits estimates of aircraft-related costs not now included in the standard ATA model (e.g., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees). A study of the cost of aircraft delay was also made and a method for estimating the cost of certain types of airline delay is described.

  5. Estimating cell populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. S.; Castleman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    An important step in the diagnosis of a cervical cytology specimen is estimating the proportions of the various cell types present. This is usually done with a cell classifier, the error rates of which can be expressed as a confusion matrix. We show how to use the confusion matrix to obtain an unbiased estimate of the desired proportions. We show that the mean square error of this estimate depends on a 'befuddlement matrix' derived from the confusion matrix, and how this, in turn, leads to a figure of merit for cell classifiers. Finally, we work out the two-class problem in detail and present examples to illustrate the theory.

  6. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  7. Estimating Torque Imparted on Spacecraft Using Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Macala, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of missions with spacecraft flying by planetary moons with atmospheres; there will be future missions with similar flybys. When a spacecraft such as Cassini flies by a moon with an atmosphere, the spacecraft will experience an atmospheric torque. This torque could be used to determine the density of the atmosphere. This is because the relation between the atmospheric torque vector and the atmosphere density could be established analytically using the mass properties of the spacecraft, known drag coefficient of objects in free-molecular flow, and the spacecraft velocity relative to the moon. The density estimated in this way could be used to check results measured by science instruments. Since the proposed methodology could estimate disturbance torque as small as 0.02 N-m, it could also be used to estimate disturbance torque imparted on the spacecraft during high-altitude flybys.

  8. Estimation and uncertainty of reversible Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Reversibility is a key concept in Markov models and master-equation models of molecular kinetics. The analysis and interpretation of the transition matrix encoding the kinetic properties of the model rely heavily on the reversibility property. The estimation of a reversible transition matrix from simulation data is, therefore, crucial to the successful application of the previously developed theory. In this work, we discuss methods for the maximum likelihood estimation of transition matrices from finite simulation data and present a new algorithm for the estimation if reversibility with respect to a given stationary vector is desired. We also develop new methods for the Bayesian posterior inference of reversible transition matrices with and without given stationary vector taking into account the need for a suitable prior distribution preserving the meta-stable features of the observed process during posterior inference. All algorithms here are implemented in the PyEMMA software — http://pyemma.org — as of version 2.0.

  9. Variational Approach to Molecular Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Nüske, Feliks; Keller, Bettina G; Pérez-Hernández, Guillermo; Mey, Antonia S J S; Noé, Frank

    2014-04-08

    The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the molecular dynamics propagator (or transfer operator) contain the essential information about the molecular thermodynamics and kinetics. This includes the stationary distribution, the metastable states, and state-to-state transition rates. Here, we present a variational approach for computing these dominant eigenvalues and eigenvectors. This approach is analogous to the variational approach used for computing stationary states in quantum mechanics. A corresponding method of linear variation is formulated. It is shown that the matrices needed for the linear variation method are correlation matrices that can be estimated from simple MD simulations for a given basis set. The method proposed here is thus to first define a basis set able to capture the relevant conformational transitions, then compute the respective correlation matrices, and then to compute their dominant eigenvalues and eigenvectors, thus obtaining the key ingredients of the slow kinetics.

  10. Molecular implementation of molecular shift register memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N. (Inventor); Onuchic, Jose N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electronic shift register memory (20) at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron transfer molecules (22) and the information is shifted by photoinduced (26) electron transfer reactions. Thus, multi-step sequences of charge transfer reactions are used to move charge with high efficiency down a molecular chain. The device integrates compositions of the invention onto a VLSI substrate (36), providing an example of a molecular electronic device which may be fabricated. Three energy level schemes, molecular implementation of these schemes, optical excitation strategies, charge amplification strategies, and error correction strategies are described.

  11. Dating Phylogenies with Hybrid Local Molecular Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Aris-Brosou, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    Background Because rates of evolution and species divergence times cannot be estimated directly from molecular data, all current dating methods require that specific assumptions be made before inferring any divergence time. These assumptions typically bear either on rates of molecular evolution (molecular clock hypothesis, local clocks models) or on both rates and times (penalized likelihood, Bayesian methods). However, most of these assumptions can affect estimated dates, oftentimes because they underestimate large amounts of rate change. Principal Findings A significant modification to a recently proposed ad hoc rate-smoothing algorithm is described, in which local molecular clocks are automatically placed on a phylogeny. This modification makes use of hybrid approaches that borrow from recent theoretical developments in microarray data analysis. An ad hoc integration of phylogenetic uncertainty under these local clock models is also described. The performance and accuracy of the new methods are evaluated by reanalyzing three published data sets. Conclusions It is shown that the new maximum likelihood hybrid methods can perform better than penalized likelihood and almost as well as uncorrelated Bayesian models. However, the new methods still tend to underestimate the actual amount of rate change. This work demonstrates the difficulty of estimating divergence times using local molecular clocks. PMID:17849008

  12. Estimating Radiogenic Cancer Risks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA's estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures developed in light of information that has become available, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

  13. Estimation of food consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  14. Supernova frequency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the frequency of type I and II supernovae occurring in galaxies of different types are derived from observational material acquired by the supernova patrol of the Shternberg Astronomical Institute.

  15. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    inference that increased recruitment was largely responsible for the improvements in population status and growth. However, various data sources also indicated that this increase in recruitment was likely a result of increased immigration rather than improved reproduction on the area. This latter inference is important from a conservation perspective in indicating the importance of birds in other locations to growth and health of the study population. Lukacs and Burnham presented material to be published elsewhere that dealt with the use of genetic markers in capture–recapture studies. The data sources for such studies are samples of hair or feces, which are then analyzed using molecular genetic techniques in order to determine individual genotypes with respect to a usually small number of loci. Two types of classification error can arise in such analyses. First, if only a small number of loci is examined, then there may be nonnegligible probabilities that multiple individual animals will have the same genotypes. The second type of error arises during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process and can result from failure of alleles to amplify (allelic dropout) or from PCR inhibitors in hair and feces that produce the appearance of false alleles or misprinting (Creel et al., 2003). Lukacs and Burnham developed models that formally incorporate possible misclassification of samples resulting from these errors. These models permit estimation of parameters such as abundance and survival in a manner that properly incorporates this uncertainty of individual identity. We anticipate that noninvasive sampling based on molecular genetic analyses of hair or feces will become extremely important for some species, and that the models of Lukacs and Burnham will become very popular for such analyses. MacKenzie & Nichols (2004) discuss the use of occupancy (proportion of patches or habitat area that is occupied) as a surrogate for abundance. In cases of territorial species and where

  16. Early Training Estimation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    are needed. First, by developing earlier and more accurate estimates of training requirements, the training planning process can begin earlier, and...this period and these questions require training input data and (2) the early training planning process requires a solid foundation on which to...development of initial design, task, skill, and training estimates? provision of input into training planning and acquisition documents: 2-39 provision

  17. Nonparametric conditional estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    Many nonparametric regression techniques (such as kernels, nearest neighbors, and smoothing splines) estimate the conditional mean of Y given X = chi by a weighted sum of observed Y values, where observations with X values near chi tend to have larger weights. In this report the weights are taken to represent a finite signed measure on the space of Y values. This measure is studied as an estimate of the conditional distribution of Y given X = chi. From estimates of the conditional distribution, estimates of conditional means, standard deviations, quantiles and other statistical functionals may be computed. Chapter 1 illustrates the computation of conditional quantiles and conditional survival probabilities on the Stanford Heart Transplant data. Chapter 2 contains a survey of nonparametric regression methods and introduces statistical metrics and von Mises' method for later use. Chapter 3 proves some consistency results. Chapter 4 provides conditions under which the suitably normalized errors in estimating the conditional distribution of Y have a Brownian limit. Using von Mises' method, asymptotic normality is obtained for nonparametric conditional estimates of compactly differentiable statistical functionals.

  18. Estimating networks with jumps

    PubMed Central

    Kolar, Mladen; Xing, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    We study the problem of estimating a temporally varying coefficient and varying structure (VCVS) graphical model underlying data collected over a period of time, such as social states of interacting individuals or microarray expression profiles of gene networks, as opposed to i.i.d. data from an invariant model widely considered in current literature of structural estimation. In particular, we consider the scenario in which the model evolves in a piece-wise constant fashion. We propose a procedure that estimates the structure of a graphical model by minimizing the temporally smoothed L1 penalized regression, which allows jointly estimating the partition boundaries of the VCVS model and the coefficient of the sparse precision matrix on each block of the partition. A highly scalable proximal gradient method is proposed to solve the resultant convex optimization problem; and the conditions for sparsistent estimation and the convergence rate of both the partition boundaries and the network structure are established for the first time for such estimators. PMID:25013533

  19. Molecular approach to the interpretation of the dielectric relaxation spectrum of a molecular glass former

    PubMed

    Gonzalez; Enciso; Bermejo; Jimenez-Ruiz; Bee

    2000-04-01

    The frequency-dependent dielectric function of ethanol at temperatures within the normal liquid range is evaluated by means of computer molecular dynamics simulations and compared with recent experimental data. The calculated spectra show a similar structure to those reported from experimental measurements and the temperature dependence of its most prominent bands also follows the experimental estimates. An attempt is also made to assign the most intense bands to specific molecular reorientations.

  20. Adaptive spectral doppler estimation.

    PubMed

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence. The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch's method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out. Simulations in Field II for pulsating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior performance for short observation windows compared with the averaged periodogram. Computational costs and implementation details are also discussed.

  1. Subelliptic Estimates for Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Victor; Sternberg, Shlomo

    1970-01-01

    New results are announced linking properties of the symbol module and characteristic variety of a differential complex with test estimates near the characteristic variety of the type considered by Hörmander (½-estimate). The first result is the invariance of the test estimates under pseudo-differential change of coordinates, and this leads to the introduction of a normal form for the complex in the neighborhood of a Cohen-MacCauley point of the symbol module. If the characteristic variety V is a manifold near the Cohen-MacCauley point (x0,ζ0) with parametrizing functions p1,...,pq, where q is the codimension of the characteristic variety in the complexified contangent bundle, the matrix [Formula: see text] of Poisson brackets defines invariantly a Hermitian form Q on the normal space to V at (x0,ζ0) when the dpζ(x0,ζ0) are used as basis, and the test estimates are satisfied at the ith stage of the complex if sig. Q (signature of Q) is ≥ n - i + 1 (n the dimension of the base manifold) or rank Q - sig. Q ≥ i + 1. Finally, conditions are given in order that, on a manifold with smooth boundary, the associated boundary complexes satisfy the ½-estimate. PMID:16591855

  2. Estimating Commit Sizes Efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Philipp; Riehle, Dirk

    The quantitative analysis of software projects can provide insights that let us better understand open source and other software development projects. An important variable used in the analysis of software projects is the amount of work being contributed, the commit size. Unfortunately, post-facto, the commit size can only be estimated, not measured. This paper presents several algorithms for estimating the commit size. Our performance evaluation shows that simple, straightforward heuristics are superior to the more complex text-analysis-based algorithms. Not only are the heuristics significantly faster to compute, they also deliver more accurate results when estimating commit sizes. Based on this experience, we design and present an algorithm that improves on the heuristics, can be computed equally fast, and is more accurate than any of the prior approaches.

  3. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, Leslie

    2013-10-15

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy

  4. Ability Estimation for Conventional Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jwa K.; Nicewander, W. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Bias, standard error, and reliability of five ability estimators were evaluated using Monte Carlo estimates of the unknown conditional means and variances of the estimators. Results indicate that estimates based on Bayesian modal, expected a posteriori, and weighted likelihood estimators were reasonably unbiased with relatively small standard…

  5. Quantifying surface normal estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert B.; Oxley, Mark E.; Eismann, Michael T.; Goda, Matthew E.

    2006-05-01

    An inverse algorithm for surface normal estimation from thermal polarimetric imagery was developed and used to quantify the requirements on a priori information. Building on existing knowledge that calculates the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and the angle of polarization (AOP) for a given surface normal in a forward model (from an object's characteristics to calculation of the DOLP and AOP), this research quantifies the impact of a priori information with the development of an inverse algorithm to estimate surface normals from thermal polarimetric emissions in long-wave infrared (LWIR). The inverse algorithm assumes a polarized infrared focal plane array capturing LWIR intensity images which are then converted to Stokes vectors. Next, the DOLP and AOP are calculated from the Stokes vectors. Last, the viewing angles, θ v, to the surface normals are estimated assuming perfect material information about the imaged scene. A sensitivity analysis is presented to quantitatively describe the a priori information's impact on the amount of error in the estimation of surface normals, and a bound is determined given perfect information about an object. Simulations explored the impact of surface roughness (σ) and the real component (n) of a dielectric's complex index of refraction across a range of viewing angles (θ v) for a given wavelength of observation.

  6. Numerical Estimation in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Lucangeli, Daniela; Piazza, Manuela; Dehaene, Stanislas; Zorzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Children's sense of numbers before formal education is thought to rely on an approximate number system based on logarithmically compressed analog magnitudes that increases in resolution throughout childhood. School-age children performing a numerical estimation task have been shown to increasingly rely on a formally appropriate, linear…

  7. Thermodynamically Correct Bioavailability Estimations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-30

    6448 I 1. SWPPUMENTA* NOTIS lIa. OISTUAMJTiOAVAILAIILTY STATIMENT 121 OT REbT ostwosCo z I Approved for public release; distribution unlimited... research is to develop thermodynamically correct bioavailability estimations using chromatographic stationary phases as a model of the "interphase

  8. Activities: Visualization, Estimation, Computation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maletsky, Evan M.

    1982-01-01

    The material is designed to help students build a cone model, visualize how its dimensions change as its shape changes, estimate maximum volume position, and develop problem-solving skills. Worksheets designed for duplication for classroom use are included. Part of the activity involves student analysis of a BASIC program. (MP)

  9. Estimating Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-01-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions…

  10. Estimating Pump Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W.; Meng, S. Y.; Meng, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Blockage predicted for all components including inducers, impellers and diffusers. Pump performance predicted by semiempirical method shows excellent agreement with test results in Space Shuttle main-engine highpressure fuel turbopump. Comparisons of pump efficiency show equally good agreement of calculated values with experimental ones. Method improves current estimation methods based solely on subjective engineering judgment.

  11. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  12. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  13. Interval estimations in metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mana, G.; Palmisano, C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates interval estimation for a measurand that is known to be positive. Both the Neyman and Bayesian procedures are considered and the difference between the two, not always perceived, is discussed in detail. A solution is proposed to a paradox originated by the frequentist assessment of the long-run success rate of Bayesian intervals.

  14. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  15. A phylogenomic and molecular marker based taxonomic framework for the order Xanthomonadales: proposal to transfer the families Algiphilaceae and Solimonadaceae to the order Nevskiales ord. nov. and to create a new family within the order Xanthomonadales, the family Rhodanobacteraceae fam. nov., containing the genus Rhodanobacter and its closest relatives.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Sohail; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Wong, Shirley; Sohail, Misbah; Schellhorn, Herbert E; Gupta, Radhey S

    2015-02-01

    The current taxonomy of the order Xanthomonadales is highly problematic and no comprehensive phylogenomic studies have been completed that include the most divergent members within the order. In this work, we have completed a phylogenomic analysis of a wide range of genomes, five of which were sequenced for the first time for this work, representing the vast majority of the diversity within the order Xanthomonadales. Using comparative genomic techniques, we have identified a large number of conserved signature inserts/deletions (CSIs) that are specifically found in different groups of related organisms, at different taxonomic levels, within the order. Our phylogenetic analyses do not support a monophyletic grouping of the members of the order Xanthomonadales and no CSIs were identified which are uniquely shared by all sequenced species within this order. However, our work has identified 10 CSIs which are specific to all members of the family Xanthomonadaceae and an additional 10 and 11 CSIs that are specific to one of two phylogenetically well-defined clades within the family Xanthomonadaceae. On the basis of the identified CSIs and the results of phylogenomic analyses, we propose a new taxonomic framework for the order Xanthomonadales. In this proposal, the families Algiphilaceae and Solimonadaceae (Nevskiaceae), which do not branch with the other members of the order Xanthomonadales, are transferred into the order Nevskiales ord. nov. The remaining members of the order Xanthomonadales are divided into two families: the family Xanthomonadaceae, containing the genus Xanthomonas and its closest relatives, and a new family, Rhodanobacteraceae fam. nov., containing the genus Rhodanobacter and its closest relatives. Additionally, we have also emended descriptions of the order Lysobacterales, the family Lysobacteraceae, and the family Nevskiaceae to indicate that they are earlier synonyms of the order Xanthomonadales, the family Xanthomonadaceae, and the family Solimonadaceae, respectively.

  16. Numerical estimation of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascasibar, Y.; Binney, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel technique, dubbed FIESTAS, to estimate the underlying density field from a discrete set of sample points in an arbitrary multidimensional space. FIESTAS assigns a volume to each point by means of a binary tree. Density is then computed by integrating over an adaptive kernel. As a first test, we construct several Monte Carlo realizations of a Hernquist profile and recover the particle density in both real and phase space. At a given point, Poisson noise causes the unsmoothed estimates to fluctuate by a factor of ~2 regardless of the number of particles. This spread can be reduced to about 1dex (~26 per cent) by our smoothing procedure. The density range over which the estimates are unbiased widens as the particle number increases. Our tests show that real-space densities obtained with an SPH kernel are significantly more biased than those yielded by FIESTAS. In phase space, about 10 times more particles are required in order to achieve a similar accuracy. As a second application we have estimated phase-space densities in a dark matter halo from a cosmological simulation. We confirm the results of Arad, Dekel & Klypin that the highest values of f are all associated with substructure rather than the main halo, and that the volume function v(f) ~f-2.5 over about four orders of magnitude in f. We show that a modified version of the toy model proposed by Arad et al. explains this result and suggests that the departures of v(f) from power-law form are not mere numerical artefacts. We conclude that our algorithm accurately measures the phase-space density up to the limit where discreteness effects render the simulation itself unreliable. Computationally, FIESTAS is orders of magnitude faster than the method based on Delaunay tessellation that Arad et al. employed, making it practicable to recover smoothed density estimates for sets of 109 points in six dimensions.

  17. A novel selectable marker based on Aspergillus niger arginase expression.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kashyap; Ahuja, Manmeet; Jayashri, T N; Sirola, Rekha Bisht; Punekar, Narayan S

    2012-06-10

    Selectable markers are valuable tools in transforming asexual fungi like Aspergillus niger. An arginase (agaA) expression vector and a suitable arginase-disrupted host would define a novel nutritional marker/selection for transformation. The development of such a marker was successfully achieved in two steps. The single genomic copy of A. niger arginase gene was disrupted by homologous integration of the bar marker. The agaA disruptant was subsequently complemented by transforming it with agaA expression vectors. Both citA and trpC promoters were able to drive the expression of arginase cDNA. Such agaA+ transformants displayed arginase expression pattern distinct from that of the parent strain. The results are also consistent with a single catabolic route for arginine in this fungus. A simple yet novel arginine-based selection for filamentous fungal transformation is thus described.

  18. Molecular similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2011-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of chemical space. Although all three concepts - molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemical space - are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations that are of the same mathematical form into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another. An expanded account of the material on chemical spaces presented in the first edition of this book is also provided. It includes a discussion of the topography of activity landscapes and the role that activity cliffs in these landscapes play in structure-activity studies.

  19. Molecular similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2004-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of a chemistry space. Although all three concepts molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemistry space are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations, that is, representations of the same mathematical form, into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another.

  20. Engineering molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Burak

    2016-04-01

    Biological molecular motors use chemical energy, mostly in the form of ATP hydrolysis, and convert it to mechanical energy. Correlated thermal fluctuations are essential for the function of a molecular machine and it is the hydrolysis of ATP that modifies the correlated fluctuations of the system. Correlations are consequences of the molecular architecture of the protein. The idea that synthetic molecular machines may be constructed by designing the proper molecular architecture is challenging. In their paper, Sarkar et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043006) propose a synthetic molecular motor based on the coarse grained elastic network model of proteins and show by numerical simulations that motor function is realized, ranging from deterministic to thermal, depending on temperature. This work opens up a new range of possibilities of molecular architecture based engine design.

  1. Workshop on molecular animation.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2010-10-13

    From February 25 to 26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for producing high-quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories.

  2. Workshop on Molecular Animation

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary February 25–26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for: producing high quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories. PMID:20947014

  3. J-adaptive estimation with estimated noise statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jazwinski, A. H.; Hipkins, C.

    1973-01-01

    The J-adaptive sequential estimator is extended to include simultaneous estimation of the noise statistics in a model for system dynamics. This extension completely automates the estimator, eliminating the requirement of an analyst in the loop. Simulations in satellite orbit determination demonstrate the efficacy of the sequential estimation algorithm.

  4. Accuracy Estimation in Force Spectroscopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankl, Christian; Kienberger, Ferry; Gruber, Hermann; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2007-08-01

    Force spectroscopy is a useful tool for the investigation of molecular interactions. We here present a detailed analysis of parameter estimation in force spectroscopy experiments. It provides the values of the statistical errors of the kinetic off-rate constant koff and the energy length scale xβ to be considered using the single barrier model. As a biologically relevant experimental system we used the interaction between human rhinovirus serotype 2 and a recombinant derivative of the very-low density lipoprotein receptor. The interaction forces of single virus-receptor pairs were measured at different loading rates and analysed according to the single barrier model. Accuracy estimates of koff and xβ were obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and bootstrapping. For this model of virus-receptor attachment, force spectroscopy experiments yielded xβ=(0.38± 0.07) nm and \\ln koff=(-2.3± 1.0)\\ln s-1.

  5. Estimating γ-rays dose using computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rawi, Anis M.; Muslih, Raad M.; Al-Harithy, Rafila S.

    When gum arabic is exposed to γ-rays, a change in its reflection and absorption ability for the different wave lengths is obtained. This change is used for estimating the absorbed γ-rays directly. In the present work we are not concerned with the type of components that are chemically formed as emphasis will only be put on the physical changes. The physical state is taken as a potential chemical change since a molecular damage is accumulated as a result of the dose absorbed. The fortran IV data General (Nova 3) designed for estimating colour measurements was connected to a spectrophotometer that enables measuring the changes in both absorbing and reflecting or even diffusing of light through irradiated materials.

  6. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  7. Optimal Centroid Position Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; McClay, W A; Awwal, A S; Ferguson, S W

    2004-07-23

    The alignment of high energy laser beams for potential fusion experiments demand high precision and accuracy by the underlying positioning algorithms. This paper discusses the feasibility of employing online optimal position estimators in the form of model-based processors to achieve the desired results. Here we discuss the modeling, development, implementation and processing of model-based processors applied to both simulated and actual beam line data.

  8. Nonparametric Conditional Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    have a Brownian limit. Using von Mises’ method, asymptotic normality is obtained for nonparametric conditional estimates of compactly differentiable ... differentiable statistical functionals. This res~arch supported by Office of Naval Research Contract NOOOl4-83-K-0472; supported National Science Foundation...2.5 Models for F. 2.6 Compact Differentiability and von Mises’ Method 3. Consistency . 3.1 Introduction and Definitions 3.2 Prohorov Consistency of

  9. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  10. Estimating directional epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Epistasis, i.e., the fact that gene effects depend on the genetic background, is a direct consequence of the complexity of genetic architectures. Despite this, most of the models used in evolutionary and quantitative genetics pay scant attention to genetic interactions. For instance, the traditional decomposition of genetic effects models epistasis as noise around the evolutionarily-relevant additive effects. Such an approach is only valid if it is assumed that there is no general pattern among interactions—a highly speculative scenario. Systematic interactions generate directional epistasis, which has major evolutionary consequences. In spite of its importance, directional epistasis is rarely measured or reported by quantitative geneticists, not only because its relevance is generally ignored, but also due to the lack of simple, operational, and accessible methods for its estimation. This paper describes conceptual and statistical tools that can be used to estimate directional epistasis from various kinds of data, including QTL mapping results, phenotype measurements in mutants, and artificial selection responses. As an illustration, I measured directional epistasis from a real-life example. I then discuss the interpretation of the estimates, showing how they can be used to draw meaningful biological inferences. PMID:25071828

  11. Bayesian Error Estimation Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    The challenge of approximating the exchange-correlation functional in Density Functional Theory (DFT) has led to the development of numerous different approximations of varying accuracy on different calculated properties. There is therefore a need for reliable estimation of prediction errors within the different approximation schemes to DFT. The Bayesian Error Estimation Functionals (BEEF) have been developed with this in mind. The functionals are constructed by fitting to experimental and high-quality computational databases for molecules and solids including chemisorption and van der Waals systems. This leads to reasonably accurate general-purpose functionals with particual focus on surface science. The fitting procedure involves considerations on how to combine different types of data, and applies Tikhonov regularization and bootstrap cross validation. The methodology has been applied to construct GGA and metaGGA functionals with and without inclusion of long-ranged van der Waals contributions. The error estimation is made possible by the generation of not only a single functional but through the construction of a probability distribution of functionals represented by a functional ensemble. The use of the functional ensemble is illustrated on compound heat of formation and by investigations of the reliability of calculated catalytic ammonia synthesis rates.

  12. Mean Density Estimation derived from Satellite Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Close, S.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of nanosatellite constellations, we define here a new method to derive neutral densities of the lower thermosphere from multiple similar platforms travelling through same regions of space. Because of similar orbits, the satellites are expected to encounter similar mean neutral densities and hence experience similar drag if their drag coefficients are equivalent. Utilizing free molecular flow theory to bound the minimum possible drag coefficient possible and order statistics to give a statistical picture of the distribution, we are able to estimate the neutral density alongside its associated error bounds. Data sources for this methodology can either be from already established Two Line Elements (TLEs) or from raw data sources, in which an additional filtering step needs to be performed to estimate relevant parameters. The effects of error in the filtering step of the methodology are also discussed and can be removed if the error distribution is Gaussian in nature. This method does not depend on prior models of the atmosphere, but instead is based upon physics models of simple shapes in free molecular flow. With a constellation of 10 satellites, we can achieve a standard deviation of roughly 4% on the estimated mean neutral density. As additional satellites are included in the estimation scheme, the result converges towards the lower limit of the achievable drag coefficient, and accuracy becomes limited by the quality of the ranging measurements and the probability of the accommodation coefficient. Data is provided courtesy of Planet Labs and comparisons are made to existing atmospheric models such as NRLMSISE-00 and JB2006.

  13. Injury Risk Estimation Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Petushek, Erich J.; Ward, Paul; Cokely, Edward T.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Simple observational assessment of movement is a potentially low-cost method for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury screening and prevention. Although many individuals utilize some form of observational assessment of movement, there are currently no substantial data on group skill differences in observational screening of ACL injury risk. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare various groups’ abilities to visually assess ACL injury risk as well as the associated strategies and ACL knowledge levels. The hypothesis was that sports medicine professionals would perform better than coaches and exercise science academics/students and that these subgroups would all perform better than parents and other general population members. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 428 individuals, including physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, strength and conditioning coaches, exercise science researchers/students, athletes, parents, and members of the general public participated in the study. Participants completed the ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz (ACL-IQ) and answered questions related to assessment strategy and ACL knowledge. Results: Strength and conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, physical therapists, and exercise science students exhibited consistently superior ACL injury risk estimation ability (+2 SD) as compared with sport coaches, parents of athletes, and members of the general public. The performance of a substantial number of individuals in the exercise sciences/sports medicines (approximately 40%) was similar to or exceeded clinical instrument-based biomechanical assessment methods (eg, ACL nomogram). Parents, sport coaches, and the general public had lower ACL-IQ, likely due to their lower ACL knowledge and to rating the importance of knee/thigh motion lower and weight and jump height higher. Conclusion: Substantial cross-professional/group differences in visual ACL

  14. An alternative covariance estimator to investigate genetic heterogeneity in populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic predictions and GWAS have used mixed models for identification of associations and trait predictions. In both cases, the covariance between individuals for performance is estimated using molecular markers. Mixed model properties indicate that the use of the data for prediction is optimal if ...

  15. Estimation for bilinear stochastic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsky, A. S.; Marcus, S. I.

    1974-01-01

    Three techniques for the solution of bilinear estimation problems are presented. First, finite dimensional optimal nonlinear estimators are presented for certain bilinear systems evolving on solvable and nilpotent lie groups. Then the use of harmonic analysis for estimation problems evolving on spheres and other compact manifolds is investigated. Finally, an approximate estimation technique utilizing cumulants is discussed.

  16. Los Alamos PC estimating system

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

  17. Molecular modelling and molecular dynamics of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Hoffmann, Brice; Lehn, Pierre; Mornon, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as an ATP-gated channel. Considerable progress has been made over the last years in the understanding of the molecular basis of the CFTR functions, as well as dysfunctions causing the common genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). This review provides a global overview of the theoretical studies that have been performed so far, especially molecular modelling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A special emphasis is placed on the CFTR-specific evolution of an ABC transporter framework towards a channel function, as well as on the understanding of the effects of disease-causing mutations and their specific modulation. This in silico work should help structure-based drug discovery and design, with a view to develop CFTR-specific pharmacotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of CF in the context of precision medicine.

  18. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  19. Combining microsatellite and pedigree data to estimate relationships among Skyros ponies.

    PubMed

    Bomcke, E; Gengler, N

    2009-01-01

    Relationship coefficients are particularly useful to improve genetic management of endangered populations. These coefficients are traditionally based on pedigree data, but in case of incomplete or inexistent pedigrees they are replaced by coefficients calculated from molecular data. The main objective of this study was to develop a new method to estimate relationship coefficients by combining molecular with pedigree data, which is useful for specific situations where neither pedigree nor molecular data are complete. The developed method was applied to contribute to the conservation of the Skyros pony breed, which consists of less than 200 individuals, divided into 3 main herds or subpopulations. In this study, relationships between individuals were estimated using traditional estimators as well as the newly developed method. For this purpose, 99 Skyros ponies were genotyped at 16 microsatellite loci. It appeared that the limitation of the most common molecular-based estimators is the use of weights that assume relationships equal to 0. The results showed that, as a consequence of this limitation, negative relationship values can be obtained in small inbred populations, for example. By contrast, the combined estimator gave no negative values. Using principal component analysis, the combined estimator also enabled a better graphic differentiation between the 3 subpopulations defined previously. In conclusion, this new estimator can be a promising alternative to traditionally used estimators, especially in inbred populations, with both incomplete pedigree and molecular information.

  20. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  1. Estimating Divergence Times and Substitution Rates in Rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Chriki-Adeeb, Rim; Chriki, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of divergence times of soil bacteria that form nitrogen-fixing associations with most leguminous plants is challenging because of a limited fossil record and complexities associated with molecular clocks and phylogenetic diversity of root nodule bacteria, collectively called rhizobia. To overcome the lack of fossil record in bacteria, divergence times of host legumes were used to calibrate molecular clocks and perform phylogenetic analyses in rhizobia. The 16S rRNA gene and intergenic spacer region remain among the favored molecular markers to reconstruct the timescale of rhizobia. We evaluate the performance of the random local clock model and the classical uncorrelated lognormal relaxed clock model, in combination with four tree models (coalescent constant size, birth-death, birth-death incomplete sampling, and Yule processes) on rhizobial divergence time estimates. Bayes factor tests based on the marginal likelihoods estimated from the stepping-stone sampling analyses strongly favored the random local clock model in combination with Yule process. Our results on the divergence time estimation from 16S rRNA gene and intergenic spacer region sequences are compatible with age estimates based on the conserved core genes but significantly older than those obtained from symbiotic genes, such as nodIJ genes. This difference may be due to the accelerated evolutionary rates of symbiotic genes compared to those of other genomic regions not directly implicated in nodulation processes.

  2. A Group Contribution Method for Estimating Cetane and Octane Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Kubic, William Louis

    2016-07-28

    Much of the research on advanced biofuels is devoted to the study of novel chemical pathways for converting nonfood biomass into liquid fuels that can be blended with existing transportation fuels. Many compounds under consideration are not found in the existing fuel supplies. Often, the physical properties needed to assess the viability of a potential biofuel are not available. The only reliable information available may be the molecular structure. Group contribution methods for estimating physical properties from molecular structure have been used for more than 60 years. The most common application is estimation of thermodynamic properties. More recently, group contribution methods have been developed for estimating rate dependent properties including cetane and octane numbers. Often, published group contribution methods are limited in terms of types of function groups and range of applicability. In this study, a new, broadly-applicable group contribution method based on an artificial neural network was developed to estimate cetane number research octane number, and motor octane numbers of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons. The new method is more accurate over a greater range molecular weights and structural complexity than existing group contribution methods for estimating cetane and octane numbers.

  3. Estimating Divergence Times and Substitution Rates in Rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    Chriki-Adeeb, Rim; Chriki, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of divergence times of soil bacteria that form nitrogen-fixing associations with most leguminous plants is challenging because of a limited fossil record and complexities associated with molecular clocks and phylogenetic diversity of root nodule bacteria, collectively called rhizobia. To overcome the lack of fossil record in bacteria, divergence times of host legumes were used to calibrate molecular clocks and perform phylogenetic analyses in rhizobia. The 16S rRNA gene and intergenic spacer region remain among the favored molecular markers to reconstruct the timescale of rhizobia. We evaluate the performance of the random local clock model and the classical uncorrelated lognormal relaxed clock model, in combination with four tree models (coalescent constant size, birth–death, birth–death incomplete sampling, and Yule processes) on rhizobial divergence time estimates. Bayes factor tests based on the marginal likelihoods estimated from the stepping-stone sampling analyses strongly favored the random local clock model in combination with Yule process. Our results on the divergence time estimation from 16S rRNA gene and intergenic spacer region sequences are compatible with age estimates based on the conserved core genes but significantly older than those obtained from symbiotic genes, such as nodIJ genes. This difference may be due to the accelerated evolutionary rates of symbiotic genes compared to those of other genomic regions not directly implicated in nodulation processes. PMID:27168719

  4. Time Delay Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-09

    summarizes two methods of spectral estimation given in Carter, Knapp, and Nuttall (1973a) and Carter and Knapp ( 1975 ). Appendix B gives important...Knapp ( 1975 ) Rxy(T) = K RXX(T), (2-22) where ’’^■—""""gg-*"^-^^ K -2 / n(x)x —— 22 -x /2a , e ’ dx (2-23) Therefore, for even...convolution is the multi- plication (Oppenheim and Schäfer ( 1975 )) Y(f) = H(f)X(f ) , (2-25) where X, H, and Y are Fourier transforms of x, h and y

  5. Hybrid estimation technique for predicting butene concentration in polyethylene reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Ali, Jarinah; Hussain, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    A component of artificial intelligence (AI), which is fuzzy logic, is combined with the so-called conventional sliding mode observer (SMO) to establish a hybrid type estimator to predict the butene concentration in the polyethylene production reactor. Butene or co-monomer concentration is another significant parameter in the polymerization process since it will affect the molecular weight distribution of the polymer produced. The hybrid estimator offers straightforward formulation of SMO and its combination with the fuzzy logic rules. The error resulted from the SMO estimation will be manipulated using the fuzzy rules to enhance the performance, thus improved on the convergence rate. This hybrid estimation is able to estimate the butene concentration satisfactorily despite the present of noise in the process.

  6. ESTIMATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (Sparc Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry)has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms ...

  7. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  8. Estimating carnivore community structures.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, José; Nuñez-Arjona, Juan Carlos; Rueda, Carmen; González, Luis Mariano; García-Domínguez, Francisco; Muñoz-Igualada, Jaime; López-Bao, José Vicente

    2017-01-25

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the structure of carnivore communities is of paramount importance because of their ecological roles, ecosystem services and impact on biodiversity conservation, but they are still scarce. This information is key for carnivore management: to build support for and acceptance of management decisions and policies it is crucial that those decisions are based on robust and high quality information. Here, we combined camera and live-trapping surveys, as well as telemetry data, with spatially-explicit Bayesian models to show the usefulness of an integrated multi-method and multi-model approach to monitor carnivore community structures. Our methods account for imperfect detection and effectively deal with species with non-recognizable individuals. In our Mediterranean study system, the terrestrial carnivore community was dominated by red foxes (0.410 individuals/km(2)); Egyptian mongooses, feral cats and stone martens were similarly abundant (0.252, 0.249 and 0.240 individuals/km(2), respectively), whereas badgers and common genets were the least common (0.130 and 0.087 individuals/km(2), respectively). The precision of density estimates improved by incorporating multiple covariates, device operation, and accounting for the removal of individuals. The approach presented here has substantial implications for decision-making since it allows, for instance, the evaluation, in a standard and comparable way, of community responses to interventions.

  9. Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKellip, Rodney D.; Ross, Kenton W.; Spruce, Joseph P.; Smoot, James C.; Ryan, Robert E.; Gasser, Gerald E.; Prados, Donald L.; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    The Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool (PPET) is a set of algorithms implemented in MATLAB that estimates key vegetative phenological parameters. For a given year, the PPET software package takes in temporally processed vegetation index data (3D spatio-temporal arrays) generated by the time series product tool (TSPT) and outputs spatial grids (2D arrays) of vegetation phenological parameters. As a precursor to PPET, the TSPT uses quality information for each pixel of each date to remove bad or suspect data, and then interpolates and digitally fills data voids in the time series to produce a continuous, smoothed vegetation index product. During processing, the TSPT displays NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) time series plots and images from the temporally processed pixels. Both the TSPT and PPET currently use moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite multispectral data as a default, but each software package is modifiable and could be used with any high-temporal-rate remote sensing data collection system that is capable of producing vegetation indices. Raw MODIS data from the Aqua and Terra satellites is processed using the TSPT to generate a filtered time series data product. The PPET then uses the TSPT output to generate phenological parameters for desired locations. PPET output data tiles are mosaicked into a Conterminous United States (CONUS) data layer using ERDAS IMAGINE, or equivalent software package. Mosaics of the vegetation phenology data products are then reprojected to the desired map projection using ERDAS IMAGINE

  10. Estimating carnivore community structures

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, José; Nuñez-Arjona, Juan Carlos; Rueda, Carmen; González, Luis Mariano; García-Domínguez, Francisco; Muñoz-Igualada, Jaime; López-Bao, José Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the structure of carnivore communities is of paramount importance because of their ecological roles, ecosystem services and impact on biodiversity conservation, but they are still scarce. This information is key for carnivore management: to build support for and acceptance of management decisions and policies it is crucial that those decisions are based on robust and high quality information. Here, we combined camera and live-trapping surveys, as well as telemetry data, with spatially-explicit Bayesian models to show the usefulness of an integrated multi-method and multi-model approach to monitor carnivore community structures. Our methods account for imperfect detection and effectively deal with species with non-recognizable individuals. In our Mediterranean study system, the terrestrial carnivore community was dominated by red foxes (0.410 individuals/km2); Egyptian mongooses, feral cats and stone martens were similarly abundant (0.252, 0.249 and 0.240 individuals/km2, respectively), whereas badgers and common genets were the least common (0.130 and 0.087 individuals/km2, respectively). The precision of density estimates improved by incorporating multiple covariates, device operation, and accounting for the removal of individuals. The approach presented here has substantial implications for decision-making since it allows, for instance, the evaluation, in a standard and comparable way, of community responses to interventions. PMID:28120871

  11. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-08-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/sqrt{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/sqrt{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example, we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  12. Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond; Sergi, Alessandro

    Statistical mechanics provides a well-established link between microscopic equilibrium states and thermodynamics. If one considers systems out of equilibrium, the link between microscopic dynamical properties and non-equilibrium macroscopic states is more difficult to establish [1,2]. For systems lying near equilibrium, linear response theory provides a route to derive linear macroscopic laws and the microscopic expressions for the transport properties that enter the constitutive relations. If the system is displaced far from equilibrium, no fully general theory exists to treat such systems. By restricting consideration to a class of non-equilibrium states which arise from perturbations (linear or non-linear) of an equilibrium state, methods can be developed to treat non-equilibrium states. Furthermore, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation methods can be devised to provide estimates for the transport properties of these systems.

  13. Open Source Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. PMID:27631126

  14. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  15. Interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Bally, J

    1986-04-11

    The interstellar medium in our galaxy contains matter in a variety of states ranging from hot plasma to cold and dusty molecular gas. The molecular phase consists of giant clouds, which are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the galaxy, the primary reservoir of material for the ongoing birth of new stars, and the medium regulating the evolution of galactic disks.

  16. Molecular imaging in endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hoetker, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging focuses on the molecular signature of cells rather than morphological changes in the tissue. The need for this novel type of imaging arises from the often difficult detection and characterization especially of small and/or premalignant lesions. Molecular imaging specifically visualizes biological properties of a lesion and might thereby be able to close diagnostic gaps, e.g. when differentiating hyperplastic from neoplastic polyps or detecting the margins of intraepithelial neoplastic spread. Additionally, not only the detection and discrimination of lesions could be improved: based on the molecular features identified using molecular imaging, therapy regimens could be adjusted on the day of diagnosis to allow for personalized medicine and optimized care for each individual patient. PMID:24917945

  17. Multifunctionality in molecular magnetism.

    PubMed

    Pinkowicz, Dawid; Czarnecki, Bernard; Reczyński, Mateusz; Arczyński, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Molecular magnetism draws from the fundamental ideas of structural chemistry and combines them with experimental physics resulting in one of the highest profile current topics, namely molecular materials that exhibit multifunctionality. Recent advances in the design of new generations of multifunctional molecular magnets that retain the functions of the building blocks and exhibit non-trivial magnetic properties at higher temperatures provide promising evidence that they may be useful for the future construction of nanoscale devices. This article is not a complete review but is rather an introduction into thefascinating world of multifunctional solids with magnetism as the leitmotif. We provide a subjective selection and discussion of the most inspiring examples of multifunctional molecular magnets: magnetic sponges, guest-responsive magnets, molecular magnets with ionic conductivity, photomagnets and non-centrosymmetric and chiral magnets.

  18. Crystalline molecular flasks.

    PubMed

    Inokuma, Yasuhide; Kawano, Masaki; Fujita, Makoto

    2011-05-01

    A variety of host compounds have been used as molecular-scale reaction vessels, protecting guests from their environment or restricting the space available around them, thus favouring particular reactions. Such molecular 'flasks' can endow guest molecules with reactivities that differ from those in bulk solvents. Here, we extend this concept to crystalline molecular flasks, solid-state crystalline networks with pores within which pseudo-solution-state reactions can take place. As the guest molecules can spontaneously align along the walls and channels of the hosts, structural changes in the substrates can be directly observed by in situ X-ray crystallography during reaction. Recently, this has enabled observation of the molecular structures of transient intermediates and other labile species, in the form of sequential structural snapshots of the chemical transformation. Here, we describe the principles, development and applications of crystalline molecular flasks.

  19. Earthquake Loss Estimation Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolova, Nina; Bonnin, Jean; Larionov, Valery; Ugarov, Aleksander

    2013-04-01

    The paper addresses the reliability issues of strong earthquakes loss assessment following strong earthquakes with worldwide Systems' application in emergency mode. Timely and correct action just after an event can result in significant benefits in saving lives. In this case the information about possible damage and expected number of casualties is very critical for taking decision about search, rescue operations and offering humanitarian assistance. Such rough information may be provided by, first of all, global systems, in emergency mode. The experience of earthquakes disasters in different earthquake-prone countries shows that the officials who are in charge of emergency response at national and international levels are often lacking prompt and reliable information on the disaster scope. Uncertainties on the parameters used in the estimation process are numerous and large: knowledge about physical phenomena and uncertainties on the parameters used to describe them; global adequacy of modeling techniques to the actual physical phenomena; actual distribution of population at risk at the very time of the shaking (with respect to immediate threat: buildings or the like); knowledge about the source of shaking, etc. Needless to be a sharp specialist to understand, for example, that the way a given building responds to a given shaking obeys mechanical laws which are poorly known (if not out of the reach of engineers for a large portion of the building stock); if a carefully engineered modern building is approximately predictable, this is far not the case for older buildings which make up the bulk of inhabited buildings. The way population, inside the buildings at the time of shaking, is affected by the physical damage caused to the buildings is not precisely known, by far. The paper analyzes the influence of uncertainties in strong event parameters determination by Alert Seismological Surveys, of simulation models used at all stages from, estimating shaking intensity

  20. An evaluation of 3D head pose estimation using the Microsoft Kinect v2.

    PubMed

    Darby, John; Sánchez, María B; Butler, Penelope B; Loram, Ian D

    2016-07-01

    The Kinect v2 sensor supports real-time non-invasive 3D head pose estimation. Because the sensor is small, widely available and relatively cheap it has great potential as a tool for groups interested in measuring head posture. In this paper we compare the Kinect's head pose estimates with a marker-based record of ground truth in order to establish its accuracy. During movement of the head and neck alone (with static torso), we find average errors in absolute yaw, pitch and roll angles of 2.0±1.2°, 7.3±3.2° and 2.6±0.7°, and in rotations relative to the rest pose of 1.4±0.5°, 2.1±0.4° and 2.0±0.8°. Larger head rotations where it becomes difficult to see facial features can cause estimation to fail (10.2±6.1% of all poses in our static torso range of motion tests) but we found no significant changes in performance with the participant standing further away from Kinect - additionally enabling full-body pose estimation - or without performing face shape calibration, something which is not always possible for younger or disabled participants. Where facial features remain visible, the sensor has applications in the non-invasive assessment of postural control, e.g. during a programme of physical therapy. In particular, a multi-Kinect setup covering the full range of head (and body) movement would appear to be a promising way forward.

  1. Divergence time estimation using fossils as terminal taxa and the origins of Lissamphibia.

    PubMed

    Pyron, R Alexander

    2011-07-01

    Were molecular data available for extinct taxa, questions regarding the origins of many groups could be settled in short order. As this is not the case, various strategies have been proposed to combine paleontological and neontological data sets. The use of fossil dates as node age calibrations for divergence time estimation from molecular phylogenies is commonplace. In addition, simulations suggest that the addition of morphological data from extinct taxa may improve phylogenetic estimation when combined with molecular data for extant species, and some studies have merged morphological and molecular data to estimate combined evidence phylogenies containing both extinct and extant taxa. However, few, if any, studies have attempted to estimate divergence times using phylogenies containing both fossil and living taxa sampled for both molecular and morphological data. Here, I infer both the phylogeny and the time of origin for Lissamphibia and a number of stem tetrapods using Bayesian methods based on a data set containing morphological data for extinct taxa, molecular data for extant taxa, and molecular and morphological data for a subset of extant taxa. The results suggest that Lissamphibia is monophyletic, nested within Lepospondyli, and originated in the late Carboniferous at the earliest. This research illustrates potential pitfalls for the use of fossils as post hoc age constraints on internal nodes and highlights the importance of explicit phylogenetic analysis of extinct taxa. These results suggest that the application of fossils as minima or maxima on molecular phylogenies should be supplemented or supplanted by combined evidence analyses whenever possible.

  2. Estimating Bias Error Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tian-Shu; Finley, Tom D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper formulates the general methodology for estimating the bias error distribution of a device in a measuring domain from less accurate measurements when a minimal number of standard values (typically two values) are available. A new perspective is that the bias error distribution can be found as a solution of an intrinsic functional equation in a domain. Based on this theory, the scaling- and translation-based methods for determining the bias error distribution arc developed. These methods are virtually applicable to any device as long as the bias error distribution of the device can be sufficiently described by a power series (a polynomial) or a Fourier series in a domain. These methods have been validated through computational simulations and laboratory calibration experiments for a number of different devices.

  3. Precipitation Estimates for Hydroelectricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco J.; Hou, Arthur Y.; de Castro, Manuel; Checa, Ramiro; Cuartero, Fernando; Barros, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroelectric plants require precise and timely estimates of rain, snow and other hydrometeors for operations. However, it is far from being a trivial task to measure and predict precipitation. This paper presents the linkages between precipitation science and hydroelectricity, and in doing so it provides insight into current research directions that are relevant for this renewable energy. Methods described include radars, disdrometers, satellites and numerical models. Two recent advances that have the potential of being highly beneficial for hydropower operations are featured: the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) mission, which represents an important leap forward in precipitation observations from space, and high performance computing (HPC) and grid technology, that allows building ensembles of numerical weather and climate models.

  4. Estimating many variances

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, H.

    1981-01-01

    Suppose that an unknown random parameter theta with distribution function G is such that given theta, an observable random variable x has conditional probability density f(x / theta) of known form. If a function t = t(x) is used to estimate theta, then the expected squared error with respect to the random variation of both theta and x is: E(t-theta)/sup 2/ = ..integral.. ..integral..(t(x)-theta)/sup 2/ f(x parallel theta)dx dG(theta). For fixed G we can seek to minimize this equation within any desired class of functions t, such as the class of all linear functions A + Bx, or the class of al Borel functions whatsoever.

  5. Uncertainties in transpiration estimates.

    PubMed

    Coenders-Gerrits, A M J; van der Ent, R J; Bogaard, T A; Wang-Erlandsson, L; Hrachowitz, M; Savenije, H H G

    2014-02-13

    arising from S. Jasechko et al. Nature 496, 347-350 (2013)10.1038/nature11983How best to assess the respective importance of plant transpiration over evaporation from open waters, soils and short-term storage such as tree canopies and understories (interception) has long been debated. On the basis of data from lake catchments, Jasechko et al. conclude that transpiration accounts for 80-90% of total land evaporation globally (Fig. 1a). However, another choice of input data, together with more conservative accounting of the related uncertainties, reduces and widens the transpiration ratio estimation to 35-80%. Hence, climate models do not necessarily conflict with observations, but more measurements on the catchment scale are needed to reduce the uncertainty range. There is a Reply to this Brief Communications Arising by Jasechko, S. et al. Nature 506, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12926 (2014).

  6. Estimating earthquake potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    The hazards to life and property from earthquakes can be minimized in three ways. First, structures can be designed and built to resist the effects of earthquakes. Second, the location of structures and human activities can be chosen to avoid or to limit the use of areas known to be subject to serious earthquake hazards. Third, preparations for an earthquake in response to a prediction or warning can reduce the loss of life and damage to property as well as promote a rapid recovery from the disaster. The success of the first two strategies, earthquake engineering and land use planning, depends on being able to reliably estimate the earthquake potential. The key considerations in defining the potential of a region are the location, size, and character of future earthquakes and frequency of their occurrence. Both historic seismicity of the region and the geologic record are considered in evaluating earthquake potential. 

  7. Virtual Screening Using Molecular Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianyi; Wu, Johnny C.; Yan, Chunli; Wang, Yuanfeng; Luo, Ray; Gonzales, Michael B.; Dalby, Kevin N.; Ren, Pengyu

    2011-01-01

    Effective virtual screening relies on our ability to make accurate prediction of protein-ligand binding, which remains a great challenge. In this work, utilizing the molecular-mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann (or Generalized Born) Surface Area approach, we have evaluated the binding affinity of a set of 156 ligands to seven families of proteins, trypsin β, thrombin α, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA), urokinase-type plasminogen activator, β-glucosidase A and coagulation factor Xa. The effect of protein dielectric constant in the implicit-solvent model on the binding free energy calculation is shown to be important. The statistical correlations between the binding energy calculated from the implicit-solvent approach and experimental free energy are in the range 0.56~0.79 across all the families. This performance is better than that of typical docking programs especially given that the latter is directly trained using known binding data while the molecular mechanics is based on general physical parameters. Estimation of entropic contribution remains the barrier to accurate free energy calculation. We show that the traditional rigid rotor harmonic oscillator approximation is unable to improve the binding free energy prediction. Inclusion of conformational restriction seems to be promising but requires further investigation. On the other hand, our preliminary study suggests that implicit-solvent based alchemical perturbation, which offers explicit sampling of configuration entropy, can be a viable approach to significantly improve the prediction of binding free energy. Overall, the molecular mechanics approach has the potential for medium to high-throughput computational drug discovery. PMID:21491494

  8. Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST) was developed to allow users to easily estimate the toxicity of chemicals using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) methodologies. QSARs are mathematical models used to predict measures of toxicity from the physical c...

  9. Estimation Strategies of Four Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowker, Ann; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study of the estimation skills of mathematicians (N=44), accountants (N=44), psychology students (N=44), and English students (N=44). Explores their methods of estimating the products and quotients of 20 problems. Contains 49 references. (DDR)

  10. Model optimization using statistical estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. D.; Hart, G. C.; Hasselman, T. K.; Kennedy, B.; Pack, H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Program revises initial or prior estimate of stiffness and mass parameters to parameters yielding frequency and mode characteristics in agreement with test data. Variances are also calculated and consequently define uncertainties of final estimates.

  11. Age estimation based on aspartic acid racemization in human sclera.

    PubMed

    Klumb, Karolin; Matzenauer, Christian; Reckert, Alexandra; Lehmann, Klaus; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Age estimation based on racemization of aspartic acid residues (AAR) in permanent proteins has been established in forensic medicine for years. While dentine is the tissue of choice for this molecular method of age estimation, teeth are not always available which leads to the need to identify other suitable tissues. We examined the suitability of total tissue samples of human sclera for the estimation of age at death. Sixty-five samples of scleral tissue were analyzed. The samples were hydrolyzed and after derivatization, the extent of aspartic acid racemization was determined by gas chromatography. The degree of AAR increased with age. In samples from younger individuals, the correlation of age and D-aspartic acid content was closer than in samples from older individuals. The age-dependent racemization in total tissue samples proves that permanent or at least long-living proteins are present in scleral tissue. The correlation of AAR in human sclera and age at death is close enough to serve as basis for age estimation. However, the precision of age estimation by this method is lower than that of age estimation based on the analysis of dentine which is due to molecular inhomogeneities of total tissue samples of sclera. Nevertheless, the approach may serve as a valuable alternative or addition in exceptional cases.

  12. Transferability of molecular markers from major legumes to Lathyrus spp. for their application in mapping and diversity studies.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Nuno Felipe; Trindade Leitão, Susana; Caminero, Constantino; Torres, Ana Maria; Rubiales, Diego; Vaz Patto, Maria Carlota

    2014-01-01

    Lathyrus cicera L. (chickling pea) and L. sativus L. (grass pea) have great potential among grain legumes due to their adaptability to inauspicious environments, high protein content and resistance to serious diseases. Nevertheless, due to its past underused, further activities are required to exploit this potential and to capitalise on the advances in molecular biology that enable improved Lathyrus spp. breeding programmes. In this study we evaluated the transferability of molecular markers developed for closely related legume species to Lathyrus spp. (Medicago truncatula, pea, lentil, faba bean and lupin) and tested the application of those new molecular tools on Lathyrus mapping and diversity studies. Genomic and expressed sequence tag microsatellite, intron-targeted amplified polymorphic, resistance gene analogue and defence-related gene markers were tested. In total 128 (27.7 %) and 132 (28.6 %) molecular markers were successfully cross-amplified, respectively in L. cicera and L. sativus. In total, the efficiency of transferability from genomic microsatellites was 5 %, and from gene-based markers, 55 %. For L. cicera, three cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers and one derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence marker based on the cross-amplified markers were also developed. Nine of those molecular markers were suitable for mapping in a L. cicera recombinant inbred line population. From the 17 molecular markers tested for diversity analysis, six (35 %) in L. cicera and seven (41 %) in L. sativus were polymorphic and discriminate well all the L. sativus accessions. Additionally, L. cicera accessions were clearly distinguished from L. sativus accessions. This work revealed a high number of transferable molecular markers to be used in current genomic studies in Lathyrus spp. Although their usefulness was higher on diversity studies, they represent the first steps for future comparative mapping involving these species.

  13. Molecular Population Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. PMID:28270526

  14. Molecular Population Genetics.

    PubMed

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data.

  15. EDITORIAL: Molecular Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Keisuke; Okamoto, Koji

    2006-06-01

    'Molecular Imaging Technology' focuses on image-based techniques using nanoscale molecules as sensor probes to measure spatial variations of various species (molecular oxygen, singlet oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitric monoxide, etc) and physical properties (pressure, temperature, skin friction, velocity, mechanical stress, etc). This special feature, starting on page 1237, contains selected papers from The International Workshop on Molecular Imaging for Interdisciplinary Research, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in Japan, which was held at the Sendai Mediatheque, Sendai, Japan, on 8 9 November 2004. The workshop was held as a sequel to the MOSAIC International Workshop that was held in Tokyo in 2003, to summarize the outcome of the 'MOSAIC Project', a five-year interdisciplinary project supported by Techno-Infrastructure Program, the Special Coordination Fund for Promotion of Science Technology to develop molecular sensor technology for aero-thermodynamic research. The workshop focused on molecular imaging technology and its applications to interdisciplinary research areas. More than 110 people attended this workshop from various research fields such as aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, radiotechnology, fluid dynamics, bio-science/engineering and medical engineering. The purpose of this workshop is to stimulate intermixing of these interdisciplinary fields for further development of molecular sensor and imaging technology. It is our pleasure to publish the seven papers selected from our workshop as a special feature in Measurement and Science Technology. We will be happy if this issue inspires people to explore the future direction of molecular imaging technology for interdisciplinary research.

  16. Molecular gearing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeff C.

    1997-11-01

    The race to create smaller devices is fueling much of the research in electronics. The competition has intensified with the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in which miniaturization is already reaching the dimensional limits imposed by physics of current lithographic techniques. Also, in the realm of biochemistry, evidence is accumulating that certain enzyme complexes are capable of very sophisticated modes of motion. Complex synergistic biochemical complexes driven by sophisticated biomechanical processes are quite common. Their biochemical functions are based on the interplay of mechanical and chemical processes, including allosteric effects. In addition, the complexity of this interplay far exceeds that of typical chemical reactions. Understanding the behavior of artificial molecular devices as well as complex natural molecular biomechanical systems is difficult. Fortunately, the problem can be successfully resolved by direct molecular engineering of simple molecular systems that can mimic desired mechanical or electronic devices. These molecular systems are called technomimetics (the name is derived, by analogy, from biomimetics). Several classes of molecular systems that can mimic mechanical, electronic, or other features of macroscopic devices have been successfully synthesized by conventional chemical methods during the past two decades. In this article we discuss only one class of such model devices: molecular gearing systems.

  17. Molecular gearing systems

    DOE PAGES

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeff C.

    1997-11-01

    The race to create smaller devices is fueling much of the research in electronics. The competition has intensified with the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in which miniaturization is already reaching the dimensional limits imposed by physics of current lithographic techniques. Also, in the realm of biochemistry, evidence is accumulating that certain enzyme complexes are capable of very sophisticated modes of motion. Complex synergistic biochemical complexes driven by sophisticated biomechanical processes are quite common. Their biochemical functions are based on the interplay of mechanical and chemical processes, including allosteric effects. In addition, the complexity of this interplay far exceeds thatmore » of typical chemical reactions. Understanding the behavior of artificial molecular devices as well as complex natural molecular biomechanical systems is difficult. Fortunately, the problem can be successfully resolved by direct molecular engineering of simple molecular systems that can mimic desired mechanical or electronic devices. These molecular systems are called technomimetics (the name is derived, by analogy, from biomimetics). Several classes of molecular systems that can mimic mechanical, electronic, or other features of macroscopic devices have been successfully synthesized by conventional chemical methods during the past two decades. In this article we discuss only one class of such model devices: molecular gearing systems.« less

  18. Error Estimates for Mixed Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    This paper presents abstract error estimates for mixed methods for the approximate solution of elliptic boundary value problems. These estimates are...then applied to obtain quasi-optimal error estimates in the usual Sobolev norms for four examples: three mixed methods for the biharmonic problem and a mixed method for 2nd order elliptic problems. (Author)

  19. Bayes' estimators of generalized entropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holste, D.; Große, I.; Herzel, H.

    1998-03-01

    The order-q Tsallis 0305-4470/31/11/007/img5 and Rényi entropy 0305-4470/31/11/007/img6 receive broad applications in the statistical analysis of complex phenomena. A generic problem arises, however, when these entropies need to be estimated from observed data. The finite size of data sets can lead to serious systematic and statistical errors in numerical estimates. In this paper, we focus upon the problem of estimating generalized entropies from finite samples and derive the Bayes estimator of the order-q Tsallis entropy, including the order-1 (i.e. the Shannon) entropy, under the assumption of a uniform prior probability density. The Bayes estimator yields, in general, the smallest mean-quadratic deviation from the true parameter as compared with any other estimator. Exploiting the functional relationship between 0305-4470/31/11/007/img7 and 0305-4470/31/11/007/img8, we use the Bayes estimator of 0305-4470/31/11/007/img7 to estimate the Rényi entropy 0305-4470/31/11/007/img8. We compare these novel estimators with the frequency-count estimators for 0305-4470/31/11/007/img7 and 0305-4470/31/11/007/img8. We find by numerical simulations that the Bayes estimator reduces statistical errors of order-q entropy estimates for Bernoulli as well as for higher-order Markov processes derived from the complete genome of the prokaryote Haemophilus influenzae.

  20. Estimating concurrence via entanglement witnesses

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkowski, Jacek; Chruscinski, Dariusz

    2010-05-15

    We show that each entanglement witness detecting a given bipartite entangled state provides an estimation of its concurrence. We illustrate our result with several well-known examples of entanglement witnesses and compare the corresponding estimation of concurrence with other estimations provided by the trace norm of partial transposition and realignment.

  1. Bibliography for aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Maine, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    An extensive bibliography in the field of aircraft parameter estimation has been compiled. This list contains definitive works related to most aircraft parameter estimation approaches. Theoretical studies as well as practical applications are included. Many of these publications are pertinent to subjects peripherally related to parameter estimation, such as aircraft maneuver design or instrumentation considerations.

  2. Molecular phylogeny of black flies in the Simulium tuberosum (Diptera: Simuliidae) species group in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sriphirom, Paradee; Sopaladawan, Piyamas Nanork; Wongpakam, Komgrit; Pramual, Pairot

    2014-01-01

    Black flies are medically and ecologically significant insects. They are also interesting from an evolutionary standpoint regarding the role of chromosomal change and ecological adaptation. In this study, molecular genetic markers based on multiple gene sequences were used to assess genetic diversity and to infer phylogenetic relationships for a group of cytologically highly diverse black flies of the Simulium tuberosum species group in Thailand. Ecological affinities of the species were also investigated. High levels of genetic diversity were found in cytological species complexes, S. tani and S. doipuiense, and also in S. rufibasis, which was cytologically nearly monomorphic. The results highlight the necessity of integrating multilevel markers for fully understanding black fly biodiversity. Phylogenetic relationships based on multiple gene sequences were consistent with an existing dendrogram inferred from cytological and morphological data. Simulium tani is the most distinctive taxa among the members of the S. tubersosum species group in Thailand based on its divergent morphological characters. Molecular data supported the monophyletic status of S. tani, S. weji, and S. yuphae, but S. doipuiense and S. rufibasis were polyphyletic, most likely due to incomplete lineage sorting and inadequate phylogenetic signals. Ecological analyses revealed that members of the S. tuberosum species group have clearly different ecological niches. The results thus supported previous views of the importance of ecology in black fly evolution.

  3. Molecular shape sorting using molecular organic cages.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Jelfs, Kim E; Schmidtmann, Marc; Ahmed, Adham; Chong, Samantha Y; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2013-04-01

    The energy-efficient separation of chemical feedstocks is a major sustainability challenge. Porous extended frameworks such as zeolites or metal-organic frameworks are one potential solution to this problem. Here, we show that organic molecules, rather than frameworks, can separate other organic molecules by size and shape. A molecular organic cage is shown to separate a common aromatic feedstock (mesitylene) from its structural isomer (4-ethyltoluene) with an unprecedented perfect specificity for the latter. This specificity stems from the structure of the intrinsically porous cage molecule, which is itself synthesized from a derivative of mesitylene. In other words, crystalline organic molecules are used to separate other organic molecules. The specificity is defined by the cage structure alone, so this solid-state 'shape sorting' is, uniquely, mirrored for cage molecules in solution. The behaviour can be understood from a combination of atomistic simulations for individual cage molecules and solid-state molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. A learning-based markerless approach for full-body kinematics estimation in-natura from a single image.

    PubMed

    Drory, Ami; Li, Hongdong; Hartley, Richard

    2017-04-11

    We present a supervised machine learning approach for markerless estimation of human full-body kinematics for a cyclist from an unconstrained colour image. This approach is motivated by the limitations of existing marker-based approaches restricted by infrastructure, environmental conditions, and obtrusive markers. By using a discriminatively learned mixture-of-parts model, we construct a probabilistic tree representation to model the configuration and appearance of human body joints. During the learning stage, a Structured Support Vector Machine (SSVM) learns body parts appearance and spatial relations. In the testing stage, the learned models are employed to recover body pose via searching in a test image over a pyramid structure. We focus on the movement modality of cycling to demonstrate the efficacy of our approach. In natura estimation of cycling kinematics using images is challenging because of human interaction with a bicycle causing frequent occlusions. We make no assumptions in relation to the kinematic constraints of the model, nor the appearance of the scene. Our technique finds multiple quality hypotheses for the pose. We evaluate the precision of our method on two new datasets using loss functions. Our method achieves a score of 91.1 and 69.3 on mean Probability of Correct Keypoint (PCK) measure and 88.7 and 66.1 on the Average Precision of Keypoints (APK) measure for the frontal and sagittal datasets respectively. We conclude that our method opens new vistas to robust user-interaction free estimation of full body kinematics, a prerequisite to motion analysis.

  5. Statistical Analysis of Molecular Signal Recording

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Joshua I.; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Tyo, Keith; Boyden, Edward S.; Church, George; Kording, Konrad P.

    2013-01-01

    A molecular device that records time-varying signals would enable new approaches in neuroscience. We have recently proposed such a device, termed a “molecular ticker tape”, in which an engineered DNA polymerase (DNAP) writes time-varying signals into DNA in the form of nucleotide misincorporation patterns. Here, we define a theoretical framework quantifying the expected capabilities of molecular ticker tapes as a function of experimental parameters. We present a decoding algorithm for estimating time-dependent input signals, and DNAP kinetic parameters, directly from misincorporation rates as determined by sequencing. We explore the requirements for accurate signal decoding, particularly the constraints on (1) the polymerase biochemical parameters, and (2) the amplitude, temporal resolution, and duration of the time-varying input signals. Our results suggest that molecular recording devices with kinetic properties similar to natural polymerases could be used to perform experiments in which neural activity is compared across several experimental conditions, and that devices engineered by combining favorable biochemical properties from multiple known polymerases could potentially measure faster phenomena such as slow synchronization of neuronal oscillations. Sophisticated engineering of DNAPs is likely required to achieve molecular recording of neuronal activity with single-spike temporal resolution over experimentally relevant timescales. PMID:23874187

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis: Current Insights

    PubMed Central

    Mathema, Barun; Kurepina, Natalia E.; Bifani, Pablo J.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis (TB) have focused largely on utilizing molecular techniques to address short- and long-term epidemiologic questions, such as in outbreak investigations and in assessing the global dissemination of strains, respectively. This is done primarily by examining the extent of genetic diversity of clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When molecular methods are used in conjunction with classical epidemiology, their utility for TB control has been realized. For instance, molecular epidemiologic studies have added much-needed accuracy and precision in describing transmission dynamics, and they have facilitated investigation of previously unresolved issues, such as estimates of recent-versus-reactive disease and the extent of exogenous reinfection. In addition, there is mounting evidence to suggest that specific strains of M. tuberculosis belonging to discrete phylogenetic clusters (lineages) may differ in virulence, pathogenesis, and epidemiologic characteristics, all of which may significantly impact TB control and vaccine development strategies. Here, we review the current methods, concepts, and applications of molecular approaches used to better understand the epidemiology of TB. PMID:17041139

  7. Potential molecular wires and molecular alligator clips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, Jeffry S.; Pearson, Darren L.; Jones, LeRoy, II; Hara, Ryuichiro; Tour, James M.

    1996-12-01

    The synthesis of oligo(2-ethylphenylene-ethynylene)s, oligo(2-(0957-4484/7/4/023/img1-ethylheptyl)phenylene-ethynylene)s, and oligo(3-ethylthiophene-ethynylene)s is described via an iterative divergent convergent approach. Synthesized were the monomer, dimer, tetramer, octamer and 16-mer of the oligo(3-ethylthiophene-ethynylene)s and oligo(2-0957-4484/7/4/023/img1-ethylheptyl)phenylene-ethynylene)s. The 16-mers are 100 Å and 128 Å long, respectively. At each stage in the iteration, the length of the framework doubles. Only three sets of reaction conditions are needed for the entire iterative synthetic sequence; an iodination, a protodesilylation, and a Pd/Cu-catalyzed cross coupling. The oligomers were characterized spectroscopically and by mass spectrometry. The optical properties are presented which show the stage of optical absorbance saturation. The size exclusion chromatography values for the number average weights, relative to polystyrene, illustrate the tremendous differences in the hydrodynamic volume of these rigid rod oligomers versus the random coils of polystyrene. These differences become quite apparent at the octamer stage. The preparation of thiol-protected end groups is described. These may serve as molecular alligator clips for adhesion to gold surfaces. These oligomers may act as molecular wires in molecular electronic devices and they also serve as useful models for understanding related bulk polymers.

  8. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  9. [Molecular diagnostics in neuropathology].

    PubMed

    Dietmaier, W; Lorenz, J; Riemenschneider, M J

    2015-03-01

    As in only few other areas of oncology, molecular markers in neurooncology have become an integral part of clinical decision-making. This development is driven by a bustling scientific activity exploring the molecular basis and pathogenesis of human brain tumors. In addition, a high percentage of brain tumor patients are included in clinical studies in which molecular markers are assessed and linked with clinical informativeness. First steps towards more differentiated therapeutic strategies against brain tumors have thus been taken. The implementation in the clinical and diagnostic routine requires a detailed knowledge and a close collaboration between all medical disciplines involved.

  10. Molecularly imprinted membranes.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-07-19

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40-50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed.

  11. Uveal melanoma: estimating prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kaliki, Swathi; Shields, Carol L; Shields, Jerry A

    2015-02-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary malignant tumor of the eye in adults, predominantly found in Caucasians. Local tumor control of uveal melanoma is excellent, yet this malignancy is associated with relatively high mortality secondary to metastasis. Various clinical, histopathological, cytogenetic features and gene expression features help in estimating the prognosis of uveal melanoma. The clinical features associated with poor prognosis in patients with uveal melanoma include older age at presentation, male gender, larger tumor basal diameter and thickness, ciliary body location, diffuse tumor configuration, association with ocular/oculodermal melanocytosis, extraocular tumor extension, and advanced tumor staging by American Joint Committee on Cancer classification. Histopathological features suggestive of poor prognosis include epithelioid cell type, high mitotic activity, higher values of mean diameter of ten largest nucleoli, higher microvascular density, extravascular matrix patterns, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, tumor-infiltrating macrophages, higher expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, and higher expression of human leukocyte antigen Class I and II. Monosomy 3, 1p loss, 6q loss, and 8q and those classified as Class II by gene expression are predictive of poor prognosis of uveal melanoma. In this review, we discuss the prognostic factors of uveal melanoma. A database search was performed on PubMed, using the terms "uvea," "iris," "ciliary body," "choroid," "melanoma," "uveal melanoma" and "prognosis," "metastasis," "genetic testing," "gene expression profiling." Relevant English language articles were extracted, reviewed, and referenced appropriately.

  12. Tree Topology Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Rolando; Tomasi, Carlo; Schmidler, Scott C.; Farsiu, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Tree-like structures are fundamental in nature, and it is often useful to reconstruct the topology of a tree—what connects to what—from a two-dimensional image of it. However, the projected branches often cross in the image: the tree projects to a planar graph, and the inverse problem of reconstructing the topology of the tree from that of the graph is ill-posed. We regularize this problem with a generative, parametric tree-growth model. Under this model, reconstruction is possible in linear time if one knows the direction of each edge in the graph—which edge endpoint is closer to the root of the tree—but becomes NP-hard if the directions are not known. For the latter case, we present a heuristic search algorithm to estimate the most likely topology of a rooted, three-dimensional tree from a single two-dimensional image. Experimental results on retinal vessel, plant root, and synthetic tree datasets show that our methodology is both accurate and efficient. PMID:26353004

  13. TRAC performance estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, L.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the performance characteristics of a Targeting Reflective Alignment Concept (TRAC) sensor. The performance will be documented for both short and long ranges. For long ranges, the sensor is used without the flat mirror attached to the target. To better understand the capabilities of the TRAC based sensors, an engineering model is required. The model can be used to better design the system for a particular application. This is necessary because there are many interrelated design variables in application. These include lense parameters, camera, and target configuration. The report presents first an analytical development of the performance, and second an experimental verification of the equations. In the analytical presentation it is assumed that the best vision resolution is a single pixel element. The experimental results suggest however that the resolution is better than 1 pixel. Hence the analytical results should be considered worst case conditions. The report also discusses advantages and limitations of the TRAC sensor in light of the performance estimates. Finally the report discusses potential improvements.

  14. Molecular Machines: Nanoscale gadgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Garibay, Miguel A.

    2008-06-01

    Meeting their biological counterparts halfway, artificial molecular machines embedded in liquid crystals, crystalline solids and mesoporous materials are poised to meet the demands of the next generation of functional materials.

  15. Are there molecular signatures?

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes molecular signatures and mutational spectrum analysis. The mutation spectrum is defined as the type and location of DNA base change. There are currently about five well documented cases. Mutations and radon-associated tumors are discussed.

  16. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  17. Natural Product Molecular Fossils.

    PubMed

    Falk, Heinz; Wolkenstein, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The natural products synthesized by organisms that were living a long time ago gave rise to their molecular fossils. These can consist of either the original unchanged compounds or they may undergo peripheral transformations in which their skeletons remain intact. In cases when molecular fossils can be traced to their organismic source, they are termed "geological biomarkers".This contribution describes apolar and polar molecular fossils and, in particular biomarkers, along the lines usually followed in organic chemistry textbooks, and points to their bioprecursors when available. Thus, the apolar compounds are divided in linear and branched alkanes followed by alicyclic compounds and aromatic and heterocyclic molecules, and, in particular, the geoporphyrins. The polar molecular fossils contain as functional groups or constituent units ethers, alcohols, phenols, carbonyl groups, flavonoids, quinones, and acids, or are polymers like kerogen, amber, melanin, proteins, or nucleic acids. The final sections discuss the methodology used and the fundamental processes encountered by the biomolecules described, including diagenesis, catagenesis, and metagenesis.

  18. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Mistakes and Molecular Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevors, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the role mistakes play in the molecular evolution of bacteria. Discusses the interacting physical, chemical, and biological factors that cause changes in DNA and play a role in prokaryotic evolution. (DDR)

  20. Molecular Motors from DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turberfield, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    DNA is a wonderful material for nanoscale construction: its self-assembly can be programmed by making use of its information-carrying capability and its hybridization or hydrolysis can be used as to provide energy for synthetic molecular machinery. With DNA it is possible to design and build three-dimensional scaffolds, to attach molecular components to them with sub-nanometre precision-and then to make them move. I shall describe our work on autonomous, biomimetic molecular motors powered by chemical fuels and the use of synthetic molecular machinery to control covalent chemical synthesis. I shall demonstrate bipedal motors whose operation depends on the coordination of the chemomechanical cycles of two separate catalytic centres and burnt bridges motors that can be programmed to navigate networks of tracks. I shall also discuss the use of kinesin motor proteins to power synthetic devices.

  1. [Molecular diagnostics in pathology].

    PubMed

    Stenzinger, A; Penzel, R; Endris, V; Weichert, W

    2013-05-01

    Tissue-based molecular diagnostics is a fast growing diagnostic field, which already complements morphologic classifications in many cases. Pathology based molecular diagnosis is performed almost exclusively on paraffin embedded material and always in conjunction with histopathology. Besides the classic field of tissue based detection of pathogenic organisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, molecular diagnostics of tumor tissue is one of the current hot topics in oncology. In this context the detection of predictive molecular biomarkers, such as specific mutations, allows patient stratification for individually tailored treatment strategies and thereby is one of the key components of individualized patient care in oncology. The rapidly growing number of clinically relevant predictive biomarkers together with impressive technical advances, specifically the development of massive parallel sequencing, will modify the care of patients with malignant diseases. Pathology, therefore, has returned in the very center of interdisciplinary patient care.

  2. Introductory molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Moulds, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book begins with an overview of the current principles of genetics and molecular genetics. Over this foundation, it adds detailed and specialized information: a description of the translation, transcription, expression and regulation of DNA and RNA; a description of the manipulation of genetic material via promoters, enhancers, and gene splicing; and a description of cloning techniques, especially those for blood group genes. The last chapter looks to the impact of molecular genetics on transfusion medicine.

  3. Open source molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-09-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. An updated online version of this catalog can be found at https://opensourcemolecularmodeling.github.io.

  4. Molecular diagnosis of genodermatoses.

    PubMed

    Wessagowit, Vesarat

    2013-01-01

    The progress of molecular genetics helps clinicians to prove or exclude a suspected diagnosis for a vast and yet increasing number of genodermatoses. This leads to precise genetic counselling, prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic haplotyping for many inherited skin conditions. It is also helpful in such occasions as phenocopy, late onset and incomplete penetrance, uniparental disomy, mitochondrial inheritance and pigmentary mosaicism. Molecular methods of two genodermatoses are explained in detail, i.e. genodermatoses with skin fragility and neurofibromatosis type 1.

  5. Molecularly Imprinted Ionomers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-05

    ion selective electrodes and ion selective optical sensors using a modified version of the molecular imprinting technique. The modification is a...materials may be the means to realize this goal. An additional application of metal ion imprinted polymers is as sensors . The ability to detect a...been shown to have dramatic effects on polymer properties. The benefits of ionic crosslinking on molecular imprinting are two-fold. First, ionic

  6. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  7. Experimental Bayesian Quantum Phase Estimation on a Silicon Photonic Chip.

    PubMed

    Paesani, S; Gentile, A A; Santagati, R; Wang, J; Wiebe, N; Tew, D P; O'Brien, J L; Thompson, M G

    2017-03-10

    Quantum phase estimation is a fundamental subroutine in many quantum algorithms, including Shor's factorization algorithm and quantum simulation. However, so far results have cast doubt on its practicability for near-term, nonfault tolerant, quantum devices. Here we report experimental results demonstrating that this intuition need not be true. We implement a recently proposed adaptive Bayesian approach to quantum phase estimation and use it to simulate molecular energies on a silicon quantum photonic device. The approach is verified to be well suited for prethreshold quantum processors by investigating its superior robustness to noise and decoherence compared to the iterative phase estimation algorithm. This shows a promising route to unlock the power of quantum phase estimation much sooner than previously believed.

  8. Molecular biology in physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, S.; Gargus, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    The aim of this symposium on molecular biology in physiology was to introduce molecular biology to physiologists who had relatively little exposure to the new developments in this field, so that they can become conversant on this topic and contribute to the advancement of physiology by incorporating molecular biological approaches as a part of their research arsenal. This report is a review of the symposium, which consisted of two four-part sessions. Each session had four papers. After the discussion of the basic concepts, terminology, and methodology used in molecular biology, it was shown how these basic principles have been applied to the study of the genes encoding two membrane proteins that have important transport functions (band 3 and ATPase). The second half of the symposium consisted of papers on the state-of-the-art developments in the application of molecular biology to the studies of the atrial natriuretic factor and renin genes, adenylate cyclase-coupled adrenergic receptors, acetylcholine receptors and sodium channel, and long-term and short-term memories. The ultimate goal is that these examples will provide an impetus for the opening of new frontiers of research in physiology by taking advantage of the tools developed from recent advances in molecular biology.

  9. PREFACE: Molecular nanomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comtet, Geneviève; Dujardin, Gérald

    2006-08-01

    The concept of molecular nanomachines has become a reality in the past few years in organic and supramolecular chemistry, in biochemistry and in atom-scale manipulation with the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). In chemistry, molecules can be designed and synthesized to have specific electrical, mechanical, optical or reactive properties. In biochemistry, single natural biomolecules can be isolated and activated as nanomachines. In atom-scale manipulation, the STM can be used to power and to control the operation of individual molecules as molecular nanomachines. The fields of chemical synthesis, biomolecular machines and atom-scale manipulations, have each developed as a separate entity. However, mutual integration of these different research fields appears to be a very fruitful approach for the future of molecular nanomachines. This special section of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is the follow-up to a meeting held in Les Houches (France) on 17-21 January 2005 on molecular nanomachines. The section aims to contribute to the readers’ understanding by giving a clear overview of the principal issues of molecular nanomachines. We hope that it will facilitate new collaborations between researchers from these different fields, so necessary for the integrated development of molecular nanomachines.

  10. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients.

  11. Workshop on Molecular Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular evolution has become the nexus of many areas of biological research. It both brings together and enriches such areas as biochemistry, molecular biology, microbiology, population genetics, systematics, developmental biology, genomics, bioinformatics, in vitro evolution, and molecular ecology. The Workshop provides an important contribution to these fields in that it promotes interdisciplinary research and interaction, and thus provides a glue that sticks together disparate fields. Due to the wide range of fields addressed by the study of molecular evolution, it is difficult to offer a comprehensive course in a university setting. It is rare for a single institution to maintain expertise in all necessary areas. In contrast, the Workshop is uniquely able to provide necessary breadth and depth by utilizing a large number of faculty with appropriate expertise. Furthermore, the flexible nature of the Workshop allows for rapid adaptation to changes in the dynamic field of molecular evolution. For example, the 2003 Workshop included recently emergent research areas of molecular evolution of development and genomics.

  12. Interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.

    1986-04-01

    The physical properties of the molecular phase of the interstellar medium are studied with regard to star formation and the structure of the Galaxy. Most observations of molecular clouds are made with single-dish, high-surface precision radio telescopes, with the best resolution attainable at 0.2 to 1 arcmin; the smallest structures that can be resolved are of order 10 to the 17th cm in diameter. It is now believed that: (1) most of the mass of the Galaxy is in the form of giant molecular clouds; (2) the largest clouds and those responsible for most massive star formation are concentrated in spiral arms; (3) the molecular clouds are the sites of perpetual star formation, and are significant in the chemical evolution of the Galaxy; (4) giant molecular clouds determine the evolution of the kinematic properties of galactic disk stars; (5) the total gas content is diminishing with time; and (6) most clouds have supersonic internal motions and do not form stars on a free-fall time scale. It is concluded that though progress has been made, more advanced instruments are needed to inspect the processes operating within stellar nurseries and to study the distribution of the molecular clouds in more distant galaxies. Instruments presently under construction which are designed to meet these ends are presented.

  13. Molecular toxicity of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xue-Ling; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-10-01

    With the rapid developments in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnlogy, more and more nanomaterials and their based consumer products have been used into our daily life. The safety concerns of nanomaterials have been well recognized by the scientific community and the public. Molecular mechanism of interactions between nanomaterials and biosystems is the most essential topic and final core of the biosafety. In the last two decades, nanotoxicology developed very fast and toxicity phenomena of nanomaterials have been reported. To achieve better understanding and detoxication of nanomaterials, thorough studies of nanotoxicity at molecular level are important. The interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules have been widely investigated as the first step toward the molecular nanotoxicology. The consequences of such interactions have been discussed in the literature. Besides this, the chemical mechanism of nanotoxicology is gaining more attention, which would lead to a better design of nontoxic nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on the molecular nanotoxicology and explore the toxicity of nanomaterials at molecular level. The molecular level studies of nanotoxicology are summarized and the published nanotoxicological data are revisited.

  14. Identification of a molecular marker for genotyping human lymphatic filarial nematode parasite Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Patra, K P; Ramu, Thangadurai; Hoti, S L; Pragasam, G Siva; Das, P K

    2007-05-01

    In India, Mass Drug Administration is on going towards elimination of lymphatic filariasis in many areas, which might lead to intense selection pressure on the parasite populations and their genetic restructuring. This calls for molecular finger printing of Wuchereria bancrofti parasite populations at national level and monitoring genetic changes in the future. For this purpose a reliable, less expensive, rapid, and reproducible molecular tool is necessary, which is not available for W. bancrofti at this time. We identified robust molecular markers based on the comparison of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiles and the genetic data generated from parasite populations collected from areas in Northern (Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh state), Southern (Kozhikode, Kerala State) and Central regions (Jagdalpur, Chattisgarh state) of India, where lymphatic filariasis is endemic for many decades. RAPD profiles for these parasite populations were generated using three different primers and the dendrograms constructed using the profiles were all different. In order to identify appropriate RAPD primer(s), we compared the results of RAPD with the fingerprint profile and genetic data obtained by the more reliable AFLP technique, using the parasite populations from the same areas. RAPD marker (OP8) primer produced phylogenetic data almost similar to that of AFLP analysis. The marker was able to reveal variations between the parasite populations collected from Varanasi, Kozhikode, and Jagdalpur. Most importantly, RAPD primer OP8 produced reproducible results, when tested in three different trials. In view of the limited availability of W. bancrofti parasite DNA, along with a lower cost and ease of performance, RAPD appears to be more suitable compared to AFLP at the present juncture, since complete genome information of this parasite is still not available. Thus, RAPD primer OP8 can be a very useful molecular maker for DNA

  15. Precision cosmological parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, William Ashton, Jr.

    2009-09-01

    methods. These techniques will help in the understanding of new physics contained in current and future data sets as well as benefit the research efforts of the cosmology community. Our idea is to shift the computationally intensive pieces of the parameter estimation framework to a parallel training step. We then provide a machine learning code that uses this training set to learn the relationship between the underlying cosmological parameters and the function we wish to compute. This code is very accurate and simple to evaluate. It can provide incredible speed- ups of parameter estimation codes. For some applications this provides the convenience of obtaining results faster, while in other cases this allows the use of codes that would be impossible to apply in the brute force setting. In this thesis we provide several examples where our method allows more accurate computation of functions important for data analysis than is currently possible. As the techniques developed in this work are very general, there are no doubt a wide array of applications both inside and outside of cosmology. We have already seen this interest as other scientists have presented ideas for using our algorithm to improve their computational work, indicating its importance as modern experiments push forward. In fact, our algorithm will play an important role in the parameter analysis of Planck, the next generation CMB space mission.

  16. Uveal melanoma: Estimating prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaliki, Swathi; Shields, Carol L; Shields, Jerry A

    2015-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary malignant tumor of the eye in adults, predominantly found in Caucasians. Local tumor control of uveal melanoma is excellent, yet this malignancy is associated with relatively high mortality secondary to metastasis. Various clinical, histopathological, cytogenetic features and gene expression features help in estimating the prognosis of uveal melanoma. The clinical features associated with poor prognosis in patients with uveal melanoma include older age at presentation, male gender, larger tumor basal diameter and thickness, ciliary body location, diffuse tumor configuration, association with ocular/oculodermal melanocytosis, extraocular tumor extension, and advanced tumor staging by American Joint Committee on Cancer classification. Histopathological features suggestive of poor prognosis include epithelioid cell type, high mitotic activity, higher values of mean diameter of ten largest nucleoli, higher microvascular density, extravascular matrix patterns, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, tumor-infiltrating macrophages, higher expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, and higher expression of human leukocyte antigen Class I and II. Monosomy 3, 1p loss, 6q loss, and 8q and those classified as Class II by gene expression are predictive of poor prognosis of uveal melanoma. In this review, we discuss the prognostic factors of uveal melanoma. A database search was performed on PubMed, using the terms “uvea,” “iris,” “ciliary body,” “choroid,” “melanoma,” “uveal melanoma” and “prognosis,” “metastasis,” “genetic testing,” “gene expression profiling.” Relevant English language articles were extracted, reviewed, and referenced appropriately. PMID:25827538

  17. Bayesian phylogenetic estimation of fossil ages

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Alexei J.; Stadler, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances have allowed for both morphological fossil evidence and molecular sequences to be integrated into a single combined inference of divergence dates under the rule of Bayesian probability. In particular, the fossilized birth–death tree prior and the Lewis-Mk model of discrete morphological evolution allow for the estimation of both divergence times and phylogenetic relationships between fossil and extant taxa. We exploit this statistical framework to investigate the internal consistency of these models by producing phylogenetic estimates of the age of each fossil in turn, within two rich and well-characterized datasets of fossil and extant species (penguins and canids). We find that the estimation accuracy of fossil ages is generally high with credible intervals seldom excluding the true age and median relative error in the two datasets of 5.7% and 13.2%, respectively. The median relative standard error (RSD) was 9.2% and 7.2%, respectively, suggesting good precision, although with some outliers. In fact, in the two datasets we analyse, the phylogenetic estimate of fossil age is on average less than 2 Myr from the mid-point age of the geological strata from which it was excavated. The high level of internal consistency found in our analyses suggests that the Bayesian statistical model employed is an adequate fit for both the geological and morphological data, and provides evidence from real data that the framework used can accurately model the evolution of discrete morphological traits coded from fossil and extant taxa. We anticipate that this approach will have diverse applications beyond divergence time dating, including dating fossils that are temporally unconstrained, testing of the ‘morphological clock', and for uncovering potential model misspecification and/or data errors when controversial phylogenetic hypotheses are obtained based on combined divergence dating analyses. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences

  18. Consequences of Secondary Calibrations on Divergence Time Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary calibrations (calibrations based on the results of previous molecular dating studies) are commonly applied in divergence time analyses in groups that lack fossil data; however, the consequences of applying secondary calibrations in a relaxed-clock approach are not fully understood. I tested whether applying the posterior estimate from a primary study as a prior distribution in a secondary study results in consistent age and uncertainty estimates. I compared age estimates from simulations with 100 randomly replicated secondary trees. On average, the 95% credible intervals of node ages for secondary estimates were significantly younger and narrower than primary estimates. The primary and secondary age estimates were significantly different in 97% of the replicates after Bonferroni corrections. Greater error in magnitude was associated with deeper than shallower nodes, but the opposite was found when standardized by median node age, and a significant positive relationship was determined between the number of tips/age of secondary trees and the total amount of error. When two secondary calibrated nodes were analyzed, estimates remained significantly different, and although the minimum and median estimates were associated with less error, maximum age estimates and credible interval widths had greater error. The shape of the prior also influenced error, in which applying a normal, rather than uniform, prior distribution resulted in greater error. Secondary calibrations, in summary, lead to a false impression of precision and the distribution of age estimates shift away from those that would be inferred by the primary analysis. These results suggest that secondary calibrations should not be applied as the only source of calibration in divergence time analyses that test time-dependent hypotheses until the additional error associated with secondary calibrations is more properly modeled to take into account increased uncertainty in age estimates. PMID:26824760

  19. A priori SNR estimation and noise estimation for speech enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Zeng, ZeQing; Zhu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A priori signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation and noise estimation are important for speech enhancement. In this paper, a novel modified decision-directed (DD) a priori SNR estimation approach based on single-frequency entropy, named DDBSE, is proposed. DDBSE replaces the fixed weighting factor in the DD approach with an adaptive one calculated according to change of single-frequency entropy. Simultaneously, a new noise power estimation approach based on unbiased minimum mean square error (MMSE) and voice activity detection (VAD), named UMVAD, is proposed. UMVAD adopts different strategies to estimate noise in order to reduce over-estimation and under-estimation of noise. UMVAD improves the classical statistical model-based VAD by utilizing an adaptive threshold to replace the original fixed one and modifies the unbiased MMSE-based noise estimation approach using an adaptive a priori speech presence probability calculated by entropy instead of the original fixed one. Experimental results show that DDBSE can provide greater noise suppression than DD and UMVAD can improve the accuracy of noise estimation. Compared to existing approaches, speech enhancement based on UMVAD and DDBSE can obtain a better segment SNR score and composite measure covl score, especially in adverse environments such as non-stationary noise and low-SNR.

  20. Quantum Estimation, meet Computational Statistics; Computational Statistics, meet Quantum Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Chris; Granade, Chris; Combes, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Quantum estimation, that is, post processing data to obtain classical descriptions of quantum states and processes, is an intractable problem--scaling exponentially with the number of interacting systems. Thankfully there is an entire field, Computational Statistics, devoted to designing algorithms to estimate probabilities for seemingly intractable problems. So, why not look to the most advanced machine learning algorithms for quantum estimation tasks? We did. I'll describe how we adapted and combined machine learning methodologies to obtain an online learning algorithm designed to estimate quantum states and processes.

  1. A priori SNR estimation and noise estimation for speech enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Zeng, ZeQing; Zhu, Ping

    2016-12-01

    A priori signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation and noise estimation are important for speech enhancement. In this paper, a novel modified decision-directed (DD) a priori SNR estimation approach based on single-frequency entropy, named DDBSE, is proposed. DDBSE replaces the fixed weighting factor in the DD approach with an adaptive one calculated according to change of single-frequency entropy. Simultaneously, a new noise power estimation approach based on unbiased minimum mean square error (MMSE) and voice activity detection (VAD), named UMVAD, is proposed. UMVAD adopts different strategies to estimate noise in order to reduce over-estimation and under-estimation of noise. UMVAD improves the classical statistical model-based VAD by utilizing an adaptive threshold to replace the original fixed one and modifies the unbiased MMSE-based noise estimation approach using an adaptive a priori speech presence probability calculated by entropy instead of the original fixed one. Experimental results show that DDBSE can provide greater noise suppression than DD and UMVAD can improve the accuracy of noise estimation. Compared to existing approaches, speech enhancement based on UMVAD and DDBSE can obtain a better segment SNR score and composite measure c ovl score, especially in adverse environments such as non-stationary noise and low-SNR.

  2. Localization of deformable tumors from short-arc projections using Bayesian estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoegele, W.; Zygmanski, P.; Dobler, B.; Kroiss, M.; Koelbl, O.; Loeschel, R.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The authors present a stochastic framework for radiotherapy patient positioning directly utilizing radiographic projections. This framework is developed to be robust against anatomical nonrigid deformations and to cope with challenging imaging scenarios, involving only a few cone beam CT projections from short arcs. Methods: Specifically, a Bayesian estimator (BE) is explicitly derived for the given scanning geometry. This estimator is compared to reference methods such as chamfer matching (CM) and the minimization of the median absolute error adapted as tools of robust image processing and statistics. In order to show the performance of the stochastic short-arc patient positioning method, a CIRS IMRT thorax phantom study is presented with movable markers and the utilization of an Elekta Synergy{sup Registered-Sign} XVI system. Furthermore, a clinical prostate CBCT scan of a Varian{sup Registered-Sign} On-Board Imager{sup Registered-Sign} system is utilized to investigate the robustness of the method for large variations of image quality (anterior-posterior vs lateral views). Results: The results show that the BE shifts reduce the initial setup error of up to 3 cm down to 3 mm at maximum for an imaging arc as short as 10 Degree-Sign while CM achieves residual errors of 7 mm at maximum only for arcs longer than 40 Degree-Sign . Furthermore, the BE can compensate robustly for low image qualities using several low quality projections simultaneously. Conclusions: In conclusion, an estimation method for marker-based patient positioning for short imaging arcs is presented and shown to be robust and accurate for deformable anatomies.

  3. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  4. DockingShop: A Tool for Interactive Molecular Docking

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ting-Cheng; Max, Nelson L.; Ding, Jinhui; Bethel, E. Wes; Crivelli, Silvia N.

    2005-04-24

    Given two independently determined molecular structures, the molecular docking problem predicts the bound association, or best fit between them, while allowing for conformational changes of the individual molecules during construction of a molecular complex. Docking Shop is an integrated environment that permits interactive molecular docking by navigating a ligand or protein to an estimated binding site of a receptor with real-time graphical feedback of scoring factors as visual guides. Our program can be used to create initial configurations for a protein docking prediction process. Its output--the structure of aprotein-ligand or protein-protein complex--may serve as an input for aprotein docking algorithm, or an optimization process. This tool provides molecular graphics interfaces for structure modeling, interactive manipulation, navigation, optimization, and dynamic visualization to aid users steer the prediction process using their biological knowledge.

  5. Enhanced removal of bilirubin on molecularly imprinted titania film.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheng-peng; Yan, Jin-long; Zhang, Chun-jing; Luo, Shu-qiong

    2011-10-01

    Titania film imprinted by bilirubin molecule at the surface of quartz crystal was prepared using molecular imprinting and surface sol-gel process. The molecularly imprinted titania film was characterized by FTIR spectra, and the interaction between bilirubin and imprinted film was investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique. Compared with pure titania film, the molecularly imprinted titania film exhibits a much higher adsorption capacity for the target molecule, and the adsorption kinetic parameter estimated from the in situ frequency measurement is about 1.6×10(8) M(-1), which is ten times higher than that obtained on pure titania film. The photocatalytic measurements indicate that the bilirubin adsorbed on molecularly imprinted titania film can be completely removed under UV illumination. Moreover, our study indicates that the molecularly imprinted titania film possesses a better stability and reusability.

  6. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    A number of considerations must go into the process of determining the risk of deleterious effects of space radiation to travelers. Among them are (1) determination of the components of the radiation environment (particle species, fluxes and energy spectra) which will encounter, (2) determination of the effects of shielding provided by the spacecraft and the bodies of the travelers which modify the incident particle spectra and mix of particles, and (3) determination of relevant biological effects of the radiation in the organs of interest. The latter can then lead to an estimation of risk from a given space scenario. Clearly, the process spans many scientific disciplines from solar and cosmic ray physics to radiation transport theeory to the multistage problem of the induction by radiation of initial lesions in living material and their evolution via physical, chemical, and biological processes at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels to produce the end point of importance.

  7. Estimators for the Cauchy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Wolf, D.R.

    1993-12-31

    We discuss the properties of various estimators of the central position of the Cauchy distribution. The performance of these estimators is evaluated for a set of simulated experiments. Estimators based on the maximum and mean of the posterior probability density function are empirically found to be well behaved when more than two measurements are available. On the contrary, because of the infinite variance of the Cauchy distribution, the average of the measured positions is an extremely poor estimator of the location of the source. However, the median of the measured positions is well behaved. The rms errors for the various estimators are compared to the Fisher-Cramer-Rao lower bound. We find that the square root of the variance of the posterior density function is predictive of the rms error in the mean posterior estimator.

  8. Maximum-Likelihood Estimator of Clock Offset between Nanomachines in Bionanosensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chengfeng; Ma, Maode

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology, electronic technology and biology have enabled the development of bio-inspired nanoscale sensors. The cooperation among the bionanosensors in a network is envisioned to perform complex tasks. Clock synchronization is essential to establish diffusion-based distributed cooperation in the bionanosensor networks. This paper proposes a maximum-likelihood estimator of the clock offset for the clock synchronization among molecular bionanosensors. The unique properties of diffusion-based molecular communication are described. Based on the inverse Gaussian distribution of the molecular propagation delay, a two-way message exchange mechanism for clock synchronization is proposed. The maximum-likelihood estimator of the clock offset is derived. The convergence and the bias of the estimator are analyzed. The simulation results show that the proposed estimator is effective for the offset compensation required for clock synchronization. This work paves the way for the cooperation of nanomachines in diffusion-based bionanosensor networks. PMID:26690173

  9. State Estimation for Humanoid Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    natural for a controller to produce force commands to the robot using inverse dynamics. Model based control and state estimation relies on the accuracy of...produce force commands to the robot using inverse dynamics. Model based control and state estimation relies on the accuracy of the model. We address the...natural for a controller to produce force commands to the robot using inverse dynamics. Model based control and state estimation relies on the accuracy of

  10. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The third-difference approach to modified Allan variance (MVAR) leads to a tractable formula for a measure of MVAR estimator confidence, the equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), in the presence of power-law phase noise. The effect of estimation stride on edf is tabulated. A simple approximation for edf is given, and its errors are tabulated. A theorem allowing conservative estimates of edf in the presence of compound noise processes is given.

  11. Robust and intelligent bearing estimation

    DOEpatents

    Claassen, John P.

    2000-01-01

    A method of bearing estimation comprising quadrature digital filtering of event observations, constructing a plurality of observation matrices each centered on a time-frequency interval, determining for each observation matrix a parameter such as degree of polarization, linearity of particle motion, degree of dyadicy, or signal-to-noise ratio, choosing observation matrices most likely to produce a set of best available bearing estimates, and estimating a bearing for each observation matrix of the chosen set.

  12. The G-Spectral Estimator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    correlation function and is equivalent to an en-transformation [11] of the same function. Gray, Houston and Morgan ( GHM ) noted the estimator to have some...satis- factory way of selecting the proper value n in the en-transform. GHM went on to conclude that an ARMA spectral estimator would probably have...which will be seen to avoid the difficulties noted by GHM , and will in fact, be shown to be equivalent to a method of moments ARMA spectral estimator

  13. Spring Small Grains Area Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. F.; Mohler, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    SSG3 automatically estimates acreage of spring small grains from Landsat data. Report describes development and testing of a computerized technique for using Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data to estimate acreage of spring small grains (wheat, barley, and oats). Application of technique to analysis of four years of data from United States and Canada yielded estimates of accuracy comparable to those obtained through procedures that rely on trained analysis.

  14. ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO ESTIMATING CANCER ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The alternative approach for estimating cancer potency from inhalation exposure to asbestos seeks to improve the methods developed by USEPA (1986). This efforts seeks to modify the the current approach for estimating cancer potency for lung cancer and mesothelioma to account for the current scientific consensus that cancer risk from asbestos depends both on mineral type and on particle size distribution. In brief, epidemiological exposure-response data for lung cancer and mesothelioma in asbestos workers are combined with estimates of the mineral type(s) and partical size distribution at each exposure location in order to estimate potency factors that are specific to a selected set of mineral type and size

  15. Asymptotic Normality of Quadratic Estimators.

    PubMed

    Robins, James; Li, Lingling; Tchetgen, Eric; van der Vaart, Aad

    2016-12-01

    We prove conditional asymptotic normality of a class of quadratic U-statistics that are dominated by their degenerate second order part and have kernels that change with the number of observations. These statistics arise in the construction of estimators in high-dimensional semi- and non-parametric models, and in the construction of nonparametric confidence sets. This is illustrated by estimation of the integral of a square of a density or regression function, and estimation of the mean response with missing data. We show that estimators are asymptotically normal even in the case that the rate is slower than the square root of the observations.

  16. Estimating the Cost of Doing a Cost Estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.; Buchanan, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    This article provides a model for estimating the cost required to do a cost estimate...Our earlier work provided data for high technology projects. This article adds data from the construction industry which validates the model over a wider range of technology.

  17. Phylogenetic molecular function annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Jordan, Michael I.; Repo, Susanna T.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2009-07-01

    It is now easier to discover thousands of protein sequences in a new microbial genome than it is to biochemically characterize the specific activity of a single protein of unknown function. The molecular functions of protein sequences have typically been predicted using homology-based computational methods, which rely on the principle that homologous proteins share a similar function. However, some protein families include groups of proteins with different molecular functions. A phylogenetic approach for predicting molecular function (sometimes called "phylogenomics") is an effective means to predict protein molecular function. These methods incorporate functional evidence from all members of a family that have functional characterizations using the evolutionary history of the protein family to make robust predictions for the uncharacterized proteins. However, they are often difficult to apply on a genome-wide scale because of the time-consuming step of reconstructing the phylogenies of each protein to be annotated. Our automated approach for function annotation using phylogeny, the SIFTER (Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships) methodology, uses a statistical graphical model to compute the probabilities of molecular functions for unannotated proteins. Our benchmark tests showed that SIFTER provides accurate functional predictions on various protein families, outperforming other available methods.

  18. Phylogenetic molecular function annotation

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Barbara E; Jordan, Michael I; Repo, Susanna T; Brenner, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    It is now easier to discover thousands of protein sequences in a new microbial genome than it is to biochemically characterize the specific activity of a single protein of unknown function. The molecular functions of protein sequences have typically been predicted using homology-based computational methods, which rely on the principle that homologous proteins share a similar function. However, some protein families include groups of proteins with different molecular functions. A phylogenetic approach for predicting molecular function (sometimes called “phylogenomics”) is an effective means to predict protein molecular function. These methods incorporate functional evidence from all members of a family that have functional characterizations using the evolutionary history of the protein family to make robust predictions for the uncharacterized proteins. However, they are often difficult to apply on a genome-wide scale because of the time-consuming step of reconstructing the phylogenies of each protein to be annotated. Our automated approach for function annotation using phylogeny, the SIFTER (Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships) methodology, uses a statistical graphical model to compute the probabilities of molecular functions for unannotated proteins. Our benchmark tests showed that SIFTER provides accurate functional predictions on various protein families, outperforming other available methods. PMID:20664722

  19. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  20. Estimating discharge measurement uncertainty using the interpolated variance estimator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, T.; Kiang, J.; Mason, R.

    2012-01-01

    Methods for quantifying the uncertainty in discharge measurements typically identify various sources of uncertainty and then estimate the uncertainty from each of these sources by applying the results of empirical or laboratory studies. If actual measurement conditions are not consistent with those encountered in the empirical or laboratory studies, these methods may give poor estimates of discharge uncertainty. This paper presents an alternative method for estimating discharge measurement uncertainty that uses statistical techniques and at-site observations. This Interpolated Variance Estimator (IVE) estimates uncertainty based on the data collected during the streamflow measurement and therefore reflects the conditions encountered at the site. The IVE has the additional advantage of capturing all sources of random uncertainty in the velocity and depth measurements. It can be applied to velocity-area discharge measurements that use a velocity meter to measure point velocities at multiple vertical sections in a channel cross section.

  1. Space vehicle pose estimation via optical correlation and nonlinear estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakoczy, John M.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2008-03-01

    A technique for 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) pose estimation of space vehicles is being developed. This technique draws upon recent developments in implementing optical correlation measurements in a nonlinear estimator, which relates the optical correlation measurements to the pose states (orientation and position). For the optical correlator, the use of both conjugate filters and binary, phase-only filters in the design of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filters is explored. A static neural network is trained a priori and used as the nonlinear estimator. New commercial animation and image rendering software is exploited to design the SDF filters and to generate a large filter set with which to train the neural network. The technique is applied to pose estimation for rendezvous and docking of free-flying spacecraft and to terrestrial surface mobility systems for NASA's Vision for Space Exploration. Quantitative pose estimation performance will be reported. Advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of this technique are discussed.

  2. Space Vehicle Pose Estimation via Optical Correlation and Nonlinear Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Herren, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A technique for 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) pose estimation of space vehicles is being developed. This technique draws upon recent developments in implementing optical correlation measurements in a nonlinear estimator, which relates the optical correlation measurements to the pose states (orientation and position). For the optical correlator, the use of both conjugate filters and binary, phase-only filters in the design of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filters is explored. A static neural network is trained a priori and used as the nonlinear estimator. New commercial animation and image rendering software is exploited to design the SDF filters and to generate a large filter set with which to train the neural network. The technique is applied to pose estimation for rendezvous and docking of free-flying spacecraft and to terrestrial surface mobility systems for NASA's Vision for Space Exploration. Quantitative pose estimation performance will be reported. Advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of this technique are discussed.

  3. Space Vehicle Pose Estimation via Optical Correlation and Nonlinear Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John M.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    A technique for 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) pose estimation of space vehicles is being developed. This technique draws upon recent developments in implementing optical correlation measurements in a nonlinear estimator, which relates the optical correlation measurements to the pose states (orientation and position). For the optical correlator, the use of both conjugate filters and binary, phase-only filters in the design of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filters is explored. A static neural network is trained a priori and used as the nonlinear estimator. New commercial animation and image rendering software is exploited to design the SDF filters and to generate a large filter set with which to train the neural network. The technique is applied to pose estimation for rendezvous and docking of free-flying spacecraft and to terrestrial surface mobility systems for NASA's Vision for Space Exploration. Quantitative pose estimation performance will be reported. Advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of this technique are discussed.

  4. Frequency tracking and parameter estimation for robust quantum state estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, Jason F.; Jacobs, Kurt; Hill, Charles D.

    2011-11-15

    In this paper we consider the problem of tracking the state of a quantum system via a continuous weak measurement. If the system Hamiltonian is known precisely, this merely requires integrating the appropriate stochastic master equation. However, even a small error in the assumed Hamiltonian can render this approach useless. The natural answer to this problem is to include the parameters of the Hamiltonian as part of the estimation problem, and the full Bayesian solution to this task provides a state estimate that is robust against uncertainties. However, this approach requires considerable computational overhead. Here we consider a single qubit in which the Hamiltonian contains a single unknown parameter. We show that classical frequency estimation techniques greatly reduce the computational overhead associated with Bayesian estimation and provide accurate estimates for the qubit frequency.

  5. A maximum-likelihood estimation of pairwise relatedness for autopolyploids

    PubMed Central

    Huang, K; Guo, S T; Shattuck, M R; Chen, S T; Qi, X G; Zhang, P; Li, B G

    2015-01-01

    Relatedness between individuals is central to ecological genetics. Multiple methods are available to quantify relatedness from molecular data, including method-of-moment and maximum-likelihood estimators. We describe a maximum-likelihood estimator for autopolyploids, and quantify its statistical performance under a range of biologically relevant conditions. The statistical performances of five additional polyploid estimators of relatedness were also quantified under identical conditions. When comparing truncated estimators, the maximum-likelihood estimator exhibited lower root mean square error under some conditions and was more biased for non-relatives, especially when the number of alleles per loci was low. However, even under these conditions, this bias was reduced to be statistically insignificant with more robust genetic sampling. We also considered ambiguity in polyploid heterozygote genotyping and developed a weighting methodology for candidate genotypes. The statistical performances of three polyploid estimators under both ideal and actual conditions (including inbreeding and double reduction) were compared. The software package POLYRELATEDNESS is available to perform this estimation and supports a maximum ploidy of eight. PMID:25370210

  6. Molecular Tracers of Turbulent Shocks in GMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pon, Andy; Johnstone, Doug; Kaufman, Michael; Tan, Jonathan; Caselli, Paola

    2013-07-01

    Molecular clouds exhibit large linewidths, which are usually interpreted as being due to supersonic turbulence. This turbulence plays a key role in many theories of star formation, as it is believed to help support and fragment molecular clouds. Current numerical MHD simulations show that the turbulent energy of a molecular cloud dissipates on the order of a crossing time, but do not explicitly follow how this energy is released. We have run models of C-type shocks, based on Kaufman & Neufeld (1996), propagating into gas with densities near 1000 cm^-3 at velocities of a few km/s, appropriate for the ambient conditions inside of a molecular cloud, to determine which species and transitions dominate the cooling and radiative energy release associated with the dissipation of turbulent energy in shocks within molecular clouds. Combining these shock models and estimates for the rate of turbulent energy dissipation (Basu & Murali 2001), we produce synthetic CO spectra and predict those line emissions that will be observable with current and upcoming observational facilities such as Herschel, SOFIA, ALMA, and CCAT. We compare our synthetic shock spectra to the photodissociation region (PDR) models of Kaufman et al. (1999) and show that mid-J CO lines (e.g., CO J = 7 to 6) from molecular clouds illuminated by standard interstellar radiation fields are dominated by emission from shocked gas. We also present Herschel observations of these shock tracing lines. References: Basu, S. & Murali, C. 2001, ApJ, 551, 743 Kaufman, M. J. & Neufeld, D. A. 1996, ApJ, 456, 250 Kaufman, M. J., Wolfire, M. G., Hollenbach, D. J., & Luhman, M. L. 1999, ApJ, 527, 795

  7. Uncertainty quantification in molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Francesco

    This dissertation focuses on uncertainty quantification (UQ) in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The application of UQ to molecular dynamics is motivated by the broad uncertainty characterizing MD potential functions and by the complexity of the MD setting, where even small uncertainties can be amplified to yield large uncertainties in the model predictions. Two fundamental, distinct sources of uncertainty are investigated in this work, namely parametric uncertainty and intrinsic noise. Intrinsic noise is inherently present in the MD setting, due to fluctuations originating from thermal effects. Averaging methods can be exploited to reduce the fluctuations, but due to finite sampling, this effect cannot be completely filtered, thus yielding a residual uncertainty in the MD predictions. Parametric uncertainty, on the contrary, is introduced in the form of uncertain potential parameters, geometry, and/or boundary conditions. We address the UQ problem in both its main components, namely the forward propagation, which aims at characterizing how uncertainty in model parameters affects selected observables, and the inverse problem, which involves the estimation of target model parameters based on a set of observations. The dissertation highlights the challenges arising when parametric uncertainty and intrinsic noise combine to yield non-deterministic, noisy MD predictions of target macroscale observables. Two key probabilistic UQ methods, namely Polynomial Chaos (PC) expansions and Bayesian inference, are exploited to develop a framework that enables one to isolate the impact of parametric uncertainty on the MD predictions and, at the same time, properly quantify the effect of the intrinsic noise. Systematic applications to a suite of problems of increasing complexity lead to the observation that an uncertain PC representation built via Bayesian regression is the most suitable model for the representation of uncertain MD predictions of target observables in the

  8. DNA based molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Jens; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Kügel, Wolfgang; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the essential cellular processes such as polymerisation reactions, gene expression and regulation are governed by mechanical processes. Controlled mechanical investigations of these processes are therefore required in order to take our understanding of molecular biology to the next level. Single-molecule manipulation and force spectroscopy have over the last 15 years been developed into extremely powerful techniques. Applying these techniques to the investigation of proteins and DNA molecules has led to a mechanistic understanding of protein function on the level of single molecules. As examples for DNA based molecular machines we will describe single-molecule experiments on RNA polymerases as well as on the packaging of DNA into a viral capsid-a process that is driven by one of the most powerful molecular motors.

  9. Molecular modeling of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the field of molecular modeling of peptides. The main focus is on atomistic modeling with molecular mechanics potentials. The description of peptide conformations and solvation through potentials is discussed. Several important computer simulation methods are briefly introduced, including molecular dynamics, accelerated sampling approaches such as replica-exchange and metadynamics, free energy simulations and kinetic network models like Milestoning. Examples of recent applications for predictions of structure, kinetics, and interactions of peptides with complex environments are described. The reliability of current simulation methods is analyzed by comparison of computational predictions obtained using different models with each other and with experimental data. A brief discussion of coarse-grained modeling and future directions is also presented.

  10. Molecular neuropathology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Markus J; Reifenberger, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  11. [Molecular diagnosis of ADPKD].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Mazza, Cinzia; Izzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with ADPKD do not need molecular genetic testing. When indicated, Sanger sequencing is the most commonly used technique. When a pathogenic mutation is not identified by Sanger, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis (MLPA) should be performed to detect gene rearrangement (insertion or deletion). The next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques can provide high-throughput and comprehensive diagnostic screening at lower cost. Finally, in the future, targeted (TS) or whole exome sequencing (WES) will likely play a role in the molecular diagnostics of ADPKD. Molecular genetic testing is indicated in several conditions: no family history; equivocal/atypical renal imaging; marked discordant disease within family; early and severe PKD; reproductive counseling and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis; related living donor transplantation.

  12. Molecular vibrational energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruebele, M.; Bigwood, R.

    This article reviews some recent work in molecular vibrational energy flow (IVR), with emphasis on our own computational and experimental studies. We consider the problem in various representations, and use these to develop a family of simple models which combine specific molecular properties (e.g. size, vibrational frequencies) with statistical properties of the potential energy surface and wavefunctions. This marriage of molecular detail and statistical simplification captures trends of IVR mechanisms and survival probabilities beyond the abilities of purely statistical models or the computational limitations of full ab initio approaches. Of particular interest is IVR in the intermediate time regime, where heavy-atom skeletal modes take over the IVR process from hydrogenic motions even upon X H bond excitation. Experiments and calculations on prototype heavy-atom systems show that intermediate time IVR differs in many aspects from the early stages of hydrogenic mode IVR. As a result, IVR can be coherently frozen, with potential applications to selective chemistry.

  13. Stueckelberg and Molecular Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Jan

    The first period of E. C. G. Stueckelberg's scientific career was marked by important contributions he made to molecular physics.1 After publishing his thesis in 1927 in Basel [1] Stueckelberg joined the prestigious Palmer Physical Laboratory in Princeton where he worked under the guidance of Karl Taylor Compton, brother of Arthur Holly Compton. Stueckelberg owed this position devoted several papers to problems of molecular physics. Stueckelberg had the benefit at Princeton of exchanges with other gifted members of the Palmer Physical Laboratory, Philip M. Morse and E. U. Condon among others.3 to a recommendation by A. Sommerfeld.2 In this stimulating environment, he devoted several papers to problems of molecular physics. Stueckelberg had the benefit at Princeton of exchanges with other gifted members of the Palmer Physical Laboratory, Philip M. Morse and E. U. Condon among others.3

  14. Applications of Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Galbán, Craig; Galbán, Stefanie; Van Dort, Marcian; Luker, Gary D.; Bhojani, Mahaveer S.; Rehemtualla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Today molecular imaging technologies play a central role in clinical oncology. The use of imaging techniques in early cancer detection, treatment response and new therapy development is steadily growing and has already significantly impacted clinical management of cancer. In this chapter we will overview three different molecular imaging technologies used for the understanding of disease biomarkers, drug development, or monitoring therapeutic outcome. They are (1) optical imaging (bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging) (2) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and (3) nuclear imaging (e.g, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)). We will review the use of molecular reporters of biological processes (e.g. apoptosis and protein kinase activity) for high throughput drug screening and new cancer therapies, diffusion MRI as a biomarker for early treatment response and PET and SPECT radioligands in oncology. PMID:21075334

  15. A molecular palaeobiological exploration of arthropod terrestrialization

    PubMed Central

    Carton, Robert; Edgecombe, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding animal terrestrialization, the process through which animals colonized the land, is crucial to clarify extant biodiversity and biological adaptation. Arthropoda (insects, spiders, centipedes and their allies) represent the largest majority of terrestrial biodiversity. Here we implemented a molecular palaeobiological approach, merging molecular and fossil evidence, to elucidate the deepest history of the terrestrial arthropods. We focused on the three independent, Palaeozoic arthropod terrestrialization events (those of Myriapoda, Hexapoda and Arachnida) and showed that a marine route to the colonization of land is the most likely scenario. Molecular clock analyses confirmed an origin for the three terrestrial lineages bracketed between the Cambrian and the Silurian. While molecular divergence times for Arachnida are consistent with the fossil record, Myriapoda are inferred to have colonized land earlier, substantially predating trace or body fossil evidence. An estimated origin of myriapods by the Early Cambrian precedes the appearance of embryophytes and perhaps even terrestrial fungi, raising the possibility that terrestrialization had independent origins in crown-group myriapod lineages, consistent with morphological arguments for convergence in tracheal systems. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325830

  16. Atomic and Molecular Adsorption on Re(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Konstanze; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-02-01

    Using periodic, self-consistent density functional theory calculations, the adsorption of several atomic (H, S, N, O and C) and molecular (CO2, N2, NH3, HCN, CO and NO) species and molecular fragments (NH2, NH, CN, CNH2, HNO, NOH, CH3, CH2, CH and OH) on the (0001) facet of rhenium at a coverage of 0.25 ML has been studied. Preferred binding sites with their corresponding binding energy and deformation energy of the surface, as well as an estimated diffusion barrier of each species have been determined. Atomic species and molecular fragments tend to bind to threefold sites, whereas molecular species tend to bind to top sites. The binding strength, with respect to the corresponding gas phase species and in increasing order for all species studied, is: CO2 < N2 < NH3 < CO < CH3 < HCN < NO < H < NH2 < OH < CH2 < CNH2 < CN < HNO < NH < NOH < S < N < O < CH < C. The vibrational frequencies of all species in their most energetically favorable adsorbed configuration have been calculated. Finally, the thermochemistry of adsorption and decomposition of NO, NO + H, NH3, N2, CO2, CO and CH4 on Re(0001) has been analyzed.

  17. Molecular processes in cellular arsenic metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, David J.

    2007-08-01

    Elucidating molecular processes that underlie accumulation, metabolism and binding of iAs and its methylated metabolites provides a basis for understanding the modes of action by which iAs acts as a toxin and a carcinogen. One approach to this problem is to construct a conceptual model that incorporates available information on molecular processes involved in the influx, metabolism, binding and efflux of arsenicals in cells. This conceptual model is initially conceived as a non-quantitative representation of critical molecular processes that can be used as a framework for experimental design and prediction. However, with refinement and incorporation of additional data, the conceptual model can be expressed in mathematical terms and should be useful for quantitative estimates of the kinetic and dynamic behavior of iAs and its methylated metabolites in cells. Development of a quantitative model will be facilitated by the availability of tools and techniques to manipulate molecular processes underlying transport of arsenicals across cell membranes or expression and activity of enzymes involved in methylation of arsenicals. This model of cellular metabolism might be integrated into more complex pharmacokinetic models for systemic metabolism of iAs and its methylated metabolites. It may also be useful in development of biologically based dose-response models describing the toxic and carcinogenic actions of arsenicals.

  18. A molecular palaeobiological exploration of arthropod terrestrialization.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Fernandez, Jesus; Carton, Robert; Tanner, Alastair R; Puttick, Mark N; Blaxter, Mark; Vinther, Jakob; Olesen, Jørgen; Giribet, Gonzalo; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Pisani, Davide

    2016-07-19

    Understanding animal terrestrialization, the process through which animals colonized the land, is crucial to clarify extant biodiversity and biological adaptation. Arthropoda (insects, spiders, centipedes and their allies) represent the largest majority of terrestrial biodiversity. Here we implemented a molecular palaeobiological approach, merging molecular and fossil evidence, to elucidate the deepest history of the terrestrial arthropods. We focused on the three independent, Palaeozoic arthropod terrestrialization events (those of Myriapoda, Hexapoda and Arachnida) and showed that a marine route to the colonization of land is the most likely scenario. Molecular clock analyses confirmed an origin for the three terrestrial lineages bracketed between the Cambrian and the Silurian. While molecular divergence times for Arachnida are consistent with the fossil record, Myriapoda are inferred to have colonized land earlier, substantially predating trace or body fossil evidence. An estimated origin of myriapods by the Early Cambrian precedes the appearance of embryophytes and perhaps even terrestrial fungi, raising the possibility that terrestrialization had independent origins in crown-group myriapod lineages, consistent with morphological arguments for convergence in tracheal systems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

  19. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  20. Molecular Rotors as Switches

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Wang, Kang L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene) monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V) revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) associated with the device. The analysis of the device I–V characteristics suggests the source of the

  1. Visualizing molecular unidirectional rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang; Song, Qiying; Gong, Xiaochun; Ji, Qinying; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-07-01

    We directly visualize the spatiotemporal evolution of a unidirectional rotating molecular rotational wave packet. Excited by two time-delayed polarization-skewed ultrashort laser pulses, the cigar- or disk-shaped rotational wave packet is impulsively kicked to unidirectionally rotate as a quantum rotor which afterwards disperses and exhibits field-free revivals. The rich dynamics can be coherently controlled by varying the timing or polarization of the excitation laser pulses. The numerical simulations very well reproduce the experimental observations and intuitively revivify the thoroughgoing evolution of the molecular rotational wave packet of unidirectional spin.

  2. Molecular environmental geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Day, Peggy A.

    1999-05-01

    The chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of contaminant species in the natural environment are controlled by reactions that occur in and among solid, aqueous, and gas phases. These reactions are varied and complex, involving changes in chemical form and mass transfer among inorganic, organic, and biochemical species. The field of molecular environmental geochemistry seeks to apply spectroscopic and microscopic probes to the mechanistic understanding of environmentally relevant chemical processes, particularly those involving contaminants and Earth materials. In general, empirical geochemical models have been shown to lack uniqueness and adequate predictive capability, even in relatively simple systems. Molecular geochemical tools, when coupled with macroscopic measurements, can provide the level of chemical detail required for the credible extrapolation of contaminant reactivity and bioavailability over ranges of temperature, pressure, and composition. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of molecular chemistry and reaction mechanisms at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interfaces spurred by the application of new spectroscopies and microscopies. These methods, such as synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques, vibrational and resonance spectroscopies, and scanning probe microscopies, provide direct chemical information that can elucidate molecular mechanisms, including element speciation, ligand coordination and oxidation state, structural arrangement and crystallinity on different scales, and physical morphology and topography of surfaces. Nonvacuum techniques that allow examination of reactions in situ (i.e., with water or fluids present) and in real time provide direct links between molecular structure and reactivity and measurements of kinetic rates or thermodynamic properties. Applications of these diverse probes to laboratory model systems have provided fundamental insight into inorganic and organic reactions at

  3. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE USING SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  4. Estimating statistical distributions using an integral identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Jianpeng

    2012-05-01

    We present an identity for an unbiased estimate of a general statistical distribution. The identity computes the distribution density from dividing a histogram sum over a local window by a correction factor from a mean-force integral, and the mean force can be evaluated as a configuration average. We show that the optimal window size is roughly the inverse of the local mean-force fluctuation. The new identity offers a more robust and precise estimate than a previous one by Adib and Jarzynski [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 014114 (2005)], 10.1063/1.1829631. It also allows a straightforward generalization to an arbitrary ensemble and a joint distribution of multiple variables. Particularly we derive a mean-force enhanced version of the weighted histogram analysis method. The method can be used to improve distributions computed from molecular simulations. We illustrate the use in computing a potential energy distribution, a volume distribution in a constant-pressure ensemble, a radial distribution function, and a joint distribution of amino acid backbone dihedral angles.

  5. ARSENIC REMOVAL COST ESTIMATING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Arsenic Removal Cost Estimating program (Excel) calculates the costs for using adsorptive media and anion exchange treatment systems to remove arsenic from drinking water. The program is an easy-to-use tool to estimate capital and operating costs for three types of arsenic re...

  6. Estimating Bottleneck Bandwidth using TCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allman, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with estimating bottleneck bandwidth using TCP are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Why TCP is wanted to estimate the bottleneck bandwidth; 2) Setting ssthresh to an appropriate value to reduce loss; 3) Possible packet-pair solutions; and 4) Preliminary results: ACTS and the Internet.

  7. Estimation of Unattenuated Factor Loadings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Todd S.; Hunter, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates that traditional exploratory factor analytic methods, when applied to correlation matrices, cannot be used to estimate unattenuated factor loadings. Presents a mathematical basis for the accurate estimation of such values when the disattenuated correlation matrix or the covariance matrix is used as input. Explains how the equations…

  8. Computer-Aided Reliability Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, S. J.; Stiffler, J. J.; Bryant, L. A.; Petersen, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    CARE III (Computer-Aided Reliability Estimation, Third Generation) helps estimate reliability of complex, redundant, fault-tolerant systems. Program specifically designed for evaluation of fault-tolerant avionics systems. However, CARE III general enough for use in evaluation of other systems as well.

  9. Estimation in Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigdon, Steven E.; Tsutakawa, Robert K.

    Estimation of ability and item parameters in latent trait models is discussed. When both ability and item parameters are considered fixed but unknown, the method of maximum likelihood for the logistic or probit models is well known. Discussed are techniques for estimating ability and item parameters when the ability parameters or item parameters…

  10. PBXN-110 Burn Rate Estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E

    2008-08-11

    It is estimated that PBXN-110 will burn laminarly with a burn function of B = (0.6-1.3)*P{sup 1.0} (B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is pressure in MPa). This paper provides a brief discussion of how this burn behavior was estimated.

  11. A Note on Entropy Estimation.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    We compare an entropy estimator H(z) recently discussed by Zhang (2012) with two estimators, H(1) and H(2), introduced by Grassberger (2003) and Schürmann (2004). We prove the identity H(z) ≡ H(1), which has not been taken into account by Zhang (2012). Then we prove that the systematic error (bias) of H(1) is less than or equal to the bias of the ordinary likelihood (or plug-in) estimator of entropy. Finally, by numerical simulation, we verify that for the most interesting regime of small sample estimation and large event spaces, the estimator H(2) has a significantly smaller statistical error than H(z).

  12. Quantum estimation of unknown parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Vargas, Esteban; Pineda, Carlos; Leyvraz, François; Barberis-Blostein, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the problem of finding the best measurement strategy for estimating the value of a quantum system parameter. In general the optimum quantum measurement, in the sense that it maximizes the quantum Fisher information and hence allows one to minimize the estimation error, can only be determined if the value of the parameter is already known. A modification of the quantum Van Trees inequality, which gives a lower bound on the error in the estimation of a random parameter, is proposed. The suggested inequality allows us to assert if a particular quantum measurement, together with an appropriate estimator, is optimal. An adaptive strategy to estimate the value of a parameter, based on our modified inequality, is proposed.

  13. CULTURE-INDEPENDENT MOLECULAR METHODS FOR FECAL SOURCE IDENTIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal contamination is widespread in the waterways of the United States. Both to correct the problem, and to estimate public health risk, it is necessary to identify the source of the contamination. Several culture-independent molecular methods for fecal source identification hav...

  14. Determination of Molecular Size and Avogadro's Number: A Student Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandrakis, George C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment for estimating molecular size and Avogadro's number. Uses the diffusion length of iodine in air at 100 degrees Celsius as a function of time, and the change in volume of a small quantity of carbon dioxide as it goes from the solid to the gaseous state. (GA)

  15. Coverage-adjusted entropy estimation.

    PubMed

    Vu, Vincent Q; Yu, Bin; Kass, Robert E

    2007-09-20

    Data on 'neural coding' have frequently been analyzed using information-theoretic measures. These formulations involve the fundamental and generally difficult statistical problem of estimating entropy. We review briefly several methods that have been advanced to estimate entropy and highlight a method, the coverage-adjusted entropy estimator (CAE), due to Chao and Shen that appeared recently in the environmental statistics literature. This method begins with the elementary Horvitz-Thompson estimator, developed for sampling from a finite population, and adjusts for the potential new species that have not yet been observed in the sample-these become the new patterns or 'words' in a spike train that have not yet been observed. The adjustment is due to I. J. Good, and is called the Good-Turing coverage estimate. We provide a new empirical regularization derivation of the coverage-adjusted probability estimator, which shrinks the maximum likelihood estimate. We prove that the CAE is consistent and first-order optimal, with rate O(P)(1/log n), in the class of distributions with finite entropy variance and that, within the class of distributions with finite qth moment of the log-likelihood, the Good-Turing coverage estimate and the total probability of unobserved words converge at rate O(P)(1/(log n)(q)). We then provide a simulation study of the estimator with standard distributions and examples from neuronal data, where observations are dependent. The results show that, with a minor modification, the CAE performs much better than the MLE and is better than the best upper bound estimator, due to Paninski, when the number of possible words m is unknown or infinite.

  16. Space shuttle propulsion parameter estimation using optional estimation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A regression analyses on tabular aerodynamic data provided. A representative aerodynamic model for coefficient estimation. It also reduced the storage requirements for the "normal' model used to check out the estimation algorithms. The results of the regression analyses are presented. The computer routines for the filter portion of the estimation algorithm and the :"bringing-up' of the SRB predictive program on the computer was developed. For the filter program, approximately 54 routines were developed. The routines were highly subsegmented to facilitate overlaying program segments within the partitioned storage space on the computer.

  17. Molecular tectonics: from simple tectons to complex molecular networks.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2005-04-01

    Molecular networks in the crystalline phase are infinite periodic molecular assemblies formed under self-assembly conditions between self-complementary or complementary tectons. These millimeter-size structures may be regarded as hypermolecules formed by supramolecular synthesis using reversible intertecton interactions. Molecular tectonics, based on molecular recognition events and their iteration, is the approach dealing with design and preparation of molecular networks in the solid state. In this Account, an overview of the rational behind this approach is presented. A variety of molecular networks based on van der Waals interactions and hydrogen and coordination bonding possessing diverse connectivity and topology are discussed.

  18. Photoionization of molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, R. P.; Calo, J. M.

    1981-12-01

    An experimental apparatus consisting of a novel multiple expansion cluster source coupled with a molecular beam system and photoionization mass spectrometer has been designed and constructed. This apparatus has been thoroughly tested and preliminary measurements of the growth kinetics of water clusters and the photoionization cross section of the water dimer have been carried out.

  19. Reading the Molecular Clock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Suggesting that the evolutionary record may be written in proteins and genes, discusses research in which species are compared by immunology, DNA, and radioimmunoassay. Molecular studies show that DNA from humans and chimps is 98 percent identical, a degree of similarity usually occurring only among animals of the same genus. (JN)

  20. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  1. Polypeptides Based Molecular Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-06

    can be nanoengineer/ nanoassemble individual building blocks at the molecular level, atom by atom, to form conducting channel towards realization of...properties of the self-assembled interconnects are characterized as well. These peptides can be nanoengineer/ nanoassemble individual building blocks at

  2. Clickable molecularly imprinted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changgang; Ye, Lei

    2011-06-07

    Terminal alkynyl and azide groups are introduced on the surface of molecularly imprinted core-shell nanoparticles using precipitation polymerization. These clickable groups enable simple nanoparticle conjugation and surface modification under mild reaction conditions, opening new opportunities for nanoparticle-based assays and chemical sensing.

  3. The molecular universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2013-07-01

    Molecular absorption and emission bands dominate the visible, infrared, and submillimeter spectra of most objects with associated gas. These observations reveal a surprisingly rich array of molecular species and attest to a complex chemistry taking place in the harsh environment of the interstellar medium of galaxies. Molecules are truly everywhere and an important component of interstellar gas. This review surveys molecular observations in the various spectral windows and summarizes the chemical and physical processes involved in the formation and evolution of interstellar molecules. The rich organic inventory of space reflects the multitude of chemical processes involved that, on the one hand, build up molecules an atom at a time and, on the other hand, break down large molecules injected by stars to smaller fragments. Both this bottom-up and the trickle-down chemistry are reviewed. The emphasis is on understanding the characteristics of complex polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and fullerenes and their role in chemistry as well as the intricate interaction of gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral-neutral reactions and the chemistry taking place on grain surfaces in dense clouds in setting the organic inventory of regions of star and planet formation and their implications for the chemical history of the Solar System. Many aspects of molecular astrophysics are illustrated with recent observations of the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory.

  4. Molecular Models in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes types of molecular models (ball-and-stick, framework, and space-filling) and evaluates commercially available kits. Gives instructions for constructive models from polystyrene balls and pipe-cleaners. Models are useful for class demonstrations although not sufficiently accurate for research use. Illustrations show biologically important…

  5. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  6. Molecular contributions to conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have opened a new chapter in species conservation efforts, as well as population biology. DNA sequencing, MHC (major histocompatibility complex), minisatellite, microsatellite, and RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) procedures allow for identification of parentage, more distant relatives, founders to new populations, unidentified individuals, population structure, effective population size, population-specific markers, etc. PCR (polymerase chain reaction) amplification of mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, ribosomal DNA, chloroplast DNA, and other systems provide for more sophisticated analyses of metapopulation structure, hybridization events, and delineation of species, subspecies, and races, all of which aid in setting species recovery priorities. Each technique can be powerful in its own right but is most credible when used in conjunction with other molecular techniques and, most importantly, with ecological and demographic data collected from the field. Surprisingly few taxa of concern have been assayed with any molecular technique. Thus, rather than showcasing exhaustive details from a few well-known examples, this paper attempts to present a broad range of cases in which molecular techniques have been used to provide insight into conservation efforts.

  7. Molecular ion photofragment spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bustamente, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    A new molecular ion photofragment spectrometer is described which features a supersonic molecular beam ion source and a radio frequency octapole ion trap interaction region. This unique combination allows several techniques to be applied to the problem of detecting a photon absorption event of a molecular ion. In particular, it may be possible to obtain low resolution survey spectra of exotic molecular ions by using a direct vibrational predissociation process, or by using other more indirect detection methods. The use of the spectrometer is demonstrated by measuring the lifetime of the O/sub 2//sup +/(/sup 4/..pi../sub u/) metastable state which is found to consist of two main components: the /sup 4/..pi../sub 5/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub -1/2/ spin components having a long lifetime (approx. 129 ms) and the /sup 4/..pi../sub 3/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub 1/2/ spin components having a short lifetime (approx. 6 ms).

  8. Estimation of toxicity using the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Since experimental measurements of toxicity are extremely time consuming and expensive, it is imperative that alternative methods to estimate toxicity are developed.

  9. Estimation of Genomic Inbreeding Coefficients Using BovineSNP50 genotypes from U.S. Jersey Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In dairy cattle, inbreeding coefficients have been estimated from pedigree information; however, recent advances in genotyping technology allow the calculation of inbreeding based on molecular pedigree information. Because strong selection and recurrent inbreeding have decreased genetic variation, ...

  10. Molecular fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bartelle, Benjamin B.; Barandov, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of brain function depends on understanding the dynamics of diverse neural signaling processes over large tissue volumes in intact animals and humans. Most existing approaches to measuring brain signaling suffer from limited tissue penetration, poor resolution, or lack of specificity for well-defined neural events. Here we discuss a new brain activity mapping method that overcomes some of these problems by combining MRI with contrast agents sensitive to neural signaling. The goal of this “molecular fMRI” approach is to permit noninvasive whole-brain neuroimaging with specificity and resolution approaching current optical neuroimaging methods. In this article, we describe the context and need for molecular fMRI as well as the state of the technology today. We explain how major types of MRI probes work and how they can be sensitized to neurobiological processes, such as neurotransmitter release, calcium signaling, and gene expression changes. We comment both on past work in the field and on challenges and promising avenues for future development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain researchers currently have a choice between measuring neural activity using cellular-level recording techniques, such as electrophysiology and optical imaging, or whole-brain imaging methods, such as fMRI. Cellular level methods are precise but only address a small portion of mammalian brains; on the other hand, whole-brain neuroimaging techniques provide very little specificity for neural pathways or signaling components of interest. The molecular fMRI techniques we discuss have particular potential to combine the specificity of cellular-level measurements with the noninvasive whole-brain coverage of fMRI. On the other hand, molecular fMRI is only just getting off the ground. This article aims to offer a snapshot of the status and future prospects for development of molecular fMRI techniques. PMID:27076413

  11. Risk estimation using probability machines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Logistic regression has been the de facto, and often the only, model used in the description and analysis of relationships between a binary outcome and observed features. It is widely used to obtain the conditional probabilities of the outcome given predictors, as well as predictor effect size estimates using conditional odds ratios. Results We show how statistical learning machines for binary outcomes, provably consistent for the nonparametric regression problem, can be used to provide both consistent conditional probability estimation and conditional effect size estimates. Effect size estimates from learning machines leverage our understanding of counterfactual arguments central to the interpretation of such estimates. We show that, if the data generating model is logistic, we can recover accurate probability predictions and effect size estimates with nearly the same efficiency as a correct logistic model, both for main effects and interactions. We also propose a method using learning machines to scan for possible interaction effects quickly and efficiently. Simulations using random forest probability machines are presented. Conclusions The models we propose make no assumptions about the data structure, and capture the patterns in the data by just specifying the predictors involved and not any particular model structure. So they do not run the same risks of model mis-specification and the resultant estimation biases as a logistic model. This methodology, which we call a “risk machine”, will share properties from the statistical machine that it is derived from. PMID:24581306

  12. Entropy estimation in Turing's perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyi

    2012-05-01

    A new nonparametric estimator of Shannon's entropy on a countable alphabet is proposed and analyzed against the well-known plug-in estimator. The proposed estimator is developed based on Turing's formula, which recovers distributional characteristics on the subset of the alphabet not covered by a size-n sample. The fundamental switch in perspective brings about substantial gain in estimation accuracy for every distribution with finite entropy. In general, a uniform variance upper bound is established for the entire class of distributions with finite entropy that decays at a rate of O(ln(n)/n) compared to O([ln(n)]2/n) for the plug-in. In a wide range of subclasses, the variance of the proposed estimator converges at a rate of O(1/n), and this rate of convergence carries over to the convergence rates in mean squared errors in many subclasses. Specifically, for any finite alphabet, the proposed estimator has a bias decaying exponentially in n. Several new bias-adjusted estimators are also discussed.

  13. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  14. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation.

    PubMed

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2013-06-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the "large p small n" setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required.

  15. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  16. Space Station Facility government estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Joseph A.

    1993-01-01

    This new, unique Cost Engineering Report introduces the 800-page, C-100 government estimate for the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) and Volume IV Aerospace Construction Price Book. At the January 23, 1991, bid opening for the SSPF, the government cost estimate was right on target. Metric, Inc., Prime Contractor, low bid was 1.2 percent below the government estimate. This project contains many different and complex systems. Volume IV is a summary of the cost associated with construction, activation and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) design, estimating, fabrication, installation, testing, termination, and verification of this project. Included are 13 reasons the government estimate was so accurate; abstract of bids, for 8 bidders and government estimate with additive alternates, special labor and materials, budget comparison and system summaries; and comments on the energy credit from local electrical utility. This report adds another project to our continuing study of 'How Does the Low Bidder Get Low and Make Money?' which was started in 1967, and first published in the 1973 AACE Transaction with 18 ways the low bidders get low. The accuracy of this estimate proves the benefits of our Kennedy Space Center (KSC) teamwork efforts and KSC Cost Engineer Tools which are contributing toward our goals of the Space Station.

  17. Estimating equivalence with quantile regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalence testing and corresponding confidence interval estimates are used to provide more enlightened statistical statements about parameter estimates by relating them to intervals of effect sizes deemed to be of scientific or practical importance rather than just to an effect size of zero. Equivalence tests and confidence interval estimates are based on a null hypothesis that a parameter estimate is either outside (inequivalence hypothesis) or inside (equivalence hypothesis) an equivalence region, depending on the question of interest and assignment of risk. The former approach, often referred to as bioequivalence testing, is often used in regulatory settings because it reverses the burden of proof compared to a standard test of significance, following a precautionary principle for environmental protection. Unfortunately, many applications of equivalence testing focus on establishing average equivalence by estimating differences in means of distributions that do not have homogeneous variances. I discuss how to compare equivalence across quantiles of distributions using confidence intervals on quantile regression estimates that detect differences in heterogeneous distributions missed by focusing on means. I used one-tailed confidence intervals based on inequivalence hypotheses in a two-group treatment-control design for estimating bioequivalence of arsenic concentrations in soils at an old ammunition testing site and bioequivalence of vegetation biomass at a reclaimed mining site. Two-tailed confidence intervals based both on inequivalence and equivalence hypotheses were used to examine quantile equivalence for negligible trends over time for a continuous exponential model of amphibian abundance. ?? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

  18. State estimation of the power system using robust estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Zahid; Razali, Radzuan B.; Daud, Hanita; Nor, Nursyarizal Mohd; Firuzabad, Mahmud Fotuhi

    2016-11-01

    The presence of gross errors in the process data for the power system state estimation (PSSE) algorithm is very crucial as they may severely degrade its results. The conventionally used state estimator is based on the method of the weighted least squares (WLS) which is not robust against the bad measurements that results in larger deviation in output estimates. In this study, a new robust algorithm based on the quasi weighted least squares (QWLS) estimator is presented. The robustness of the QWLS approach is achieved by reducing the impact of bad measurements on the objective function. In the existence of gross errors, the proposed algorithm provides estimates as good as those that are achieved by the conventional method of the WLS when no gross error exists in the process data. The implementation of the proposed algorithm has been illustrated for the case studies on the 6-bus and IEEE 14-bus power networks. The numerical results validate the performance of the proposed estimator in the PSSE algorithm.

  19. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    A paper at the 1992 FCS showed how to express the modified Allan variance (mvar) in terms of the third difference of the cumulative sum of time residuals. Although this reformulated definition was presented merely as a computational trick for simplifying the calculation of mvar estimates, it has since turned out to be a powerful theoretical tool for deriving the statistical quality of those estimates in terms of their equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), defined for an estimator V by edf V = 2(EV)2/(var V). Confidence intervals for mvar can then be constructed from levels of the appropriate 2 distribution.

  20. Estimates Of Magnetic Plage Filling Factors Using The Cn Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Steven H.; Judge, Philip

    2016-12-01

    The 388nm CN band (like the better known "G band" of CH) is used in the Sun to locate strong magnetic concentrations. Magnetic network and plage are bright in these molecular bands, since the enhanced chromospheric heating there destroys the molecule, erasing its absorption and allowing the continuum to shine through. We take advantage of this to estimate the filling factor of strong fields in active dwarf stars. CN band depths in active stars can be compared with those of inactive stars of very similar temperature and metallicity, and after an adjustment for line-blanketing, used to estimate a magnetic plage filling factor. We estimate filling factors for a two stars, and compare them to direct Stokes I line-broadening measurements. Limitations, caveats, and future directions are briefly considered.

  1. Flux Estimates of Ions from the Lunar Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarantos, M.; Hartle, R. E.; Killen, R. M.; Saito, Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Glocer, A.

    2012-01-01

    We compare estimates for the ion fluxes of twelve expected constituents of the lunar exosphere with estimates for the ion fluxes ejected from the lunar surface by solar wind ions and electrons. Our estimates demonstrate that measurements of lunar ions will help constrain the abundances of many undetected species in the lunar exosphere, particularly AI and Si, because the expected ion flux levels from the exosphere exceed those from the surface. To correctly infer the relative abundances of exospheric ions and neutrals from Kaguya Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) measurements, we must take into account the velocity distributions of local ions. The predicted spectrum underestimates the measured levels of 0+ relative to other lunar ion species, a result that may suggest contributions by molecular ions to the measured 0+ rates.

  2. Adl migration estimation model (for microcomputers) (release number 1). Software

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    ADL Migration Estimation Model (AMEM) is a user friendly software package programmed for an IBM personal computer that provides the user with the ability to estimate the weight fraction of a chemical migrating from a polymeric material. The chemical may be an additive (e.g., a plasticizer) or unreacted monomer (e.g., styrene). The program estimates the migration of chemicals based on mathematical equations derived using diffusion and mass transfer theories. The user is prompted for chemical specific data such as molecular weight and vapor pressure of the migrant. The user may enter the diffusion coefficient for the polymer of interest or may use one of the default values provided by the software for six generic types of polymers with a wide range of diffusion coefficients. Background information, model development, mathematical calculations, example scenarios, and a user's guide are provided in the documentation.

  3. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  4. Some Stereochemical Principles from Polymers: Molecular Symmetry and Molecular Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Charles C.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of the properties of polyethylene, polypropylene, polyisobutylene, and their three epoxides to illustrate the relationships of entropy to molecular properties and the concepts of molecular chirality, geometry, and flexibility. (CC)

  5. Improved harmonic mean estimator for phylogenetic model evidence.

    PubMed

    Arima, Serena; Tardella, Luca

    2012-04-01

    Bayesian phylogenetic methods are generating noticeable enthusiasm in the field of molecular systematics. Many phylogenetic models are often at stake, and different approaches are used to compare them within a Bayesian framework. The Bayes factor, defined as the ratio of the marginal likelihoods of two competing models, plays a key role in Bayesian model selection. We focus on an alternative estimator of the marginal likelihood whose computation is still a challenging problem. Several computational solutions have been proposed, none of which can be considered outperforming the others simultaneously in terms of simplicity of implementation, computational burden and precision of the estimates. Practitioners and researchers, often led by available software, have privileged so far the simplicity of the harmonic mean (HM) estimator. However, it is known that the resulting estimates of the Bayesian evidence in favor of one model are biased and often inaccurate, up to having an infinite variance so that the reliability of the corresponding conclusions is doubtful. We consider possible improvements of the generalized harmonic mean (GHM) idea that recycle Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations from the posterior, share the computational simplicity of the original HM estimator, but, unlike it, overcome the infinite variance issue. We show reliability and comparative performance of the improved harmonic mean estimators comparing them to approximation techniques relying on improved variants of the thermodynamic integration.

  6. Theoretical molecular studies of astrophysical interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1991-01-01

    When work under this grant began in 1974 there was a great need for state-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers. These were required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities, but, owing to lack of experimental or theoretical values, estimates then being used for this purpose ranged over several orders of magnitude. A problem of particular interest was collisional excitation of formaldehyde; Townes and Cheung had suggested that the relative size of different state-to-state rates (propensity rules) was responsible for the anomalous absorption observed for this species. We believed that numerical molecular scattering techniques (in particular the close coupling or coupled channel method) could be used to obtain accurate results, and that these would be computationally feasible since only a few molecular rotational levels are populated at the low temperatures thought to prevail in the observed regions. Such calculations also require detailed knowledge of the intermolecular forces, but we thought that those could also be obtained with sufficient accuracy by theoretical (quantum chemical) techniques. Others, notably Roy Gordon at Harvard, had made progress in solving the molecular scattering equations, generally using semi-empirical intermolecular potentials. Work done under this grant generalized Gordon's scattering code, and introduced the use of theoretical interaction potentials obtained by solving the molecular Schroedinger equation. Earlier work had considered only the excitation of a diatomic molecule by collisions with an atom, and we extended the formalism to include excitation of more general molecular rotors (e.g., H2CO, NH2, and H2O) and also collisions of two rotors (e.g., H2-H2).

  7. Age estimation from canine volumes.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Danilo; Gaudio, Daniel; Guercini, Nicola; Cipriani, Filippo; Gibelli, Daniele; Caputi, Sergio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Techniques for estimation of biological age are constantly evolving and are finding daily application in the forensic radiology field in cases concerning the estimation of the chronological age of a corpse in order to reconstruct the biological profile, or of a living subject, for example in cases of immigration of people without identity papers from a civil registry. The deposition of teeth secondary dentine and consequent decrease of pulp chamber in size are well known as aging phenomena, and they have been applied to the forensic context by the development of age estimation procedures, such as Kvaal-Solheim and Cameriere methods. The present study takes into consideration canines pulp chamber volume related to the entire teeth volume, with the aim of proposing new regression formulae for age estimation using 91 cone beam computerized scans and a freeware open-source software, in order to permit affordable reproducibility of volumes calculation.

  8. ESTIMATING REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS IN BIRDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will focus on the statistical issues surrounding estimation of avian nest-survival. I first describe the natural history and breeding ecology of two North American songbirds, the Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) and the Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina)....

  9. Bayesian estimation of turbulent motion.

    PubMed

    Héas, Patrick; Herzet, Cédric; Mémin, Etienne; Heitz, Dominique; Mininni, Pablo D

    2013-06-01

    Based on physical laws describing the multiscale structure of turbulent flows, this paper proposes a regularizer for fluid motion estimation from an image sequence. Regularization is achieved by imposing some scale invariance property between histograms of motion increments computed at different scales. By reformulating this problem from a Bayesian perspective, an algorithm is proposed to jointly estimate motion, regularization hyperparameters, and to select the most likely physical prior among a set of models. Hyperparameter and model inference are conducted by posterior maximization, obtained by marginalizing out non--Gaussian motion variables. The Bayesian estimator is assessed on several image sequences depicting synthetic and real turbulent fluid flows. Results obtained with the proposed approach exceed the state-of-the-art results in fluid flow estimation.

  10. [Medical insurance estimation of risks].

    PubMed

    Dunér, H

    1975-11-01

    The purpose of insurance medicine is to make a prognostic estimate of medical risk-factors in persons who apply for life, health, or accident insurance. Established risk-groups with a calculated average mortality and morbidity form the basis for premium rates and insurance terms. In most cases the applicant is accepted for insurance after a self-assessment of his health. Only around one per cent of the applications are refused, but there are cases in which the premium is raised, temporarily or permanently. It is often a matter of rough estimate, since the knowlege of the long-term prognosis for many diseases is incomplete. The insurance companies' rules for estimate of risk are revised at intervals of three or four years. The estimate of risk as regards life insurance has been gradually liberalised, while the medical conditions for health insurance have become stricter owing to an increase in the claims rate.

  11. Manned Mars mission cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaker, Joseph; Smith, Keith

    1986-01-01

    The potential costs of several options of a manned Mars mission are examined. A cost estimating methodology based primarily on existing Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) parametric cost models is summarized. These models include the MSFC Space Station Cost Model and the MSFC Launch Vehicle Cost Model as well as other modes and techniques. The ground rules and assumptions of the cost estimating methodology are discussed and cost estimates presented for six potential mission options which were studied. The estimated manned Mars mission costs are compared to the cost of the somewhat analogous Apollo Program cost after normalizing the Apollo cost to the environment and ground rules of the manned Mars missions. It is concluded that a manned Mars mission, as currently defined, could be accomplished for under $30 billion in 1985 dollars excluding launch vehicle development and mission operations.

  12. Development of New Candidate Gene and EST-Based Molecular Markers for Gossypium Species.

    PubMed

    Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kantety, Ramesh V; Yu, John Z; Saha, Sukumar; Sharma, Govind C

    2011-01-01

    New source of molecular markers accelerate the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum EST sequences that were used for polymorphism detection followed by genetic and physical mapping. Nineteen gene-based markers were surveyed for polymorphism detection in 26 Gossypium species. Cluster analysis generated a phylogenetic tree with four major sub-clusters for 23 species while three species branched out individually. CAP method enhanced the rate of polymorphism of candidate gene-based markers between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. Two hundred A-genome based SSR markers were designed after datamining of G. arboreum EST sequences (Mississippi Gossypium arboreum  EST-SSR: MGAES). Over 70% of MGAES markers successfully produced amplicons while 65 of them demonstrated polymorphism between the parents of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense RIL population and formed 14 linkage groups. Chromosomal localization of both candidate gene-based and MGAES markers was assisted by euploid and hypoaneuploid CS-B analysis. Gene-based and MGAES markers were highly informative as they were designed from candidate genes and fiber transcriptome with a potential to be integrated into the existing cotton genetic and physical maps.

  13. Estimate product quality with ANNs

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, A.; Trivella, F.

    1996-09-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been applied to predict catalytic reformer octane number (ON) and gasoline splitter product qualities. Results show that ANNs are a valuable tool to derive fast and accurate product quality measurements, and offer a low-cost alternative to online analyzers or rigorous mathematical models. The paper describes product quality measurements, artificial neural networks, ANN structure, estimating gasoline octane numbers, and estimating naphtha splitter product qualities.

  14. Acquisition Cost/Price Estimating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    REVIEW AND VALIDATION, (3) RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGY AND (4) DATA ANALYSIS. THESE FUNCTIONAL THRUSTS ARE IN TURN FOCUSED TO ESTIMATING AND ANALISIS ...RELATIONSHIPS, CERs, IS LARGELY A FUNCTION OF THE QUANTITY AND QUALITY OF DATA THAT IS AVAILABLE AT THE TINE OF FORMULATION. IN ORDER TO ENSURE THAT SUCH COST...HAVE BEEN DISCUSSED PREVIOUSLY AS GOOD SOURCES OF DATA FOR COST ESTIMATING. THEIR PRIMARY FUNCTION , HOWEVER, IS TO PROVIDE THE ARMY WITH EARLY

  15. Some Topics in Linear Estimation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    outstanding symposium. Iz SOME TOPICS IN LINEAR ESTIMATION 309 TABILE OF CONTENTS 1. The Integral Equations of Smoothing and Filtering la. The Smoothing ... Smoothing and Filtering 2. Some Examples - Stationary Processes 2a. Scalar Stationary Processes over Infinite Intervals 2b. Finite Intervals - The...Stationary 4. A Concluding Remark 310 T. KAILATH 1. The Integral Equations of Smoothing and Filtering Our estimation problems will be discussed in the context

  16. PDV Uncertainty Estimation & Methods Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Machorro, E.

    2011-11-01

    Several methods are presented for estimating the rapidly changing instantaneous frequency of a time varying signal that is contaminated by measurement noise. Useful a posteriori error estimates for several methods are verified numerically through Monte Carlo simulation. However, given the sampling rates of modern digitizers, sub-nanosecond variations in velocity are shown to be reliably measurable in most (but not all) cases. Results support the hypothesis that in many PDV regimes of interest, sub-nanosecond resolution can be achieved.

  17. The Psychology of Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Cost estimation for large (and even not so large) government programs is a challenge. The number and magnitude of cost overruns associated with large Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs highlight the difficulties in developing and promulgating accurate cost estimates. These overruns can be the result of inadequate technology readiness or requirements definition, the whims of politicians or government bureaucrats, or even as failures of the cost estimating profession itself. However, there may be another reason for cost overruns that is right in front of us, but only recently have we begun to grasp it: the fact that cost estimators and their customers are human. The last 70+ years of research into human psychology and behavioral economics have yielded amazing findings into how we humans process and use information to make judgments and decisions. What these scientists have uncovered is surprising: humans are often irrational and illogical beings, making decisions based on factors such as emotion and perception, rather than facts and data. These built-in biases to our thinking directly affect how we develop our cost estimates and how those cost estimates are used. We cost estimators can use this knowledge of biases to improve our cost estimates and also to improve how we communicate and work with our customers. By understanding how our customers think, and more importantly, why they think the way they do, we can have more productive relationships and greater influence. By using psychology to our advantage, we can more effectively help the decision maker and our organizations make fact-based decisions.

  18. Estimating beta-mixing coefficients

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Daniel J.; Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla; Schervish, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The literature on statistical learning for time series assumes the asymptotic independence or “mixing” of the data-generating process. These mixing assumptions are never tested, and there are no methods for estimating mixing rates from data. We give an estimator for the beta-mixing rate based on a single stationary sample path and show it is L1-risk consistent. PMID:26279742

  19. Nonlinear Regression Methods for Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    accuracy when the geometric dilution of precision ( GDOP ) causes collinearity, which in turn brings about poor position estimates. The main goal is...measurements are needed to wash-out the 168 measurement noise. Furthermore, the measurement arrangement’s geometry ( GDOP ) strongly impacts the achievable...Newton algorithm, 61 geometric dilution of precision, see GDOP initial parameter estimate, 91 iterative least squares, see ILS Kalman filtering, 10

  20. PHAZE. Parametric Hazard Function Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.

    1990-09-01

    Phaze performs statistical inference calculations on a hazard function ( also called a failure rate or intensity function) based on reported failure times of components that are repaired and restored to service. Three parametric models are allowed: the exponential, linear, and Weibull hazard models. The inference includes estimation (maximum likelihood estimators and confidence regions) of the parameters and of the hazard function itself, testing of hypotheses such as increasing failure rate, and checking of the model assumptions.

  1. Parameter estimation in food science.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Kirk D; Mishra, Dharmendra K

    2013-01-01

    Modeling includes two distinct parts, the forward problem and the inverse problem. The forward problem-computing y(t) given known parameters-has received much attention, especially with the explosion of commercial simulation software. What is rarely made clear is that the forward results can be no better than the accuracy of the parameters. Therefore, the inverse problem-estimation of parameters given measured y(t)-is at least as important as the forward problem. However, in the food science literature there has been little attention paid to the accuracy of parameters. The purpose of this article is to summarize the state of the art of parameter estimation in food science, to review some of the common food science models used for parameter estimation (for microbial inactivation and growth, thermal properties, and kinetics), and to suggest a generic method to standardize parameter estimation, thereby making research results more useful. Scaled sensitivity coefficients are introduced and shown to be important in parameter identifiability. Sequential estimation and optimal experimental design are also reviewed as powerful parameter estimation methods that are beginning to be used in the food science literature.

  2. Blind estimation of reverberation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, Rama; Jones, Douglas L.; Wheeler, Bruce C.; O'Brien, William D.; Lansing, Charissa R.; Feng, Albert S.

    2003-11-01

    The reverberation time (RT) is an important parameter for characterizing the quality of an auditory space. Sounds in reverberant environments are subject to coloration. This affects speech intelligibility and sound localization. Many state-of-the-art audio signal processing algorithms, for example in hearing-aids and telephony, are expected to have the ability to characterize the listening environment, and turn on an appropriate processing strategy accordingly. Thus, a method for characterization of room RT based on passively received microphone signals represents an important enabling technology. Current RT estimators, such as Schroeder's method, depend on a controlled sound source, and thus cannot produce an online, blind RT estimate. Here, a method for estimating RT without prior knowledge of sound sources or room geometry is presented. The diffusive tail of reverberation was modeled as an exponentially damped Gaussian white noise process. The time-constant of the decay, which provided a measure of the RT, was estimated using a maximum-likelihood procedure. The estimates were obtained continuously, and an order-statistics filter was used to extract the most likely RT from the accumulated estimates. The procedure was illustrated for connected speech. Results obtained for simulated and real room data are in good agreement with the real RT values.

  3. Ratio estimation in SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, R. C.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.

    2011-09-01

    The determination of an isotope ratio by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) traditionally involves averaging a number of ratios collected over the course of a measurement. We show that this method leads to an additive positive bias in the expectation value of the estimated ratio that is approximately equal to the true ratio divided by the counts of the denominator isotope of an individual ratio. This bias does not decrease as the number of ratios used in the average increases. By summing all counts in the numerator isotope, then dividing by the sum of counts in the denominator isotope, the estimated ratio is less biased: the bias is approximately equal to the ratio divided by the summed counts of the denominator isotope over the entire measurement. We propose a third ratio estimator (Beale's estimator) that can be used when the bias from the summed counts is unacceptably large for the hypothesis being tested. We derive expressions for the variance of these ratio estimators as well as the conditions under which they are normally distributed. Finally, we investigate a SIMS dataset showing the effects of ratio bias, and discuss proper ratio estimation for SIMS analysis.

  4. Revisiting a Classic Study of the Molecular Clock.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lauren M; Boland, Joseph R; Braverman, John M

    2016-03-01

    A constant rate of molecular evolution among homologous proteins and across lineages is known as the molecular clock. This concept has been useful for estimating divergence times. Here, we revisit a study by Richard Dickerson (J Mol Evol 1:26-45, 1971), wherein he provided striking visual evidence for a constant rate of amino acid changes among various evolutionary branch points. Dickerson's study is commonly cited as support of the molecular clock and a figure from it is often reproduced in textbooks. Since its publication, however, there have been updates made to dates of common ancestors based on the fossil record that should be considered. Additionally, collecting the accession numbers and carefully outlining Dickerson's methods serves as a resource to students of the molecular clock hypothesis.

  5. On the massive star-forming capacity of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, Jose; Shore, Steven N.; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    1994-01-01

    Assuming that photoionization is the self-limiting process for continued star formation, we estimate the maximum number of massive (OB) stars that can form within a molecular cloud. The most efficient cloud destruction mechanism in the early stages of H II region evolution is the evaporation of the cloud by stars located near the cloud boundary. The maximum number of OB stars is of order 1 per 10(exp 4) solar mass of average molecular gas, or 10 per 10(exp 4) solar mass of dense molecular gas. The resulting star-forming efficiencies within cloud complexes range from 2% to 16% depending on both the location of the stars in the cloud and the details of the initial mass function, with an overall value of about 5% for average molecular gas.

  6. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Ullmann, Jeremy F.P.; Norton, William H.J.; Brennan, Caroline H.; Parker, Matthew O.; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling CNS disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in-vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern biological psychiatry research. PMID:25349164

  7. Molecular processes in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1988-01-01

    The transition dipole moments of the c 3 Pi u - a 3 Sigma g +, i 3 Pi g - c 3 Pi u, and i 3 Pi g - b 3 Sigma u + transitions of molecular hydrogen were calculated over a wide range of internuclear distances R. Calculations of the emission spectra are nearing completion. Substantial progress was made in the calculation of the absorption coefficient of a colliding pair of hydrogen atoms in the binary encounter approximation. Detailed calculations were performed on the continuum emission arising from the excitation of the a 3 sigma g + state of H2 by the impact of electrons of various energies. Each curve is labelled by the electron energy in electron volts. The strong emission near Lyman alpha is interesting in that it is produced by excitation of molecular hydrogen.

  8. An Artificial Molecular Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Christian; Ragazzon, Giulio; Colasson, Benoit; La Rosa, Marcello; Silvi, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The transport of substrates is one of the main tasks of biomolecular machines in living organisms. We report a synthetic small‐molecule system designed to catch, displace, and release molecular cargo in solution under external control. The system consists of a bistable rotaxane that behaves as an acid–base controlled molecular shuttle, whose ring component bears a tether ending with a nitrile group. The latter can be coordinated to a ruthenium complex that acts as the load, and dissociated upon irradiation with visible light. The cargo loading/unloading and ring transfer/return processes are reversible and can be controlled independently. The robust coordination bond ensures that the cargo remains attached to the device while the transport takes place. PMID:27308223

  9. Interactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  10. Templated quasicrystalline molecular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, Joe; Young, Kirsty; Lowe, Michael; Hars, Sanger; Yadav, Thakur; Hesp, David; Dhanak, Vinod; Tsai, An-Pang; Sharma, Hem Raj; McGrath, Ronan

    2014-03-01

    Quasicrystals are materials with long range ordering but no periodicity. We report scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations of quasicrystalline molecular layers on five-fold quasicrystal surfaces. The molecules adopt positions and orientations on the surface consistent with the quasicrystalline ordering of the substrate. Carbon-60 adsorbs atop sufficiently-separated Fe atoms on icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe to form a unique quasicrystalline lattice whereas further C60 molecules decorate remaining surface Fe atoms in a quasi-degenerate fashion. Pentacene (Pn) adsorbs at tenfold-symmetric points around surface-bisected rhombic triacontahedral clusters in icosahedral Ag-In-Yb. These systems constitute the first demonstrations of quasicrystalline molecular ordering on a template. EPSRC EP/D05253X/1, EP/D071828/1, UK BIS.

  11. Molecular biology of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Revers, Frédéric; García, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Potyvirus is the largest genus of plant viruses causing significant losses in a wide range of crops. Potyviruses are aphid transmitted in a nonpersistent manner and some of them are also seed transmitted. As important pathogens, potyviruses are much more studied than other plant viruses belonging to other genera and their study covers many aspects of plant virology, such as functional characterization of viral proteins, molecular interaction with hosts and vectors, structure, taxonomy, evolution, epidemiology, and diagnosis. Biotechnological applications of potyviruses are also being explored. During this last decade, substantial advances have been made in the understanding of the molecular biology of these viruses and the functions of their various proteins. After a general presentation on the family Potyviridae and the potyviral proteins, we present an update of the knowledge on potyvirus multiplication, movement, and transmission and on potyvirus/plant compatible interactions including pathogenicity and symptom determinants. We end the review providing information on biotechnological applications of potyviruses.

  12. Molecular diagnosis of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Petinataud, D; Berger, S; Contet-Audonneau, N; Machouart, M

    2014-12-01

    Onychomycosis is a frequent cause of nail infections due to dermatophytes. Molds and yeast may also be responsible of these pathologies. Antifungal treatments are frequently given without a mycological diagnosis, partly because of the requisite time for obtaining the biological results. The mycological diagnosis requires a direct microscopic examination and a culture in order to accurately identify the fungal genus and species. Nevertheless, this conventional diagnosis is often time consuming due to the delay of fungal cultures and presents disadvantages that make it not sufficient enough to give a precise and confident response to the clinicians. Therefore additional tests have been developed to help distinguish onychomycosis from other nail disorders. Among them, molecular biology techniques offer modern and rapid tools to improve traditional microbiological diagnosis. In this review, we first present the conventional diagnosis methods for onychomycosis and then we describe the main molecular biology tools and the currently available commercial kits that allow a rapid detection of the pathology.

  13. Primer on molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  14. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  15. Molecular Vaccines for Malaria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    is a p:micularly elegant example of molecular design applied to a recombi nant prote in , combining rational antigen choice (the vaccine uses a major...ing list of examples concordant with these principles. One is rhe ex istence of cryptic epitopes- normally immunologically silent epitopes rhar when...to divert· the immune response from cryptic epitopes formed by the potential binding site lying within the groove,l7 AMAI illustrates the barrier

  16. Atomic and molecular theory

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, Mitio.

    1990-01-01

    The multifaceted role of theoretical physics in understanding the earliest stages of radiation action is discussed. Scientific topics chosen for the present discourse include photoabsorption, electron collisions, and ionic collisions, and electron transport theory, Connections of atomic and molecular physics with condensed-matter physics are also discussed. The present article includes some historical perspective and an outlook for the future. 114 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Molecular Biology of Archaebacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-31

    elucidate at the molecular level some of the features that make archaebacteria unique and distinguish them from eubacteria and eucaryotes. Three types...regulate translation of the mRNA by a mechanism similar to that employed in eubacteria . Thus halophilic archaebacteria retain the same gene order and...possibly also the same regulatory mechanism for controlling ribosomal protein synthesis that is found in eubacteria . Ribosomal protein structure: The

  18. [Hereditary deafness: molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Denoyelle, Françoise; Levilliers, Jacqueline; Simmler, Marie-Christine; Petit, Christine

    2004-03-01

    This article outlines recent advances in explaining hereditary deafness in molecular terms, focusing on isolated (i.e. nonsyndromic) hearing loss. The number of genes identified (36 to date) is growing rapidly. However, difficulties inherent in genetic linkage analysis, coupled with the possible involvement of environmental causes, have so far prevented the characterization of the main genes causative or predisposing to the late-onset forms of deafness.

  19. Molecular opacities for exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Bernath, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy. PMID:24664921

  20. Linear artificial molecular muscles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Flood, Amar H; Bonvallet, Paul A; Vignon, Scott A; Northrop, Brian H; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Jeppesen, Jan O; Huang, Tony J; Brough, Branden; Baller, Marko; Magonov, Sergei; Solares, Santiago D; Goddard, William A; Ho, Chih-Ming; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2005-07-13

    Two switchable, palindromically constituted bistable [3]rotaxanes have been designed and synthesized with a pair of mechanically mobile rings encircling a single dumbbell. These designs are reminiscent of a "molecular muscle" for the purposes of amplifying and harnessing molecular mechanical motions. The location of the two cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings can be controlled to be on either tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) or naphthalene (NP) stations, either chemically ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) or electrochemically (cyclic voltammetry), such that switching of inter-ring distances from 4.2 to 1.4 nm mimics the contraction and extension of skeletal muscle, albeit on a shorter length scale. Fast scan-rate cyclic voltammetry at low temperatures reveals stepwise oxidations and movements of one-half of the [3]rotaxane and then of the other, a process that appears to be concerted at room temperature. The active form of the bistable [3]rotaxane bears disulfide tethers attached covalently to both of the CBPQT(4+) ring components for the purpose of its self-assembly onto a gold surface. An array of flexible microcantilever beams, each coated on one side with a monolayer of 6 billion of the active bistable [3]rotaxane molecules, undergoes controllable and reversible bending up and down when it is exposed to the synchronous addition of aqueous chemical oxidants and reductants. The beam bending is correlated with flexing of the surface-bound molecular muscles, whereas a monolayer of the dumbbell alone is inactive under the same conditions. This observation supports the hypothesis that the cumulative nanoscale movements within surface-bound "molecular muscles" can be harnessed to perform larger-scale mechanical work.