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Sample records for molecular motor kif3

  1. Left–Right Determination: Involvement of Molecular Motor KIF3, Cilia, and Nodal Flow

    PubMed Central

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Tanaka, Yosuke; Okada, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian left–right determination is a good example for how multiple cell biological processes coordinate in the formation of a basic body plan. The leftward movement of fluid at the ventral node, called nodal flow, is the central process in symmetry breaking on the left–right axis. Nodal flow is autonomously generated by the rotation of posteriorly tilted cilia that are built by transport via KIF3 motor on cells of the ventral node. How nodal flow is interpreted to create left–right asymmetry has been a matter of debate. Recent evidence suggests that the leftward movement of sheathed lipidic particles, called nodal vesicular parcels (NVPs), may result in the activation of the noncanonical hedgehog signaling pathway, an asymmetric elevation in intracellular Ca2+ and changes in gene expression. PMID:20066075

  2. Properties of the Kinesin-1 motor DdKif3 from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Röhlk, Christian; Rohlfs, Meino; Leier, Sven; Schliwa, Manfred; Liu, Xiao; Parsch, John; Woehlke, Günther

    2008-04-01

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum possesses genes for 13 different kinesins. Here we characterize DdKif3, a member of the Kinesin-1 family. Kinesin-1 motors form homodimers that can move micrometer-long distances on microtubules using the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. We expressed recombinant motors in Escherichia coli and tested them in different in vitro assays. Full-length and truncated Kif3 motors were active in gliding and ATPase assays. They showed a strong dependence on ionic strength. Like the full-length motor, the truncated DdKif3-592 motor (aa 1-592; comprising motor domain, neck, and partial stalk) reached its maximum speed of around 2.0micrcom s(-1) at a potassium acetate concentration of 200mM. The shortened DdKif3-342 motor (aa 1-342; comprising motor domain, partial neck) showed a high ATP turnover, comparable to that of the fungal Kinesin-1, Nkin. Results from the duty cycle calculations and gliding assays indicate that DdKif3 is a processive motor. A GFP-fusion protein revealed a mainly cytoplasmic localization of DdKif3. Immunofluorescence staining makes an association with the endoplasmic reticulum or mitochondria unlikely. Despite a similar phylogenetic distance to both metazoa and fungi, in terms of its biochemical properties DdKif3 revealed a closer similarity to fungal than animal kinesins.

  3. Molecular characterization of a KIF3B-like kinesin gene in the testis of Octopus tankahkeei (Cephalopoda, Octopus).

    PubMed

    Dang, Ran; Zhu, Jun-Quan; Tan, Fu-Qing; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2012-05-01

    KIF3B is known for maintaining and assembling cilia and flagellum. To date, the function of KIF3B and its relationship with KIF3A during spermiogenesis in the cephalopod Octopus tankahkeei remains unknown. In the present study, we characterized a gene encoding a homologue of rat KIF3B in the O. tankahkeei testis and examined its temporal and spatial expression pattern during spermiogenesis. The cDNA of KIF3B was obtained with degenerate and RACE PCR and the distribution pattern of ot-kif3b were observed with RT-PCR. The morphological development during spermiogenesis was illustrated by histological and transmission electron microscopy and mRNA expression of ot-kif3b was observed by in situ hybridization. The 2,365 nucleotides cDNA consisted of a 102 bp 5' untranslated region (UTR), a 2,208 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 736 amino acids, and a 55 bp 3' UTR. Multiple alignments revealed that the putative Ot-KIF3B shared 68, 68, 69, 68, and 67% identity with that of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Gallus gallus, Danio rerio, and Xenopus laevis, respectively, along with high identities with Ot-KIF3A in fundamental structures. Ot-kif3b transcripts appeared gradually in early spermatids, increased in intermediate spermatids and maximized in drastically remodeled and final spermatids. The kif3b gene is identified and its expression pattern is demonstrated for the first time in O. tankahkeei. Compared to ot-kif3a reported by our laboratory before, our data suggested that the putative heterodimeric motor proteins Ot-KIF3A/B may be involved in intraspermatic transport and might contribute to structural changes during spermiogenesis.

  4. Intraflagellar transport velocity is governed by the number of active KIF17 and KIF3AB motors and their motility properties under load.

    PubMed

    Milic, Bojan; Andreasson, Johan O L; Hogan, Daniel W; Block, Steven M

    2017-08-15

    Homodimeric KIF17 and heterotrimeric KIF3AB are processive, kinesin-2 family motors that act jointly to carry out anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), ferrying cargo along microtubules (MTs) toward the tips of cilia. How IFT trains attain speeds that exceed the unloaded rate of the slower, KIF3AB motor remains unknown. By characterizing the motility properties of kinesin-2 motors as a function of load we find that the increase in KIF3AB velocity, elicited by forward loads from KIF17 motors, cannot alone account for the speed of IFT trains in vivo. Instead, higher IFT velocities arise from an increased likelihood that KIF3AB motors dissociate from the MT, resulting in transport by KIF17 motors alone, unencumbered by opposition from KIF3AB. The rate of transport is therefore set by an equilibrium between a faster state, where only KIF17 motors move the train, and a slower state, where at least one KIF3AB motor on the train remains active in transport. The more frequently the faster state is accessed, the higher the overall velocity of the IFT train. We conclude that IFT velocity is governed by (i) the absolute numbers of each motor type on a given train, (ii) how prone KIF3AB is to dissociation from MTs relative to KIF17, and (iii) how prone both motors are to dissociation relative to binding MTs.

  5. Kinesin-2 KIF3AC and KIF3AB Can Drive Long-Range Transport along Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Rank, Katherine C.; Bensel, Brandon M.; Taylor, Keenan C.; Rayment, Ivan; Gilbert, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian KIF3AC is classified as a heterotrimeric kinesin-2 that is best known for organelle transport in neurons, yet in vitro studies to characterize its single molecule behavior are lacking. The results presented show that a KIF3AC motor that includes the native helix α7 sequence for coiled-coil formation is highly processive with run lengths of ∼1.23 μm and matching those exhibited by conventional kinesin-1. This result was unexpected because KIF3AC exhibits the canonical kinesin-2 neck-linker sequence that has been reported to be responsible for shorter run lengths observed for another heterotrimeric kinesin-2, KIF3AB. However, KIF3AB with its native neck linker and helix α7 is also highly processive with run lengths of ∼1.62 μm and exceeding those of KIF3AC and kinesin-1. Loop L11, a component of the microtubule-motor interface and implicated in activating ADP release upon microtubule collision, is significantly extended in KIF3C as compared with other kinesins. A KIF3AC encoding a truncation in KIF3C loop L11 (KIF3ACΔL11) exhibited longer run lengths at ∼1.55 μm than wild-type KIF3AC and were more similar to KIF3AB run lengths, suggesting that L11 also contributes to tuning motor processivity. The steady-state ATPase results show that shortening L11 does not alter kcat, consistent with the observation that single molecule velocities are not affected by this truncation. However, shortening loop L11 of KIF3C significantly increases the microtubule affinity of KIF3ACΔL11, revealing another structural and mechanistic property that can modulate processivity. The results presented provide new, to our knowledge, insights to understand structure-function relationships governing processivity and a better understanding of the potential of KIF3AC for long-distance transport in neurons. PMID:26445448

  6. Heterotrimeric kinesin-2 (KIF3) mediates transition zone and axoneme formation of mouse photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Wei, Yuxiao; Ronquillo, Cecinio C; Marc, Robert E; Yoder, Bradley K; Frederick, Jeanne M; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    Anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) employing kinesin-2 molecular motors has been implicated in trafficking of photoreceptor outer segment proteins. We generated embryonic retina-specific (prefix "emb") and adult tamoxifen-induced (prefix "tam") deletions of KIF3a and IFT88 in adult mice to study photoreceptor ciliogenesis and protein trafficking. In (emb)Kif3a(-/-) and in (emb)Ift88(-/-) mice, basal bodies failed to extend transition zones (connecting cilia) with outer segments, and visual pigments mistrafficked. In contrast, (tam)Kif3a(-/-) and (tam)Ift88(-/-) photoreceptor axonemes disintegrated slowly post-induction, starting distally, but rhodopsin and cone pigments trafficked normally for more than 2 weeks, a time interval during which the outer segment is completely renewed. The results demonstrate that visual pigments transport to the retinal outer segment despite removal of KIF3 and IFT88, and KIF3-mediated anterograde IFT is responsible for photoreceptor transition zone and axoneme formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Heterotrimeric Kinesin-2 (KIF3) Mediates Transition Zone and Axoneme Formation of Mouse Photoreceptors*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Wei, Yuxiao; Ronquillo, Cecinio C.; Marc, Robert E.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) employing kinesin-2 molecular motors has been implicated in trafficking of photoreceptor outer segment proteins. We generated embryonic retina-specific (prefix “emb”) and adult tamoxifen-induced (prefix “tam”) deletions of KIF3a and IFT88 in adult mice to study photoreceptor ciliogenesis and protein trafficking. In embKif3a−/− and in embIft88−/− mice, basal bodies failed to extend transition zones (connecting cilia) with outer segments, and visual pigments mistrafficked. In contrast, tamKif3a−/− and tamIft88−/− photoreceptor axonemes disintegrated slowly post-induction, starting distally, but rhodopsin and cone pigments trafficked normally for more than 2 weeks, a time interval during which the outer segment is completely renewed. The results demonstrate that visual pigments transport to the retinal outer segment despite removal of KIF3 and IFT88, and KIF3-mediated anterograde IFT is responsible for photoreceptor transition zone and axoneme formation. PMID:25825494

  8. Disruption of KIF3A in patient-derived glioblastoma cells: effects on ciliogenesis, hedgehog sensitivity, and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hoang-Minh, Lan B.; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Siebzehnrubl, Dorit; Ugartemendia, George; Futch, Hunter; Griffith, Benjamin; Breunig, Joshua J.; De Leon, Gabriel; Mitchell, Duane A.; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Reynolds, Brent A.; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    KIF3A, a component of the kinesin-2 motor, is necessary for the progression of diverse tumor types. This is partly due to its role in regulating ciliogenesis and cell responsiveness to sonic hedgehog (SHH). Notably, primary cilia have been detected in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor biopsies and derived cell lines. Here, we asked whether disrupting KIF3A in GBM cells affected ciliogenesis, in vitro growth and responsiveness to SHH, or tumorigenic behavior in vivo. We used a lentiviral vector to create three patient-derived GBM cell lines expressing a dominant negative, motorless form of Kif3a (dnKif3a). In all unmodified lines, we found that most GBM cells were capable of producing ciliated progeny and that dnKif3a expression in these cells ablated ciliogenesis. Interestingly, unmodified and dnKif3a-expressing cell lines displayed differential sensitivities and pathway activation to SHH and variable tumor-associated survival following mouse xenografts. In one cell line, SHH-induced cell proliferation was prevented in vitro by either expressing dnKif3a or inhibiting SMO signaling using cyclopamine, and the survival times of mice implanted with dnKif3a-expressing cells were increased. In a second line, expression of dnKif3a increased the cells' baseline proliferation while, surprisingly, sensitizing them to SHH-induced cell death. The survival times of mice implanted with these dnKif3a-expressing cells were decreased. Finally, expression of dnKif3a in a third cell line had no effect on cell proliferation, SHH sensitivity, or mouse survival times. These findings indicate that KIF3A is essential for GBM cell ciliogenesis, but its role in modulating GBM cell behavior is highly variable. PMID:26760767

  9. Disruption of KIF3A in patient-derived glioblastoma cells: effects on ciliogenesis, hedgehog sensitivity, and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hoang-Minh, Lan B; Deleyrolle, Loic P; Siebzehnrubl, Dorit; Ugartemendia, George; Futch, Hunter; Griffith, Benjamin; Breunig, Joshua J; De Leon, Gabriel; Mitchell, Duane A; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Reynolds, Brent A; Sarkisian, Matthew R

    2016-02-09

    KIF3A, a component of the kinesin-2 motor, is necessary for the progression of diverse tumor types. This is partly due to its role in regulating ciliogenesis and cell responsiveness to sonic hedgehog (SHH). Notably, primary cilia have been detected in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor biopsies and derived cell lines. Here, we asked whether disrupting KIF3A in GBM cells affected ciliogenesis, in vitro growth and responsiveness to SHH, or tumorigenic behavior in vivo. We used a lentiviral vector to create three patient-derived GBM cell lines expressing a dominant negative, motorless form of Kif3a (dnKif3a). In all unmodified lines, we found that most GBM cells were capable of producing ciliated progeny and that dnKif3a expression in these cells ablated ciliogenesis. Interestingly, unmodified and dnKif3a-expressing cell lines displayed differential sensitivities and pathway activation to SHH and variable tumor-associated survival following mouse xenografts. In one cell line, SHH-induced cell proliferation was prevented in vitro by either expressing dnKif3a or inhibiting SMO signaling using cyclopamine, and the survival times of mice implanted with dnKif3a-expressing cells were increased. In a second line, expression of dnKif3a increased the cells' baseline proliferation while, surprisingly, sensitizing them to SHH-induced cell death. The survival times of mice implanted with these dnKif3a-expressing cells were decreased. Finally, expression of dnKif3a in a third cell line had no effect on cell proliferation, SHH sensitivity, or mouse survival times. These findings indicate that KIF3A is essential for GBM cell ciliogenesis, but its role in modulating GBM cell behavior is highly variable.

  10. Functional Analysis of KIF3A and KIF3B during Spermiogenesis of Chinese Mitten Crab Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Wang, Qi; Wang, Da-Hui; Zhou, Hong; Hu, Yan-Jun; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Background Spermatogenesis represents the transformation process at the level of cellular development. KIF3A and KIF3B are believed to play some roles in the assembly and maintenance of flagella, intracellular transport of materials including organelles and proteins, and other unknown functions during this process. During spermatogenesis in Eriocheir sinensis, if the sperm shaping machinery is dependent on KIF3A and KIF3B remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings The cDNA of KIF3A and KIF3B were obtained by designing degenerate primers, 3′RACE, and 5′RACE. We detected the genetic presence of kif3a and kif3b in the heart, muscle, liver, gill, and testis of E. sinensis through RT-PCR. By western blot analysis, the protein presence of KIF3A and KIF3B in heart, muscle, gill, and testis reflected the content in protein level. Using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, we could track the dynamic location of KIF3A and KIF3B during different developmental phases of sperm. KIF3A and KIF3B were found surrounding the nucleus in early spermatids. In intermediate spermatids, these proteins expressed at high levels around the nucleus and extended to the final phase. During the nuclear shaping period, KIF3A and KIF3B reached their maximum in the late spermatids and were located around the nucleus and concentrated in the acrosome to some extent. Conclusions/Significance Our results revealed that KIF3A and KIF3B were involved in the nuclear and cellular morphogenesis at the levels of mRNA and protein. These proteins can potentially facilitate the intracellular transport of organelles, proteins, and other cargoes. The results represent the functions of KIF3A and KIF3B in the spermatogenesis of Crustacea and clarify phylogenetic relationships among the Decapoda. PMID:24870586

  11. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B)

    SciTech Connect

    Duangtum, Natapol; Junking, Mutita; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Cheunsuchon, Boonyarit; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} Impaired trafficking of kAE1 causes distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). {yields} The interaction between kAE1 and kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) is reported. {yields} The co-localization between kAE and KIF3B was detected in human kidney tissues. {yields} A marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane was observed when KIF3B was knockdown. {yields} KFI3B plays an important role in trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Impaired trafficking of human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to the basolateral membrane of {alpha}-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct leads to the defect of the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} exchange and the failure of proton (H{sup +}) secretion at the apical membrane of these cells, causing distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). In the sorting process, kAE1 interacts with AP-1 mu1A, a subunit of AP-1A adaptor complex. However, it is not known whether kAE1 interacts with motor proteins in its trafficking process to the plasma membrane or not. We report here that kAE1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) in kidney cells and a dileucine motif at the carboxyl terminus of kAE1 contributes to this interaction. We have also demonstrated that kAE1 co-localizes with KIF3B in human kidney tissues and the suppression of endogenous KIF3B in HEK293T cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases membrane localization of kAE1 but increases its intracellular accumulation. All results suggest that KIF3B is involved in the trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane of human kidney {alpha}-intercalated cells.

  12. Advanced cancer with situs inversus totalis associated with KIF3 complex deficiency: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Tomohiro; Maeta, Yoshihiko; Nakamura, Sei-ichi; Sawata, Takashi; Shimizu, Tetsu; Kishi, Kiyoshi; Miyasaka, Shigeto; Maeta, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis (SIT) is a relatively rare congenital anomaly, occurring at an incidence of 1 in 10 000-50 000 live births. Although there are some case reports of SIT with the presence of cancer, there are few reports on the relationship between SIT and cancer. However, the recent phylogenetic investigations of this condition suggest that this may be linked to the development and progression of cancer on the molecular level. The key elements are one of the intracellular motor proteins, the KIF3 complex, and the cell-adhesion factors N-cadherin and beta-catenin. We herein present the cases of advanced gastric cancer and lung cancer with SIT, and review the relationship between SIT and the development and progression of cancer.

  13. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  14. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B).

    PubMed

    Duangtum, Natapol; Junking, Mutita; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Cheunsuchon, Boonyarit; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2011-09-16

    Impaired trafficking of human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to the basolateral membrane of α-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct leads to the defect of the Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange and the failure of proton (H(+)) secretion at the apical membrane of these cells, causing distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). In the sorting process, kAE1 interacts with AP-1 mu1A, a subunit of AP-1A adaptor complex. However, it is not known whether kAE1 interacts with motor proteins in its trafficking process to the plasma membrane or not. We report here that kAE1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) in kidney cells and a dileucine motif at the carboxyl terminus of kAE1 contributes to this interaction. We have also demonstrated that kAE1 co-localizes with KIF3B in human kidney tissues and the suppression of endogenous KIF3B in HEK293T cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases membrane localization of kAE1 but increases its intracellular accumulation. All results suggest that KIF3B is involved in the trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane of human kidney α-intercalated cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. CB-08KIF3A IS ESSENTIAL FOR CILIOGENESIS, CILIA FUNCTION AND PROMOTES GLIOBLASTOMA PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Hoang-Minh, Lan; Deleyrolle, Loic; Ugartemendia, George; Breunig, Joshua; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Reynolds, Brent; Sarkisian, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent findings that cilia transduce diverse signaling pathways affecting cell proliferation, migration and survival, little is known about the influence of cilia or cilia-associated proteins in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We recently showed that primary cilia project from subsets of cells in GBM patient biopsies and derived cell lines. To determine if cilia contribute to GBM growth, we blocked ciliogenesis using a lentivirus expressing a dominant negative form of KIF3A, an essential ciliogenesis protein. We generated stable GBM cell lines (L0 and S3; representing different molecular subclasses) whereby dnKIF3A+ cells exhibited virtual complete loss of cilia compared to controls (confirmed by immunostaining and EM). Canonically, secreted Sonic hedgehog (SHH) ligand binds and activates receptor signaling cascades (e.g., smoothened (SMO)) within cilia to promote normal cell proliferation and tumor cell growth in specific developmental and pathological contexts, respectively. To examine the role of SHH in GBM proliferation, we exposed control and dnKIF3A+ L0 and S3 cells to saline or recombinant SHH. We found the number of L0 control cells significantly increased after SHH compared to saline, an effect blocked by pretreatment with cyclopamine (SMO inhibitor). However, SHH did not increase the number of L0 dnKIF3A+ cells. Interestingly, SHH exposure had no effect on S3 control cell numbers, despite observations that SHH signaling components (SMO and Gli3) were recruited to their cilia in response to SHH. This suggests GBM cilia are SHH-responsive but the downstream consequences of ciliary signaling may differ between cell lines. Notably, mice intracranially xenografted with L0 cells expressing dnKIF3A survived significantly longer than mice receiving control cells, and retained the loss of cilia phenotype in the tumors. Collectively, these data suggest KIF3A promotes GBM tumor progression, but the extent to which the effects are mediated by cilia and the

  16. Disruption of kif3a results in defective osteoblastic differentiation in dental mesenchymal stem/precursor cells via the Wnt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sicong; Chen, Guoqing; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Yu, Mei; Bao, Jinku; Tian, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The anterograde intraflagellar transport motor protein, kif3a, regulates the integrity of primary cilia and various cellular functions, however, the role of kif3a in dental mesenchymal stem/precursor cell differentiation remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the expression of kif3a was knocked down in human dental follicle cells (hDFCs) and human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) using short hairpin RNA. The results of subsequent immunofluorescence revealed that knocking down kif3a resulted in the loss of primary cilia, which led to impairment of substantial mineralization and expression of the differentiation-associated markers, including alkaline phosphatase, Runt-related transcription factor 2, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialophosphoprotein in the hDFCs and hDPCs. The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses showed that the expression levels of Wnt3a-mediated active β-catenin and lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 were attenuated, whereas the expression of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β was enhanced, in the kif3a-knockdown cells. In addition, exogenous Wnt3a partially rescued osteoblastic differentiation in the hDFCs and hDPCs. These results demonstrated that inhibition of kif3a in the hDFCs and hDPCs disrupted primary cilia formation and/or function, and indicated that kif3a is important in the differentiation of hDFCs and hDPCs through the Wnt pathway. These findings not only enhance current understanding of tooth development and diseases of tooth mineralization, but also indicate possible strategies to regulate mineralization during tooth repair and regeneration. PMID:27432616

  17. Artificial molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S; Wilson, Miriam R; Feringa, Ben L; Leigh, David A

    2017-05-09

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new development, significant advances have been made. In this review an overview is given of the principal designs of artificial molecular motors and their modes of operation. Although synthetic molecular motors have also found widespread application as (multistate) switches, we focus on the control of directional movement, both at the molecular scale and at larger magnitudes. We identify some key challenges remaining in the field.

  18. A novel role of KIF3b in the seminoma cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao-Qing; Xiao, Yu-Xi; She, Zhen-Yu; Tan, Fu-Qing; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2017-03-01

    KIF3b is a protein of the kinesin-2 family which plays an important role in intraflagellar transport. Testis cancer is a common cancer among young men. Its diagnostic rate is increasing and over half of the cases are seminomas. Many aspects of the mechanism and gene expression background of this cancer remain unclear. Using western-blotting and semi-quantitative PCR we found high protein levels of KIF3b enrichment in seminoma tissue despite the mRNA levels remaining equivalent to that of normal testicular tissues. The distribution of KIF3b was mainly in cells with division potential. Wound-healing assays and cell counting kit assays showed that the knockdown of KIF3b significantly suppressed cell migration ability, viability and number in HeLa cells. Immunofluorescence images during the cell cycle revealed that KIF3b tended to gather at the spindles and was enriched at the central spindle. This indicated that KIF3b may also have direct impacts upon spindle formation and cytokinesis. By counting the numbers of nuclei, spindles and cells, we found that the rates of multipolar division and multi-nucleation were raised in KIF3b-knockdown cells. In this way we demonstrate that KIF3b functions importantly in mitosis and may be essential to seminoma cell division and proliferation as well as being necessary for normal cell division. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Motors from DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turberfield, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    DNA is a wonderful material for nanoscale construction: its self-assembly can be programmed by making use of its information-carrying capability and its hybridization or hydrolysis can be used as to provide energy for synthetic molecular machinery. With DNA it is possible to design and build three-dimensional scaffolds, to attach molecular components to them with sub-nanometre precision-and then to make them move. I shall describe our work on autonomous, biomimetic molecular motors powered by chemical fuels and the use of synthetic molecular machinery to control covalent chemical synthesis. I shall demonstrate bipedal motors whose operation depends on the coordination of the chemomechanical cycles of two separate catalytic centres and burnt bridges motors that can be programmed to navigate networks of tracks. I shall also discuss the use of kinesin motor proteins to power synthetic devices.

  20. FLA8/KIF3B phosphorylation regulates kinesin-II interaction with IFT-B to control IFT entry and turnaround.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yinwen; Pang, Yunong; Wu, Qiong; Hu, Zhangfeng; Han, Xue; Xu, Yisheng; Deng, Haiteng; Pan, Junmin

    2014-09-08

    The assembly and maintenance of cilia depends on intraflagellar transport (IFT). Activated IFT motor kinesin-II enters the cilium with loaded IFT particles comprising IFT-A and IFT-B complexes. At the ciliary tip, kinesin-II becomes inactivated, and IFT particles are released. Moreover, the rate of IFT entry is dynamically regulated during cilium assembly. However, the regulatory mechanism of IFT entry and loading/unloading of IFT particles remains elusive. We show that the kinesin-II motor subunit FLA8, a homolog of KIF3B, is phosphorylated on the conserved S663 by a calcium-dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas. This phosphorylation disrupts the interaction between kinesin-II and IFT-B, inactivates kinesin-II and inhibits IFT entry, and is also required for IFT-B unloading at the ciliary tip. Furthermore, our data suggest that the IFT entry rate is controlled by regulation of the cellular level of phosphorylated FLA8. Therefore, FLA8 phosphorylation acts as a molecular switch to control IFT entry and turnaround.

  1. The kinesin-2 family member KIF3C regulates microtubule dynamics and is required for axon growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gumy, Laura F; Chew, Daniel J; Tortosa, Elena; Katrukha, Eugene A; Kapitein, Lukas C; Tolkovsky, Aviva M; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Fawcett, James W

    2013-07-10

    Axon regeneration after injury requires the extensive reconstruction, reorganization, and stabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton in the growth cones. Here, we identify KIF3C as a key regulator of axonal growth and regeneration by controlling microtubule dynamics and organization in the growth cone. KIF3C is developmentally regulated. Rat embryonic sensory axons and growth cones contain undetectable levels of KIF3C protein that is locally translated immediately after injury. In adult neurons, KIF3C is axonally transported from the cell body and is enriched at the growth cone where it preferentially binds to tyrosinated microtubules. Functionally, the interaction of KIF3C with EB3 is necessary for its localization at the microtubule plus-ends in the growth cone. Depletion of KIF3C in adult neurons leads to an increase in stable, overgrown and looped microtubules because of a strong decrease in the microtubule frequency of catastrophes, suggesting that KIF3C functions as a microtubule-destabilizing factor. Adult axons lacking KIF3C, by RNA interference or KIF3C gene knock-out, display an impaired axonal outgrowth in vitro and a delayed regeneration after injury both in vitro and in vivo. Murine KIF3C knock-out embryonic axons grow normally but do not regenerate after injury because they are unable to locally translate KIF3C. These data show that KIF3C is an injury-specific kinesin that contributes to axon growth and regeneration by regulating and organizing the microtubule cytoskeleton in the growth cone.

  2. DNA based molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Jens; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Kügel, Wolfgang; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the essential cellular processes such as polymerisation reactions, gene expression and regulation are governed by mechanical processes. Controlled mechanical investigations of these processes are therefore required in order to take our understanding of molecular biology to the next level. Single-molecule manipulation and force spectroscopy have over the last 15 years been developed into extremely powerful techniques. Applying these techniques to the investigation of proteins and DNA molecules has led to a mechanistic understanding of protein function on the level of single molecules. As examples for DNA based molecular machines we will describe single-molecule experiments on RNA polymerases as well as on the packaging of DNA into a viral capsid-a process that is driven by one of the most powerful molecular motors.

  3. Mechanochemistry of Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Zev

    2008-03-01

    Molecular motors lie at the heart of biological processes from DNA replication to vesicle transport. We seek to understand the physical mechanisms by which these nanoscale machines convert chemical energy into mechanical work. I will overview our ongoing use of single molecule tracking and manipulation techniques to observe and perturb substeps in the mechanochemical cycles of individual motors, before concentrating on our recent efforts to dissect the structural basis of a ``reverse gear'' in myosin VI. The basic actomyosin motor has been embellished, altered, and re-used many times through the evolution of diverse members of the myosin superfamily. Class VI myosins are highly specialized (-) end directed motors involved in a growing list of functions in animal cells, including endocytosis, cell migration, and maintenance of stereociliar membrane tension. How does myosin VI achieve reverse directionality, despite sharing extensive sequence and structural conservation with (+) end directed myosins? We generated a series of truncated myosin VI constructs and characterized the size and direction of the power stroke for each construct using dual-labeled gliding filament assays and optical trapping. Motors truncated near the end of the converter domain generate (+) end directed motion, whereas longer constructs move toward the (-) end, confirming the importance of a class-specific insert that redirects the lever arm. Our quantitative results suggest a surprising model in which the lever arm rotates ˜180^o during the power stroke. We are currently studying the behavior of engineered myosin VI constructs with artificial lever arms, in order to further challenge and refine our power stroke model.

  4. Combined Deletion of Vhl and Kif3a Accelerates Renal Cyst Formation.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Holger; Vicari, Daniele; Wild, Peter J; Frew, Ian J

    2015-11-01

    A subset of familial and sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) is believed to develop from cystic precursor lesions. Loss of function of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene (VHL) predisposes renal epithelial cells to loss of the primary cilium in response to specific signals. Because the primary cilium suppresses renal cyst formation, loss of the cilium may be an initiating event in the formation of ccRCC. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the consequences of inducible renal epithelium-specific deletion of Vhl together with ablation of the primary cilium via deletion of the kinesin family member 3A (Kif3a) gene. We developed a microcomputed tomography-based imaging approach to allow quantitative longitudinal monitoring of cystic burden, revealing that combined loss of Vhl and Kif3a shortened the latency of cyst initiation, increased the number of cysts per kidney, and increased the total cystic burden. In contrast with findings in other cystic models, cysts in Kif3a mutant mice did not display accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1α), and deletion of both Hif1a and Kif3a did not affect cyst development or progression. Vhl/Kif3a double mutation also increased the frequency of cysts that displayed multilayered epithelial growth, which correlated with an increased frequency of misoriented cystic epithelial cell divisions. These results argue against the involvement of HIF1α in promoting renal cyst growth and suggest that the formation of simple and atypical renal cysts that resemble ccRCC precursor lesions is greatly accelerated by the combined loss of Vhl and the primary cilium. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  5. Combined Deletion of Vhl and Kif3a Accelerates Renal Cyst Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Holger; Vicari, Daniele; Wild, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of familial and sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) is believed to develop from cystic precursor lesions. Loss of function of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene (VHL) predisposes renal epithelial cells to loss of the primary cilium in response to specific signals. Because the primary cilium suppresses renal cyst formation, loss of the cilium may be an initiating event in the formation of ccRCC. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the consequences of inducible renal epithelium–specific deletion of Vhl together with ablation of the primary cilium via deletion of the kinesin family member 3A (Kif3a) gene. We developed a microcomputed tomography–based imaging approach to allow quantitative longitudinal monitoring of cystic burden, revealing that combined loss of Vhl and Kif3a shortened the latency of cyst initiation, increased the number of cysts per kidney, and increased the total cystic burden. In contrast with findings in other cystic models, cysts in Kif3a mutant mice did not display accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1α), and deletion of both Hif1a and Kif3a did not affect cyst development or progression. Vhl/Kif3a double mutation also increased the frequency of cysts that displayed multilayered epithelial growth, which correlated with an increased frequency of misoriented cystic epithelial cell divisions. These results argue against the involvement of HIF1α in promoting renal cyst growth and suggest that the formation of simple and atypical renal cysts that resemble ccRCC precursor lesions is greatly accelerated by the combined loss of Vhl and the primary cilium. PMID:25788526

  6. Molecular Motors and Stochastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard

    The behavior of single molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin V, which move on linear filaments, involves a nontrivial coupling between the biochemical motor cycle and the stochastic movement. This coupling can be studied in the framework of nonuniform ratchet models which are characterized by spatially localized transition rates between the different internal states of the motor. These models can be classified according to their functional relationships between the motor velocity and the concentration of the fuel molecules. The simplest such relationship applies to two subclasses of models for dimeric kinesin and agrees with experimental observations on this molecular motor.

  7. Combined deletion of Vhl, Trp53 and Kif3a causes cystic and neoplastic renal lesions.

    PubMed

    Guinot, Anna; Lehmann, Holger; Wild, Peter J; Frew, Ian J

    2016-07-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene is bi-allelically inactivated in the majority of cases of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC); however, Vhl knockout mouse models do not recapitulate human ccRCC, implying that additional mutations are required for tumour formation. Mutational inactivation of VHL sensitises renal epithelial cells to lose the primary cilium in response to other mutations or extracellular stimuli. Loss of cilia is believed to represent a second hit in VHL mutant cells that causes the development of cystic lesions that, in some cases, can progress to ccRCC. Supporting this idea, genetic ablation of the primary cilium by deletion of the kinesin family member 3A (Kif3a) gene cooperates with loss of Vhl to accelerate cyst formation in mouse kidneys. Additionally, aged Vhl/Trp53 double-mutant mice develop renal cysts and tumours at a relatively low incidence, suggesting that there is a genetic cooperation between VHL and TP53 mutation in the development of ccRCC. Here we generated renal epithelium-specific Kif3a/Trp53 and Vhl/Kif3a/Trp53 mutant mice to investigate whether primary cilium deletion would accelerate the development of cystic precursor lesions or cause their progression to ccRCC. Longitudinal microcomputed tomography (μCT) imaging and histopathological analyses revealed an increased rate of cyst formation, increased proportion of cysts with proliferating cells, higher frequency of atypical cysts as well as the development of neoplasms in Vhl/Kif3a/Trp53 mutant kidneys compared to Kif3a/Trp53 or Vhl/Kif3a mutant kidneys. These findings demonstrate that primary cilium loss, in addition to Vhl and Trp53 losses, promotes the transition towards malignancy and provide further evidence that the primary cilium functions as a tumour suppressor organelle in the kidney. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Cooperative behavior of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Karen C; Stienen, Ger J M; Schmid, Christoph F

    2002-01-01

    Both experimental evidence and theoretical models for collective effects in the working mechanism of molecular motors are reviewed at three different levels, namely: (i) interaction between the two heads of double-headed motors, particularly in processive motors like kinesin, myosin V and myosin VI, (ii) cooperative regulation of muscle thin filaments by accessory proteins and the Ca2+ level, and (iii) collective dynamic effects stemming from the mechanical coupling of molecular motors within macroscopic structures such as muscle thick filaments or axonemes. We aim to bridge the gap between structural information at the molecular level and physiological data with accompanying specific models on the one hand, and general stochastic physical models for the action of molecular motors on the other hand. An underlying assumption is that while, ultimately, the function of molecular motors will be explainable by a quantitative description of specific intramolecular dynamics and intermolecular interactions, for some coarse grained larger scale dynamic features it will be sufficient and illuminating to construct physical models that are simplified to the bare essentials.

  9. Molecular Motors: A Theorist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Fisher, Michael E.

    Individual molecular motors, or motor proteins, are enzymatic molecules that convert chemical energy, typically obtained from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), into mechanical work and motion. Processive motor proteins, such as kinesin, dynein, and certain myosins, step unidirectionally along linear tracks, specifically microtubules and actin filaments, and play a crucial role in cellular transport processes, organization, and function. In this review some theoretical aspects of motor-protein dynamics are presented in the light of current experimental methods that enable the measurement of the biochemical and biomechanical properties on a single-molecule basis. After a brief discussion of continuum ratchet concepts, we focus on discrete kinetic and stochastic models that yield predictions for the mean velocity, V(F, [ATP],…), and other observables as a function of an imposed load force F, the ATP concentration, and other variables. The combination of appropriate theory with single-molecule observations should help uncover the mechanisms underlying motor-protein function.

  10. The mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Keller, D; Bustamante, C

    2000-02-01

    A theory of molecular motors is presented that explains how the energy released in single chemical reactions can generate mechanical motion and force. In the simplest case the fluctuating movements of a motor enzyme are well described by a diffusion process on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, where one dimension is a chemical reaction coordinate and the other is the spatial displacement of the motor. The coupling between chemistry and motion results from the shape of the surface, and motor velocities and forces result from diffusion currents on this surface. This microscopic description is shown to possess an equivalent kinetic mechanism in which the rate constants depend on externally applied forces. By using this equivalence we explore the characteristic properties of several broad classes of motor mechanisms and give general expressions for motor velocity versus load force for any member of each class. We show that in some cases simple plots of 1/velocity vs. 1/concentration can distinguish between classes of motor mechanisms and may be used to determine the step at which movement occurs.

  11. The mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, D; Bustamante, C

    2000-01-01

    A theory of molecular motors is presented that explains how the energy released in single chemical reactions can generate mechanical motion and force. In the simplest case the fluctuating movements of a motor enzyme are well described by a diffusion process on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, where one dimension is a chemical reaction coordinate and the other is the spatial displacement of the motor. The coupling between chemistry and motion results from the shape of the surface, and motor velocities and forces result from diffusion currents on this surface. This microscopic description is shown to possess an equivalent kinetic mechanism in which the rate constants depend on externally applied forces. By using this equivalence we explore the characteristic properties of several broad classes of motor mechanisms and give general expressions for motor velocity versus load force for any member of each class. We show that in some cases simple plots of 1/velocity vs. 1/concentration can distinguish between classes of motor mechanisms and may be used to determine the step at which movement occurs. PMID:10653770

  12. Fluctuation Relations for Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, David; Mallick, Kirone

    This review is focused on the application of specific fluctuation relations, such as the Gallavotti-Cohen relation, to ratchet models of a molecular motor. A special emphasis is placed on two-state models such as the flashing ratchet model. We derive the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation for these models and we discuss some of its implications.

  13. Linear and rotary molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kinosita, K

    1998-01-01

    A single molecule of F1-ATPase has been shown to be the smallest rotary motor ever found, with a central rotor of radius approximately 1 nm turning in a stator barrel of radius approximately 5 nm. Continuous rotation of the central gamma subunit was revealed under an optical microscope by attaching to gamma a huge marker, an actin filament. In a separate study, rotation of a sliding actin filament around its axis has been revealed by attaching a small probe, a single fluorescent dye molecule, to the actin filament and detecting the orientation of the fluorophore, and thus of the actin filament, through polarization imaging. The axial rotation was slow compared to the linear sliding, indicating that myosin does not 'walk' along the helical array of actin protomers but 'runs,' skipping many protomers. The two motors above, one rotary and the other linear, represent two extreme cases of the mode of motor operation: in the F1-ATPase the two partners, the rotor and stator, never detach from each other whereas myosin touches actin only occasionally. In considering the mechanisms of these and other molecular motors, distinction between bending and binding is important. The use of huge and small probes as described above should be useful in studies of protein machines in general, as a means of detecting conformational changes in a single protein molecule during function.

  14. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  15. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  16. Duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body and have many different and important roles. These micromachines move along filament tracks and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II (a nonprocessive molecular machine with a low duty ratio), cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of nonprocessive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track. © 2012 American Physical Society

  17. Duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body and have many different and important roles. These micromachines move along filament tracks and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II (a nonprocessive molecular machine with a low duty ratio), cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of nonprocessive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track.

  18. Molecular motors and their functions in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular motors that hydrolyze ATP and use the derived energy to generate force are involved in a variety of diverse cellular functions. Genetic, biochemical, and cellular localization data have implicated motors in a variety of functions such as vesicle and organelle transport, cytoskeleton dynamics, morphogenesis, polarized growth, cell movements, spindle formation, chromosome movement, nuclear fusion, and signal transduction. In non-plant systems three families of molecular motors (kinesins, dyneins, and myosins) have been well characterized. These motors use microtubules (in the case of kinesines and dyneins) or actin filaments (in the case of myosins) as tracks to transport cargo materials intracellularly. During the last decade tremendous progress has been made in understanding the structure and function of various motors in animals. These studies are yielding interesting insights into the functions of molecular motors and the origin of different families of motors. Furthermore, the paradigm that motors bind cargo and move along cytoskeletal tracks does not explain the functions of some of the motors. Relatively little is known about the molecular motors and their roles in plants. In recent years, by using biochemical, cell biological, molecular, and genetic approaches a few molecular motors have been isolated and characterized from plants. These studies indicate that some of the motors in plants have novel features and regulatory mechanisms. The role of molecular motors in plant cell division, cell expansion, cytoplasmic streaming, cell-to-cell communication, membrane trafficking, and morphogenesis is beginning to be understood. Analyses of the Arabidopsis genome sequence database (51% of genome) with conserved motor domains of kinesin and myosin families indicates the presence of a large number (about 40) of molecular motors and the functions of many of these motors remain to be discovered. It is likely that many more motors with novel regulatory

  19. Ratchet models of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaster, Nicole

    2003-09-01

    Transport processes in and of cells are of major importance for the survival of the organism. Muscles have to be able to contract, chromosomes have to be moved to opposing ends of the cell during mitosis, and organelles, which are compartments enclosed by membranes, have to be transported along molecular tracks. Molecular motors are proteins whose main task is moving other molecules.For that purpose they transform the chemical energy released in the hydrolysis of ATP into mechanical work. The motors of the cytoskeleton belong to the three super families myosin, kinesin and dynein. Their tracks are filaments of the cytoskeleton, namely actin and the microtubuli. Here, we examine stochastic models which are used for describing the movements of these linear molecular motors. The scale of the movements comprises the regime of single steps of a motor protein up to the directed walk along a filament. A single step bridges around 10 nm, depending on the protein, and takes about 10 ms, if there is enough ATP available. Our models comprise M states or conformations the motor can attain during its movement along a one-dimensional track. At K locations along the track transitions between the states are possible. The velocity of the protein depending on the transition rates between the single states can be determined analytically. We calculate this velocity for systems of up to four states and locations and are able to derive a number of rules which are helpful in estimating the behaviour of an arbitrary given system. Beyond that we have a look at decoupled subsystems, i.e., one or a couple of states which have no connection to the remaining system. With a certain probability a motor undergoes a cycle of conformational changes, with another probability an independent other cycle. Active elements in real transport processes by molecular motors will not be limited to the transitions between the states. In distorted networks or starting from the discrete Master equation of the

  20. Molecular Motors: Power Strokes Outperform Brownian Ratchets.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Jason A; Dill, Ken A

    2016-07-07

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy (typically from ATP hydrolysis) to directed motion and mechanical work. Their actions are often described in terms of "Power Stroke" (PS) and "Brownian Ratchet" (BR) mechanisms. Here, we use a transition-state model and stochastic thermodynamics to describe a range of mechanisms ranging from PS to BR. We incorporate this model into Hill's diagrammatic method to develop a comprehensive model of motor processivity that is simple but sufficiently general to capture the full range of behavior observed for molecular motors. We demonstrate that, under all conditions, PS motors are faster, more powerful, and more efficient at constant velocity than BR motors. We show that these differences are very large for simple motors but become inconsequential for complex motors with additional kinetic barrier steps.

  1. Loss of Glis2/NPHP7 causes kidney epithelial cell senescence and suppresses cyst growth in the Kif3a mouse model of cystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dongmei; Rauhauser, Alysha; Li, Binghua; Ren, Chongyu; McEnery, Kayla; Zhu, Jili; Chaki, Moumita; Vadnagara, Komal; Elhadi, Sarah; Jetten, Anton M; Igarashi, Peter; Attanasio, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Enlargement of kidney tubules is a common feature of multiple cystic kidney diseases in humans and mice. However, while some of these pathologies are characterized by cyst expansion and organ enlargement, in others, progressive interstitial fibrosis and kidney atrophy prevail. The Kif3a knockout mouse is an established non-orthologous mouse model of cystic kidney disease. Conditional inactivation of Kif3a in kidney tubular cells results in loss of primary cilia and rapid cyst growth. Conversely, loss of function of the gene GLIS2/NPHP7 causes progressive kidney atrophy, interstitial inflammatory infiltration, and fibrosis. Kif3a null tubular cells have unrestrained proliferation and reduced stabilization of p53 resulting in a loss of cell cycle arrest in the presence of DNA damage. In contrast, loss of Glis2 is associated with activation of checkpoint kinase 1, stabilization of p53, and induction of cell senescence. Interestingly, the cystic phenotype of Kif3a knockout mice is partially rescued by genetic ablation of Glis2 and pharmacological stabilization of p53. Thus, Kif3a is required for cell cycle regulation and the DNA damage response, whereas cell senescence is significantly enhanced in Glis2 null cells. Hence, cell senescence is a central feature in nephronophthisis type 7 and Kif3a is unexpectedly required for efficient DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Co-operative transport by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Müller, Melanie J I; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Intracellular transport is often driven co-operatively by several molecular motors, which may belong to one or several motor species. Understanding how these motors interact and what co-ordinates and regulates their movements is a central problem in studies of intracellular transport. A general theoretical framework for the analysis of such transport processes is described, which enables us to explain the behaviour of intracellular cargos by the transport properties of individual motors and their interactions. We review recent advances in the theoretical description of motor co-operativity and discuss related experimental results.

  3. Molecular switches and motors on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pathem, Bala Krishna; Claridge, Shelley A; Zheng, Yue Bing; Weiss, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular switches and motors respond structurally, electronically, optically, and/or mechanically to external stimuli, testing and potentially enabling extreme miniaturization of optoelectronic devices, nanoelectromechanical systems, and medical devices. The assembly of motors and switches on surfaces makes it possible both to measure the properties of individual molecules as they relate to their environment and to couple function between assembled molecules. In this review, we discuss recent progress in assembling molecular switches and motors on surfaces, measuring static and dynamic structures, understanding switching mechanisms, and constructing functional molecular materials and devices. As demonstrative examples, we choose a representative molecule from three commonly studied classes including molecular switches, photochromic molecules, and mechanically interlocked molecules. We conclude by offering perspectives on the future of molecular switches and motors on surfaces.

  4. Bio-inspired novel design principles for artificial molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Hugel, Thorsten; Lumme, Christina

    2010-10-01

    Since we have learned that biological organisms like ourselves are driven by tiny biological molecular motors we try to design and produce artificial molecular motors. However, despite the huge efforts since decades, man-made artificial molecular motors are still far from biological molecular motors or macroscopic motors with regard to performance, especially with respect to energy efficiency. This review highlights recent progress towards artificial molecular motors and discusses how their design and development can be guided by the design concepts of biological molecular motors or macroscopic motors.

  5. Molecular motors: thermodynamics and the random walk.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, N.; Imafuku, Y.; Tawada, K.

    2001-01-01

    The biochemical cycle of a molecular motor provides the essential link between its thermodynamics and kinetics. The thermodynamics of the cycle determine the motor's ability to perform mechanical work, whilst the kinetics of the cycle govern its stochastic behaviour. We concentrate here on tightly coupled, processive molecular motors, such as kinesin and myosin V, which hydrolyse one molecule of ATP per forward step. Thermodynamics require that, when such a motor pulls against a constant load f, the ratio of the forward and backward products of the rate constants for its cycle is exp [-(DeltaG + u(0)f)/kT], where -DeltaG is the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis and u(0) is the motor's step size. A hypothetical one-state motor can therefore act as a chemically driven ratchet executing a biased random walk. Treating this random walk as a diffusion problem, we calculate the forward velocity v and the diffusion coefficient D and we find that its randomness parameter r is determined solely by thermodynamics. However, real molecular motors pass through several states at each attachment site. They satisfy a modified diffusion equation that follows directly from the rate equations for the biochemical cycle and their effective diffusion coefficient is reduced to D-v(2)tau, where tau is the time-constant for the motor to reach the steady state. Hence, the randomness of multistate motors is reduced compared with the one-state case and can be used for determining tau. Our analysis therefore demonstrates the intimate relationship between the biochemical cycle, the force-velocity relation and the random motion of molecular motors. PMID:11600075

  6. Collective dynamics of interacting molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Campàs, O; Kafri, Y; Zeldovich, K B; Casademunt, J; Joanny, J-F

    2006-07-21

    The collective dynamics of N interacting processive molecular motors are considered theoretically when an external force is applied to the leading motor. We show, using a discrete lattice model, that the force-velocity curves strongly depend on the effective dynamic interactions between motors and differ significantly from those of a simple approach where the motors equally share the force. Moreover, they become essentially independent of the number of motors if N is large enough (N> or approximately 5 for conventional kinesin). We show that a two-state ratchet model has a very similar behavior to that of the coarse-grained lattice model with effective interactions. The general picture is unaffected by motor attachment and detachment events.

  7. Development of an electrically driven molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colin J; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-10-01

    For molecules to be used as components in molecular machinery, methods are required that couple individual molecules to external energy sources in order to selectively excite motion in a given direction. While significant progress has been made in the construction of synthetic molecular motors powered by light and by chemical reactions, there are few experimental examples of electrically driven molecular motors. To this end, we pioneered the use of a new, stable and tunable molecular rotor system based on surface-bound thioethers to comprehensively study many aspects of molecular rotation. As biological molecular motors often operate at interfaces, our synthetic system is especially amenable to microscopic interrogation as compared to solution-based systems. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory, we studied the rotation of surface-bound thioethers, which can be induced either thermally or by electrons from the STM tip in a two-terminal setup. Moreover, the temperature and electron flux can be adjusted to allow each rotational event to be monitored at the molecular scale in real time. This work culminated in the first experimental demonstration of a single-molecule electric motor, where the electrically driven rotation of a butyl methyl sulfide molecule adsorbed on a copper surface could be directionally biased. The direction and rate of the rotation are related to the chirality of both the molecule and the STM tip (which serves as the electrode), illustrating the importance of the symmetry of the metal contacts in atomic-scale electrical devices.

  8. Unidirectional rotary motion in achiral molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Štacko, Peter; Visser, Johan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2015-11-01

    Control of the direction of motion is an essential feature of biological rotary motors and results from the intrinsic chirality of the amino acids from which the motors are made. In synthetic autonomous light-driven rotary motors, point chirality is transferred to helical chirality, and this governs their unidirectional rotation. However, achieving directional rotary motion in an achiral molecular system in an autonomous fashion remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we report an achiral molecular motor in which the presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon atom proved to be sufficient for exclusive autonomous disrotary motion of two appended rotor moieties. Isomerization around the two double bonds enables both rotors to move in the same direction with respect to their surroundings—like wheels on an axle—demonstrating that autonomous unidirectional rotary motion can be achieved in a symmetric system.

  9. Unidirectional rotary motion in achiral molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Štacko, Peter; Visser, Johan; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-11-01

    Control of the direction of motion is an essential feature of biological rotary motors and results from the intrinsic chirality of the amino acids from which the motors are made. In synthetic autonomous light-driven rotary motors, point chirality is transferred to helical chirality, and this governs their unidirectional rotation. However, achieving directional rotary motion in an achiral molecular system in an autonomous fashion remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we report an achiral molecular motor in which the presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon atom proved to be sufficient for exclusive autonomous disrotary motion of two appended rotor moieties. Isomerization around the two double bonds enables both rotors to move in the same direction with respect to their surroundings--like wheels on an axle--demonstrating that autonomous unidirectional rotary motion can be achieved in a symmetric system.

  10. Universal optimal working cycles of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Wang, Zhisong

    2011-04-07

    Molecular motors capable of directional track-walking or rotation are abundant in living cells, and inspire the emerging field of artificial nanomotors. Some biomotors can convert 90% of free energy from chemical fuels into usable mechanical work, and the same motors still maintain a speed sufficient for cellular functions. This study exposed a new regime of universal optimization that amounts to a thermodynamically best working regime for molecular motors but is unfamiliar in macroscopic engines. For the ideal case of zero energy dissipation, the universally optimized working cycle for molecular motors is infinitely slow like Carnot cycle for heat engines. But when a small amount of energy dissipation reduces energy efficiency linearly from 100%, the speed is recovered exponentially due to Boltzmann's law. Experimental data on a major biomotor (kinesin) suggest that the regime of universal optimization has been largely approached in living cells, underpinning the extreme efficiency-speed trade-off in biomotors. The universal optimization and its practical approachability are unique thermodynamic advantages of molecular systems over macroscopic engines in facilitating motor functions. The findings have important implications for the natural evolution of biomotors as well as the development of artificial counterparts.

  11. Mechanochemical models of processive molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ganhui; Sun, Sean X.

    2012-05-01

    Motor proteins are the molecular engines powering the living cell. These nanometre-sized molecules convert chemical energy, both enthalpic and entropic, into useful mechanical work. High resolution single molecule experiments can now observe motor protein movement with increasing precision. The emerging data must be combined with structural and kinetic measurements to develop a quantitative mechanism. This article describes a modelling framework where quantitative understanding of motor behaviour can be developed based on the protein structure. The framework is applied to myosin motors, with emphasis on how synchrony between motor domains give rise to processive unidirectional movement. The modelling approach shows that the elasticity of protein domains are important in regulating motor function. Simple models of protein domain elasticity are presented. The framework can be generalized to other motor systems, or an ensemble of motors such as muscle contraction. Indeed, for hundreds of myosins, our framework can be reduced to the Huxely-Simmons description of muscle movement in the mean-field limit.

  12. Molecular motors: strategies to get along.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Roop; Gross, Steven P

    2004-11-23

    The majority of active transport in the cell is driven by three classes of molecular motors: the kinesin and dynein families that move toward the plus-end and minus-end of microtubules, respectively, and the unconventional myosin motors that move along actin filaments. Each class of motor has different properties, but in the cell they often function together. In this review we summarize what is known about their single-molecule properties and the possibilities for regulation of such properties. In view of new results on cytoplasmic dynein, we attempt to rationalize how these different classes of motors might work together as part of the intracellular transport machinery. We propose that kinesin and myosin are robust and highly efficient transporters, but with somewhat limited room for regulation of function. Because cytoplasmic dynein is less efficient and robust, to achieve function comparable to the other motors it requires a number of accessory proteins as well as multiple dyneins functioning together. This necessity for additional factors, as well as dynein's inherent complexity, in principle allows for greatly increased control of function by taking the factors away either singly or in combination. Thus, dynein's contribution relative to the other motors can be dynamically tuned, allowing the motors to function together differently in a variety of situations.

  13. Mechanoregulation of molecular motors in flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelha, Hermes

    2014-11-01

    Molecular motors are nano-biological machines responsible for exerting forces that drive movement in living organisms, from cargo transport to cell division and motility. Interestingly, despite the inherent complexity of many interacting motors, order and structure may arise naturally, as exemplified by the harmonic, self-organized undulatory motion of the flagellum. The real mechanisms behind this collective spontaneous oscillation are still unknown, and it is challenging task to measure experimentally the molecular motor dynamics within the flagellar structure in real time. In this talk we will explore different competing hypotheses that are capable of generating flagellar bending waves that ``resemble'' in-vitro observations, emphasizing the need for further mathematical analysis and model validation. It also highlight that this is a fertile and challenging area of inter-disciplinary research for applied mathematicians and demonstrates the importance of future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics of these motile cell appendages.

  14. Unidirectional molecular motor on a gold surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Delden, Richard A.; Ter Wiel, Matthijs K. J.; Pollard, Michael M.; Vicario, Javier; Koumura, Nagatoshi; Feringa, Ben L.

    2005-10-01

    Molecules capable of mimicking the function of a wide range of mechanical devices have been fabricated, with motors that can induce mechanical movement attracting particular attention. Such molecular motors convert light or chemical energy into directional rotary or linear motion, and are usually prepared and operated in solution. But if they are to be used as nanomachines that can do useful work, it seems essential to construct systems that can function on a surface, like a recently reported linear artificial muscle. Surface-mounted rotors have been realized and limited directionality in their motion predicted. Here we demonstrate that a light-driven molecular motor capable of repetitive unidirectional rotation can be mounted on the surface of gold nanoparticles. The motor design uses a chiral helical alkene with an upper half that serves as a propeller and is connected through a carbon-carbon double bond (the rotation axis) to a lower half that serves as a stator. The stator carries two thiol-functionalized `legs', which then bind the entire motor molecule to a gold surface. NMR spectroscopy reveals that two photo-induced cis-trans isomerizations of the central double bond, each followed by a thermal helix inversion to prevent reverse rotation, induce a full and unidirectional 360° rotation of the propeller with respect to the surface-mounted lower half of the system.

  15. Thermodynamics and kinetics of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R Dean

    2010-06-02

    Molecular motors are first and foremost molecules, governed by the laws of chemistry rather than of mechanics. The dynamical behavior of motors based on chemical principles can be described as a random walk on a network of states. A key insight is that any molecular motor in solution explores all possible motions and configurations at thermodynamic equilibrium. By using input energy and chemical design to prevent motion that is not wanted, what is left behind is the motion that is desired. This review is focused on two-headed motors such as kinesin and Myosin V that move on a polymeric track. By use of microscopic reversibility, it is shown that the ratio between the number of forward steps and the number of backward steps in any sufficiently long time period does not directly depend on the mechanical properties of the linker between the two heads. Instead, this ratio is governed by the relative chemical specificity of the heads in the front-versus-rear position for the fuel, adenosine triphosphate and its products, adenosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate. These insights have been key factors in the design of biologically inspired synthetic molecular walkers constructed out of DNA or out of small organic molecules.

  16. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R. Dean

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Molecular motors are first and foremost molecules, governed by the laws of chemistry rather than of mechanics. The dynamical behavior of motors based on chemical principles can be described as a random walk on a network of states. A key insight is that any molecular motor in solution explores all possible motions and configurations at thermodynamic equilibrium. By using input energy and chemical design to prevent motion that is not wanted, what is left behind is the motion that is desired. This review is focused on two-headed motors such as kinesin and Myosin V that move on a polymeric track. By use of microscopic reversibility, it is shown that the ratio between the number of forward steps and the number of backward steps in any sufficiently long time period does not directly depend on the mechanical properties of the linker between the two heads. Instead, this ratio is governed by the relative chemical specificity of the heads in the front-versus-rear position for the fuel, adenosine triphosphate and its products, adenosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate. These insights have been key factors in the design of biologically inspired synthetic molecular walkers constructed out of DNA or out of small organic molecules. PMID:20513383

  17. Hopping and stalling of processive molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Imafuku, Yasuhiro; Thomas, Neil; Tawada, Katsuhisa

    2009-11-07

    When a two-headed molecular motor such as kinesin is attached to its track by just a single head in the presence of an applied load, thermally activated head detachment followed by rapid re-attachment at another binding site can cause the motor to 'hop' backwards. Such hopping, on its own, would produce a linear force-velocity relation. However, for kinesin, we must incorporate hopping into the motor's alternating-head scheme, where we expect it to be most important for the state prior to neck-linker docking. We show that hopping can account for the backward steps, run length and stalling of conventional kinesin. In particular, although hopping does not hydrolyse ATP, we find that the hopping rate obeys the same Michaelis-Menten relation as the ATP hydrolysis rate. Hopping can also account for the reduced processivity observed in kinesins with mutations in their tubulin-binding loop. Indeed, it may provide a general mechanism for the breakdown of perfect processivity in two-headed molecular motors.

  18. Molecular motors and membrane traffic in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Ma, S; Fey, P; Chisholm, R L

    2001-03-15

    Phagocytosis and membrane traffic in general are largely dependent on the cytoskeleton and their associated molecular motors. The myosin family of motors, especially the unconventional myosins, interact with the actin cortex to facilitate the internalization of external materials during the early steps of phagocytosis. Members of the kinesin and dynein motor families, which mediate transport along microtubules (MTs), facilitate the intracellular processing of the internalized materials and the movement of membrane. Recent studies indicate that some unconventional myosins are also involved in membrane transport, and that the MT- and actin-dependent transport systems might interact with each other. Studies in Dictyostelium have led to the discovery of many motors involved in critical steps of phagocytosis and membrane transport. With the ease of genetic and biochemical approaches, the established functional analysis to test phagocytosis and vesicle transport, and the effort of the Dictyostelium cDNA and Genome Projects, Dictyostelium will continue to be a superb model system to study phagocytosis in particular and cytoskeleton and motors in general.

  19. Asymmetric synthesis of first generation molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Thomas M; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Zhao, Depeng; Lubbe, Anouk S; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-08-15

    A general enantioselective route to functionalized first generation molecular motors is described. An enantioselective protonation of the silyl enol ethers of indanones by a Au(I)BINAP complex sets the stage for a highly diastereoselective McMurry coupling as a second enhancement step for enantiomeric excess. In this way various functionalized overcrowded alkenes could be synthesized in good yields (up to 78%) and good to excellent enantiomeric excess (85% ee->98% ee) values.

  20. Propagation Modeling and Analysis of Molecular Motors in Molecular Communication.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2016-10-24

    Molecular motor networks (MMNs) are networks constructed from molecular motors to enable nanomachines to perform coordinated tasks of sensing, computing, and actuation at the nano- and micro- scales. Living cells are naturally enabled with this same mechanism to establish point-to-point communication between different locations inside the cell. Similar to a railway system, the cytoplasm contains an intricate infrastructure of tracks, named microtubules, interconnecting different internal components of the cell. Motor proteins, such as kinesin and dynein, are able to travel along these tracks directionally, carrying with them large molecules that would otherwise be unreliably transported across the cytoplasm using free diffusion. Molecular communication has been previously proposed for the design and study of MMNs. However, the topological aspects of MMNs, including the effects of branches, have been ignored in the existing studies. In this paper, a physical end-to-end model for MMNs is developed, considering the location of the transmitter node, the network topology, and the receiver nodes. The end-to-end gain and group delay are considered as the performance measures, and analytical expressions for them are derived. The analytical model is validated by Monte-Carlo simulations and the performance of MMNs is analyzed numerically. It is shown that, depending on their nature and position, MMN nodes create impedance effects that are critical for the overall performance. This model could be applied to assist the design of artificial MMNs and to study cargo transport in neurofilaments to elucidate brain diseases related to microtubule jamming.

  1. Propagation Modeling and Analysis of Molecular Motors in Molecular Communication.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2016-12-01

    Molecular motor networks (MMNs) are networks constructed from molecular motors to enable nanomachines to perform coordinated tasks of sensing, computing, and actuation at the nano- and micro- scales. Living cells are naturally enabled with this same mechanism to establish point-to-point communication between different locations inside the cell. Similar to a railway system, the cytoplasm contains an intricate infrastructure of tracks, named microtubules, interconnecting different internal components of the cell. Motor proteins, such as kinesin and dynein, are able to travel along these tracks directionally, carrying with them large molecules that would otherwise be unreliably transported across the cytoplasm using free diffusion. Molecular communication has been previously proposed for the design and study of MMNs. However, the topological aspects of MMNs, including the effects of branches, have been ignored in the existing studies. In this paper, a physical end-to-end model for MMNs is developed, considering the location of the transmitter node, the network topology, and the receiver nodes. The end-to-end gain and group delay are considered as the performance measures, and analytical expressions for them are derived. The analytical model is validated by Monte-Carlo simulations and the performance of MMNs is analyzed numerically. It is shown that, depending on their nature and position, MMN nodes create impedance effects that are critical for the overall performance. This model could be applied to assist the design of artificial MMNs and to study cargo transport in neurofilaments to elucidate brain diseases related to microtubule jamming.

  2. Ultrafast molecular motor driven nanoseparation and biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lard, Mercy; Ten Siethoff, Lasse; Kumar, Saroj; Persson, Malin; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Linke, Heiner; Månsson, Alf

    2013-10-15

    Portable biosensor systems would benefit from reduced dependency on external power supplies as well as from further miniaturization and increased detection rate. Systems built around self-propelled biological molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments hold significant promise in these regards as they are built from nanoscale components that enable nanoseparation independent of fluidic pumping. Previously reported microtubule-kinesin based devices are slow, however, compared to several existing biosensor systems. Here we demonstrate that this speed limitation can be overcome by using the faster actomyosin motor system. Moreover, due to lower flexural rigidity of the actin filaments, smaller features can be achieved compared to microtubule-based systems, enabling further miniaturization. Using a device designed through optimization by Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate extensive myosin driven enrichment of actin filaments on a detector area of less than 10 μm², with a concentration half-time of approximately 40 s. We also show accumulation of model analyte (streptavidin at nanomolar concentration in nanoliter effective volume) detecting increased fluorescence intensity within seconds after initiation of motor-driven transportation from capture regions. We discuss further optimizations of the system and incorporation into a complete biosensing workflow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Statistical kinetics of processive molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Mark Jacob

    1999-10-01

    We describe new theoretical and experimental tools for studying biological motor proteins at the single molecule scale. These tools enable measurements of molecular fuel economies, thereby providing insight into the pathways for conversion of biochemical energy into mechanical work. Kinesin is an ATP-dependent motor that moves processively along microtubules in discrete steps of 8 nm. How many molecules of ATP are hydrolysed per step? To determine this coupling ratio, we develop a fluctuation analysis, which relates the variance in records of mechanical displacement to the number of rate-limiting biochemical transitions in the engine cycle. Using fluctuation analysis and optical trapping interferometry, we determine that near zero load, single molecules of kinesin hydrolyse one ATP nucleotide per 8-nm step. To study kinesin behavior under load, we use a molecular force clamp, capable of maintaining constant loads on single kinesin motors moving processively. Analysis of records of motion under variable ATP concentrations and loads reveals that kinesin is a `tightly- coupled' motor, maintaining the 1:1 coupling ratio up to loads of ~ 5 pN. Moreover, a Michaelis-Menten analysis of velocity shows that the kinesin cycle contains at least two load- dependent transitions. The rate of one of these transitions affects ATP affinity, while the other does not. Therefore, the kinesin stall force must depend on the ATP concentration, as is demonstrated experimentally. These findings rule out existing theoretical models of kinesin motility. We develop a simple theoretical formalism describing a tightly-coupled mechanism for movement. This `energy-landscape' formalism quantitatively accounts for motile properties of RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme that transcribes DNA into RNA. The shapes of RNAP force-velocity curves indicate that biochemical steps limiting transcription rates at low loads do not generate movement. Modeling suggests that high loads may halt RNAP by promoting a

  4. High-Pressure Microscopy for Studying Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Movement is a fundamental characteristic of all living things. This biogenic function is carried out by various nanometer-sized molecular machines. Molecular motor is a typical molecular machinery in which the characteristic features of proteins are integrated; these include enzymatic activity, energy conversion, molecular recognition and self-assembly. These biologically important reactions occur with the association of water molecules that surround the motors. Applied pressures can alter the intermolecular interactions between the motors and water. In this chapter we describe the development of a high-pressure microscope and a new motility assay that enables the visualization of the motility of molecular motors under conditions of high-pressure. Our results demonstrate that applied pressure dynamically changes the motility of molecular motors such as kinesin, F1-ATPase and bacterial flagellar motors.

  5. The art of building small: from molecular switches to molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Feringa, Ben L

    2007-08-31

    Molecular switches and motors are essential components of artificial molecular machines. In this perspective, we discuss progress in our design, synthesis, and functioning of photochemical and electrochemical switches and chemical and light-driven molecular motors. Special emphasis is given to the control of a range of functions and properties, including luminescence, self-assembly, motion, color, conductance, transport, and chirality. We will also discuss our efforts to control mechanical movement at the molecular level, a feature that is at the heart of molecular motors and machines. The anchoring of molecular motors on surfaces and molecular motors at work are discussed.

  6. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Boon, N J; Hoyle, R B

    2012-08-28

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)] on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  7. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, N. J.; Hoyle, R. B.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)], 10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  8. Kif3a controls murine nephron number via GLI3 repressor, cell survival, and gene expression in a lineage-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Chi, Lijun; Galtseva, Alevtina; Chen, Lin; Mo, Rong; Hui, Chi-Chung; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2013-01-01

    The primary cilium is required during early embryo patterning, epithelial tubulogenesis, and growth factor-dependent signal transduction. The requirement for primary cilia during renal epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions that give rise to nephrons is undefined. Here, we used Cre-mediated recombination to generate mice with Kif3a deficiency targeted to the ureteric and/or metanephric mesenchyme cell lineages in the embryonic kidney. Gradual loss of primary cilia in either lineage leads to a phenotype of reduced nephron number. Remarkably, in addition to cyst formation, loss of primary cilia in the ureteric epithelial cell leads to decreased expression of Wnt11 and Ret and reduced ureteric branching. Constitutive expression of GLI3 repressor (Gli3(Δ699/+) ) rescues these abnormalities. In embryonic metanephric mesenchyme cells, Kif3a deficiency limits survival of nephrogenic progenitor cells and expression of genes required for nephron formation. Together, our data demonstrate that Kif3a controls nephron number via distinct cell lineage-specific mechanisms.

  9. Kif3a Controls Murine Nephron Number Via GLI3 Repressor, Cell Survival, and Gene Expression in a Lineage-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Lijun; Galtseva, Alevtina; Chen, Lin; Mo, Rong; Hui, Chi-chung; Rosenblum, Norman D.

    2013-01-01

    The primary cilium is required during early embryo patterning, epithelial tubulogenesis, and growth factor-dependent signal transduction. The requirement for primary cilia during renal epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions that give rise to nephrons is undefined. Here, we used Cre-mediated recombination to generate mice with Kif3a deficiency targeted to the ureteric and/or metanephric mesenchyme cell lineages in the embryonic kidney. Gradual loss of primary cilia in either lineage leads to a phenotype of reduced nephron number. Remarkably, in addition to cyst formation, loss of primary cilia in the ureteric epithelial cell leads to decreased expression of Wnt11 and Ret and reduced ureteric branching. Constitutive expression of GLI3 repressor (Gli3Δ699/+) rescues these abnormalities. In embryonic metanephric mesenchyme cells, Kif3a deficiency limits survival of nephrogenic progenitor cells and expression of genes required for nephron formation. Together, our data demonstrate that Kif3a controls nephron number via distinct cell lineage-specific mechanisms. PMID:23762375

  10. Theoretical analysis of dynamic processes for interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-01

    Biological transport is supported by the collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by carrying out an analysis of a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes, in which interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. This allows us to explicitly connect microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. A theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that the dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on the interactions, and that the correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motor transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  11. Theoretical Analysis of Dynamic Processes for Interacting Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-13

    Biological transport is supported by collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by analyzing a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes where interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. It allows us to connect explicitly microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. Theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on interactions, and correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motors transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  12. Kinesin-2 family motors in the unusual photoreceptor cilium.

    PubMed

    Malicki, Jarema; Besharse, Joseph C

    2012-12-15

    This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of kinesin-2 family motors in vertebrate photoreceptor development. Zebrafish photoreceptors develop by the 3rd day of embryogenesis, making it possible to study mutant phenotypes without the use of conditional alleles. Recent work using a zebrafish kif3b mutant allele validates the concept that the heterotrimeric kinesin II motor is generally required for ciliogenesis. In zebrafish photoreceptors, however, loss of kif3b function delays but does not block cilium formation. This is thought to occur because both kif3b or kif3c can dimerize with kif3a and function redundantly. The second ciliary kinesin thought to function in photoreceptor cells is kif17. Prior work has shown that either morpholino knockdown of this gene or the overexpression of its dominant negative form can reduce or delay photoreceptor cilium development without any evident impact on ciliogenesis in general. This has led to the idea that kif17 may play an important role only in some specialized cilium types, such the one in photoreceptor cells. In a recently identified kif17 mutant, however, photoreceptor outer segments are formed by 5 dpf and an obvious delay of outer segment formation is seen only at the earliest stage analyzed (3 dpf). This work suggests that kif17 plays a significant role mainly at an early stage of photoreceptor development. Taken together, these studies lead to an intriguing concept that as they differentiate photoreceptors alter their kinesin repertoire. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermodynamics and kinetics of a molecular motor ensemble.

    PubMed

    Baker, J E; Thomas, D D

    2000-10-01

    If, contrary to conventional models of muscle, it is assumed that molecular forces equilibrate among rather than within molecular motors, an equation of state and an expression for energy output can be obtained for a near-equilibrium, coworking ensemble of molecular motors. These equations predict clear, testable relationships between motor structure, motor biochemistry, and ensemble motor function, and we discuss these relationships in the context of various experimental studies. In this model, net work by molecular motors is performed with the relaxation of a near-equilibrium intermediate step in a motor-catalyzed reaction. The free energy available for work is localized to this step, and the rate at which this free energy is transferred to work is accelerated by the free energy of a motor-catalyzed reaction. This thermodynamic model implicitly deals with a motile cell system as a dynamic network (not a rigid lattice) of molecular motors within which the mechanochemistry of one motor influences and is influenced by the mechanochemistry of other motors in the ensemble.

  14. Thermodynamics and kinetics of a molecular motor ensemble.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J E; Thomas, D D

    2000-01-01

    If, contrary to conventional models of muscle, it is assumed that molecular forces equilibrate among rather than within molecular motors, an equation of state and an expression for energy output can be obtained for a near-equilibrium, coworking ensemble of molecular motors. These equations predict clear, testable relationships between motor structure, motor biochemistry, and ensemble motor function, and we discuss these relationships in the context of various experimental studies. In this model, net work by molecular motors is performed with the relaxation of a near-equilibrium intermediate step in a motor-catalyzed reaction. The free energy available for work is localized to this step, and the rate at which this free energy is transferred to work is accelerated by the free energy of a motor-catalyzed reaction. This thermodynamic model implicitly deals with a motile cell system as a dynamic network (not a rigid lattice) of molecular motors within which the mechanochemistry of one motor influences and is influenced by the mechanochemistry of other motors in the ensemble. PMID:11023881

  15. An electromechanical model of myosin molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tadashi

    2003-12-21

    There is a long-running debate on the working mechanism of myosin molecular motors, which, by interacting with actin filaments, convert the chemical energy of ATP into a variety of mechanical work. After the development of technologies for observing and manipulating individual working molecules, experimental results negating the widely accepted 'lever-arm hypothesis' have been reported. In this paper, based on the experimental results so far accumulated, an alternative hypothesis is proposed, in which motor molecules are modelled as electromechanical components that interact with each other through electrostatic force. Electrostatic attractive force between myosin and actin is assumed to cause a conformational change in the myosin head during the attachment process. An elastic energy resulting from the conformational change then produces the power stroke. The energy released at the ATP hydrolysis is mainly used to detach the myosin head from actin filaments. The mechanism presented in this paper is compatible with the experimental results contradictory to the previous theories. It also explains the behavior of myosins V and VI, which are engaged in cellular transport and move processively along actin filaments.

  16. Length regulation of active biopolymers by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Johann, Denis; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Kruse, Karsten

    2012-06-22

    For biopolymers like cytoskeletal actin filaments and microtubules, assembly and disassembly are inherently dissipative processes. Molecular motors can affect the rates of subunit removal at filament ends. We introduce a driven lattice-gas model to study the effects of motor-induced depolymerization on the length of active biopolymers and find that increasing motor activity sharpens unimodal steady-state length distributions. Furthermore, for sufficiently fast moving motors, the relative width of the length distribution is determined only by the attachment rate of motors. Our results show how established molecular processes can be used to robustly regulate the size of cytoskeletal structures like mitotic spindles.

  17. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons.

  18. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons. PMID:27570482

  19. Universal aspects of the chemomechanical coupling for molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Lipowsky, R

    2000-11-13

    The directed movement of molecular motors is studied theoretically within a general class of nonuniform ratchet models in which the motor can attain M internal states and undergo transitions between these states at K spatial locations. The functional relationship between the motor velocity and the concentration of the fuel molecule is analyzed for arbitrary values of M and K. This relationship is found to exhibit universal features which depend on the number of unbalanced transitions per motor cycle arising from the enzymatic motor activity. This agrees with experimental results on dimeric kinesin and is predicted to apply to other cytoskeletal motors.

  20. Distinct transport regimes for two elastically coupled molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2012-05-18

    Cooperative cargo transport by two molecular motors involves an elastic motor-motor coupling, which can reduce the motors' velocity and/or enhance their unbinding from the filament. We show theoretically that these interference effects lead, in general, to four distinct transport regimes. In addition to a weak coupling regime, kinesin and dynein motors are found to exhibit a strong coupling and an enhanced unbinding regime, whereas myosin motors are predicted to attain a reduced velocity regime. All of these regimes, which we derive by explicit calculations and general time scale arguments, can be explored experimentally by varying the elastic coupling strength.

  1. A general two-cycle network model of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2009-09-01

    Molecular motors are single macromolecules that generate forces at the piconewton range and nanometer scale. They convert chemical energy into mechanical work by moving along filamentous structures. In this paper, we study the velocity of two-head molecular motors in the framework of a mechanochemical network theory. The network model, a generalization of the recently work of Liepelt and Lipowsky [Steffen Liepelt, Reinhard Lipowsky, Kinesins network of chemomechanical motor cycles, Physical Review Letters 98 (25) (2007) 258102], is based on the discrete mechanochemical states of a molecular motor with multiple cycles. By generalizing the mathematical method developed by Fisher and Kolomeisky for a single cycle motor [Michael E. Fisher, Anatoly B. Kolomeisky, Simple mechanochemistry describes the dynamics of kinesin molecules, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 98 (14) (2001) 7748-7753], we are able to obtain an explicit formula for the velocity of a molecular motor.

  2. Unidirectional light-driven molecular motors based on overcrowded alkenes.

    PubMed

    Cnossen, Arjen; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, interest in nanotechnology has led to the design and synthesis of a toolbox of nanoscale versions of macroscopic devices and components. In molecular nanotechnology, linear motors based on rotaxanes and rotary motors based on overcrowded alkenes are particularly promising for performing work at the nanoscale. In this chapter, progress on light-driven molecular motors based on overcrowded alkenes is reviewed. Both the so-called first and second generation molecular motors are discussed, as well as their potential applications.

  3. Quantum dynamics of light-driven chiral molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Shin-ichiro; Hoki, Kunihito; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2009-03-21

    The results of theoretical studies on quantum dynamics of light-driven molecular motors with internal rotation are presented. Characteristic features of chiral motors driven by a non-helical, linearly polarized electric field of light are explained on the basis of symmetry argument. The rotational potential of the chiral motor is characterized by a ratchet form. The asymmetric potential determines the directional motion: the rotational direction is toward the gentle slope of the asymmetric potential. This direction is called the intuitive direction. To confirm the unidirectional rotational motion, results of quantum dynamical calculations of randomly-oriented molecular motors are presented. A theoretical design of the smallest light-driven molecular machine is presented. The smallest chiral molecular machine has an optically driven engine and a running propeller on its body. The mechanisms of transmission of driving forces from the engine to the propeller are elucidated by using a quantum dynamical treatment. The results provide a principle for control of optically-driven molecular bevel gears. Temperature effects are discussed using the density operator formalism. An effective method for ultrafast control of rotational motions in any desired direction is presented with the help of a quantum control theory. In this method, visible or UV light pulses are applied to drive the motor via an electronic excited state. A method for driving a large molecular motor consisting of an aromatic hydrocarbon is presented. The molecular motor is operated by interactions between the induced dipole of the molecular motor and the electric field of light pulses.

  4. Motor Proteins and Molecular Motors: How to Operate Machines at Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-01-01

    Several classes of biological molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical work are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. These nanometer-sized machines operate in noisy stochastic isothermal environment, strongly supporting fundamental cellular processes such as transfer of genetic information, transport, organization and functioning. In last two decades motor proteins have become a subject of intense research efforts that were aimed to uncover fundamental principles and mechanisms of molecular motors dynamics. In this review, we critically discuss a recent progress in experimental and theoretical studies on motor proteins. Our focus is on analyzing fundamental concepts and ideas that have been utilized for explaining non-equilibrium nature and mechanisms of molecular motors. PMID:24100357

  5. Motor proteins and molecular motors: how to operate machines at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2013-11-20

    Several classes of biological molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical work are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. These nanometer-sized machines operate in noisy stochastic isothermal environments, strongly supporting fundamental cellular processes such as the transfer of genetic information, transport, organization and functioning. In the past two decades motor proteins have become a subject of intense research efforts, aimed at uncovering the fundamental principles and mechanisms of molecular motor dynamics. In this review, we critically discuss recent progress in experimental and theoretical studies on motor proteins. Our focus is on analyzing fundamental concepts and ideas that have been utilized to explain the non-equilibrium nature and mechanisms of molecular motors.

  6. Collective alignment of polar filaments by molecular motors.

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebert, F.; Aranson, I. S.; Vershinin, M.; Gross, S. P.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of California at Irvine

    2009-04-01

    We study the alignment of polar biofilaments, such as microtubules and actin, subject to the action of multiple molecular motors attached simultaneously to more than one filament. Focusing on a paradigm model of only two filaments interacting with multiple motors, we were able to investigate in detail the alignment dynamics. While almost no alignment occurs in the case of a single motor, the filaments become rapidly aligned due to the collective action of the motors. Our analysis shows that the alignment time is governed by the number of bound motors and the magnitude of the motors stepping fluctuations. We predict that the time scale of alignment is in the order of seconds, much faster than that reported for passive crosslink-induced bundling. In vitro experiments on the alignment of microtubules by multiple-motor covered beads are in qualitative agreement. We also discuss another mode of fast alignment of filaments, namely the cooperation between motors and passive crosslinks.

  7. Collective alignment of polar filaments by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Ziebert, F; Vershinin, M; Gross, S P; Aranson, I S

    2009-04-01

    We study the alignment of polar biofilaments, such as microtubules and actin, subject to the action of multiple molecular motors attached simultaneously to more than one filament. Focusing on a paradigm model of only two filaments interacting with multiple motors, we were able to investigate in detail the alignment dynamics. While almost no alignment occurs in the case of a single motor, the filaments become rapidly aligned due to the collective action of the motors. Our analysis shows that the alignment time is governed by the number of bound motors and the magnitude of the motors' stepping fluctuations. We predict that the time scale of alignment is in the order of seconds, much faster than that reported for passive crosslink-induced bundling. In vitro experiments on the alignment of microtubules by multiple-motor covered beads are in qualitative agreement. We also discuss another mode of fast alignment of filaments, namely the cooperation between motors and passive crosslinks.

  8. Cargo transport: molecular motors navigate a complex cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jennifer L; Ali, M Yusuf; Warshaw, David M

    2008-02-01

    Intracellular cargo transport requires microtubule-based motors, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein, and the actin-based myosin motors to maneuver through the challenges presented by the filamentous meshwork that comprises the cytoskeleton. Recent in vitro single molecule biophysical studies have begun to explore this process by characterizing what occurs as these tiny molecular motors happen upon an intersection between two cytoskeletal filaments. These studies, in combination with in vivo work, define the mechanism by which molecular motors exchange cargo while traveling between filamentous tracks and deliver it to its destination when going from the cell center to the periphery and back again.

  9. Exploiting molecular motors as nanomachines: the mechanisms of de novo and re-engineered cytoskeletal motors.

    PubMed

    DelRosso, Nicole V; Derr, Nathan D

    2017-08-01

    Cytoskeletal molecular motors provide exciting proof that nanoscale transporters can be highly efficient, moving for microns along filamentous tracks by hydrolyzing ATP to fuel nanometer-size steps. For nanotechnology, such conversion of chemical energy into productive work serves as an enticing platform for re-purposing and re-engineering. It also provides a roadmap for successful molecular mechanisms that can be mimicked to create de novo molecular motors for nanotechnology applications. Here we focus specifically on how the mechanisms of molecular motors are being re-engineered for greater control over their transport parameters. We then discuss mechanistic work to create fully synthetic motors de novo and conclude with future directions in creating novel motor systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular motors as an auto-oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Ishiwata, Shin’ichi; Shimamoto, Yuta; Suzuki, Madoka

    2010-01-01

    The organization of biomotile systems possesses structural and functional hierarchy, building up from single molecules via protein assemblies and cells further up to an organ. A typical example is the hierarchy of cardiac muscle, on the top of which is the heart. The heartbeat is supported by the rhythmic contraction of the muscle cells that is controlled by the Ca2+ oscillation triggered by periodic electrical excitation of pacemaker cells. Thus, it is usually believed that the heartbeat is governed by the control system based on a sequential one-way chain with the electrical∕chemical information transfer from the upper to the lower level of hierarchy. On the other hand, it has been known for many years that the contractile system of muscle, i.e., skinned muscle fibers and myofibrils, itself possesses the auto-oscillatory properties even in the constant chemical environment. A recent paper [Plaçais, et al. (2009), Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 158102] demonstrated the auto-oscillatory movement∕tension development in an in vitro motility assay composed of a single actin filament and randomly distributed myosin II molecules, suggesting that the auto-oscillatory properties are inherent to the contractile proteins. Here we discuss how the molecular motors may acquire the higher-ordered auto-oscillatory properties while stepping up the staircase of hierarchy. PMID:21119762

  11. Helicases as molecular motors: An insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuteja, Narendra; Tuteja, Renu

    2006-12-01

    Helicases are one of the smallest motors of biological system, which harness the chemical free energy of ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the opening of energetically stable duplex nucleic acids and thereby are involved in almost all aspect of nucleic acid metabolism including replication, repair, recombination, transcription, translation, and ribosome biogenesis. Basically, they break the hydrogen bonding between the duplex helix and translocate unidirectionally along the bound strand. Mostly all the helicases contain some conserved signature motifs, which act as an engine to power the unwinding. After the discovery of the first prokaryotic DNA helicase from Escherichia coli bacteria in 1976 and the first eukaryotic one from the lily plant in 1978, many more (>100) have been isolated. All the helicases share some common properties, including nucleic acid binding, NTP hydrolysis and unwinding of the duplex. Many helicases have been crystallized and their structures have revealed an underlying common structural fold for their function. The defects in helicases gene have also been reported to be responsible for variety of human genetic disorders, which can lead to cancer, premature aging or mental retardation. Recently, a new role of a helicase in abiotic stress signaling in plant has been discovered. Overall, helicases act as essential molecular tools for cellular machinery and help in maintaining the integrity of genome. Here an overview of helicases has been covered which includes history, biochemical assay, properties, classification, role in human disease and mechanism of unwinding and translocation.

  12. Molecular motors--a paradigm for mutant analysis.

    PubMed

    Endow, S A

    2000-04-01

    Molecular motors perform essential functions in the cell and have the potential to provide insights into the basis of many important processes. A unique property of molecular motors is their ability to convert energy from ATP hydrolysis into work, enabling the motors to bind to and move along cytoskeletal filaments. The mechanism of energy conversion by molecular motors is not yet understood and may lead to the discovery of new biophysical principles. Mutant analysis could provide valuable information, but it is not obvious how to obtain mutants that are informative for study. The analysis presented here points out several strategies for obtaining mutants by selection from molecular or genetic screens, or by rational design. Mutants that are expected to provide important information about the motor mechanism include ATPase mutants, which interfere with the nucleotide hydrolysis cycle, and uncoupling mutants, which unlink basic motor activities and reveal their interdependence. Natural variants can also be exploited to provide unexpected information about motor function. This general approach to uncovering protein function by analysis of informative mutants is applicable not only to molecular motors, but to other proteins of interest.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of single and coupled synthetic molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-M; Zuckermann, M

    2012-11-01

    We use a minimal model to study the processive motion of coupled synthetic molecular motors along a DNA track and we present data from Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulations based on this model. The model was originally proposed by Bromley et al. [HFSP J. 3, 204 (2009)] for studying the properties of a synthetic protein motor, the "Tumbleweed" (TW), and involves rigid Y-shaped motors diffusively rotating along the track while controlled by a series of periodically injected ligand pulses into the solution. The advantage of the model is that it mimics the mechanical properties of the TW motor in detail. Both the average first passage time which measures the diffusive motion of the motors, and the average dwell time on the track which measures their processivity are investigated by varying the parameters of the model. The latter includes ligand concentration and the range and strength of the binding interaction between motors and the track. In particular, it is of experimental interest to study the dependence of these dynamic time scales of the motors on the ligand concentration. Single rigid TW motors were first studied since no previous MC simulations of these motors have been performed. We first studied single motors for which we found a logarithmic decrease of the average first passage time and a logarithmic increase of the average dwell time with increasing ligand concentration. For two coupled motors, the dependence on ligand concentration is still logarithmic for the average first passage time but becomes linear for the average dwell time. This suggests a much greater stability in the processive motion of coupled motors as compared to single motors in the limit of large ligand concentration. By increasing the number of coupled motors, m, it was found that the average first passage time of the coupled motors only increases slowly with m while the average dwell time increases exponentially with m. Thus the stability of coupled motors on the track can be

  14. Maximum directionality and systematic classification of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Wang, Zhisong

    2011-03-21

    Track-walking molecular motors are widely used in living cells for transport purposes, and artificial mimics are being vigorously pursued in engineered molecular systems. The defining character for a motor is its intrinsic capability to utilize energy input to rectify a sustained directional motion out of stochastic thermal motion. The energy injection can be coupled to a motor's mechanical steps in different ways, leading to different motor mechanisms. We derive here a formulation for maximum motor performance in terms of a new quantity called directionality based on a general representation of the track-walking motors. Compared to performance measures like velocity and processivity, directionality is a cleaner and more robust indicator of the rectification mechanism that amounts to a motor's inner design/working principles. Meaningful and distinctly different upper limits of directionality were found to exist for a wide variety of experimentally demonstrated and theoretically proposed motors and their biological counterparts. The maximum directionality provides a conceptual framework by which all of these different motors were quantitatively compared and systematically classified according to their mechanistic advancement. The results yield a series of guidelines for artificial motor development, and expose important evolutionary traits of biomotors.

  15. Models of protein linear molecular motors for dynamic nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V; Nicolau, Dan V

    2009-02-01

    Protein molecular motors are natural nano-machines that convert the chemical energy from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate into mechanical work. These efficient machines are central to many biological processes, including cellular motion, muscle contraction and cell division. The remarkable energetic efficiency of the protein molecular motors coupled with their nano-scale has prompted an increasing number of studies focusing on their integration in hybrid micro- and nanodevices, in particular using linear molecular motors. The translation of these tentative devices into technologically and economically feasible ones requires an engineering, design-orientated approach based on a structured formalism, preferably mathematical. This contribution reviews the present state of the art in the modelling of protein linear molecular motors, as relevant to the future design-orientated development of hybrid dynamic nanodevices.

  16. Fluctuation theorem for the flashing ratchet model of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, D.; Mallick, K.

    2009-08-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into mechanical energy. A well-studied model of a molecular motor is the flashing ratchet model. We show that this model exhibits a fluctuation relation known as the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry. Our study highlights the fact that the symmetry is present only if the chemical and mechanical degrees of freedom are both included in the description.

  17. Fluctuation theorem for the flashing ratchet model of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, D; Mallick, K

    2009-08-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into mechanical energy. A well-studied model of a molecular motor is the flashing ratchet model. We show that this model exhibits a fluctuation relation known as the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry. Our study highlights the fact that the symmetry is present only if the chemical and mechanical degrees of freedom are both included in the description.

  18. Molecular motors: a traffic cop within?

    PubMed Central

    Welte, M. A.; Gross, S. P.

    2008-01-01

    Intracellular transport along microtubules is often bidirectional, employing multiple plus- and minus-end directed motors. How cells regulate such transport in time and space is a fundamental but unsolved question in cell biology. A recent paper presents a new modeling approach to predict how much of transport can be understood just from our knowledge of the motors involved. The model can generate strikingly complex patterns of motion, mimicking key aspects of cargo transport in vivo. Previous studies had inferred that plus-end motors on bidirectional cargoes are usually turned off when the minus-end motors are engaged (and vice versa). In the model, such motor coordination can arise from motors competing in a tug-of-war, without help from additional regulators. This new theoretical framework should stimulate much research that will help unravel whether regulation of intracellular transport is dominated by higher-order control mechanisms or is achieved simply by tuning basic properties of the motors themselves. PMID:19404428

  19. How molecular motors shape the flagellar beat

    PubMed Central

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.; Hilfinger, Andreas; Howard, Jonathon; Jülicher, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Cilia and eukaryotic flagella are slender cellular appendages whose regular beating propels cells and microorganisms through aqueous media. The beat is an oscillating pattern of propagating bends generated by dynein motor proteins. A key open question is how the activity of the motors is coordinated in space and time. To elucidate the nature of this coordination we inferred the mechanical properties of the motors by analyzing the shape of beating sperm: Steadily beating bull sperm were imaged and their shapes were measured with high precision using a Fourier averaging technique. Comparing our experimental data with wave forms calculated for different scenarios of motor coordination we found that only the scenario of interdoublet sliding regulating motor activity gives rise to satisfactory fits. We propose that the microscopic origin of such “sliding control” is the load dependent detachment rate of motors. Agreement between observed and calculated wave forms was obtained only if significant sliding between microtubules occurred at the base. This suggests a novel mechanism by which changes in basal compliance could reverse the direction of beat propagation. We conclude that the flagellar beat patterns are determined by an interplay of the basal properties of the axoneme and the mechanical feedback of dynein motors. PMID:19404446

  20. Molecular motor traffic: From biological nanomachines to macroscopic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard; Chai, Yan; Klumpp, Stefan; Liepelt, Steffen; Müller, Melanie J. I.

    2006-12-01

    All cells of animals and plants contain complex transport systems based on molecular motors which walk along cytoskeletal filaments. These motors are rather small and have a size of 20-100 nm but are able to pull vesicles, organelles and other types of cargo over large distances, from micrometers up to meters. There are several families of motors: kinesins, dyneins, and myosins. Most of these motors have two heads which are used as legs and perform discrete steps along the filaments. Several aspects of the motor behavior will be discussed: motor cycles of two-headed motors; walks of single motors or cargo particles which consist of directed movements interrupted by random, diffusive motion; cargo transport through tube-like compartments; active diffusion of cargo particles in slab-like compartments; cooperative transport of cargo by several motors which may be uni- or bi-directional; and systems with many interacting motors that exhibit traffic jams, self-organized density and flux patterns, and traffic phase transitions far from equilibrium. It is necessary to understand these traffic phenomena in a quantitative manner in order to construct and optimize biomimetic transport systems based on motors and filaments with many possible applications in bioengineering, pharmacology, and medicine.

  1. Towards synthetic molecular motors: a model elastic-network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amartya; Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-04-01

    Protein molecular motors play a fundamental role in biological cells and development of their synthetic counterparts is a major challenge. Here, we show how a model motor system with the operation mechanism resembling that of muscle myosin can be designed at the concept level, without addressing the implementation aspects. The model is constructed as an elastic network, similar to the coarse-grained descriptions used for real proteins. We show by numerical simulations that the designed synthetic motor can operate as a deterministic or Brownian ratchet and that there is a continuous transition between such two regimes. The motor operation under external load, approaching the stall condition, is also analysed.

  2. Quantum dot labeling strategies to characterize single-molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Shane R; Ali, M Yusuf; Warshaw, David M

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule labeling and detection techniques allow high-resolution imaging of the motion of single molecules. Molecular motors are biological machines that convert chemical energy into mechanical work. Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a well-characterized processive molecular motor, essential for cargo transport in living organisms. Quantum dots (Qdots) are fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals that are extremely useful for single-molecule studies in biological sciences. High-resolution video microscopy and single-particle tracking of a Qdot-labeled MyoVa motor molecule allow the detection of individual steps in vitro and in live cells.

  3. Cooperative behavior of molecular motors: Cargo transport and traffic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard; Beeg, Janina; Dimova, Rumiana; Klumpp, Stefan; Müller, Melanie J. I.

    2010-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells including those of our own body contain complex transport systems based on molecular motors which walk along cytoskeletal filaments. These motors are rather small and make discrete mechanical steps with a step size of the order of 10 nm but are able to pull cargo particles over much larger distances, from micrometers up to meters. In vivo, the intracellular cargos include large membrane-bounded organelles, smaller vesicles, a subset of mRNAs, cytoskeletal filaments, and various protein building blocks, which are transported between different cell compartments. This cargo transport is usually performed by teams of motors. If all motors belong to the same molecular species, the cooperative action of the motors leads to uni-directional transport with a strongly increased run length and with a characteristic force dependence of the velocity distributions. If two antagonistic teams of motors pull on the same cargo particle, they perform a stochastic tug-of-war, which is characterized by a subtle force balance between the two motor teams and leads to several distinct patterns of bi-directional transport. So far, all experimental observations on bi-directional transport are consistent with such a tug-of-war. If many motors and/or cargo particles are transported along the filaments, one encounters various traffic phenomena. Depending on their mutual interactions and the compartment geometry, the motors form various spatio-temporal patterns such as traffic jams, and undergo nonequilibrium phase transitions between different patterns of transport.

  4. Molecular crowding creates traffic jams of kinesin motors on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Cécile; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Varga, Vladimír; Helbing, Dirk; Diez, Stefan; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crowdedness of the interior of cells, microtubule-based motor proteins are able to deliver cargoes rapidly and reliably throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that motor proteins may be adapted to operate in crowded environments by having molecular properties that prevent them from forming traffic jams. To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted high-density traffic of purified kinesin-8 motor protein, a highly processive motor with long end-residency time, along microtubules in a total internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy assay. We found that traffic jams, characterized by an abrupt increase in the density of motors with an associated abrupt decrease in motor speed, form even in the absence of other obstructing proteins. To determine the molecular properties that lead to jamming, we altered the concentration of motors, their processivity, and their rate of dissociation from microtubule ends. Traffic jams occurred when the motor density exceeded a critical value (density-induced jams) or when motor dissociation from the microtubule ends was so slow that it resulted in a pileup (bottleneck-induced jams). Through comparison of our experimental results with theoretical models and stochastic simulations, we characterized in detail under which conditions density- and bottleneck-induced traffic jams form or do not form. Our results indicate that transport kinesins, such as kinesin-1, may be evolutionarily adapted to avoid the formation of traffic jams by moving only with moderate processivity and dissociating rapidly from microtubule ends. PMID:22431622

  5. Molecular crowding creates traffic jams of kinesin motors on microtubules.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Cécile; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Varga, Vladimír; Helbing, Dirk; Diez, Stefan; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-04-17

    Despite the crowdedness of the interior of cells, microtubule-based motor proteins are able to deliver cargoes rapidly and reliably throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that motor proteins may be adapted to operate in crowded environments by having molecular properties that prevent them from forming traffic jams. To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted high-density traffic of purified kinesin-8 motor protein, a highly processive motor with long end-residency time, along microtubules in a total internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy assay. We found that traffic jams, characterized by an abrupt increase in the density of motors with an associated abrupt decrease in motor speed, form even in the absence of other obstructing proteins. To determine the molecular properties that lead to jamming, we altered the concentration of motors, their processivity, and their rate of dissociation from microtubule ends. Traffic jams occurred when the motor density exceeded a critical value (density-induced jams) or when motor dissociation from the microtubule ends was so slow that it resulted in a pileup (bottleneck-induced jams). Through comparison of our experimental results with theoretical models and stochastic simulations, we characterized in detail under which conditions density- and bottleneck-induced traffic jams form or do not form. Our results indicate that transport kinesins, such as kinesin-1, may be evolutionarily adapted to avoid the formation of traffic jams by moving only with moderate processivity and dissociating rapidly from microtubule ends.

  6. Third-Generation Light-Driven Symmetric Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Štacko, Peter; Roke, Diederik; Wolters, Alexander T; Heideman, G Henrieke; Chang, Mu-Chieh; van der Meulen, Pieter; Visser, Johan; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-07-19

    Symmetric molecular motors based on two overcrowded alkenes with a notable absence of a stereogenic center show potential to function as novel mechanical systems in the development of more advanced nanomachines offering controlled motion over surfaces. Elucidation of the key parameters and limitations of these third-generation motors is essential for the design of optimized molecular machines based on light-driven rotary motion. Herein we demonstrate the thermal and photochemical rotational behavior of a series of third-generation light-driven molecular motors. The steric hindrance of the core unit exerted upon the rotors proved pivotal in controlling the speed of rotation, where a smaller size results in lower barriers. The presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon center provides the motor with unidirectionality. Tuning of the steric effects of the substituents at the bridgehead allows for the precise control of the direction of disrotary motion, illustrated by the design of two motors which show opposite rotation with respect to a methyl substituent. A third-generation molecular motor with the potential to be the fastest based on overcrowded alkenes to date was used to visualize the equal rate of rotation of both its rotor units. The autonomous rotational behavior perfectly followed the predicted model, setting the stage for more advanced motors for functional dynamic systems.

  7. Methodology for the Simulation of Molecular Motors at Different Scales.

    PubMed

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Chipot, Christophe

    2017-04-20

    Millisecond-scale conformational transitions represent a seminal challenge for traditional molecular dynamics simulations, even with the help of high-end supercomputer architectures. Such events are particularly relevant to the study of molecular motors-proteins or abiological constructs that convert chemical energy into mechanical work. Here, we present a hybrid-simulation scheme combining an array of methods including elastic network models, transition path sampling, and advanced free-energy methods, possibly in conjunction with generalized-ensemble schemes to deliver a viable option for capturing the millisecond-scale motor steps of biological motors. The methodology is already implemented in large measure in popular molecular dynamics programs, and it can leverage the massively parallel capabilities of petascale computers. The applicability of the hybrid method is demonstrated with two examples, namely cyclodextrin-based motors and V-type ATPases.

  8. Tetrapodal molecular switches and motors: synthesis and photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuang-Yen; Wezenberg, Sander J; Carroll, Gregory T; London, Gábor; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pijper, Thomas C; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-08-01

    The design, synthesis, and dynamic behavior of a series of novel tetrapodal molecular switches and motors containing common functional groups for attachment to various inorganic and organic surfaces are presented. Using a Diels-Alder reaction, an anthracene unit with four functionalized alkyl substituents ("legs") was coupled to maleimide-functionalized molecular switches or motors under ambient conditions. Terminal functional groups at the "legs" include thioacetates and azides, making these switches and motors ideal candidates for attachment to metallic or alkyne-functionalized surfaces. UV/vis absorption spectroscopy shows that the molecular switches and motors retain their ability to undergo reversible photoinduced and/or thermally induced structural changes after attachment to the tetrapodal anthracene.

  9. How molecular motors work - insights from the molecular machinist's toolbox: the Nobel prize in Chemistry 2016.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R D

    2017-02-01

    The Nobel prize in Chemistry for 2016 was awarded to Jean Pierre Sauvage, Sir James Fraser Stoddart, and Bernard (Ben) Feringa for their contributions to the design and synthesis of molecular machines. While this field is still in its infancy, and at present there are no commercial applications, many observers have stressed the tremendous potential of molecular machines to revolutionize technology. However, perhaps the most important result so far accruing from the synthesis of molecular machines is the insight provided into the fundamental mechanisms by which molecular motors, including biological motors such as kinesin, myosin, FoF1 ATPase, and the flagellar motor, function. The ability to "tinker" with separate components of molecular motors allows asking, and answering, specific questions about mechanism, particularly with regard to light driven vs. chemistry driven molecular motors.

  10. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-02-19

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. Engineering molecular motors with controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells and provide optimized device components for tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions and other signals. Here, we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies and guided by a structural model for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we have constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should make it possible to achieve spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size and branchpoint turning.

  11. Embedding dual function into molecular motors through collective motion

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    Protein motors, such as kinesins and dyneins, bind to a microtubule and travel along it in a specific direction. Previously, it was thought that the directionality for a given motor was constant in the absence of an external force. However, the directionality of the kinesin-5 Cin8 was recently found to change as the number of motors that bind to the same microtubule is increased. Here, we introduce a simple mechanical model of a microtubule-sliding assay in which multiple motors interact with the filament. We show that, due to the collective phenomenon, the directionality of the motor changes (e.g., from minus- to plus- end directionality), depending on the number of motors. This is induced by a large diffusive component in the directional walk and by the subsequent frustrated motor configuration, in which multiple motors pull the filament in opposite directions, similar to a game of tug-of-war. A possible role of the dual-directional motors for the mitotic spindle formation is also discussed. Our framework provides a general mechanism to embed two conflicting tasks into a single molecular machine, which works context-dependently. PMID:28281683

  12. Embedding dual function into molecular motors through collective motion.

    PubMed

    Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-03-10

    Protein motors, such as kinesins and dyneins, bind to a microtubule and travel along it in a specific direction. Previously, it was thought that the directionality for a given motor was constant in the absence of an external force. However, the directionality of the kinesin-5 Cin8 was recently found to change as the number of motors that bind to the same microtubule is increased. Here, we introduce a simple mechanical model of a microtubule-sliding assay in which multiple motors interact with the filament. We show that, due to the collective phenomenon, the directionality of the motor changes (e.g., from minus- to plus- end directionality), depending on the number of motors. This is induced by a large diffusive component in the directional walk and by the subsequent frustrated motor configuration, in which multiple motors pull the filament in opposite directions, similar to a game of tug-of-war. A possible role of the dual-directional motors for the mitotic spindle formation is also discussed. Our framework provides a general mechanism to embed two conflicting tasks into a single molecular machine, which works context-dependently.

  13. Stochastic simulations of cargo transport by processive molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Korn, Christian B; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2009-12-28

    We use stochastic computer simulations to study the transport of a spherical cargo particle along a microtubule-like track on a planar substrate by several kinesin-like processive motors. Our newly developed adhesive motor dynamics algorithm combines the numerical integration of a Langevin equation for the motion of a sphere with kinetic rules for the molecular motors. The Langevin part includes diffusive motion, the action of the pulling motors, and hydrodynamic interactions between sphere and wall. The kinetic rules for the motors include binding to and unbinding from the filament as well as active motor steps. We find that the simulated mean transport length increases exponentially with the number of bound motors, in good agreement with earlier results. The number of motors in binding range to the motor track fluctuates in time with a Poissonian distribution, both for springs and cables being used as models for the linker mechanics. Cooperativity in the sense of equal load sharing only occurs for high values for viscosity and attachment time.

  14. Stochastic simulations of cargo transport by processive molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Christian B.; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2009-12-01

    We use stochastic computer simulations to study the transport of a spherical cargo particle along a microtubule-like track on a planar substrate by several kinesin-like processive motors. Our newly developed adhesive motor dynamics algorithm combines the numerical integration of a Langevin equation for the motion of a sphere with kinetic rules for the molecular motors. The Langevin part includes diffusive motion, the action of the pulling motors, and hydrodynamic interactions between sphere and wall. The kinetic rules for the motors include binding to and unbinding from the filament as well as active motor steps. We find that the simulated mean transport length increases exponentially with the number of bound motors, in good agreement with earlier results. The number of motors in binding range to the motor track fluctuates in time with a Poissonian distribution, both for springs and cables being used as models for the linker mechanics. Cooperativity in the sense of equal load sharing only occurs for high values for viscosity and attachment time.

  15. Single rotating molecule-machines: nanovehicles and molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Rapenne, Gwénaël; Joachim, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade many molecular machines with controlled molecular motions have been synthesized. In the present review chapter we will present and discuss our contribution to the field, in particular through some examples of rotating molecular machines that have been designed, synthesized, and studied in our group. After starting by explaining why it is so important to study such machines as single molecules, we will focus on two families of molecular machines, nanovehicles and molecular motors. The first members of the nanovehicle family are molecules with two triptycenes as wheels: the axle and the wheelbarrow. Then come the four-wheel nanocars. Since triptycene wheels are not very mobile on metallic surfaces, alternative wheels with a bowl-shape structure have also been synthesized and studied on surfaces. The molecular motors are built around ruthenium organometallic centers and have a piano-stool geometry with peripheric ferrocenyl groups.

  16. Automating the search of molecular motor templates by evolutionary methods.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Jose D; Vico, Francisco J

    2011-11-01

    Biological molecular motors are nanoscale devices capable of transforming chemical energy into mechanical work, which are being researched in many scientific disciplines. From a computational point of view, the characteristics and dynamics of these motors are studied at multiple time scales, ranging from very detailed and complex molecular dynamics simulations spanning a few microseconds, to extremely simple and coarse-grained theoretical models of their working cycles. However, this research is performed only in the (relatively few) instances known from molecular biology. In this work, results from elastic network analysis and behaviour-finding methods are applied to explore a subset of the configuration space of template molecular structures that are able to transform chemical energy into directed movement, for a fixed instance of working cycle. While using methods based on elastic networks limits the scope of our results, it enables the implementation of computationally lightweight methods, in a way that evolutionary search techniques can be applied to discover novel molecular motor templates. The results show that molecular motion can be attained from a variety of structural configurations, when a functional working cycle is provided. Additionally, these methods enable a new computational way to test hypotheses about molecular motors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Controlled clockwise and anticlockwise rotational switching of a molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Perera, U G E; Ample, F; Kersell, H; Zhang, Y; Vives, G; Echeverria, J; Grisolia, M; Rapenne, G; Joachim, C; Hla, S-W

    2013-01-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines. However, the parallels between the two systems are often only superficial, because most molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, rotary molecular motors powered by light and chemical energy have been developed. In electrically driven motors, tunnelling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope have been used to drive the rotation of a simple rotor in a single direction and to move a four-wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a stand-alone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or anticlockwise direction by selective inelastic electron tunnelling through different subunits of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotor for controlled rotations, and a ruthenium atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation arises from sawtooth-like rotational potentials, which are solely determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site.

  18. Controlled clockwise and anticlockwise rotational switching of a molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, U. G. E.; Ample, F.; Kersell, H.; Zhang, Y.; Vives, G.; Echeverria, J.; Grisolia, M.; Rapenne, G.; Joachim, C.; Hla, S.-W.

    2013-01-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines. However, the parallels between the two systems are often only superficial, because most molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, rotary molecular motors powered by light and chemical energy have been developed. In electrically driven motors, tunnelling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope have been used to drive the rotation of a simple rotor in a single direction and to move a four-wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a stand-alone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or anticlockwise direction by selective inelastic electron tunnelling through different subunits of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotor for controlled rotations, and a ruthenium atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation arises from sawtooth-like rotational potentials, which are solely determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site.

  19. Controlled Rotation and Manipulation of Individual Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersell, Heath; Perera, U. G. E.; Ample, F.; Zhang, Y.; Vives, G.; Echeverria, J.; Grisolia, M.; Rapenne, G.; Joachim, C.; Hla, S.-W.

    2015-03-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines, but the parallels between the two are frequently only superficial because many molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, chemically and light driven rotary molecular motors have been developed. For electrically driven motors, tunneling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) have been used to drive rotation in a simple rotor into a single direction and to move a wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a single standalone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction [1] by selective inelastic electron tunneling through different sub-units of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotator for controlled rotations, and a Ru atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation originates from saw-tooth-like rotational potentials, which are determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site. This project is supported by the US DOE, BES grant: DE-FG02-02ER46012.

  20. Molecular motors and the 2nd law of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhisong

    2014-03-01

    Molecular motors from biology and nanotechnology often operate on chemical energy of fuel molecules in an isothermal environment, unlike macroscopic heat engines that draw energy from a heat flow between two temperatures. Nevertheless, isothermal molecular motors are still subject to the 2nd law of thermodynamics in a fundamental way: their directional motion must cost a finite amount of energy other than the environmental heat even though no work is done; otherwise the 2nd law would be violated. Hence the 2nd law requires a finite energy price for pure direction of molecular motors. But what is the lowest price of direction allowed by the 2nd law? And how does the 2nd law-decreed price of direction limit performance of molecular motors? In the talk, I shall present our theoretical study of the 2nd law-molecular motor link on basis of the accumulated biomotor phenomenology, and also introduce our experimental effort to develop biomimetic DNA bipedal nanomotors following the mechanistic guidelines out of the theoretical study. [Main contents of this talk are from references:] This work is partially supported by FRC grants R-144-000-259-112, R-144-000-290-112 and R-144-000-320-112.

  1. Mechanism of Spontaneous Oscillation Emerging from Collective Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, Yuta; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2008-04-01

    Biological systems include a large number and various kinds of molecular machines. Individual molecular machines work stochastically, while the systems constructed of the ensembles of these machines exhibit dynamically-ordered phenomena, rather than a simple sum of individual parts. Here we focus on the spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) observed in the contractile system of muscle. From the mechanical measurements in the precursor state of SPOC, we discuss how the functions of individual molecular motors are autonomously regulated in the contractile system.

  2. Coiled coils and SAH domains in cytoskeletal molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Cytoskeletal motors include myosins, kinesins and dyneins. Myosins move along tracks of actin filaments, whereas kinesins and dyneins move along microtubules. Many of these motors are involved in trafficking cargo in cells. However, myosins are mostly monomeric, whereas kinesins are mostly dimeric, owing to the presence of a coiled coil. Some myosins (myosins 6, 7 and 10) contain an SAH (single α-helical) domain, which was originally thought to be a coiled coil. These myosins are now known to be monomers, not dimers. The differences between SAH domains and coiled coils are described and the potential roles of SAH domains in molecular motors are discussed.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations of single and coupled synthetic molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-M.; Zuckermann, M.

    2012-11-01

    We use a minimal model to study the processive motion of coupled synthetic molecular motors along a DNA track and we present data from Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulations based on this model. The model was originally proposed by Bromley [HFSP J.10.2976/1.3111282 3, 204 (2009)] for studying the properties of a synthetic protein motor, the “Tumbleweed” (TW), and involves rigid Y-shaped motors diffusively rotating along the track while controlled by a series of periodically injected ligand pulses into the solution. The advantage of the model is that it mimics the mechanical properties of the TW motor in detail. Both the average first passage time which measures the diffusive motion of the motors, and the average dwell time on the track which measures their processivity are investigated by varying the parameters of the model. The latter includes ligand concentration and the range and strength of the binding interaction between motors and the track. In particular, it is of experimental interest to study the dependence of these dynamic time scales of the motors on the ligand concentration. Single rigid TW motors were first studied since no previous MC simulations of these motors have been performed. We first studied single motors for which we found a logarithmic decrease of the average first passage time and a logarithmic increase of the average dwell time with increasing ligand concentration. For two coupled motors, the dependence on ligand concentration is still logarithmic for the average first passage time but becomes linear for the average dwell time. This suggests a much greater stability in the processive motion of coupled motors as compared to single motors in the limit of large ligand concentration. By increasing the number of coupled motors, m, it was found that the average first passage time of the coupled motors only increases slowly with m while the average dwell time increases exponentially with m. Thus the stability of coupled motors on the track can

  4. Collective transport of weakly interacting molecular motors with Langmuir kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, Sameep; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2015-04-01

    Filament-based intracellular transport involves the collective action of molecular motor proteins. Experimental evidences suggest that microtubule (MT) filament bound motor proteins such as kinesins weakly interact among themselves during transport and with the surrounding cellular environment. Motivated by these observations we study a driven lattice gas model for collective unidirectional transport of molecular motors on open filament. This model incorporates short-range next-nearest-neighbour (NNN) interactions between the motors and couples the transport process on filament with surrounding cellular environment through adsorption-desorption Langmuir kinetics (LK) of the motors. We analyse this model within the framework of a mean-field (MF) theory in the limit of weak interactions between the motors. We point to the mapping of this model with the non-conserved version of the Katz-Lebowitz-Spohn (KLS) model. The system exhibits rich phase behavior with a variety of inhomogeneous phases including localized shocks in the bulk of the filament. We obtain the steady-state density and current profiles, analyse their variation as a function of the strength of interaction and construct the non-equilibrium MF phase diagram. We compare these MF results with Monte Carlo simulations and find that the MF analysis shows reasonably good agreement with simulation results as long as the motors are weakly interacting. For sufficently strong NNN interaction between the motors, the mean-field results deviate significantly, and for very strong NNN interaction in the absence of LK, the current in the lattice is determined solely by the NNN interaction parameter and it becomes independent of entry and exit rates of motors at the filament boundaries.

  5. In vitro assays of molecular motors--impact of motor-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Mansson, Alf; Balaz, Martina; Albet-Torres, Nuria; Rosengren, K Johan

    2008-05-01

    In many types of biophysical studies of both single molecules and ensembles of molecular motors the motors are adsorbed to artificial surfaces. Some of the most important assay systems of this type (in vitro motility assays and related single molecule techniques) will be briefly described together with an account of breakthroughs in the understanding of actomyosin function that have resulted from their use. A poorly characterized, but potentially important, entity in these studies is the mechanism of motor adsorption to surfaces and the effects of motor surface interactions on experimental results. A better understanding of these phenomena is also important for the development of commercially viable nanotechnological applications powered by molecular motors. Here, we will consider several aspects of motor surface interactions with a particular focus on heavy meromyosin (HMM) from skeletal muscle. These aspects will be related to heavy meromyosin structure and relevant parts of the vast literature on protein-surface interactions for non-motor proteins. An overview of methods for studying motor-surface interactions will also be given. The information is used as a basis for further development of a model for HMM-surface interactions and is discussed in relation to experiments where nanopatterning has been employed for in vitro reconstruction of actomyosin order. The challenges and potentials of this approach in biophysical studies, compared to the use of self-assembly of biological components into supramolecular protein aggregates (e.g. myosin filaments) will be considered. Finally, this review will consider the implications for further developments of motor-powered lab-on-a-chip devices.

  6. "Cargo-mooring" as an operating principle for molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Lisowski, Bartosz; Kuśmierz, Łukasz; Żabicki, Michał; Bier, Martin

    2015-06-07

    Navigating through an ever-changing and unsteady environment, and utilizing chemical energy, molecular motors transport the cell׳s crucial components, such as organelles and vesicles filled with neurotransmitter. They generate force and pull cargo, as they literally walk along the polymeric tracks, e.g. microtubules. What we suggest in this paper is that the motor protein is not really pulling its load. The load is subject to diffusion and the motor may be doing little else than rectifying the fluctuations, i.e. ratcheting the load׳s diffusion. Below we present a detailed model to show how such ratcheting can quantitatively account for observed data. The consequence of such a mechanism is the dependence of the transport׳s speed and efficacy not only on the motor, but also on the cargo (especially its size) and on the environment (i.e. its viscosity and structure). Current experimental works rarely provide this type of information for in vivo studies. We suggest that even small differences between assays can impact the outcome. Our results agree with those obtained in wet laboratories and provide novel insight in a molecular motor׳s functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Remote control of molecular motors using light-activated gearshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Zev

    2013-03-01

    Engineering molecular motors with dynamically controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in vivo and provide sophisticated components for directed nanoscale transport in vitro. We previously constructed myosin motors that respond to a change in [Ca++] by reversing their direction of motion along the polarized actin filament. To expand the potential applications of controllable molecular motors, we have now developed myosins that shift gears in response to blue light illumination. Light is a versatile control signal that can be readily modulated in time and space, and is generally orthogonal to cellular signaling. Using structure-guided protein engineering, we have incorporated LOV photoreceptor domains into the lever arms of chimeric myosins, resulting in motors that robustly speed up, slow down, or switch directions upon illumination. These genetically encoded motors should be directly deployable inside living cells. Our successful designs include constructs based on two different myosin classes, and we show that optical velocity control can be implemented in motors that move at microns/sec speeds, enabling practical biological and bioengineering applications.

  8. Patterns of molecular motors that guide and sort filaments.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Beat; Nédélec, François

    2012-11-21

    Molecular motors can be immobilized to transport filaments and loads that are attached to these filaments inside a nano-device. However, if motors are distributed uniformly over a flat surface, the motility is undirected, and the filaments move equally in all directions. For many applications it is important to control the direction in which the filaments move, and two strategies have been explored to achieve this: applying external forces and confining the filaments inside channels. In this article, we discuss a third strategy in which the topography of the sample remains flat, but the motors are distributed non-uniformly over the surface. Systems of filaments and patterned molecular motors were simulated using a stochastic engine that included Brownian motion and filament bending elasticity. Using an evolutionary algorithm, patterns were optimized for their capacity to precisely control the paths of the filaments. We identified patterns of motors that could either direct the filaments in a particular direction, or separate short and long filaments. These functionalities already exceed what has been achieved with confinement. The patterns are composed of one or two types of motors positioned in lines or along arcs and should be easy to manufacture. Finally, these patterns can be easily combined into larger designs, allowing one to precisely control the motion of microscopic objects inside a device.

  9. Guiding Molecular Motors with Nano-Imprinted Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, Richard; Carlberg, Patrick; Månsson, Alf; Nicholls, Ian A.; Omling, Pär; Sundberg, Mark; Tågerud, Sven; Montelius, Lars

    2005-05-01

    This work, for the first time, demonstrates that nano-imprinted samples, with 100 nm wide polymer lines, can act as guides for molecular motors consisting of motor proteins actin and myosin. The motor protein function was characterized using fluorescence microscopy and compared to actomyosin motility on non-structured nitrocellulose surfaces. Our results open for further use of the nano-imprint technique in the production of disposable chips for bio-nanotechnological applications and miniaturized biological test systems. We discuss how the nano-imprinted motor protein assay system may be optimized and also how it compares to previously tested assay systems involving low-resolution UV-lithography and low throughput but high-resolution electron beam lithography.

  10. Molecular rotors and motors: recent advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Michl, Josef; Sykes, E Charles H

    2009-05-26

    At the "Molecular Rotors and Motors" symposium of the Spring 2009 ACS National Meeting in Salt Lake City (March 22-26), a diverse mix of talks addressed many current issues in the field. Speakers described topics that varied from single-molecule rotors and nanomachines to exquisite synthetic approaches toward building functional materials and mathematical and computational methods aimed at uncovering design opportunities and highlighting the fundamental limitations of molecular motors. While the realization of building useful nanomachines remains far off, a general consensus abounded that investigating biological systems and understanding the implications of the laws of thermodynamics and quantum mechanics for the behavior of nanostructures will help drive important advances in the quest for molecular machinery. Molecular rotors were demonstrated to have practical applications as probes for microviscosity, and many speakers presented experimental studies that indicated that highly directed translation and rotation of individual molecules, as well as interacting dipolar arrays, are just around the corner. While this Nano Focus is not intended to be a comprehensive review of the subject, it will focus on several key advances that were presented at the ACS meeting and highlight future challenges for the field of molecular rotors and motors.

  11. Time-dependent motor properties of multipedal molecular spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samii, Laleh; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth H. C.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2011-09-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic biomolecular walkers that use the asymmetry resulting from cleavage of their tracks to bias the direction of their stepping motion. Using Monte Carlo simulations that implement the Gillespie algorithm, we investigate the dependence of the biased motion of molecular spiders, along with binding time and processivity, on tunable experimental parameters, such as number of legs, span between the legs, and unbinding rate of a leg from a substrate site. We find that an increase in the number of legs increases the spiders’ processivity and binding time but not their mean velocity. However, we can increase the mean velocity of spiders with simultaneous tuning of the span and the unbinding rate of a spider leg from a substrate site. To study the efficiency of molecular spiders, we introduce a time-dependent expression for the thermodynamic efficiency of a molecular motor, allowing us to account for the behavior of spider populations as a function of time. Based on this definition, we find that spiders exhibit transient motor function over time scales of many hours and have a maximum efficiency on the order of 1%, weak compared to other types of molecular motors.

  12. Rotation of artificial rotor axles in rotary molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Mihori; Iwamoto, Kousuke; Ueno, Hiroshi; Hara, Mayu; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Kishikawa, Jun-ichi; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Ken

    2016-01-01

    F1- and V1-ATPase are rotary molecular motors that convert chemical energy released upon ATP hydrolysis into torque to rotate a central rotor axle against the surrounding catalytic stator cylinder with high efficiency. How conformational change occurring in the stator is coupled to the rotary motion of the axle is the key unknown in the mechanism of rotary motors. Here, we generated chimeric motor proteins by inserting an exogenous rod protein, FliJ, into the stator ring of F1 or of V1 and tested the rotation properties of these chimeric motors. Both motors showed unidirectional and continuous rotation, despite no obvious homology in amino acid sequence between FliJ and the intrinsic rotor subunit of F1 or V1. These results showed that any residue-specific interactions between the stator and rotor are not a prerequisite for unidirectional rotation of both F1 and V1. The torque of chimeric motors estimated from viscous friction of the rotation probe against medium revealed that whereas the F1-FliJ chimera generates only 10% of WT F1, the V1-FliJ chimera generates torque comparable to that of V1 with the native axle protein that is structurally more similar to FliJ than the native rotor of F1. This suggests that the gross structural mismatch hinders smooth rotation of FliJ accompanied with the stator ring of F1. PMID:27647891

  13. Rotation of artificial rotor axles in rotary molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Baba, Mihori; Iwamoto, Kousuke; Iino, Ryota; Ueno, Hiroshi; Hara, Mayu; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Kishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Ken

    2016-10-04

    F1- and V1-ATPase are rotary molecular motors that convert chemical energy released upon ATP hydrolysis into torque to rotate a central rotor axle against the surrounding catalytic stator cylinder with high efficiency. How conformational change occurring in the stator is coupled to the rotary motion of the axle is the key unknown in the mechanism of rotary motors. Here, we generated chimeric motor proteins by inserting an exogenous rod protein, FliJ, into the stator ring of F1 or of V1 and tested the rotation properties of these chimeric motors. Both motors showed unidirectional and continuous rotation, despite no obvious homology in amino acid sequence between FliJ and the intrinsic rotor subunit of F1 or V1 These results showed that any residue-specific interactions between the stator and rotor are not a prerequisite for unidirectional rotation of both F1 and V1 The torque of chimeric motors estimated from viscous friction of the rotation probe against medium revealed that whereas the F1-FliJ chimera generates only 10% of WT F1, the V1-FliJ chimera generates torque comparable to that of V1 with the native axle protein that is structurally more similar to FliJ than the native rotor of F1 This suggests that the gross structural mismatch hinders smooth rotation of FliJ accompanied with the stator ring of F1.

  14. Biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders.

    PubMed

    Samii, Laleh; Linke, Heiner; Zuckermann, Martin J; Forde, Nancy R

    2010-02-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic molecular motors featuring multiple legs that each can interact with a substrate through binding and cleavage. Experimental studies suggest the motion of the spider in a matrix is biased toward uncleaved substrates and that spider properties such as processivity can be altered by changing the binding strength of the legs to substrate [R. Pei, S. K. Taylor, D. Stefanovic, S. Rudchenko, T. E. Mitchell, and M. N. Stojanovic, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 12693 (2006)]. We investigate the origin of biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders using Monte Carlo simulations. Our simulations combine a realistic chemical kinetic model, hand-over-hand or inchworm modes of stepping, and the use of a one-dimensional track. We find that stronger binding to substrate, cleavage and spider detachment from the track are contributing mechanisms to population bias. We investigate the contributions of stepping mechanism to speed, randomness parameter, processivity, coupling, and efficiency, and comment on how these molecular motor properties can be altered by changing experimentally tunable kinetic parameters.

  15. Biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samii, Laleh; Linke, Heiner; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2010-02-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic molecular motors featuring multiple legs that each can interact with a substrate through binding and cleavage. Experimental studies suggest the motion of the spider in a matrix is biased toward uncleaved substrates and that spider properties such as processivity can be altered by changing the binding strength of the legs to substrate [R. Pei, S. K. Taylor, D. Stefanovic, S. Rudchenko, T. E. Mitchell, and M. N. Stojanovic, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 12693 (2006)]. We investigate the origin of biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders using Monte Carlo simulations. Our simulations combine a realistic chemical kinetic model, hand-over-hand or inchworm modes of stepping, and the use of a one-dimensional track. We find that stronger binding to substrate, cleavage and spider detachment from the track are contributing mechanisms to population bias. We investigate the contributions of stepping mechanism to speed, randomness parameter, processivity, coupling, and efficiency, and comment on how these molecular motor properties can be altered by changing experimentally tunable kinetic parameters.

  16. Myosin-I molecular motors at a glance.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Ostap, E Michael

    2016-07-15

    Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to play various cellular roles related to membrane dynamics and trafficking. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we review and illustrate the proposed cellular functions of metazoan myosin-I molecular motors by examining the structural, biochemical, mechanical and cell biological evidence for their proposed molecular roles. We highlight evidence for the roles of myosin-I isoforms in regulating membrane tension and actin architecture, powering plasma membrane and organelle deformation, participating in membrane trafficking, and functioning as a tension-sensitive dock or tether. Collectively, myosin-I motors have been implicated in increasingly complex cellular phenomena, yet how a single isoform accomplishes multiple types of molecular functions is still an active area of investigation. To fully understand the underlying physiology, it is now essential to piece together different approaches of biological investigation. This article will appeal to investigators who study immunology, metabolic diseases, endosomal trafficking, cell motility, cancer and kidney disease, and to those who are interested in how cellular membranes are coupled to the underlying actin cytoskeleton in a variety of different applications.

  17. Interferometric Scattering Microscopy for the Study of Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Andrecka, J; Takagi, Y; Mickolajczyk, K J; Lippert, L G; Sellers, J R; Hancock, W O; Goldman, Y E; Kukura, P

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of molecular motor function has been greatly improved by the development of imaging modalities, which enable real-time observation of their motion at the single-molecule level. Here, we describe the use of a new method, interferometric scattering microscopy, for the investigation of motor protein dynamics by attaching and tracking the motion of metallic nanoparticle labels as small as 20nm diameter. Using myosin-5, kinesin-1, and dynein as examples, we describe the basic assays, labeling strategies, and principles of data analysis. Our approach is relevant not only for motor protein dynamics but also provides a general tool for single-particle tracking with high spatiotemporal precision, which overcomes the limitations of single-molecule fluorescence methods. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Universal bound on the efficiency of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-12-01

    The thermodynamic uncertainty relation provides an inequality relating any mean current, the associated dispersion and the entropy production rate for arbitrary non-equilibrium steady states. Applying it here to a general model of a molecular motor running against an external force or torque, we show that the thermodynamic efficiency of such motors is universally bounded by an expression involving only experimentally accessible quantities. For motors pulling cargo through a viscous fluid, a universal bound for the corresponding Stokes efficiency follows as a variant. A similar result holds if mechanical force is used to synthesize molecules of high chemical potential. Crucially, no knowledge of the detailed underlying mechano-chemical mechanism is required for applying these bounds.

  19. Modelling interacting molecular motors with an internal degree of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkoviezky, Itai; Gov, Nir S.

    2013-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying the collective motion of molecular motors in living cells are not yet fully understood. One such open puzzle is the observed pulses of backward-moving myosin-X in the filopodia structure. Motivated by this phenomenon we introduce two generalizations of the ‘total asymmetric exclusion process’ (TASEP) that might be relevant to the formation of such pulses. The first is adding a nearest-neighbours attractive interaction between motors, while the second is adding an internal degree of freedom corresponding to a processive and immobile form of the motors. Switching between the two states occurs stochastically, without a conservation law. Both models show strong deviations from the mean field behaviour and lack particle-hole symmetry. We use approximations borrowed from the research on vehicular traffic models to calculate the current and jam size distribution in a system with periodic boundary conditions and introduce a novel modification to one of these approximation schemes.

  20. Interferometric Scattering Microscopy for the Study of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Andrecka, J.; Takagi, Y.; Mickolajczyk, K.J.; Lippert, L.G.; Sellers, J.R.; Hancock, W.O.; Goldman, Y.E.; Kukura, P.

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of molecular motor function has been greatly improved by the development of imaging modalities, which enable real-time observation of their motion at the single-molecule level. Here, we describe the use of a new method, interferometric scattering microscopy, for the investigation of motor protein dynamics by attaching and tracking the motion of metallic nanoparticle labels as small as 20 nm diameter. Using myosin-5, kinesin-1, and dynein as examples, we describe the basic assays, labeling strategies, and principles of data analysis. Our approach is relevant not only for motor protein dynamics but also provides a general tool for single-particle tracking with high spatiotemporal precision, which overcomes the limitations of single-molecule fluorescence methods. PMID:27793291

  1. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Modelling of a DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun; Xie, Ping; Xue, Xiao-Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2009-11-01

    During the assembly of many viruses, a powerful molecular motor packages the genome into a preassembled capsid. The Bacillus subtilis phage phi29 is an excellent model system to investigate the DNA packaging mechanism because of its highly efficient in vitro DNA packaging activity and the development of a single-molecule packaging assay. Here we make use of structural and biochemical experimental data to build a physical model of DNA packaging by the phi29 DNA packaging motor. Based on the model, various dynamic behaviours such as the packaging rate, pause frequency and slip frequency under different ATP concentrations, ADP concentrations, external loads as well as capsid fillings are studied by using Monte Carlo simulation. Good agreement is obtained between the simulated and available experimental results. Moreover, we make testable predictions that should guide future experiments related to motor function.

  2. Molecular Motors and Efficient Motion in a Viscoelastic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Keith

    2005-11-01

    Molecular motors perform many critical functions for cells, including chromosome separation during mitosis, vesicle transport, and muscle contraction. In this talk, we will discuss the ways in which physics concepts and instrumentation are being used to determine the forces and efficiencies of two of these motors, kinesin and dynein, in cells. We will emphasize a) studies at Wake Forest University that focus on the force versus velocity curves (load curves) of kinesin in the neurites of live PC12 cells, and b) work at UNC-Chapel Hill that measures the forces developed by dynein motors within beating cilia on the outer surfaces of live lung cells during mucus transport. We will show how the viscoelastic properties of cytoplasm and mucus can be determined from the Brownian motion of vesicles and beads in these media.. We find that the load on these motors in vivo may exceed that in vitro by a factor of 1000, and that several motors can share the task of moving a single vesicle.

  3. Dynamics of molecular motors with finite processivity on heterogeneous tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David

    2006-03-01

    The dynamics of molecular motors which occasionally detach from a heterogeneous track like DNA or RNA is considered.[1] Motivated by recent single-molecule experiments, we study a simple model for a motor moving along a disordered track using chemical energy while an external force opposes its motion. The motors also have finite processivity, i.e., they can leave the track with a position-dependent rate. We show that the response of the system to disorder in the hopping-off rate depends on the value of the external force. For most values of the external force, strong disorder causes the motors which survive for long times on the track to be localized at preferred positions. However, near the stall force, localization occurs for any amount of disorder. To obtain these results, we study the complex eigenvalue spectrum of the time evolution operator. Existence of localized states near the top of the band implies a stretched exponential contribution to the decay of the survival probability. A similar spectral analysis also provides a very efficient method for studying the dynamics of motors with infinite processivity. 1. Y. Kafri D. K. Lubensky and D. R. Nelson Phys. Rev. E 71, 041906 (2005).

  4. Chemically optimizing operational efficiency of molecular rotary motors.

    PubMed

    Conyard, Jamie; Cnossen, Arjen; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L; Meech, Stephen R

    2014-07-09

    Unidirectional molecular rotary motors that harness photoinduced cis-trans (E-Z) isomerization are promising tools for the conversion of light energy to mechanical motion in nanoscale molecular machines. Considerable progress has been made in optimizing the frequency of ground-state rotation, but less attention has been focused on excited-state processes. Here the excited-state dynamics of a molecular motor with electron donor and acceptor substituents located to modify the excited-state reaction coordinate, without altering its stereochemistry, are studied. The substituents are shown to modify the photochemical yield of the isomerization without altering the motor frequency. By combining 50 fs resolution time-resolved fluorescence with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy the underlying excited-state dynamics are characterized. The Franck-Condon excited state relaxes in a few hundred femtoseconds to populate a lower energy dark state by a pathway that utilizes a volume conserving structural change. This is assigned to pyramidalization at a carbon atom of the isomerizing bridging double bond. The structure and energy of the dark state thus reached are a function of the substituent, with electron-withdrawing groups yielding a lower energy longer lived dark state. The dark state is coupled to the Franck-Condon state and decays on a picosecond time scale via a coordinate that is sensitive to solvent friction, such as rotation about the bridging bond. Neither subpicosecond nor picosecond dynamics are sensitive to solvent polarity, suggesting that intramolecular charge transfer and solvation are not key driving forces for the rate of the reaction. Instead steric factors and medium friction determine the reaction pathway, with the sterically remote substitution primarily influencing the energetics. Thus, these data indicate a chemical method of optimizing the efficiency of operation of these molecular motors without modifying their overall rotational frequency.

  5. Dynamics of molecular motors and polymer translocation with sequence heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Kafri, Yariv; Lubensky, David K; Nelson, David R

    2004-06-01

    The effect of sequence heterogeneity on polynucleotide translocation across a pore and on simple models of molecular motors such as helicases, DNA polymerase/exonuclease, and RNA polymerase is studied in detail. Pore translocation of RNA or DNA is biased due to the different chemical environments on the two sides of the membrane, whereas the molecular motor motion is biased through a coupling to chemical energy. An externally applied force can oppose these biases. For both systems we solve lattice models exactly both with and without disorder. The models incorporate explicitly the coupling to the different chemical environments for polymer translocation and the coupling to the chemical energy (as well as nucleotide pairing energies) for molecular motors. Using the exact solutions and general arguments, we show that the heterogeneity leads to anomalous dynamics. Most notably, over a range of forces around the stall force (or stall tension for DNA polymerase/exonuclease systems) the displacement grows sublinearly as t(micro), with micro < 1. The range over which this behavior can be observed experimentally is estimated for several systems and argued to be detectable for appropriate forces and buffers. Similar sequence heterogeneity effects may arise in the packing of viral DNA.

  6. Mechanical transduction mechanisms of RecA-like molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jung-Chi

    2011-12-01

    A majority of ATP-dependent molecular motors are RecA-like proteins, performing diverse functions in biology. These RecA-like molecular motors consist of a highly conserved core containing the ATP-binding site. Here I examined how ATP binding within this core is coupled to the conformational changes of different RecA-like molecular motors. Conserved hydrogen bond networks and conformational changes revealed two major mechanical transduction mechanisms: (1) intra-domain conformational changes and (2) inter-domain conformational changes. The intra-domain mechanism has a significant hydrogen bond rearrangement within the domain containing the P-loop, causing relative motion between two parts of the protein. The inter-domain mechanism exhibits little conformational change in the P-loop domain. Instead, the major conformational change is observed between the P-loop domain and an adjacent domain or subunit containing the arginine finger. These differences in the mechanical transduction mechanisms may link to the underlying energy surface governing a Brownian ratchet or a power stroke.

  7. Rotary molecular motion at the nanoscale: motors, propellers, wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Lela; Wang, Boyang; Kral, Petr

    2009-03-01

    We describe by molecular dynamics simulations nanoscale systems that could realize rotary motion. First, we study molecular propellers formed by carbon nanotube rotors with attached aromatic blades [1]. We show that these propellers could pump different types of liquids, and their pumping efficiency strongly depends on the chemistry of the (hydrophobic or hydrophilic) liquid-blade interface. We also investigate nanoscopic wheels with hydrophobic surfaces that show rolling activity on water when driven. Finally, we model efficient molecular motors driven by electron tunneling, which could drive rotary molecular systems [2]. [3pt] [1] B. Wang and P. Kr'al, . Rev. Lett. 98, 266102 (2007).[0pt] [2] B. Wang, L. Vukovic and P. Kr'al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 186808 (2008).

  8. Operating principles of rotary molecular motors: differences between F1 and V1 motors.

    PubMed

    Yamato, Ichiro; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Murata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Among the many types of bioenergy-transducing machineries, F- and V-ATPases are unique bio- and nano-molecular rotary motors. The rotational catalysis of F1-ATPase has been investigated in detail, and molecular mechanisms have been proposed based on the crystal structures of the complex and on extensive single-molecule rotational observations. Recently, we obtained crystal structures of bacterial V1-ATPase (A3B3 and A3B3DF complexes) in the presence and absence of nucleotides. Based on these new structures, we present a novel model for the rotational catalysis mechanism of V1-ATPase, which is different from that of F1-ATPases.

  9. Ultrafast Excited State Dynamics in Molecular Motors: Coupling of Motor Length to Medium Viscosity.

    PubMed

    Conyard, Jamie; Stacko, Peter; Chen, Jiawen; McDonagh, Sophie; Hall, Christopher R; Laptenok, Sergey P; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L; Meech, Stephen R

    2017-03-16

    Photochemically driven molecular motors convert the energy of incident radiation to intramolecular rotational motion. The motor molecules considered here execute four step unidirectional rotational motion. This comprises a pair of successive light induced isomerizations to a metastable state followed by thermal helix inversions. The internal rotation of a large molecular unit required in these steps is expected to be sensitive to both the viscosity of the medium and the volume of the rotating unit. In this work, we describe a study of motor motion in both ground and excited states as a function of the size of the rotating units. The excited state decay is ultrafast, highly non-single exponential, and is best described by a sum of three exponential relaxation components. The average excited state decay time observed for a series of motors with substituents of increasing volume was determined. While substitution does affect the lifetime, the size of the substituent has only a minor effect. The solvent polarity dependence is also slight, but there is a significant solvent viscosity effect. Increasing the viscosity has no effect on the fastest of the three decay components, but it does lengthen the two slower decay times, consistent with them being associated with motion along an intramolecular coordinate displacing a large solvent volume. However, these slower relaxation times are again not a function of the size of the substituent. We conclude that excited state decay arises from motion along a coordinate which does not necessarily require complete rotation of the substituents through the solvent, but is instead more localized in the core structure of the motor. The decay of the metastable state to the ground state through a helix inversion occurs 14 orders of magnitude more slowly than the excited state decay, and was measured as a function of substituent size, solvent viscosity and temperature. In this case neither substituent size nor solvent viscosity influences

  10. Chemical and thermal modulation of molecular motor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Weili

    Molecular motors of kinesin and dynein families are responsible for various intracellular activities, from long distance movement of organelles, vesicles, protein complexes, and mRNAs to powering mitotic processes. They can take nanometer steps using chemical energy from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and their dysfunction is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases that require long distance transport of cargos. Here I report on the study of the properties of molecular motors at a single-molecule level using optical trappings. I first studied the inhibition properties of kinesin motors by marine natural compound adociasulfates. I showed that adociasulfates compete with microtubules for binding to kinesins and thus inhibit kinesins' activity. Although adociasulfates are a strong inhibitor for all kinesin members, they show a much higher inhibition effect for conventional kinesins than for mitotic kinesins. Thus adociasulfates can be used to specifically inhibit conventional kinesins. By comparing the inhibition of kinesins by two structurally similar adociasulfates, one can see that the negatively charged sulfate residue of adociasulfates can be replaced by other negative residues and thus make it possible for adociasulfate-derived compounds to be more cell permeable. Kinesins and dyneins move cargos towards opposite directions along a microtubule. Cargos with both kinesins and dyneins attached often move bidirectionally due to undergoing a tug-of-war between the oppositely moving kinesin and dynein motors. Here I studied the effect of temperature on microtubule-based kinesin and dynein motor transport. While kinesins' and dyneins' velocities are closely matched above 15 °C, below this temperature the dyneins' velocity decreases much faster than the kinesins'. The kinesins' and dyneins' forces do not measurably change with temperature. The results suggest that temperature has significant effects on bidirectional transport and can be used to

  11. Microtubules and associated molecular motors in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Mouriño-Pérez, Rosa Reyna; Riquelme, Meritxell; Callejas-Negrete, Olga Alicia; Galván-Mendoza, José Iván

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton provides structure, shape and movement to various cells. Microtubules (MTs) are tubular structures made of α and β-tubulin heterodimers organized in 13 protofilaments, forming a hollow cylinder. A vast group of MT-associated proteins determines the function, behavior and interaction of the MTs with other cellular components. Among these proteins, molecular motors such as the dynein-dynactin complex and kinesin superfamily play roles in MT organization and organelle transport. This article focuses on the MT cytoskeleton and associated molecular motors in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa In addition to reviewing current available information for this fungus and contrasting it with knowledge of other fungal species, we present new experimental results that support the role of dynein, dynactin and conventional kinesin in MT organization, dynamics and transport of subcellular structures (nuclei and secretory vesicles). In wild type hyphae of N. crassa, cytoplasmic MTs are arranged longitudinally along hyphae and display a helical curvature. They interlace with one another to form a network throughout the cytoplasm. N. crassa dynein and dynactin mutants have a scant and disorganized MT cytoskeleton, an erratic and reduced Spitzenkörper (Spk) and distorted hyphal morphology. In contrast, hyphae of mutants with defective conventional kinesin exhibit only minor disruptions in MT and Spk organization. Although nuclear positioning is affected in all mutants, the MT-associated motor proteins are not major contributors to nuclear movement during hyphal growth. Cytoplasmic bulk flow is the vehicle for nuclear displacement in growing hyphal regions of N. crassa Motors are involved in nuclei saltatory movements in both retrograde or anterograde direction. In the dynein and kinesin mutants, micro and macrovesicles can reach the Spk, although growth is slightly impaired and the Spk displays an erratic path. Hyphal growth requires MTs, and their associated

  12. Traffic jams and shocks of molecular motors inside cellular protrusions.

    PubMed

    Pinkoviezky, I; Gov, N S

    2014-05-01

    Molecular motors are involved in key transport processes inside actin-based cellular protrusions. The motors carry cargo proteins to the protrusion tip which participate in regulating the actin polymerization and play a key role in facilitating the growth and formation of such protrusions. It is observed that the motors accumulate at the tips of cellular protrusions and form aggregates that are found to drift towards the protrusion base at the rate of actin treadmilling. We present a one-dimensional driven lattice model, where motors become inactive after delivering their cargo at the tip, or by loosing their cargo to a cargoless neighbor. The results suggest that the experimental observations may be explained by the formation of traffic jams that form at the tip. The model is solved using a novel application of mean-field and shock analysis. We find a new class of shocks that undergo intermittent collapses. Extensions with attachment and detachment events and relevance to experiments are briefly described.

  13. Molecular engineering of a backwards-moving myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2004-02-05

    All members of the diverse myosin superfamily have a highly conserved globular motor domain that contains the actin- and nucleotide-binding sites and produces force and movement. The light-chain-binding domain connects the motor domain to a variety of functionally specialized tail domains and amplifies small structural changes in the motor domain through rotation of a lever arm. Myosins move on polarized actin filaments either forwards to the barbed (+) or backwards to the pointed (-) end. Here, we describe the engineering of an artificial backwards-moving myosin from three pre-existing molecular building blocks. These blocks are: a forward-moving class I myosin motor domain, a directional inverter formed by a four-helix bundle segment of human guanylate-binding protein-1 and an artificial lever arm formed by two alpha-actinin repeats. Our results prove that reverse-direction movement of myosins can be achieved simply by rotating the direction of the lever arm 180 degrees.

  14. Facile assembly of light-driven molecular motors onto a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawen; Chen, Kuang-Yen; Carroll, Gregory T; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-10-28

    In order to improve the rotary motion of surface assembled light-driven molecular motors, tetra-acid-functionalized motors were bound to an amine-coated quartz surface without prior activation of the acid groups. In contrast to earlier bipodal motors, the tetravalent motor showed no significant reduction in the rotation speed when attached to a surface.

  15. Thermal fluctuations biased for directional motion in molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoshiharu; Taniguchi, Yuichi; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Yanagida, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    Recently developed single molecule measurements have demonstrated that the mechanisms for numerous protein functions involve thermal fluctuation, or Brownian motion. Protein interactions bias the random thermal noise in a manner such that the protein can perform its given functions. This phenomenon has been observed in molecular motor unidirectional movement where Brownian motion is used to preferentially bind the motor heads in one direction causing directional motility. This is analogous to that used by proteins in which spontaneous structural fluctuations are used to switch function. Seeing that two very different systems implement similar mechanisms suggests there exists a general scheme applied by diverse proteins that exploits thermal fluctuations in order to achieve their respective functions.

  16. Optical Traps to Study Properties of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Rice, Sarah E.; Rock, Ronald S.; Purcell, Thomas J.; Warrick, Hans M.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This article describes the use of optical traps to study processive and nonprocessive molecular motor proteins, focusing on the design of the instrument and the assays to characterize motility. PMID:22046048

  17. Mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kjelstrup, S; Rubi, J M; Pagonabarraga, I; Bedeaux, D

    2013-11-28

    We show that the kinetics of a molecular motor fueled by ATP and operating between a deactivated and an activated state can be derived from the principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics applied to the mesoscopic domain. The activation by ATP, the possible slip of the motor, as well as the forward stepping carrying a load are viewed as slow diffusion along a reaction coordinate. Local equilibrium is assumed in the reaction coordinate spaces, making it possible to derive the non-equilibrium thermodynamic description. Using this scheme, we find expressions for the velocity of the motor, in terms of the driving force along the spacial coordinate, and for the chemical reaction that brings about activation, in terms of the chemical potentials of the reactants and products which maintain the cycle. The second law efficiency is defined, and the velocity corresponding to maximum power is obtained for myosin movement on actin. Experimental results fitting with the description are reviewed, giving a maximum efficiency of 0.45 at a myosin headgroup velocity of 5 × 10(-7) m s(-1). The formalism allows the introduction and test of meso-level models, which may be needed to explain experiments.

  18. Actin-based motility propelled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadyayula, Sai Pramod; Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-09-01

    Actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes propelled by filament end-tracking molecular motors has been simulated. Such systems may act as potential nanoscale actuators and shuttles useful in sorting and sensing biomolecules. Filaments are modeled as three-dimensional elastic springs distributed on one end of the capsule and persistently attached to the motile bacterial surface through an end-tracking motor complex. Filament distribution is random, and monomer concentration decreases linearly as a function of position on the bacterial surface. Filament growth rate increases with monomer concentration but decreases with the extent of compression. The growing filaments exert push-pull forces on the bacterial surface. In addition to forces, torques arise due to two factors—distribution of motors on the bacterial surface, and coupling of torsion upon growth due to the right-handed helicity of F-actin—causing the motile object to undergo simultaneous translation and rotation. The trajectory of the bacterium is simulated by performing a force and torque balance on the bacterium. All simulations use a fixed value of torsion. Simulations show strong alignment of the filaments and the long axis of the bacterium along the direction of motion. In the absence of torsion, the bacterial surface essentially moves along the direction of the long axis. When a small amount of the torsion is applied to the bacterial surface, the bacterium is seen to move in right-handed helical trajectories, consistent with experimental observations.

  19. Microscale transport and sorting by kinesin molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lili; Moorjani, Samira G; Jackson, Thomas N; Hancock, William O

    2004-03-01

    As biomolecular detection systems shrink in size, there is an increasing demand for systems that transport and position materials at micron- and nanoscale dimensions. Our goal is to combine cellular transport machinery-kinesin molecular motors and microtubules-with integrated optoelectronics into a hybrid biological/engineered microdevice that will bind, transport, and detect specific proteins, DNA/RNA molecules, viruses, or cells. For microscale transport, 1.5 microm deep channels were created with SU-8 photoresist on glass, kinesin motors adsorbed to the bottom of the channels, and the channel walls used to bend and redirect microtubules moving over the immobilized motors. Novel channel geometries were investigated as a means to redirect and sort microtubules moving in these channels. We show that DC and AC electric fields are sufficient to transport microtubules in solution, establishing an approach for redirecting microtubules moving in channels. Finally, we inverted the geometry to demonstrate that kinesins can transport gold nanowires along surface immobilized microtubules, providing a model for nanoscale directed assembly.

  20. Visible-Light Excitation of a Molecular Motor with an Extended Aromatic Core

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Exploring routes to visible-light-driven rotary motors, the possibility of red-shifting the excitation wavelength of molecular motors by extension of the aromatic core is studied. Introducing a dibenzofluorenyl moiety in a standard molecular motor resulted in red-shifting of the absorption spectrum. UV/vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy showed that these motors could be isomerized with light of wavelengths up to 490 nm and that the structural modification did not impair the anticipated rotary behavior. Extension of the aromatic core is therefore a suitable strategy to apply in pursuit of visible-light-driven molecular motors. PMID:28248510

  1. Molecular Architecture of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The flagellum is one of the most sophisticated self-assembling molecular machines in bacteria. Powered by the proton-motive force, the flagellum rapidly rotates in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, which ultimately controls bacterial motility and behavior. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica have served as important model systems for extensive genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of the flagellum, providing unparalleled insights into its structure, function, and gene regulation. Despite these advances, our understanding of flagellar assembly and rotational mechanisms remains incomplete, in part because of the limited structural information available regarding the intact rotor–stator complex and secretion apparatus. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has become a valuable imaging technique capable of visualizing the intact flagellar motor in cells at molecular resolution. Because the resolution that can be achieved by cryo-ET with large bacteria (such as E. coli and S. enterica) is limited, analysis of small-diameter bacteria (including Borrelia burgdorferi and Campylobacter jejuni) can provide additional insights into the in situ structure of the flagellar motor and other cellular components. This review is focused on the application of cryo-ET, in combination with genetic and biophysical approaches, to the study of flagellar structures and its potential for improving the understanding of rotor–stator interactions, the rotational switching mechanism, and the secretion and assembly of flagellar components. PMID:24697492

  2. Stochastic thermodynamics of single enzymes and molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Seifert, U

    2011-03-01

    For a single enzyme or molecular motor operating in an aqueous solution of non-equilibrated solute concentrations, a thermodynamic description is developed on the level of an individual trajectory of transitions between states. The concept of internal energy, intrinsic entropy and free energy for states follows from a microscopic description using one assumption on time scale separation. A first-law energy balance then allows the unique identification of the heat dissipated in one transition. Consistency with the second law on the ensemble level enforces both stochastic entropy as third contribution to the entropy change involved in one transition and the local detailed balance condition for the ratio between forward and backward rates for any transition. These results follow without assuming weak coupling between the enzyme and the solutes, ideal solution behavior or mass action law kinetics. The present approach highlights both the crucial role of the intrinsic entropy of each state and the physically questionable role of chemiostats for deriving the first law for molecular motors subject to an external force under realistic conditions.

  3. Active fluidization of polymer networks through molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, D; Duggan, C; Saha, D; Smith, D; Käs, J

    2002-03-28

    Entangled polymer solutions and melts exhibit elastic, solid-like resistance to quick deformations and a viscous, fluid-like response to slow deformations. This viscoelastic behaviour reflects the dynamics of individual polymer chains driven by brownian motion: since individual chains can only move in a snake-like fashion through the mesh of surrounding polymer molecules, their diffusive transport, described by reptation, is so slow that the relaxation of suddenly imposed stress is delayed. Entangled polymer solutions and melts therefore elastically resist deforming motions that occur faster than the stress relaxation time. Here we show that the protein myosin II permits active control over the viscoelastic behaviour of actin filament solutions. We find that when each actin filament in a polymerized actin solution interacts with at least one myosin minifilament, the stress relaxation time of the polymer solution is significantly shortened. We attribute this effect to myosin's action as a 'molecular motor', which allows it to interact with randomly oriented actin filaments and push them through the solution, thus enhancing longitudinal filament motion. By superseding reptation with sliding motion, the molecular motors thus overcome a fundamental principle of complex fluids: that only depolymerization makes an entangled, isotropic polymer solution fluid for quick deformations.

  4. High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy of a Molecular Rotary Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingos, Sergio R.; Cnossen, Arjen; Perez, Cristobal; Buma, Wybren Jan; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Schnell, Melanie

    2017-06-01

    To develop synthetic molecular motors and machinery that can mimic their biological counterparts has become a stimulating quest in modern synthetic chemistry. Gas phase studies of these simpler synthetic model systems provide the necessary isolated conditions that facilitate the elucidation of their structural intricacies. We report the first high-resolution rotational study of a synthetic molecular rotary motor based on chiral overcrowded alkenes using chirp-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Rotational constants and quartic centrifugal distortion constants were determined based on a fit using more than two hundred rotational transitions spanning 5≤J≤21 in the 2-4 GHz frequency range. Despite the lack of polar groups, the rotor's asymmetry produces strong a- and b-type rotational transitions arising from a single predominant conformer. Evidence for fragmentation of the rotor allows for unambiguous identification of the isolated rotor components. The experimental spectroscopic parameters of the rotor are compared and discussed against current high-level ab initio and density functional theory methods. Vicario et al. Chem. Commun., 5910-5912 (2005) Brown et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum., 79, 053103 (2008)

  5. Protonmotive force: development of electrostatic drivers for synthetic molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Crowley, James D; Steele, Ian M; Bosnich, Brice

    2006-12-04

    Ferrocene has been investigated as a platform for developing protonmotive electrostatic drivers for molecular motors. When two 3-pyridine groups are substituted to the (rapidly rotating) cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings of ferrocene, one on each Cp, it is shown that the (Cp) eclipsed, pi-stacked rotameric conformation is preferred both in solution and in the solid state. Upon quaternization of both of the pyridines substituents, either by protonation or by alkylation, it is shown that the preferred rotameric conformation is one where the pyridinium groups are rotated away from the fully pi-stacked conformation. Electrostatic calculations indicate that the rotation is caused by the electrostatic repulsion between the charges. Consistently, when the pi-stacking energy is increased pi-stacked population increases, and conversely when the electrostatic repulsion is increased pi-stacked population is decreased. This work serves to provide an approximate estimate of the amount of torque that the electrostatically driven ferrocene platform can generate when incorporated into a molecular motor. The overall conclusion is that the electrostatic interaction energy between dicationic ferrocene dipyridyl systems is similar to the pi-stacking interaction energy and, consequently, at least tricationic systems are required to fully uncouple the pi-stacked pyridine substituents.

  6. How molecular motors work – insights from the molecular machinist's toolbox: the Nobel prize in Chemistry 2016

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R. D.

    2017-01-01

    The Nobel prize in Chemistry for 2016 was awarded to Jean Pierre Sauvage, Sir James Fraser Stoddart, and Bernard (Ben) Feringa for their contributions to the design and synthesis of molecular machines. While this field is still in its infancy, and at present there are no commercial applications, many observers have stressed the tremendous potential of molecular machines to revolutionize technology. However, perhaps the most important result so far accruing from the synthesis of molecular machines is the insight provided into the fundamental mechanisms by which molecular motors, including biological motors such as kinesin, myosin, FoF1 ATPase, and the flagellar motor, function. The ability to “tinker” with separate components of molecular motors allows asking, and answering, specific questions about mechanism, particularly with regard to light driven vs. chemistry driven molecular motors. PMID:28572896

  7. Kinesin molecular motors: Transport pathways, receptors, and human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2001-06-01

    Kinesin molecular motor proteins are responsible for many of the major microtubule-dependent transport pathways in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identity of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. Kinesin-II recently was found to be required for transport in motile and nonmotile cilia and flagella where it is essential for proper left-right determination in mammalian development, sensory function in ciliated neurons, and opsin transport and viability in photoreceptors. Thus, these pathways and proteins may be prominent contributors to several human diseases including ciliary dyskinesias, situs inversus, and retinitis pigmentosa. Kinesin-I is needed to move many different types of cargoes in neuronal axons. Two candidates for receptor proteins that attach kinesin-I to vesicular cargoes were recently found. One candidate, sunday driver, is proposed to both link kinesin-I to an unknown vesicular cargo and to bind and organize the mitogen-activated protein kinase components of a c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling module. A second candidate, amyloid precursor protein, is proposed to link kinesin-I to a different, also unknown, class of axonal vesicles. The finding of a possible functional interaction between kinesin-I and amyloid precursor protein may implicate kinesin-I based transport in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Optogenetic control of molecular motors and organelle distributions in cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liting; Che, Daphne; Zhang, Kai; Ong, Qunxiang; Guo, Shunling; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-05-21

    Intracellular transport and distribution of organelles play important roles in diverse cellular functions, including cell polarization, intracellular signaling, cell survival, and apoptosis. Here, we report an optogenetic strategy to control the transport and distribution of organelles by light. This is achieved by optically recruiting molecular motors onto organelles through the heterodimerization of Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) and its interacting partner CIB1. CRY2 and CIB1 dimerize within subseconds upon exposure to blue light, which requires no exogenous ligands and low intensity of light. We demonstrate that mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lysosomes can be driven toward the cell periphery upon light-induced recruitment of kinesin, or toward the cell nucleus upon recruitment of dynein. Light-induced motor recruitment and organelle movements are repeatable, reversible, and can be achieved at subcellular regions. This light-controlled organelle redistribution provides a new strategy for studying the causal roles of organelle transport and distribution in cellular functions in living cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stepping molecular motor amid Lévy white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, Bartosz; Valenti, Davide; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Bier, Martin; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2015-04-01

    We consider a model of a stepping molecular motor consisting of two connected heads. Directional motion of the stepper takes place along a one-dimensional track. Each head is subject to a periodic potential without spatial reflection symmetry. When the potential for one head is switched on, it is switched off for the other head. Additionally, the system is subject to the influence of symmetric, white Lévy noise that mimics the action of external random forcing. The stepper exhibits motion with a preferred direction which is examined by analyzing the median of the displacement of a midpoint between the positions of the two heads. We study the modified dynamics of the stepper by numerical simulations. We find flux reversals as noise parameters are changed. Speed and direction appear to very sensitively depend on characteristics of the noise.

  10. Stepping molecular motor amid Lévy white noise.

    PubMed

    Lisowski, Bartosz; Valenti, Davide; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Bier, Martin; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2015-04-01

    We consider a model of a stepping molecular motor consisting of two connected heads. Directional motion of the stepper takes place along a one-dimensional track. Each head is subject to a periodic potential without spatial reflection symmetry. When the potential for one head is switched on, it is switched off for the other head. Additionally, the system is subject to the influence of symmetric, white Lévy noise that mimics the action of external random forcing. The stepper exhibits motion with a preferred direction which is examined by analyzing the median of the displacement of a midpoint between the positions of the two heads. We study the modified dynamics of the stepper by numerical simulations. We find flux reversals as noise parameters are changed. Speed and direction appear to very sensitively depend on characteristics of the noise.

  11. On the way to rotaxane-based molecular motors: studies in molecular mobility and topological chirality.

    PubMed

    Schalley, C A; Beizai, K; Vögtle, F

    2001-06-01

    ATP synthase represents a machine at the molecular level which couples the rotation of an axle in a wheel with the endergonic production of ATP, the general source of chemical energy in the cell. The natural system prototypically bears all features of a macroscopic motor: a rotor within a stator held by a membrane and fueled by a difference in chemical potential in the form of a proton gradient combined with a machine for ATP production. The assembly of axle and wheel to a rotor device reminds one very much of a rotaxane. In this Account, we discuss some important features of motors and their (potential) realization in simpler artificial model systems, that is, the molecular mobility of mechanically bound molecules, the importance of chirality for unidirectional motion, the sources of energy for driving the rotation, and the potential of using membranes and surfaces for ordering a large number of devices to achieve macroscopic effects.

  12. Kinesin Motor Enzymology: Chemistry, Structure, and Physics of Nanoscale Molecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Cochran, J C

    2015-09-01

    Molecular motors are enzymes that convert chemical potential energy into controlled kinetic energy for mechanical work inside cells. Understanding the biophysics of these motors is essential for appreciating life as well as apprehending diseases that arise from motor malfunction. This review focuses on kinesin motor enzymology with special emphasis on the literature that reports the chemistry, structure and physics of several different kinesin superfamily members.

  13. Reprogrammable Assembly of Molecular Motor on Solid Surfaces via Dynamic Bonds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Sun, Jian; Wang, Qian; Guan, Yan; Zhou, Le; Zhang, Jingxuan; Zhang, Lanying; Yang, Huai

    2017-06-01

    Controllable assembly of molecular motors on solid surfaces is a fundamental issue for providing them to perform physical tasks. However, it can hardly be achieved by most previous methods due to their inherent limitations. Here, a general strategy is designed for the reprogrammable assembly of molecular motors on solid surfaces based on dynamic bonds. In this method, molecular motors with disulfide bonds can be remotely, reversibly, and precisely attached to solid surfaces with disulfide bonds, regardless of their chemical composition and microstructure. More importantly, it not only allows encoding geometric information referring to a pattern of molecular motors, but also enables erasing and re-encoding of geometric information via hemolytic photocleavage and recombination of disulfide bonds. Thus, solid surfaces can be regarded as "computer hardware", where molecular motors can be reformatted and reprogramed as geometric information. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. External forces influence the elastic coupling effects during cargo transport by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Cellular transport is achieved by the cooperative action of molecular motors which are elastically linked to a common cargo. When the motors pull on the cargo at the same time, they experience fluctuating elastic strain forces induced by the stepping of the other motors. These elastic coupling forces can influence the motors' stepping and unbinding behavior and thereby the ability to transport cargos. Based on a generic single motor description, we introduce a framework that explains the response of two identical molecular motors to a constant external force. In particular, we relate the single motor parameters, the coupling strength and the external load force to the dynamics of the motor pair. We derive four distinct transport regimes and determine how the crossover lines between the regimes depend on the load force. Our description of the overall cargo dynamics takes into account relaxational displacements of the cargo caused by the unbinding of one motor. For large forces and weak elastic coupling these back-shifts dominate the displacements. To develop an intuitive understanding about motor cooperativity during cargo transport, we introduce a time scale for load sharing. This time scale allows us to predict how the regulation of single motor parameters influences the cooperativity. As an example, we show that up-regulating the single motor processivity enhances load sharing of the motor pair.

  15. Simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhiyuan; Karpeev, Dmitry; Aranson, Igor S.; Bates, Peter W.

    2008-05-01

    We perform Monte Carlo type simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules interacting with molecular motors. We model microtubules as stiff polar rods of equal length exhibiting anisotropic diffusion in the plane. The molecular motors are implicitly introduced by specifying certain probabilistic collision rules resulting in realignment of the rods. This approximation of the complicated microtubule-motor interaction by a simple instant collision allows us to bypass the “computational bottlenecks” associated with the details of the diffusion and the dynamics of motors and the reorientation of microtubules. Consequently, we are able to perform simulations of large ensembles of microtubules and motors on a very large time scale. This simple model reproduces all important phenomenology observed in in vitro experiments: Formation of vortices for low motor density and raylike asters and bundles for higher motor density.

  16. Simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules and molecular motors.

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, Z.; Karpeev, D.; Aranson, I. S.; Bates, P. W.; Michigan State Univ.

    2008-05-01

    We perform Monte Carlo type simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules interacting with molecular motors. We model microtubules as stiff polar rods of equal length exhibiting anisotropic diffusion in the plane. The molecular motors are implicitly introduced by specifying certain probabilistic collision rules resulting in realignment of the rods. This approximation of the complicated microtubule-motor interaction by a simple instant collision allows us to bypass the 'computational bottlenecks' associated with the details of the diffusion and the dynamics of motors and the reorientation of microtubules. Consequently, we are able to perform simulations of large ensembles of microtubules and motors on a very large time scale. This simple model reproduces all important phenomenology observed in in vitro experiments: Formation of vortices for low motor density and raylike asters and bundles for higher motor density.

  17. The reciprocal coordination and mechanics of molecular motors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Laib, Jeneva A; Marin, John A; Bloodgood, Robert A; Guilford, William H

    2009-03-03

    Molecular motors in living cells are involved in whole-cell locomotion, contractility, developmental shape changes, and organelle movement and positioning. Whether motors of different directionality are functionally coordinated in cells or operate in a semirandom "tug of war" is unclear. We show here that anterograde and retrograde microtubule-based motors in the flagella of Chlamydomonas are regulated such that only motors of a common directionality are engaged at any single time. A laser trap was used to position microspheres on the plasma membrane of immobilized paralyzed Chlamydomonas flagella. The anterograde and retrograde movements of the microsphere were measured with nanometer resolution as microtubule-based motors engaged the transmembrane protein FMG-1. An average of 10 motors acted to move the microsphere in either direction. Reversal of direction during a transport event was uncommon, and quiescent periods separated every transport event, suggesting the coordinated and exclusive action of only a single motor type. After a jump to 32 degrees C, temperature-sensitive mutants of kinesin-2 (fla10) showed exclusively retrograde transport events, driven by 7 motors on average. These data suggest that molecular motors in living cells can be reciprocally coordinated to engage simultaneously in large numbers and for exclusive transport in a single direction, even when a mixed population of motors is present. This offers a unique model for studying the mechanics, regulation, and directional coordination of molecular motors in a living intracellular environment.

  18. Enantiopure Functional Molecular Motors Obtained by a Switchable Chiral-Resolution Process.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Gan, Jefri; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-05-17

    Molecular switches, rotors, and motors play an important role in the development of nano-machines and devices, as well as responsive and adaptive functional materials. For unidirectional rotors based on chiral overcrowded alkenes, their stereochemical homogeneity is of crucial importance. Herein, a method to obtain new and functionalizable overcrowded alkenes in enantiopure form is presented. The procedure involves a short synthesis of three steps and a solvent-switchable chiral resolution by using a readily available resolving agent. X-ray crystallography revealed the mode of binding of the motor with the resolving agent, as well as the absolute configuration of the motor. (1) H NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy techniques were used to determine the dynamic behavior of this molecular motor. This method provides rapid access to ample amounts of enantiopure molecular motors, which will greatly facilitate the further development of responsive molecular systems based on chiral overcrowded alkenes.

  19. The Art of Building Small: From Molecular Switches to Motors (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Feringa, Ben L

    2017-09-04

    A journey into the nano-world: The ability to design, use and control motor-like functions at the molecular level sets the stage for numerous dynamic molecular systems. In his Nobel Lecture, B. L. Feringa describes the evolution of the field of molecular motors and explains how to program and control molecules by incorporating responsive and adaptive properties. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Myosin-V: a class of unconventional molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Larson, R E

    1996-03-01

    In this review we focus on the biochemical and structural properties of the myosin-V class of unconventional myosins as an example of the diversity of molecular motors within the myosin superfamily. A member of this class was first identified as a novel calmodulin-binding protein in mammalian brain (Larson RE, Pitta DE and Ferro JA (1988). Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, 21: 213-217). To date, the myosin-V class is represented by two molecules from yeast, one from nematodes, several from vertebrates (chickens, rats, mice and humans) and possibly one from plants. The domain structure of these myosins features a highly conserved head containing the ATP-hydrolysis and actin-binding sites, an extended neck composed of six tandem IQ-motifs which are sites for calmodulin binding and a large tail which has coiled-coil segments intercalated with globular regions of as yet unknown function. Biochemical studies on purified myosin-V from vertebrate brains and the description of myosin-V mutants in yeast and mice have made myosin-V one of the best characterized, unconventional myosin classes at the present time, surpassed only by the well-studied myosin-I class.

  1. Harnessing molecular motors for nanoscale pulldown in live cells.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jonathan E; Barzik, Melanie; Drummond, Meghan C; Sutton, Daniel C; Goodman, Spencer M; Morozko, Eva L; Cole, Stacey M; Boukhvalova, Alexandra K; Skidmore, Jennifer; Syam, Diana; Wilson, Elizabeth A; Fitzgerald, Tracy; Rehman, Atteeq U; Martin, Donna M; Boger, Erich T; Belyantseva, Inna A; Friedman, Thomas B

    2017-02-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) regulate assembly of macromolecular complexes, yet remain challenging to study within the native cytoplasm where they normally exert their biological effect. Here we miniaturize the concept of affinity pulldown, a gold-standard in vitro PPI interrogation technique, to perform nanoscale pulldowns (NanoSPDs) within living cells. NanoSPD hijacks the normal process of intracellular trafficking by myosin motors to forcibly pull fluorescently tagged protein complexes along filopodial actin filaments. Using dual-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate complex formation by showing that bait and prey molecules are simultaneously trafficked and actively concentrated into a nanoscopic volume at the tips of filopodia. The resulting molecular traffic jams at filopodial tips amplify fluorescence intensities and allow PPIs to be interrogated using standard epifluorescence microscopy. A rigorous quantification framework and software tool are provided to statistically evaluate NanoSPD data sets. We demonstrate the capabilities of NanoSPD for a range of nuclear and cytoplasmic PPIs implicated in human deafness, in addition to dissecting these interactions using domain mapping and mutagenesis experiments. The NanoSPD methodology is extensible for use with other fluorescent molecules, in addition to proteins, and the platform can be easily scaled for high-throughput applications.

  2. Fluctuation theorems for discrete kinetic models of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggionato, Alessandra; Silvestri, Vittoria

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by discrete kinetic models for non-cooperative molecular motors on periodic tracks, we consider random walks (also not Markov) on quasi one dimensional (1d) lattices, obtained by gluing several copies of a fundamental graph in a linear fashion. We show that, for a suitable class of quasi-1d lattices, the large deviation rate function associated to the position of the walker satisfies a Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry for any choice of the dynamical parameters defining the stochastic walk. This class includes the linear model considered in Lacoste et al (2008 Phys. Rev. E 78 011915). We also derive fluctuation theorems for the time-integrated cycle currents and discuss how the matrix approach of Lacoste et al (2008 Phys. Rev. E 78 011915) can be extended to derive the above Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry for any Markov random walk on {Z} with periodic jump rates. Finally, we review in the present context some large deviation results of Faggionato and Silvestri (2017 Ann. Inst. Henri Poincaré 53 46-78) and give some specific examples with explicit computations.

  3. Coarse-Grained Structural Modeling of Molecular Motors Using Multibody Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Parker, David; Bryant, Zev; Delp, Scott L

    2009-09-01

    Experimental and computational approaches are needed to uncover the mechanisms by which molecular motors convert chemical energy into mechanical work. In this article, we describe methods and software to generate structurally realistic models of molecular motor conformations compatible with experimental data from different sources. Coarse-grained models of molecular structures are constructed by combining groups of atoms into a system of rigid bodies connected by joints. Contacts between rigid bodies enforce excluded volume constraints, and spring potentials model system elasticity. This simplified representation allows the conformations of complex molecular motors to be simulated interactively, providing a tool for hypothesis building and quantitative comparisons between models and experiments. In an example calculation, we have used the software to construct atomically detailed models of the myosin V molecular motor bound to its actin track. The software is available at www.simtk.org.

  4. Molecular motors robustly drive active gels to a critically connected state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, José; Sheinman, Michael; Sharma, Abhinav; Mackintosh, Fred C.; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2013-09-01

    Living systems naturally exhibit internal driving: active, molecular processes drive non-equilibrium phenomena such as metabolism or migration. Active gels constitute a fascinating class of internally driven matter, in which molecular motors exert localized stresses inside polymer networks. There is evidence that network crosslinking is required to allow motors to induce macroscopic contraction. Yet a quantitative understanding of how network connectivity enables contraction is lacking. Here we show experimentally that myosin motors contract crosslinked actin polymer networks to clusters with a scale-free size distribution. This critical behaviour occurs over an unexpectedly broad range of crosslink concentrations. To understand this robustness, we developed a quantitative model of contractile networks that takes into account network restructuring: motors reduce connectivity by forcing crosslinks to unbind. Paradoxically, to coordinate global contractions, motor activity should be low. Otherwise, motors drive initially well-connected networks to a critical state where ruptures form across the entire network.

  5. Construction of a Chassis for a Tripartite Protein-Based Molecular Motor.

    PubMed

    Small, Lara S R; Bruning, Marc; Thomson, Andrew R; Boyle, Aimee L; Davies, Roberta B; Curmi, Paul M G; Forde, Nancy R; Linke, Heiner; Woolfson, Derek N; Bromley, Elizabeth H C

    2017-03-14

    Improving our understanding of biological motors, both to fully comprehend their activities in vital processes, and to exploit their impressive abilities for use in bionanotechnology, is highly desirable. One means of understanding these systems is through the production of synthetic molecular motors. We demonstrate the use of orthogonal coiled-coil dimers (including both parallel and antiparallel coiled coils) as a hub for linking other components of a previously described synthetic molecular motor, the Tumbleweed. We use circular dichroism, analytical ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, and disulfide rearrangement studies to demonstrate the ability of this six-peptide set to form the structure designed for the Tumbleweed motor. The successful formation of a suitable hub structure is both a test of the transferability of design rules for protein folding as well as an important step in the production of a synthetic protein-based molecular motor.

  6. How Molecular Motors Are Arranged on a Cargo Is Important for Vesicular Transport

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Robert P.; Jia, Zhiyuan; Gross, Steven P.; Yu, Clare C.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial organization of the cell depends upon intracellular trafficking of cargos hauled along microtubules and actin filaments by the molecular motor proteins kinesin, dynein, and myosin. Although much is known about how single motors function, there is significant evidence that cargos in vivo are carried by multiple motors. While some aspects of multiple motor function have received attention, how the cargo itself —and motor organization on the cargo—affects transport has not been considered. To address this, we have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of motors transporting a spherical cargo, subject to thermal fluctuations that produce both rotational and translational diffusion. We found that these fluctuations could exert a load on the motor(s), significantly decreasing the mean travel distance and velocity of large cargos, especially at large viscosities. In addition, the presence of the cargo could dramatically help the motor to bind productively to the microtubule: the relatively slow translational and rotational diffusion of moderately sized cargos gave the motors ample opportunity to bind to a microtubule before the motor/cargo ensemble diffuses out of range of that microtubule. For rapidly diffusing cargos, the probability of their binding to a microtubule was high if there were nearby microtubules that they could easily reach by translational diffusion. Our simulations found that one reason why motors may be approximately 100 nm long is to improve their ‘on’ rates when attached to comparably sized cargos. Finally, our results suggested that to efficiently regulate the number of active motors, motors should be clustered together rather than spread randomly over the surface of the cargo. While our simulation uses the specific parameters for kinesin, these effects result from generic properties of the motors, cargos, and filaments, so they should apply to other motors as well. PMID:21573204

  7. How molecular motors are arranged on a cargo is important for vesicular transport.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Robert P; Jia, Zhiyuan; Gross, Steven P; Yu, Clare C

    2011-05-01

    The spatial organization of the cell depends upon intracellular trafficking of cargos hauled along microtubules and actin filaments by the molecular motor proteins kinesin, dynein, and myosin. Although much is known about how single motors function, there is significant evidence that cargos in vivo are carried by multiple motors. While some aspects of multiple motor function have received attention, how the cargo itself--and motor organization on the cargo--affects transport has not been considered. To address this, we have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of motors transporting a spherical cargo, subject to thermal fluctuations that produce both rotational and translational diffusion. We found that these fluctuations could exert a load on the motor(s), significantly decreasing the mean travel distance and velocity of large cargos, especially at large viscosities. In addition, the presence of the cargo could dramatically help the motor to bind productively to the microtubule: the relatively slow translational and rotational diffusion of moderately sized cargos gave the motors ample opportunity to bind to a microtubule before the motor/cargo ensemble diffuses out of range of that microtubule. For rapidly diffusing cargos, the probability of their binding to a microtubule was high if there were nearby microtubules that they could easily reach by translational diffusion. Our simulations found that one reason why motors may be approximately 100 nm long is to improve their 'on' rates when attached to comparably sized cargos. Finally, our results suggested that to efficiently regulate the number of active motors, motors should be clustered together rather than spread randomly over the surface of the cargo. While our simulation uses the specific parameters for kinesin, these effects result from generic properties of the motors, cargos, and filaments, so they should apply to other motors as well.

  8. Defocused Imaging of UV-Driven Surface-Bound Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Krajnik, Bartosz; Chen, Jiawen; Watson, Matthew A; Cockroft, Scott L; Feringa, Ben L; Hofkens, Johan

    2017-05-31

    Synthetic molecular motors continue to attract great interest due to their ability to transduce energy into nanomechanical motion, the potential to do work and drive systems out-of-equilibrium. Of particular interest are unidirectional rotary molecular motors driven by chemical fuel or light. Probing the mechanistic details of their operation at the single-molecule level is hampered by the diffraction limit, which prevents the collection of dynamic positional information by traditional optical methods. Here, we use defocused wide-field imaging to examine the unidirectional rotation of individual molecular rotary motors on a quartz surface in unprecedented detail. The sequential occupation of nanomechanical states during the UV and heat-induced cycle of rotation are directly imaged in real-time. The approach will undoubtedly prove important in elucidating the mechanistic details and assessing the utility of novel synthetic molecular motors in the future.

  9. Chiral Hydrogen Bond Environment Providing Unidirectional Rotation in Photoactive Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    García-Iriepa, Cristina; Marazzi, Marco; Zapata, Felipe; Valentini, Alessio; Sampedro, Diego; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2013-05-02

    Generation of a chiral hydrogen bond environment in efficient molecular photoswitches is proposed as a novel strategy for the design of photoactive molecular motors. Here, the following strategy is used to design a retinal-based motor presenting singular properties: (i) a single excitation wavelength is needed to complete the unidirectional rotation process (360°); (ii) the absence of any thermal step permits the process to take place at low temperatures; and (iii) the ultrafast process permits high rotational frequencies.

  10. Effects of the chemomechanical stepping cycle on the traffic of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Stefan; Chai, Yan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2008-10-01

    We discuss effects of the stepping kinetics of molecular motors on their traffic behavior on crowded filaments using a simple two-state chemomechanical cycle. While the general traffic behavior is quite robust with respect to the detailed kinetics of the step, a few observable parameters exhibit a strong dependence on these parameters. Most strikingly, the effective unbinding rate of the motors may both increase and decrease with increasing traffic density, depending on the details of the motor step. Likewise the run length either exhibits a strong decrease or almost no dependence on the traffic density. We compare our theoretical results with recent experimental observations on motor traffic.

  11. Enhanced Diffusion of Molecular Motors in the Presence of Adenosine Triphosphate and External Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Ryota; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The diffusion of a molecular motor in the presence of a constant external force is considered on the basis of a simple theoretical model. The motor is represented by a Brownian particle moving in a series of parabolic potentials placed periodically on a line, and the potential is switched stochastically from one parabola to another by a chemical reaction, which corresponds to the hydrolysis or synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in motor proteins. It is found that the diffusion coefficient as a function of the force exhibits peaks. The mechanism of this diffusion enhancement and the possibility of observing it in F1-ATPase, a biological rotary motor, are discussed.

  12. Symposium FF: Molecular Motors, Nanomachines, and Active Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-23

    catalytic activity and HMM propelled actin filament sliding may be exploited for highly parallel, far-field light- microscopy based characterization of...stochastic model for motor cooperation based on the known properties of single motor molecules and in vitro bead assays with latex beads that were incubated...scientists from diverse fields working on the conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy. Topics presented spanned the nano- ( single molecule

  13. Computational Design of a Family of Light-Driven Rotary Molecular Motors with Improved Quantum Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two new light-driven molecular rotary motors based on the N-alkylated indanylidene benzopyrrole frameworks are proposed and studied using quantum chemical calculations and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. These new motors perform pure axial rotation, and the photochemical steps of the rotary cycle are dominated by the fast bond-length-alternation motion that enables ultrafast access to the S1/S0 intersection. The new motors are predicted to display a quantum efficiency higher than that of the currently available synthetic all-hydrocarbon motors. Remarkably, the quantum efficiency is not governed by the topography (peaked versus sloped) of the minimum-energy conical intersection, whereas the S1 decay time depends on the topography as well as on the energy of the intersection relative to the S1 minimum. It is the axial chirality (helicity), rather than the point chirality, that controls the sense of rotation of the motor. PMID:26670164

  14. Transport dynamics of molecular motors that switch between an active and inactive state.

    PubMed

    Pinkoviezky, I; Gov, N S

    2013-08-01

    Molecular motors are involved in key transport processes in the cell. Many of these motors can switch from an active to a nonactive state, either spontaneously or depending on their interaction with other molecules. When active, the motors move processively along the filaments, while when inactive they are stationary. We treat here the simple case of spontaneously switching motors, between the active and inactive states, along an open linear track. We use our recent analogy with vehicular traffic, where we go beyond the mean-field description. We map the phase diagram of this system, and find that it clearly breaks the symmetry between the different phases, as compared to the standard total asymmetric exclusion process. We make several predictions that may be testable using molecular motors in vitro and in living cells.

  15. Towards dynamic control of wettability by using functionalized altitudinal molecular motors on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    London, Gábor; Chen, Kuang-Yen; Carroll, Gregory T; Feringa, Ben L

    2013-08-05

    We report the synthesis of altitudinal molecular motors that contain functional groups in their rotor part. In an approach to achieve dynamic control over the properties of solid surfaces, a hydrophobic perfluorobutyl chain and a relatively hydrophilic cyano group were introduced to the rotor part of the motors. Molecular motors were attached to quartz surfaces by using interfacial 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions. To test the effect of the functional groups on the rotary motion, photochemical and thermal isomerization studies of the motors were performed both in solution and when attached to the surface. We found that the substituents have no significant effect on the thermal and photochemical processes, and the functionalized motors preserved their rotary function both in solution and on a quartz surface. Preliminary results on the influence of the functional groups on surface wettability are also described.

  16. Computational Design of a Family of Light-Driven Rotary Molecular Motors with Improved Quantum Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Alexander; Gamez, Jose A; Thiel, Walter; Filatov, Michael

    2016-01-07

    Two new light-driven molecular rotary motors based on the N-alkylated indanylidene benzopyrrole frameworks are proposed and studied using quantum chemical calculations and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. These new motors perform pure axial rotation, and the photochemical steps of the rotary cycle are dominated by the fast bond-length-alternation motion that enables ultrafast access to the S1/S0 intersection. The new motors are predicted to display a quantum efficiency higher than that of the currently available synthetic all-hydrocarbon motors. Remarkably, the quantum efficiency is not governed by the topography (peaked versus sloped) of the minimum-energy conical intersection, whereas the S1 decay time depends on the topography as well as on the energy of the intersection relative to the S1 minimum. It is the axial chirality (helicity), rather than the point chirality, that controls the sense of rotation of the motor.

  17. Correlations and symmetry of interactions influence collective dynamics of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis-Garza, Daniel; Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-04-01

    Enzymatic molecules that actively support many cellular processes, including transport, cell division and cell motility, are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. Experimental studies indicate that they interact with each other and they frequently work together in large groups. To understand the mechanisms of collective behavior of motor proteins we study the effect of interactions in the transport of molecular motors along linear filaments. It is done by analyzing a recently introduced class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes that takes into account the intermolecular interactions via thermodynamically consistent approach. We develop a new theoretical method that allows us to compute analytically all dynamic properties of the system. Our analysis shows that correlations play important role in dynamics of interacting molecular motors. Surprisingly, we find that the correlations for repulsive interactions are weaker and more short-range than the correlations for the attractive interactions. In addition, it is shown that symmetry of interactions affect dynamic properties of molecular motors. The implications of these findings for motor proteins transport are discussed. Our theoretical predictions are tested by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations.

  18. Effectiveness, active energy produced by molecular motors, and nonlinear capacitance of the cochlear outer hair cell.

    PubMed

    Spector, Alexander A

    2005-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells are crucial for active hearing. These cells have a unique form of motility, named electromotility, whose main features are the cell's length changes, active force production, and nonlinear capacitance. The molecular motor, prestin, that drives outer hair cell electromotility has recently been identified. We reveal relationships between the active energy produced by the outer hair cell molecular motors, motor effectiveness, and the capacitive properties of the cell membrane. We quantitatively characterize these relationships by introducing three characteristics: effective capacitance, zero-strain capacitance, and zero-resultant capacitance. We show that zero-strain capacitance is smaller than zero-resultant capacitance, and that the effective capacitance is between the two. It was also found that the differences between the introduced capacitive characteristics can be expressed in terms of the active energy produced by the cell's molecular motors. The effectiveness of the cell and its molecular motors is introduced as the ratio of the motors'active energy to the energy of the externally applied electric field. It is shown that the effectiveness is proportional to the difference between zero-strain and zero-resultant capacitance. We analyze the cell and motor's effectiveness within a broad range of cellular parameters and estimate it to be within a range of 12%-30%.

  19. Exclusion and Hierarchy of Time Scales Lead to Spatial Segregation of Molecular Motors in Cellular Protrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkoviezky, I.; Gov, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular motors that carry cargo along biopolymer filaments within cells play a crucial role in the functioning of the cell. In particular, these motors are essential for the formation and maintenance of the cellular protrusions that play key roles in motility and specific functionalities, such as the stereocilia in hair cells. Typically, there are several species of motors, carrying different cargos, that share the same track. Furthermore, it was observed that in the mature stereocilia, the different motors occupy well-segregated bands as a function of distance from the tip. We use a totally asymmetric exclusion process model with two- and three-motor species, to study the conditions that give rise to such spatial patterns. We find that the well-segregated bands appear for motors with a strong hierarchy of attachment or detachment rates. This is a striking example of pattern formation in nonequilibrium, low-dimensional systems.

  20. Exclusion and Hierarchy of Time Scales Lead to Spatial Segregation of Molecular Motors in Cellular Protrusions.

    PubMed

    Pinkoviezky, I; Gov, N S

    2017-01-06

    Molecular motors that carry cargo along biopolymer filaments within cells play a crucial role in the functioning of the cell. In particular, these motors are essential for the formation and maintenance of the cellular protrusions that play key roles in motility and specific functionalities, such as the stereocilia in hair cells. Typically, there are several species of motors, carrying different cargos, that share the same track. Furthermore, it was observed that in the mature stereocilia, the different motors occupy well-segregated bands as a function of distance from the tip. We use a totally asymmetric exclusion process model with two- and three-motor species, to study the conditions that give rise to such spatial patterns. We find that the well-segregated bands appear for motors with a strong hierarchy of attachment or detachment rates. This is a striking example of pattern formation in nonequilibrium, low-dimensional systems.

  1. Differential screening of mutated SOD1 transgenic mice reveals early up-regulation of a fast axonal transport component in spinal cord motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, L; de Tapia, M; René, F; Lutz-Bucher, B; Gordon, J W; Mercken, L; Pradier, L; Loeffler, J P

    2000-08-01

    In the present study we analyze the molecular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). For this, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene with a Gly(86) to Arg (G86R) mutation equivalent to that found in a subset of human FALS. Using an optimized suppression subtractive hybridization method, a cDNA specifically up-regulated during the asymptomatic phase in the lumbar spinal cord of G86R mice was identified by sequence analysis as the KIF3-associated protein (KAP3), a regulator of fast axonal transport. RT-PCR analysis revealed that KAP3 induction was an early event arising long before axonal degeneration. Immunohistochemical studies further revealed that KAP3 protein predominantly accumulates in large motor neurons of the ventral spinal cord. We further demonstrated that KAP3 up-regulation occurs independent of any change in the other components of the kinesin II complex. However, since the ubiquitous KIF1A motor is up-regulated, our results show an early and complex rearrangement of the fast axonal transport machinery in the course of FALS pathology.

  2. Mechanism of cooperative behaviour in systems of slow and fast molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Larson, Adam G; Landahl, Eric C; Rice, Sarah E

    2009-06-28

    Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [M. J. Muller, S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2008, 105(12), 4609-4614; S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2005, 102(48), 17284-17289]. Here, we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behaviour of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity approximately 15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behaviour depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors.

  3. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells. PMID:23587993

  4. Pattern Formations in Polymer-Molecular Motor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Humphrey, David; Duggan, Cynthia; Käs, Josef

    2001-03-01

    In previous studies with the microtubule-kinesin system, organized patterns such as asters and rotating vortices have been seen (Nedelec et al, Nature 1997), which were of a dynamic nature and dependent on active motors. A similar system was constructed using actin and myosin, which displays similar patterns, however, with drastically different dynamics. These patterns arise independent of the initial amount of immediate use energy (in the form of ATP), assembling only upon the near exhaustion of available ATP. Further studies have clearly shown that in fact these patterns are not dependent upon the motor activity of the myosin but its propensity to serve as a cross-linking element in an actin network, with the motor activity serving to prevent the arising of order in the system. We believe the dynamic differences inherent between the two polymer-motor systems studied lies primarily in the structural nature of the motor complexes, with the kinesin complex ordering the system by pushing multiple filaments in a parallel direction, and the myosin complexes disordering the system by pushing filaments in an antiparallel manner.

  5. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, M D

    2013-06-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells.

  6. Kinetic Mechanism of DNA Translocation by the RSC Molecular Motor

    PubMed Central

    Eastlund, Allen; Malik, Shuja Shafi; Fischer, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by chromatin remodeling enzymes requires the translocation of these enzymes along the nucleosomal DNA. Using a fluorescence stopped-flow assay we monitored DNA translocation by a minimal RSC motor and through global analysis of these time courses we have determined that this motor has a macroscopic translocation rate of 2.9 bp/s with a step size of 1.24 bp. From the complementary quantitative analysis of the associated time courses of ATP consumption during DNA translocation we have determined that this motor has an efficiency of 3.0 ATP/bp, which is slightly less that the efficiency observed for several genetically related DNA helicases and which likely results from random pausing by the motor during translocation. Nevertheless, this motor is able to exert enough force during translocation to displace streptavidin from biotinylated DNA. Taken together these results are the necessary first step for quantifying both the role of DNA translocation in nucleosome repositioning by RSC and the efficiency at which RSC couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to nucleosome repositioning. PMID:23399434

  7. Molecular motors: how to make models that can be used to convey the concept of molecular ratchets and thermal capture.

    PubMed

    DoHarris, Lindsay; Giesler, Amanda; Humber, Brent; Sukumar, Aravin; Janssen, Luke J

    2011-06-01

    A wide variety of cellular processes use molecular motors, including processive motors that move along some form of track (e.g., myosin with actin, kinesin or dynein with tubulin) and polymerases that move along a template (e.g., DNA and RNA polymerases, ribosomes). In trying to understand how these molecular motors actually move, many apply their understanding of how man-made motors work: the latter use some form of energy to exert a force or torque on its load. However, quite a different mechanism has been proposed to possibly account for the movement of molecular motors. Rather than hydrolyzing ATP to push or pull their load, they might use their own thermal vibrational energy as well as that of their load and their environment to move the load, capturing those movements that occur along a desired vector or axis and resisting others; ATP hydrolysis is required to make backward movements impossible. This intriguing thermal capture or Brownian ratchet model is relatively more difficult to convey to students. In this report, we describe several teaching aids that are very easily constructed using widely available household materials to convey the concept of a molecular ratchet.

  8. Intrinsic irreversibility limits the efficiency of multidimensional molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, M. W.; Tumlin, C.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the efficiency limits of Brownian motors able to extract work from the temperature difference between reservoirs or from external thermodynamic forces. These systems can operate in a variety of modes, including as isothermal engines, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps. We derive analytical results showing that certain classes of multidimensional Brownian motor, including the Smoluchowski-Feynman ratchet, are unable to attain perfect efficiency (Carnot efficiency for heat engines). This demonstrates the presence of intrinsic irreversibilities in their operating mechanism. We present numerical simulations showing that in some cases the loss process that limits efficiency is associated with vortices in the probability current.

  9. Intrinsic irreversibility limits the efficiency of multidimensional molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Jack, M W; Tumlin, C

    2016-05-01

    We consider the efficiency limits of Brownian motors able to extract work from the temperature difference between reservoirs or from external thermodynamic forces. These systems can operate in a variety of modes, including as isothermal engines, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps. We derive analytical results showing that certain classes of multidimensional Brownian motor, including the Smoluchowski-Feynman ratchet, are unable to attain perfect efficiency (Carnot efficiency for heat engines). This demonstrates the presence of intrinsic irreversibilities in their operating mechanism. We present numerical simulations showing that in some cases the loss process that limits efficiency is associated with vortices in the probability current.

  10. Molecular motors pulling cargos in the viscoelastic cytosol: how power strokes beat subdiffusion.

    PubMed

    Goychuk, Igor; Kharchenko, Vasyl O; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-08-21

    The discovery of anomalous diffusion of larger biopolymers and submicron tracers such as endogenous granules, organelles, or virus capsids in living cells, attributed to the viscoelastic nature of the cytoplasm, provokes the question whether this complex environment equally impacts the active intracellular transport of submicron cargos by molecular motors such as kinesins: does the passive anomalous diffusion of free cargo always imply its anomalously slow active transport by motors, the mean transport distance along microtubule growing sublinearly rather than linearly in time? Here we analyze this question within the widely used two-state Brownian ratchet model of kinesin motors based on the continuous-state diffusion along microtubules driven by a flashing binding potential, where the cargo particle is elastically attached to the motor. Depending on the cargo size, the loading force, the amplitude of the binding potential, the turnover frequency of the molecular motor enzyme, and the linker stiffness we demonstrate that the motor transport may turn out either normal or anomalous, as indeed measured experimentally. We show how a highly efficient normal active transport mediated by motors may emerge despite the passive anomalous diffusion of the cargo, and study the intricate effects of the elastic linker. Under different, well specified conditions the microtubule-based motor transport becomes anomalously slow and thus significantly less efficient.

  11. Tracing entire operation cycles of molecular motor hepatitis C virus helicase in structurally resolved dynamical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus helicase is a molecular motor that splits duplex DNA while actively moving over it. An approximate coarse-grained dynamical description of this protein, including its interactions with DNA and ATP, is constructed. Using such a mechanical model, entire operation cycles of an important protein machine could be followed in structurally resolved dynamical simulations. Ratcheting inchworm translocation and spring-loaded DNA unwinding, suggested by experimental data, were reproduced. Thus, feasibility of coarse-grained simulations, bridging a gap between full molecular dynamics and reduced phenomenological theories of molecular motors, has been demonstrated. PMID:21081697

  12. In silico design and testing of guiding tracks for molecular shuttles powered by kinesin motors.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Takahiro; Tanahashi, Akihito; Hirano, Motohisa

    2010-06-07

    We present an extended computer simulation method which allows in silico design and testing of guiding tracks for molecular shuttles powered by kinesin motors. The simulation reproduced molecular shuttle movements under external forces and dissociation of shuttles from guiding track surfaces. The simulation was validated by comparing the simulation results with the corresponding experimental ones. Using the simulation, track designers can change guiding track designs, choose guiding methods, tune the strength of external forces, and test the module performance. This simulation would significantly reduce the effort expended in designing guiding tracks for molecular shuttles powered by kinesin motors.

  13. Allosteric control of kinesin's motor domain by tubulin: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Krukau, Aliaksei; Knecht, Volker; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2014-04-07

    Molecular motors such as kinesin are essential for many biological processes. These motors have two motor domains, which bind to tubulin filaments, hydrolyze ATP, and transduce the released chemical energy into directed movements. The general principles of this chemomechanical coupling are now well-established but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive because small conformational changes within large proteins are difficult to detect experimentally. Here, we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to monitor such changes within a single motor domain of KIF1A, which belongs to the kinesin-3 motor family. The nucleotide binding pocket of this domain can be empty or occupied by ATP or ADP. For these three nucleotide states, we determine the mobility of the backbone of the protein, both in solution and attached to tubulin. Only one subdomain of the motor domain is found to exhibit a strongly increased mobility upon binding to tubulin: the neck linker that presumably acts as a mechanical transmitter to the other motor domain in dimeric kinesin-3 motors. Furthermore, upon binding to tubulin, the neck linker mobility becomes sensitive to the bound nucleotide and is highly increased after phosphate release, which implies undocking of this linker from the core of the motor domain. These simulation results are consistent with experimental data from EPR spectroscopy, FRET, and cryo-electron microscopy. A detailed analysis of our simulation data also reveals that the undocking of the neck linker in the ADP-kinesin-tubulin state arises from allosteric interactions between the nucleotide and tubulin and that the β-sheet core undergoes a twist both during phosphate release and ATP binding. The computational approach used here can be applied to other motor domains and mechanoenzymes in order to identify allosteric interactions between the subdomains of these proteins.

  14. A molecular brake, not a clutch, stops the Rhodobacter sphaeroides flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Pilizota, Teuta; Brown, Mostyn T.; Leake, Mark C.; Branch, Richard W.; Berry, Richard M.; Armitage, Judith P.

    2009-01-01

    Many bacterial species swim by employing ion-driven molecular motors that power the rotation of helical filaments. Signals are transmitted to the motor from the external environment via the chemotaxis pathway. In bidirectional motors, the binding of phosphorylated CheY (CheY-P) to the motor is presumed to instigate conformational changes that result in a different rotor-stator interface, resulting in rotation in the alternative direction. Controlling when this switch occurs enables bacteria to accumulate in areas favorable for their survival. Unlike most species that swim with bidirectional motors, Rhodobacter sphaeroides employs a single stop-start flagellar motor. Here, we asked, how does the binding of CheY-P stop the motor in R. sphaeroides—using a clutch or a brake? By applying external force with viscous flow or optical tweezers, we show that the R. sphaeroides motor is stopped using a brake. The motor stops at 27–28 discrete angles, locked in place by a relatively high torque, approximately 2–3 times its stall torque. PMID:19571004

  15. How molecular motors work in the crowded environment of living cells: coexistence and efficiency of normal and anomalous transport.

    PubMed

    Goychuk, Igor; Kharchenko, Vasyl O; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments reveal both passive subdiffusion of various nanoparticles and anomalous active transport of such particles by molecular motors in the molecularly crowded environment of living biological cells. Passive and active microrheology reveals that the origin of this anomalous dynamics is due to the viscoelasticity of the intracellular fluid. How do molecular motors perform in such a highly viscous, dissipative environment? Can we explain the observed co-existence of the anomalous transport of relatively large particles of 100 to 500 nm in size by kinesin motors with the normal transport of smaller particles by the same molecular motors? What is the efficiency of molecular motors in the anomalous transport regime? Here we answer these seemingly conflicting questions and consistently explain experimental findings in a generalization of the well-known continuous diffusion model for molecular motors with two conformational states in which viscoelastic effects are included.

  16. Increased speed of rotation for the smallest light-driven molecular motor.

    PubMed

    ter Wiel, Matthijs K J; van Delden, Richard A; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2003-12-10

    In this paper we present the smallest artificial light-driven molecular motor consisting of only 28 carbon and 24 hydrogen atoms. The concept of controlling directionality of rotary movement at the molecular level by introduction of a stereogenic center next to the central olefinic bond of a sterically overcrowded alkene does not only hold for molecular motors with six-membered rings, but is also applicable to achieve the unidirectional movement for molecular motors having five-membered rings. Although X-ray analyses show that the five-membered rings in the cis- and trans-isomer of the new molecular motor are nearly flat, the energy differences between the (pseudo-)diaxial and (pseudo-)diequatorial conformations of the methyl substituents in both isomers are still large enough to direct the rotation of one-half of the molecule with respect to the other half in a clockwise fashion. The full rotary cycle comprises four consecutive steps: two photochemical isomerizations each followed by a thermal helix inversion. Both photochemical cis-trans isomerizations proceed with a preference for the unstable diequatorial isomers over the stable diaxial isomers. The thermal barriers for helix inversion of this motor molecule have decreased dramatically compared to its six-membered ring analogue, the half-life of the fastest step being only 18 s at room temperature.

  17. Interplay between crosslinkers and dynamic molecular motor-induced instabilities in the moderation of biopolymer organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Humphrey, David; Ziebert, Falko; Zimmermann, Walter; Käs, Josef

    2006-03-01

    Structure and function of biological cells rely on the highly-dynamic self-organization of protein filaments to an intracellular cytoskeleton responsive to mechanical and chemical stimuli. While dissolving these complex cellular structures through Brownian motion is inherently slow (tens of minutes), changes in the activity of the molecular motor myosin II cause rapid order-disorder transitions within 1-2 minutes in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin networks. When motor-induced filament sliding decreases, actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies triggered by a nonlinear instability. Modulation of static crosslinker concentrations allow for a wide phase space of order ranging from nematics to compact asters & dense packing of motor-filament clusters. The observed isothermal transitions between disorder and self-organization illustrate that molecular motors can substantially contribute to dynamic cellular organization.

  18. Tug-of-war between opposing molecular motors explains chromosomal oscillation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, S; Paul, R

    2014-03-07

    Chromosomes move towards and away from the centrosomes during the mitosis. This oscillation is observed when the kinetochore, a specific protein structure on the chromosome is captured by centrosome-nucleated polymer called microtubules. We present a computational model, incorporating activities of various molecular motors and microtubule dynamics, to demonstrate the observed oscillation. The model is robust and is not restricted to any particular cell type. Quantifying the average velocity, amplitude and periodicity of the chromosomal oscillation, we compare numerical results with the available experimental data. Our analysis supports a tug-of-war like mechanism between opposing motors that changes the course of chromosomal oscillation. It turns out that, various modes of oscillation can be fully understood by assembling the dynamics of molecular motors. Near the stall regime, when opposing motors are engaged in a tug-of-war, sufficiently large kinetochore-microtubule generated force may prolong the stall durations.

  19. Motility States of Molecular Motors Engaged in a Stochastic Tug-of-War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Melanie J. I.; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular transport is mediated by molecular motors that pull cargos along cytoskeletal filaments. Many cargos move bidirectionally and are transported by two teams of motors which move into opposite directions along the filament. We have recently introduced a stochastic tug-of-war model for this situation. This model describes the motion of the cargo as a Markov process on a two-dimensional state space defined by the numbers of active plus and active minus motors. In spite of its simplicity, this tug-of-war model leads to a complex dependence of the cargo motility on the motor parameters. We present new numerical results for the dependence on the number of involved motors. In addition, we derive a simple and intuitive sharp maxima approximation, from which one obtains the cargo motility state from only four simple inequalities. This approach provides a fast and reliable method to determine the cargo motility.

  20. Future Challenges in Single-Molecule Fluorescence and Laser Trap Approaches to Studies of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Elting, Mary Williard; Spudich, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule analysis is a powerful modern form of biochemistry, in which individual kinetic steps of a catalytic cycle of an enzyme can be explored in exquisite detail. Both single-molecule fluorescence and single-molecule force techniques have been widely used to characterize a number of protein systems. We focus here on molecular motors as a paradigm. We describe two areas where we expect to see exciting developments in the near future: first, characterizing the coupling of force production to chemical and mechanical changes in motors, and second, understanding how multiple motors work together in the environment of the cell. PMID:23237942

  1. Surface Inclusion of Unidirectional Molecular Motors in Hexagonal Tris(o-phenylene)cyclotriphosphazene.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Jiří; Chen, Jiawen; Bastien, Guillaume; Dračínský, Martin; Mašát, Milan; Rogers, Charles T; Feringa, Ben L; Michl, Josef

    2017-08-02

    A new unidirectional light-driven molecular motor suitable for host-guest surface inclusion complexes with tris(o-phenylene)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) was synthesized. The motor molecules formed regular two-dimensional trigonal arrays covering the large facets of disc-shaped TPP nanocrystals. Photochemical and thermal isomerization studies demonstrated that the light-driven rotation of the anchored motors is similar to that observed in solution and is not compromised neither by either the surface confinement or the density of surface coverage (50 vs 100%).

  2. Future challenges in single-molecule fluorescence and laser trap approaches to studies of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Elting, Mary Williard; Spudich, James A

    2012-12-11

    Single-molecule analysis is a powerful modern form of biochemistry, in which individual kinetic steps of a catalytic cycle of an enzyme can be explored in exquisite detail. Both single-molecule fluorescence and single-molecule force techniques have been widely used to characterize a number of protein systems. We focus here on molecular motors as a paradigm. We describe two areas where we expect to see exciting developments in the near future: first, characterizing the coupling of force production to chemical and mechanical changes in motors, and second, understanding how multiple motors work together in the environment of the cell.

  3. Stepping and Crowding of Molecular Motors: Statistical Kinetics from an Exclusion Process Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ciandrini, Luca; Romano, M. Carmen; Parmeggiani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Motor enzymes are remarkable molecular machines that use the energy derived from the hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to generate mechanical movement, achieved through different steps that constitute their kinetic cycle. These macromolecules, nowadays investigated with advanced experimental techniques to unveil their molecular mechanisms and the properties of their kinetic cycles, are implicated in many biological processes, ranging from biopolymerization (e.g., RNA polymerases and ribosomes) to intracellular transport (motor proteins such as kinesins or dyneins). Although the kinetics of individual motors is well studied on both theoretical and experimental grounds, the repercussions of their stepping cycle on the collective dynamics still remains unclear. Advances in this direction will improve our comprehension of transport process in the natural intracellular medium, where processive motor enzymes might operate in crowded conditions. In this work, we therefore extend contemporary statistical kinetic analysis to study collective transport phenomena of motors in terms of lattice gas models belonging to the exclusion process class. Via numerical simulations, we show how to interpret and use the randomness calculated from single particle trajectories in crowded conditions. Importantly, we also show that time fluctuations and non-Poissonian behavior are intrinsically related to spatial correlations and the emergence of large, but finite, clusters of comoving motors. The properties unveiled by our analysis have important biological implications on the collective transport characteristics of processive motor enzymes in crowded conditions. PMID:25185553

  4. Motor properties from persistence: a linear molecular walker lacking spatial and temporal asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckermann, Martin J.; Angstmann, Christopher N.; Schmitt, Regina; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth HC; Forde, Nancy R.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul MG

    2015-05-01

    The stepping direction of linear molecular motors is usually defined by a spatial asymmetry of the motor, its track, or both. Here we present a model for a molecular walker that undergoes biased directional motion along a symmetric track in the presence of a temporally symmetric chemical cycle. Instead of using asymmetry, directionality is achieved by persistence. At small load force the walker can take on average thousands of steps in a given direction until it stochastically reverses direction. We discuss a specific experimental implementation of a synthetic motor based on this design and find, using Langevin and Monte Carlo simulations, that a realistic walker can work against load forces on the order of picoNewtons with an efficiency of ∼18%, comparable to that of kinesin. In principle, the walker can be turned into a permanent motor by externally monitoring the walker’s momentary direction of motion, and using feedback to adjust the direction of a load force. We calculate the thermodynamic cost of using feedback to enhance motor performance in terms of the Shannon entropy, and find that it reduces the efficiency of a realistic motor only marginally. We discuss the implications for natural protein motor performance in the context of the strong performance of this design based only on a thermal ratchet.

  5. Influence of molecular motors on the motion of particles in viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Sebastián

    2014-06-01

    We study theoretically and by numerical simulations the motion of particles driven by molecular motors in a viscoelastic medium representing the cell cytoplasm. For this, we consider a generalized Langevin equation coupled to a stochastic stepping dynamics for the motors that takes into account the action of each motor separately. In the absence of motors, the model produces subdiffusive motion of particles characterized by a power-law scaling of the mean square displacement versus the lag time as t^{α}, with 0<α<1, similar to that observed in cells. Our results show how the action of the motors can induce a transition to a superdiffusive regime at large lag times with the characteristics of those found in experiments reported in the literature. We also show that at small lag times, the motors can act as static crosslinkers that slow down the natural subdiffusive transport. An analysis of previously reported experimental data in the relevant time scales provides evidence of this phenomenon. Finally, we study the effect of a harmonic potential representing an optical trap, and we show a way to approach to a macroscopic description of the active transport in cells. This last point stresses the relevance of the molecular motors for generating not only directed motion to specific targets, but also fast diffusivelike random motion.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of kinesin-14 motors in spindle assembly and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    She, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2017-07-01

    During eukaryote cell division, molecular motors are crucial regulators of microtubule organization, spindle assembly, chromosome segregation and intracellular transport. The kinesin-14 motors are evolutionarily conserved minus-end-directed kinesin motors that occur in diverse organisms from simple yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Members of the kinesin-14 motor family can bind to, crosslink or slide microtubules and, thus, regulate microtubule organization and spindle assembly. In this Commentary, we present the common subthemes that have emerged from studies of the molecular kinetics and mechanics of kinesin-14 motors, particularly with regard to their non-processive movement, their ability to crosslink microtubules and interact with the minus- and plus-ends of microtubules, and with microtubule-organizing center proteins. In particular, counteracting forces between minus-end-directed kinesin-14 and plus-end-directed kinesin-5 motors have recently been implicated in the regulation of microtubule nucleation. We also discuss recent progress in our current understanding of the multiple and fundamental functions that kinesin-14 motors family members have in important aspects of cell division, including the spindle pole, spindle organization and chromosome segregation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Yochelis, A.; Ebrahim, S.; Millis, B.; Cui, R.; Kachar, B.; Naoz, M.; Gov, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general. PMID:26335545

  8. Muscle activation described with a differential equation model for large ensembles of locally coupled molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam

    2014-10-01

    Molecular motors, by turning chemical energy into mechanical work, are responsible for active cellular processes. Often groups of these motors work together to perform their biological role. Motors in an ensemble are coupled and exhibit complex emergent behavior. Although large motor ensembles can be modeled with partial differential equations (PDEs) by assuming that molecules function independently of their neighbors, this assumption is violated when motors are coupled locally. It is therefore unclear how to describe the ensemble behavior of the locally coupled motors responsible for biological processes such as calcium-dependent skeletal muscle activation. Here we develop a theory to describe locally coupled motor ensembles and apply the theory to skeletal muscle activation. The central idea is that a muscle filament can be divided into two phases: an active and an inactive phase. Dynamic changes in the relative size of these phases are described by a set of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). As the dynamics of the active phase are described by PDEs, muscle activation is governed by a set of coupled ODEs and PDEs, building on previous PDE models. With comparison to Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the theory captures the behavior of locally coupled ensembles. The theory also plausibly describes and predicts muscle experiments from molecular to whole muscle scales, suggesting that a micro- to macroscale muscle model is within reach.

  9. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions.

    PubMed

    Yochelis, A; Ebrahim, S; Millis, B; Cui, R; Kachar, B; Naoz, M; Gov, N S

    2015-09-03

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general.

  10. Stepping and crowding of molecular motors: statistical kinetics from an exclusion process perspective.

    PubMed

    Ciandrini, Luca; Romano, M Carmen; Parmeggiani, Andrea

    2014-09-02

    Motor enzymes are remarkable molecular machines that use the energy derived from the hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to generate mechanical movement, achieved through different steps that constitute their kinetic cycle. These macromolecules, nowadays investigated with advanced experimental techniques to unveil their molecular mechanisms and the properties of their kinetic cycles, are implicated in many biological processes, ranging from biopolymerization (e.g., RNA polymerases and ribosomes) to intracellular transport (motor proteins such as kinesins or dyneins). Although the kinetics of individual motors is well studied on both theoretical and experimental grounds, the repercussions of their stepping cycle on the collective dynamics still remains unclear. Advances in this direction will improve our comprehension of transport process in the natural intracellular medium, where processive motor enzymes might operate in crowded conditions. In this work, we therefore extend contemporary statistical kinetic analysis to study collective transport phenomena of motors in terms of lattice gas models belonging to the exclusion process class. Via numerical simulations, we show how to interpret and use the randomness calculated from single particle trajectories in crowded conditions. Importantly, we also show that time fluctuations and non-Poissonian behavior are intrinsically related to spatial correlations and the emergence of large, but finite, clusters of comoving motors. The properties unveiled by our analysis have important biological implications on the collective transport characteristics of processive motor enzymes in crowded conditions.

  11. Asymmetric Synthesis of Second-Generation Light-Driven Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Danowski, Wojciech; Otten, Edwin; Wezenberg, Sander J; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-05-19

    The enantiomeric homogeneity of light-driven molecular motors based on overcrowded alkenes is crucial in their application as either unidirectional rotors or as chiral multistate switches. It was challenging to obtain these compounds as single enantiomers via the established synthetic procedures due to loss of optical purity in the key step, i.e., the Barton-Kellogg olefination reaction. Searching for strategies to avoid racemization, a new class of light-driven molecular motors was designed, synthesized, and studied. The stereochemical integrity was fully preserved throughout the synthesis, and on the basis of photochemical and kinetic studies using UV/vis, CD, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, it was established that they still function properly as unidirectional molecular motors.

  12. An enantioselective synthetic route toward second-generation light-driven rotary molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Pijper, Thomas C; Pijper, Dirk; Pollard, Michael M; Dumur, Frédéric; Davey, Stephen G; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2010-02-05

    Controlling the unidirectional rotary process of second-generation molecular motors demands access to these motors in their enantiomerically pure form. In this paper, we describe an enantioselective route to three new second-generation light-driven molecular motors. Their synthesis starts with the preparation of an optically active alpha-methoxy-substituted upper-half ketone involving an enzymatic resolution. The subsequent conversion of this ketone to the corresponding hydrazone by treatment with hydrazine led to full racemization. However, conversion to a TBDMS-protected hydrazone by treatment with bis-TBDMS hydrazine, prepared according to a new procedure, proceeds with nearly full retention of the stereochemical integrity. Oxidation of the TBDMS-protected hydrazone and subsequent coupling to a lower-half thioketone followed by recrystallization provided the molecular motors with >99% ee. As these are the first molecular motors that have a methoxy substituent at the stereogenic center, the photochemical and thermal isomerization steps involved in the rotary cycle of one of these new molecules were studied in detail with various spectroscopic techniques.

  13. Mechanical properties of organelles driven by microtubule-dependent molecular motors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Luciana; Salierno, Marcelo; Wetzler, Diana E; Despósito, Marcelo A; Levi, Valeria

    2011-04-01

    The organization of the cytoplasm is regulated by molecular motors which transport organelles and other cargoes along cytoskeleton tracks. Melanophores have pigment organelles or melanosomes that move along microtubules toward their minus and plus end by the action of cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-2, respectively. In this work, we used single particle tracking to characterize the mechanical properties of motor-driven organelles during transport along microtubules. We tracked organelles with high temporal and spatial resolutions and characterized their dynamics perpendicular to the cytoskeleton track. The quantitative analysis of these data showed that the dynamics is due to a spring-like interaction between melanosomes and microtubules in a viscoelastic microenvironment. A model based on a generalized Langevin equation explained these observations and predicted that the stiffness measured for the motor complex acting as a linker between organelles and microtubules is ∼ one order smaller than that determined for motor proteins in vitro. This result suggests that other biomolecules involved in the interaction between motors and organelles contribute to the mechanical properties of the motor complex. We hypothesise that the high flexibility observed for the motor linker may be required to improve the efficiency of the transport driven by multiple copies of motor molecules.

  14. Ultra-fast force-clamp laser trapping of single molecular motors and DNA binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Monico, Carina; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-09-01

    Forces play a fundamental role in a wide array of biological processes, regulating enzymatic activity, kinetics of molecular bonds, and molecular motors mechanics. Single molecule force spectroscopy techniques have enabled the investigation of such processes, but they are inadequate to probe short-lived (millisecond and sub-millisecond) molecular complexes. We developed an ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy technique that uses a dual trap configuration to apply constant loads to a single intermittently interacting biological polymer and a binding protein. Our system displays a delay of only ˜10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. The force-clamp configuration in which our assay operates allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds. Moreover, conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors can be recorded with sub-nanometer accuracy and few tens of microseconds of temporal resolution. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  15. Molecular motors that digest their track to rectify Brownian motion: processive movement of exonuclease enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2009-09-16

    A general model is presented for the processive movement of molecular motors such as λ-exonuclease, RecJ and exonuclease I that use digestion of a DNA track to rectify Brownian motion along this track. Using this model, the translocation dynamics of these molecular motors is studied. The sequence-dependent pausing of λ-exonuclease, which results from a site-specific high affinity DNA interaction, is also studied. The theoretical results are consistent with available experimental data. Moreover, the model is used to predict the lifetime distribution and force dependence of these paused states.

  16. Efficiency bounds of molecular motors under a trade-off figure of merit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanchao; Huang, Chuankun; Lin, Guoxing; Chen, Jincan

    2017-05-01

    On the basis of the theory of irreversible thermodynamics and an elementary model of the molecular motors converting chemical energy by ATP hydrolysis to mechanical work exerted against an external force, the efficiencies of the molecular motors at two different optimization configurations for trade-off figure of merit representing a best compromise between the useful energy and the lost energy are calculated. The upper and lower bounds for the efficiency at two different optimization configurations are determined. It is found that the optimal efficiencies at the two different optimization configurations are always larger than 1 / 2.

  17. A theoretical model of a molecular-motor-powered pump.

    PubMed

    Bull, Joseph L; Hunt, Alan J; Meyhöfer, Edgar

    2005-03-01

    The motion of a cylindrical bead in a fluid contained within a two-dimensional channel is investigated using the boundary element method as a model of a biomolecular-motor-powered microfluidics pump. The novelty of the pump lies in the use of motor proteins (kinesin) to power the bead motion and the few moving parts comprising the pump. The performance and feasibility of this pump design is investigated using two model geometries: a straight channel, and a curved channel with two concentric circular walls. In the straight channel geometry, it is shown that increasing the bead radius relative to the channel width, increases the flow rate at the expense of increasing the force the kinesins must generate in order to move the bead. Pump efficiency is generally higher for larger bead radii, and larger beads can support higher imposed loads. In the circular channel geometry, it is shown that bead rotation modifies the force required to move the bead and that shifting the bead inward slightly reduces the required force. Bead rotation has a minimal effect on flow rate. Recirculation regions, which can develop between the bead and the channel walls, influence the stresses and force on the bead. These results suggest this pump design is feasible, and the kinesin molecules provide sufficient force to deliver pico- to atto- l/s flows.

  18. Beam finite-element model of a molecular motor for the simulation of active fibre networks

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Kei W.; Birzle, Anna M.; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular motors are proteins that excessively increase the efficiency of subcellular transport processes. They allow for cell division, nutrient transport and even macroscopic muscle movement. In order to understand the effect of motors in large biopolymer networks, e.g. the cytoskeleton, we require a suitable model of a molecular motor. In this contribution, we present such a model based on a geometrically exact beam finite-element formulation. We discuss the numerical model of a non-processive motor such as myosin II, which interacts with actin filaments. Based on experimental data and inspired by the theoretical understanding offered by the power-stroke model and the swinging-cross-bridge model, we parametrize our numerical model in order to achieve the effect that a physiological motor has on its cargo. To this end, we introduce the mechanical and mathematical foundations of the model, then discuss its calibration, prove its usefulness by conducting finite-element simulations of actin–myosin motility assays and assess the influence of motors on the rheology of semi-flexible biopolymer networks. PMID:26997891

  19. Bidirectional Transport by Molecular Motors: Enhanced Processivity and Response to External Forces

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Melanie J.I.; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Intracellular transport along cytoskeletal filaments is often mediated by two teams of molecular motors that pull on the same cargo and move in opposite directions along the filaments. We have recently shown theoretically that this bidirectional transport can be understood as a stochastic tug-of-war between the two motor teams. Here, we further develop our theory to investigate the experimentally accessible dynamic behavior of cargos transported by strong motors such as kinesin-1 or cytoplasmic dynein. By studying the run and binding times of such a cargo, we show that the properties of biological motors, such as the large ratio of stall/detachment force and the small ratio of superstall backward/forward velocity, are favorable for bidirectional cargo transport, leading to fast motion and enhanced diffusion. In addition, cargo processivity is shown to be strongly enhanced by transport via several molecular motors even if these motors are engaged in a tug-of-war. Finally, we study the motility of a bidirectional cargo under force. Frictional forces arising, e.g., from the viscous cytoplasm, lead to peaks in the velocity distribution, while external forces as exerted, e.g., by an optical trap, lead to hysteresis effects. Our results, in particular our explicit expressions for the cargo binding time and the distance of the peaks in the velocity relation under friction, are directly accessible to in vitro as well as in vivo experiments. PMID:20513405

  20. Bidirectional transport by molecular motors: enhanced processivity and response to external forces.

    PubMed

    Müller, Melanie J I; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-06-02

    Intracellular transport along cytoskeletal filaments is often mediated by two teams of molecular motors that pull on the same cargo and move in opposite directions along the filaments. We have recently shown theoretically that this bidirectional transport can be understood as a stochastic tug-of-war between the two motor teams. Here, we further develop our theory to investigate the experimentally accessible dynamic behavior of cargos transported by strong motors such as kinesin-1 or cytoplasmic dynein. By studying the run and binding times of such a cargo, we show that the properties of biological motors, such as the large ratio of stall/detachment force and the small ratio of superstall backward/forward velocity, are favorable for bidirectional cargo transport, leading to fast motion and enhanced diffusion. In addition, cargo processivity is shown to be strongly enhanced by transport via several molecular motors even if these motors are engaged in a tug-of-war. Finally, we study the motility of a bidirectional cargo under force. Frictional forces arising, e.g., from the viscous cytoplasm, lead to peaks in the velocity distribution, while external forces as exerted, e.g., by an optical trap, lead to hysteresis effects. Our results, in particular our explicit expressions for the cargo binding time and the distance of the peaks in the velocity relation under friction, are directly accessible to in vitro as well as in vivo experiments.

  1. Bounds and phase diagram of efficiency at maximum power for tight-coupling molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Tu, Z C

    2013-02-01

    The efficiency at maximum power (EMP) for tight-coupling molecular motors is investigated within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. It is found that the EMP depends merely on the constitutive relation between the thermodynamic current and force. The motors are classified into four generic types (linear, superlinear, sublinear, and mixed types) according to the characteristics of the constitutive relation, and then the corresponding ranges of the EMP for these four types of molecular motors are obtained. The exact bounds of the EMP are derived and expressed as the explicit functions of the free energy released by the fuel in each motor step. A phase diagram is constructed which clearly shows how the region where the parameters (the load distribution factor and the free energy released by the fuel in each motor step) are located can determine whether the value of the EMP is larger or smaller than 1/2. This phase diagram reveals that motors using ATP as fuel under physiological conditions can work at maximum power with higher efficiency (> 1/2) for a small load distribution factor (< 0.1).

  2. Assembly of bipolar microtubule structures by passive cross-linkers and molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Johann, D; Goswami, D; Kruse, K

    2016-06-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. The spindle contains the midzone, a stable region of overlapping antiparallel microtubules, that is essential for maintaining bipolarity. Although a lot is known about the molecular players involved, the mechanism underlying midzone formation and maintenance is still poorly understood. We study the interaction of polar filaments that are cross-linked by molecular motors moving directionally and by passive cross-linkers diffusing along microtubules. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross-linkers can generate a stable finite overlap between a pair of antiparallel polar filaments. We develop a mean-field theory to study this mechanism in detail and investigate the influence of steric interactions between motors and passive cross-linkers on the overlap dynamics. In the presence of interspecies steric interactions, passive cross-linkers mimic the behavior of molecular motors and stable finite overlaps are generated even for non-cross-linking motors. Finally, we develop a mean-field theory for a bundle of aligned polar filaments and show that they can self-organize into a spindlelike pattern. Our work suggests possible ways as to how cells can generate spindle midzones and control their extensions.

  3. Assembly of bipolar microtubule structures by passive cross-linkers and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johann, D.; Goswami, D.; Kruse, K.

    2016-06-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. The spindle contains the midzone, a stable region of overlapping antiparallel microtubules, that is essential for maintaining bipolarity. Although a lot is known about the molecular players involved, the mechanism underlying midzone formation and maintenance is still poorly understood. We study the interaction of polar filaments that are cross-linked by molecular motors moving directionally and by passive cross-linkers diffusing along microtubules. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross-linkers can generate a stable finite overlap between a pair of antiparallel polar filaments. We develop a mean-field theory to study this mechanism in detail and investigate the influence of steric interactions between motors and passive cross-linkers on the overlap dynamics. In the presence of interspecies steric interactions, passive cross-linkers mimic the behavior of molecular motors and stable finite overlaps are generated even for non-cross-linking motors. Finally, we develop a mean-field theory for a bundle of aligned polar filaments and show that they can self-organize into a spindlelike pattern. Our work suggests possible ways as to how cells can generate spindle midzones and control their extensions.

  4. En route to surface-bound electric field-driven molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Tour, James M

    2003-06-27

    Four caltrop-shaped molecules that might be useful as surface-bound electric field-driven molecular motors have been synthesized. The caltrops are comprised of a pair of electron donor-acceptor arms and a tripod base. The molecular arms are based on a carbazole or oligo(phenylene ethynylene) core with a strong net dipole. The tripod base uses a silicon atom as its core. The legs of the tripod bear sulfur-tipped bonding units, as acetyl-protected benzylic thiols, for bonding to a gold surface. The geometry of the tripod base allows the caltrop to project upward from a metallic surface after self-assembly. Ellipsometric studies show that self-assembled monolayers of the caltrops are formed on Au surfaces with molecular thicknesses consistent with the desired upright-shaft arrangement. As a result, the zwitterionic molecular arms might be controllable when electric fields are applied around the caltrops, thereby constituting field-driven motors.

  5. Effective rates from thermodynamically consistent coarse-graining of models for molecular motors with probe particles.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Eva; Seifert, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Many single-molecule experiments for molecular motors comprise not only the motor but also large probe particles coupled to it. The theoretical analysis of these assays, however, often takes into account only the degrees of freedom representing the motor. We present a coarse-graining method that maps a model comprising two coupled degrees of freedom which represent motor and probe particle to such an effective one-particle model by eliminating the dynamics of the probe particle in a thermodynamically and dynamically consistent way. The coarse-grained rates obey a local detailed balance condition and reproduce the net currents. Moreover, the average entropy production as well as the thermodynamic efficiency is invariant under this coarse-graining procedure. Our analysis reveals that only by assuming unrealistically fast probe particles, the coarse-grained transition rates coincide with the transition rates of the traditionally used one-particle motor models. Additionally, we find that for multicyclic motors the stall force can depend on the probe size. We apply this coarse-graining method to specific case studies of the F(1)-ATPase and the kinesin motor.

  6. Single-molecule and single-particle imaging of molecular motors in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fili, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Motor proteins are multi-potent molecular machines, whose localisation, function and regulation are achieved through tightly controlled processes involving conformational changes and interactions with their tracks, cargos and binding partners. Understanding how these complex machines work requires dissection of these processes both in space and time. Complementing the traditional ensemble measurements, single-molecule assays enable the detection of rare or short-lived intermediates and molecular heterogeneities, and the measurements of subpopulation dynamics. This chapter is focusing on the fluorescence imaging of single motors and their cargo. It discusses what is required in order to achieve single-molecule imaging with high temporal and spatial resolution and how these requirements are met both in vitro and in vivo. It also presents a general overview and applied examples of the major single-molecule imaging techniques and experimental assays which have been used to study motor proteins.

  7. Force Generation by Molecular-Motor-Powered Microtubule Bundles; Implications for Neuronal Polarization and Growth.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Maximilian; Franze, Kristian; Zemel, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    The heavily cross-linked microtubule (MT) bundles found in neuronal processes play a central role in the initiation, growth and maturation of axons and dendrites; however, a quantitative understanding of their mechanical function is still lacking. We here developed computer simulations to investigate the dynamics of force generation in 1D bundles of MTs that are cross-linked and powered by molecular motors. The motion of filaments and the forces they exert are investigated as a function of the motor type (unipolar or bipolar), MT density and length, applied load, and motor connectivity. We demonstrate that only unipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-1) can provide the driving force for bundle expansion, while bipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-5) oppose it. The force generation capacity of the bundles is shown to depend sharply on the fraction of unipolar motors due to a percolation transition that must occur in the bundle. Scaling laws between bundle length, force, MT length and motor fraction are presented. In addition, we investigate the dynamics of growth in the presence of a constant influx of MTs. Beyond a short equilibration period, the bundles grow linearly in time. In this growth regime, the bundle extends as one mass forward with most filaments sliding with the growth velocity. The growth velocity is shown to be dictated by the inward flux of MTs, to inversely scale with the load and to be independent of the free velocity of the motors. These findings provide important molecular-level insights into the mechanical function of the MT cytoskeleton in normal axon growth and regeneration after injury.

  8. Force Generation by Molecular-Motor-Powered Microtubule Bundles; Implications for Neuronal Polarization and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Maximilian; Franze, Kristian; Zemel, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    The heavily cross-linked microtubule (MT) bundles found in neuronal processes play a central role in the initiation, growth and maturation of axons and dendrites; however, a quantitative understanding of their mechanical function is still lacking. We here developed computer simulations to investigate the dynamics of force generation in 1D bundles of MTs that are cross-linked and powered by molecular motors. The motion of filaments and the forces they exert are investigated as a function of the motor type (unipolar or bipolar), MT density and length, applied load, and motor connectivity. We demonstrate that only unipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-1) can provide the driving force for bundle expansion, while bipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-5) oppose it. The force generation capacity of the bundles is shown to depend sharply on the fraction of unipolar motors due to a percolation transition that must occur in the bundle. Scaling laws between bundle length, force, MT length and motor fraction are presented. In addition, we investigate the dynamics of growth in the presence of a constant influx of MTs. Beyond a short equilibration period, the bundles grow linearly in time. In this growth regime, the bundle extends as one mass forward with most filaments sliding with the growth velocity. The growth velocity is shown to be dictated by the inward flux of MTs, to inversely scale with the load and to be independent of the free velocity of the motors. These findings provide important molecular-level insights into the mechanical function of the MT cytoskeleton in normal axon growth and regeneration after injury. PMID:26617489

  9. In situ control of polymer helicity with a non-covalently bound photoresponsive molecular motor dopant.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Heideman, G Henrieke; Zhao, Depeng; Wezenberg, Sander J; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-06-13

    The transfer of chirality from a molecular motor to a dynamic helical polymer via ionic interactions was investigated. A dopant with photoswitchable chirality was able to induce a preferred helicity in a poly(phenylacetylene) polymer and the helicity is inverted upon irradiation. The findings described herein will advance the development of functional and responsive polymeric systems.

  10. A Hopping Mechanism for Cargo Transport by Molecular Motors on Crowded Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Carla

    2010-05-01

    Most models designed to study the bidirectional movement of cargos as they are driven by molecular motors rely on the idea that motors of different polarities can be coordinated by external agents if arranged into a motor-cargo complex to perform the necessary work Gross, Hither and yon: a review of bidirectional microtubule-based transport (Gross in Phys. Biol. 1:R1-R11, 2004). Although these models have provided us with important insights into these phenomena, there are still many unanswered questions regarding the mechanisms through which the movement of the complex takes place on crowded microtubules. For example (i) how does cargo-binding affect motor motility? and in connection with that - (ii) how does the presence of other motors (and also other cargos) on the microtubule affect the motility of the motor-cargo complex? We discuss these questions from a different perspective. The movement of a cargo is conceived here as a hopping process resulting from the transference of cargo between neighboring motors. In the light of this, we examine the conditions under which cargo might display bidirectional movement even if directed by motors of a single polarity. The global properties of the model in the long-time regime are obtained by mapping the dynamics of the collection of interacting motors and cargos into an asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) which can be resolved using the matrix ansatz introduced by Derrida (Derrida and Evans in Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics in One Dimension, pp. 277-304, 1997; Derrida et al. in J. Phys. A 26:1493-1517, 1993).

  11. Characterizing the composition of molecular motors on moving axonal cargo using "cargo mapping" analysis.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Sylvia; Campbell, George E; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Encalada, Sandra E

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms by which molecular motors coordinate their activities to transport vesicular cargoes within neurons requires the quantitative analysis of motor/cargo associations at the single vesicle level. The goal of this protocol is to use quantitative fluorescence microscopy to correlate ("map") the position and directionality of movement of live cargo to the composition and relative amounts of motors associated with the same cargo. "Cargo mapping" consists of live imaging of fluorescently labeled cargoes moving in axons cultured on microfluidic devices, followed by chemical fixation during recording of live movement, and subsequent immunofluorescence (IF) staining of the exact same axonal regions with antibodies against motors. Colocalization between cargoes and their associated motors is assessed by assigning sub-pixel position coordinates to motor and cargo channels, by fitting Gaussian functions to the diffraction-limited point spread functions representing individual fluorescent point sources. Fixed cargo and motor images are subsequently superimposed to plots of cargo movement, to "map" them to their tracked trajectories. The strength of this protocol is the combination of live and IF data to record both the transport of vesicular cargoes in live cells and to determine the motors associated to these exact same vesicles. This technique overcomes previous challenges that use biochemical methods to determine the average motor composition of purified heterogeneous bulk vesicle populations, as these methods do not reveal compositions on single moving cargoes. Furthermore, this protocol can be adapted for the analysis of other transport and/or trafficking pathways in other cell types to correlate the movement of individual intracellular structures with their protein composition. Limitations of this protocol are the relatively low throughput due to low transfection efficiencies of cultured primary neurons and a limited field of view available for

  12. DNA polymerase as a molecular motor and pump.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Samudra; Spiering, Michelle M; Dey, Krishna K; Duan, Wentao; Patra, Debabrata; Butler, Peter J; Astumian, R Dean; Benkovic, Stephen J; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-03-25

    DNA polymerase is responsible for synthesizing DNA, a key component in the running of biological machinery. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the diffusive movement of a molecular complex of DNA template and DNA polymerase enhances during nucleotide incorporation into the growing DNA template. The diffusion coefficient of the complex also shows a strong dependence on its inorganic cofactor, Mg2+ ions. When exposed to gradients of either nucleotide or cofactor concentrations, an ensemble of DNA polymerase complex molecules shows collective movement toward regions of higher concentrations. By immobilizing the molecular complex on a patterned gold surface, we demonstrate the fabrication of DNA polymerase-powered fluid pumps. These miniature pumps are capable of transporting fluid and tracer particles in a directional manner with the pumping speed increasing in the presence of the cofactor. The role of DNA polymerase as a micropump opens up avenues for designing miniature fluid pumps using enzymes as engines.

  13. Low processivity for DNA translocation by the ISWI molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Eastlund, Allen; Al-Ani, Gada; Fischer, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    The motor protein ISWI (Imitation SWItch) is the conserved catalytic ATPase domain of the ISWI family of chromatin remodelers. Members of the ISWI family are involved in regulating the structure of cellular chromatin during times of transcription, translation, and repair. Current models for the nucleosome repositioning activity of ISWI and other chromatin remodelers require the translocation of the remodeling protein along double-stranded DNA through an ATP-dependent mechanism. Here we report results from spectrofluorometric stopped-flow experiments which demonstrate that ISWI displays very low processivity for free DNA translocation. By combining these results with those from experiments monitoring the DNA stimulated ATPase activity of ISWI we further demonstrate that the DNA translocation by ISWI is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis. The calculated coupling efficiency of 0.067±0.018 ATP/ISWI/bp is seemingly quite low in comparison to similar DNA translocases and we present potential models to account for this. Nevertheless, the tight coupling of ATP hydrolysis to DNA translocation suggests that DNA translocation is not energetically rate limiting for nucleosome repositioning by ISWI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Embryonic amygdalar transplants in adult rats with motor cortex lesions: a molecular and electrophysiological analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Díaz, Lydia; Nava-Mesa, Mauricio O; Heredia, Margarita; Riolobos, Adelaida S; Gómez-Álvarez, Marcelo; Criado, José María; de la Fuente, Antonio; Yajeya, Javier; Navarro-López, Juan D

    2011-01-01

    Transplants of embryonic nervous tissue ameliorate motor deficits induced by motor cortex lesions in adult animals. Restoration of lost brain functions has been recently shown in grafts of homotopic cortical origin, to be associated with a functional integration of the transplant after development of reciprocal host-graft connections. Nevertheless little is known about physiological properties or gene expression profiles of cortical implants with functional restorative capacity but no cortical origin. In this study, we show molecular and electrophysiological evidence supporting the functional development and integration of heterotopic transplants of embryonic amygdalar tissue placed into pre-lesioned motor cortex of adult rats. Grafts were analyzed 3 months post-transplantation. Using reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we found that key glutamatergic, GABAergic, and muscarinic receptors transcripts were expressed at different quantitative levels both in grafted and host tissues, but were all continuously present in the graft. Parallel sharp electrode recordings of grafted neurons in brain slices showed a regular firing pattern of transplanted neurons similar to host amygdalar pyramidal neurons. Synaptic connections from the adjacent host cortex on grafted neurons were electrophysiologically investigated and confirmed our molecular results. Taken together, our findings indicate that grafted neurons from a non-cortical, non-motor-related, but ontogenetical similar source, not only received functionally effective contacts from the adjacent motor cortex, but also developed electrophysiological and gene expression patterns comparable to host pyramidal neurons; suggesting an interesting tool for the field of neural repair and donor tissue in adults.

  15. Application of Quasi-Steady-State Methods to Nonlinear Models of Intracellular Transport by Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Zmurchok, Cole; Small, Tim; Ward, Michael J; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2017-07-13

    Molecular motors such as kinesin and dynein are responsible for transporting material along microtubule networks in cells. In many contexts, motor dynamics can be modelled by a system of reaction-advection-diffusion partial differential equations (PDEs). Recently, quasi-steady-state (QSS) methods have been applied to models with linear reactions to approximate the behaviour of the full PDE system. Here, we extend this QSS reduction methodology to certain nonlinear reaction models. The QSS method relies on the assumption that the nonlinear binding and unbinding interactions of the cellular motors occur on a faster timescale than the spatial diffusion and advection processes. The full system dynamics are shown to be well approximated by the dynamics on the slow manifold. The slow manifold is parametrized by a single scalar quantity that satisfies a scalar nonlinear PDE, called the QSS PDE. We apply the QSS method to several specific nonlinear models for the binding and unbinding of molecular motors, and we use the resulting approximations to draw conclusions regarding the parameter dependence of the spatial distribution of motors for these models.

  16. Macroscopic contraction of a gel induced by the integrated motion of light-driven molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Maaloum, Mounir; Rawiso, Michel; Kulic, Igor; Foy, Justin T.; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Making molecular machines that can be useful in the macroscopic world is a challenging long-term goal of nanoscience. Inspired by the protein machinery found in biological systems, and based on the theoretical understanding of the physics of motion at the nanoscale, organic chemists have developed a number of molecules that can produce work by contraction or rotation when triggered by various external chemical or physical stimuli. In particular, basic molecular switches that commute between at least two thermodynamic minima and more advanced molecular motors that behave as dissipative units working far from equilibrium when fuelled with external energy have been reported. However, despite recent progress, the ultimate challenge of coordinating individual molecular motors in a continuous mechanical process that can have a measurable effect at the macroscale has remained elusive. Here, we show that by integrating light-driven unidirectional molecular rotors as reticulating units in a polymer gel, it is possible to amplify their individual motions to achieve macroscopic contraction of the material. Our system uses the incoming light to operate under far-from-equilibrium conditions, and the work produced by the motor in the photostationary state is used to twist the entangled polymer chains up to the collapse of the gel. Our design could be a starting point to integrate nanomotors in metastable materials to store energy and eventually to convert it.

  17. Macroscopic contraction of a gel induced by the integrated motion of light-driven molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Maaloum, Mounir; Rawiso, Michel; Kulic, Igor; Foy, Justin T; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Making molecular machines that can be useful in the macroscopic world is a challenging long-term goal of nanoscience. Inspired by the protein machinery found in biological systems, and based on the theoretical understanding of the physics of motion at the nanoscale, organic chemists have developed a number of molecules that can produce work by contraction or rotation when triggered by various external chemical or physical stimuli. In particular, basic molecular switches that commute between at least two thermodynamic minima and more advanced molecular motors that behave as dissipative units working far from equilibrium when fuelled with external energy have been reported. However, despite recent progress, the ultimate challenge of coordinating individual molecular motors in a continuous mechanical process that can have a measurable effect at the macroscale has remained elusive. Here, we show that by integrating light-driven unidirectional molecular rotors as reticulating units in a polymer gel, it is possible to amplify their individual motions to achieve macroscopic contraction of the material. Our system uses the incoming light to operate under far-from-equilibrium conditions, and the work produced by the motor in the photostationary state is used to twist the entangled polymer chains up to the collapse of the gel. Our design could be a starting point to integrate nanomotors in metastable materials to store energy and eventually to convert it.

  18. Directed motion of periodically driven molecular motors: a graph-theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Alexey V; Mandal, Dibyendu; Chernyak, Vladimir Y; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A

    2013-01-14

    We propose a numerical algorithm for calculation of quantized directed motion of a stochastic system of interacting particles induced by periodic changes of control parameters on the graph of microstates. As a main application, we consider models of catenane molecular motors, which demonstrated the possibility of a similar control of directed motion of molecular components. We show that our algorithm allows one to calculate the motion of a system in the space of its microstates even when the considered phase space is combinatorially large (~1 × 10(6) microscopic states). Several general observations are made about the structure of the phase diagram of the systems studied, which may be used for rational design and efficient control of new generations of molecular motors.

  19. Light-driven rotary molecular motors without point chirality: a minimal design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Oruganti, Baswanth; Durbeej, Bo

    2017-03-08

    A fundamental requirement for achieving photoinduced unidirectional rotary motion about an olefinic bond in a molecular motor is that the potential energy surface of the excited state is asymmetric with respect to clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. In most available light-driven rotary molecular motors, such asymmetry is guaranteed by the presence of a stereocenter. Here, we present non-adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations based on multiconfigurational quantum chemistry to demonstrate that this chiral feature is not essential for inducing unidirectional rotary motion in molecules that incorporate a cyclohexenylidene moiety into a protonated Schiff-base framework. Rather, the simulations show that it is possible to exploit the intrinsic asymmetry of the puckered cyclohexenylidene to control the direction of photoinduced rotation.

  20. Measuring the number and spacing of molecular motors propelling a gliding microtubule.

    PubMed

    Fallesen, Todd L; Macosko, Jed C; Holzwarth, G

    2011-01-01

    The molecular motor gliding assay, in which a microtubule or other filament moves across a surface coated with motors, has provided much insight into how molecular motors work. The kinesin-microtubule system is also a strong candidate for the job of nanoparticle transporter in nanotechnology devices. In most cases, several motors transport each filament. Each motor serves both to bind the microtubule to a stationary surface and to propel the microtubule along the surface. By applying a uniform transverse force of 4-19 pN to a superparamagnetic bead attached to the trailing end of the microtubule, we have measured the distance d between binding points (motors). The average value of d was determined as a function of motor surface density σ. The measurements agree well with the scaling model of Duke, Holy, and Liebler, which predicts that (d)~σ(-2/5) if 0.05≤σ≤20 μm(-2) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 330 (1995)]. The distribution of d fits an extension of the model. The radius of curvature of a microtubule bent at a binding point by the force of the magnetic bead was ≈1 μm, 5000-fold smaller than the radius of curvature of microtubules subjected only to thermal forces. This is evidence that at these points of high bending stress, generated by the force on the magnetic bead, the microtubule is in the more flexible state of a two-state model of microtubule bending proposed by Heussinger, Schüller, and Frey [Phys. Rev. E 81, 021904 (2010)].

  1. Memory, bias, and correlations in bidirectional transport of molecular-motor-driven cargoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2013-10-01

    Molecular motors are specialized proteins that perform active, directed transport of cellular cargoes on cytoskeletal filaments. In many cases, cargo motion powered by motor proteins is found to be bidirectional, and may be viewed as a biased random walk with fast unidirectional runs interspersed with slow tug-of-war states. The statistical properties of this walk are not known in detail, and here, we study memory and bias, as well as directional correlations between successive runs in bidirectional transport. We show, based on a study of the direction-reversal probabilities of the cargo using a purely stochastic (tug-of-war) model, that bidirectional motion of cellular cargoes is, in general, a correlated random walk. In particular, while the motion of a cargo driven by two oppositely pulling motors is a Markovian random walk, memory of direction appears when multiple motors haul the cargo in one or both directions. In the latter case, the Markovian nature of the underlying single-motor processes is hidden by internal transitions between degenerate run and pause states of the cargo. Interestingly, memory is found to be a nonmonotonic function of the number of motors. Stochastic numerical simulations of the tug-of-war model support our mathematical results and extend them to biologically relevant situations.

  2. Memory, bias, and correlations in bidirectional transport of molecular-motor-driven cargoes.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2013-10-01

    Molecular motors are specialized proteins that perform active, directed transport of cellular cargoes on cytoskeletal filaments. In many cases, cargo motion powered by motor proteins is found to be bidirectional, and may be viewed as a biased random walk with fast unidirectional runs interspersed with slow tug-of-war states. The statistical properties of this walk are not known in detail, and here, we study memory and bias, as well as directional correlations between successive runs in bidirectional transport. We show, based on a study of the direction-reversal probabilities of the cargo using a purely stochastic (tug-of-war) model, that bidirectional motion of cellular cargoes is, in general, a correlated random walk. In particular, while the motion of a cargo driven by two oppositely pulling motors is a Markovian random walk, memory of direction appears when multiple motors haul the cargo in one or both directions. In the latter case, the Markovian nature of the underlying single-motor processes is hidden by internal transitions between degenerate run and pause states of the cargo. Interestingly, memory is found to be a nonmonotonic function of the number of motors. Stochastic numerical simulations of the tug-of-war model support our mathematical results and extend them to biologically relevant situations.

  3. Extracting the stepping dynamics of molecular motors in living cells from trajectories of single particles.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Augusto; Bruno, Luciana; Levi, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motors are responsible of transporting a wide variety of cargos in the cytoplasm. Current efforts are oriented to characterize the biophysical properties of motors in cells with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of these nanomachines in the complex cellular environment. In this study, we present an algorithm designed to extract motor step sizes and dwell times between steps from trajectories of motors or cargoes driven by motors in cells. The algorithm is based on finding patterns in the trajectory compatible with the behavior expected for a motor step, i.e., a region of confined motion followed by a jump in the position to another region of confined motion with similar characteristics to the previous one. We show that this algorithm allows the analysis of 2D trajectories even if they present complex motion patterns such as active transport interspersed with diffusion and does not require the assumption of a given step size or dwell period. The confidence on the step detection can be easily obtained and allows the evaluation of the confidence of the dwell and step size distributions. To illustrate the possible applications of this algorithm, we analyzed trajectories of myosin-V driven organelles in living cells.

  4. Insight into the molecular mechanism of the multitasking kinesin-8 motor

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Carsten; Brejc, Katjuša; Belmont, Lisa; Bodey, Andrew J; Lee, Yan; Yu, Ming; Guo, Jun; Sakowicz, Roman; Hartman, James; Moores, Carolyn A

    2010-01-01

    Members of the kinesin-8 motor class have the remarkable ability to both walk towards microtubule plus-ends and depolymerise these ends on arrival, thereby regulating microtubule length. To analyse how kinesin-8 multitasks, we studied the structure and function of the kinesin-8 motor domain. We determined the first crystal structure of a kinesin-8 and used cryo-electron microscopy to calculate the structure of the microtubule-bound motor. Microtubule-bound kinesin-8 reveals a new conformation compared with the crystal structure, including a bent conformation of the α4 relay helix and ordering of functionally important loops. The kinesin-8 motor domain does not depolymerise stabilised microtubules with ATP but does form tubulin rings in the presence of a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue. This shows that, by collaborating, kinesin-8 motor domain molecules can release tubulin from microtubules, and that they have a similar mechanical effect on microtubule ends as kinesin-13, which enables depolymerisation. Our data reveal aspects of the molecular mechanism of kinesin-8 motors that contribute to their unique dual motile and depolymerising functions, which are adapted to control microtubule length. PMID:20818331

  5. Stochastic mechano-chemical kinetics of molecular motors: A multidisciplinary enterprise from a physicist’s perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2013-08-01

    A molecular motor is made of either a single macromolecule or a macromolecular complex. Just like their macroscopic counterparts, molecular motors “transduce” input energy into mechanical work. All the nano-motors considered here operate under isothermal conditions far from equilibrium. Moreover, one of the possible mechanisms of energy transduction, called Brownian ratchet, does not even have any macroscopic counterpart. But, molecular motor is not synonymous with Brownian ratchet; a large number of molecular motors execute a noisy power stroke, rather than operating as Brownian ratchet. We review not only the structural design and stochastic kinetics of individual single motors, but also their coordination, cooperation and competition as well as the assembly of multi-module motors in various intracellular kinetic processes. Although all the motors considered here execute mechanical movements, efficiency and power output are not necessarily good measures of performance of some motors. Among the intracellular nano-motors, we consider the porters, sliders and rowers, pistons and hooks, exporters, importers, packers and movers as well as those that also synthesize, manipulate and degrade “macromolecules of life”. We review mostly the quantitative models for the kinetics of these motors. We also describe several of those motor-driven intracellular stochastic processes for which quantitative models are yet to be developed. In part I, we discuss mainly the methodology and the generic models of various important classes of molecular motors. In part II, we review many specific examples emphasizing the unity of the basic mechanisms as well as diversity of operations arising from the differences in their detailed structure and kinetics. Multi-disciplinary research is presented here from the perspective of physicists.

  6. Complex restriction enzymes: NTP-driven molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Bourniquel, Aude A; Bickle, Thomas A

    2002-11-01

    Survival is assuredly the prime directive for all living organisms either as individuals or as a species. One of the main challenges encountered by bacterial populations is the danger of bacteriophage attacks, since infection of a single bacterium may rapidly propagate, decimating the entire population. In order to protect themselves against this acute threat, bacteria have developed an array of defence mechanisms, which range from preventing the infection itself via interference with bacteriophage adsorption to the cell surface and prevention of phage DNA injection, to degradation of the injected phage DNA. This last defence mechanism is catalysed by the bacterial restriction-modification (R-M) systems, and in particular, by nucleoside 5'-triphosphate (NTP)-dependent restriction enzymes, e.g. type I and type III R-M systems or the modification-dependent endonucleases. Type I and type III restriction systems have dual properties. They may either act as methylases and protect the host's own DNA against restriction by methylating specific residues, or they catalyse ATP-dependent endonuclease activity so that invading foreign DNA lacking the host-specific methylation is degraded. These defence mechanism systems are further complemented by the presence of methylation-dependent, GTP-dependent endonucleases, that restricts specifically methylated DNA. Although all three types of endonucleases are structurally very different, they share a common functional mechanism. They recognise and bind to specific DNA sequences but do not cleave DNA within those target sites. They belong to the general class of DNA motor proteins, which use the free energy associated with nucleoside 5'-triphosphate hydrolysis to translocate DNA so that the subsequent DNA cleavage event occurs at a distance from the endonuclease recognition site. Moreover, DNA cleavage appears to be a random process triggered upon stalling of the DNA translocation process and requiring dimerisation of the bound

  7. Gamma-diketone axonopathy: analyses of cytoskeletal motors and highways in CNS myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihai; Gavin, Terrence; DeCaprio, Anthony P; LoPachin, Richard M

    2010-09-01

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) intoxication is associated with axon atrophy that might be responsible for the characteristic gait abnormalities, hindlimb skeletal muscle weakness and other neurological deficits that accompany neurotoxicity. Although previous mechanistic research focused on neurofilament triplet proteins (NFL, NFM, NFH), other cytoskeletal targets are possible. Therefore, to identify potential non-NF protein targets, we characterized the effects of HD on protein-protein interactions in cosedimentation assays using microtubules and NFs prepared from spinal cord of rats intoxicated at different daily dose rates (175 and 400 mg/kg/day). Results indicate that HD did not alter the presence of alpha- or beta-tubulins in these preparations, nor were changes noted in the distribution of either anterograde (KIF1A, KIF3, KIF5) or retrograde (dynein) molecular motors. The cosedimentation of dynactin, a dynein-associated protein, also was not affected. Immunoblot analysis of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in microtubule preparations revealed substantial reductions (45-80%) in MAP1A, MAP1B heavy chain, MAP2, and tau regardless of HD dose rate. MAP1B light chain content was not altered. Finally, HD intoxication did not influence native NF protein content in either preparation. As per previous research, microtubule and NF preparations were enriched in high-molecular weight NF species. However, these NF derivatives were common to both HD and control samples, suggesting a lack of pathognomonic relevance. These data indicate that, although motor proteins were not affected, HD selectively impaired MAP-microtubule binding, presumably through adduction of lysine residues that mediate such interactions. Given their critical role in cytoskeletal physiology, MAPs could represent a relevant target for the induction of gamma-diketone axonopathy.

  8. Analysis of persistence during intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, C.; Despósito, M. A.; Levi, V.; Bruno, L.

    2010-09-01

    The displacement of particles or probes in the cell cytoplasm as a function of time is characterized by different anomalous diffusion regimes. The transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles or large proteins, involves the action of ATP-consuming molecular motors. We investigate the motion of pigment organelles driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the turning angles (phi) of the obtained 2D trajectories as a function of the time lag, we determine the critical time of the transition between anticorrelated and directed motion as the time when the turning angles begin to concentrate around phi = 0. We relate this transition with the crossover from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior observed in a previous work [5]. We also assayed the properties of the trajectories in cells with inhibited myosin activity, and we can compare the results in the presence and absence of active motors.

  9. Coordination of Molecular Motors: From in vitro Assays to Intracellular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary New technologies have emerged that enable the tracking of molecular motors and their cargos with very high resolution both in vitro and in live cells. Classic in vitro motility assays are being supplemented with assays of increasing complexity that more closely model the cellular environment. In cells, the introduction of probes such as quantum dots allows the high resolution tracking of both motors and vesicular cargos. The “bottom up” enhancement of in vitro assays and the “top down” analysis of motility inside cells are likely to converge over the next few years. Together, these studies are providing new insights into the coordination of motors during intracellular transport. PMID:20102789

  10. The effect of side motion in the dynamics of interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midha, Tripti; Gupta, Arvind Kumar; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2017-07-01

    To mimic the collective motion of interacting molecular motors, we propose and discuss an open two-lane symmetrically coupled interactive TASEP model that incorporates interaction in the thermodynamically consistent fashion. We study the effect of both repulsive and attractive interaction on the system’s dynamical properties using various cluster mean field analysis and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The interactions bring correlations into the system, which were found to be reduced due to the side motion of particles. We produce the steady-state phase diagrams for symmetrically split interaction strength. The behavior of the maximal particle current with respect to the interaction energy E is analyzed for different coupling rates and interaction splittings. The results suggest that for strong coupling and large splittings, the maximal flow of the motors occurs at a weak attractive interaction strength which matches with the known experimental results on kinesin motor protein.

  11. Active translocation of a semiflexible polymer assisted by an ATP-based molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Fiasconaro, A; Mazo, J J; Falo, F

    2017-06-23

    In this work we study the assisted translocation of a polymer across a membrane nanopore, inside which a molecular motor exerts a force fuelled by the hydrolysis of ATP molecules. In our model the motor switches to its active state for a fixed amount of time, while it waits for an ATP molecule which triggers the motor, during an exponentially distributed time lapse. The polymer is modelled as a beads-springs chain with both excluded volume and bending contributions, and moves in a stochastic three dimensional environment modelled with a Langevin dynamics at a fixed temperature. The resulting dynamics shows a Michaelis-Menten translocation velocity that depends on the chain flexibility. The scaling behavior of the mean translocation time with the polymer length for different bending values is also investigated.

  12. Transition to superdiffusive behavior in intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, L.; Levi, V.; Brunstein, M.; Despósito, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    Intracellular transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles, or large proteins, is a complex dynamical process that involves the interplay of adenosine triphosphate-consuming molecular motors, cytoskeleton filaments, and the viscoelastic cytoplasm. In this work we investigate the motion of pigment organelles (melanosomes) driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high-spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the obtained trajectories, we show that the melanosomes mean-square displacement undergoes a transition from a subdiffusive to a superdiffusive behavior. A stochastic theoretical model, which explicitly considers the collective action of the molecular motors, is introduced to generalize the interpretation of our data. Starting from a generalized Langevin equation, we derive an analytical expression for the mean square displacement, which also takes into account the experimental noise. By fitting theoretical expressions to experimental data we were able to discriminate the exponents that characterize the passive and active contributions to the dynamics and to estimate the “global” motor forces correctly. Then, our model gives a quantitative description of active transport in living cells with a reduced number of parameters.

  13. Transition to superdiffusive behavior in intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Bruno, L; Levi, V; Brunstein, M; Despósito, M A

    2009-07-01

    Intracellular transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles, or large proteins, is a complex dynamical process that involves the interplay of adenosine triphosphate-consuming molecular motors, cytoskeleton filaments, and the viscoelastic cytoplasm. In this work we investigate the motion of pigment organelles (melanosomes) driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high-spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the obtained trajectories, we show that the melanosomes mean-square displacement undergoes a transition from a subdiffusive to a superdiffusive behavior. A stochastic theoretical model, which explicitly considers the collective action of the molecular motors, is introduced to generalize the interpretation of our data. Starting from a generalized Langevin equation, we derive an analytical expression for the mean square displacement, which also takes into account the experimental noise. By fitting theoretical expressions to experimental data we were able to discriminate the exponents that characterize the passive and active contributions to the dynamics and to estimate the "global" motor forces correctly. Then, our model gives a quantitative description of active transport in living cells with a reduced number of parameters.

  14. Operations and thermodynamics of an artificial rotary molecular motor in solution.

    PubMed

    Moro, Lorenzo; di Giosia, Matteo; Calvaresi, Matteo; Bakalis, Evangelos; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2014-06-23

    A general framework is provided that makes possible the estimation of time-dependent properties of a stochastic system moving far from equilibrium. The process is investigated and discussed in general terms of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The approach is simple and can be exploited to gain insight into the dynamics of any molecular-level machine. As a case study, the dynamics of an artificial molecular rotary motor, similar to the inversion of a helix, which drives the motor from a metastable state to equilibrium, are examined. The energy path that the motor walks was obtained from the results of atomistic calculations. The motor undergoes unidirectional rotation and its entropy, internal energy, free energy, and net exerted force are given as a function of time, starting from the solution of Smoluchowski's equation. The rather low value of the organization index, that is, the ratio of the work done by the particle against friction during the unidirectional motion per available free energy, reveals that the motion is mainly subject to randomness, and the amount of energy converted to heat due to the directional motion is very small.

  15. Structural and Molecular Basis for Coordination in a Viral DNA Packaging Motor

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Aldrete, Emilio; Sherman, Michael B.; Woodson, Michael; Atz, Rockney; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Morais, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Ring NTPases are a class of ubiquitous molecular motors involved in basic biological partitioning processes. dsDNA viruses encode ring ATPases that translocate their genomes to near-crystalline densities within pre-assembled viral capsids. Here, X-ray crystallography, cryoEM, and biochemical analyses of the dsDNA packaging motor in bacteriophage phi29 show how individual subunits are arranged in a pentameric ATPase ring, and suggest how their activities are coordinated to translocate dsDNA. The resulting pseudo-atomic structure of the motor and accompanying functional analyses show how ATP is bound in the ATPase active site; identify two DNA contacts, including a potential DNA translocating loop; demonstrate that a trans-acting arginine finger is involved in coordinating hydrolysis around the ring; and suggest a functional coupling between the arginine finger and the DNA translocating loop. The ability to visualize the motor in action illuminates how the different motor components interact with each other and with their DNA substrate. PMID:26904950

  16. Allosteric Regulation of the Rotational Speed in a Light-Driven Molecular Motor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The rotational speed of an overcrowded alkene-based molecular rotary motor, having an integrated 4,5-diazafluorenyl coordination motif, can be regulated allosterically via the binding of metal ions. DFT calculations have been used to predict the relative speed of rotation of three different (i.e., zinc, palladium, and platinum) metal dichloride complexes. The photochemical and thermal isomerization behavior of these complexes has been studied in detail using UV–vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Our results confirm that metal coordination induces a contraction of the diazafluorenyl lower half, resulting in a reduction of the steric hindrance in the “fjord” region of the molecule, which causes an increase of the rotational speed. Importantly, metal complexation can be accomplished in situ and is found to be reversible upon the addition of a competing ligand. Consequently, the rotational behavior of these molecular motors can be dynamically controlled with chemical additives. PMID:27669358

  17. Prototypes of molecular motors based on star-shaped organometallic ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Vives, Guillaume; de Rouville, Henri-Pierre Jacquot; Carella, Alexandre; Launay, Jean-Pierre; Rapenne, Gwénaël

    2009-06-01

    This tutorial review presents our strategy to control the rotation in a molecular rotary motor, and the family of star-shaped ruthenium complexes designed to perform such a task. The molecules have a piano-stool structure with a "stator" meant to be grafted on a surface, and a "rotor" bearing redox-active groups, so that addressing the molecule with nano-electrodes would trigger rotation.

  18. How molecular motors extract order from chaos (a key issues review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Peter M.

    2016-03-01

    Molecular motors are the workhorses of living cells. Seemingly by ‘magic’, these molecules are able to complete purposeful tasks while being immersed in a sea of thermal chaos. Here, we review the current understanding of how these machines work, present simple models based on thermal ratchets, discuss implications for statistical physics, and provide an overview of ongoing research in this important and fascinating field of study.

  19. How molecular motors extract order from chaos (a key issues review).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Peter M

    2016-03-01

    Molecular motors are the workhorses of living cells. Seemingly by 'magic', these molecules are able to complete purposeful tasks while being immersed in a sea of thermal chaos. Here, we review the current understanding of how these machines work, present simple models based on thermal ratchets, discuss implications for statistical physics, and provide an overview of ongoing research in this important and fascinating field of study.

  20. Synthesis of technomimetic molecules: towards rotation control in single-molecular machines and motors.

    PubMed

    Rapenne, Gwénaël

    2005-04-07

    Technomimetic molecules are molecules designed to imitate macroscopic objects at the molecular level, also transposing the motions that these objects are able to undergo. This article focuses on technomimetic molecules with rotary motions, including gears, wheelbarrows and motors. Following the bottom-up approach the synthesis of technomimetic molecules grants access to the study of mechanical properties at the molecular level. These molecules are designed to operate as single molecules on surfaces under the control of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope or atomic force microscope.

  1. Computational Insight to Improve the Thermal Isomerisation Performance of Overcrowded Alkene-Based Molecular Motors through Structural Redesign.

    PubMed

    Oruganti, Baswanth; Wang, Jun; Durbeej, Bo

    2016-11-04

    Synthetic overcrowded alkene-based molecular motors achieve 360° unidirectional rotary motion of one motor half (rotator) relative to the other (stator) through sequential photochemical and thermal isomerisation steps. In order to facilitate and expand the use of these motors for various applications, it is important to investigate ways to increase the rates and efficiencies of the reactions governing the rotary motion. Here, we use computational methods to explore whether the thermal isomerisation performance of some of the fastest available motors of this type can be further improved by reducing the sizes of the motor halves. Presenting three new redesigned motors that combine an indanylidene rotator with a cyclohexadiene, pyran or thiopyran stator, we first use multiconfigurational quantum chemical methods to verify that the photoisomerisations of these motors sustain unidirectional rotary motion. Then, by performing density functional calculations, we identify both stepwise and concerted mechanisms for the thermal isomerisations of the motors and show that the rate-determining free-energy barriers of these processes are up to 25 kJ mol(-1) smaller than those of the original motors. Furthermore, the thermal isomerisations of the redesigned motors proceed in fewer steps. Altogether, the results suggest that the redesigned motors are useful templates for improving the thermal isomerisation performance of existing overcrowded alkene-based motors.

  2. Insights into the mechanisms of myosin and kinesin molecular motors from the single-molecule unbinding force measurements.

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, Sergey V; Oguchi, Yusuke; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2010-06-06

    In cells, ATP (adenosine triphosphate)-driven motor proteins, both cytoskeletal and nucleic acid-based, operate on their corresponding 'tracks', that is, actin, microtubules or nucleic acids, by converting the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work. During each mechanochemical cycle, a motor proceeds via several nucleotide states, characterized by different affinities for the 'track' filament and different nucleotide (ATP or ADP) binding kinetics, which is crucial for a motor to efficiently perform its cellular functions. The measurements of the rupture force between the motor and the track by applying external loads to the individual motor-substrate bonds in various nucleotide states have proved to be an important tool to obtain valuable insights into the mechanism of the motors' performance. We review the application of this technique to various linear molecular motors, both processive and non-processive, giving special attention to the importance of the experimental geometry.

  3. Molecular motor-driven abrupt anisotropic shape change in a single crystal of a Ni complex.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zi-Shuo; Mito, Masaki; Kamachi, Takashi; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Azuma, Nobuaki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Zhang, Kuirun; Nakanishi, Takumi; Kang, Soonchul; Kanegawa, Shinji; Sato, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Many molecular machines with controllable molecular-scale motors have been developed. However, transmitting molecular movement to the macroscopic scale remains a formidable challenge. Here we report a single crystal of a Ni complex whose shape changes abruptly and reversibly in response to thermal changes at around room temperature. Variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the crystalline shape change is induced by an unusual 90° rotation of uniaxially aligned oxalate molecules. The oxalate dianions behave as molecular-scale rotors, with their movement propagated through the entire crystalline material via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Consequently, the subnanometre-scale changes in the oxalate molecules are instantly amplified to a micrometre-scale contraction or expansion of the crystal, accompanied by a thermal hysteresis loop. The shape change in the crystal was clearly detected under an optical microscope. The large directional deformation and prompt response suggest a role for this material in microscale or nanoscale thermal actuators.

  4. Molecular motor-driven abrupt anisotropic shape change in a single crystal of a Ni complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zi-Shuo; Mito, Masaki; Kamachi, Takashi; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Azuma, Nobuaki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Zhang, Kuirun; Nakanishi, Takumi; Kang, Soonchul; Kanegawa, Shinji; Sato, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Many molecular machines with controllable molecular-scale motors have been developed. However, transmitting molecular movement to the macroscopic scale remains a formidable challenge. Here we report a single crystal of a Ni complex whose shape changes abruptly and reversibly in response to thermal changes at around room temperature. Variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the crystalline shape change is induced by an unusual 90° rotation of uniaxially aligned oxalate molecules. The oxalate dianions behave as molecular-scale rotors, with their movement propagated through the entire crystalline material via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Consequently, the subnanometre-scale changes in the oxalate molecules are instantly amplified to a micrometre-scale contraction or expansion of the crystal, accompanied by a thermal hysteresis loop. The shape change in the crystal was clearly detected under an optical microscope. The large directional deformation and prompt response suggest a role for this material in microscale or nanoscale thermal actuators.

  5. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Jonathan E.; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R.; Friedman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin–specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end–directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼430 nm·s−1 at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (kcat ∼6 s−1) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (kdet = 6.2 s−1) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  6. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: the parallel cluster model.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  7. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  8. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-01

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  9. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations.

  10. Improved hidden Markov models for molecular motors, part 2: extensions and application to experimental data.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sheyum; Müllner, Fiona E; Selvin, Paul R; Sigworth, Fred J

    2010-12-01

    Unbiased interpretation of noisy single molecular motor recordings remains a challenging task. To address this issue, we have developed robust algorithms based on hidden Markov models (HMMs) of motor proteins. The basic algorithm, called variable-stepsize HMM (VS-HMM), was introduced in the previous article. It improves on currently available Markov-model based techniques by allowing for arbitrary distributions of step sizes, and shows excellent convergence properties for the characterization of staircase motor timecourses in the presence of large measurement noise. In this article, we extend the VS-HMM framework for better performance with experimental data. The extended algorithm, variable-stepsize integrating-detector HMM (VSI-HMM) better models the data-acquisition process, and accounts for random baseline drifts. Further, as an extension, maximum a posteriori estimation is provided. When used as a blind step detector, the VSI-HMM outperforms conventional step detectors. The fidelity of the VSI-HMM is tested with simulations and is applied to in vitro myosin V data where a small 10 nm population of steps is identified. It is also applied to an in vivo recording of melanosome motion, where strong evidence is found for repeated, bidirectional steps smaller than 8 nm in size, implying that multiple motors simultaneously carry the cargo.

  11. When size does matter: organelle size influences the properties of transport mediated by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, María Cecilia; Bruno, Luciana; Wolosiuk, Alejandro; Despósito, Marcelo A; Levi, Valeria

    2013-11-01

    Organelle transport is driven by the action of molecular motors. In this work, we studied the dynamics of organelles of different sizes with the aim of understanding the complex relation between organelle motion and microenvironment. We used single particle tracking to obtain trajectories of melanosomes (pigmented organelles in Xenopus laevis melanophores). In response to certain hormones, melanosomes disperse in the cytoplasm or aggregate in the perinuclear region by the combined action of microtubule and actin motors. Melanosome trajectories followed an anomalous diffusion model in which the anomalous diffusion exponent (α) provided information regarding the trajectories' topography and thus of the processes causing it. During aggregation, the directionality of big organelles was higher than that of small organelles and did not depend on the presence of either actin or intermediate filaments (IF). Depolymerization of IF significantly reduced α values of small organelles during aggregation but slightly affect their directionality during dispersion. Our results could be interpreted considering that the number of copies of active motors increases with organelle size. Transport of big organelles was not influenced by actin or IF during aggregation showing that these organelles are moved processively by the collective action of dynein motors. Also, we found that intermediate filaments enhance the directionality of small organelles suggesting that this network keeps organelles close to the tracks allowing their efficient reattachment. The higher directionality of small organelles during dispersion could be explained considering the better performance of kinesin-2 vs. dynein at the single molecule level. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of beads for tracking small-scale molecular motor dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lade, Steven J.; Craig, Erin M.; Linke, Heiner

    2011-08-01

    Investigations into molecular motor dynamics are increasingly focused on small-scale features of the motor’s motion. We define performance measures of a common type of single-molecule motility assay, the bead assay, for its ability to detect such features. Using numerical models, we explore the dependence of assay performance on a number of experimentally controllable parameters, including bead size, optical force, and the method of attaching the bead to the motor. We find that the best parameter choice depends on the objective of the experiments, and give a guide to parameter selection. Comparison of the models against experimental data from a recent bead assay of myosin V exemplifies how our methods can also be used to extract additional information from bead assays, particularly that related to small-scale features. By analyzing the experimental data we find evidence for previously undetected multiple waiting states of the bead-motor complex. Furthermore, from numerical simulations we find that equilibrium bead dynamics display features previously attributed to aborted motor steps, and that bead dynamics alone can produce multiple subphases during a step.

  13. A minimal system allowing tubulation with molecular motors pulling on giant liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Aurélien; Cappello, Giovanni; Cartaud, Jean; Prost, Jacques; Goud, Bruno; Bassereau, Patricia

    2002-04-01

    The elucidation of physical and molecular mechanisms by which a membrane tube is generated from a membrane reservoir is central to the understanding of the structure and dynamics of intracellular organelles and of transport intermediates in eukaryotic cells. Compelling evidence exists that molecular motors of the dynein and kinesin families are involved in the tubulation of organelles. Here, we show that lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), to which kinesin molecules have been attached by means of small polystyrene beads, give rise to membrane tubes and to complex tubular networks when incubated in vitro with microtubules and ATP. Similar tubes and networks are obtained with GUVs made of purified Golgi lipids, as well as with Golgi membranes. No tube formation was observed when kinesins were directly bound to the GUV membrane, suggesting that it is critical to distribute the load on both lipids and motors by means of beads. A kinetic analysis shows that network growth occurs in two phases: a phase in which membrane-bound beads move at the same velocity than free beads, followed by a phase in which the tube growth rate decreases and strongly fluctuates. Our work demonstrates that the action of motors bound to a lipid bilayer is sufficient to generate membrane tubes and opens the way to well controlled experiments aimed at the understanding of basic mechanisms in intracellular transport.

  14. The myosin family: unconventional roles of actin-dependent molecular motors in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Maravillas-Montero, José L; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo

    2012-01-01

    Myosins comprise a family of ATP-dependent motor proteins that are best known for their role in muscle contraction and their involvement in a wide range of other eukaryotic motility processes. Recent phylogenetic analysis places myosins into 35 highly diverse classes. Although these actin-based molecular motors have been characterized extensively, and much is known about their function in different cellular compartments, there is little information available about these molecules in hematopoietic cells. The available data establish that myosins expressed by immune cells are able to support general tasks, such as maintaining plasma membrane tension, moving and secreting vesicles, aiding in endo- and exocytotic processes, and promoting the adhesion and motility of cells. Additionally, however, myosins are involved in highly specialized functions, such as regulating cell activation, IS-induced signaling, and the severing of microfilaments via the control of GTPases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of myosins in leukocytes, with emphasis on the emerging roles of these molecular motors in immune functions.

  15. Mechanochemical coupling of the motion of molecular motors to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R D; Bier, M

    1996-02-01

    The typical biochemical paradigm for coupling between hydrolysis of ATP and the performance of chemical or mechanical work involves a well-defined sequence of events (a kinetic mechanism) with a fixed stoichiometry between the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed and the turnover of the output reaction. Recent experiments show, however, that such a deterministic picture of coupling may not be adequate to explain observed behavior of molecular motor proteins in the presence of applied forces. Here we present a general model in which the binding of ATP and release of ADP serve to modulate the binding energy of a motor protein as it travels along a biopolymer backbone. The mechanism is loosely coupled--the average number of ATPs hydrolyzed to cause a single step from one binding site to the next depends strongly on the magnitude of an applied force and on the effective viscous drag force. The statistical mechanical perspective described here offers insight into how local anisotrophy along the "track" for a molecular motor, combined with an energy-releasing chemical reaction to provide a source of nonequilibrium fluctuations, can lead to macroscopic motion.

  16. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force.

    PubMed

    Vu, Huong T; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-08-12

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F)-dependent velocity [P(v)] and run length [P(n)] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P(n) and P(v) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F, P(v) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v, which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  17. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Huong T.; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F )-dependent velocity [P (v )] and run length [P (n )] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P (n ) and P (v ) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F , P (v ) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v , which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  18. Molecular motor-induced instabilities and cross linkers determine biopolymer organization.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.; Ziebert, F.; Humphrey, D.; Duggan, C.; Steinbeck, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Kas, J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Leipzig; Univ. of Texas at Austin; Univ. Bayreuth

    2007-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells rely on the active self-organization of protein filaments to form a responsive intracellular cytoskeleton. The necessity of motility and reaction to stimuli additionally requires pathways that quickly and reversibly change cytoskeletal organization. While thermally driven order-disorder transitions are, from the viewpoint of physics, the most obvious method for controlling states of organization, the timescales necessary for effective cellular dynamics would require temperatures exceeding the physiologically viable temperature range. We report a mechanism whereby the molecular motor myosin II can cause near-instantaneous order-disorder transitions in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin solutions. When motor-induced filament sliding diminishes, the actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies. Addition of stable cross linkers was found to alter the architectures of ordered assemblies. These isothermal transitions between dynamic disorder and self-assembled ordered states illustrate that the interplay between passive crosslinking and molecular motor activity plays a substantial role in dynamic cellular organization.

  19. Mechanochemical coupling of the motion of molecular motors to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R D; Bier, M

    1996-01-01

    The typical biochemical paradigm for coupling between hydrolysis of ATP and the performance of chemical or mechanical work involves a well-defined sequence of events (a kinetic mechanism) with a fixed stoichiometry between the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed and the turnover of the output reaction. Recent experiments show, however, that such a deterministic picture of coupling may not be adequate to explain observed behavior of molecular motor proteins in the presence of applied forces. Here we present a general model in which the binding of ATP and release of ADP serve to modulate the binding energy of a motor protein as it travels along a biopolymer backbone. The mechanism is loosely coupled--the average number of ATPs hydrolyzed to cause a single step from one binding site to the next depends strongly on the magnitude of an applied force and on the effective viscous drag force. The statistical mechanical perspective described here offers insight into how local anisotrophy along the "track" for a molecular motor, combined with an energy-releasing chemical reaction to provide a source of nonequilibrium fluctuations, can lead to macroscopic motion. Images Scheme 1 FIGURE 1 PMID:8789082

  20. A minimal system allowing tubulation with molecular motors pulling on giant liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Aurélien; Cappello, Giovanni; Cartaud, Jean; Prost, Jacques; Goud, Bruno; Bassereau, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The elucidation of physical and molecular mechanisms by which a membrane tube is generated from a membrane reservoir is central to the understanding of the structure and dynamics of intracellular organelles and of transport intermediates in eukaryotic cells. Compelling evidence exists that molecular motors of the dynein and kinesin families are involved in the tubulation of organelles. Here, we show that lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), to which kinesin molecules have been attached by means of small polystyrene beads, give rise to membrane tubes and to complex tubular networks when incubated in vitro with microtubules and ATP. Similar tubes and networks are obtained with GUVs made of purified Golgi lipids, as well as with Golgi membranes. No tube formation was observed when kinesins were directly bound to the GUV membrane, suggesting that it is critical to distribute the load on both lipids and motors by means of beads. A kinetic analysis shows that network growth occurs in two phases: a phase in which membrane-bound beads move at the same velocity than free beads, followed by a phase in which the tube growth rate decreases and strongly fluctuates. Our work demonstrates that the action of motors bound to a lipid bilayer is sufficient to generate membrane tubes and opens the way to well controlled experiments aimed at the understanding of basic mechanisms in intracellular transport. PMID:11959994

  1. Molecular Motor-Induced Instabilities and Cross Linkers Determine Biopolymer Organization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D.; Ziebert, F.; Humphrey, D.; Duggan, C.; Steinbeck, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Käs, J.

    2007-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells rely on the active self-organization of protein filaments to form a responsive intracellular cytoskeleton. The necessity of motility and reaction to stimuli additionally requires pathways that quickly and reversibly change cytoskeletal organization. While thermally driven order-disorder transitions are, from the viewpoint of physics, the most obvious method for controlling states of organization, the timescales necessary for effective cellular dynamics would require temperatures exceeding the physiologically viable temperature range. We report a mechanism whereby the molecular motor myosin II can cause near-instantaneous order-disorder transitions in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin solutions. When motor-induced filament sliding diminishes, the actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies. Addition of stable cross linkers was found to alter the architectures of ordered assemblies. These isothermal transitions between dynamic disorder and self-assembled ordered states illustrate that the interplay between passive crosslinking and molecular motor activity plays a substantial role in dynamic cellular organization. PMID:17604319

  2. Structure of the torque ring of the flagellar motor and the molecular basis for rotational switching

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lawrence K.; Ginsburg, Michael A.; Crovace, Claudia; Donohoe, Mhairi; Stock, Daniela

    2010-09-13

    The flagellar motor drives the rotation of flagellar filaments at hundreds of revolutions per second, efficiently propelling bacteria through viscous media. The motor uses the potential energy from an electrochemical gradient of cations across the cytoplasmic membrane to generate torque. A rapid switch from anticlockwise to clockwise rotation determines whether a bacterium runs smoothly forward or tumbles to change its trajectory. A protein called FliG forms a ring in the rotor of the flagellar motor that is involved in the generation of torque through an interaction with the cation-channel-forming stator subunit MotA. FliG has been suggested to adopt distinct conformations that induce switching but these structural changes and the molecular mechanism of switching are unknown. Here we report the molecular structure of the full-length FliG protein, identify conformational changes that are involved in rotational switching and uncover the structural basis for the formation of the FliG torque ring. This allows us to propose a model of the complete ring and switching mechanism in which conformational changes in FliG reverse the electrostatic charges involved in torque generation.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  5. A metal switch for controlling the activity of molecular motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Jared C; Zhao, Yu Cheng; Wilcox, Dean E; Kull, F Jon

    2011-12-25

    Kinesins are molecular motors that require a divalent metal ion (for example, Mg(2+)) to convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into directed force production along microtubules. Here we present the crystal structure of a recombinant kinesin motor domain bound to Mn(2+) and ADP and report on a serine-to-cysteine substitution in the switch 1 motif of kinesin that allows its ATP hydrolysis activity to be controlled by adjusting the ratio of Mn(2+) to Mg(2+). This mutant kinesin binds ATP similarly in the presence of either metal ion, but its ATP hydrolysis activity is greatly diminished in the presence of Mg(2+). In human kinesin-1 and kinesin-5 as well as Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-10 and kinesin-14, this defect is rescued by Mn(2+), providing a way to control both the enzymatic activity and force-generating ability of these nanomachines.

  6. 180 degree unidirectional bond rotation in a biaryl lactone artificial molecular motor prototype.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Bart J; Branchaud, Bruce P

    2006-12-07

    A bifunctional biaryl lactone has been synthesized that should be capable of iterative unidirectional aryl-aryl bond rotation via: (1) a diastereoselective lactone ring opening, (S)-1 to (P,S)-2 or (M,S)-2; (2) a chemoselective lactonization, (P,S)-2 or (M,S)-2 to (S)-3; and (3) a chemoselective hydrolysis, (S)-3 to (S)-1. Preliminary results of a racemic sample have indicated unidirectional 180 degrees rotation with very high directional selectivity per individual artificial molecular motor molecule through the first two steps of this sequence. [reaction: see text

  7. Discrete Kinetic Models for Molecular Motors: Asymptotic Velocity and Gaussian Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggionato, Alessandra; Silvestri, Vittoria

    2014-12-01

    We consider random walks on quasi one dimensional lattices, as introduced in Faggionato and Silvestri (Random Walks on Quasi One Dimensional Lattices: Large Deviations and Fluctuation Theorems, 2014). This mathematical setting covers a large class of discrete kinetic models for non-cooperative molecular motors on periodic tracks. We derive general formulas for the asymptotic velocity and diffusion coefficient, and we show how to reduce their computation to suitable linear systems of the same degree of a single fundamental cell, with possible linear chain removals. We apply the above results to special families of kinetic models, also catching some errors in the biophysics literature.

  8. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Final report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.

    1997-02-01

    The normal growth and development of plant cells depends on the precise organization and distribution of the cellular contents. The basic goal of this investigation was to define a group of the molecules that are involved in organizing and transporting plant cell components. Based largely on studies of animal and fungal cells, one of the molecules thought to be involved in intracellular trafficking in plants is the actin-based motor protein myosin. Therefore, the major aim of this study was to isolate and analyze plant genes encoding myosin proteins. The plant of choice for these experiments was Arabidopsis thaliana, which offers numerous advantages for molecular genetics research.

  9. Affinity of molecular interactions in the bacteriophage φ29 DNA packaging motor

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark A.; Wood, Jonathan P.A.; Capaldi, Stephanie A.; Baron, Andrew J.; Gell, Christopher; Smith, D. Alastair; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    DNA packaging in the bacteriophage φ29 involves a molecular motor with protein and RNA components, including interactions between the viral connector protein and molecules of pRNA, both of which form multimeric complexes. Data are presented to demonstrate the higher order assembly of pRNA together with the affinity of pRNA:pRNA and pRNA:connector interactions, which are used to propose a model for motor function. In solution, pRNA can form dimeric and trimeric multimers in a magnesium-dependent manner, with dissociation constants for multimerization in the micromolar range. pRNA:connector binding is also facilitated by the presence of magnesium ions, with a nanomolar apparent dissociation constant for the interaction. From studies with a mutant pRNA, it appears that multimerization of pRNA is not essential for connector binding and it is likely that connector protein is involved in the stabilization of higher order RNA multimers. It is proposed that magnesium ions may promote conformational change that facilitate pRNA:connector interactions, essential for motor function. PMID:16714447

  10. Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function.

    PubMed

    Otero, Maria G; Alloatti, Matías; Cromberg, Lucas E; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Encalada, Sandra E; Pozo Devoto, Victorio M; Bruno, Luciana; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Falzone, Tomás L

    2014-04-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurons depends on the correct delivery of the proteasome complex. In neurodegenerative diseases, aggregation and accumulation of proteins in axons link transport defects with degradation impairments; however, the transport properties of proteasomes remain unknown. Here, using in vivo experiments, we reveal the fast anterograde transport of assembled and functional 26S proteasome complexes. A high-resolution tracking system to follow fluorescent proteasomes revealed three types of motion: actively driven proteasome axonal transport, diffusive behavior in a viscoelastic axonema and proteasome-confined motion. We show that active proteasome transport depends on motor function because knockdown of the KIF5B motor subunit resulted in impairment of the anterograde proteasome flux and the density of segmental velocities. Finally, we reveal that neuronal proteasomes interact with intracellular membranes and identify the coordinated transport of fluorescent proteasomes with synaptic precursor vesicles, Golgi-derived vesicles, lysosomes and mitochondria. Taken together, our results reveal fast axonal transport as a new mechanism of proteasome delivery that depends on membrane cargo 'hitch-hiking' and the function of molecular motors. We further hypothesize that defects in proteasome transport could promote abnormal protein clearance in neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Myosin Va molecular motors manoeuvre liposome cargo through suspended actin filament intersections in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Andrew T.; Nelson, Shane R.; Ali, M. Yusuf; Kennedy, Guy G.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Walcott, Sam; Warshaw, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular cargo transport relies on myosin Va molecular motor ensembles to travel along the cell's three-dimensional (3D) highway of actin filaments. At actin filament intersections, the intersecting filament is a structural barrier to and an alternate track for directed cargo transport. Here we use 3D super-resolution fluorescence imaging to determine the directional outcome (that is, continues straight, turns or terminates) for an ∼10 motor ensemble transporting a 350 nm lipid-bound cargo that encounters a suspended 3D actin filament intersection in vitro. Motor–cargo complexes that interact with the intersecting filament go straight through the intersection 62% of the time, nearly twice that for turning. To explain this, we develop an in silico model, supported by optical trapping data, suggesting that the motors' diffusive movements on the vesicle surface and the extent of their engagement with the two intersecting actin tracks biases the motor–cargo complex on average to go straight through the intersection. PMID:28569841

  12. Special Feature: Liquids and Structural Glasses Special Feature: An active biopolymer network controlled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Dogic, Zvonimir; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Bendix, Poul M.; MacKintosh, Frederick C.; Hartwig, John H.; Stossel, Thomas P.; Weitz, David A.

    2009-09-01

    We describe an active polymer network in which processive molecular motors control network elasticity. This system consists of actin filaments cross-linked by filamin A (FLNa) and contracted by bipolar filaments of muscle myosin II. The myosin motors stiffen the network by more than two orders of magnitude by pulling on actin filaments anchored in the network by FLNa cross-links, thereby generating internal stress. The stiffening response closely mimics the effects of external stress applied by mechanical shear. Both internal and external stresses can drive the network into a highly nonlinear, stiffened regime. The active stress reaches values that are equivalent to an external stress of 14 Pa, consistent with a 1-pN force per myosin head. This active network mimics many mechanical properties of cells and suggests that adherent cells exert mechanical control by operating in a nonlinear regime where cell stiffness is sensitive to changes in motor activity. This design principle may be applicable to engineering novel biologically inspired, active materials that adjust their own stiffness by internal catalytic control.

  13. A chemically powered unidirectional rotary molecular motor based on a palladium redox cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Beatrice S. L.; Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L.

    2016-09-01

    The conversion of chemical energy to drive directional motion at the molecular level allows biological systems, ranging from subcellular components to whole organisms, to perform a myriad of dynamic functions and respond to changes in the environment. Directional movement has been demonstrated in artificial molecular systems, but the fundamental motif of unidirectional rotary motion along a single-bond rotary axle induced by metal-catalysed transformation of chemical fuels has not been realized, and the challenge is to couple the metal-centred redox processes to stepwise changes in conformation to arrive at a full unidirectional rotary cycle. Here, we present the design of an organopalladium-based motor and the experimental demonstration of a 360° unidirectional rotary cycle using simple chemical fuels. Exploiting fundamental reactivity principles in organometallic chemistry enables control of directional rotation and offers the potential of harnessing the wealth of opportunities offered by transition-metal-based catalytic conversions to drive motion and dynamic functions.

  14. The molecular basis of frictional loads in the in vitro motility assay with applications to the study of the loaded mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael J; Moore, Jeffrey R

    2010-05-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy into mechanical movement, generating forces necessary to accomplish an array of cellular functions. Since molecular motors generate force, they typically work under loaded conditions where the motor mechanochemistry is altered by the presence of a load. Several biophysical techniques have been developed to study the loaded behavior and force generating capabilities of molecular motors yet most of these techniques require specialized equipment. The frictional loading assay is a modification to the in vitro motility assay that can be performed on a standard epifluorescence microscope, permitting the high-throughput measurement of the loaded mechanochemistry of molecular motors. Here, we describe a model for the molecular basis of the frictional loading assay by modeling the load as a series of either elastic or viscoelastic elements. The model, which calculates the frictional loads imposed by different binding proteins, permits the measurement of isotonic kinetics, force-velocity relationships, and power curves in the motility assay. We show computationally and experimentally that the frictional load imposed by alpha-actinin, the most widely employed actin binding protein in frictional loading experiments, behaves as a viscoelastic rather than purely elastic load. As a test of the model, we examined the frictional loading behavior of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin under normal and fatigue-like conditions using alpha-actinin as a load. We found that, consistent with fiber studies, fatigue-like conditions cause reductions in myosin isometric force, unloaded sliding velocity, maximal power output, and shift the load at which peak power output occurs.

  15. Paddling mechanism for the substrate translocation by AAA+ motor revealed by multiscale molecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Nobuyasu; Kameda, Tomoshi; Okazaki, Kei-ichi; Takada, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Hexameric ring-shaped AAA+ molecular motors have a key function of active translocation of a macromolecular chain through the central pore. By performing multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we revealed that HslU, a AAA+ motor in a bacterial homologue of eukaryotic proteasome, translocates its substrate polypeptide via paddling mechanism during ATP-driven cyclic conformational changes. First, fully atomistic MD simulations showed that the HslU pore grips the threaded signal peptide by the highly conserved Tyr-91 and Val-92 firmly in the closed form and loosely in the open form of the HslU. The grip depended on the substrate sequence. These features were fed into a coarse-grained MD, and conformational transitions of HslU upon ATP cycles were simulated. The simulations exhibited stochastic unidirectional translocation of a polypeptide. This unidirectional translocation is attributed to paddling motions of Tyr-91s between the open and the closed forms: downward motions of Tyr-91s with gripping the substrate and upward motions with slipping on it. The paddling motions were caused by the difference between the characteristic time scales of the pore-radius change and the up-down displacements of Tyr-91s. Computational experiments on mutations at the pore and the substrate were in accord with several experiments. PMID:19828442

  16. Are two-station biased random walkers always potential molecular motors?

    PubMed

    Bakalis, Evangelos; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2015-01-12

    The short answer to the title question is no. Despite their tremendous complexity, many nanomachines are simply one-dimensional systems undergoing a biased, that is, unidirectional, walk on a two-minima potential energy curve. The initially prepared state, or station, is higher in energy than the final equilibrium state that is reached after overcoming an energy barrier. All chemical reactions comply with this scheme, which does not necessarily imply that a generic chemical reaction is a potential molecular motor. If the barrier is low, the system may walk back and the motion will have a large purely Brownian component. Alternatively, a large distance from the barrier of either of the two stations may introduce a Brownian component. Starting from a general inequality that leverages on the idea that the amount of heat dissipated along the potential energy curve is a good indication of the effectiveness of the biased walk, we provide guidelines for the selection of the features of artificial molecular motors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The molecular motor Myosin Va interacts with the cilia-centrosomal protein RPGRIP1L

    PubMed Central

    Assis, L. H. P.; Silva-Junior, R. M. P.; Dolce, L. G.; Alborghetti, M. R.; Honorato, R. V.; Nascimento, A. F. Z.; Melo-Hanchuk, T. D.; Trindade, D. M.; Tonoli, C. C. C.; Santos, C. T.; Oliveira, P. S. L.; Larson, R. E.; Kobarg, J.; Espreafico, E. M.; Giuseppe, P. O.; Murakami, M. T.

    2017-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is an actin-based molecular motor abundantly found at the centrosome. However, the role of MyoVa at this organelle has been elusive due to the lack of evidence on interacting partners or functional data. Herein, we combined yeast two-hybrid screen, biochemical studies and cellular assays to demonstrate that MyoVa interacts with RPGRIP1L, a cilia-centrosomal protein that controls ciliary signaling and positioning. MyoVa binds to the C2 domains of RPGRIP1L via residues located near or in the Rab11a-binding site, a conserved site in the globular tail domain (GTD) from class V myosins. According to proximity ligation assays, MyoVa and RPGRIP1L can interact near the cilium base in ciliated RPE cells. Furthermore, we showed that RPE cells expressing dominant-negative constructs of MyoVa are mostly unciliated, providing the first experimental evidence about a possible link between this molecular motor and cilia-related processes. PMID:28266547

  18. Mouse Myosin-19 Is a Plus-end-directed, High-duty Ratio Molecular Motor*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zekuan; Ma, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Hai-Man; Ji, Huan-Hong; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Dan; Sun, Yujie; Li, Xiang-dong

    2014-01-01

    Class XIX myosin (Myo19) is a vertebrate-specific unconventional myosin, responsible for the transport of mitochondria. To characterize biochemical properties of Myo19, we prepared recombinant mouse Myo19-truncated constructs containing the motor domain and the IQ motifs using the baculovirus/Sf9 expression system. We identified regulatory light chain (RLC) of smooth muscle/non-muscle myosin-2 as the light chain of Myo19. The actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding velocity of Myo19-truncated constructs were about one-third and one-sixth as those of myosin-5a, respectively. The apparent affinity of Myo19 to actin was about the same as that of myosin-5a. The RLCs bound to Myo19 could be phosphorylated by myosin light chain kinase, but this phosphorylation had little effect on the actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Using dual fluorescence-labeled actin filaments, we determined that Myo19 is a plus-end-directed molecular motor. We found that, similar to that of the high-duty ratio myosin, such as myosin-5a, ADP release rate was comparable with the maximal actin-activated ATPase activity of Myo19, indicating that ADP release is a rate-limiting step for the ATPase cycle of acto-Myo19. ADP strongly inhibited the actin-activated ATPase activity and actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Based on the above results, we concluded that Myo19 is a high-duty ratio molecular motor moving to the plus-end of the actin filament. PMID:24825904

  19. A Molecular Tweezer Ameliorates Motor Deficits in Mice Overexpressing α-Synuclein.

    PubMed

    Richter, Franziska; Subramaniam, Sudhakar R; Magen, Iddo; Lee, Patrick; Hayes, Jane; Attar, Aida; Zhu, Chunni; Franich, Nicholas R; Bove, Nicholas; De La Rosa, Krystal; Kwong, Jacky; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Bitan, Gal

    2017-06-05

    Aberrant accumulation and self-assembly of α-synuclein are tightly linked to several neurodegenerative diseases called synucleinopathies, including idiopathic Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. Deposition of fibrillar α-synuclein as insoluble inclusions in affected brain cells is a pathological hallmark of synucleinopathies. However, water-soluble α-synuclein oligomers may be the actual culprits causing neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in synucleinopathies. Accordingly, therapeutic approaches targeting the toxic α-synuclein assemblies are attractive for these incurable disorders. The "molecular tweezer" CLR01 selectively remodels abnormal protein self-assembly through reversible binding to Lys residues. Here, we treated young male mice overexpressing human wild-type α-synuclein under control of the Thy-1 promoter (Thy1-aSyn mice) with CLR01 and examined motor behavior and α-synuclein in the brain. Intracerebroventricular administration of CLR01 for 28 days to the mice improved motor dysfunction in the challenging beam test and caused a significant decrease of buffer-soluble α-synuclein in the striatum. Proteinase-K-resistant, insoluble α-synuclein deposits remained unchanged in the substantia nigra, whereas levels of diffuse cytoplasmic α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons increased in mice receiving CLR01 compared with vehicle. More moderate improvement of motor deficits was also achieved by subcutaneous administration of CLR01, in 2/5 trials of the challenging beam test and in the pole test, which requires balance and coordination. The data support further development of molecular tweezers as therapeutic agents for synucleinopathies.

  20. Totally asymmetric simple exclusion process simulations of molecular motor transport on random networks with asymmetric exit rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, D. V.; Miedema, D. M.; Nienhuis, B.; Schall, P.

    2015-11-01

    Using the totally asymmetric simple-exclusion-process and mean-field transport theory, we investigate the transport in closed random networks with simple crossing topology—two incoming, two outgoing segments, as a model for molecular motor motion along biopolymer networks. Inspired by in vitro observation of molecular motor motion, we model the motor behavior at the intersections by introducing different exit rates for the two outgoing segments. Our simulations of this simple network reveal surprisingly rich behavior of the transport current with respect to the global density and exit rate ratio. For asymmetric exit rates, we find a broad current plateau at intermediate motor densities resulting from the competition of two subnetwork populations. This current plateau leads to stabilization of transport properties within such networks.

  1. Adhesion of photon-driven molecular motors to surfaces via 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions: effect of interfacial interactions on molecular motion.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Gregory T; London, Gábor; Landaluce, Tatiana Fernández; Rudolf, Petra; Feringa, Ben L

    2011-01-25

    We report the attachment of altitudinal light-driven molecular motors to surfaces using 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions. Molecular motors were designed containing azide or alkyne groups for attachment to alkyne- or azide-modified surfaces. Surface attachment was characterized by UV-vis, IR, XPS, and ellipsometry measurements. Surface-bound motors were found to undergo photochemical and thermal isomerizations consistent with unidirectional rotation in solution. Confinement at a surface was found to reduce the rate of the thermal isomerization process. The rate of thermal isomerization was also dependent on the surface coverage of the motors. In solution, changes in the UV-vis signal that accompany thermal isomerization can be fit with a single monoexponential decay. In contrast, thermal isomerization of the surface-bound motors does not follow a single monoexponential decay and was found to fit a biexponential decay. Both one- and two-legged motors were attached to surfaces. The kinetics of thermal isomerization was not affected by the valency of attachment, indicating that the changes in kinetics from solution to surface systems are related to interactions between the surface-bound motors.

  2. Synthetic Molecular Motors: Thermal N Inversion and Directional Photoinduced C=N Bond Rotation of Camphorquinone Imines.

    PubMed

    Greb, Lutz; Eichhöfer, Andreas; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2015-11-23

    The thermal and photochemical E/Z isomerization of camphorquinone-derived imines was studied by a combination of kinetic, structural, and computational methods. The thermal isomerization proceeds by linear N inversion, whereas the photoinduced process occurs through C=N bond rotation with preferred directionality as a result of diastereoisomerism. Thereby, these imines are arguably the simplest example of synthetic molecular motors. The generality of the orthogonal trajectories of the thermal and photochemical pathways allows for the postulation that every suitable chiral imine qualifies, in principle, as a molecular motor driven by light or heat.

  3. Metastasis suppressor, NDRG1, mediates its activity through signaling pathways and molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Zhang, Daohai; Bae, Dong-Hun; Sahni, Sumit; Jansson, Patric; Zheng, Ying; Zhao, Qian; Yue, Fei; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2013-09-01

    The metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), is negatively correlated with tumor progression in multiple neoplasms, being a promising new target for cancer treatment. However, the precise molecular effects of NDRG1 remain unclear. Herein, we summarize recent advances in understanding the impact of NDRG1 on cancer metastasis with emphasis on its interactions with the key oncogenic nuclear factor-kappaB, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/phosphorylated AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin and Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways. Recent studies demonstrating the inhibitory effects of NDRG1 on the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a key initial step in metastasis, TGF-β pathway and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway are also described. Furthermore, NDRG1 was also demonstrated to regulate molecular motors in cancer cells, leading to inhibition of F-actin polymerization, stress fiber formation and subsequent reduction of cancer cell migration. Collectively, this review summarizes the underlying molecular mechanisms of the antimetastatic effects of NDRG1 in cancer cells.

  4. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA(+) ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named 'the ADP model' and 'the ATP model', where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA(+) ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results.

  5. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA+ ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named ‘the ADP model’ and ‘the ATP model’, where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA+ ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. PMID:27334455

  6. Lattice-gas model for active vesicle transport by molecular motors with opposite polarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhuri, Sudipto; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a multispecies lattice-gas model for motor protein driven collective cargo transport on cellular filaments. We use this model to describe and analyze the collective motion of interacting vesicle cargos being carried by oppositely directed molecular motors, moving on a single biofilament. Building on a totally asymmetric exclusion process to characterize the motion of the interacting cargos, we allow for mass exchange with the environment, input, and output at filament boundaries and focus on the role of interconversion rates and how they affect the directionality of the net cargo transport. We quantify the effect of the various different competing processes in terms of nonequilibrium phase diagrams. The interplay of interconversion rates, which allow for flux reversal and evaporation-deposition processes, introduces qualitatively unique features in the phase diagrams. We observe regimes of three-phase coexistence, the possibility of phase re-entrance, and a significant flexibility in how the different phase boundaries shift in response to changes in control parameters. The moving steady-state solutions of this model allows for different possibilities for the spatial distribution of cargo vesicles, ranging from homogeneous distribution of vesicles to polarized distributions, characterized by inhomogeneities or shocks. Current reversals due to internal regulation emerge naturally within the framework of this model. We believe that this minimal model will clarify the understanding of many features of collective vesicle transport, apart from serving as the basis for building more exact quantitative models for vesicle transport relevant to various in vivo situations.

  7. Reaction-diffusion-advection approach to spatially localized treadmilling aggregates of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Bar-On, Tomer; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional myosins belong to a class of molecular motors that walk processively inside cellular protrusions towards the tips, on top of actin filament. Surprisingly, in addition, they also form retrograde moving self-organized aggregates. The qualitative properties of these aggregates are recapitulated by a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model and admit two distinct families of modes: traveling waves and pulse trains. Unlike the traveling waves that are generated by a linear instability, pulses are nonlinear structures that propagate on top of linearly stable uniform backgrounds. Asymptotic analysis of isolated pulses via a simplified reaction-diffusion-advection variant on large periodic domains, allows to draw qualitative trends for pulse properties, such as the amplitude, width, and propagation speed. The results agree well with numerical integrations and are related to available empirical observations.

  8. Basic properties of rotary dynamics of the molecular motor Enterococcus hirae V1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Hiroshi; Hara, Mayu; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamato, Ichiro; Muneyuki, Eiro; Noji, Hiroyuki; Murata, Takeshi; Iino, Ryota

    2013-11-08

    V-ATPases are rotary molecular motors that generally function as proton pumps. We recently solved the crystal structures of the V1 moiety of Enterococcus hirae V-ATPase (EhV1) and proposed a model for its rotation mechanism. Here, we characterized the rotary dynamics of EhV1 using single-molecule analysis employing a load-free probe. EhV1 rotated in a counterclockwise direction, exhibiting two distinct rotational states, namely clear and unclear, suggesting unstable interactions between the rotor and stator. The clear state was analyzed in detail to obtain kinetic parameters. The rotation rates obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a maximal rotation rate (Vmax) of 107 revolutions/s and a Michaelis constant (Km) of 154 μM at 26 °C. At all ATP concentrations tested, EhV1 showed only three pauses separated by 120°/turn, and no substeps were resolved, as was the case with Thermus thermophilus V1-ATPase (TtV1). At 10 μM ATP (Km), the distribution of the durations of the catalytic pause was reproduced by a consecutive reaction with two time constants of 2.6 and 0.5 ms. These kinetic parameters were similar to those of TtV1. Our results identify the common properties of rotary catalysis of V1-ATPases that are distinct from those of F1-ATPases and will further our understanding of the general mechanisms of rotary molecular motors.

  9. A study of some non-equilibrium driven models and their contribution to the understanding of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, Irina; Gonzalez, Joshua

    2008-03-01

    From the point of view of a physicist, a bio-molecular motor represents an interesting non-equilibrium system and it is directly amenable to an analysis using standard methods of non-equilibrium statistical physics. We conduct a rigorous Monte Carlo study of three different driven lattice gas models that retain the basic behavior of three types of cytoskeletal molecular motors. Our models incorporate novel features such as realistic dynamics rules and complex motor-motor interactions. We are interested to have a deeper understanding of how various parameters influence the macroscopic behavior of these systems, what is the density profile and if the system undergoes a phase transition. On the analytical front, we computed the steady-state probability distributions exactly for the one of the models using the matrix method that was established in 1993 by B. Derrida et al. We also explored the possibilities offered by the ``Bethe ansatz'' method by mapping some well studied spin models into asymmetric simple exclusion models (already analyzed using computer simulations), and to use the results obtained for the spin models in finding an exact solution for our problem. We have exhaustive computational studies of the kinesin and dynein molecular motor models that prove to be very useful in checking our analytical work.

  10. Tug-of-war between two elastically coupled molecular motors: a case study on force generation and force balance.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Mehmet Can; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2017-01-04

    Intracellular transport is performed by molecular motors that pull cargos along cytoskeletal filaments. Many cellular cargos are observed to move bidirectionally, with fast transport in both directions. This behaviour can be understood as a stochastic tug-of-war between two teams of antagonistic motors. The first theoretical model for such a tug-of-war, the Müller-Klumpp-Lipowsky (MKL) model, was based on two simplifying assumptions: (i) both motor teams move with the same velocity in the direction of the stronger team, and (ii) this velocity matching and the associated force balance arise immediately after the rebinding of an unbound motor to the filament. In this study, we extend the MKL model by including an elastic coupling between the antagonistic motors, and by allowing the motors to perform discrete motor steps. Each motor step changes the elastic interaction forces experienced by the motors. In order to elucidate the basic concepts of force balance and force fluctuations, we focus on the simplest case of two antagonistic motors, one kinesin against one dynein. We calculate the probability distribution for the spatial separation of the motors and the dependence of this distribution on the motors' unbinding rate. We also compute the probability distribution for the elastic interaction forces experienced by the motors, which determines the average elastic force 〈F〉 and the standard deviation of the force fluctuations around this average value. The average force 〈F〉 is found to decrease monotonically with increasing unbinding rate ε0. The behaviour of the MKL model is recovered in the limit of small ε0. In the opposite limit of large ε0, 〈F〉 is found to decay to zero as 1/ε0. Finally, we study the limiting case with ε0 = 0 for which we determine both the force statistics and the time needed to attain the steady state. Our theoretical predictions are accessible to experimental studies of in vitro systems consisting of two antagonistic motors

  11. The Utilization of Sensori-motor Experiences for Introducing Young Pupils to Molecular Motion: A Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Does a sensori-motor experience help a physics student understand the movement of molecules in solids, liquids, and gases? Students aged 9-10 were given either traditional demonstrations of solids, liquids, and gases and the variation of molecular motion with temperature (iconic presentation), or they were involved in physical activities as they…

  12. Specific Transformation of Assembly with Actin Filaments and Molecular Motors in a Cell-Sized Self-Emerged Liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Kingo; Negishi, Makiko; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Hayashi, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    Eukaryotes, by the same combination of cytoskeleton and molecular motor, for example actin filament and myosin, can generate a variety of movements. For this diversity, the organization of biological machineries caused by the confinement and/or crowding effects of internal living cells, may play very important roles.

  13. The Utilization of Sensori-motor Experiences for Introducing Young Pupils to Molecular Motion: A Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Does a sensori-motor experience help a physics student understand the movement of molecules in solids, liquids, and gases? Students aged 9-10 were given either traditional demonstrations of solids, liquids, and gases and the variation of molecular motion with temperature (iconic presentation), or they were involved in physical activities as they…

  14. [Origin of motion in the human ureter: mechanics, energetics and kinetics of the myosin molecular motors].

    PubMed

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; De Lisa, Antonello; Tintrup, Frank; Manca, Francesco; Mancinelli, Rino

    2012-01-01

    Ureteral peristalsis is the result of coordinated mechanical motor performance of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle layer of the ureter wall. The main aim of this study was to characterize in smooth muscle of proximal segments of human ureter, the mechanical properties at level of muscle tissue and at level of myosin molecular motors. Ureteral samples were collected from 15 patients, who underwent nephrectomy for renal cancer. Smooth muscle strips longitudinally and circularly oriented from proximal segments of human ureter were used for the in vitro experiments. Mechanical indices including the maximum unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax), and the maximum isometric tension (P0) normalized per cross-sectional area, were determined in vitro determined in electrically evoked contractions of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle strips. Myosin cross-bridge (CB) number per mm2 (Ψ) the elementary force per single CB (Ψ) and kinetic parameters were calculated in muscle strips, using Huxley's equations adapted to nonsarcomeric muscles. Longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited a significantly (p<0.05) faster Vmax (63%) and a higher P0 (40%), if compared to circular strips. Moreover, longitudinal muscle strips showed a significantly higher unitary force (Ψ) per CB. However, no significant differences were observed in CB number, the attachment (f1) and the detachment (g2) rate constants between longitudinal and circular muscle strips. The main result obtained in the present work documents that the mechanical, energetic and unitary forces per CB of longitudinal layer of proximal ureter are better compared to the circular one; these preliminary findings suggested, unlike intestinal smooth muscle, a major role of longitudinal smooth muscle layer in the ureter peristalsis.

  15. Electric dipole theory and thermodynamics of actomyosin molecular motor in muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Lampinen, Markku J; Noponen, Tuula

    2005-10-21

    Movements in muscles are generated by the myosins which interact with the actin filaments. In this paper we present an electric theory to describe how the chemical energy is first stored in electrostatic form in the myosin system and how it is then released and transformed into work. Due to the longitudinal polarized molecular structure with the negative phosphate group tail, the ATP molecule possesses a large electric dipole moment (p(0)), which makes it an ideal energy source for the electric dipole motor of the actomyosin system. The myosin head contains a large number of strongly restrained water molecules, which makes the ATP-driven electric dipole motor possible. The strongly restrained water molecules can store the chemical energy released by ATP binding and hydrolysis processes in the electric form due to their myosin structure fixed electric dipole moments (p(i)). The decrease in the electric energy is transformed into mechanical work by the rotational movement of the myosin head, which follows from the interaction of the dipoles p(i) with the potential field V(0) of ATP and with the potential field Psi of the actin. The electrical meaning of the hydrolysis reaction is to reduce the dipole moment p(0)-the remaining dipole moment of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is appropriately smaller to return the low negative value of the electric energy nearly back to its initial value, enabling the removal of ADP from the myosin head so that the cycling process can be repeated. We derive for the electric energy of the myosin system a general equation, which contains the potential field V(0) with the dipole moment p(0), the dipole moments p(i) and the potential field psi. Using the previously published experimental data for the electric dipole of ATP (p(0) congruent with 230 debye) and for the amount of strongly restrained water molecules (N congruent with 720) in the myosin subfragment (S1), we show that the Gibbs free energy changes of the ATP binding and

  16. Physics of transport and traffic phenomena in biology: from molecular motors and cells to organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2005-12-01

    Traffic-like collective movements are observed at almost all levels of biological systems. Molecular motor proteins like, for example, kinesin and dynein, which are the vehicles of almost all intra-cellular transport in eukaryotic cells, sometimes encounter traffic jam that manifests as a disease of the organism. Similarly, traffic jam of collagenase MMP-1, which moves on the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, has also been observed in recent experiments. Novel efforts have been made to utilize some uni-cellular organisms as “micro-transporters”. Traffic-like movements of social insects like ants and termites on trails are, perhaps, more familiar in our everyday life. Experimental, theoretical and computational investigations in the last few years have led to a deeper understanding of the generic or common physical principles involved in these phenomena. In this review we critically examine the current status of our understanding, expose the limitations of the existing methods, mention open challenging questions and speculate on the possible future directions of research in this interdisciplinary area where physics meets not only chemistry and biology but also (nano-)technology.

  17. Reactions driving conformational movements (molecular motors) in gels: conformational and structural chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Otero, Toribio F

    2017-01-18

    In this perspective the empirical kinetics of conducting polymers exchanging anions and solvent during electrochemical reactions to get dense reactive gels is reviewed. The reaction drives conformational movements of the chains (molecular motors), exchange of ions and solvent with the electrolyte and structural (relaxation, swelling, shrinking and compaction) gel changes. Reaction-driven structural changes are identified and quantified from electrochemical responses. The empirical reaction activation energy (Ea), the reaction coefficient (k) and the reaction orders (α and β) change as a function of the conformational energy variation during the reaction. This conformational energy becomes an empirical magnitude. Ea, k, α and β include and provide quantitative conformational and structural information. The chemical kinetics becomes structural chemical kinetics (SCK) for reactions driving conformational movements of the reactants. The electrochemically stimulated conformational relaxation model describes empirical results and some results from the literature for biochemical reactions. In parallel the development of an emerging technological world of soft, wet, multifunctional and biomimetic tools and anthropomorphic robots driven by reactions of the constitutive material, as in biological organs, can be now envisaged being theoretically supported by the kinetic model.

  18. Back-stepping, hidden substeps, and conditional dwell times in molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Tsygankov, Denis; Lindén, Martin; Fisher, Michael E

    2007-02-01

    Processive molecular motors take more-or-less uniformly sized steps, along spatially periodic tracks, mostly forwards but increasingly backwards under loads. Experimentally, the major steps can be resolved clearly within the noise but one knows biochemically that one or more mechanochemical substeps remain hidden in each enzymatic cycle. In order to properly interpret experimental data for back-to-forward step ratios, mean conditional step-to-step dwell times, etc., a first-passage analysis has been developed that takes account of hidden substeps in N -state sequential models. The explicit, general results differ significantly from previous treatments that identify the observed steps with complete mechanochemical cycles; e.g., the mean dwell times tau(+) and tau(-) prior to forward and back steps, respectively, are normally unequal although the dwell times tau(++) and tau(--) between successive forward and back steps are equal. Illustrative (N=2) -state examples display a wide range of behavior. The formulation extends to the case of two or more detectable transitions in a multistate cycle with hidden substeps.

  19. A theoretical model of a molecular-motor-powered microfluidics pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Joseph L.

    2003-11-01

    Flow induced by translating and rotating beads within a circular channel is investigated as a model of a novel molecular-motor-powered microfluidics pump. Micro flows are often generated by external pumps, rather than by devices that are integral to the microfluidics chip. We are currently developing a micro-scale pump that could be part of a biosensor, "lab on a chip" device, drug delivery system, or other bio-microfluidics device. The pump consists of a kinesin-coated bead moving along a microtubule track in a circular channel. The model is developed from the Stokes equation subject to wall and bead boundary conditions, and is solved using the boundary element method. It is shown that the pump can generate flows in the atto- to pico-l/s range, and that there is an optimal loading for a given pump geometry that results in maximum pump efficiency. Increasing the diameter of the bead relative to the channel width increases the flow generated at the expense of requiring a higher force to move the bead. It is found that bead rotation can increase or reduce the power required, depending on the direction of rotation, and that positioning the bead slightly off center can reduce the required power input. This work is funded by DARPA.

  20. Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, Dan V.; Lard, Mercy; Korten, Till; van Delft, Falco C. M. J. M.; Persson, Malin; Bengtsson, Elina; Månsson, Alf; Diez, Stefan; Linke, Heiner; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2016-01-01

    The combinatorial nature of many important mathematical problems, including nondeterministic-polynomial-time (NP)-complete problems, places a severe limitation on the problem size that can be solved with conventional, sequentially operating electronic computers. There have been significant efforts in conceiving parallel-computation approaches in the past, for example: DNA computation, quantum computation, and microfluidics-based computation. However, these approaches have not proven, so far, to be scalable and practical from a fabrication and operational perspective. Here, we report the foundations of an alternative parallel-computation system in which a given combinatorial problem is encoded into a graphical, modular network that is embedded in a nanofabricated planar device. Exploring the network in a parallel fashion using a large number of independent, molecular-motor-propelled agents then solves the mathematical problem. This approach uses orders of magnitude less energy than conventional computers, thus addressing issues related to power consumption and heat dissipation. We provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of such a device by solving, in a parallel fashion, the small instance {2, 5, 9} of the subset sum problem, which is a benchmark NP-complete problem. Finally, we discuss the technical advances necessary to make our system scalable with presently available technology. PMID:26903637

  1. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, B. D.; Thijssen, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green’s function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  2. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Napitu, B D; Thijssen, J M

    2015-07-15

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  3. Silanization of quartz, silicon and mica surfaces with light-driven molecular motors: construction of surface-bound photo-active nanolayers.

    PubMed

    London, Gábor; Carroll, Gregory T; Feringa, Ben L

    2013-06-07

    The attachment of molecular rotary motors containing triethoxysilane functional groups to quartz, silicon and mica surfaces is described. Motors containing silane coupling agents in their structure form stable molecular layers on quartz and silicon surfaces. Motors attached to these surfaces were found to undergo photochemical and thermal isomerization steps similar to those observed in solution. Additionally, successful formation of molecular "carpets" on atomically flat mica extending micrometer-sized length scales is presented. These "carpets" were found to undergo morphological changes upon irradiation with UV-light.

  4. Exchange of microtubule molecular motors during melanosome transport in Xenopus laevis melanophores is triggered by collisions with intracellular obstacles.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Luciana; Echarte, Maria Mercedes; Levi, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    The observation that several cargoes move bidirectionally along microtubules in vivo raised the question regarding how molecular motors with opposed polarity coordinate during transport. In this work, we analyzed the switch of microtubule motors during the transport of melanosomes in Xenopus melanophores by registering trajectories of these organelles moving along microtubules using a fast and precise tracking method. We analyzed in detail the intervals of trajectories showing reversions in the original direction of transport and processive motion in the opposite direction for at least 250 nm. In most of the cases, the speed of the melanosome before the reversion slowly decreases with time approaching zero then, the organelle returns over the same path moving initially at a very high speed and slowing down with time. These results could be explained according to a model in which reversions are triggered by an elastic collision of the cargo with obstacles in the cytosol. This interaction generates a force opposed to the movement of the motor-driven organelle increasing the probability of detaching the active motors from the track. The model can explain reversions in melanosome trajectories as well as other characteristics of in vivo transport along microtubules observed by other authors. Our results suggest that the crowded cytoplasm plays a key role in regulating the coordination of microtubules-dependent motors.

  5. Covalent Immobilization of Microtubules on Glass Surfaces for Molecular Motor Force Measurements and Other Single-Molecule Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Rao, Lu; Gennerich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Rigid attachment of microtubules (MTs) to glass cover slip surfaces is a prerequisite for a variety of microscopy experiments in which MTs are used as substrates for MT-associated proteins, such as the molecular motors kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. We present an MT-surface coupling protocol in which aminosilanized glass is formylated using the cross-linker glutaraldehyde, fluorescence-labeled MTs are covalently attached, and the surface is passivated with highly pure beta-casein. The technique presented here yields rigid MT immobilization while simultaneously blocking the remaining glass surface against nonspecific binding by polystyrene optical trapping microspheres. This surface chemistry is straightforward and relatively cheap and uses a minimum of specialized equipment or hazardous reagents. These methods provide a foundation for a variety of optical tweezers experiments with MT-associated molecular motors and may also be useful in other assays requiring surface-immobilized proteins. PMID:24633798

  6. Synchronization of elastically coupled processive molecular motors and regulation of cargo transport.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Felix; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The collective work of motor proteins plays an important role in cellular transport processes. Since measuring intermotor coupling and hence a comparison to theoretical predictions is difficult, we introduce the synchronization as an alternative observable for motor cooperativity. This synchronization can be determined from the ratio of the mean times of motor resting and stepping. Results from a multistate Markov chain model and Brownian dynamics simulations, describing the elastically coupled motors, coincide well. Our model can explain the experimentally observed effect of strongly increased transport velocities and powers by the synchronization and coupling of myosin V and kinesin I.

  7. "Watching" the Dark State in Ultrafast Nonadiabatic Photoisomerization Process of a Light-Driven Molecular Rotary Motor.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaojuan; Cui, Xueyan; Hu, Deping; Jiang, Chenwei; Zhao, Di; Lan, Zhenggang; Li, Fuli

    2017-02-16

    Photoisomerization dynamics of a light-driven molecular rotary motor, 9-(2-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-cyclopenta[a]naphthalen-1-ylidene)-9H-fluorene, is investigated with trajectory surface-hopping dynamics at the semiempirical OM2/MRCI level. The rapid population decay of the S1 excited state for the M isomer is observed, with two different decay time scales (500 fs and 1.0 ps). By weighting the contributions of fast and slow decay trajectories, the averaged lifetime of the S1 excited state is about 710 fs. The calculated quantum yield of the M-to-P photoisomerization of this molecular rotary motor is about 59.9%. After the S0 → S1 excitation, the dynamical process of electronic decay is followed by twisting about the central C═C double bond and the motion of pyramidalization at the carbon atom of the stator-axle linkage. Although two S0/S1 minimum-energy conical intersections are obtained at the OM2/MRCI level, only one conical intersection is found to be responsible for the nonadiabatic dynamics. The existence of "dark state" in the molecular rotary motor is confirmed through the simulated time-resolved fluorescence emission spectrum. Both quenching and red shift of fluorescence emission spectrum observed by Conyard et al. [ Conyard, J.; Addison, K.; Heisler, I. A.; Cnossen, A.; Browne, W. R.; Feringa, B. L.; Meech, S. R. Nat. Chem. 2012 , 4 , 547 - 551 ; Conyard, J.; Conssen, A.; Browne, W. R.; Feringa, B. L.; Meech, S. R. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014 , 136 , 9692 - 9700 ] are well understood. We find that this "dark state" in the molecular rotary motor is not a new electronic state, but the "dark region" with low oscillator strength on the initial S1 state.

  8. Interrogating Emergent Transport Properties for Molecular Motor Ensembles: A Semi-analytical Approach.

    PubMed

    Bhaban, Shreyas; Materassi, Donatello; Li, Mingang; Hays, Thomas; Salapaka, Murti

    2016-11-01

    Intracellular transport is an essential function in eucaryotic cells, facilitated by motor proteins-proteins converting chemical energy into kinetic energy. It is understood that motor proteins work in teams enabling unidirectional and bidirectional transport of intracellular cargo over long distances. Disruptions of the underlying transport mechanisms, often caused by mutations that alter single motor characteristics, are known to cause neurodegenerative diseases. For example, phosphorylation of kinesin motor domain at the serine residue is implicated in Huntington's disease, with a recent study of phosphorylated and phosphomimetic serine residues indicating lowered single motor stalling forces. In this article we report the effects of mutations of this nature on transport properties of cargo carried by multiple wild-type and mutant motors. Results indicate that mutants with altered stall forces might determine the average velocity and run-length even when they are outnumbered by wild type motors in the ensemble. It is shown that mutants gain a competitive advantage and lead to an increase in the expected run-length when the load on the cargo is in the vicinity of the mutant's stalling force or a multiple of its stalling force. A separate contribution of this article is the development of a semi-analytic method to analyze transport of cargo by multiple motors of multiple types. The technique determines transition rates between various relative configurations of motors carrying the cargo using the transition rates between various absolute configurations. This enables a computation of biologically relevant quantities like average velocity and run-length without resorting to Monte Carlo simulations. It can also be used to introduce alterations of various single motor parameters to model a mutation and to deduce effects of such alterations on the transport of a common cargo by multiple motors. Our method is easily implementable and we provide a software package for

  9. Interrogating Emergent Transport Properties for Molecular Motor Ensembles: A Semi-analytical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Materassi, Donatello; Li, Mingang; Hays, Thomas; Salapaka, Murti

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is an essential function in eucaryotic cells, facilitated by motor proteins—proteins converting chemical energy into kinetic energy. It is understood that motor proteins work in teams enabling unidirectional and bidirectional transport of intracellular cargo over long distances. Disruptions of the underlying transport mechanisms, often caused by mutations that alter single motor characteristics, are known to cause neurodegenerative diseases. For example, phosphorylation of kinesin motor domain at the serine residue is implicated in Huntington’s disease, with a recent study of phosphorylated and phosphomimetic serine residues indicating lowered single motor stalling forces. In this article we report the effects of mutations of this nature on transport properties of cargo carried by multiple wild-type and mutant motors. Results indicate that mutants with altered stall forces might determine the average velocity and run-length even when they are outnumbered by wild type motors in the ensemble. It is shown that mutants gain a competitive advantage and lead to an increase in the expected run-length when the load on the cargo is in the vicinity of the mutant’s stalling force or a multiple of its stalling force. A separate contribution of this article is the development of a semi-analytic method to analyze transport of cargo by multiple motors of multiple types. The technique determines transition rates between various relative configurations of motors carrying the cargo using the transition rates between various absolute configurations. This enables a computation of biologically relevant quantities like average velocity and run-length without resorting to Monte Carlo simulations. It can also be used to introduce alterations of various single motor parameters to model a mutation and to deduce effects of such alterations on the transport of a common cargo by multiple motors. Our method is easily implementable and we provide a software package

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations and cross-link analysis of the rotary molecular motor F(o) of ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol

    The protein F1Fo ATP synthase is responsible for the generation of the molecule adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP). It consists of two coupled rotary motors, F1 and Fo. ATP is generated via a rotary mechanism that couples the synthesis of ATP in F1 to the proton translocation across Fo which is driven by the electrochemical proton gradient across the membrane. F1 consists of three different subunits in the stoichiometry a1b2c10. So far, only the structure of the c-subunit and a partial structure of the b-subunit have been solved at atomic level detail. However, enough biochemical and structural information is available to construct an atomic model of Fo. There are still many open questions about Fo operation ranging from the subunit arrangement to the proton pathway and proton conduction mechanism to the rotary mechanism that couples the proton conduction to the rotation of its rotor. In this thesis study, I investigated the following four aspects of Fo: the proton pathway in Fo; the motion of F o subunits during its rotation; the rotation of the C-terminal helix of the c-subunit induced by a pH change; the forced rotation of a c10 ring in a membrane. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, I was able to identify a proton pathway formed as two half proton channels in F o, i.e., a proton entrance channel and a proton exit channel. This is in good agreement with experiment. Furthermore, based on the diagramatic cross-link analysis, I propose a new Fo rotary mechanism which shows the cooperative movement of helices in Fo during proton transport and can explain experimental results which could not be explained by previous models. The investigation of the C-terminal helix rotation by NM simulations showed no pH induced rotation of the helix of the c-subunit. Finally, using steered MD simulations, I found that the c10 ring is mechanically robust against forced rotation in vacuum but not in a membrane on the MD time scale. Overall, structural information combined with my

  11. The nonlinear chemo-mechanic coupled dynamics of the F 1 -ATPase molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lizhong; Liu, Fang

    2012-03-01

    The ATP synthase consists of two opposing rotary motors, F0 and F1, coupled to each other. When the F1 motor is not coupled to the F0 motor, it can work in the direction hydrolyzing ATP, as a nanomotor called F1-ATPase. It has been reported that the stiffness of the protein varies nonlinearly with increasing load. The nonlinearity has an important effect on the rotating rate of the F1-ATPase. Here, considering the nonlinearity of the γ shaft stiffness for the F1-ATPase, a nonlinear chemo-mechanical coupled dynamic model of F1 motor is proposed. Nonlinear vibration frequencies of the γ shaft and their changes along with the system parameters are investigated. The nonlinear stochastic response of the elastic γ shaft to thermal excitation is analyzed. The results show that the stiffness nonlinearity of the γ shaft causes an increase of the vibration frequency for the F1 motor, which increases the motor's rotation rate. When the concentration of ATP is relatively high and the load torque is small, the effects of the stiffness nonlinearity on the rotating rates of the F1 motor are obvious and should be considered. These results are useful for improving calculation of the rotating rate for the F1 motor and provide insight about the stochastic wave mechanics of F1-ATPase.

  12. Kinetic modeling of molecular motors: pause model and parameter determination from single-molecule experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, José A.; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule manipulation experiments of molecular motors provide essential information about the rate and conformational changes of the steps of the reaction located along the manipulation coordinate. This information is not always sufficient to define a particular kinetic cycle. Recent single-molecule experiments with optical tweezers showed that the DNA unwinding activity of a Phi29 DNA polymerase mutant presents a complex pause behavior, which includes short and long pauses. Here we show that different kinetic models, considering different connections between the active and the pause states, can explain the experimental pause behavior. Both the two independent pause model and the two connected pause model are able to describe the pause behavior of a mutated Phi29 DNA polymerase observed in an optical tweezers single-molecule experiment. For the two independent pause model all parameters are fixed by the observed data, while for the more general two connected pause model there is a range of values of the parameters compatible with the observed data (which can be expressed in terms of two of the rates and their force dependencies). This general model includes models with indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state, and also models with cycling in both directions. Additionally, assuming that detailed balance is verified, which forbids cycling, this reduces the ranges of the values of the parameters (which can then be expressed in terms of one rate and its force dependency). The resulting model interpolates between the independent pause model and the indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state model

  13. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective cell-surface labeling of the molecular motor protein prestin

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Ryan M.; Silberg, Jonathan J.; Pereira, Fred A.; Raphael, Robert M.

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Trafficking to the plasma membrane is required for prestin function. {yields} Biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) was fused to prestin through a transmembrane domain. {yields} BAP-prestin can be metabolically labeled with biotin in HEK293 cells. {yields} Biotin-BAP-prestin allows for selective imaging of fully trafficked prestin. {yields} The biotin-BAP-prestin displays voltage-sensitive activity. -- Abstract: Prestin, a multipass transmembrane protein whose N- and C-termini are localized to the cytoplasm, must be trafficked to the plasma membrane to fulfill its cellular function as a molecular motor. One challenge in studying prestin sequence-function relationships within living cells is separating the effects of amino acid substitutions on prestin trafficking, plasma membrane localization and function. To develop an approach for directly assessing prestin levels at the plasma membrane, we have investigated whether fusion of prestin to a single pass transmembrane protein results in a functional fusion protein with a surface-exposed N-terminal tag that can be detected in living cells. We find that fusion of the biotin-acceptor peptide (BAP) and transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to the N-terminus of prestin-GFP yields a membrane protein that can be metabolically-labeled with biotin, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and selectively detected at the plasma membrane using fluorescently-tagged streptavidin. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a surface detectable tag and a single-pass transmembrane domain to prestin does not disrupt its voltage-sensitive activity.

  15. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA helicases. Essential molecular motor proteins for cellular machinery.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra; Tuteja, Renu

    2004-05-01

    DNA helicases are ubiquitous molecular motor proteins which harness the chemical free energy of ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the unwinding of energetically stable duplex DNA, and thus play important roles in nearly all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism, including replication, repair, recombination, and transcription. They break the hydrogen bonds between the duplex helix and move unidirectionally along the bound strand. All helicases are also translocases and DNA-dependent ATPases. Most contain conserved helicase motifs that act as an engine to power DNA unwinding. All DNA helicases share some common properties, including nucleic acid binding, NTP binding and hydrolysis, and unwinding of duplex DNA in the 3' to 5' or 5' to 3' direction. The minichromosome maintenance (Mcm) protein complex (Mcm4/6/7) provides a DNA-unwinding function at the origin of replication in all eukaryotes and may act as a licensing factor for DNA replication. The RecQ family of helicases is highly conserved from bacteria to humans and is required for the maintenance of genome integrity. They have also been implicated in a variety of human genetic disorders. Since the discovery of the first DNA helicase in Escherichia coli in 1976, and the first eukaryotic one in the lily in 1978, a large number of these enzymes have been isolated from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, and the number is still growing. In this review we cover the historical background of DNA helicases, helicase assays, biochemical properties, prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA helicases including Mcm proteins and the RecQ family of helicases. The properties of most of the known DNA helicases from prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, including viruses and bacteriophages, are summarized in tables.

  16. Probing single processive molecular motors with high-speed optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardini, L.; Pavone, F. S.; Capitanio, M.

    2017-02-01

    Here we present development of optical techniques for the study of single processive myosin motors based on the combination of high-speed optical tweezers force spectroscopy and single molecule fluorescence imaging. Ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy1 is applied to study the dependence of single chemo-mechanical steps of processive myosin motors on the applied load. On the other hand, single molecule localization through FIONA (Fluorescence Imaging with One Nanometer Accuracy)2, 3 is applied to in vitro motility assay to measure parameters such as the runlength, velocity and step size of single myosin V motors, labeled with Quantum Dots, under unloaded conditions.

  17. A simple statistical approach to the boyer model of the molecular motor adenosine triphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Loginov, E. B. Pikin, S. A.

    2006-03-15

    A physical description of the F{sub 0}F{sub 1} adenosine triphosphatase as a rotating motor is proposed. The catalytic center and the ion-conducting membrane are considered within the classical Boyer model for the rotor and the catalytic parts of the motor, thereby allowing application of a simple three-pole model, which decreases the number of parameters significantly. The stochastic character of the processes occurring in motors is described by the Fokker-Planck equations. Various dependences of the rotation speed on the degree of excitation, localization of excitations, and the amplitude of the potential are reported.

  18. The emergence of sarcomeric, graded-polarity and spindle-like patterns in bundles of short cytoskeletal polymers and two opposite molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, E. M.; Dey, S.; Mogilner, A.

    2011-09-01

    We use linear stability analysis and numerical solutions of partial differential equations to investigate pattern formation in the one-dimensional system of short dynamic polymers and one (plus-end directed) or two (one is plus-end, another minus-end directed) molecular motors. If polymer sliding and motor gliding rates are slow and/or the polymer turnover rate is fast, then the polymer-motor bundle has mixed polarity and homogeneous motor distribution. However, if motor gliding is fast, a sarcomeric pattern with periodic bands of alternating polymer polarity separated by motor aggregates evolves. On the other hand, if polymer sliding is fast, a graded-polarity bundle with motors at the center emerges. In the presence of the second, minus-end directed motor, the sarcomeric pattern is more ubiquitous, while the graded-polarity pattern is destabilized. However, if the minus-end motor is weaker than the plus-end directed one, and/or polymer nucleation is autocatalytic, and/or long polymers are present in the bundle, then a spindle-like architecture with a sorted-out polarity emerges with the plus-end motors at the center and minus-end motors at the edges. We discuss modeling implications for actin-myosin fibers and in vitro and meiotic spindles.

  19. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    PubMed Central

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective. PMID:25945702

  20. Mechanical Operation and Intersubunit Coordination of Ring-Shaped Molecular Motors: Insights from Single-Molecule Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shixin; Chistol, Gheorghe; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Ring NTPases represent a large and diverse group of proteins that couple their nucleotide hydrolysis activity to a mechanical task involving force generation and some type of transport process in the cell. Because of their shape, these enzymes often operate as gates that separate distinct cellular compartments to control and regulate the passage of chemical species across them. In this manner, ions and small molecules are moved across membranes, biopolymer substrates are segregated between cells or moved into confined spaces, double-stranded nucleic acids are separated into single strands to provide access to the genetic information, and polypeptides are unfolded and processed for recycling. Here we review the recent advances in the characterization of these motors using single-molecule manipulation and detection approaches. We describe the various mechanisms by which ring motors convert chemical energy to mechanical force or torque and coordinate the activities of individual subunits that constitute the ring. We also examine how single-molecule studies have contributed to a better understanding of the structural elements involved in motor-substrate interaction, mechanochemical coupling, and intersubunit coordination. Finally, we discuss how these molecular motors tailor their operation—often through regulation by other cofactors—to suit their unique biological functions. PMID:24806916

  1. Mechanical operation and intersubunit coordination of ring-shaped molecular motors: insights from single-molecule studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shixin; Chistol, Gheorghe; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-05-06

    Ring NTPases represent a large and diverse group of proteins that couple their nucleotide hydrolysis activity to a mechanical task involving force generation and some type of transport process in the cell. Because of their shape, these enzymes often operate as gates that separate distinct cellular compartments to control and regulate the passage of chemical species across them. In this manner, ions and small molecules are moved across membranes, biopolymer substrates are segregated between cells or moved into confined spaces, double-stranded nucleic acids are separated into single strands to provide access to the genetic information, and polypeptides are unfolded and processed for recycling. Here we review the recent advances in the characterization of these motors using single-molecule manipulation and detection approaches. We describe the various mechanisms by which ring motors convert chemical energy to mechanical force or torque and coordinate the activities of individual subunits that constitute the ring. We also examine how single-molecule studies have contributed to a better understanding of the structural elements involved in motor-substrate interaction, mechanochemical coupling, and intersubunit coordination. Finally, we discuss how these molecular motors tailor their operation-often through regulation by other cofactors-to suit their unique biological functions.

  2. Computational design of faster rotating second-generation light-driven molecular motors by control of steric effects.

    PubMed

    Oruganti, Baswanth; Fang, Changfeng; Durbeej, Bo

    2015-09-07

    We report a systematic computational investigation of the possibility to accelerate the rate-limiting thermal isomerizations of the rotary cycles of synthetic light-driven overcrowded alkene-based molecular motors through modulation of steric interactions. Choosing as a reference system a second-generation motor known to accomplish rotary motion in the MHz regime and using density functional theory methods, we propose a three-step mechanism for the thermal isomerizations of this motor and show that variation of the steric bulkiness of the substituent at the stereocenter can reduce the (already small) free-energy barrier of the rate-determining step by a further 15-17 kJ mol(-1). This finding holds promise for future motors of this kind to reach beyond the MHz regime. Furthermore, we demonstrate and explain why one particular step is kinetically favored by decreasing and another step is kinetically favored by increasing the steric bulkiness of this substituent, and identify a possible back reaction capable of impeding the rotary rate.

  3. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-04-16

    In this review, current structural understanding of the apicomplexan glideosome and actin regulation is described. Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective.

  4. A first-principles study of overcrowded alkene-based light-driven rotary molecular motor as a possible optical molecular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lina; Zhao, Jingfen; Cui, Bin; Fang, Changfeng; Liu, Desheng

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of a molecular motor as an optical molecular switch by using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with first-principles density functional theory. The two main forms of this molecule during the 360° rotation, named the anti-folded isomer and the syn-folded isomer, have shown a consistent difference in the current. The current of the syn-folded isomer is larger than that of the anti-folded isomer, meaning that the conductivity of the molecules alters four times within a rotary cycle. The merit of the photo-induced conductivity tuning makes the molecule a promising candidate for optical molecular switches.

  5. Dictyostelium myosin-IE is a fast molecular motor involved in phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Dürrwang, Ulrike; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Erent, Muriel; Kull, F Jon; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Geeves, Michael A; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2006-02-01

    Class I myosins are single-headed motor proteins, implicated in various motile processes including organelle translocation, ion-channel gating, and cytoskeleton reorganization. Here we describe the cellular localization of myosin-IE and its role in the phagocytic uptake of solid particles and cells. A complete analysis of the kinetic and motor properties of Dictyostelium discoideum myosin-IE was achieved by the use of motor domain constructs with artificial lever arms. Class I myosins belonging to subclass IC like myosin-IE are thought to be tuned for tension maintenance or stress sensing. In contrast to this prediction, our results show myosin-IE to be a fast motor. Myosin-IE motor activity is regulated by myosin heavy chain phosphorylation, which increases the coupling efficiency between the actin and nucleotide binding sites tenfold and the motile activity more than fivefold. Changes in the level of free Mg(2+) ions, which are within the physiological range, are shown to modulate the motor activity of myosin-IE by inhibiting the release of adenosine diphosphate.

  6. A rotary molecular motor that can work at near 100% efficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Kinosita, K; Yasuda, R; Noji, H; Adachi, K

    2000-01-01

    A single molecule of F1-ATPase is by itself a rotary motor in which a central gamma-subunit rotates against a surrounding cylinder made of alpha3beta3-subunits. Driven by the three betas that sequentially hydrolyse ATP, the motor rotates in discrete 120 degree steps, as demonstrated in video images of the movement of an actin filament bound, as a marker, to the central gamma-subunit. Over a broad range of load (hydrodynamic friction against the rotating actin filament) and speed, the F1 motor produces a constant torque of ca. 40 pN nm. The work done in a 120 degree step, or the work per ATP molecule, is thus ca. 80 pN nm. In cells, the free energy of ATP hydrolysis is ca. 90 pN nm per ATP molecule, suggesting that the F1 motor can work at near 100% efficiency. We confirmed in vitro that F1 indeed does ca. 80 pN nm of work under the condition where the free energy per ATP is 90 pN nm. The high efficiency may be related to the fully reversible nature of the F1 motor: the ATP synthase, of which F1 is a part, is considered to synthesize ATP from ADP and phosphate by reverse rotation of the F1 motor. Possible mechanisms of F1 rotation are discussed. PMID:10836501

  7. Distal hereditary motor neuropathy with vocal cord paresis: from difficulty in choral singing to a molecular genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Gillian; Barwick, Katy E S; Hartley, Louise; McEntagart, Meriel; Crosby, Andrew H; Llewelyn, Gareth; Morris, Huw R

    2016-06-01

    Patients presenting with distal weakness can be a diagnostic challenge; the eventual diagnosis often depends upon accurate clinical phenotyping. We present a mother and daughter with a rare form of distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 7 in whom the diagnosis became apparent by initial difficulty in singing, from early vocal cord dysfunction. This rare neuropathy has now been identified in two apparently unrelated families in Wales. This family's clinical presentation is typical of distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 7, and they have the common truncating mutation in the SLC5A7 gene. Advances in genetic analysis of these rare conditions broaden our understanding of their potential molecular mechanisms and may allow more directed therapy.

  8. Active transport of oil droplets along oriented microtubules by kinesin molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Bottier, Céline; Fattaccioli, Jacques; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Morin, Fabrice O; Kim, Beomjoon; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2009-06-21

    We demonstrate the active transport of liquid cargos in the form of oil-in-water emulsion droplets loaded on kinesin motor proteins moving along oriented microtubules. We analyze the motility properties of the kinesin motors (velocity and run length) and find that the liquid cargo in the form of oil droplets does not alter the motor function of the kinesin molecules. This work provides a novel method for handling only a few molecules/particles encapsulated inside the oil droplets and represents a key finding for the integration of kinesin-based active transport into nanoscale lab-on-a-chip devices. We also investigate the effect of the diameter of the droplets on the motility properties of the kinesin motors. The velocity is approximately constant irrespective of the diameter of the droplets whereas we highlight a strong increase of the run length when the diameter of the droplets increases. We correlate these results with the number of kinesin motors involved in the transport process and find an excellent agreement between our experimental result and a theoretical model.

  9. Molecular motor function in axonal transport in vivo probed by genetic and computational analysis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Gerald F.; Yang, Ge; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Weaver, Carole; Shah, Sameer B.; Robinson, John T.; Hays, Thomas S.; Danuser, Gaudenz; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectional axonal transport driven by kinesin and dynein along microtubules is critical to neuronal viability and function. To evaluate axonal transport mechanisms, we developed a high-resolution imaging system to track the movement of amyloid precursor protein (APP) vesicles in Drosophila segmental nerve axons. Computational analyses of a large number of moving vesicles in defined genetic backgrounds with partial reduction or overexpression of motor proteins enabled us to test with high precision existing and new models of motor activity and coordination in vivo. We discovered several previously unknown features of vesicle movement, including a surprising dependence of anterograde APP vesicle movement velocity on the amount of kinesin-1. This finding is largely incompatible with the biophysical properties of kinesin-1 derived from in vitro analyses. Our data also suggest kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein motors assemble in stable mixtures on APP vesicles and their direction and velocity are controlled at least in part by dynein intermediate chain. PMID:22398725

  10. An exact approach for studying cargo transport by an ensemble of molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracellular transport is crucial for many cellular processes where a large fraction of the cargo is transferred by motor-proteins over a network of microtubules. Malfunctions in the transport mechanism underlie a number of medical maladies. Existing methods for studying how motor-proteins coordinate the transfer of a shared cargo over a microtubule are either analytical or are based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Approaches that yield analytical results, while providing unique insights into transport mechanism, make simplifying assumptions, where a detailed characterization of important transport modalities is difficult to reach. On the other hand, Monte-Carlo based simulations can incorporate detailed characteristics of the transport mechanism; however, the quality of the results depend on the number and quality of simulation runs used in arriving at results. Here, for example, it is difficult to simulate and study rare-events that can trigger abnormalities in transport. Results In this article, a semi-analytical methodology that determines the probability distribution function of motor-protein behavior in an exact manner is developed. The method utilizes a finite-dimensional projection of the underlying infinite-dimensional Markov model, which retains the Markov property, and enables the detailed and exact determination of motor configurations, from which meaningful inferences on transport characteristics of the original model can be derived. Conclusions Under this novel probabilistic approach new insights about the mechanisms of action of these proteins are found, suggesting hypothesis about their behavior and driving the design and realization of new experiments. The advantages provided in accuracy and efficiency make it possible to detect rare events in the motor protein dynamics, that could otherwise pass undetected using standard simulation methods. In this respect, the model has allowed to provide a possible explanation for possible mechanisms

  11. On the possibility to accelerate the thermal isomerizations of overcrowded alkene-based rotary molecular motors with electron-donating or electron-withdrawing substituents.

    PubMed

    Oruganti, Baswanth; Durbeej, Bo

    2016-09-01

    We employ computational methods to investigate the possibility of using electron-donating or electron-withdrawing substituents to reduce the free-energy barriers of the thermal isomerizations that limit the rotational frequencies achievable by synthetic overcrowded alkene-based molecular motors. Choosing as reference systems one of the fastest motors known to date and two variants thereof, we consider six new motors obtained by introducing electron-donating methoxy and dimethylamino or electron-withdrawing nitro and cyano substituents in conjugation with the central olefinic bond connecting the two (stator and rotator) motor halves. Performing density functional theory calculations, we then show that electron-donating (but not electron-withdrawing) groups at the stator are able to reduce the already small barriers of the reference motors by up to 18 kJ mol(-1). This result outlines a possible strategy for improving the rotational frequencies of motors of this kind. Furthermore, exploring the origin of the catalytic effect, it is found that electron-donating groups exert a favorable steric influence on the thermal isomerizations, which is not manifested by electron-withdrawing groups. This finding suggests a new mechanism for controlling the critical steric interactions of these motors. Graphical Abstract The introduction of electron-donating groups in one of the fastest rotary molecular motors known to date is found to reduce the free-energy barriers of the thermal steps that limit the rotational frequencies by up to 18 kJ mol(-1).

  12. Identification of molecular motors in the Woods Hole squid, Loligo pealei: an expressed sequence tag approach.

    PubMed

    DeGiorgis, Joseph A; Cavaliere, Kimberly R; Burbach, J Peter H

    2011-10-01

    The squid giant axon and synapse are unique systems for studying neuronal function. While a few nucleotide and amino acid sequences have been obtained from squid, large scale genetic and proteomic information is lacking. We have been particularly interested in motors present in axons and their roles in transport processes. Here, to obtain genetic data and to identify motors expressed in squid, we initiated an expressed sequence tag project by single-pass sequencing mRNAs isolated from the stellate ganglia of the Woods Hole Squid, Loligo pealei. A total of 22,689 high quality expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences were obtained and subjected to basic local alignment search tool analysis. Seventy six percent of these sequences matched genes in the National Center for Bioinformatics databases. By CAP3 analysis this library contained 2459 contigs and 7568 singletons. Mining for motors successfully identified six kinesins, six myosins, a single dynein heavy chain, as well as components of the dynactin complex, and motor light chains and accessory proteins. This initiative demonstrates that EST projects represent an effective approach to obtain sequences of interest. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel molecular motor, Leishmania myosin-XXI.

    PubMed

    Batters, Christopher; Woodall, Katy A; Toseland, Christopher P; Hundschell, Christian; Veigel, Claudia

    2012-08-10

    The genome of the Leishmania parasite contains two classes of myosin. Myosin-XXI, seemingly the only myosin isoform expressed in the protozoan parasite, has been detected in both the promastigote and amastigote stages of the Leishmania life cycle. It has been suggested to perform a variety of functions, including roles in membrane anchorage, but also long-range directed movements of cargo. However, nothing is known about the biochemical or mechanical properties of this motor. Here we designed and expressed various myosin-XXI constructs using a baculovirus expression system. Both full-length (amino acids 1-1051) and minimal motor domain constructs (amino acids 1-800) featured actin-activated ATPase activity. Myosin-XXI was soluble when expressed either with or without calmodulin. In the presence of calcium (pCa 4.1) the full-length motor could bind a single calmodulin at its neck domain (probably amino acids 809-823). Calmodulin binding was required for motility but not for ATPase activity. Once bound, calmodulin remained stably attached independent of calcium concentration (pCa 3-7). In gliding filament assays, myosin-XXI moved actin filaments at ∼15 nm/s, insensitive to both salt (25-1000 mm KCl) and calcium concentrations (pCa 3-7). Calmodulin binding to the neck domain might be involved in regulating the motility of the myosin-XXI motor for its various cellular functions in the different stages of the Leishmania parasite life cycle.

  14. Using electrical and optical tweezers to facilitate studies of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Mark E; Sun, Yujie; Bau, Haim H; Goldman, Yale E

    2009-06-28

    Dielectrophoresis was used to stretch and suspend actin filaments across a trench etched between two electrodes patterned on a glass slide. Optical tweezers were used to bring a motor protein-coated bead into close proximity to a pre-selected, suspended actin filament, facilitating the attachment of the myosin-coated bead to the filament. The clearance beneath the filament allowed the bead to move freely along and around its filamentous track, unhindered by solid surfaces. Using defocused images, the three-dimensional position of the bead was tracked as a function of time to obtain its trajectory. Experiments were carried out with myosin V and myosin X. Both motor proteins followed left-handed helical paths with the myosin X motor exhibiting a shorter pitch than the myosin V. The combined use of electrostatic and optical tweezers facilitates the preparation of motility assays with suspended tracks. Variants of this technique will enable higher complexity experiments in vitro to better understand the behavior of motors in cells.

  15. Torque, chemistry and efficiency in molecular motors: a study of the rotary-chemical coupling in F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shayantani; Bora, Ram Prasad; Warshel, Arieh

    2015-11-01

    Detailed understanding of the action of biological molecular machines must overcome the challenge of gaining a clear knowledge of the corresponding free-energy landscape. An example for this is the elucidation of the nature of converting chemical energy to torque and work in the rotary molecular motor of F1-ATPase. A major part of the challenge involves understanding the rotary-chemical coupling from a non-phenomenological structure/energy description. Here we focused on using a coarse-grained model of F1-ATPase to generate a structure-based free-energy landscape of the rotary-chemical process of the whole system. In particular, we concentrated on exploring the possible impact of the position of the catalytic dwell on the efficiency and torque generation of the molecular machine. It was found that the experimentally observed torque can be reproduced with landscapes that have different positions for the catalytic dwell on the rotary-chemical surface. Thus, although the catalysis is undeniably required for torque generation, the experimentally observed position of the catalytic dwell at 80° might not have a clear advantage for the force generation by F1-ATPase. This further implies that the rotary-chemical couplings in these biological motors are quite robust and their efficiencies do not depend explicitly on the position of the catalytic dwells. Rather, the specific positioning of the dwells with respect to the rotational angle is a characteristic arising due to the structural construct of the molecular machine and might not bear any clear connection to the thermodynamic efficiency for the system.

  16. Testing a structural model for viral DNA packaging motor function by optical tweezers measurements, site directed mutagenesis, and molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicholas A.; Migliori, Amy D.; Arya, Gaurav; Rao, Venigalla B.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2013-09-01

    Many double-stranded DNA viruses employ a molecular motor to package DNA into preformed capsid shells. Based on structures of phage T4 motor proteins determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, Rao, Rossmann and coworkers recently proposed a structural model for motor function. They proposed that DNA is ratcheted by a large conformational change driven by electrostatic interactions between charged residues at an interface between two globular domains of the motor protein. We have conducted experiments to test this model by studying the effect on packaging under applied load of site-directed changes altering these residues. We observe significant impairment of packaging activity including reductions in packaging rate, percent time packaging, and time active under high load. We show that these measured impairments correlate well with alterations in free energies associated with the conformational change predicted by molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Coupling mechanical forces to electrical signaling: molecular motors and the intracellular transport of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-04-01

    Proper localization of various ion channels is fundamental to neuronal functions, including postsynaptic potential plasticity, dendritic integration, action potential initiation and propagation, and neurotransmitter release. Microtubule-based forward transport mediated by kinesin motors plays a key role in placing ion channel proteins to correct subcellular compartments. PDZ- and coiled-coil-domain proteins function as adaptor proteins linking ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors to various kinesin motors, respectively. Recent studies show that several voltage-gated ion channel/transporter proteins directly bind to kinesins during forward transport. Three major regulatory mechanisms underlying intracellular transport of ion channels are also revealed. These studies contribute to understanding how mechanical forces are coupled to electrical signaling and illuminating pathogenic mechanisms in neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Solution structure of two molecular motor domains: nonclaret disjunctional and kinesin.

    PubMed Central

    Eden, D; Luu, B Q; Zapata, D J; Sablin, E P; Kull, F J

    1995-01-01

    The effects of selected ligands on the structure of the truncated heavy-chain chemomechanical motor domains of Drosophila ncd and human kinesin were compared using the technique of transient electric birefringence. The 366-amino acid C-terminal motor domain of Drosophila nonclaret disjunctional, ncd(335-700), and the 349-amino acid N-terminal motor domain of human kinesin, kinesin(349), were studied at 4 degrees C in neutral buffers with ionic strength of 100 mM to form complexes with either MgADP or MgADP.Vi. The rotational diffusion time adjusted to 20 degrees C and water, tau 20,W, for ncd(335-700).MgADP is 32.8 ns, and for ncd(335-700).MgADP.Vi is 34.8 ns, suggesting prolate ellipsoids with dimensions 9.40 x 3.77 nm and 9.73 x 3.70 nm, respectively. The specific Kerr constant, Ksp, of ncd is -1.65 x 10(-12) cm2V-2 for the MgADP complex and -1.15 x 10(-12) cm2V-2 for the MgADP.Vi complex. The large negative Ksp for a prolate protein suggests an unusual charge distribution with two long surfaces with opposite charge. The tau 20,W for kinesin(349).MgADP is longer than the corresponding ncd motor and shows a decrease with increased electric field. The kinesin(349).MgADP.Vi complex has a longer tau 20,W. The Ksp for kinesin(349) is 0.36 x 10(-12) cm2V-2 for each complex. PMID:7787102

  19. The Molecular Basis of Cardiac Mechanics: Regulation of Motor Unit Recruitment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    bridges determines the affinity of the regulatory proteins for calcium. The force response to sarcomere length oscillations was measured at...strain gauge. Sarcomere oscillations were imposed with a fast servomotor. The force response lagged the sarcomere length oscillations at frequency...mm2) since each cubic millimeter of the cardiac or skeletal muscle contains 100•1012 motor units (The length of half sarcomere is around 1.0µm

  20. Local cytoskeletal and organelle interactions impact molecular motor-driven early endosomal trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Allison L.; Goldman, Yale E.; Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; Ostap, E. Michael

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Background In the intracellular environment, motor-driven cargo must navigate a dense cytoskeletal network among abundant organelles. Results We investigated the effects of the crowded intracellular environment on early endosomal trafficking. Live-cell imaging of an endosomal cargo (endocytosed epidermal growth factor-conjugated quantum dots) combined with high-resolution tracking was used to analyze the heterogeneous motion of individual endosomes. The motile population of endosomes moved towards the perinuclear region in directed bursts of microtubule-based, dynein-dependent transport interrupted by longer periods of diffusive motion. Actin network density did not affect motile endosomes during directed runs or diffusive interruptions. Simultaneous two-color imaging was used to correlate changes in endosomal movement with potential obstacles to directed runs. Termination of directed runs spatially correlated with microtubule-dense regions, encounters with other endosomes, and interactions with the endoplasmic reticulum. During a subset of run terminations, we also observed merging and splitting of endosomes, deformation of the endoplasmic reticulum, and directional reversals at speeds up to ten-fold greater than characteristic in vitro motor velocities. These observations suggest endosomal membrane tension is high during directed run termination. Conclusions Our results indicate that the crowded cellular environment significantly impacts the motor-driven motility of organelles. Rather than simply acting as impediments to movement, interactions of trafficking cargos with intracellular obstacles may facilitate communication between membrane-bound compartments or contribute to the generation of membrane tension necessary for fusion and fission of endosomal membranes or remodeling of the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:23770188

  1. Engineering of a novel Ca²⁺-regulated kinesin molecular motor using a calmodulin dimer linker.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Hideki; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2012-06-29

    The kinesin-microtubule system holds great promise as a molecular shuttle device within biochips. However, one current barrier is that such shuttles do not have "on-off" control of their movement. Here we report the development of a novel molecular motor powered by an accelerator and brake system, using a kinesin monomer and a calmodulin (CaM) dimer. The kinesin monomer, K355, was fused with a CaM target peptide (M13 peptide) at the C-terminal part of the neck region (K355-M13). We also prepared CaM dimers using CaM mutants (Q3C), (R86C), or (A147C) and crosslinkers that react with cysteine residues. Following induction of K355-M13 dimerization with CaM dimers, we measured K355-M13 motility and found that it can be reversibly regulated in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. We also found that velocities of K355-M13 varied depending on the type and crosslink position of the CaM dimer used; crosslink length also had a moderate effect on motility. These results suggest Ca(2+)-dependent dimerization of K355-M13 could be used as a novel molecular shuttle, equipped with an accelerator and brake system, for biochip applications.

  2. Simple non-fluorescent polarity labeling of microtubules for molecular motor assays.

    PubMed

    Soppina, Virupakshi; Rai, Arpan; Mallik, Roop

    2009-06-01

    Transport of intracellular organelles along the microtubule cytoskeleton occurs in a bidirectional manner due to opposing activity of microtubule-associated motor proteins of the kinesin and dynein families. Regulation of this opposing activity and the resultant motion is believed to generate a polarized distribution of many organelles within the cell. The bidirectional motion can be reconstituted on in vitro assembled microtubules using organelles extracted from cells. This provides an opportunity to understand the regulation of intracellular transport through quantitative analysis of the motion of organelles in a controlled environment. Such analysis requires the use of polarity-labeled microtubules to resolve the plus and minus components of bidirectional motion. However, existing methods of in vitro microtubule polarity labeling are unsuitable for high-resolution recording of motion. Here we present a simple and reliable method that uses avidin-coated magnetic beads to prepare microtubules labeled at the minus end. The microtubule polarity can be identified without any need for fluorescence excitation. We demonstrate video-rate high-resolution imaging of single cellular organelles moving along plus and minus directions on labeled microtubules. Quantitative analysis of this motion indicates that these organelles are likely to be driven by multiple dynein motors in vivo.

  3. A molecular mechanism of direction switching in the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Koushik; Brunstetter, Duncan; Titen, Sienna; Blair, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The direction of flagellar rotation is regulated by a rotor-mounted protein assembly, termed the “switch complex,” formed from multiple copies of the proteins FliG, FliM, and FliN. The structures of major parts of these proteins are known, and the overall organization of proteins in the complex has been elucidated previously using a combination of protein-binding, mutational, and cross-linking approaches. In Escherichia coli, the switch from counterclockwise to clockwise rotation is triggered by the signaling protein phospho-CheY, which binds to the lower part of the switch complex and induces small movements of FliM and FliN subunits relative to each other. Direction switching also must produce movements in the upper part of the complex, particularly in the C-terminal domain of FliG (FliGC), which interacts with the stator to generate the torque for flagellar rotation. In the present study, protein movements in the middle and upper parts of the switch complex have been probed by means of targeted cross-linking and mutational analysis. Switching induces a tilting movement of the FliM domains that form the middle part of the switch and a consequent rotation of the affixed FliGC domains that reorients the stator interaction sites by about 90°. In a recently proposed hypothesis for the motor mechanism, such a reorientation of FliGC would reverse the direction of motor rotation. PMID:21969567

  4. Molecular motors are differentially distributed on Golgi membranes from polarized epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Microtubules (MT) are required for the efficient transport of membranes from the trans-Golgi and for transcytosis of vesicles from the basolateral membrane to the apical cytoplasm in polarized epithelia. MTs in these cells are primarily oriented with their plus ends basally near the Golgi and their minus-ends in the apical cytoplasm. Here we report that isolated Golgi and Golgi-enriched membranes from intestinal epithelial cells possess the actin based motor myosin-I, the MT minus- end-directed motor cytoplasmic dynein and its in vitro motility activator dynactin (p150/Glued). The Golgi can be separated into stacks, possessing features of the Golgi cisternae, and small membranes enriched in the trans-Golgi network marker TGN 38/41. Whereas myosin-I is present on all membranes in the Golgi fraction, dynein is present only on the small membrane fraction. Dynein, like myosin-I, is associated with membranes as a cytoplasmic peripheral membrane protein. Dynein and myosin-I coassociate with membranes that bind to MTs and cross-link actin filaments and MTs in a nucleotide-dependent manner. We propose that cytoplasmic dynein moves Golgi membranes along MTs to the cell cortex where myosin-I provides local delivery through the actin- rich cytoskeleton to the apical membrane. PMID:8045931

  5. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry based Molecular Histology of Human Spinal Cord Tissue and Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Malmberg, Per; Lindberg, Olle R.; Fletcher, John S.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is a powerful method for imaging biological samples with high spatial resolution. Whole section ToF SIMS scans and multivariate data analysis have been performed on human spinal cord in order to delineate anatomical regions of interest based on their chemical distribution pattern. ToF SIMS analysis of thoracic spinal cord sections was performed at 5µm resolution within 2 hours. Multivariate image analysis by means of principal component analysis and maximum auto correlation factor analysis resulted in detection of more than 400 m/z peaks that were found to be significantly changed. Here, the results show characteristic biochemical distributions that are well in line with major histological regions, including grey and white matter. As an approach for iterative segmentation, we further evaluated previously outlined regions of interest as identified by multivariate image analysis. Here, further discrimination of the grey matter into ventral, lateral and dorsal neuroanatomical regions was observed. TOF SIMS imaging has been carried out at submicron resolution obtaining localization and characterization of spinal motor neurons based on their chemical fingerprint, including neurotransmitter precursors that serve as molecular indicators for motor neuron integrity. Thus, TOF SIMS can be used as an approach for chemical histology and pathology. SIMS holds immense potential for investigating the subcellular mechanisms underlying spinal cord related diseases including chronic pain and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:23947367

  6. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Understanding molecular pathogenesis could lead to future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Nivedita U; Shy, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies, like many other degenerative disorders, have been challenging to treat. At this point, there is little specific therapy for the inherited neuropathies other than genetic counseling as well as symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation. In the past, ascorbic acid, progesterone antagonists, and subcutaneous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) injections have demonstrated improvement in animal models of CMT 1A, the most common inherited neuropathy, but have failed to translate any effect in humans. Given the difficulty in treatment, it is important to understand the molecular pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies in order to strategize potential future therapies. The hereditary neuropathies are in an era of molecular insight and over the past 20 years, more than 78 subtypes of Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) have been identified and extensively studied to understand the biological pathways in greater detail. Next generation molecular sequencing has also improved the diagnosis as well as the understanding of CMT. A greater understanding of the molecular pathways will help pave the way to future therapeutics of CMT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Michaelis-Menten at 100 and allosterism at 50: driving molecular motors in a hailstorm with noisy ATPase engines and allosteric transmission.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2014-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motor proteins move on filamentous tracks by converting input chemical energy that they derive by catalyzing the hydrolysis of ATP. The ATPase site is the analogue of an engine and hydrolysis of ATP is the analogue of burning of chemical fuel. Moreover, the functional role of a segment of the motor is analogous to that of the transmission system of an automobile, which consists of a shaft, gear, clutch, etc. The operation of the engine is intrinsically 'noisy' and the motor faces a molecular 'hailstorm' in the aqueous medium. In this commemorative review, we celebrate the centenary of Michaelis and Menten's landmark paper of 1913 and the golden jubilee of Monod and colleagues classic paper of 1963 by highlighting their relevance with respect to explaining the operational mechanisms of the engine and the transmission system, respectively, of cytoskeletal motors.

  8. INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Monte—Carlo Simulation of Multiple-Molecular-Motor Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-Qing; Wang, Guo-Dong; Shen, Wei-Bo

    2010-10-01

    Multimotor transport is studied by Monte-Carlo simulation with consideration of motor detachment from the filament. Our work shows, in the case of low load, the velocity of multi-motor system can decrease or increase with increasing motor numbers depending on the single motor force-velocity curve. The stall force and run-length reduced greatly compared to other models. Especially in the case of low ATP concentrations, the stall force of multi motor transport even smaller than the single motor's stall force.

  9. From Computational Photobiology to the Design of Vibrationally Coherent Molecular Devices and Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivucci, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    In the past multi-configurational quantum chemical computations coupled with molecular mechanics force fields have been employed to investigate spectroscopic, thermal and photochemical properties of visual pigments. Here we show how the same computational technology can nowadays be used to design, characterize and ultimately, prepare light-driven molecular switches which mimics the photophysics of the visual pigment bovine rhodopsin (Rh). When embedded in the protein cavity the chromophore of Rh undergoes an ultrafast and coherent photoisomerization. In order to design a synthetic chromophore displaying similar properties in common solvents, we recently focused on indanylidene-pyrroline (NAIP) systems. We found that these systems display light-induced ground state coherent vibrational motion similar to the one detected in Rh. Semi-classical trajectories provide a mechanistic description of the structural changes associated to the observed coherent motion which is shown to be ultimately due to periodic changes in the π-conjugation.

  10. Direct Observation of a Dark State in the Photocycle of a Light-Driven Molecular Motor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the excited-state properties of light driven molecular machines is crucial to achieving high efficiency and directed functionality. A key challenge in achieving control lies in unravelling the complex photodynamics and especially in identifying the role played by dark states. Here we use the structure sensitivity and high time resolution of UV-pump/IR-probe spectroscopy to build a detailed and comprehensive model of the structural evolution of light driven molecular rotors. The photodynamics of these chiral overcrowded alkene derivatives are determined by two close-lying excited electronic states. The potential energy landscape of these “bright” and “dark” states gives rise to a broad excited-state electronic absorption band over the entire mid-IR range that is probed for the first time and modeled by quantum mechanical calculations. The transient IR vibrational fingerprints observed in our studies allow for an unambiguous identification of the identity of the “dark” electronic excited state from which the photon’s energy is converted into motion, and thereby pave the way for tuning the quantum yield of future molecular rotors based on this structural motif. PMID:27684513

  11. Direct Observation of a Dark State in the Photocycle of a Light-Driven Molecular Motor.

    PubMed

    Amirjalayer, Saeed; Cnossen, Arjen; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L; Buma, Wybren J; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-11-03

    Controlling the excited-state properties of light driven molecular machines is crucial to achieving high efficiency and directed functionality. A key challenge in achieving control lies in unravelling the complex photodynamics and especially in identifying the role played by dark states. Here we use the structure sensitivity and high time resolution of UV-pump/IR-probe spectroscopy to build a detailed and comprehensive model of the structural evolution of light driven molecular rotors. The photodynamics of these chiral overcrowded alkene derivatives are determined by two close-lying excited electronic states. The potential energy landscape of these "bright" and "dark" states gives rise to a broad excited-state electronic absorption band over the entire mid-IR range that is probed for the first time and modeled by quantum mechanical calculations. The transient IR vibrational fingerprints observed in our studies allow for an unambiguous identification of the identity of the "dark" electronic excited state from which the photon's energy is converted into motion, and thereby pave the way for tuning the quantum yield of future molecular rotors based on this structural motif.

  12. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Progress report, [July 1, 1992--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    We have evidence for at least nine myosin-like genes in Arbidopsis, six of which have been cloned by a PCR-based method from genomic DNA, two have been isolated by genomic DNA cloning, and four have been identified by cDNA cloning. Most of our attention has been focused on the four myosin genes for which we have cDNA clones, and these cDNAs have now been sequenced to completion. Each of these myosins is similar in overall structure, with each containing the characteristic myosin head (motor) domain, which possesses ATP- and actin-binding motifs, a series of IQ repeats, which may be involved in calmodulin binding, a domain with a high probability of forming an alpha-helical coiled-coil secondary structure, which may allow the polypeptides to form dimers, and a variable tail domain, which may serve to define the specific cellular component that each myosin interacts with. One of these myosin genes, called MYA1, displays structural similarity to class of myosins that includes the yeast MYO2, mouse Dilute, and chicken p190 proteins, and this group of myosins is thought to play a role in intracellular trafficking of organelles. Because MYA1 is similar to this interesting class of myosins, we have chosen to conduct detailed studies of MYA1.

  13. Controlling the ratchet effect through the symmetries of the systems: application to molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo; Quintero, Niurka R

    2007-04-01

    We discuss a novel generic mechanism for controlling the ratchet effect through the breaking of relevant symmetries. We review previous works on ratchets where directed transport is induced by the breaking of standard temporal symmetries f(t)=-f(t+T/2) and f(t)=f(-t) (or f(t)=-f(-t)). We find that in seemingly unrelated systems the average velocity (or the current) of particles (or solitons) exhibits common features. We show that, as a consequence of Curie's symmetry principle, the average velocity (or the current) is related to the breaking of the symmetries of the system. This relationship allows us to control the transport in a systematic way. The qualitative agreement between the present analytical predictions and previous experimental, numerical, and theoretical results leads us to suggest that for the given breaking of the temporal symmetries there is an optimal wave form for a given time-periodic force. Also, we comment on how this mechanism can be applied to the case where a ratchet effect is induced by breaking of spatial symmetries. Finally, we conjecture that the ratchet potential underlying biological motor proteins might be optimized according to the breaking of the relevant symmetries.

  14. Engineering of a novel Ca{sup 2+}-regulated kinesin molecular motor using a calmodulin dimer linker

    SciTech Connect

    Shishido, Hideki; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Engineered kinesin-M13 and calmodulin involving single cysteine were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaM mutant was cross-linked to dimer by bifunctional thiol reactive reagent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinesin-M13 was dimerized via CaM dimer in the presence of calcium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Function of the engineered kinesin was regulated by a Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin dimer linker. -- Abstract: The kinesin-microtubule system holds great promise as a molecular shuttle device within biochips. However, one current barrier is that such shuttles do not have 'on-off' control of their movement. Here we report the development of a novel molecular motor powered by an accelerator and brake system, using a kinesin monomer and a calmodulin (CaM) dimer. The kinesin monomer, K355, was fused with a CaM target peptide (M13 peptide) at the C-terminal part of the neck region (K355-M13). We also prepared CaM dimers using CaM mutants (Q3C), (R86C), or (A147C) and crosslinkers that react with cysteine residues. Following induction of K355-M13 dimerization with CaM dimers, we measured K355-M13 motility and found that it can be reversibly regulated in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. We also found that velocities of K355-M13 varied depending on the type and crosslink position of the CaM dimer used; crosslink length also had a moderate effect on motility. These results suggest Ca{sup 2+}-dependent dimerization of K355-M13 could be used as a novel molecular shuttle, equipped with an accelerator and brake system, for biochip applications.

  15. Molecular Mapping of Movement-Associated Areas in the Avian Brain: A Motor Theory for Vocal Learning Origin

    PubMed Central

    Feenders, Gesa; Liedvogel, Miriam; Rivas, Miriam; Zapka, Manuela; Horita, Haruhito; Hara, Erina; Wada, Kazuhiro; Mouritsen, Henrik; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2008-01-01

    Vocal learning is a critical behavioral substrate for spoken human language. It is a rare trait found in three distantly related groups of birds-songbirds, hummingbirds, and parrots. These avian groups have remarkably similar systems of cerebral vocal nuclei for the control of learned vocalizations that are not found in their more closely related vocal non-learning relatives. These findings led to the hypothesis that brain pathways for vocal learning in different groups evolved independently from a common ancestor but under pre-existing constraints. Here, we suggest one constraint, a pre-existing system for movement control. Using behavioral molecular mapping, we discovered that in songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds, all cerebral vocal learning nuclei are adjacent to discrete brain areas active during limb and body movements. Similar to the relationships between vocal nuclei activation and singing, activation in the adjacent areas correlated with the amount of movement performed and was independent of auditory and visual input. These same movement-associated brain areas were also present in female songbirds that do not learn vocalizations and have atrophied cerebral vocal nuclei, and in ring doves that are vocal non-learners and do not have cerebral vocal nuclei. A compilation of previous neural tracing experiments in songbirds suggests that the movement-associated areas are connected in a network that is in parallel with the adjacent vocal learning system. This study is the first global mapping that we are aware for movement-associated areas of the avian cerebrum and it indicates that brain systems that control vocal learning in distantly related birds are directly adjacent to brain systems involved in movement control. Based upon these findings, we propose a motor theory for the origin of vocal learning, this being that the brain areas specialized for vocal learning in vocal learners evolved as a specialization of a pre-existing motor pathway that controls

  16. Molecular mapping of movement-associated areas in the avian brain: a motor theory for vocal learning origin.

    PubMed

    Feenders, Gesa; Liedvogel, Miriam; Rivas, Miriam; Zapka, Manuela; Horita, Haruhito; Hara, Erina; Wada, Kazuhiro; Mouritsen, Henrik; Jarvis, Erich D

    2008-03-12

    Vocal learning is a critical behavioral substrate for spoken human language. It is a rare trait found in three distantly related groups of birds-songbirds, hummingbirds, and parrots. These avian groups have remarkably similar systems of cerebral vocal nuclei for the control of learned vocalizations that are not found in their more closely related vocal non-learning relatives. These findings led to the hypothesis that brain pathways for vocal learning in different groups evolved independently from a common ancestor but under pre-existing constraints. Here, we suggest one constraint, a pre-existing system for movement control. Using behavioral molecular mapping, we discovered that in songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds, all cerebral vocal learning nuclei are adjacent to discrete brain areas active during limb and body movements. Similar to the relationships between vocal nuclei activation and singing, activation in the adjacent areas correlated with the amount of movement performed and was independent of auditory and visual input. These same movement-associated brain areas were also present in female songbirds that do not learn vocalizations and have atrophied cerebral vocal nuclei, and in ring doves that are vocal non-learners and do not have cerebral vocal nuclei. A compilation of previous neural tracing experiments in songbirds suggests that the movement-associated areas are connected in a network that is in parallel with the adjacent vocal learning system. This study is the first global mapping that we are aware for movement-associated areas of the avian cerebrum and it indicates that brain systems that control vocal learning in distantly related birds are directly adjacent to brain systems involved in movement control. Based upon these findings, we propose a motor theory for the origin of vocal learning, this being that the brain areas specialized for vocal learning in vocal learners evolved as a specialization of a pre-existing motor pathway that controls

  17. Physics in cell biology: on the physics of biopolymers and molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Frey, Erwin

    2002-03-12

    "What is Life?" is the title of a book by Erwin Schrödinger, first published in 1944. This book is a bold attempt to try to understand some of the wonders of life in terms of physics, in particular statistical mechanics. Since the publication of this visionary book, we have seen a revolution in molecular biology complemented by the development of new physical tools like single-molecule spectroscopy. The goal of this article is to highlight some examples where physics can contribute to questions in cell biology. One might hope that through interdisciplinary research one can get closer to answering Schrödinger's fundamental question.

  18. Transport in Physical Space: The Example of Pedestrians, Cars, and Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appert-Rolland, Cécile; Klein, Sarah; Ebbinghaus, Maximilian; Santen, Ludger

    Transport systems in physical space exhibit various phenomena which may have some counterparts in socio- or econo-systems. We review here several of them. In highway vehicular traffic, the introduction of a reaction time leads to metastability and hysteresis. Pattern formation occurs in pedestrian flows. At a microscopic scale, we can learn from molecular pedestrians that transporting an object by opposite teams can be more efficient in a crowded environment and allow for an easy control of the system. Besides, we will show that the interplay between transport and the dynamics of the underlying network can sometimes lead to positive effects in terms of efficiency of transport.

  19. Different conical intersections control nonadiabatic photochemistry of fluorene light-driven molecular rotary motor: A CASSCF and spin-flip DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanying; Liu, Fengyi; Wang, Bin; Su, Qingqing; Wang, Wenliang; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-12-01

    We report the light-driven isomerization mechanism of a fluorene-based light-driven rotary motor (corresponding to Feringa's 2nd generation rotary motor, [M. M. Pollard et al., Org. Biomol. Chem. 6, 507-512 (2008)]) at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) (SFDFT) levels, combined with the complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) single-point energy corrections. The good consistence between the SFDFT and CASSCF results confirms the capability of SFDFT in investigating the photoisomerization step of the light-driven molecular rotary motor, and proposes the CASPT2//SFDFT as a promising and effective approach in exploring photochemical processes. At the mechanistic aspect, for the fluorene-based motor, the S1/S0 minimum-energy conical intersection (MECIs) caused by pyramidalization of a fluorene carbon have relatively low energies and are easily accessible by the reactive molecule evolution along the rotary reaction path; therefore, the fluorene-type MECIs play the dominant role in nonadiabatic decay, as supported by previous experimental and theoretical works. Comparably, the other type of MECIs that results from pyramidalization of an indene carbon, which has been acting as the dominant nonadiabatic decay channel in the stilbene motor, is energetically inaccessible, thus the indene-type MECIs are "missing" in previous mechanistic studies including molecular dynamic simulations. A correlation between the geometric and electronic factors of MECIs and that of the S1 energy profile along the C═C rotary coordinate was found. The findings in current study are expected to deepen the understanding of nonadiabatic transition in the light-driven molecular rotary motor and provide insights into mechanistic tuning of their performance.

  20. Different conical intersections control nonadiabatic photochemistry of fluorene light-driven molecular rotary motor: A CASSCF and spin-flip DFT study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanying; Liu, Fengyi; Wang, Bin; Su, Qingqing; Wang, Wenliang; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-12-28

    We report the light-driven isomerization mechanism of a fluorene-based light-driven rotary motor (corresponding to Feringa's 2nd generation rotary motor, [M. M. Pollard et al., Org. Biomol. Chem. 6, 507-512 (2008)]) at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) (SFDFT) levels, combined with the complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) single-point energy corrections. The good consistence between the SFDFT and CASSCF results confirms the capability of SFDFT in investigating the photoisomerization step of the light-driven molecular rotary motor, and proposes the CASPT2//SFDFT as a promising and effective approach in exploring photochemical processes. At the mechanistic aspect, for the fluorene-based motor, the S1/S0 minimum-energy conical intersection (MECIs) caused by pyramidalization of a fluorene carbon have relatively low energies and are easily accessible by the reactive molecule evolution along the rotary reaction path; therefore, the fluorene-type MECIs play the dominant role in nonadiabatic decay, as supported by previous experimental and theoretical works. Comparably, the other type of MECIs that results from pyramidalization of an indene carbon, which has been acting as the dominant nonadiabatic decay channel in the stilbene motor, is energetically inaccessible, thus the indene-type MECIs are "missing" in previous mechanistic studies including molecular dynamic simulations. A correlation between the geometric and electronic factors of MECIs and that of the S1 energy profile along the C═C rotary coordinate was found. The findings in current study are expected to deepen the understanding of nonadiabatic transition in the light-driven molecular rotary motor and provide insights into mechanistic tuning of their performance.

  1. Molecular hydrogen alleviates motor deficits and muscle degeneration in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Satoru; Ito, Mikako; Fukami, Mayu; Hashimoto, Miki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Ohno, Kinji

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating muscle disease caused by a mutation in DMD encoding dystrophin. Oxidative stress accounts for dystrophic muscle pathologies in DMD. We examined the effects of molecular hydrogen in mdx mice, a model animal for DMD. The pregnant mother started to take supersaturated hydrogen water (>5 ppm) ad libitum from E15.5 up to weaning of the offspring. The mdx mice took supersaturated hydrogen water from weaning until age 10 or 24 weeks when they were sacrificed. Hydrogen water prevented abnormal body mass gain that is commonly observed in mdx mice. Hydrogen improved the spontaneous running distance that was estimated by a counter-equipped running-wheel, and extended the duration on the rota-rod. Plasma creatine kinase activities were decreased by hydrogen at ages 10 and 24 weeks. Hydrogen also decreased the number of central nuclei of muscle fibers at ages 10 and 24 weeks, and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine in gastrocnemius muscle at age 24 weeks. Additionally, hydrogen tended to increase protein expressions of antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 1, as well as anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, in skeletal muscle at age 10 weeks. Although molecular mechanisms of the diverse effects of hydrogen remain to be elucidated, hydrogen potentially improves muscular dystrophy in DMD patients.

  2. Taking a molecular motor for a spin: helicase mechanism studied by spin labeling and PELDOR

    PubMed Central

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Schiemann, Olav; Naismith, James H.; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    The complex molecular motions central to the functions of helicases have long attracted attention. Protein crystallography has provided transformative insights into these dynamic conformational changes, however important questions about the true nature of helicase configurations during the catalytic cycle remain. Using pulsed EPR (PELDOR or DEER) to measure interdomain distances in solution, we have examined two representative helicases: PcrA from superfamily 1 and XPD from superfamily 2. The data show that PcrA is a dynamic structure with domain movements that correlate with particular functional states, confirming and extending the information gleaned from crystal structures and other techniques. XPD in contrast is shown to be a rigid protein with almost no conformational changes resulting from nucleotide or DNA binding, which is well described by static crystal structures. Our results highlight the complimentary nature of PELDOR to crystallography and the power of its precision in understanding the conformational changes relevant to helicase function. PMID:26657627

  3. M(o)TOR of aging: MTOR as a universal molecular hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2013-01-01

    A recent ground-breaking publication described hypothalamus-driven programmatic aging. As a Russian proverb goes “everything new is well-forgotten old”. In 1958, Dilman proposed that aging and its related diseases are programmed by the hypothalamus. This theory, supported by beautiful experiments, remained unnoticed just to be re-discovered recently. Yet, it does not explain all manifestations of aging. And would organism age without hypothalamus? Do sensing pathways such as MTOR (mechanistic Target of Rapamycin) and IKK-beta play a role of a “molecular hypothalamus” in every cell? Are hypothalamus-driven alterations simply a part of quasi-programmed aging manifested by hyperfunction and secondary signal-resistance? Here are some answers. PMID:23872658

  4. Electromagnetic probes of molecular motors in the electron transport chains of mitochondria and chloroplasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. H., Jr.; Nawarathna, D.; Vajrala, V.; Gardner, J.; Widger, W. R.

    2005-12-01

    We report on measurements of harmonics generated by whole cells, mitochondria, and chloroplasts in response to applied sinusoidal electric fields. The frequency- and amplitude-dependence of the induced harmonics exhibit features that correlate with physiological processes. Budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) cells produce numerous harmonics, the amplitudes of which depend strongly on frequency. When the second or third harmonic amplitude is plotted vs. applied frequency, we observe two peaks, around 3 kHz and 12 kHz, which are suppressed by respiratory inhibitors. We observe similar peaks when measuring the harmonic response of B. indicas, a relative of the mitochondrial ancestor. In uncoupled mitochondria, in which most of the electron transport chain is active but the ATP-synthase molecular turbine is inactive, only one (lower frequency) of the two peaks is present. Finally, we find that harmonics generated by chloroplasts depend dramatically on incident light, and vanish in the absence of light.

  5. M(o)TOR of aging: MTOR as a universal molecular hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-07-01

    A recent ground-breaking publication described hypothalamus-driven programmatic aging. As a Russian proverb goes "everything new is well-forgotten old". In 1958, Dilman proposed that aging and its related diseases are programmed by the hypothalamus. This theory, supported by beautiful experiments, remained unnoticed just to be re-discovered recently. Yet, it does not explain all manifestations of aging. And would organism age without hypothalamus? Do sensing pathways such as MTOR (mechanistic Target of Rapamycin) and IKK-beta play a role of a "molecular hypothalamus" in every cell? Are hypothalamus-driven alterations simply a part of quasi-programmed aging manifested by hyperfunction and secondary signal-resistance? Here are some answers.

  6. From molecular chaperones to membrane motors: through the lens of a mass spectrometrist.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Carol V

    2017-02-08

    Twenty-five years ago, we obtained our first mass spectra of molecular chaperones in complex with protein ligands and entered a new field of gas-phase structural biology. It is perhaps now time to pause and reflect, and to ask how many of our initial structure predictions and models derived from mass spectrometry (MS) datasets were correct. With recent advances in structure determination, many of the most challenging complexes that we studied over the years have become tractable by other structural biology approaches enabling such comparisons to be made. Moreover, in the light of powerful new electron microscopy methods, what role is there now for MS? In considering these questions, I will give my personal view on progress and problems as well as my predictions for future directions. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. From molecular chaperones to membrane motors: through the lens of a mass spectrometrist

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, we obtained our first mass spectra of molecular chaperones in complex with protein ligands and entered a new field of gas-phase structural biology. It is perhaps now time to pause and reflect, and to ask how many of our initial structure predictions and models derived from mass spectrometry (MS) datasets were correct. With recent advances in structure determination, many of the most challenging complexes that we studied over the years have become tractable by other structural biology approaches enabling such comparisons to be made. Moreover, in the light of powerful new electron microscopy methods, what role is there now for MS? In considering these questions, I will give my personal view on progress and problems as well as my predictions for future directions. PMID:28202679

  8. Engineering applications of biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Hess, Henry

    2011-08-15

    Biomolecular motors, in particular motor proteins from the kinesin and myosin families, can be used to explore engineering applications of molecular motors in general. Their outstanding performance enables the experimental study of hybrid systems, where bio-inspired functions such as sensing, actuation, and transport rely on the nanoscale generation of mechanical force. Scaling laws and theoretical studies demonstrate the optimality of biomolecular motor designs and inform the development of synthetic molecular motors.

  9. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Survival Motor Neuron Gene in 460 Turkish Cases with Suspicious Spinal Muscular Atrophy Disease.

    PubMed

    Rashnonejad, Afrooz; Onay, Huseyin; Atik, Tahir; Atan Sahin, Ozlem; Gokben, Sarenur; Tekgul, Hasan; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2016-01-01

    To describe 12 yr experience of molecular genetic diagnosis of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) in 460 cases of Turkish patients. A retrospective analysis was performed on data from 460 cases, referred to Medical Genetics Laboratory, Ege University's Hospital, Izmir, Turkey, prediagnosed as SMA or with family history of SMA between 2003 and 2014. The PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and the Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis were performed to detect the survival motor neuron (SMN)1 deletions and to estimate SMN1 and SMN2 gene copy numbers. Using PCR-RFLP test, 159 of 324 postnatal and 18 of 77 prenatal cases were detected to have SMN1 deletions. From positive samples, 88.13% had a homozygous deletion in both exon 7 and exon 8 of SMN1. Using MLPA, 54.5% of families revealed heterozygous deletions of SMN1, and 2 or 3 copies of SMN2, suggesting a healthy SMA carrier. Among patients referred for SMA testing, the annual percentage of patients diagnosed as SMA has decreased gradually from 90.62% (2003) down to 20.83% (2014). Although PCR-RFLP method is a reliable test for SMA screening, MLPA is a necessary additional test and provide relevant data for genetic counseling of families having previously affected child. The gradual decrease in the percentage of patients molecularly diagnosed as SMA shows that clinicians have begun to use genetic tests in the differential diagnosis of muscular atrophies. Cost and availability of these genetic tests has greatly attributed to their use.

  10. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Survival Motor Neuron Gene in 460 Turkish Cases with Suspicious Spinal Muscular Atrophy Disease

    PubMed Central

    RASHNONEJAD, Afrooz; ONAY, Huseyin; ATIK, Tahir; ATAN SAHIN, Ozlem; GOKBEN, Sarenur; TEKGUL, Hasan; OZKINAY, Ferda

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe 12 yr experience of molecular genetic diagnosis of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) in 460 cases of Turkish patients. Materials & Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on data from 460 cases, referred to Medical Genetics Laboratory, Ege University’s Hospital, Izmir, Turkey, prediagnosed as SMA or with family history of SMA between 2003 and 2014. The PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and the Multiplex ligation–dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis were performed to detect the survival motor neuron (SMN)1 deletions and to estimate SMN1 and SMN2 gene copy numbers. Results Using PCR-RFLP test, 159 of 324 postnatal and 18 of 77 prenatal cases were detected to have SMN1 deletions. From positive samples, 88.13% had a homozygous deletion in both exon 7 and exon 8 of SMN1. Using MLPA, 54.5% of families revealed heterozygous deletions of SMN1, and 2 or 3 copies of SMN2, suggesting a healthy SMA carrier. Among patients referred for SMA testing, the annual percentage of patients diagnosed as SMA has decreased gradually from 90.62% (2003) down to 20.83% (2014). Conclusion Although PCR-RFLP method is a reliable test for SMA screening, MLPA is a necessary additional test and provide relevant data for genetic counseling of families having previously affected child. The gradual decrease in the percentage of patients molecularly diagnosed as SMA shows that clinicians have begun to use genetic tests in the differential diagnosis of muscular atrophies. Cost and availability of these genetic tests has greatly attributed to their use. PMID:27843464

  11. Converting conformational changes to electrostatic energy in molecular motors: The energetics of ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Strajbl, Marek; Shurki, Avital; Warshel, Arieh

    2003-12-09

    F1-ATPase is the catalytic component of the ATP synthase molecular machine responsible for most of the uphill synthesis of ATP in living systems. The enormous advances in biochemical and structural studies of this machine provide an opportunity for detailed understanding of the nature of its rotary mechanism. However, further quantitative progress in this direction requires development of reliable ways of translating the observed structural changes to the corresponding energies. This requirement is particularly challenging because we are dealing with a large system that couples major structural changes with a chemical process. The present work provides such a structure-function correlation by using the linear response approximation to describe the rotary mechanism. This approach allows one to evaluate the energy of transitions between different conformational states by considering only the changes in the corresponding electrostatic energies of the ligands. The relevant energetics are also obtained by calculating the linear response approximation-based free energies of transferring the ligands from water to the different sites of F1-ATPase in their different conformational states. We also use the empirical valence bond approach to evaluate the actual free-energy profile for the ATP synthesis in the different conformational states of the system. Integrating the information from the different approaches provides a semiquantitative structure-function correlation for F1-ATPase. It is found that the conformational changes are converted to changes in the electrostatic interaction between the protein and its ligands, which drives the ATP synthesis.

  12. Ultraslow myosin molecular motors of placental contractile stem villi in humans.

    PubMed

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Lecarpentier, Edouard; Guerin, Catherine; Hébert, Jean-Louis; Arsalane, Abdelilah; Moumen, Abdelouahab; Krokidis, Xénophon; Michel, Francine; Timbely, Oumar

    2014-01-01

    Human placental stem villi (PSV) present contractile properties. In vitro mechanics were investigated in 40 human PSV. Contraction of PSV was induced by both KCl exposure (n = 20) and electrical tetanic stimulation (n = 20). Isotonic contractions were registered at several load levels ranging from zero-load up to isometric load. The tension-velocity relationship was found to be hyperbolic. This made it possible to apply the A. Huxley formalism for determining the rate constants for myosin cross-bridge (CB) attachment and detachment, CB single force, catalytic constant, myosin content, and maximum myosin ATPase activity. These molecular characteristics of myosin CBs did not differ under either KCl exposure or tetanus. A comparative approach was established from studies previously published in the literature and driven by mean of a similar method. As compared to that described in mammalian striated muscles, we showed that in human PSV, myosin CB rate constants for attachment and detachment were about 103 times lower whereas myosin ATPase activity was 105 times lower. Up to now, CB kinetics of contractile cells arranged along the long axis of the placental sheath appeared to be the slowest ever observed in any mammalian contractile tissue.

  13. Synthesis of molecular motors incorporating para-phenylene-conjugated or bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-insulated electroactive groups.

    PubMed

    Vives, Guillaume; Gonzalez, Alexandre; Jaud, Joël; Launay, Jean-Pierre; Rapenne, Gwénaël

    2007-01-01

    The insulating role of the bicyclo[2.2.2]octane fragment has been theoretically evaluated by comparing the electronic coupling parameter (V(ab)) in 1,4-bis(ferrocenyl)benzene (1) and 1,4-bis(ferrocenyl)bicyclo[2.2.2]octane (2). The geometries were optimized by DFT and an extended Hückel calculation was performed to evaluate V(ab) by the dimer splitting method. The calculations showed a 12-fold decrease of the electronic coupling from 60 meV for 1 to 5 meV for 2. The second part describes the synthesis of two potential molecular motors with one incorporating the insulating bicyclo[2.2.2]octane fragment. These molecules are based on a ruthenium complex bearing a tripodal stator functionalized to be anchored onto surfaces. The ferrocenyl electroactive groups and the cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rotor are connected through a p-phenylene spacer (5) or through a spacer incorporating an insulating bicyclo[2.2.2]octane moiety (6).

  14. Spinal motor neuron neuroaxonal spheroids in chronic aluminum neurotoxicity contain phosphatase-resistant high molecular weight neurofilament (NFH).

    PubMed

    Gaytan-Garcia, S; Kim, H; Strong, M J

    1996-04-15

    It has previously been shown that a single intracisternal inoculum of AlCl3 in young adult New Zealand white rabbits will induce a dose-dependent phosphatase resistance of high molecular weight neurofilament protein (NFH) that is proportionate to the extent of neurofilamentous inclusion formation (Strong and Jakowec, 1994). To determine if the potential for dissolution of aluminum-induced neurofilamentous inclusions was dependent on the degree of NFH phosphatase resistance, we have examined NFH phosphatase sensitivity in a reversible chronic model of aluminum neurotoxicity. Rabbits receiving repeated intracisternal inoculums of 100 microgram AlCl3 at 28 day intervals until day 267 develop spinal motor neuron perikaryal and neuroaxonal neurofilamentous aggregates in a stereotypic, dose-dependent fashion. In the rabbits receiving inoculums until day 156 with survival until day 267 without further aluminum exposure, neuroaxonal spheroids remained prominent while perikaryal inclusions largely resolved. Immunoreactivity to a monoclonal antibody recognizing phosphorylated NFH (SMI 31) was abolished in perikaryal aggregates at each time interval by dephosphorylation with bovine alkaline phosphatase. However, neuroaxonal spheroids maintained their immunoreactivity. Using time-course dephosphorylation studies of spinal cord homogenates, we observed a significant reduction in the rate of dephosphorylation of NFH following 267 days of AlCl3 exposure (P < 0.05). These observations suggest that neuroaxonal spheroids contain phosphatase-resistant NFH isoforms and that the potential for resolution of intraneuronal neurofilamentous inclusions correlates with the susceptibility of NF within these inclusions to enzymatic dephosphorylation.

  15. Elasticity of a semiflexible filament with a discontinuous tension due to a cross-link or a molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the stretching elasticity of a wormlike chain with a tension discontinuity resulting from a Hookean spring connecting its backbone to a fixed point. The elasticity of isolated semiflexible filaments has been the subject in a significant body of literature, primarily because of its relevance to the mechanics of biological matter. In real systems, however, these filaments are usually part of supramolecular structures involving cross-linkers or molecular motors, which cause tension discontinuities. Our model is intended as a minimal structural element incorporating such a discontinuity. We obtain analytical results in the weakly bending limit of the filament, concerning its force-extension relation and the response of the two parts in which the filament is divided by the spring. For a small tension discontinuity, the linear response of the filament extension to this discontinuity strongly depends on the external tension. For large external tension f , the spring force contributes a subdominant correction ˜1 /f3 /2 to the well-known ˜1 /√{f } -dependence of the end-to-end extension.

  16. Direct observation of bis(dicarbollyl)nickel conformers in solution by fluorescence spectroscopy: an approach to redox-controlled metallacarborane molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Safronov, Alexander V; Shlyakhtina, Natalia I; Everett, Thomas A; VanGordon, Monika R; Sevryugina, Yulia V; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2014-10-06

    As a continuation of work on metallacarborane-based molecular motors, the structures of substituted bis(dicarbollyl)nickel complexes in Ni(III) and Ni(IV) oxidation states were investigated in solution by fluorescence spectroscopy. Symmetrically positioned cage-linked pyrene molecules served as fluorescent probes to enable the observation of mixed meso-trans/dl-gauche (pyrene monomer fluorescence) and dl-cis/dl-gauche (intramolecular pyrene excimer fluorescence with residual monomer fluorescence) cage conformations of the nickelacarboranes in the Ni(III) and Ni(IV) oxidation states, respectively. The absence of energetically disfavored conformers in solution--dl-cis in the case of nickel(III) complexes and meso-trans in the case of nickel(IV)--was demonstrated based on spectroscopic data and conformer energy calculations in solution. The conformational persistence observed in solution indicates that bis(dicarbollyl)nickel complexes may provide attractive templates for building electrically driven and/or photodriven molecular motors.

  17. fMRI as a molecular imaging procedure for the functional reorganization of motor systems in chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    LAZARIDOU, ASIMINA; ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS; MINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOS; KHANCHICEH, AZADEH; SINGHAL, ANEESH; MOSKOWITZ, MICHAEL; ROSEN, BRUCE; TZIKA, ARIA

    2013-01-01

    Previous brain imaging studies suggest that stroke alters functional connectivity in motor execution networks. Moreover, current understanding of brain plasticity has led to new approaches in stroke rehabilitation. Recent studies showed a significant role of effective coupling of neuronal activity in the SMA (supplementary motor area) and M1 (primary motor cortex) network for motor outcome in patients after stroke. After a subcortical stroke, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during movement reveals cortical reorganization that is associated with the recovery of function. The aim of the present study was to explore connectivity alterations within the motor-related areas combining motor fMRI with a novel MR-compatible hand-induced robotic device (MR_CHIROD) training. Patients completed training at home and underwent serial MR evaluation at baseline and after 8 weeks of training. Training at home consisted of squeezing a gel exercise ball with the paretic hand at ~75% of maximum strength for 1 h/day, 3 days/week. The fMRI analysis revealed alterations in M1, SMA, PMC (premotor cortex) and Cer (cerebellum) in both stroke patients and healthy controls after the training. Findings of the present study suggest that enhancement of SMA activity could benefit M1 dysfunction in stroke survivors. These results also indicate that connectivity alterations between motor areas might assist the counterbalance of a functionally abnormal M1 in chronic stroke survivors and possibly other patients with motor dysfunction. PMID:23900349

  18. Power Stroke Angular Velocity Profiles of Archaeal A-ATP Synthase Versus Thermophilic and Mesophilic F-ATP Synthase Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Sielaff, Hendrik; Martin, James; Singh, Dhirendra; Biuković, Goran; Grüber, Gerhard; Frasch, Wayne D

    2016-12-02

    The angular velocities of ATPase-dependent power strokes as a function of the rotational position for the A-type molecular motor A3B3DF, from the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase, and the thermophilic motor α3β3γ, from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (formerly known as Bacillus PS3) F-ATP synthase, are resolved at 5 μs resolution for the first time. Unexpectedly, the angular velocity profile of the A-type was closely similar in the angular positions of accelerations and decelerations to the profiles of the evolutionarily distant F-type motors of thermophilic and mesophilic origins, and they differ only in the magnitude of their velocities. M. mazei A3B3DF power strokes occurred in 120° steps at saturating ATP concentrations like the F-type motors. However, because ATP-binding dwells did not interrupt the 120° steps at limiting ATP, ATP binding to A3B3DF must occur during the catalytic dwell. Elevated concentrations of ADP did not increase dwells occurring 40° after the catalytic dwell. In F-type motors, elevated ADP induces dwells 40° after the catalytic dwell and slows the overall velocity. The similarities in these power stroke profiles are consistent with a common rotational mechanism for A-type and F-type rotary motors, in which the angular velocity is limited by the rotary position at which ATP binding occurs and by the drag imposed on the axle as it rotates within the ring of stator subunits.

  19. Kinesin-2 motors transport IFT-particles, dyneins and tubulin subunits to the tips of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory cilia: relevance to vision research?

    PubMed

    Scholey, Jonathan M

    2012-12-15

    The sensory outer segments (OS) of vertebrate retinal photoreceptors, which detect photons of light, resemble the distal segments of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory cilia, which detect chemical ligands that influence the chemotactic movements of the animal. Based on fluorescence microscopy assays performed in sensory cilia of living, transgenic "wild type" and mutant C. elegans, combined with in vitro motility assays using purified motors, we have proposed that two types of kinesin-2 motor, heterotrimeric kinesin-II and homodimeric OSM-3, cooperate to build amphid and phasmid sensory cilia on chemosensory neurons. Specifically, we propose that these motors function together in a redundant manner to build the axoneme core (aka middle segments (MS)), whereas OSM-3 alone serves to build the distal segments (DS). Furthermore, our data suggest that these motors accomplish this by driving two sequential steps of anterograde transport of cargoes consisting of IFT-particles, retrograde dynein motors, and ciliary tubulin subunits, from the transition zone to the tips of the axonemal microtubules (MTs). Homologs of kinesin-II (KIF3) and OSM-3 (KIF17) are also proposed to contribute to the assembly of vertebrate photoreceptors, although how they do so is currently unclear. Here I review our work on kinesin-2 motors, intraflagellar transport (IFT) and cilium biogenesis in C. elegans sensory cilia, and comment on its possible relevance to current research on vertebrate photoreceptor cilia assembly and function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Controlled Directional Motions of Molecular Vehicles, Rotors, and Motors: From Metallic to Silicon Surfaces, a Strategy to Operate at Higher Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chérioux, Frédéric; Galangau, Olivier; Palmino, Frank; Rapenne, Gwénaël

    2016-06-17

    In the last decade, many nanomachines with controlled molecular motions have been studied, mainly on metallic surfaces, which are easy to obtain very clean, and are stable over months. However, the studies of mechanical properties of nanomachines are mainly performed at very low temperatures, usually between 5 and 80 K, which prevents any kind of applications. In this Minireview, we will present our strategy to operate at higher temperatures, in particular through the use of semiconducting silicon surfaces. We also review our best achievements in the field through some examples of rotating molecular machines that have been designed, synthesized, and studied in our groups. On metallic surfaces, the nanovehicles are molecules with two or four triptycenes as wheels and the molecular motor is built around a ruthenium organometallic center with a piano-stool geometry and peripheric ferrocenyl groups. On semiconducting silicon surfaces, vehicles are also made from triptycene fragments and the rotor is a pentaphenylbenzene molecule.

  1. Pigment granule translocation in red ovarian chromatophores from the palaemonid shrimp Macrobrachium olfersi (Weigmann, 1836): functional roles for the cytoskeleton and its molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Milograna, Sarah Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Márcia Regina; Baqui, Munira Muhammad Abdel; McNamara, John Campbell

    2014-12-01

    The binding of red pigment concentrating hormone (RPCH) to membrane receptors in crustacean chromatophores triggers Ca²⁺/cGMP signaling cascades that activate cytoskeletal motors, driving pigment granule translocation. We investigate the distributions of microfilaments and microtubules and their associated molecular motors, myosin and dynein, by confocal and transmission electron microscopy, evaluating a functional role for the cytoskeleton in pigment translocation using inhibitors of polymer turnover and motor activity in vitro. Microtubules occupy the chromatophore cell extensions whether the pigment granules are aggregated or dispersed. The inhibition of microtubule turnover by taxol induces pigment aggregation and inhibits re-dispersion. Phalloidin-FITC actin labeling, together with tannic acid fixation and ultrastructural analysis, reveals that microfilaments form networks associated with the pigment granules. Actin polymerization induced by jasplaquinolide strongly inhibits RPCH-induced aggregation, causes spontaneous pigment dispersion, and inhibits pigment re-dispersion. Inhibition of actin polymerization by latrunculin-A completely impedes pigment aggregation and re-dispersion. Confocal immunocytochemistry shows that non-muscle myosin II (NMMII) co-localizes mainly with pigment granules while blebbistatin inhibition of NMMII strongly reduces the RPCH response, also inducing spontaneous pigment dispersion. Myosin II and dynein also co-localize with the pigment granules. Inhibition of dynein ATPase by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine induces aggregation, inhibits RPCH-triggered aggregation, and inhibits re-dispersion. Granule aggregation and dispersion depend mainly on microfilament integrity although microtubules may be involved. Both cytoskeletal polymers are functional only when subunit turnover is active. Myosin and dynein may be the molecular motors that drive pigment aggregation. These mechanisms of granule translocation in crustacean

  2. Elements in nucleotide sensing and hydrolysis of the AAA+ disaggregation machine ClpB: a structure-based mechanistic dissection of a molecular motor

    SciTech Connect

    Zeymer, Cathleen Barends, Thomas R. M.; Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution crystal structures together with mutational analysis and transient kinetics experiments were utilized to understand nucleotide sensing and the regulation of the ATPase cycle in an AAA+ molecular motor. ATPases of the AAA+ superfamily are large oligomeric molecular machines that remodel their substrates by converting the energy from ATP hydrolysis into mechanical force. This study focuses on the molecular chaperone ClpB, the bacterial homologue of Hsp104, which reactivates aggregated proteins under cellular stress conditions. Based on high-resolution crystal structures in different nucleotide states, mutational analysis and nucleotide-binding kinetics experiments, the ATPase cycle of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD2), one of the motor subunits of this AAA+ disaggregation machine, is dissected mechanistically. The results provide insights into nucleotide sensing, explaining how the conserved sensor 2 motif contributes to the discrimination between ADP and ATP binding. Furthermore, the role of a conserved active-site arginine (Arg621), which controls binding of the essential Mg{sup 2+} ion, is described. Finally, a hypothesis is presented as to how the ATPase activity is regulated by a conformational switch that involves the essential Walker A lysine. In the proposed model, an unusual side-chain conformation of this highly conserved residue stabilizes a catalytically inactive state, thereby avoiding unnecessary ATP hydrolysis.

  3. Low molecular weight species of TDP-43 generated by abnormal splicing form inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and result in motor neuron death.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shangxi; Sanelli, Teresa; Chiang, Helen; Sun, Yulong; Chakrabartty, Avijit; Keith, Julia; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Robertson, Janice

    2015-07-01

    The presence of lower molecular weight species comprising the C-terminal region of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a characteristic of TDP-43 proteinopathy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Here, we have identified a novel splice variant of TDP-43 that is upregulated in ALS and generates a 35-kDa N-terminally truncated species through use of an alternate translation initiation codon (ATG(Met85)), denoted here as Met(85)-TDP-35. Met(85)-TDP-35 expressed ectopically in human neuroblastoma cells exhibited reduced solubility, cytoplasmic distribution, and aggregation. Furthermore, Met(85)-TDP-35 sequestered full-length TDP-43 from the nucleus to form cytoplasmic aggregates. Expression of Met(85)-TDP-35 in primary motor neurons resulted in the formation of Met(85)-TDP-35-positive cytoplasmic aggregates and motor neuron death. A neo-epitope antibody specific for Met(85)-TDP-35 labeled the 35-kDa lower molecular weight species on immunoblots of urea-soluble extracts from ALS-FTLD disease-affected tissues and co-labeled TDP-43-positive inclusions in ALS spinal cord sections, confirming the physiological relevance of this species. These results show that the 35-kDa low molecular weight species in ALS-FTLD can be generated from an abnormal splicing event and use of a downstream initiation codon and may represent a mechanism by which TDP-43 elicits its pathogenicity.

  4. A reconsideration of the link between the energetics of water and of ATP hydrolysis energy in the power strokes of molecular motors in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Widdas, Wilfred F

    2008-09-01

    Mechanical energy from oxygen metabolism by mammalian tissues has been studied since 1837. The production of heat by mechanical work was studied by Fick in about 1860. Prior to Fick's work, energetics were revised by Joule's experiments which founded the First Law of Thermodynamics. Fenn in 1923/24 found that frog muscle contractions generated extra heat proportional to the amount of work done in shortening the muscle. This was fully consistent with the Joule, Helmholtz concept used for the First Law of Thermodynamics. The link between the energetics of water and ATP hydrolysis in molecular motors is recommended for reconsideration.

  5. A Reconsideration of the Link between the Energetics of Water and of ATP Hydrolysis Energy in the Power Strokes of Molecular Motors in Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Widdas, Wilfred F.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical energy from oxygen metabolism by mammalian tissues has been studied since 1837. The production of heat by mechanical work was studied by Fick in about 1860. Prior to Fick’s work, energetics were revised by Joule’s experiments which founded the First Law of Thermodynamics. Fenn in 1923/24 found that frog muscle contractions generated extra heat proportional to the amount of work done in shortening the muscle. This was fully consistent with the Joule, Helmholtz concept used for the First Law of Thermodynamics. The link between the energetics of water and ATP hydrolysis in molecular motors is recommended for reconsideration. PMID:19325829

  6. Kinesin-2 family in vertebrate ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chengtian; Omori, Yoshihiro; Brodowska, Katarzyna; Kovach, Peter; Malicki, Jarema

    2012-01-01

    The differentiation of cilia is mediated by kinesin-driven transport. As the function of kinesins in vertebrate ciliogenesis is poorly characterized, we decided to determine the role of kinesin-2 family motors—heterotrimeric kinesin-II and the homodimeric Kif17 kinesin—in zebrafish cilia. We report that kif17 is largely dispensable for ciliogenesis; kif17 homozygous mutant animals are viable and display subtle morphological defects of olfactory cilia only. In contrast to that, the kif3b gene, encoding a heterotrimeric kinesin subunit, is necessary for cilia differentiation in most tissues, although exceptions exist, and include photoreceptors and a subset of hair cells. Cilia of these cell types persist even in kif3b/kif17 double mutants. Although we have not observed a functional redundancy of kif3b and kif17, kif17 is able to substitute for kif3b in some cilia. In contrast to kif3b/kif17 double mutants, simultaneous interference with kif3b and kif3c leads to the complete loss of photoreceptor and hair cell cilia, revealing redundancy of function. This is in agreement with the idea that Kif3b and Kif3c motor subunits form complexes with Kif3a, but not with each other. Interestingly, kif3b mutant photoreceptor cilia differentiate with a delay, suggesting that kif3c, although redundant with kif3b at later stages of differentiation, is not active early in photoreceptor ciliogenesis. Consistent with that, the overexpression of kif3c in kif3b mutants rescues early photoreceptor cilia defects. These data reveal unexpected diversity of functional relationships between vertebrate ciliary kinesins, and show that the repertoire of kinesin motors changes in some cilia during their differentiation. PMID:22308397

  7. Functional interactions of VirB11 traffic ATPases with VirB4 and VirD4 molecular motors in type IV secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Ripoll-Rozada, Jorge; Zunzunegui, Sandra; de la Cruz, Fernando; Arechaga, Ignacio; Cabezón, Elena

    2013-09-01

    Pilus biogenesis and substrate transport by type IV secretion systems require energy, which is provided by three molecular motors localized at the base of the secretion channel. One of these motors, VirB11, belongs to the superfamily of traffic ATPases, which includes members of the type II secretion system and the type IV pilus and archaeal flagellar assembly apparatus. Here, we report the functional interactions between TrwD, the VirB11 homolog of the conjugative plasmid R388, and TrwK and TrwB, the motors involved in pilus biogenesis and DNA transport, respectively. Although these interactions remained standing upon replacement of the traffic ATPase by a homolog from a phylogenetically related conjugative system, namely, TraG of plasmid pKM101, this homolog could not replace the TrwD function for DNA transfer. This result suggests that VirB11 works as a switch between pilus biogenesis and DNA transport and reinforces a mechanistic model in which VirB11 proteins act as traffic ATPases by regulating both events in type IV secretion systems.

  8. Medicinal plant Combretum leprosum mart ameliorates motor, biochemical and molecular alterations in a Parkinson's disease model induced by MPTP.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Livia S; Rohor, Bruna Z; Areal, Lorena B; Pereira, Evaldo V; Santos, Alexandre M C; Facundo, Valdir A; Santos, Adair R S; Pires, Rita G W; Martins-Silva, Cristina

    2016-06-05

    (approximately 3 fold increase compared to V/M group). Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) gene expressions were significantly reduced in the V/M group (60%). Conversely, C.l.EE treatment was able to increase the mRNA levels of those genes in the E/M group (approximately 2 fold for TH and DAT). These data show, for the first time, that C. leprosum ethanolic extract prevented motor and molecular changes induced by MPTP, and partially reverted dopamine deficit. Thus, our results demonstrate that C.l.EE has potential for the treatment and prevention of PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Unravelling the electronic structure and dynamics of an isolated molecular rotary motor in the gas-phase† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of molecular motor synthesis and NMR data; geometrical data of optimised structures used in computational chemistry calculations; natural orbitals of the active space used in state-averaged CASSCF calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc01997a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Beekmeyer, Reece; Parkes, Michael A.; Ridgwell, Luke; Riley, Jamie W.; Chen, Jiawen; Feringa, Ben L.; Kerridge, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Light-driven molecular motors derived from chiral overcrowded alkenes are an important class of compounds in which sequential photochemical and thermal rearrangements result in unidirectional rotation of one part of the molecule with respect to another. Here, we employ anion photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of a unidirectional molecular rotary motor anion in the gas-phase and quantum chemistry calculations to guide the interpretation of our results. We find that following photoexcitation of the first electronically excited state, the molecule rotates around its axle and some population remains on the excited potential energy surface and some population undergoes internal conversion back to the electronic ground state. These observations are similar to those observed in time-resolved measurements of rotary molecular motors in solution. This work demonstrates the potential of anion photoelectron spectroscopy for studying the electronic structure and dynamics of molecular motors in the gas-phase, provides important benchmarks for theory and improves our fundamental understanding of light-activated molecular rotary motors, which can be used to inform the design of new photoactivated nanoscale devices.

  10. The cellular and molecular pathology of the motor system in hereditary spastic paraparesis due to mutation of the spastin gene.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Stephen B; McDermott, Christopher J; Grierson, Andrew J; Wood, Jonathan D; Gelsthorpe, Catherine; Ince, Paul G; Shaw, Pamela J

    2003-11-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, the most common cause of which is mutation of the spastin gene. Recent evidence suggests a role for spastin in microtubule dynamics, but the distribution of the protein within the CNS is unknown. The core neuropathology of HSP is distal degeneration of the lateral corticospinal tract and of fasciculus gracilis, but there are few neuropathological studies of cases with a defined mutation. We aimed to determine the distribution of spastin expression in the human CNS and to investigate the cellular pathology of the motor system in HSP due to mutation of the spastin gene. Using an antibody to spastin, we have carried out immunohistochemistry on postmortem brain. We have demonstrated that spastin is a neuronal protein. It is widely expressed in the CNS so that the selectivity of the degeneration in HSP is not due to the normal cellular distribution of the protein. We have identified mutation of the spastin gene in 3 autopsy cases of HSP. Distal degeneration of long tracts in the spinal cord, consistent with a dying back axonopathy, was accompanied by a microglial reaction. The presence of novel hyaline inclusions in anterior horn cells and an alteration in immunostaining for cytoskeletal proteins and mitochondria indicates that long tract degeneration is accompanied by cytopathology in the motor system and may support a role for derangement of cytoskeletal function. All 3 cases also demonstrated evidence of tau pathology outside the motor system, suggesting that the neuropathology is not confined to the motor system in spastin-related HSP.

  11. Silymarin improved 6-OHDA-induced motor impairment in hemi-parkisonian rats: behavioral and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Haddadi, Rasool; Nayebi, Alireza Mohajjel; Farajniya, Safar; Brooshghalan, Shahla Eyvari; Sharifi, Hamdolah

    2014-04-11

    Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress has been shown to be associated with the development of Parkinson disease (PD). In the present study, we investigated the effect of intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of silymarin, on 6-OHDA-induced motor-impairment, brain lipid per-oxidation and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of inflammatory cytokine in the rats. The results showed that silymarin is able to improve motor coordination significantly (p < 0.001) in a dose dependent manner. There was a significant (p < 0.001) increase in MDA levels of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats whereas; in silymarin (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, i.p. for 5 days) pre-treated hemi-parkinsonian rats MDA levels was decreased markedly (p < 0.001). Furthermore the CSF levels of IL-1β was decreased (p < 0.001) in silymarin (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg) pre-treated rats up to the range of normal non-parkinsonian animals. We found that pre-treatment with silymarin could improve 6-OHDA-induced motor imbalance by attenuating brain lipid per-oxidation as well as CSF level of IL-1β as a pro-inflammatory cytokine. We suggest a potential prophylactic effect for silymarin in PD. However, further clinical trial studies should be carried out to prove this hypothesis.

  12. Silymarin improved 6-OHDA-induced motor impairment in hemi-parkisonian rats: behavioral and molecular study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress has been shown to be associated with the development of Parkinson disease (PD). In the present study, we investigated the effect of intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of silymarin, on 6-OHDA-induced motor-impairment, brain lipid per-oxidation and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of inflammatory cytokine in the rats. Results The results showed that silymarin is able to improve motor coordination significantly (p < 0.001) in a dose dependent manner. There was a significant (p < 0.001) increase in MDA levels of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats whereas; in silymarin (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, i.p. for 5 days) pre-treated hemi-parkinsonian rats MDA levels was decreased markedly (p < 0.001). Furthermore the CSF levels of IL-1β was decreased (p < 0.001) in silymarin (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg) pre-treated rats up to the range of normal non-parkinsonian animals. Conclusion We found that pre-treatment with silymarin could improve 6-OHDA-induced motor imbalance by attenuating brain lipid per-oxidation as well as CSF level of IL-1β as a pro-inflammatory cytokine. We suggest a potential prophylactic effect for silymarin in PD. However, further clinical trial studies should be carried out to prove this hypothesis. PMID:24726284

  13. Laboratory measurements of the heterogeneous oxidation of condensed-phase organic molecular makers for motor vehicle exhaust.

    PubMed

    Weitkamp, Emily A; Lambe, Andrew T; Donahue, Neil M; Robinson, Allen L

    2008-11-01

    Triterpanoid hopanes and steranes are petroleum biomarkers used to apportion fine particulate matter to motor vehicle emissions. To investigate the chemical stability of these compounds, aerosolized motor oil was exposed to the hydroxyl radical (OH) in a smog chamber and the reaction rate constants of hopanes, steranes, and n-alkanes were measured. The experiments were conducted across a range of atmospheric conditions including low and high relative humidity (RH) and with mixtures of lubricating oil and secondary organic aerosol. Hopanes and steranes were found to react at atmospherically significant rates across the entire range of experimental conditions; they are estimated to have lifetimes on the order of several days at average summertime OH levels. The one experimental parameter that strongly influenced the effective rate constants was RH; oxidization of hopanes and steranes was about a factor of 4 slower at 75% RH than at 10% RH. Chemical mass balance (CMB) analysis was performed to illustrate the effects of oxidation on source apportionment estimates. As the extent of oxidation increases, traditional CMB analysis increasingly underestimates the contribution of gasoline vehicles butthe diesel estimates are largely unaffected. The results demonstrate that even modest levels of oxidation can alter policy-relevant conclusions about the total and relative contribution of gasoline and diesel vehicle emissions to ambient fine particle concentrations.

  14. Molecular consequences of the R453C hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation on human β-cardiac myosin motor function

    PubMed Central

    Sommese, Ruth F.; Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Sutton, Shirley; Deacon, John C.; Choe, Elizabeth; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Ruppel, Kathleen; Spudich, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is among the most frequently occurring inherited cardiac disorders. HCM is caused by mutations in the genes encoding the fundamental force-generating machinery of the cardiac muscle, including β-cardiac myosin. Here, we present a biomechanical analysis of the HCM-causing mutation, R453C, in the context of human β-cardiac myosin. We found that this mutation causes a ∼30% decrease in the maximum ATPase of the human β-cardiac subfragment 1, the motor domain of myosin, and a similar percent decrease in the in vitro velocity. The major change in the R453C human β-cardiac subfragment 1 is a 50% increase in the intrinsic force of the motor compared with wild type, with no appreciable change in the stroke size, as observed with a dual-beam optical trap. These results predict that the overall force of the ensemble of myosin molecules in the muscle should be higher in the R453C mutant compared with wild type. Loaded in vitro motility assay confirms that the net force in the ensemble is indeed increased. Overall, this study suggests that the R453C mutation should result in a hypercontractile state in the heart muscle. PMID:23798412

  15. On the Functional Role of the {epsilon} Subunit of the Molecular Motor F-Adenosine Triphosphatase in Lipid Membranes of Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, S. A. Loginov, E. B.

    2010-11-15

    The effect of the e subunit of the molecular motor F-adenosine triphosphatase, which is built into the lipid membrane of a cell, on the dynamics of the rotor ({gamma} subunit), with which this subunit is bound, has been qualitatively considered. It is shown that its structural and conformational features arising during the hydrolysis of 'fuel' adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecules can be explained by the change in the potential within which the rotor is located. As the numerical calculations showed, at a low ATP concentration, the hydrolysis is accompanied by an unstable rotation of the {gamma} subunit and the related proton current. A model is proposed to describe the interaction between the {epsilon} subunit and the lipid order fluctuations caused by the membrane transition to the gel state. It is demonstrated that the rotor rotations become inhomogeneous when this interaction is enhanced with a decrease in the cell temperature.

  16. Tuning Multiple Motor Travel Via Single Motor Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Shu, Zhanyong; King, Stephen J.; Gross, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-based molecular motors often work in small groups to transport cargos in cells. A key question in understanding transport (and its regulation in vivo) is to identify the sensitivity of multiple-motor-based motion to various single molecule properties. Whereas both single-motor travel distance and microtubule binding rate have been demonstrated to contribute to cargo travel, the role of single-motor velocity is yet to be explored. Here, we recast a previous theoretical study, and make explicit a potential contribution of velocity to cargo travel. We test this possibility experimentally, and demonstrate a strong negative correlation between single-motor velocity and cargo travel for transport driven by two motors. Our study thus discovers a previously unappreciated role of single-motor velocity in regulating multiple-motor transport. PMID:22672518

  17. High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons as pure model substances and in motor oil samples can be ionized without fragmentation by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Nadim; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-10-15

    High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons are still difficult to detect by mass spectrometry. Although several studies have targeted this problem, lack of good self-ionization has limited the ability of mass spectrometry to examine these hydrocarbons. Failure to control ion generation in the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source hampers the detection of intact stable gas-phase ions of non-polar hydrocarbon in mass spectrometry. Seventeen non-volatile non-polar hydrocarbons, reported to be difficult to ionize, were examined by an optimized APCI methodology using nitrogen as the reagent gas. All these analytes were successfully ionized as abundant and intact stable [M-H](+) ions without the use of any derivatization or adduct chemistry and without significant fragmentation. Application of the method to real-life hydrocarbon mixtures like light shredder waste and car motor oil was demonstrated. Despite numerous reports to the contrary, it is possible to ionize high molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons by APCI, omitting the use of additives. This finding represents a significant step towards extending the applicability of mass spectrometry to non-polar hydrocarbon analyses in crude oil, petrochemical products, waste or food. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Chemistry: No turning back for motorized molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayden, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Two molecular motors have been developed that use chemical energy to drive rotational motion in a single direction. The findings bring the prospect of devices powered by such motors a tantalizing step closer. See Letter p.235

  19. New insights into the function of a versatile class of membrane molecular motors from studies of Myxococcus xanthus surface (gliding) motility.

    PubMed

    Mignot, Tâm; Nöllmann, Marcelo

    2017-03-02

    Cell motility is a central function of living cells, as it empowers colonization of new environmental niches, cooperation, and development of multicellular organisms. This process is achieved by complex yet precise energy-consuming machineries in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Bacteria move on surfaces using extracellular appendages such as flagella and pili but also by a less-understood process called gliding motility. During this process, rod-shaped bacteria move smoothly along their long axis without any visible morphological changes besides occasional bending. For this reason, the molecular mechanism of gliding motility and its origin have long remained a complete mystery. An important breakthrough in the understanding of gliding motility came from single cell and genetic studies in the delta-proteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus. These early studies revealed, for the first time, the existence of bacterial Focal Adhesion complexes (FA). FAs are formed at the bacterial pole and rapidly move towards the opposite cell pole. Their attachment to the underlying surface is linked to cell propulsion, in a process similar to the rearward translocation of actomyosin complexes in Apicomplexans. The protein machinery that forms at FAs was shown to contain up to seventeen proteins predicted to localize in all layers of the bacterial cell envelope, the cytosolic face, the inner membrane (IM), the periplasmic space and the outer membrane (OM). Among these proteins, a proton-gated channel at the inner membrane was identified as the molecular motor. Thus, thrust generation requires the transduction of traction forces generated at the inner membrane through the cell envelope beyond the rigid barrier of the bacterial peptidoglycan.

  20. New insights into the function of a versatile class of membrane molecular motors from studies of Myxococcus xanthus surface (gliding) motility

    PubMed Central

    Mignot, Tâm; Nöllmann, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Cell motility is a central function of living cells, as it empowers colonization of new environmental niches, cooperation, and development of multicellular organisms. This process is achieved by complex yet precise energy-consuming machineries in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Bacteria move on surfaces using extracellular appendages such as flagella and pili but also by a less-understood process called gliding motility. During this process, rod-shaped bacteria move smoothly along their long axis without any visible morphological changes besides occasional bending. For this reason, the molecular mechanism of gliding motility and its origin have long remained a complete mystery. An important breakthrough in the understanding of gliding motility came from single cell and genetic studies in the delta-proteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus. These early studies revealed, for the first time, the existence of bacterial Focal Adhesion complexes (FA). FAs are formed at the bacterial pole and rapidly move towards the opposite cell pole. Their attachment to the underlying surface is linked to cell propulsion, in a process similar to the rearward translocation of actomyosin complexes in Apicomplexans. The protein machinery that forms at FAs was shown to contain up to seventeen proteins predicted to localize in all layers of the bacterial cell envelope, the cytosolic face, the inner membrane (IM), the periplasmic space and the outer membrane (OM). Among these proteins, a proton-gated channel at the inner membrane was identified as the molecular motor. Thus, thrust generation requires the transduction of traction forces generated at the inner membrane through the cell envelope beyond the rigid barrier of the bacterial peptidoglycan. PMID:28357395

  1. Molecular mechanisms of substrate-controlled ring dynamics and substepping in a nucleic acid-dependent hexameric motor

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Nathan D.; Lawson, Michael R.; Witkowsky, Lea B.; Qu, Song; Berger, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Ring-shaped hexameric helicases and translocases support essential DNA-, RNA-, and protein-dependent transactions in all cells and many viruses. How such systems coordinate ATPase activity between multiple subunits to power conformational changes that drive the engagement and movement of client substrates is a fundamental question. Using the Escherichia coli Rho transcription termination factor as a model system, we have used solution and crystallographic structural methods to delineate the range of conformational changes that accompany distinct substrate and nucleotide cofactor binding events. Small-angle X-ray scattering data show that Rho preferentially adopts an open-ring state in solution and that RNA and ATP are both required to cooperatively promote ring closure. Multiple closed-ring structures with different RNA substrates and nucleotide occupancies capture distinct catalytic intermediates accessed during translocation. Our data reveal how RNA-induced ring closure templates a sequential ATP-hydrolysis mechanism, provide a molecular rationale for how the Rho ATPase domains distinguishes between distinct RNA sequences, and establish structural snapshots of substepping events in a hexameric helicase/translocase. PMID:27856760

  2. Molecular Motor MYO1C, Acetyltransferase KAT6B and Osteogenetic Transcription Factor RUNX2 Expression in Human Masseter Muscle Contributes to Development of Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Desh, Heather; Gray, S Lauren; Horton, Michael J; Raoul, Gwenael; Rowlerson, Anthea M; Ferri, Joel; Vieira, Alexandre R; Sciote, James J

    2014-01-01

    Objective Type I myosins are molecular motors necessary for glucose transport in the cytoplasm and initiation of transcription in the nucleus. Two of these, MYO1H and MYO1C, are paralogs which may be important in the development of malocclusion. The objective of this study was to investigate their gene expression in the masseter muscle of malocclusion subjects. Two functionally related proteins known to contribute to malocclusion were also investigated: KAT6B (a chromatin remodeling epigenetic enzyme which is activated by MYO1C) and RUNX2 (a transcription factor regulating osteogenesis which is activated by KAT6B). Design Masseter muscle samples and malocclusion classifications were obtained from orthognathic surgery subjects. Muscle was sectioned and immunostained to determine fiber type properties. RNA was isolated from the remaining sample to determine expression levels for the four genes by TaqMan® RT-PCR. Fiber type properties, gene expression quantities and malocclusion classification were compared. Results There were very significant associations (P<0.0000001) between MYO1C and KAT6B expressions. There were also significant associations (P<0.005) between RUNX2 expression and masseter muscle type II fiber properties. Very few significant associations were identified between MYO1C and masseter muscle fiber type properties. Conclusions The relationship between MYO1C and KAT6B suggests that the two are interacting in chromatin remodeling for gene expression. This is the nuclear myosin1 (NM1) function of MYO1C. A surprising finding is the relationship between RUNX2 and type II masseter muscle fibers, since RUNX2 expression in mature muscle was previously unknown. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the role of RUNX2 in adult masseter muscle. PMID:24698832

  3. Motor syndromes.

    PubMed

    Corea, Francesco; Micheli, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Motor disturbances alone or associated with other focal deficits are the most common symptoms suggesting a neurovascular event. An appropriate clinical assessment of these signs and symptoms may help physicians to better diagnose and to both better treat and predict outcome. In this paper the main clinical features of motor deficit are described together with other motor-related events such as ataxia and movement disturbances.

  4. Hairy cell leukemia in a patient with situs inversus totalis: an extremely rare combination.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Prajwol; Zilberman, Valeria; Avezbakiyev, Boris; Gotlieb, Vladimir

    2013-05-01

    Hairy cell leukemia is a rare cancer of the blood. The occurrence of hairy cell leukemia with another very rare genetic disorder makes us question whether it is just a coincidence. This article reports the first case of hairy cell leukemia in a patient with situs inversus totalis in western literature. There have been studies into the pathogenesis of situs inversus totalis that suggest it is caused by the failure of embryonic cells to properly rotate during embryogenesis. On the molecular level, the nodal cilia, which are responsible for embryonic rotation, are built by transport through the KIF3 complex - a kinesin superfamily of molecular motors. The KIF3 complex is also responsible for N-cadherin movement in cells. Furthermore, it is well known that these cell adhesion molecules play an important role in carcinogenesis and its progression. This report attempts to link the rare conditions and propose a possible genetic relationship between the two.

  5. Molecular machinery built from DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J.

    2013-03-01

    DNA can be used as both construction material and fuel for molecular motors. Systems of motors and tracks can be constructed and movement of the motor along the track can be directly observed. The path that a taken by a motor as it navigates a network of tracks can be programmed by instructions that are added externally or carried by the motor itself. Such systems might be used as part molecular assembly lines that can be dynamically reconfigured in response to changing demands.

  6. Hybrid survival motor neuron genes in patients with autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy: New insights into molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahnen, E.; Schoenling, J.; Zerres, K.

    1996-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a frequent autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder leading to weakness and atrophy of voluntary muscles. The survival motor-neuron gene (SMN), a strong candidate for SMA, is present in two highly homologous copies (telSMN and cenSMN) within the SMA region. Only five nucleotide differences within the region between intron 6 and exon 8 distinguish these homologues. Independent of the severity of the disease, 90%-98% of all SMA patients carry homozygous deletions in telSMN, affecting either exon 7 or both exons 7 and 8. We present the molecular analysis of 42 SMA patients who carry homozygous deletions of telSMN exon 7 but not of exon 8. The question arises whether in these cases the telSMN is truncated upstream of exon 8 or whether hybrid SMN genes exist that are composed of centromeric and telomeric sequences. By a simple PCR-based assay we demonstrate that in each case the remaining telSMN exon 8 is part of a hybrid SMN gene. Sequencing of cloned hybrid SMN genes from seven patients revealed the same composition in all but two patients: the base-pair differences in introns 6 and 7 and exon 7 are of centromeric origin whereas exon 8 is of telomeric origin. Nonetheless, haplotype analysis with polymorphic multicopy markers, Ag1-CA and C212, localized at the 5{prime} end of the SMN genes, suggests different mechanisms of occurrence, unequal rearrangements, and gene conversion involving both copies of the SMN genes. In approximately half of all patients, we identified a consensus haplotype, suggesting a common origin. Interestingly, we identified a putative recombination hot spot represented by recombination-simulating elements (TGGGG and TGAGGT) in exon 8 that is homologous to the human deletion-hot spot consensus sequence in the immunoglobulin switch region, the {alpha}-globin cluster, and the polymerase {alpha} arrest sites. This may explain why independent hybrid SMN genes show identical sequences. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Stepper motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekramer, Cornelis

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the more commonly used permanent magnet stepper motors for spaceflight. It will discuss the mechanical and electrical aspects of the devices, their torque behavior, those parameters which need to be controlled and measured, and test methods to be employed. It will also discuss torque margins, compare these to the existing margin requirements, and determine the applicability of these requirements. Finally it will attempt to generate a set of requirements which will be used in any stepper motor procurement and will fully characterize the stepper motor behavior in a consistent and repeatable fashion.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of the Feedback of the Robust Signaling Pathway Network of Myosin V Molecular Motors on GluR1 of AMPA in Neurons: A Networking Approach for Controlling Nanobiomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Qin; Nakano, Tadashi

    Acting as nanobiomachines within the cell, myosin V molecular motors contribute greatly to the LTP (Long Term Potentiation) in neural signaling, which transport the recycling endosomes from the dendrite to the spine of neurons and the GluR1 in AMPA receptors lead to the activities of memorization in brains. However it is unknown that how the restriction of GluR1 at the spine of neuron is caused by the signaling cascade of myosin V and Rab11/Rab11-FIP2 during the myosin V centered signaling process in neurons. Here we report that the feedback of the biochemical reaction for binding Myosin V and Rab11/Rab11-FIP2 plays a pivotal role to restrict the accumulation of GluR1 at the spine. We have investigated the feedback of myosin V and Rab11/Rab11-FIP2 on the convergence of GluR1 by using the computational model of intracellular signaling pathway networks we designed and the simulation software Cell Illustrator Professional Version 3.0 ®. The obtained results show that controllability of molecular motor based nanobiomachines is inevitable for exploring the molecular mechanism of neuroscience at the nanoscale.

  9. Ultrasonic Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Nakamura, M. K. Kurosawa , and S. Ueha, "Characteristics of a Hybrid Transducer-Type Ultrasonic Motor," IEEE Trans. Ultrason.Ferroelec. Freq., vol. 44...pp. 823-828, 1997. [12] M. K. Kurosawa , T. Morita, and T. Higuchi, "A Cylindrical Ultrasonic Micromotor Based on PZT Thin Film," IEEE Ultrasonics...Symposium, vol. 1, pp. 549-552, 1994. [13] T. Morita, M. K. Kurosawa , and T. Higuchi, "A Cylindrical Micro Ultrasonic Motor Using PZT Thin Film

  10. Nanoscale rotary motors driven by electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Boyang; Vuković, Lela; Král, Petr

    2008-10-31

    We examine by semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations the possibility of driving nanoscale rotary motors by electron tunneling. The model systems studied have a carbon nanotube shaft with covalently attached "isolating" molecular stalks ending with "conducting" blades. Periodic charging and discharging of the blades at two metallic electrodes maintains an electric dipole on the blades that is rotated by an external electric field. Our simulations demonstrate that these molecular motors can be efficient under load and in the presence of noise and defects.

  11. Advanced Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Knoth, Edward A; Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Schumaker, Edward J

    2012-12-14

    vProject Summary Transportation energy usage is predicted to increase substantially by 2020. Hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powered vehicles are destined to become more prominent as fuel prices rise with the demand. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle platforms are both dependent on high performance electric motors. Electric motors for transportation duty will require sizeable low-speed torque to accelerate the vehicle. As motor speed increases, the torque requirement decreases which results in a nearly constant power motor output. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are well suited for this duty. , , These rotor geometries are configured in straight lines and semi circular arc shapes. These designs are of limited configurations because of the lack of availability of permanent magnets of any other shapes at present. We propose to fabricate rotors via a novel processing approach where we start with magnet powders and compact them into a net shape rotor in a single step. Using this approach, widely different rotor designs can be implemented for efficiency. The current limitation on magnet shape and thickness will be eliminated. This is accomplished by co-filling magnet and soft iron powders at specified locations in intricate shapes using specially designed dies and automatic powder filling station. The process fundamentals for accomplishing occurred under a previous Applied Technology Program titled, Motors and Generators for the 21st Century. New efficient motor designs that are not currently possible (or cost prohibitive) can be accomplished by this approach. Such an approach to motor fabrication opens up a new dimension in motor design. Feasibility Results We were able to optimize a IPMSM rotor to take advantage of the powder co-filling and DMC compaction processing methods. The minimum low speed torque requirement of 5 N-m can be met through an optimized design with magnet material having a Br capability of 0.2 T. This level of magnetic performance can

  12. Motor Planning.

    PubMed

    Wong, Aaron L; Haith, Adrian M; Krakauer, John W

    2015-08-01

    Motor planning colloquially refers to any process related to the preparation of a movement that occurs during the reaction time prior to movement onset. However, this broad definition encompasses processes that are not strictly motor-related, such as decision-making about the identity of task-relevant stimuli in the environment. Furthermore, the assumption that all motor-planning processes require processing time, and can therefore be studied behaviorally by measuring changes in the reaction time, needs to be reexamined. In this review, we take a critical look at the processes leading from perception to action and suggest a definition of motor planning that encompasses only those processes necessary for a movement to be executed-that is, processes that are strictly movement related. These processes resolve the ambiguity inherent in an abstract goal by defining a specific movement to achieve it. We propose that the majority of processes that meet this definition can be completed nearly instantaneously, which means that motor planning itself in fact consumes only a small fraction of the reaction time. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Genetic heterogeneity of motor neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Griffin, Helen; Whittaker, Roger G.; Antoniadi, Thalia; Evangelista, Teresinha; Miller, James; Greenslade, Mark; Forester, Natalie; Duff, Jennifer; Bradshaw, Anna; Kleinle, Stephanie; Boczonadi, Veronika; Steele, Hannah; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Franko, Edit; Pyle, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence, molecular cause, and clinical presentation of hereditary motor neuropathies in a large cohort of patients from the North of England. Methods: Detailed neurologic and electrophysiologic assessments and next-generation panel testing or whole exome sequencing were performed in 105 patients with clinical symptoms of distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN, 64 patients), axonal motor neuropathy (motor Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease [CMT2], 16 patients), or complex neurologic disease predominantly affecting the motor nerves (hereditary motor neuropathy plus, 25 patients). Results: The prevalence of dHMN is 2.14 affected individuals per 100,000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval 1.62–2.66) in the North of England. Causative mutations were identified in 26 out of 73 index patients (35.6%). The diagnostic rate in the dHMN subgroup was 32.5%, which is higher than previously reported (20%). We detected a significant defect of neuromuscular transmission in 7 cases and identified potentially causative mutations in 4 patients with multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy. Conclusions: Many of the genes were shared between dHMN and motor CMT2, indicating identical disease mechanisms; therefore, we suggest changing the classification and including dHMN also as a subcategory of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Abnormal neuromuscular transmission in some genetic forms provides a treatable target to develop therapies. PMID:28251916

  14. Brownian motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänggi, P.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, F.

    2005-02-01

    In systems possessing a spatial or dynamical symmetry breaking, thermal Brownian motion combined with unbiased, non-equilibrium noise gives rise to a channelling of chance that can be used to exercise control over systems at the micro- and even on the nano-scale. This theme is known as the Brownian motor concept. The constructive role of (the generally overdamped) Brownian motion is exemplified for a noise-induced transport of particles within various set-ups. We first present the working principles and characteristics with a proof-of-principle device, a diffusive temperature Brownian motor. Next, we consider very recent applications based on the phenomenon of signal mixing. The latter is particularly simple to implement experimentally in order to optimize and selectively control a rich variety of directed transport behaviors. The subtleties and also the potential for Brownian motors operating in the quantum regime are outlined and some state-of-the-art applications, together with future roadways, are presented.

  15. [Motor rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Doménech, J; García-Aymerich, V; Juste, J; Ortiz, A

    2002-02-01

    The child's rehabilitation objectives are the same of the early intervention. The early intervention include motor approaches to facilitate the unique way of the newborn's expression: the movement and with it his holistic development. The motor approach is a classic aspect of early intervention but it is not itself early intervention. When the treatment objective is a term or preterm newborn or neonate the motor approach may be the principal method to facilitate perceptions experiences and basic habits. This intervention is not made with a specific physiotherapeutic technique. It is a sequential stimulation or development, without forget that the child must be taken as a whole. This point of view has special importance the first days of life and must be included in perinatal approach routines. In this paper we expose the work method of a Child Rehabilitation Team liked to a Newborn Unit.

  16. Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Kollmorgen Corporation's Mermaid II two person submersible is propeller-driven by a system of five DC brushless motors with new electronic controllers that originated in work performed in a NASA/DOE project managed by Lewis Research Center. A key feature of the system is electric commutation rather than mechanical commutation for converting AC current to DC.

  17. Therma motor

    DOEpatents

    Kandarian, R.

    The disclosure is directed to a thermal motor utilizing two tapered prestressed parallel adjacent cylinders lengthwise disposed about one third in a coolant. Heat is applied to contacting portions of the cylinders outside the coolant to cause them to deform and turn. Heat sources such as industrial waste heat, geothermal hot water, solar radiation, etc. can be used.

  18. Chemistry in motion: tiny synthetic motors.

    PubMed

    Colberg, Peter H; Reigh, Shang Yik; Robertson, Bryan; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Diffusion is the principal transport mechanism that controls the motion of solute molecules and other species in solution; however, the random walk process that underlies diffusion is slow and often nonspecific. Although diffusion is an essential mechanism for transport in the biological realm, biological systems have devised more efficient transport mechanisms using molecular motors. Most biological motors utilize some form of chemical energy derived from their surroundings to induce conformational changes in order to carry out specific functions. These small molecular motors operate in the presence of strong thermal fluctuations and in the regime of low Reynolds numbers, where viscous forces dominate inertial forces. Thus, their dynamical behavior is fundamentally different from that of macroscopic motors, and different mechanisms are responsible for the production of useful mechanical motion. There is no reason why our interest should be confined to the small motors that occur naturally in biological systems. Recently, micron and nanoscale motors that use chemical energy to produce directed motion by a number of different mechanisms have been made in the laboratory. These small synthetic motors also experience strong thermal fluctuations and operate in regimes where viscous forces dominate. Potentially, these motors could be directed to perform different transport tasks, analogous to those of biological motors, for both in vivo and in vitro applications. Although some synthetic motors execute conformational changes to effect motion, the majority do not, and, instead, they use other mechanisms to convert chemical energy into directed motion. In this Account, we describe how synthetic motors that operate by self-diffusiophoresis make use of a self-generated concentration gradient to drive motor motion. A description of propulsion by self-diffusiophoresis is presented for Janus particle motors comprising catalytic and noncatalytic faces. The properties

  19. The heterotrimeric kinesin-2 complex interacts with and regulates GLI protein function.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Brandon S; Barry, Renee L; Verhey, Kristen J; Allen, Benjamin L

    2015-03-01

    GLI transport to the primary cilium and nucleus is required for proper Hedgehog (HH) signaling; however, the mechanisms that mediate these trafficking events are poorly understood. Kinesin-2 motor proteins regulate ciliary transport of cargo, yet their role in GLI protein function remains unexplored. To examine a role for the heterotrimeric KIF3A-KIF3B-KAP3 kinesin-2 motor complex in regulating GLI activity, we performed a series of structure-function analyses using biochemical, cell signaling and in vivo approaches that define novel specific interactions between GLI proteins and two components of this complex, KAP3 and KIF3A. We find that all three mammalian GLI proteins interact with KAP3 and we map specific interaction sites in both proteins. Furthermore, we find that GLI proteins interact selectively with KIF3A, but not KIF3B, and that GLI interacts synergistically with KAP3 and KIF3A. Using a combination of cell signaling assays and chicken in ovo electroporation, we demonstrate that KAP3 interactions restrict GLI activator function but not GLI repressor function. These data suggest that GLI interactions with KIF3A-KIF3B-KAP3 complexes are essential for proper GLI transcriptional activity.

  20. Locomotion of chemically powered autonomous nanowire motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Longqiu; Li, Tianlong; Zhang, Guangyu; Sun, Qian

    2015-08-01

    Physical insights on the hydrodynamics and locomotion of self-propelled nanowire motor under nonequilibrium steady state are investigated using finite element method in accordance with hybrid molecular dynamics/multiparticle collision dynamics and rigid body dynamics. Nanowire motor is discretized into finite segments, and forces of solvent molecule acting on the motor are assumed to be the sum of forces acting on all segments of the motor. We show that the locomotion of nanowire motor is mainly determined by the imbalance forces acting on the catalytic and noncatalytic segments. The average velocity along the axis increases significantly as a function of time prior to reaching equilibrium. The length of nanowire motor shows negligible effect on the velocity of the motor. Preliminary experimental results are provided to validate the current model.

  1. New moves in motor control.

    PubMed

    Büschges, Ansgar; Scholz, Henrike; El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2011-07-12

    Motor behaviour results from information processing across multiple neural networks acting at all levels from initial selection of the behaviour to its final generation. Understanding how motor behaviour is produced requires identifying the constituent neurons of these networks, their cellular properties, and their pattern of synaptic connectivity. Neural networks have been traditionally studied with neurophysiological and neuroanatomical approaches. These approaches have been highly successful in particularly suitable 'model' preparations, typically ones in which the numbers of neurons in the networks were relatively small, neural network composition was unvarying across individual animals, and the preparations continued to produce fictive motor patterns in vitro. However, analysing networks without these characteristics, and analysing the complete ensemble of networks that cooperatively generate behaviours, is difficult with these approaches. Recently developed molecular and neurogenetic tools provide additional avenues for analysing motor networks by allowing individual or groups of neurons within networks to be manipulated in novel ways and allowing experiments to be performed not only in vitro but also in vivo. We review here some of the new insights into motor network function that these advances have provided and indicate how these advances might bridge gaps in our understanding of motor control. To these ends, we first review motor neural network organisation highlighting cross-phylum principles. We then use prominent examples from the field to show how neurogenetic approaches can complement classical physiological studies, and identify additional areas where these approaches could be advantageously applied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Unconventional functions of microtubule motors.

    PubMed

    Muresan, Virgil; Muresan, Zoia

    2012-04-01

    With the functional characterization of proteins advancing at fast pace, the notion that one protein performs different functions - often with no relation to each other - emerges as a novel principle of how cells work. Molecular motors are no exception to this new development. Here, we provide an account on recent findings revealing that microtubule motors are multifunctional proteins that regulate many cellular processes, in addition to their main function in transport. Some of these functions rely on their motor activity, but others are independent of it. Of the first category, we focus on the role of microtubule motors in organelle biogenesis, and in the remodeling of the cytoskeleton, especially through the regulation of microtubule dynamics. Of the second category, we discuss the function of microtubule motors as static anchors of the cargo at the destination, and their participation in regulating signaling cascades by modulating interactions between signaling proteins, including transcription factors. We also review atypical forms of transport, such as the cytoplasmic streaming in the oocyte, and the movement of cargo by microtubule fluctuations. Our goal is to provide an overview of these unexpected functions of microtubule motors, and to incite future research in this expanding field.

  3. Engineering molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Burak

    2016-04-01

    Biological molecular motors use chemical energy, mostly in the form of ATP hydrolysis, and convert it to mechanical energy. Correlated thermal fluctuations are essential for the function of a molecular machine and it is the hydrolysis of ATP that modifies the correlated fluctuations of the system. Correlations are consequences of the molecular architecture of the protein. The idea that synthetic molecular machines may be constructed by designing the proper molecular architecture is challenging. In their paper, Sarkar et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043006) propose a synthetic molecular motor based on the coarse grained elastic network model of proteins and show by numerical simulations that motor function is realized, ranging from deterministic to thermal, depending on temperature. This work opens up a new range of possibilities of molecular architecture based engine design.

  4. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jianwei; Nakajima, Akira; Janssen, William G M; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Xiong, Xiaoli; Morrison, John H; Brorson, James R; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2008-02-27

    It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI) plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-specific and developmental stage-dependent, because neither emotional/spatial memory was affected nor was the enhanced motor learning observed when the motor training was conducted starting at the age of 3 months old in these transgenic mice. These results indicate that changes in the expression of gene(s) that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity in cerebellar granule cells may constitute a molecular basis for the cerebellum to be involved in the GEI by facilitating motor skill learning.

  5. Neuregulin 1-ErbB module in C-bouton synapses on somatic motor neurons: molecular compartmentation and response to peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Casanovas, Anna; Salvany, Sara; Lahoz, Víctor; Tarabal, Olga; Piedrafita, Lídia; Sabater, Raimundo; Hernández, Sara; Calderó, Jordi; Esquerda, Josep E.

    2017-01-01

    The electric activity of lower motor neurons (MNs) appears to play a role in determining cell-vulnerability in MN diseases. MN excitability is modulated by cholinergic inputs through C-type synaptic boutons, which display an endoplasmic reticulum-related subsurface cistern (SSC) adjacent to the postsynaptic membrane. Besides cholinergic molecules, a constellation of proteins involved in different signal-transduction pathways are clustered at C-type synaptic sites (M2 muscarinic receptors, Kv2.1 potassium channels, Ca2+ activated K+ [SK] channels, and sigma-1 receptors [S1R]), but their collective functional significance so far remains unknown. We have previously suggested that neuregulin-1 (NRG1)/ErbBs-based retrograde signalling occurs at this synapse. To better understand signalling through C-boutons, we performed an analysis of the distribution of C-bouton-associated signalling proteins. We show that within SSC, S1R, Kv2.1 and NRG1 are clustered in highly specific, non-overlapping, microdomains, whereas ErbB2 and ErbB4 are present in the adjacent presynaptic compartment. This organization may define highly ordered and spatially restricted sites for different signal-transduction pathways. SSC associated proteins are disrupted in axotomised MNs together with the activation of microglia, which display a positive chemotactism to C-bouton sites. This indicates that C-bouton associated molecules are also involved in neuroinflammatory signalling in diseased MNs, emerging as new potential therapeutic targets. PMID:28065942

  6. Neuregulin 1-ErbB module in C-bouton synapses on somatic motor neurons: molecular compartmentation and response to peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, Anna; Salvany, Sara; Lahoz, Víctor; Tarabal, Olga; Piedrafita, Lídia; Sabater, Raimundo; Hernández, Sara; Calderó, Jordi; Esquerda, Josep E

    2017-01-09

    The electric activity of lower motor neurons (MNs) appears to play a role in determining cell-vulnerability in MN diseases. MN excitability is modulated by cholinergic inputs through C-type synaptic boutons, which display an endoplasmic reticulum-related subsurface cistern (SSC) adjacent to the postsynaptic membrane. Besides cholinergic molecules, a constellation of proteins involved in different signal-transduction pathways are clustered at C-type synaptic sites (M2 muscarinic receptors, Kv2.1 potassium channels, Ca(2+) activated K(+) [SK] channels, and sigma-1 receptors [S1R]), but their collective functional significance so far remains unknown. We have previously suggested that neuregulin-1 (NRG1)/ErbBs-based retrograde signalling occurs at this synapse. To better understand signalling through C-boutons, we performed an analysis of the distribution of C-bouton-associated signalling proteins. We show that within SSC, S1R, Kv2.1 and NRG1 are clustered in highly specific, non-overlapping, microdomains, whereas ErbB2 and ErbB4 are present in the adjacent presynaptic compartment. This organization may define highly ordered and spatially restricted sites for different signal-transduction pathways. SSC associated proteins are disrupted in axotomised MNs together with the activation of microglia, which display a positive chemotactism to C-bouton sites. This indicates that C-bouton associated molecules are also involved in neuroinflammatory signalling in diseased MNs, emerging as new potential therapeutic targets.

  7. Molecular motor KIF17 is fundamental for memory and learning via differential support of synaptic NR2A/2B levels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiling; Takei, Yosuke; Kido, Mizuho A; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2011-04-28

    Kinesin superfamily motor protein 17 (KIF17) is a candidate transporter of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit 2B (NR2B). Disruption of the murine kif17 gene inhibits NR2B transport, accompanied by decreased transcription of nr2b, resulting in a loss of synaptic NR2B. In kif17(-/-) hippocampal neurons, the NR2A level is also decreased because of accelerated ubiquitin-proteasome system-dependent degradation. Accordingly, NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents, early and late long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and CREB responses are attenuated in kif17(-/-) neurons, concomitant with a hippocampus-dependent memory impairment in knockout mice. In wild-type neurons, CREB is activated by synaptic inputs, which increase the levels of KIF17 and NR2B. Thus, KIF17 differentially maintains the levels of NR2A and NR2B, and, when synapses are stimulated, the NR2B/KIF17 complex is upregulated on demand through CREB activity. These KIF17-based mechanisms for maintaining NR2A/2B levels could underlie multiple phases of memory processes in vivo.

  8. Starting motor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Hamano, I

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a starting motor having a housing, planetary reduction gears including an internal gear in the housing. The improvement consists of an elastic member having a first annular portion mounted in engagement with a fixed annular member of the housing and a plurality of protruding axially extending elastic portions providing a corrugated surface pressed into engagement with an end portion of the internal gear, the elastic member being sandwiched between the internal gear and the housing member, the protruding axially extending elastic portions providing resilient means which flex and incline circumferentially under turning force from the internal gear and exert reactive thrust on the internal gear elastically so that the frictional force at the abutting surfaces of the protruding portions holds the internal gear in resilient engagement with the elastic member and the resilient means acts as a buffer to absorb rotary impact force developing in the planetary reduction gears.

  9. Gross motor control

    MedlinePlus

    Gross motor control is the ability to make large, general movements (such as waving an arm or lifting a ... Gross motor control is a milestone in the development of an infant. Infants develop gross motor control before they ...

  10. Neuroplasticity subserving motor skill learning

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Eran; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent years have seen significant progress in our understanding of the neural substrates of motor skill learning. Advances in neuroimaging provide new insight into functional reorganization associated with the acquisition, consolidation and retention of motor skills. Plastic changes involving structural reorganization in gray and white matter architecture that occurs over shorter time periods than previously thought have been documented as well. Data from experimental animals provided crucial information on plausible cellular and molecular substrates contributing to large-scale reorganization underlying skill acquisition in humans. Here, we review findings demonstrating functional and structural plasticity across different spatial and temporal scales that mediate motor skill learning, while identifying converging areas of interest, and possible avenues for future research. PMID:22078504

  11. Effect of the size of solvent molecules on the single-chain mechanics of poly(ethylene glycol): implications on a novel design of a molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhonglong; Zhang, Bo; Qian, Hu-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Cui, Shuxun

    2016-10-20

    Excluded-volume (EV) interaction, also known as the EV effect, can drive the collapse of polymer chains in a polymer solution and promote the crystallization of polymer chains. Herein we report, for the first time, the effect of EV interaction on the single-chain mechanics of a polymer, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). By using AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy, the single-chain mechanics of a PEG chain has been detected in various nonpolar organic solvents with different molecule sizes. It is observed that the nonpolar solvents can be classified into two categories. In the small-sized organic solvents (e.g., tetrachloroethane and n-nonane), PEG presents its inherent elasticity, which is consistent with the theoretical single-chain elasticity from quantum mechanical calculations. However, in the middle-sized solvents (e.g., n-dodecane and n-hexadecane), the single-chain entropic elasticity of PEG is influenced by EV interactions noticeably, which indicates that the PEG chain tends to adopt a compact conformation under these conditions. To stretch a PEG chain from a free state to a fully extended state, more energy (1.54 kBT per repeating unit) is needed in small-sized organic solvents than in middle-sized organic solvents. It is expected that a partially stretched PEG chain would shrink to some extent when the solvent is changed from a middle-sized organic solvent to a small-sized one. Accordingly, a novel design of a PEG-based single-molecule motor that works with solvent stimuli is proposed.

  12. Motor control for a brushless DC motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, William J. (Inventor); Faulkner, Dennis T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a motor control system for a brushless DC motor having an inverter responsively coupled to the motor control system and in power transmitting relationship to the motor. The motor control system includes a motor rotor speed detecting unit that provides a pulsed waveform signal proportional to rotor speed. This pulsed waveform signal is delivered to the inverter to thereby cause an inverter fundamental current waveform output to the motor to be switched at a rate proportional to said rotor speed. In addition, the fundamental current waveform is also pulse width modulated at a rate proportional to the rotor speed. A fundamental current waveform phase advance circuit is controllingly coupled to the inverter. The phase advance circuit is coupled to receive the pulsed waveform signal from the motor rotor speed detecting unit and phase advance the pulsed waveform signal as a predetermined function of motor speed to thereby cause the fundamental current waveform to be advanced and thereby compensate for fundamental current waveform lag due to motor winding reactance which allows the motor to operate at higher speeds than the motor is rated while providing optimal torque and therefore increased efficiency.

  13. Emergence of Motor Circuit Activity

    PubMed Central

    Law, Chris; Paquet, Michel; Kania, Artur

    2014-01-01

    In the developing nervous system, ordered neuronal activity patterns can occur even in the absence of sensory input and to investigate how these arise, we have used the model system of the embryonic chicken spinal motor circuit, focusing on motor neurons of the lateral motor column (LMC). At the earliest stages of their molecular differentiation, we can detect differences between medial and lateral LMC neurons in terms of expression of neurotransmitter receptor subunits, including CHRNA5, CHRNA7, GRIN2A, GRIK1, HTR1A and HTR1B, as well as the KCC2 transporter. Using patch-clamp recordings we also demonstrate that medial and lateral LMC motor neurons have subtly different activity patterns that reflect the differential expression of neurotransmitter receptor subunits. Using a combination of patch-clamp recordings in single neurons and calcium-imaging of motor neuron populations, we demonstrate that inhibition of nicotinic, muscarinic or GABA-ergic activity, has profound effects of motor circuit activity during the initial stages of neuromuscular junction formation. Finally, by analysing the activity of large populations of motor neurons at different developmental stages, we show that the asynchronous, disordered neuronal activity that occurs at early stages of circuit formation develops into organised, synchronous activity evident at the stage of LMC neuron muscle innervation. In light of the considerable diversity of neurotransmitter receptor expression, activity patterns in the LMC are surprisingly similar between neuronal types, however the emergence of patterned activity, in conjunction with the differential expression of transmitter systems likely leads to the development of near-mature patterns of locomotor activity by perinatal ages. PMID:24722186

  14. Motor vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y.; Sano, S.

    1986-04-15

    An improvement in a motor vehicle is described including: a vehicle body; a front road wheel disposed in the front part of the vehicle body; a rear road wheel disposed in the rear part of the vehicle body; an engine for driving at least either of the front and rear road wheels; and a steering wheel for steering at least either of the front and rear road wheels; comprising: detection means connected to the vehicle for detecting the transverse sliding angle of the vehicle body; and display means connected to the detection means for visually displaying the moving direction of the vehicle body on the basis of an output of the detection means; and the detection means comprises a first sensor for detecting the advancing speed of the vehicle, a second sensor for detecting the transverse acceleration of the vehicle, a third sensor for detecting the yawing velocity of the vehicle, and a processor for calculating the transverse sliding angle on the basis of the advancing speed, the transverse acceleration and the yawing velocity.

  15. Wind motor

    SciTech Connect

    Biscomb, L. I.

    1985-07-09

    A spider-like carrier having at least three generally horizontal arms has a hub mounted to the vertical, rotary-axis input shaft of a load. Each arm has at least one horizontal cross-arm secured to it near its radially outer end, which is supported from the ground by a low-friction support device such as a wheel or set of wheels. Mounted on each arm at the cross-arm or cross-arms is at least one sail, vane, airfoil or similar working member which is erected or spread generally normally to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be blown downwind and is feathered or headed to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be driven upwind. Horizontal axis and vertical axis journalling options for the working members and various sail shapes are shown, including a concave/convex sail and motor-oriented airfoil shape which provides lift when being driven upwind are shown.

  16. Synthetic Motors and Nanomachines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, Amar

    2006-03-01

    A bistable and palindromically-constituted [3]rotaxane incorporating two mechanically-mobile rings interlocked around a linear dumbbell component, has been designed to operate like the sarcomeres of skeletal muscle. Contraction and extension occurs when the inter-ring distance of the two rings switch, ideally, between 4.2 and 1.4 nm upon redox stimulation either chemically or electrochemically in the solution phase. When the mobile rings of these artificial molecular muscles are bound onto the tops of gold-coated, micron-scale cantilever beams, their controllable nanometer motions have a chance to be amplified along the long axis of each cantilever. It turns out that ˜6 billion of the self-assembled [3]rotaxanes can bend the cantilevers in a bistable manner concomitant with the cycled addition of redox agents. The extent of bending is commensurate with 10's of pN of force per [3]rotaxane. Recent studies on a set of ``single-shot'' control [2]rotaxanes have provided additional evidence for the origins of the force generation as it arises from a molecule-based electrostatic repulsion energy of about 10 kcal/mol at 300 K. These findings will be presented in terms of the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics that have been utilized extensively to direct the design and synthesis of artificial molecular machines and which may also serve as a guide for the rational design of unidirectional molecular motors.

  17. Na+-driven bacterial flagellar motors.

    PubMed

    Imae, Y; Atsumi, T

    1989-12-01

    Bacterial flagellar motors are the reversible rotary engine which propels the cell by rotating a helical flagellar filament as a screw propeller. The motors are embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane, and the energy for rotation is supplied by the electrochemical potential of specific ions across the membrane. Thus, the analysis of motor rotation at the molecular level is linked to an understanding of how the living system converts chemical energy into mechanical work. Based on the coupling ions, the motors are divided into two types; one is the H+-driven type found in neutrophiles such as Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli and the other is the Na+-driven type found in alkalophilic Bacillus and marine Vibrio. In this review, we summarize the current status of research on the rotation mechanism of the Na+-driven flagellar motors, which introduces several new aspects in the analysis.

  18. A microrotary motor powered by bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Yuichi; Miyata, Makoto; Tada, Tetsuya; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2006-09-01

    Biological molecular motors have a number of unique advantages over artificial motors, including efficient conversion of chemical energy into mechanical work and the potential for self-assembly into larger structures, as is seen in muscle sarcomeres and bacterial and eukaryotic flagella. The development of an appropriate interface between such biological materials and synthetic devices should enable us to realize useful hybrid micromachines. Here we describe a microrotary motor composed of a 20-μm-diameter silicon dioxide rotor driven on a silicon track by the gliding bacterium Mycoplasma mobile. This motor is fueled by glucose and inherits some of the properties normally attributed to living systems. glucose | micro actuator | motor protein | nanobiotechnology | Mycoplasma gliding

  19. Dynamic Concentration of Motors in Microtubule Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nédélec, François; Surrey, Thomas; Maggs, A. C.

    2001-04-01

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of the dynamics of molecular motors in microtubule arrays and asters. By solving a convection-diffusion equation we find that the density profile of motors in a two-dimensional aster is characterized by continuously varying exponents. Simulations are used to verify the assumptions of the continuum model. We observe the concentration profiles of kinesin moving in quasi-two-dimensional artificial asters by fluorescent microscopy and compare with our theoretical results.

  20. Motor neuropathies and lower motor neuron syndromes.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, A

    2017-05-01

    Motor or motor-predominant neuropathies may arise from disease processes affecting the motor axon and/or its surrounding myelin. Lower motor neuron syndrome (LMNS) arises from a disease process affecting the spinal motor neuron itself. The term LMNS is more generally used, rather than motor neuronopathy, although both entities are clinically similar. Common features are muscle weakness (distal or proximal) with atrophy and hyporeflexia, but no sensory involvement. They can be acquired or hereditary. Immune-mediated neuropathies (multifocal motor neuropathy, motor-predominant chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy) are important to identify, as effective treatments are available. Other acquired neuropathies, such as infectious, paraneoplastic and radiation-induced neuropathies are also well known. Focal LMNS is an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-mimicking syndrome especially affecting young adults. The main hereditary LMNSs in adulthood are Kennedy's disease, late-onset spinal muscular atrophy and distal hereditary motor neuropathies. Motor neuropathies and LMNS are all clinical entities that should be better known, despite being rare diseases. They can sometimes be difficult to differentially diagnose from other diseases, particularly from the more frequent ALS in its pure LMN form. Nevertheless, correct identification of these syndromes is important because their treatment and prognoses are definitely different. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Predicting Allostery Wiring Diagrams within Motor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehver, Riina

    2013-03-01

    Motor proteins are intricate molecular machines that make use of allostery as a basis of their function. Fundamental questions in trying to understand the operational mechanism of the motors is, therefore, how allostery communicated is within the proteins, what are the pathways that transmit allosteric signals, how to model and predict them. We have proposed a normal-mode analysis based perturbation model that predicts the pathways based on the structure and chemical composition of the molecules. We use the model to investigate allosteric pathways (allostery wiring diagrams) within motor proteins myosin V and VI.

  2. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions and their isotopic signatures (H/D) from a motor vehicle: implications on atmospheric H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Bond, S. W.; Soltic, P.; Röckmann, T.

    2010-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its isotopic signature (deuterium/hydrogen, δD), carbon monoxide (CO), and other compounds were studied in the exhaust of a passenger car engine fuelled with gasoline or methane and run under variable air-fuel ratios and operating modes. H2 and CO concentrations were largely reduced downstream of the three-way catalytic converter (TWC) compared to levels upstream, and showed a strong dependence on the air-fuel ratio (expressed as lambda, λ). The isotopic composition of H2 ranged from δD = -140‰ to δD = -195‰ upstream of the TWC but these values decreased to -270‰ to -370‰ after passing through the TWC. Post-TWC δD values for the fuel-rich range showed a strong dependence on TWC temperature with more negative δD for lower temperatures. These effects are attributed to a rapid temperature-dependent H-D isotope equilibration between H2 and water (H2O). In addition, post TWC δD in H2 showed a strong dependence on the fraction of removed H2, suggesting isotopic enrichment during catalytic removal of H2 with enrichment factors (ɛ) ranging from -39.8‰ to -15.5‰ depending on the operating mode. Our results imply that there may be considerable variability in real-world δD emissions from vehicle exhaust, which may mainly depend on TWC technology and exhaust temperature regime. This variability is suggestive of a δD from traffic that varies over time, by season, and by geographical location. An earlier-derived integrated pure (end-member) δD from anthropogenic activities of -270‰ (Rahn et al., 2002) can be explained as a mixture of mainly vehicle emissions from cold starts and fully functional TWCs, but enhanced δD values by >50‰ are likely for regions where TWC technology is not fully implemented. Our results also suggest that a full hydrogen isotope analysis on fuel and exhaust gas may greatly aid at understanding process-level reactions in the exhaust gas, in particular in the TWC.

  3. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions and their isotopic signatures (H/D) from a motor vehicle: implications on atmospheric H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Bond, S. W.; Soltic, P.; Röckmann, T.

    2010-02-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its isotopic signature (deuterium/hydrogen, δD), carbon monoxide (CO) and other compounds were studied in the exhaust of a passenger car engine fuelled with gasoline or methane and run under variable air-fuel ratios and operating modes. H2 and CO concentrations were largely reduced downstream of the three-way catalytic converter (TWC) compared to levels upstream, and showed a strong dependence on the air-fuel ratio (expressed as lambda, λ). The isotopic composition of H2 ranged from δD=-140‰ to δD=-195‰ upstream of the TWC but these values decreased to -270‰ to -370‰ after passing through the TWC. Post-TWC δD values for the fuel-rich range showed a strong dependence on TWC temperature with more negative δD for lower temperatures. These effects are attributed to a rapid temperature-dependent H-D isotope equilibration between H2 and water (H2O). In addition, post TWC δD in H2 showed a strong dependence on the fraction of removed H2, suggesting isotopic enrichment during catalytic removal of H2 with enrichment factors (ɛ) ranging from -39.8‰ to -15.5‰ depending on the operating mode. Our results imply that there may be considerable variability in real-world δD emissions from vehicle exhaust, which may mainly depend on TWC technology and exhaust temperature regime. This variability is suggestive of a δD from traffic that varies over time, by season, and by geographical location. An earlier-derived integrated pure (end-member) δD from anthropogenic activities of -270‰ (Rahn et al., 2002) can be explained as a mixture of mainly vehicle emissions from cold starts and fully functional TWCs, but enhanced δD values by >50‰ are likely for regions where TWC technology is not fully implemented. Our results also suggest that a full hydrogen isotope analysis on fuel and exhaust gas may greatly aid at understanding process-level reactions in the exhaust gas, in particular in the TWC.

  4. Taking control of the flagellar motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Mathieu; Truchon, Dany; Rainville, Simon

    2008-06-01

    Numerous types of bacteria swim in their environment by rotating long helical filaments. At the base of each filament is a tiny rotary motor called the bacterial flagellar motor. A lot is already known about the structure, assembly and function of this splendid molecular machine of nanoscopic dimensions. Nevertheless many fundamental questions remain open and the study of the flagellar motor is a very exciting area of current research. We are developing an in vitro assay to enable studies of the bacterial flagellar motor in precisely controlled conditions and to gain direct access to the inner components of the motor. We partly squeeze a filamentous E. coli bacterium inside a micropipette, leaving a working flagellar motor outside. We then punch a hole through the cell wall at the end of the bacterium located inside the micropipette using a brief train of ultrashort (~60 fs) laser pulses. This enables us to control the rotation of the motor with an external voltage (for at least 15 minutes). In parallel, new methods to monitor the speed of rotation of the motor in the low load (high speed) regime are being developed using various nanoparticules.

  5. Traffic control: regulation of kinesin motors.

    PubMed

    Verhey, Kristen J; Hammond, Jennetta W

    2009-11-01

    Kinesins are a family of molecular motors that use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to move along the surface of, or destabilize, microtubule filaments. Much progress has been made in understanding the mechanics and functions of the kinesin motors that play important parts in cell division, cell motility, intracellular trafficking and ciliary function. How kinesins are regulated in cells to ensure the temporal and spatial fidelity of their microtubule-based activities is less well understood. Recent work has revealed molecular mechanisms that control kinesin autoinhibition and subsequent activation, binding to cargos and microtubule tracks, and localization at specific sites of action.

  6. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  7. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  8. Stages of motor skill learning.

    PubMed

    Luft, Andreas R; Buitrago, Manuel M

    2005-12-01

    Successful learning of a motor skill requires repetitive training. Once the skill is mastered, it can be remembered for a long period of time. The durable memory makes motor skill learning an interesting paradigm for the study of learning and memory mechanisms. To gain better understanding, one scientific approach is to dissect the process into stages and to study these as well as their interactions. This article covers the growing evidence that motor skill learning advances through stages, in which different storage mechanisms predominate. The acquisition phase is characterized by fast (within session) and slow learning (between sessions). For a short