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Sample records for molecular motors design

  1. Bio-inspired novel design principles for artificial molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Hugel, Thorsten; Lumme, Christina

    2010-10-01

    Since we have learned that biological organisms like ourselves are driven by tiny biological molecular motors we try to design and produce artificial molecular motors. However, despite the huge efforts since decades, man-made artificial molecular motors are still far from biological molecular motors or macroscopic motors with regard to performance, especially with respect to energy efficiency. This review highlights recent progress towards artificial molecular motors and discusses how their design and development can be guided by the design concepts of biological molecular motors or macroscopic motors.

  2. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  3. Artificial molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S; Wilson, Miriam R; Feringa, Ben L; Leigh, David A

    2017-05-09

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new development, significant advances have been made. In this review an overview is given of the principal designs of artificial molecular motors and their modes of operation. Although synthetic molecular motors have also found widespread application as (multistate) switches, we focus on the control of directional movement, both at the molecular scale and at larger magnitudes. We identify some key challenges remaining in the field.

  4. In silico design and testing of guiding tracks for molecular shuttles powered by kinesin motors.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Takahiro; Tanahashi, Akihito; Hirano, Motohisa

    2010-06-07

    We present an extended computer simulation method which allows in silico design and testing of guiding tracks for molecular shuttles powered by kinesin motors. The simulation reproduced molecular shuttle movements under external forces and dissociation of shuttles from guiding track surfaces. The simulation was validated by comparing the simulation results with the corresponding experimental ones. Using the simulation, track designers can change guiding track designs, choose guiding methods, tune the strength of external forces, and test the module performance. This simulation would significantly reduce the effort expended in designing guiding tracks for molecular shuttles powered by kinesin motors.

  5. Molecular Motors from DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turberfield, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    DNA is a wonderful material for nanoscale construction: its self-assembly can be programmed by making use of its information-carrying capability and its hybridization or hydrolysis can be used as to provide energy for synthetic molecular machinery. With DNA it is possible to design and build three-dimensional scaffolds, to attach molecular components to them with sub-nanometre precision-and then to make them move. I shall describe our work on autonomous, biomimetic molecular motors powered by chemical fuels and the use of synthetic molecular machinery to control covalent chemical synthesis. I shall demonstrate bipedal motors whose operation depends on the coordination of the chemomechanical cycles of two separate catalytic centres and burnt bridges motors that can be programmed to navigate networks of tracks. I shall also discuss the use of kinesin motor proteins to power synthetic devices.

  6. Computational Design of a Family of Light-Driven Rotary Molecular Motors with Improved Quantum Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two new light-driven molecular rotary motors based on the N-alkylated indanylidene benzopyrrole frameworks are proposed and studied using quantum chemical calculations and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. These new motors perform pure axial rotation, and the photochemical steps of the rotary cycle are dominated by the fast bond-length-alternation motion that enables ultrafast access to the S1/S0 intersection. The new motors are predicted to display a quantum efficiency higher than that of the currently available synthetic all-hydrocarbon motors. Remarkably, the quantum efficiency is not governed by the topography (peaked versus sloped) of the minimum-energy conical intersection, whereas the S1 decay time depends on the topography as well as on the energy of the intersection relative to the S1 minimum. It is the axial chirality (helicity), rather than the point chirality, that controls the sense of rotation of the motor. PMID:26670164

  7. Computational Design of a Family of Light-Driven Rotary Molecular Motors with Improved Quantum Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Alexander; Gamez, Jose A; Thiel, Walter; Filatov, Michael

    2016-01-07

    Two new light-driven molecular rotary motors based on the N-alkylated indanylidene benzopyrrole frameworks are proposed and studied using quantum chemical calculations and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. These new motors perform pure axial rotation, and the photochemical steps of the rotary cycle are dominated by the fast bond-length-alternation motion that enables ultrafast access to the S1/S0 intersection. The new motors are predicted to display a quantum efficiency higher than that of the currently available synthetic all-hydrocarbon motors. Remarkably, the quantum efficiency is not governed by the topography (peaked versus sloped) of the minimum-energy conical intersection, whereas the S1 decay time depends on the topography as well as on the energy of the intersection relative to the S1 minimum. It is the axial chirality (helicity), rather than the point chirality, that controls the sense of rotation of the motor.

  8. Light-driven rotary molecular motors without point chirality: a minimal design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Oruganti, Baswanth; Durbeej, Bo

    2017-03-08

    A fundamental requirement for achieving photoinduced unidirectional rotary motion about an olefinic bond in a molecular motor is that the potential energy surface of the excited state is asymmetric with respect to clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. In most available light-driven rotary molecular motors, such asymmetry is guaranteed by the presence of a stereocenter. Here, we present non-adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations based on multiconfigurational quantum chemistry to demonstrate that this chiral feature is not essential for inducing unidirectional rotary motion in molecules that incorporate a cyclohexenylidene moiety into a protonated Schiff-base framework. Rather, the simulations show that it is possible to exploit the intrinsic asymmetry of the puckered cyclohexenylidene to control the direction of photoinduced rotation.

  9. DNA based molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Jens; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Kügel, Wolfgang; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the essential cellular processes such as polymerisation reactions, gene expression and regulation are governed by mechanical processes. Controlled mechanical investigations of these processes are therefore required in order to take our understanding of molecular biology to the next level. Single-molecule manipulation and force spectroscopy have over the last 15 years been developed into extremely powerful techniques. Applying these techniques to the investigation of proteins and DNA molecules has led to a mechanistic understanding of protein function on the level of single molecules. As examples for DNA based molecular machines we will describe single-molecule experiments on RNA polymerases as well as on the packaging of DNA into a viral capsid-a process that is driven by one of the most powerful molecular motors.

  10. Mechanochemistry of Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Zev

    2008-03-01

    Molecular motors lie at the heart of biological processes from DNA replication to vesicle transport. We seek to understand the physical mechanisms by which these nanoscale machines convert chemical energy into mechanical work. I will overview our ongoing use of single molecule tracking and manipulation techniques to observe and perturb substeps in the mechanochemical cycles of individual motors, before concentrating on our recent efforts to dissect the structural basis of a ``reverse gear'' in myosin VI. The basic actomyosin motor has been embellished, altered, and re-used many times through the evolution of diverse members of the myosin superfamily. Class VI myosins are highly specialized (-) end directed motors involved in a growing list of functions in animal cells, including endocytosis, cell migration, and maintenance of stereociliar membrane tension. How does myosin VI achieve reverse directionality, despite sharing extensive sequence and structural conservation with (+) end directed myosins? We generated a series of truncated myosin VI constructs and characterized the size and direction of the power stroke for each construct using dual-labeled gliding filament assays and optical trapping. Motors truncated near the end of the converter domain generate (+) end directed motion, whereas longer constructs move toward the (-) end, confirming the importance of a class-specific insert that redirects the lever arm. Our quantitative results suggest a surprising model in which the lever arm rotates ˜180^o during the power stroke. We are currently studying the behavior of engineered myosin VI constructs with artificial lever arms, in order to further challenge and refine our power stroke model.

  11. Molecular Motors and Stochastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard

    The behavior of single molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin V, which move on linear filaments, involves a nontrivial coupling between the biochemical motor cycle and the stochastic movement. This coupling can be studied in the framework of nonuniform ratchet models which are characterized by spatially localized transition rates between the different internal states of the motor. These models can be classified according to their functional relationships between the motor velocity and the concentration of the fuel molecules. The simplest such relationship applies to two subclasses of models for dimeric kinesin and agrees with experimental observations on this molecular motor.

  12. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  13. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  14. From Computational Photobiology to the Design of Vibrationally Coherent Molecular Devices and Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivucci, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    In the past multi-configurational quantum chemical computations coupled with molecular mechanics force fields have been employed to investigate spectroscopic, thermal and photochemical properties of visual pigments. Here we show how the same computational technology can nowadays be used to design, characterize and ultimately, prepare light-driven molecular switches which mimics the photophysics of the visual pigment bovine rhodopsin (Rh). When embedded in the protein cavity the chromophore of Rh undergoes an ultrafast and coherent photoisomerization. In order to design a synthetic chromophore displaying similar properties in common solvents, we recently focused on indanylidene-pyrroline (NAIP) systems. We found that these systems display light-induced ground state coherent vibrational motion similar to the one detected in Rh. Semi-classical trajectories provide a mechanistic description of the structural changes associated to the observed coherent motion which is shown to be ultimately due to periodic changes in the π-conjugation.

  15. Cooperative behavior of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Karen C; Stienen, Ger J M; Schmid, Christoph F

    2002-01-01

    Both experimental evidence and theoretical models for collective effects in the working mechanism of molecular motors are reviewed at three different levels, namely: (i) interaction between the two heads of double-headed motors, particularly in processive motors like kinesin, myosin V and myosin VI, (ii) cooperative regulation of muscle thin filaments by accessory proteins and the Ca2+ level, and (iii) collective dynamic effects stemming from the mechanical coupling of molecular motors within macroscopic structures such as muscle thick filaments or axonemes. We aim to bridge the gap between structural information at the molecular level and physiological data with accompanying specific models on the one hand, and general stochastic physical models for the action of molecular motors on the other hand. An underlying assumption is that while, ultimately, the function of molecular motors will be explainable by a quantitative description of specific intramolecular dynamics and intermolecular interactions, for some coarse grained larger scale dynamic features it will be sufficient and illuminating to construct physical models that are simplified to the bare essentials.

  16. Molecular Motors: A Theorist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Fisher, Michael E.

    Individual molecular motors, or motor proteins, are enzymatic molecules that convert chemical energy, typically obtained from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), into mechanical work and motion. Processive motor proteins, such as kinesin, dynein, and certain myosins, step unidirectionally along linear tracks, specifically microtubules and actin filaments, and play a crucial role in cellular transport processes, organization, and function. In this review some theoretical aspects of motor-protein dynamics are presented in the light of current experimental methods that enable the measurement of the biochemical and biomechanical properties on a single-molecule basis. After a brief discussion of continuum ratchet concepts, we focus on discrete kinetic and stochastic models that yield predictions for the mean velocity, V(F, [ATP],…), and other observables as a function of an imposed load force F, the ATP concentration, and other variables. The combination of appropriate theory with single-molecule observations should help uncover the mechanisms underlying motor-protein function.

  17. The art of building small: from molecular switches to molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Feringa, Ben L

    2007-08-31

    Molecular switches and motors are essential components of artificial molecular machines. In this perspective, we discuss progress in our design, synthesis, and functioning of photochemical and electrochemical switches and chemical and light-driven molecular motors. Special emphasis is given to the control of a range of functions and properties, including luminescence, self-assembly, motion, color, conductance, transport, and chirality. We will also discuss our efforts to control mechanical movement at the molecular level, a feature that is at the heart of molecular motors and machines. The anchoring of molecular motors on surfaces and molecular motors at work are discussed.

  18. The mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Keller, D; Bustamante, C

    2000-02-01

    A theory of molecular motors is presented that explains how the energy released in single chemical reactions can generate mechanical motion and force. In the simplest case the fluctuating movements of a motor enzyme are well described by a diffusion process on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, where one dimension is a chemical reaction coordinate and the other is the spatial displacement of the motor. The coupling between chemistry and motion results from the shape of the surface, and motor velocities and forces result from diffusion currents on this surface. This microscopic description is shown to possess an equivalent kinetic mechanism in which the rate constants depend on externally applied forces. By using this equivalence we explore the characteristic properties of several broad classes of motor mechanisms and give general expressions for motor velocity versus load force for any member of each class. We show that in some cases simple plots of 1/velocity vs. 1/concentration can distinguish between classes of motor mechanisms and may be used to determine the step at which movement occurs.

  19. The mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, D; Bustamante, C

    2000-01-01

    A theory of molecular motors is presented that explains how the energy released in single chemical reactions can generate mechanical motion and force. In the simplest case the fluctuating movements of a motor enzyme are well described by a diffusion process on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, where one dimension is a chemical reaction coordinate and the other is the spatial displacement of the motor. The coupling between chemistry and motion results from the shape of the surface, and motor velocities and forces result from diffusion currents on this surface. This microscopic description is shown to possess an equivalent kinetic mechanism in which the rate constants depend on externally applied forces. By using this equivalence we explore the characteristic properties of several broad classes of motor mechanisms and give general expressions for motor velocity versus load force for any member of each class. We show that in some cases simple plots of 1/velocity vs. 1/concentration can distinguish between classes of motor mechanisms and may be used to determine the step at which movement occurs. PMID:10653770

  20. Fluctuation Relations for Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, David; Mallick, Kirone

    This review is focused on the application of specific fluctuation relations, such as the Gallavotti-Cohen relation, to ratchet models of a molecular motor. A special emphasis is placed on two-state models such as the flashing ratchet model. We derive the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation for these models and we discuss some of its implications.

  1. Thermodynamics and kinetics of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R Dean

    2010-06-02

    Molecular motors are first and foremost molecules, governed by the laws of chemistry rather than of mechanics. The dynamical behavior of motors based on chemical principles can be described as a random walk on a network of states. A key insight is that any molecular motor in solution explores all possible motions and configurations at thermodynamic equilibrium. By using input energy and chemical design to prevent motion that is not wanted, what is left behind is the motion that is desired. This review is focused on two-headed motors such as kinesin and Myosin V that move on a polymeric track. By use of microscopic reversibility, it is shown that the ratio between the number of forward steps and the number of backward steps in any sufficiently long time period does not directly depend on the mechanical properties of the linker between the two heads. Instead, this ratio is governed by the relative chemical specificity of the heads in the front-versus-rear position for the fuel, adenosine triphosphate and its products, adenosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate. These insights have been key factors in the design of biologically inspired synthetic molecular walkers constructed out of DNA or out of small organic molecules.

  2. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R. Dean

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Molecular motors are first and foremost molecules, governed by the laws of chemistry rather than of mechanics. The dynamical behavior of motors based on chemical principles can be described as a random walk on a network of states. A key insight is that any molecular motor in solution explores all possible motions and configurations at thermodynamic equilibrium. By using input energy and chemical design to prevent motion that is not wanted, what is left behind is the motion that is desired. This review is focused on two-headed motors such as kinesin and Myosin V that move on a polymeric track. By use of microscopic reversibility, it is shown that the ratio between the number of forward steps and the number of backward steps in any sufficiently long time period does not directly depend on the mechanical properties of the linker between the two heads. Instead, this ratio is governed by the relative chemical specificity of the heads in the front-versus-rear position for the fuel, adenosine triphosphate and its products, adenosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate. These insights have been key factors in the design of biologically inspired synthetic molecular walkers constructed out of DNA or out of small organic molecules. PMID:20513383

  3. Computational design of faster rotating second-generation light-driven molecular motors by control of steric effects.

    PubMed

    Oruganti, Baswanth; Fang, Changfeng; Durbeej, Bo

    2015-09-07

    We report a systematic computational investigation of the possibility to accelerate the rate-limiting thermal isomerizations of the rotary cycles of synthetic light-driven overcrowded alkene-based molecular motors through modulation of steric interactions. Choosing as a reference system a second-generation motor known to accomplish rotary motion in the MHz regime and using density functional theory methods, we propose a three-step mechanism for the thermal isomerizations of this motor and show that variation of the steric bulkiness of the substituent at the stereocenter can reduce the (already small) free-energy barrier of the rate-determining step by a further 15-17 kJ mol(-1). This finding holds promise for future motors of this kind to reach beyond the MHz regime. Furthermore, we demonstrate and explain why one particular step is kinetically favored by decreasing and another step is kinetically favored by increasing the steric bulkiness of this substituent, and identify a possible back reaction capable of impeding the rotary rate.

  4. Linear and rotary molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kinosita, K

    1998-01-01

    A single molecule of F1-ATPase has been shown to be the smallest rotary motor ever found, with a central rotor of radius approximately 1 nm turning in a stator barrel of radius approximately 5 nm. Continuous rotation of the central gamma subunit was revealed under an optical microscope by attaching to gamma a huge marker, an actin filament. In a separate study, rotation of a sliding actin filament around its axis has been revealed by attaching a small probe, a single fluorescent dye molecule, to the actin filament and detecting the orientation of the fluorophore, and thus of the actin filament, through polarization imaging. The axial rotation was slow compared to the linear sliding, indicating that myosin does not 'walk' along the helical array of actin protomers but 'runs,' skipping many protomers. The two motors above, one rotary and the other linear, represent two extreme cases of the mode of motor operation: in the F1-ATPase the two partners, the rotor and stator, never detach from each other whereas myosin touches actin only occasionally. In considering the mechanisms of these and other molecular motors, distinction between bending and binding is important. The use of huge and small probes as described above should be useful in studies of protein machines in general, as a means of detecting conformational changes in a single protein molecule during function.

  5. Unidirectional molecular motor on a gold surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Delden, Richard A.; Ter Wiel, Matthijs K. J.; Pollard, Michael M.; Vicario, Javier; Koumura, Nagatoshi; Feringa, Ben L.

    2005-10-01

    Molecules capable of mimicking the function of a wide range of mechanical devices have been fabricated, with motors that can induce mechanical movement attracting particular attention. Such molecular motors convert light or chemical energy into directional rotary or linear motion, and are usually prepared and operated in solution. But if they are to be used as nanomachines that can do useful work, it seems essential to construct systems that can function on a surface, like a recently reported linear artificial muscle. Surface-mounted rotors have been realized and limited directionality in their motion predicted. Here we demonstrate that a light-driven molecular motor capable of repetitive unidirectional rotation can be mounted on the surface of gold nanoparticles. The motor design uses a chiral helical alkene with an upper half that serves as a propeller and is connected through a carbon-carbon double bond (the rotation axis) to a lower half that serves as a stator. The stator carries two thiol-functionalized `legs', which then bind the entire motor molecule to a gold surface. NMR spectroscopy reveals that two photo-induced cis-trans isomerizations of the central double bond, each followed by a thermal helix inversion to prevent reverse rotation, induce a full and unidirectional 360° rotation of the propeller with respect to the surface-mounted lower half of the system.

  6. Unidirectional light-driven molecular motors based on overcrowded alkenes.

    PubMed

    Cnossen, Arjen; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, interest in nanotechnology has led to the design and synthesis of a toolbox of nanoscale versions of macroscopic devices and components. In molecular nanotechnology, linear motors based on rotaxanes and rotary motors based on overcrowded alkenes are particularly promising for performing work at the nanoscale. In this chapter, progress on light-driven molecular motors based on overcrowded alkenes is reviewed. Both the so-called first and second generation molecular motors are discussed, as well as their potential applications.

  7. Duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body and have many different and important roles. These micromachines move along filament tracks and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II (a nonprocessive molecular machine with a low duty ratio), cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of nonprocessive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track. © 2012 American Physical Society

  8. Duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body and have many different and important roles. These micromachines move along filament tracks and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II (a nonprocessive molecular machine with a low duty ratio), cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of nonprocessive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track.

  9. Molecular motors and their functions in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular motors that hydrolyze ATP and use the derived energy to generate force are involved in a variety of diverse cellular functions. Genetic, biochemical, and cellular localization data have implicated motors in a variety of functions such as vesicle and organelle transport, cytoskeleton dynamics, morphogenesis, polarized growth, cell movements, spindle formation, chromosome movement, nuclear fusion, and signal transduction. In non-plant systems three families of molecular motors (kinesins, dyneins, and myosins) have been well characterized. These motors use microtubules (in the case of kinesines and dyneins) or actin filaments (in the case of myosins) as tracks to transport cargo materials intracellularly. During the last decade tremendous progress has been made in understanding the structure and function of various motors in animals. These studies are yielding interesting insights into the functions of molecular motors and the origin of different families of motors. Furthermore, the paradigm that motors bind cargo and move along cytoskeletal tracks does not explain the functions of some of the motors. Relatively little is known about the molecular motors and their roles in plants. In recent years, by using biochemical, cell biological, molecular, and genetic approaches a few molecular motors have been isolated and characterized from plants. These studies indicate that some of the motors in plants have novel features and regulatory mechanisms. The role of molecular motors in plant cell division, cell expansion, cytoplasmic streaming, cell-to-cell communication, membrane trafficking, and morphogenesis is beginning to be understood. Analyses of the Arabidopsis genome sequence database (51% of genome) with conserved motor domains of kinesin and myosin families indicates the presence of a large number (about 40) of molecular motors and the functions of many of these motors remain to be discovered. It is likely that many more motors with novel regulatory

  10. Ratchet models of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaster, Nicole

    2003-09-01

    Transport processes in and of cells are of major importance for the survival of the organism. Muscles have to be able to contract, chromosomes have to be moved to opposing ends of the cell during mitosis, and organelles, which are compartments enclosed by membranes, have to be transported along molecular tracks. Molecular motors are proteins whose main task is moving other molecules.For that purpose they transform the chemical energy released in the hydrolysis of ATP into mechanical work. The motors of the cytoskeleton belong to the three super families myosin, kinesin and dynein. Their tracks are filaments of the cytoskeleton, namely actin and the microtubuli. Here, we examine stochastic models which are used for describing the movements of these linear molecular motors. The scale of the movements comprises the regime of single steps of a motor protein up to the directed walk along a filament. A single step bridges around 10 nm, depending on the protein, and takes about 10 ms, if there is enough ATP available. Our models comprise M states or conformations the motor can attain during its movement along a one-dimensional track. At K locations along the track transitions between the states are possible. The velocity of the protein depending on the transition rates between the single states can be determined analytically. We calculate this velocity for systems of up to four states and locations and are able to derive a number of rules which are helpful in estimating the behaviour of an arbitrary given system. Beyond that we have a look at decoupled subsystems, i.e., one or a couple of states which have no connection to the remaining system. With a certain probability a motor undergoes a cycle of conformational changes, with another probability an independent other cycle. Active elements in real transport processes by molecular motors will not be limited to the transitions between the states. In distorted networks or starting from the discrete Master equation of the

  11. Quantum dynamics of light-driven chiral molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Shin-ichiro; Hoki, Kunihito; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2009-03-21

    The results of theoretical studies on quantum dynamics of light-driven molecular motors with internal rotation are presented. Characteristic features of chiral motors driven by a non-helical, linearly polarized electric field of light are explained on the basis of symmetry argument. The rotational potential of the chiral motor is characterized by a ratchet form. The asymmetric potential determines the directional motion: the rotational direction is toward the gentle slope of the asymmetric potential. This direction is called the intuitive direction. To confirm the unidirectional rotational motion, results of quantum dynamical calculations of randomly-oriented molecular motors are presented. A theoretical design of the smallest light-driven molecular machine is presented. The smallest chiral molecular machine has an optically driven engine and a running propeller on its body. The mechanisms of transmission of driving forces from the engine to the propeller are elucidated by using a quantum dynamical treatment. The results provide a principle for control of optically-driven molecular bevel gears. Temperature effects are discussed using the density operator formalism. An effective method for ultrafast control of rotational motions in any desired direction is presented with the help of a quantum control theory. In this method, visible or UV light pulses are applied to drive the motor via an electronic excited state. A method for driving a large molecular motor consisting of an aromatic hydrocarbon is presented. The molecular motor is operated by interactions between the induced dipole of the molecular motor and the electric field of light pulses.

  12. Propagation Modeling and Analysis of Molecular Motors in Molecular Communication.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2016-10-24

    Molecular motor networks (MMNs) are networks constructed from molecular motors to enable nanomachines to perform coordinated tasks of sensing, computing, and actuation at the nano- and micro- scales. Living cells are naturally enabled with this same mechanism to establish point-to-point communication between different locations inside the cell. Similar to a railway system, the cytoplasm contains an intricate infrastructure of tracks, named microtubules, interconnecting different internal components of the cell. Motor proteins, such as kinesin and dynein, are able to travel along these tracks directionally, carrying with them large molecules that would otherwise be unreliably transported across the cytoplasm using free diffusion. Molecular communication has been previously proposed for the design and study of MMNs. However, the topological aspects of MMNs, including the effects of branches, have been ignored in the existing studies. In this paper, a physical end-to-end model for MMNs is developed, considering the location of the transmitter node, the network topology, and the receiver nodes. The end-to-end gain and group delay are considered as the performance measures, and analytical expressions for them are derived. The analytical model is validated by Monte-Carlo simulations and the performance of MMNs is analyzed numerically. It is shown that, depending on their nature and position, MMN nodes create impedance effects that are critical for the overall performance. This model could be applied to assist the design of artificial MMNs and to study cargo transport in neurofilaments to elucidate brain diseases related to microtubule jamming.

  13. Propagation Modeling and Analysis of Molecular Motors in Molecular Communication.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2016-12-01

    Molecular motor networks (MMNs) are networks constructed from molecular motors to enable nanomachines to perform coordinated tasks of sensing, computing, and actuation at the nano- and micro- scales. Living cells are naturally enabled with this same mechanism to establish point-to-point communication between different locations inside the cell. Similar to a railway system, the cytoplasm contains an intricate infrastructure of tracks, named microtubules, interconnecting different internal components of the cell. Motor proteins, such as kinesin and dynein, are able to travel along these tracks directionally, carrying with them large molecules that would otherwise be unreliably transported across the cytoplasm using free diffusion. Molecular communication has been previously proposed for the design and study of MMNs. However, the topological aspects of MMNs, including the effects of branches, have been ignored in the existing studies. In this paper, a physical end-to-end model for MMNs is developed, considering the location of the transmitter node, the network topology, and the receiver nodes. The end-to-end gain and group delay are considered as the performance measures, and analytical expressions for them are derived. The analytical model is validated by Monte-Carlo simulations and the performance of MMNs is analyzed numerically. It is shown that, depending on their nature and position, MMN nodes create impedance effects that are critical for the overall performance. This model could be applied to assist the design of artificial MMNs and to study cargo transport in neurofilaments to elucidate brain diseases related to microtubule jamming.

  14. Towards synthetic molecular motors: a model elastic-network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amartya; Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-04-01

    Protein molecular motors play a fundamental role in biological cells and development of their synthetic counterparts is a major challenge. Here, we show how a model motor system with the operation mechanism resembling that of muscle myosin can be designed at the concept level, without addressing the implementation aspects. The model is constructed as an elastic network, similar to the coarse-grained descriptions used for real proteins. We show by numerical simulations that the designed synthetic motor can operate as a deterministic or Brownian ratchet and that there is a continuous transition between such two regimes. The motor operation under external load, approaching the stall condition, is also analysed.

  15. Models of protein linear molecular motors for dynamic nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V; Nicolau, Dan V

    2009-02-01

    Protein molecular motors are natural nano-machines that convert the chemical energy from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate into mechanical work. These efficient machines are central to many biological processes, including cellular motion, muscle contraction and cell division. The remarkable energetic efficiency of the protein molecular motors coupled with their nano-scale has prompted an increasing number of studies focusing on their integration in hybrid micro- and nanodevices, in particular using linear molecular motors. The translation of these tentative devices into technologically and economically feasible ones requires an engineering, design-orientated approach based on a structured formalism, preferably mathematical. This contribution reviews the present state of the art in the modelling of protein linear molecular motors, as relevant to the future design-orientated development of hybrid dynamic nanodevices.

  16. Molecular Motors: Power Strokes Outperform Brownian Ratchets.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Jason A; Dill, Ken A

    2016-07-07

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy (typically from ATP hydrolysis) to directed motion and mechanical work. Their actions are often described in terms of "Power Stroke" (PS) and "Brownian Ratchet" (BR) mechanisms. Here, we use a transition-state model and stochastic thermodynamics to describe a range of mechanisms ranging from PS to BR. We incorporate this model into Hill's diagrammatic method to develop a comprehensive model of motor processivity that is simple but sufficiently general to capture the full range of behavior observed for molecular motors. We demonstrate that, under all conditions, PS motors are faster, more powerful, and more efficient at constant velocity than BR motors. We show that these differences are very large for simple motors but become inconsequential for complex motors with additional kinetic barrier steps.

  17. Co-operative transport by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Müller, Melanie J I; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Intracellular transport is often driven co-operatively by several molecular motors, which may belong to one or several motor species. Understanding how these motors interact and what co-ordinates and regulates their movements is a central problem in studies of intracellular transport. A general theoretical framework for the analysis of such transport processes is described, which enables us to explain the behaviour of intracellular cargos by the transport properties of individual motors and their interactions. We review recent advances in the theoretical description of motor co-operativity and discuss related experimental results.

  18. Molecular motors--a paradigm for mutant analysis.

    PubMed

    Endow, S A

    2000-04-01

    Molecular motors perform essential functions in the cell and have the potential to provide insights into the basis of many important processes. A unique property of molecular motors is their ability to convert energy from ATP hydrolysis into work, enabling the motors to bind to and move along cytoskeletal filaments. The mechanism of energy conversion by molecular motors is not yet understood and may lead to the discovery of new biophysical principles. Mutant analysis could provide valuable information, but it is not obvious how to obtain mutants that are informative for study. The analysis presented here points out several strategies for obtaining mutants by selection from molecular or genetic screens, or by rational design. Mutants that are expected to provide important information about the motor mechanism include ATPase mutants, which interfere with the nucleotide hydrolysis cycle, and uncoupling mutants, which unlink basic motor activities and reveal their interdependence. Natural variants can also be exploited to provide unexpected information about motor function. This general approach to uncovering protein function by analysis of informative mutants is applicable not only to molecular motors, but to other proteins of interest.

  19. How molecular motors work - insights from the molecular machinist's toolbox: the Nobel prize in Chemistry 2016.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R D

    2017-02-01

    The Nobel prize in Chemistry for 2016 was awarded to Jean Pierre Sauvage, Sir James Fraser Stoddart, and Bernard (Ben) Feringa for their contributions to the design and synthesis of molecular machines. While this field is still in its infancy, and at present there are no commercial applications, many observers have stressed the tremendous potential of molecular machines to revolutionize technology. However, perhaps the most important result so far accruing from the synthesis of molecular machines is the insight provided into the fundamental mechanisms by which molecular motors, including biological motors such as kinesin, myosin, FoF1 ATPase, and the flagellar motor, function. The ability to "tinker" with separate components of molecular motors allows asking, and answering, specific questions about mechanism, particularly with regard to light driven vs. chemistry driven molecular motors.

  20. Molecular switches and motors on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pathem, Bala Krishna; Claridge, Shelley A; Zheng, Yue Bing; Weiss, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular switches and motors respond structurally, electronically, optically, and/or mechanically to external stimuli, testing and potentially enabling extreme miniaturization of optoelectronic devices, nanoelectromechanical systems, and medical devices. The assembly of motors and switches on surfaces makes it possible both to measure the properties of individual molecules as they relate to their environment and to couple function between assembled molecules. In this review, we discuss recent progress in assembling molecular switches and motors on surfaces, measuring static and dynamic structures, understanding switching mechanisms, and constructing functional molecular materials and devices. As demonstrative examples, we choose a representative molecule from three commonly studied classes including molecular switches, photochromic molecules, and mechanically interlocked molecules. We conclude by offering perspectives on the future of molecular switches and motors on surfaces.

  1. Ultrafast molecular motor driven nanoseparation and biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lard, Mercy; Ten Siethoff, Lasse; Kumar, Saroj; Persson, Malin; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Linke, Heiner; Månsson, Alf

    2013-10-15

    Portable biosensor systems would benefit from reduced dependency on external power supplies as well as from further miniaturization and increased detection rate. Systems built around self-propelled biological molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments hold significant promise in these regards as they are built from nanoscale components that enable nanoseparation independent of fluidic pumping. Previously reported microtubule-kinesin based devices are slow, however, compared to several existing biosensor systems. Here we demonstrate that this speed limitation can be overcome by using the faster actomyosin motor system. Moreover, due to lower flexural rigidity of the actin filaments, smaller features can be achieved compared to microtubule-based systems, enabling further miniaturization. Using a device designed through optimization by Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate extensive myosin driven enrichment of actin filaments on a detector area of less than 10 μm², with a concentration half-time of approximately 40 s. We also show accumulation of model analyte (streptavidin at nanomolar concentration in nanoliter effective volume) detecting increased fluorescence intensity within seconds after initiation of motor-driven transportation from capture regions. We discuss further optimizations of the system and incorporation into a complete biosensing workflow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Maximum directionality and systematic classification of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Wang, Zhisong

    2011-03-21

    Track-walking molecular motors are widely used in living cells for transport purposes, and artificial mimics are being vigorously pursued in engineered molecular systems. The defining character for a motor is its intrinsic capability to utilize energy input to rectify a sustained directional motion out of stochastic thermal motion. The energy injection can be coupled to a motor's mechanical steps in different ways, leading to different motor mechanisms. We derive here a formulation for maximum motor performance in terms of a new quantity called directionality based on a general representation of the track-walking motors. Compared to performance measures like velocity and processivity, directionality is a cleaner and more robust indicator of the rectification mechanism that amounts to a motor's inner design/working principles. Meaningful and distinctly different upper limits of directionality were found to exist for a wide variety of experimentally demonstrated and theoretically proposed motors and their biological counterparts. The maximum directionality provides a conceptual framework by which all of these different motors were quantitatively compared and systematically classified according to their mechanistic advancement. The results yield a series of guidelines for artificial motor development, and expose important evolutionary traits of biomotors.

  3. Third-Generation Light-Driven Symmetric Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Štacko, Peter; Roke, Diederik; Wolters, Alexander T; Heideman, G Henrieke; Chang, Mu-Chieh; van der Meulen, Pieter; Visser, Johan; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-07-19

    Symmetric molecular motors based on two overcrowded alkenes with a notable absence of a stereogenic center show potential to function as novel mechanical systems in the development of more advanced nanomachines offering controlled motion over surfaces. Elucidation of the key parameters and limitations of these third-generation motors is essential for the design of optimized molecular machines based on light-driven rotary motion. Herein we demonstrate the thermal and photochemical rotational behavior of a series of third-generation light-driven molecular motors. The steric hindrance of the core unit exerted upon the rotors proved pivotal in controlling the speed of rotation, where a smaller size results in lower barriers. The presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon center provides the motor with unidirectionality. Tuning of the steric effects of the substituents at the bridgehead allows for the precise control of the direction of disrotary motion, illustrated by the design of two motors which show opposite rotation with respect to a methyl substituent. A third-generation molecular motor with the potential to be the fastest based on overcrowded alkenes to date was used to visualize the equal rate of rotation of both its rotor units. The autonomous rotational behavior perfectly followed the predicted model, setting the stage for more advanced motors for functional dynamic systems.

  4. Molecular motors: thermodynamics and the random walk.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, N.; Imafuku, Y.; Tawada, K.

    2001-01-01

    The biochemical cycle of a molecular motor provides the essential link between its thermodynamics and kinetics. The thermodynamics of the cycle determine the motor's ability to perform mechanical work, whilst the kinetics of the cycle govern its stochastic behaviour. We concentrate here on tightly coupled, processive molecular motors, such as kinesin and myosin V, which hydrolyse one molecule of ATP per forward step. Thermodynamics require that, when such a motor pulls against a constant load f, the ratio of the forward and backward products of the rate constants for its cycle is exp [-(DeltaG + u(0)f)/kT], where -DeltaG is the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis and u(0) is the motor's step size. A hypothetical one-state motor can therefore act as a chemically driven ratchet executing a biased random walk. Treating this random walk as a diffusion problem, we calculate the forward velocity v and the diffusion coefficient D and we find that its randomness parameter r is determined solely by thermodynamics. However, real molecular motors pass through several states at each attachment site. They satisfy a modified diffusion equation that follows directly from the rate equations for the biochemical cycle and their effective diffusion coefficient is reduced to D-v(2)tau, where tau is the time-constant for the motor to reach the steady state. Hence, the randomness of multistate motors is reduced compared with the one-state case and can be used for determining tau. Our analysis therefore demonstrates the intimate relationship between the biochemical cycle, the force-velocity relation and the random motion of molecular motors. PMID:11600075

  5. Collective dynamics of interacting molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Campàs, O; Kafri, Y; Zeldovich, K B; Casademunt, J; Joanny, J-F

    2006-07-21

    The collective dynamics of N interacting processive molecular motors are considered theoretically when an external force is applied to the leading motor. We show, using a discrete lattice model, that the force-velocity curves strongly depend on the effective dynamic interactions between motors and differ significantly from those of a simple approach where the motors equally share the force. Moreover, they become essentially independent of the number of motors if N is large enough (N> or approximately 5 for conventional kinesin). We show that a two-state ratchet model has a very similar behavior to that of the coarse-grained lattice model with effective interactions. The general picture is unaffected by motor attachment and detachment events.

  6. Tetrapodal molecular switches and motors: synthesis and photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuang-Yen; Wezenberg, Sander J; Carroll, Gregory T; London, Gábor; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pijper, Thomas C; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-08-01

    The design, synthesis, and dynamic behavior of a series of novel tetrapodal molecular switches and motors containing common functional groups for attachment to various inorganic and organic surfaces are presented. Using a Diels-Alder reaction, an anthracene unit with four functionalized alkyl substituents ("legs") was coupled to maleimide-functionalized molecular switches or motors under ambient conditions. Terminal functional groups at the "legs" include thioacetates and azides, making these switches and motors ideal candidates for attachment to metallic or alkyne-functionalized surfaces. UV/vis absorption spectroscopy shows that the molecular switches and motors retain their ability to undergo reversible photoinduced and/or thermally induced structural changes after attachment to the tetrapodal anthracene.

  7. Development of an electrically driven molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colin J; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-10-01

    For molecules to be used as components in molecular machinery, methods are required that couple individual molecules to external energy sources in order to selectively excite motion in a given direction. While significant progress has been made in the construction of synthetic molecular motors powered by light and by chemical reactions, there are few experimental examples of electrically driven molecular motors. To this end, we pioneered the use of a new, stable and tunable molecular rotor system based on surface-bound thioethers to comprehensively study many aspects of molecular rotation. As biological molecular motors often operate at interfaces, our synthetic system is especially amenable to microscopic interrogation as compared to solution-based systems. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory, we studied the rotation of surface-bound thioethers, which can be induced either thermally or by electrons from the STM tip in a two-terminal setup. Moreover, the temperature and electron flux can be adjusted to allow each rotational event to be monitored at the molecular scale in real time. This work culminated in the first experimental demonstration of a single-molecule electric motor, where the electrically driven rotation of a butyl methyl sulfide molecule adsorbed on a copper surface could be directionally biased. The direction and rate of the rotation are related to the chirality of both the molecule and the STM tip (which serves as the electrode), illustrating the importance of the symmetry of the metal contacts in atomic-scale electrical devices.

  8. Unidirectional rotary motion in achiral molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Štacko, Peter; Visser, Johan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2015-11-01

    Control of the direction of motion is an essential feature of biological rotary motors and results from the intrinsic chirality of the amino acids from which the motors are made. In synthetic autonomous light-driven rotary motors, point chirality is transferred to helical chirality, and this governs their unidirectional rotation. However, achieving directional rotary motion in an achiral molecular system in an autonomous fashion remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we report an achiral molecular motor in which the presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon atom proved to be sufficient for exclusive autonomous disrotary motion of two appended rotor moieties. Isomerization around the two double bonds enables both rotors to move in the same direction with respect to their surroundings—like wheels on an axle—demonstrating that autonomous unidirectional rotary motion can be achieved in a symmetric system.

  9. Unidirectional rotary motion in achiral molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Štacko, Peter; Visser, Johan; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-11-01

    Control of the direction of motion is an essential feature of biological rotary motors and results from the intrinsic chirality of the amino acids from which the motors are made. In synthetic autonomous light-driven rotary motors, point chirality is transferred to helical chirality, and this governs their unidirectional rotation. However, achieving directional rotary motion in an achiral molecular system in an autonomous fashion remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we report an achiral molecular motor in which the presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon atom proved to be sufficient for exclusive autonomous disrotary motion of two appended rotor moieties. Isomerization around the two double bonds enables both rotors to move in the same direction with respect to their surroundings--like wheels on an axle--demonstrating that autonomous unidirectional rotary motion can be achieved in a symmetric system.

  10. Single rotating molecule-machines: nanovehicles and molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Rapenne, Gwénaël; Joachim, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade many molecular machines with controlled molecular motions have been synthesized. In the present review chapter we will present and discuss our contribution to the field, in particular through some examples of rotating molecular machines that have been designed, synthesized, and studied in our group. After starting by explaining why it is so important to study such machines as single molecules, we will focus on two families of molecular machines, nanovehicles and molecular motors. The first members of the nanovehicle family are molecules with two triptycenes as wheels: the axle and the wheelbarrow. Then come the four-wheel nanocars. Since triptycene wheels are not very mobile on metallic surfaces, alternative wheels with a bowl-shape structure have also been synthesized and studied on surfaces. The molecular motors are built around ruthenium organometallic centers and have a piano-stool geometry with peripheric ferrocenyl groups.

  11. Universal optimal working cycles of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Wang, Zhisong

    2011-04-07

    Molecular motors capable of directional track-walking or rotation are abundant in living cells, and inspire the emerging field of artificial nanomotors. Some biomotors can convert 90% of free energy from chemical fuels into usable mechanical work, and the same motors still maintain a speed sufficient for cellular functions. This study exposed a new regime of universal optimization that amounts to a thermodynamically best working regime for molecular motors but is unfamiliar in macroscopic engines. For the ideal case of zero energy dissipation, the universally optimized working cycle for molecular motors is infinitely slow like Carnot cycle for heat engines. But when a small amount of energy dissipation reduces energy efficiency linearly from 100%, the speed is recovered exponentially due to Boltzmann's law. Experimental data on a major biomotor (kinesin) suggest that the regime of universal optimization has been largely approached in living cells, underpinning the extreme efficiency-speed trade-off in biomotors. The universal optimization and its practical approachability are unique thermodynamic advantages of molecular systems over macroscopic engines in facilitating motor functions. The findings have important implications for the natural evolution of biomotors as well as the development of artificial counterparts.

  12. Mechanochemical models of processive molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ganhui; Sun, Sean X.

    2012-05-01

    Motor proteins are the molecular engines powering the living cell. These nanometre-sized molecules convert chemical energy, both enthalpic and entropic, into useful mechanical work. High resolution single molecule experiments can now observe motor protein movement with increasing precision. The emerging data must be combined with structural and kinetic measurements to develop a quantitative mechanism. This article describes a modelling framework where quantitative understanding of motor behaviour can be developed based on the protein structure. The framework is applied to myosin motors, with emphasis on how synchrony between motor domains give rise to processive unidirectional movement. The modelling approach shows that the elasticity of protein domains are important in regulating motor function. Simple models of protein domain elasticity are presented. The framework can be generalized to other motor systems, or an ensemble of motors such as muscle contraction. Indeed, for hundreds of myosins, our framework can be reduced to the Huxely-Simmons description of muscle movement in the mean-field limit.

  13. Controlled clockwise and anticlockwise rotational switching of a molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Perera, U G E; Ample, F; Kersell, H; Zhang, Y; Vives, G; Echeverria, J; Grisolia, M; Rapenne, G; Joachim, C; Hla, S-W

    2013-01-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines. However, the parallels between the two systems are often only superficial, because most molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, rotary molecular motors powered by light and chemical energy have been developed. In electrically driven motors, tunnelling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope have been used to drive the rotation of a simple rotor in a single direction and to move a four-wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a stand-alone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or anticlockwise direction by selective inelastic electron tunnelling through different subunits of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotor for controlled rotations, and a ruthenium atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation arises from sawtooth-like rotational potentials, which are solely determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site.

  14. Controlled clockwise and anticlockwise rotational switching of a molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, U. G. E.; Ample, F.; Kersell, H.; Zhang, Y.; Vives, G.; Echeverria, J.; Grisolia, M.; Rapenne, G.; Joachim, C.; Hla, S.-W.

    2013-01-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines. However, the parallels between the two systems are often only superficial, because most molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, rotary molecular motors powered by light and chemical energy have been developed. In electrically driven motors, tunnelling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope have been used to drive the rotation of a simple rotor in a single direction and to move a four-wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a stand-alone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or anticlockwise direction by selective inelastic electron tunnelling through different subunits of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotor for controlled rotations, and a ruthenium atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation arises from sawtooth-like rotational potentials, which are solely determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site.

  15. Controlled Rotation and Manipulation of Individual Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersell, Heath; Perera, U. G. E.; Ample, F.; Zhang, Y.; Vives, G.; Echeverria, J.; Grisolia, M.; Rapenne, G.; Joachim, C.; Hla, S.-W.

    2015-03-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines, but the parallels between the two are frequently only superficial because many molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, chemically and light driven rotary molecular motors have been developed. For electrically driven motors, tunneling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) have been used to drive rotation in a simple rotor into a single direction and to move a wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a single standalone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction [1] by selective inelastic electron tunneling through different sub-units of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotator for controlled rotations, and a Ru atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation originates from saw-tooth-like rotational potentials, which are determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site. This project is supported by the US DOE, BES grant: DE-FG02-02ER46012.

  16. Molecular motors: strategies to get along.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Roop; Gross, Steven P

    2004-11-23

    The majority of active transport in the cell is driven by three classes of molecular motors: the kinesin and dynein families that move toward the plus-end and minus-end of microtubules, respectively, and the unconventional myosin motors that move along actin filaments. Each class of motor has different properties, but in the cell they often function together. In this review we summarize what is known about their single-molecule properties and the possibilities for regulation of such properties. In view of new results on cytoplasmic dynein, we attempt to rationalize how these different classes of motors might work together as part of the intracellular transport machinery. We propose that kinesin and myosin are robust and highly efficient transporters, but with somewhat limited room for regulation of function. Because cytoplasmic dynein is less efficient and robust, to achieve function comparable to the other motors it requires a number of accessory proteins as well as multiple dyneins functioning together. This necessity for additional factors, as well as dynein's inherent complexity, in principle allows for greatly increased control of function by taking the factors away either singly or in combination. Thus, dynein's contribution relative to the other motors can be dynamically tuned, allowing the motors to function together differently in a variety of situations.

  17. Mechanoregulation of molecular motors in flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelha, Hermes

    2014-11-01

    Molecular motors are nano-biological machines responsible for exerting forces that drive movement in living organisms, from cargo transport to cell division and motility. Interestingly, despite the inherent complexity of many interacting motors, order and structure may arise naturally, as exemplified by the harmonic, self-organized undulatory motion of the flagellum. The real mechanisms behind this collective spontaneous oscillation are still unknown, and it is challenging task to measure experimentally the molecular motor dynamics within the flagellar structure in real time. In this talk we will explore different competing hypotheses that are capable of generating flagellar bending waves that ``resemble'' in-vitro observations, emphasizing the need for further mathematical analysis and model validation. It also highlight that this is a fertile and challenging area of inter-disciplinary research for applied mathematicians and demonstrates the importance of future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics of these motile cell appendages.

  18. Remote control of molecular motors using light-activated gearshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Zev

    2013-03-01

    Engineering molecular motors with dynamically controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in vivo and provide sophisticated components for directed nanoscale transport in vitro. We previously constructed myosin motors that respond to a change in [Ca++] by reversing their direction of motion along the polarized actin filament. To expand the potential applications of controllable molecular motors, we have now developed myosins that shift gears in response to blue light illumination. Light is a versatile control signal that can be readily modulated in time and space, and is generally orthogonal to cellular signaling. Using structure-guided protein engineering, we have incorporated LOV photoreceptor domains into the lever arms of chimeric myosins, resulting in motors that robustly speed up, slow down, or switch directions upon illumination. These genetically encoded motors should be directly deployable inside living cells. Our successful designs include constructs based on two different myosin classes, and we show that optical velocity control can be implemented in motors that move at microns/sec speeds, enabling practical biological and bioengineering applications.

  19. Patterns of molecular motors that guide and sort filaments.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Beat; Nédélec, François

    2012-11-21

    Molecular motors can be immobilized to transport filaments and loads that are attached to these filaments inside a nano-device. However, if motors are distributed uniformly over a flat surface, the motility is undirected, and the filaments move equally in all directions. For many applications it is important to control the direction in which the filaments move, and two strategies have been explored to achieve this: applying external forces and confining the filaments inside channels. In this article, we discuss a third strategy in which the topography of the sample remains flat, but the motors are distributed non-uniformly over the surface. Systems of filaments and patterned molecular motors were simulated using a stochastic engine that included Brownian motion and filament bending elasticity. Using an evolutionary algorithm, patterns were optimized for their capacity to precisely control the paths of the filaments. We identified patterns of motors that could either direct the filaments in a particular direction, or separate short and long filaments. These functionalities already exceed what has been achieved with confinement. The patterns are composed of one or two types of motors positioned in lines or along arcs and should be easy to manufacture. Finally, these patterns can be easily combined into larger designs, allowing one to precisely control the motion of microscopic objects inside a device.

  20. Hopping and stalling of processive molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Imafuku, Yasuhiro; Thomas, Neil; Tawada, Katsuhisa

    2009-11-07

    When a two-headed molecular motor such as kinesin is attached to its track by just a single head in the presence of an applied load, thermally activated head detachment followed by rapid re-attachment at another binding site can cause the motor to 'hop' backwards. Such hopping, on its own, would produce a linear force-velocity relation. However, for kinesin, we must incorporate hopping into the motor's alternating-head scheme, where we expect it to be most important for the state prior to neck-linker docking. We show that hopping can account for the backward steps, run length and stalling of conventional kinesin. In particular, although hopping does not hydrolyse ATP, we find that the hopping rate obeys the same Michaelis-Menten relation as the ATP hydrolysis rate. Hopping can also account for the reduced processivity observed in kinesins with mutations in their tubulin-binding loop. Indeed, it may provide a general mechanism for the breakdown of perfect processivity in two-headed molecular motors.

  1. Molecular motors and membrane traffic in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Ma, S; Fey, P; Chisholm, R L

    2001-03-15

    Phagocytosis and membrane traffic in general are largely dependent on the cytoskeleton and their associated molecular motors. The myosin family of motors, especially the unconventional myosins, interact with the actin cortex to facilitate the internalization of external materials during the early steps of phagocytosis. Members of the kinesin and dynein motor families, which mediate transport along microtubules (MTs), facilitate the intracellular processing of the internalized materials and the movement of membrane. Recent studies indicate that some unconventional myosins are also involved in membrane transport, and that the MT- and actin-dependent transport systems might interact with each other. Studies in Dictyostelium have led to the discovery of many motors involved in critical steps of phagocytosis and membrane transport. With the ease of genetic and biochemical approaches, the established functional analysis to test phagocytosis and vesicle transport, and the effort of the Dictyostelium cDNA and Genome Projects, Dictyostelium will continue to be a superb model system to study phagocytosis in particular and cytoskeleton and motors in general.

  2. Asymmetric synthesis of first generation molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Thomas M; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Zhao, Depeng; Lubbe, Anouk S; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-08-15

    A general enantioselective route to functionalized first generation molecular motors is described. An enantioselective protonation of the silyl enol ethers of indanones by a Au(I)BINAP complex sets the stage for a highly diastereoselective McMurry coupling as a second enhancement step for enantiomeric excess. In this way various functionalized overcrowded alkenes could be synthesized in good yields (up to 78%) and good to excellent enantiomeric excess (85% ee->98% ee) values.

  3. How molecular motors work – insights from the molecular machinist's toolbox: the Nobel prize in Chemistry 2016

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R. D.

    2017-01-01

    The Nobel prize in Chemistry for 2016 was awarded to Jean Pierre Sauvage, Sir James Fraser Stoddart, and Bernard (Ben) Feringa for their contributions to the design and synthesis of molecular machines. While this field is still in its infancy, and at present there are no commercial applications, many observers have stressed the tremendous potential of molecular machines to revolutionize technology. However, perhaps the most important result so far accruing from the synthesis of molecular machines is the insight provided into the fundamental mechanisms by which molecular motors, including biological motors such as kinesin, myosin, FoF1 ATPase, and the flagellar motor, function. The ability to “tinker” with separate components of molecular motors allows asking, and answering, specific questions about mechanism, particularly with regard to light driven vs. chemistry driven molecular motors. PMID:28572896

  4. Molecular rotors and motors: recent advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Michl, Josef; Sykes, E Charles H

    2009-05-26

    At the "Molecular Rotors and Motors" symposium of the Spring 2009 ACS National Meeting in Salt Lake City (March 22-26), a diverse mix of talks addressed many current issues in the field. Speakers described topics that varied from single-molecule rotors and nanomachines to exquisite synthetic approaches toward building functional materials and mathematical and computational methods aimed at uncovering design opportunities and highlighting the fundamental limitations of molecular motors. While the realization of building useful nanomachines remains far off, a general consensus abounded that investigating biological systems and understanding the implications of the laws of thermodynamics and quantum mechanics for the behavior of nanostructures will help drive important advances in the quest for molecular machinery. Molecular rotors were demonstrated to have practical applications as probes for microviscosity, and many speakers presented experimental studies that indicated that highly directed translation and rotation of individual molecules, as well as interacting dipolar arrays, are just around the corner. While this Nano Focus is not intended to be a comprehensive review of the subject, it will focus on several key advances that were presented at the ACS meeting and highlight future challenges for the field of molecular rotors and motors.

  5. Statistical kinetics of processive molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Mark Jacob

    1999-10-01

    We describe new theoretical and experimental tools for studying biological motor proteins at the single molecule scale. These tools enable measurements of molecular fuel economies, thereby providing insight into the pathways for conversion of biochemical energy into mechanical work. Kinesin is an ATP-dependent motor that moves processively along microtubules in discrete steps of 8 nm. How many molecules of ATP are hydrolysed per step? To determine this coupling ratio, we develop a fluctuation analysis, which relates the variance in records of mechanical displacement to the number of rate-limiting biochemical transitions in the engine cycle. Using fluctuation analysis and optical trapping interferometry, we determine that near zero load, single molecules of kinesin hydrolyse one ATP nucleotide per 8-nm step. To study kinesin behavior under load, we use a molecular force clamp, capable of maintaining constant loads on single kinesin motors moving processively. Analysis of records of motion under variable ATP concentrations and loads reveals that kinesin is a `tightly- coupled' motor, maintaining the 1:1 coupling ratio up to loads of ~ 5 pN. Moreover, a Michaelis-Menten analysis of velocity shows that the kinesin cycle contains at least two load- dependent transitions. The rate of one of these transitions affects ATP affinity, while the other does not. Therefore, the kinesin stall force must depend on the ATP concentration, as is demonstrated experimentally. These findings rule out existing theoretical models of kinesin motility. We develop a simple theoretical formalism describing a tightly-coupled mechanism for movement. This `energy-landscape' formalism quantitatively accounts for motile properties of RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme that transcribes DNA into RNA. The shapes of RNAP force-velocity curves indicate that biochemical steps limiting transcription rates at low loads do not generate movement. Modeling suggests that high loads may halt RNAP by promoting a

  6. High-Pressure Microscopy for Studying Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Movement is a fundamental characteristic of all living things. This biogenic function is carried out by various nanometer-sized molecular machines. Molecular motor is a typical molecular machinery in which the characteristic features of proteins are integrated; these include enzymatic activity, energy conversion, molecular recognition and self-assembly. These biologically important reactions occur with the association of water molecules that surround the motors. Applied pressures can alter the intermolecular interactions between the motors and water. In this chapter we describe the development of a high-pressure microscope and a new motility assay that enables the visualization of the motility of molecular motors under conditions of high-pressure. Our results demonstrate that applied pressure dynamically changes the motility of molecular motors such as kinesin, F1-ATPase and bacterial flagellar motors.

  7. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Boon, N J; Hoyle, R B

    2012-08-28

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)] on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  8. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, N. J.; Hoyle, R. B.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)], 10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  9. Theoretical analysis of dynamic processes for interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-01

    Biological transport is supported by the collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by carrying out an analysis of a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes, in which interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. This allows us to explicitly connect microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. A theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that the dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on the interactions, and that the correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motor transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  10. Theoretical Analysis of Dynamic Processes for Interacting Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-13

    Biological transport is supported by collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by analyzing a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes where interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. It allows us to connect explicitly microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. Theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on interactions, and correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motors transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  11. The Art of Building Small: From Molecular Switches to Motors (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Feringa, Ben L

    2017-09-04

    A journey into the nano-world: The ability to design, use and control motor-like functions at the molecular level sets the stage for numerous dynamic molecular systems. In his Nobel Lecture, B. L. Feringa describes the evolution of the field of molecular motors and explains how to program and control molecules by incorporating responsive and adaptive properties. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Reprogrammable Assembly of Molecular Motor on Solid Surfaces via Dynamic Bonds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Sun, Jian; Wang, Qian; Guan, Yan; Zhou, Le; Zhang, Jingxuan; Zhang, Lanying; Yang, Huai

    2017-06-01

    Controllable assembly of molecular motors on solid surfaces is a fundamental issue for providing them to perform physical tasks. However, it can hardly be achieved by most previous methods due to their inherent limitations. Here, a general strategy is designed for the reprogrammable assembly of molecular motors on solid surfaces based on dynamic bonds. In this method, molecular motors with disulfide bonds can be remotely, reversibly, and precisely attached to solid surfaces with disulfide bonds, regardless of their chemical composition and microstructure. More importantly, it not only allows encoding geometric information referring to a pattern of molecular motors, but also enables erasing and re-encoding of geometric information via hemolytic photocleavage and recombination of disulfide bonds. Thus, solid surfaces can be regarded as "computer hardware", where molecular motors can be reformatted and reprogramed as geometric information. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Chiral Hydrogen Bond Environment Providing Unidirectional Rotation in Photoactive Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    García-Iriepa, Cristina; Marazzi, Marco; Zapata, Felipe; Valentini, Alessio; Sampedro, Diego; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2013-05-02

    Generation of a chiral hydrogen bond environment in efficient molecular photoswitches is proposed as a novel strategy for the design of photoactive molecular motors. Here, the following strategy is used to design a retinal-based motor presenting singular properties: (i) a single excitation wavelength is needed to complete the unidirectional rotation process (360°); (ii) the absence of any thermal step permits the process to take place at low temperatures; and (iii) the ultrafast process permits high rotational frequencies.

  14. Thermodynamics and kinetics of a molecular motor ensemble.

    PubMed

    Baker, J E; Thomas, D D

    2000-10-01

    If, contrary to conventional models of muscle, it is assumed that molecular forces equilibrate among rather than within molecular motors, an equation of state and an expression for energy output can be obtained for a near-equilibrium, coworking ensemble of molecular motors. These equations predict clear, testable relationships between motor structure, motor biochemistry, and ensemble motor function, and we discuss these relationships in the context of various experimental studies. In this model, net work by molecular motors is performed with the relaxation of a near-equilibrium intermediate step in a motor-catalyzed reaction. The free energy available for work is localized to this step, and the rate at which this free energy is transferred to work is accelerated by the free energy of a motor-catalyzed reaction. This thermodynamic model implicitly deals with a motile cell system as a dynamic network (not a rigid lattice) of molecular motors within which the mechanochemistry of one motor influences and is influenced by the mechanochemistry of other motors in the ensemble.

  15. Thermodynamics and kinetics of a molecular motor ensemble.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J E; Thomas, D D

    2000-01-01

    If, contrary to conventional models of muscle, it is assumed that molecular forces equilibrate among rather than within molecular motors, an equation of state and an expression for energy output can be obtained for a near-equilibrium, coworking ensemble of molecular motors. These equations predict clear, testable relationships between motor structure, motor biochemistry, and ensemble motor function, and we discuss these relationships in the context of various experimental studies. In this model, net work by molecular motors is performed with the relaxation of a near-equilibrium intermediate step in a motor-catalyzed reaction. The free energy available for work is localized to this step, and the rate at which this free energy is transferred to work is accelerated by the free energy of a motor-catalyzed reaction. This thermodynamic model implicitly deals with a motile cell system as a dynamic network (not a rigid lattice) of molecular motors within which the mechanochemistry of one motor influences and is influenced by the mechanochemistry of other motors in the ensemble. PMID:11023881

  16. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  17. An electromechanical model of myosin molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tadashi

    2003-12-21

    There is a long-running debate on the working mechanism of myosin molecular motors, which, by interacting with actin filaments, convert the chemical energy of ATP into a variety of mechanical work. After the development of technologies for observing and manipulating individual working molecules, experimental results negating the widely accepted 'lever-arm hypothesis' have been reported. In this paper, based on the experimental results so far accumulated, an alternative hypothesis is proposed, in which motor molecules are modelled as electromechanical components that interact with each other through electrostatic force. Electrostatic attractive force between myosin and actin is assumed to cause a conformational change in the myosin head during the attachment process. An elastic energy resulting from the conformational change then produces the power stroke. The energy released at the ATP hydrolysis is mainly used to detach the myosin head from actin filaments. The mechanism presented in this paper is compatible with the experimental results contradictory to the previous theories. It also explains the behavior of myosins V and VI, which are engaged in cellular transport and move processively along actin filaments.

  18. Length regulation of active biopolymers by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Johann, Denis; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Kruse, Karsten

    2012-06-22

    For biopolymers like cytoskeletal actin filaments and microtubules, assembly and disassembly are inherently dissipative processes. Molecular motors can affect the rates of subunit removal at filament ends. We introduce a driven lattice-gas model to study the effects of motor-induced depolymerization on the length of active biopolymers and find that increasing motor activity sharpens unimodal steady-state length distributions. Furthermore, for sufficiently fast moving motors, the relative width of the length distribution is determined only by the attachment rate of motors. Our results show how established molecular processes can be used to robustly regulate the size of cytoskeletal structures like mitotic spindles.

  19. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons.

  20. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons. PMID:27570482

  1. Universal aspects of the chemomechanical coupling for molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Lipowsky, R

    2000-11-13

    The directed movement of molecular motors is studied theoretically within a general class of nonuniform ratchet models in which the motor can attain M internal states and undergo transitions between these states at K spatial locations. The functional relationship between the motor velocity and the concentration of the fuel molecule is analyzed for arbitrary values of M and K. This relationship is found to exhibit universal features which depend on the number of unbalanced transitions per motor cycle arising from the enzymatic motor activity. This agrees with experimental results on dimeric kinesin and is predicted to apply to other cytoskeletal motors.

  2. Distinct transport regimes for two elastically coupled molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2012-05-18

    Cooperative cargo transport by two molecular motors involves an elastic motor-motor coupling, which can reduce the motors' velocity and/or enhance their unbinding from the filament. We show theoretically that these interference effects lead, in general, to four distinct transport regimes. In addition to a weak coupling regime, kinesin and dynein motors are found to exhibit a strong coupling and an enhanced unbinding regime, whereas myosin motors are predicted to attain a reduced velocity regime. All of these regimes, which we derive by explicit calculations and general time scale arguments, can be explored experimentally by varying the elastic coupling strength.

  3. A general two-cycle network model of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2009-09-01

    Molecular motors are single macromolecules that generate forces at the piconewton range and nanometer scale. They convert chemical energy into mechanical work by moving along filamentous structures. In this paper, we study the velocity of two-head molecular motors in the framework of a mechanochemical network theory. The network model, a generalization of the recently work of Liepelt and Lipowsky [Steffen Liepelt, Reinhard Lipowsky, Kinesins network of chemomechanical motor cycles, Physical Review Letters 98 (25) (2007) 258102], is based on the discrete mechanochemical states of a molecular motor with multiple cycles. By generalizing the mathematical method developed by Fisher and Kolomeisky for a single cycle motor [Michael E. Fisher, Anatoly B. Kolomeisky, Simple mechanochemistry describes the dynamics of kinesin molecules, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 98 (14) (2001) 7748-7753], we are able to obtain an explicit formula for the velocity of a molecular motor.

  4. Design and characterization of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yener, Serra

    This thesis presents modeling and prototype fabrication and characterization of new types of piezoelectric ultrasonic micromotors. Our approach in designing these piezoelectric motors was: (i) to simplify the structure including the poling configuration of piezoelectric elements used in the stator and (ii) to reduce the number of components in order to decrease the cost and enhance the driving reliability. There are two different types of piezoelectric motors designed throughout this research. The first of these designs consists of a metal tube, on which two piezoelectric ceramic plates poled in thickness direction, were bonded. Two orthogonal bending modes of the hollow cylinder were superimposed resulting in a rotational vibration. Since the structure and poling configuration of the active piezoelectric elements used in the stator are simple, this motor structure is very suitable for miniaturization. Moreover, a single driving source can excite two bending modes at the same time, thus generate a wobble motion. Three types of prototypes are included in this design. The piezoelectric stator structure is the same for all. However, the dimensions of the motors are reduced by almost 50 percent. Starting with a 10 mm long stator, we reached to 4 mm in the last prototype. The initial diameter was 2.4 mm, which was reduced to 1.6 mm. In the final design, the rotor part of the motor was changed resulting in the reduction in the number of components. In terms of driving circuit, a single driving source was enough to run the motors and a conventional switching power supply type resonant L-C circuit was used. A simple motor structure with a simple driving circuit were combined successfully and fabricated inexpensively. The second design is a shear type piezoelectric linear motor. The behavior of a single rectangular piezoelectric shear plate was analyzed and after optimizing the dimensions and the mode characteristics, a prototype was fabricated. The prototype consists of

  5. Construction of a Chassis for a Tripartite Protein-Based Molecular Motor.

    PubMed

    Small, Lara S R; Bruning, Marc; Thomson, Andrew R; Boyle, Aimee L; Davies, Roberta B; Curmi, Paul M G; Forde, Nancy R; Linke, Heiner; Woolfson, Derek N; Bromley, Elizabeth H C

    2017-03-14

    Improving our understanding of biological motors, both to fully comprehend their activities in vital processes, and to exploit their impressive abilities for use in bionanotechnology, is highly desirable. One means of understanding these systems is through the production of synthetic molecular motors. We demonstrate the use of orthogonal coiled-coil dimers (including both parallel and antiparallel coiled coils) as a hub for linking other components of a previously described synthetic molecular motor, the Tumbleweed. We use circular dichroism, analytical ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, and disulfide rearrangement studies to demonstrate the ability of this six-peptide set to form the structure designed for the Tumbleweed motor. The successful formation of a suitable hub structure is both a test of the transferability of design rules for protein folding as well as an important step in the production of a synthetic protein-based molecular motor.

  6. Improve Motor Operation at Off-Design Voltages - Motor Tip Sheet #9

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Motors are designed to operate within +/- 10% of their nameplate rated voltages. When motors operate at conditions of over- or under-voltage, motor efficiency and other performance parameters are degraded.

  7. Optical Traps to Study Properties of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Rice, Sarah E.; Rock, Ronald S.; Purcell, Thomas J.; Warrick, Hans M.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This article describes the use of optical traps to study processive and nonprocessive molecular motor proteins, focusing on the design of the instrument and the assays to characterize motility. PMID:22046048

  8. Motor Proteins and Molecular Motors: How to Operate Machines at Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-01-01

    Several classes of biological molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical work are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. These nanometer-sized machines operate in noisy stochastic isothermal environment, strongly supporting fundamental cellular processes such as transfer of genetic information, transport, organization and functioning. In last two decades motor proteins have become a subject of intense research efforts that were aimed to uncover fundamental principles and mechanisms of molecular motors dynamics. In this review, we critically discuss a recent progress in experimental and theoretical studies on motor proteins. Our focus is on analyzing fundamental concepts and ideas that have been utilized for explaining non-equilibrium nature and mechanisms of molecular motors. PMID:24100357

  9. Motor proteins and molecular motors: how to operate machines at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2013-11-20

    Several classes of biological molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical work are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. These nanometer-sized machines operate in noisy stochastic isothermal environments, strongly supporting fundamental cellular processes such as the transfer of genetic information, transport, organization and functioning. In the past two decades motor proteins have become a subject of intense research efforts, aimed at uncovering the fundamental principles and mechanisms of molecular motor dynamics. In this review, we critically discuss recent progress in experimental and theoretical studies on motor proteins. Our focus is on analyzing fundamental concepts and ideas that have been utilized to explain the non-equilibrium nature and mechanisms of molecular motors.

  10. Collective alignment of polar filaments by molecular motors.

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebert, F.; Aranson, I. S.; Vershinin, M.; Gross, S. P.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of California at Irvine

    2009-04-01

    We study the alignment of polar biofilaments, such as microtubules and actin, subject to the action of multiple molecular motors attached simultaneously to more than one filament. Focusing on a paradigm model of only two filaments interacting with multiple motors, we were able to investigate in detail the alignment dynamics. While almost no alignment occurs in the case of a single motor, the filaments become rapidly aligned due to the collective action of the motors. Our analysis shows that the alignment time is governed by the number of bound motors and the magnitude of the motors stepping fluctuations. We predict that the time scale of alignment is in the order of seconds, much faster than that reported for passive crosslink-induced bundling. In vitro experiments on the alignment of microtubules by multiple-motor covered beads are in qualitative agreement. We also discuss another mode of fast alignment of filaments, namely the cooperation between motors and passive crosslinks.

  11. Collective alignment of polar filaments by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Ziebert, F; Vershinin, M; Gross, S P; Aranson, I S

    2009-04-01

    We study the alignment of polar biofilaments, such as microtubules and actin, subject to the action of multiple molecular motors attached simultaneously to more than one filament. Focusing on a paradigm model of only two filaments interacting with multiple motors, we were able to investigate in detail the alignment dynamics. While almost no alignment occurs in the case of a single motor, the filaments become rapidly aligned due to the collective action of the motors. Our analysis shows that the alignment time is governed by the number of bound motors and the magnitude of the motors' stepping fluctuations. We predict that the time scale of alignment is in the order of seconds, much faster than that reported for passive crosslink-induced bundling. In vitro experiments on the alignment of microtubules by multiple-motor covered beads are in qualitative agreement. We also discuss another mode of fast alignment of filaments, namely the cooperation between motors and passive crosslinks.

  12. Cargo transport: molecular motors navigate a complex cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jennifer L; Ali, M Yusuf; Warshaw, David M

    2008-02-01

    Intracellular cargo transport requires microtubule-based motors, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein, and the actin-based myosin motors to maneuver through the challenges presented by the filamentous meshwork that comprises the cytoskeleton. Recent in vitro single molecule biophysical studies have begun to explore this process by characterizing what occurs as these tiny molecular motors happen upon an intersection between two cytoskeletal filaments. These studies, in combination with in vivo work, define the mechanism by which molecular motors exchange cargo while traveling between filamentous tracks and deliver it to its destination when going from the cell center to the periphery and back again.

  13. Exploiting molecular motors as nanomachines: the mechanisms of de novo and re-engineered cytoskeletal motors.

    PubMed

    DelRosso, Nicole V; Derr, Nathan D

    2017-08-01

    Cytoskeletal molecular motors provide exciting proof that nanoscale transporters can be highly efficient, moving for microns along filamentous tracks by hydrolyzing ATP to fuel nanometer-size steps. For nanotechnology, such conversion of chemical energy into productive work serves as an enticing platform for re-purposing and re-engineering. It also provides a roadmap for successful molecular mechanisms that can be mimicked to create de novo molecular motors for nanotechnology applications. Here we focus specifically on how the mechanisms of molecular motors are being re-engineered for greater control over their transport parameters. We then discuss mechanistic work to create fully synthetic motors de novo and conclude with future directions in creating novel motor systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular motors as an auto-oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Ishiwata, Shin’ichi; Shimamoto, Yuta; Suzuki, Madoka

    2010-01-01

    The organization of biomotile systems possesses structural and functional hierarchy, building up from single molecules via protein assemblies and cells further up to an organ. A typical example is the hierarchy of cardiac muscle, on the top of which is the heart. The heartbeat is supported by the rhythmic contraction of the muscle cells that is controlled by the Ca2+ oscillation triggered by periodic electrical excitation of pacemaker cells. Thus, it is usually believed that the heartbeat is governed by the control system based on a sequential one-way chain with the electrical∕chemical information transfer from the upper to the lower level of hierarchy. On the other hand, it has been known for many years that the contractile system of muscle, i.e., skinned muscle fibers and myofibrils, itself possesses the auto-oscillatory properties even in the constant chemical environment. A recent paper [Plaçais, et al. (2009), Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 158102] demonstrated the auto-oscillatory movement∕tension development in an in vitro motility assay composed of a single actin filament and randomly distributed myosin II molecules, suggesting that the auto-oscillatory properties are inherent to the contractile proteins. Here we discuss how the molecular motors may acquire the higher-ordered auto-oscillatory properties while stepping up the staircase of hierarchy. PMID:21119762

  15. Helicases as molecular motors: An insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuteja, Narendra; Tuteja, Renu

    2006-12-01

    Helicases are one of the smallest motors of biological system, which harness the chemical free energy of ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the opening of energetically stable duplex nucleic acids and thereby are involved in almost all aspect of nucleic acid metabolism including replication, repair, recombination, transcription, translation, and ribosome biogenesis. Basically, they break the hydrogen bonding between the duplex helix and translocate unidirectionally along the bound strand. Mostly all the helicases contain some conserved signature motifs, which act as an engine to power the unwinding. After the discovery of the first prokaryotic DNA helicase from Escherichia coli bacteria in 1976 and the first eukaryotic one from the lily plant in 1978, many more (>100) have been isolated. All the helicases share some common properties, including nucleic acid binding, NTP hydrolysis and unwinding of the duplex. Many helicases have been crystallized and their structures have revealed an underlying common structural fold for their function. The defects in helicases gene have also been reported to be responsible for variety of human genetic disorders, which can lead to cancer, premature aging or mental retardation. Recently, a new role of a helicase in abiotic stress signaling in plant has been discovered. Overall, helicases act as essential molecular tools for cellular machinery and help in maintaining the integrity of genome. Here an overview of helicases has been covered which includes history, biochemical assay, properties, classification, role in human disease and mechanism of unwinding and translocation.

  16. Parsimonious design principles for motor unit models.

    PubMed

    Ban, Lan; Shapiro, Nicholas P; Lee, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    Motor units are known to display type-specific differences in passive and active electrical properties, and attempts to predict motor unit type based on the measurement of membrane properties have been rather successful. Quantitative models of motoneurons have also grown in complexity and their predictive power is predicated upon the accurate description of basic membrane properties. This paper presents results from a modeling study which sought to specify a small and simple set of "design rules" that motoneurons might obey during type-specific differentiation.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of single and coupled synthetic molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-M; Zuckermann, M

    2012-11-01

    We use a minimal model to study the processive motion of coupled synthetic molecular motors along a DNA track and we present data from Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulations based on this model. The model was originally proposed by Bromley et al. [HFSP J. 3, 204 (2009)] for studying the properties of a synthetic protein motor, the "Tumbleweed" (TW), and involves rigid Y-shaped motors diffusively rotating along the track while controlled by a series of periodically injected ligand pulses into the solution. The advantage of the model is that it mimics the mechanical properties of the TW motor in detail. Both the average first passage time which measures the diffusive motion of the motors, and the average dwell time on the track which measures their processivity are investigated by varying the parameters of the model. The latter includes ligand concentration and the range and strength of the binding interaction between motors and the track. In particular, it is of experimental interest to study the dependence of these dynamic time scales of the motors on the ligand concentration. Single rigid TW motors were first studied since no previous MC simulations of these motors have been performed. We first studied single motors for which we found a logarithmic decrease of the average first passage time and a logarithmic increase of the average dwell time with increasing ligand concentration. For two coupled motors, the dependence on ligand concentration is still logarithmic for the average first passage time but becomes linear for the average dwell time. This suggests a much greater stability in the processive motion of coupled motors as compared to single motors in the limit of large ligand concentration. By increasing the number of coupled motors, m, it was found that the average first passage time of the coupled motors only increases slowly with m while the average dwell time increases exponentially with m. Thus the stability of coupled motors on the track can be

  18. Fatigue failure and molecular machine design.

    PubMed

    Hess, Henry; Dumont, Emmanuel L P

    2011-06-20

    Sophisticated molecular machines have evolved in nature, and the first synthetic molecular machines have been demonstrated. With our increasing understanding of individual operating cycles, the question of how operation can be sustained over many cycles comes to the forefront. In the design of macroscale machines, performance and lifetime are opposing goals. Similarly, the natural evolution of biological nanomachines, such as myosin motor proteins, is likely constrained by lifetime requirements. Rather than bond rupture at high forces, bond fatigue under repeated small stresses may limit the mechanical performance of molecular machines. Here, the effect of cyclic stresses using single and double bonds as simple examples are discussed. Additionally, it is demonstrated that an increase in lifetime requires a reduction in mechanical load and that molecular engineering design features, such as polyvalent bonds capable of rebinding, can extend the bond lifetime dramatically. A universal scaling law for the force output of motors is extrapolated to the molecular scale to estimate the design space for molecular machines. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Designing the molecular future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gisbert

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 25 years ago the first computer applications were conceived for the purpose of automated `de novo' drug design, prominent pioneering tools being ALADDIN, CAVEAT, GENOA, and DYLOMMS. Many of these early concepts were enabled by innovative techniques for ligand-receptor interaction modeling like GRID, MCSS, DOCK, and CoMFA, which still provide the theoretical framework for several more recently developed molecular design algorithms. After a first wave of software tools and groundbreaking applications in the 1990s—expressly GROW, GrowMol, LEGEND, and LUDI representing some of the key players—we are currently witnessing a renewed strong interest in this field. Innovative ideas for both receptor and ligand-based drug design have recently been published. We here provide a personal perspective on the evolution of de novo design, highlighting some of the historic achievements as well as possible future developments of this exciting field of research, which combines multiple scientific disciplines and is, like few other areas in chemistry, subject to continuous enthusiastic discussion and compassionate dispute.

  20. Fluctuation theorem for the flashing ratchet model of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, D.; Mallick, K.

    2009-08-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into mechanical energy. A well-studied model of a molecular motor is the flashing ratchet model. We show that this model exhibits a fluctuation relation known as the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry. Our study highlights the fact that the symmetry is present only if the chemical and mechanical degrees of freedom are both included in the description.

  1. Fluctuation theorem for the flashing ratchet model of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, D; Mallick, K

    2009-08-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into mechanical energy. A well-studied model of a molecular motor is the flashing ratchet model. We show that this model exhibits a fluctuation relation known as the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry. Our study highlights the fact that the symmetry is present only if the chemical and mechanical degrees of freedom are both included in the description.

  2. Molecular motors: a traffic cop within?

    PubMed Central

    Welte, M. A.; Gross, S. P.

    2008-01-01

    Intracellular transport along microtubules is often bidirectional, employing multiple plus- and minus-end directed motors. How cells regulate such transport in time and space is a fundamental but unsolved question in cell biology. A recent paper presents a new modeling approach to predict how much of transport can be understood just from our knowledge of the motors involved. The model can generate strikingly complex patterns of motion, mimicking key aspects of cargo transport in vivo. Previous studies had inferred that plus-end motors on bidirectional cargoes are usually turned off when the minus-end motors are engaged (and vice versa). In the model, such motor coordination can arise from motors competing in a tug-of-war, without help from additional regulators. This new theoretical framework should stimulate much research that will help unravel whether regulation of intracellular transport is dominated by higher-order control mechanisms or is achieved simply by tuning basic properties of the motors themselves. PMID:19404428

  3. How molecular motors shape the flagellar beat

    PubMed Central

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.; Hilfinger, Andreas; Howard, Jonathon; Jülicher, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Cilia and eukaryotic flagella are slender cellular appendages whose regular beating propels cells and microorganisms through aqueous media. The beat is an oscillating pattern of propagating bends generated by dynein motor proteins. A key open question is how the activity of the motors is coordinated in space and time. To elucidate the nature of this coordination we inferred the mechanical properties of the motors by analyzing the shape of beating sperm: Steadily beating bull sperm were imaged and their shapes were measured with high precision using a Fourier averaging technique. Comparing our experimental data with wave forms calculated for different scenarios of motor coordination we found that only the scenario of interdoublet sliding regulating motor activity gives rise to satisfactory fits. We propose that the microscopic origin of such “sliding control” is the load dependent detachment rate of motors. Agreement between observed and calculated wave forms was obtained only if significant sliding between microtubules occurred at the base. This suggests a novel mechanism by which changes in basal compliance could reverse the direction of beat propagation. We conclude that the flagellar beat patterns are determined by an interplay of the basal properties of the axoneme and the mechanical feedback of dynein motors. PMID:19404446

  4. Design and implementation of spherical ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoaki; Toyama, Shigeki; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    We present a mechanical design and implementation of spherical ultrasonic motor (SUSM) that is an actuator with multiple rotational degrees of freedom (multi-DOF). The motor is constructed of 3 annular stators and a spherical rotor and is much smaller and simpler than conventional multi-DOF mechanisms such as gimbals using servomotors. We designed a novel SUSM using experimental data from a single annular stator and a finite element method. The SUSM using a spherical rotor of diameter 20 mm without any reduction gear has demonstrated advantages of high responsiveness, good accuracy, and high torque at low speed. The dynamic implementation of SUSM was consistent with the driving model of SUSM based on a friction drive.

  5. Molecular motor traffic: From biological nanomachines to macroscopic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard; Chai, Yan; Klumpp, Stefan; Liepelt, Steffen; Müller, Melanie J. I.

    2006-12-01

    All cells of animals and plants contain complex transport systems based on molecular motors which walk along cytoskeletal filaments. These motors are rather small and have a size of 20-100 nm but are able to pull vesicles, organelles and other types of cargo over large distances, from micrometers up to meters. There are several families of motors: kinesins, dyneins, and myosins. Most of these motors have two heads which are used as legs and perform discrete steps along the filaments. Several aspects of the motor behavior will be discussed: motor cycles of two-headed motors; walks of single motors or cargo particles which consist of directed movements interrupted by random, diffusive motion; cargo transport through tube-like compartments; active diffusion of cargo particles in slab-like compartments; cooperative transport of cargo by several motors which may be uni- or bi-directional; and systems with many interacting motors that exhibit traffic jams, self-organized density and flux patterns, and traffic phase transitions far from equilibrium. It is necessary to understand these traffic phenomena in a quantitative manner in order to construct and optimize biomimetic transport systems based on motors and filaments with many possible applications in bioengineering, pharmacology, and medicine.

  6. 175Hp contrarotating homopolar motor design report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannell, Michael J.; Drake, John L.; McConnell, Richard A.; Martino, William R.

    1994-06-01

    A normally conducting contrarotating homopolar motor has been designed and constructed. The reaction torque, in the outer rotor, from the inner rotor is utilized to produce true contrarotation. The machine utilizes liquid cooled conductors, high performance liquid metal current collectors, and ferrous conductors in the active region. The basic machine output is 175 hp at + or - 1,200 rpm with an input of 4 volts and 35,000 amps.

  7. Effect of the size of solvent molecules on the single-chain mechanics of poly(ethylene glycol): implications on a novel design of a molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhonglong; Zhang, Bo; Qian, Hu-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Cui, Shuxun

    2016-10-20

    Excluded-volume (EV) interaction, also known as the EV effect, can drive the collapse of polymer chains in a polymer solution and promote the crystallization of polymer chains. Herein we report, for the first time, the effect of EV interaction on the single-chain mechanics of a polymer, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). By using AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy, the single-chain mechanics of a PEG chain has been detected in various nonpolar organic solvents with different molecule sizes. It is observed that the nonpolar solvents can be classified into two categories. In the small-sized organic solvents (e.g., tetrachloroethane and n-nonane), PEG presents its inherent elasticity, which is consistent with the theoretical single-chain elasticity from quantum mechanical calculations. However, in the middle-sized solvents (e.g., n-dodecane and n-hexadecane), the single-chain entropic elasticity of PEG is influenced by EV interactions noticeably, which indicates that the PEG chain tends to adopt a compact conformation under these conditions. To stretch a PEG chain from a free state to a fully extended state, more energy (1.54 kBT per repeating unit) is needed in small-sized organic solvents than in middle-sized organic solvents. It is expected that a partially stretched PEG chain would shrink to some extent when the solvent is changed from a middle-sized organic solvent to a small-sized one. Accordingly, a novel design of a PEG-based single-molecule motor that works with solvent stimuli is proposed.

  8. Quantum dot labeling strategies to characterize single-molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Shane R; Ali, M Yusuf; Warshaw, David M

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule labeling and detection techniques allow high-resolution imaging of the motion of single molecules. Molecular motors are biological machines that convert chemical energy into mechanical work. Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a well-characterized processive molecular motor, essential for cargo transport in living organisms. Quantum dots (Qdots) are fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals that are extremely useful for single-molecule studies in biological sciences. High-resolution video microscopy and single-particle tracking of a Qdot-labeled MyoVa motor molecule allow the detection of individual steps in vitro and in live cells.

  9. Cooperative behavior of molecular motors: Cargo transport and traffic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard; Beeg, Janina; Dimova, Rumiana; Klumpp, Stefan; Müller, Melanie J. I.

    2010-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells including those of our own body contain complex transport systems based on molecular motors which walk along cytoskeletal filaments. These motors are rather small and make discrete mechanical steps with a step size of the order of 10 nm but are able to pull cargo particles over much larger distances, from micrometers up to meters. In vivo, the intracellular cargos include large membrane-bounded organelles, smaller vesicles, a subset of mRNAs, cytoskeletal filaments, and various protein building blocks, which are transported between different cell compartments. This cargo transport is usually performed by teams of motors. If all motors belong to the same molecular species, the cooperative action of the motors leads to uni-directional transport with a strongly increased run length and with a characteristic force dependence of the velocity distributions. If two antagonistic teams of motors pull on the same cargo particle, they perform a stochastic tug-of-war, which is characterized by a subtle force balance between the two motor teams and leads to several distinct patterns of bi-directional transport. So far, all experimental observations on bi-directional transport are consistent with such a tug-of-war. If many motors and/or cargo particles are transported along the filaments, one encounters various traffic phenomena. Depending on their mutual interactions and the compartment geometry, the motors form various spatio-temporal patterns such as traffic jams, and undergo nonequilibrium phase transitions between different patterns of transport.

  10. Molecular crowding creates traffic jams of kinesin motors on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Cécile; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Varga, Vladimír; Helbing, Dirk; Diez, Stefan; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crowdedness of the interior of cells, microtubule-based motor proteins are able to deliver cargoes rapidly and reliably throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that motor proteins may be adapted to operate in crowded environments by having molecular properties that prevent them from forming traffic jams. To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted high-density traffic of purified kinesin-8 motor protein, a highly processive motor with long end-residency time, along microtubules in a total internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy assay. We found that traffic jams, characterized by an abrupt increase in the density of motors with an associated abrupt decrease in motor speed, form even in the absence of other obstructing proteins. To determine the molecular properties that lead to jamming, we altered the concentration of motors, their processivity, and their rate of dissociation from microtubule ends. Traffic jams occurred when the motor density exceeded a critical value (density-induced jams) or when motor dissociation from the microtubule ends was so slow that it resulted in a pileup (bottleneck-induced jams). Through comparison of our experimental results with theoretical models and stochastic simulations, we characterized in detail under which conditions density- and bottleneck-induced traffic jams form or do not form. Our results indicate that transport kinesins, such as kinesin-1, may be evolutionarily adapted to avoid the formation of traffic jams by moving only with moderate processivity and dissociating rapidly from microtubule ends. PMID:22431622

  11. Molecular crowding creates traffic jams of kinesin motors on microtubules.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Cécile; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Varga, Vladimír; Helbing, Dirk; Diez, Stefan; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-04-17

    Despite the crowdedness of the interior of cells, microtubule-based motor proteins are able to deliver cargoes rapidly and reliably throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that motor proteins may be adapted to operate in crowded environments by having molecular properties that prevent them from forming traffic jams. To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted high-density traffic of purified kinesin-8 motor protein, a highly processive motor with long end-residency time, along microtubules in a total internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy assay. We found that traffic jams, characterized by an abrupt increase in the density of motors with an associated abrupt decrease in motor speed, form even in the absence of other obstructing proteins. To determine the molecular properties that lead to jamming, we altered the concentration of motors, their processivity, and their rate of dissociation from microtubule ends. Traffic jams occurred when the motor density exceeded a critical value (density-induced jams) or when motor dissociation from the microtubule ends was so slow that it resulted in a pileup (bottleneck-induced jams). Through comparison of our experimental results with theoretical models and stochastic simulations, we characterized in detail under which conditions density- and bottleneck-induced traffic jams form or do not form. Our results indicate that transport kinesins, such as kinesin-1, may be evolutionarily adapted to avoid the formation of traffic jams by moving only with moderate processivity and dissociating rapidly from microtubule ends.

  12. Methodology for the Simulation of Molecular Motors at Different Scales.

    PubMed

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Chipot, Christophe

    2017-04-20

    Millisecond-scale conformational transitions represent a seminal challenge for traditional molecular dynamics simulations, even with the help of high-end supercomputer architectures. Such events are particularly relevant to the study of molecular motors-proteins or abiological constructs that convert chemical energy into mechanical work. Here, we present a hybrid-simulation scheme combining an array of methods including elastic network models, transition path sampling, and advanced free-energy methods, possibly in conjunction with generalized-ensemble schemes to deliver a viable option for capturing the millisecond-scale motor steps of biological motors. The methodology is already implemented in large measure in popular molecular dynamics programs, and it can leverage the massively parallel capabilities of petascale computers. The applicability of the hybrid method is demonstrated with two examples, namely cyclodextrin-based motors and V-type ATPases.

  13. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-02-19

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. Engineering molecular motors with controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells and provide optimized device components for tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions and other signals. Here, we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies and guided by a structural model for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we have constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should make it possible to achieve spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size and branchpoint turning.

  14. Embedding dual function into molecular motors through collective motion

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    Protein motors, such as kinesins and dyneins, bind to a microtubule and travel along it in a specific direction. Previously, it was thought that the directionality for a given motor was constant in the absence of an external force. However, the directionality of the kinesin-5 Cin8 was recently found to change as the number of motors that bind to the same microtubule is increased. Here, we introduce a simple mechanical model of a microtubule-sliding assay in which multiple motors interact with the filament. We show that, due to the collective phenomenon, the directionality of the motor changes (e.g., from minus- to plus- end directionality), depending on the number of motors. This is induced by a large diffusive component in the directional walk and by the subsequent frustrated motor configuration, in which multiple motors pull the filament in opposite directions, similar to a game of tug-of-war. A possible role of the dual-directional motors for the mitotic spindle formation is also discussed. Our framework provides a general mechanism to embed two conflicting tasks into a single molecular machine, which works context-dependently. PMID:28281683

  15. Embedding dual function into molecular motors through collective motion.

    PubMed

    Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-03-10

    Protein motors, such as kinesins and dyneins, bind to a microtubule and travel along it in a specific direction. Previously, it was thought that the directionality for a given motor was constant in the absence of an external force. However, the directionality of the kinesin-5 Cin8 was recently found to change as the number of motors that bind to the same microtubule is increased. Here, we introduce a simple mechanical model of a microtubule-sliding assay in which multiple motors interact with the filament. We show that, due to the collective phenomenon, the directionality of the motor changes (e.g., from minus- to plus- end directionality), depending on the number of motors. This is induced by a large diffusive component in the directional walk and by the subsequent frustrated motor configuration, in which multiple motors pull the filament in opposite directions, similar to a game of tug-of-war. A possible role of the dual-directional motors for the mitotic spindle formation is also discussed. Our framework provides a general mechanism to embed two conflicting tasks into a single molecular machine, which works context-dependently.

  16. Stochastic simulations of cargo transport by processive molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Korn, Christian B; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2009-12-28

    We use stochastic computer simulations to study the transport of a spherical cargo particle along a microtubule-like track on a planar substrate by several kinesin-like processive motors. Our newly developed adhesive motor dynamics algorithm combines the numerical integration of a Langevin equation for the motion of a sphere with kinetic rules for the molecular motors. The Langevin part includes diffusive motion, the action of the pulling motors, and hydrodynamic interactions between sphere and wall. The kinetic rules for the motors include binding to and unbinding from the filament as well as active motor steps. We find that the simulated mean transport length increases exponentially with the number of bound motors, in good agreement with earlier results. The number of motors in binding range to the motor track fluctuates in time with a Poissonian distribution, both for springs and cables being used as models for the linker mechanics. Cooperativity in the sense of equal load sharing only occurs for high values for viscosity and attachment time.

  17. Stochastic simulations of cargo transport by processive molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Christian B.; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2009-12-01

    We use stochastic computer simulations to study the transport of a spherical cargo particle along a microtubule-like track on a planar substrate by several kinesin-like processive motors. Our newly developed adhesive motor dynamics algorithm combines the numerical integration of a Langevin equation for the motion of a sphere with kinetic rules for the molecular motors. The Langevin part includes diffusive motion, the action of the pulling motors, and hydrodynamic interactions between sphere and wall. The kinetic rules for the motors include binding to and unbinding from the filament as well as active motor steps. We find that the simulated mean transport length increases exponentially with the number of bound motors, in good agreement with earlier results. The number of motors in binding range to the motor track fluctuates in time with a Poissonian distribution, both for springs and cables being used as models for the linker mechanics. Cooperativity in the sense of equal load sharing only occurs for high values for viscosity and attachment time.

  18. Automating the search of molecular motor templates by evolutionary methods.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Jose D; Vico, Francisco J

    2011-11-01

    Biological molecular motors are nanoscale devices capable of transforming chemical energy into mechanical work, which are being researched in many scientific disciplines. From a computational point of view, the characteristics and dynamics of these motors are studied at multiple time scales, ranging from very detailed and complex molecular dynamics simulations spanning a few microseconds, to extremely simple and coarse-grained theoretical models of their working cycles. However, this research is performed only in the (relatively few) instances known from molecular biology. In this work, results from elastic network analysis and behaviour-finding methods are applied to explore a subset of the configuration space of template molecular structures that are able to transform chemical energy into directed movement, for a fixed instance of working cycle. While using methods based on elastic networks limits the scope of our results, it enables the implementation of computationally lightweight methods, in a way that evolutionary search techniques can be applied to discover novel molecular motor templates. The results show that molecular motion can be attained from a variety of structural configurations, when a functional working cycle is provided. Additionally, these methods enable a new computational way to test hypotheses about molecular motors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular motors and the 2nd law of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhisong

    2014-03-01

    Molecular motors from biology and nanotechnology often operate on chemical energy of fuel molecules in an isothermal environment, unlike macroscopic heat engines that draw energy from a heat flow between two temperatures. Nevertheless, isothermal molecular motors are still subject to the 2nd law of thermodynamics in a fundamental way: their directional motion must cost a finite amount of energy other than the environmental heat even though no work is done; otherwise the 2nd law would be violated. Hence the 2nd law requires a finite energy price for pure direction of molecular motors. But what is the lowest price of direction allowed by the 2nd law? And how does the 2nd law-decreed price of direction limit performance of molecular motors? In the talk, I shall present our theoretical study of the 2nd law-molecular motor link on basis of the accumulated biomotor phenomenology, and also introduce our experimental effort to develop biomimetic DNA bipedal nanomotors following the mechanistic guidelines out of the theoretical study. [Main contents of this talk are from references:] This work is partially supported by FRC grants R-144-000-259-112, R-144-000-290-112 and R-144-000-320-112.

  20. Mechanism of Spontaneous Oscillation Emerging from Collective Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, Yuta; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2008-04-01

    Biological systems include a large number and various kinds of molecular machines. Individual molecular machines work stochastically, while the systems constructed of the ensembles of these machines exhibit dynamically-ordered phenomena, rather than a simple sum of individual parts. Here we focus on the spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) observed in the contractile system of muscle. From the mechanical measurements in the precursor state of SPOC, we discuss how the functions of individual molecular motors are autonomously regulated in the contractile system.

  1. Coiled coils and SAH domains in cytoskeletal molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Cytoskeletal motors include myosins, kinesins and dyneins. Myosins move along tracks of actin filaments, whereas kinesins and dyneins move along microtubules. Many of these motors are involved in trafficking cargo in cells. However, myosins are mostly monomeric, whereas kinesins are mostly dimeric, owing to the presence of a coiled coil. Some myosins (myosins 6, 7 and 10) contain an SAH (single α-helical) domain, which was originally thought to be a coiled coil. These myosins are now known to be monomers, not dimers. The differences between SAH domains and coiled coils are described and the potential roles of SAH domains in molecular motors are discussed.

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of single and coupled synthetic molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-M.; Zuckermann, M.

    2012-11-01

    We use a minimal model to study the processive motion of coupled synthetic molecular motors along a DNA track and we present data from Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulations based on this model. The model was originally proposed by Bromley [HFSP J.10.2976/1.3111282 3, 204 (2009)] for studying the properties of a synthetic protein motor, the “Tumbleweed” (TW), and involves rigid Y-shaped motors diffusively rotating along the track while controlled by a series of periodically injected ligand pulses into the solution. The advantage of the model is that it mimics the mechanical properties of the TW motor in detail. Both the average first passage time which measures the diffusive motion of the motors, and the average dwell time on the track which measures their processivity are investigated by varying the parameters of the model. The latter includes ligand concentration and the range and strength of the binding interaction between motors and the track. In particular, it is of experimental interest to study the dependence of these dynamic time scales of the motors on the ligand concentration. Single rigid TW motors were first studied since no previous MC simulations of these motors have been performed. We first studied single motors for which we found a logarithmic decrease of the average first passage time and a logarithmic increase of the average dwell time with increasing ligand concentration. For two coupled motors, the dependence on ligand concentration is still logarithmic for the average first passage time but becomes linear for the average dwell time. This suggests a much greater stability in the processive motion of coupled motors as compared to single motors in the limit of large ligand concentration. By increasing the number of coupled motors, m, it was found that the average first passage time of the coupled motors only increases slowly with m while the average dwell time increases exponentially with m. Thus the stability of coupled motors on the track can

  3. Motor properties from persistence: a linear molecular walker lacking spatial and temporal asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckermann, Martin J.; Angstmann, Christopher N.; Schmitt, Regina; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth HC; Forde, Nancy R.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul MG

    2015-05-01

    The stepping direction of linear molecular motors is usually defined by a spatial asymmetry of the motor, its track, or both. Here we present a model for a molecular walker that undergoes biased directional motion along a symmetric track in the presence of a temporally symmetric chemical cycle. Instead of using asymmetry, directionality is achieved by persistence. At small load force the walker can take on average thousands of steps in a given direction until it stochastically reverses direction. We discuss a specific experimental implementation of a synthetic motor based on this design and find, using Langevin and Monte Carlo simulations, that a realistic walker can work against load forces on the order of picoNewtons with an efficiency of ∼18%, comparable to that of kinesin. In principle, the walker can be turned into a permanent motor by externally monitoring the walker’s momentary direction of motion, and using feedback to adjust the direction of a load force. We calculate the thermodynamic cost of using feedback to enhance motor performance in terms of the Shannon entropy, and find that it reduces the efficiency of a realistic motor only marginally. We discuss the implications for natural protein motor performance in the context of the strong performance of this design based only on a thermal ratchet.

  4. Collective transport of weakly interacting molecular motors with Langmuir kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, Sameep; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2015-04-01

    Filament-based intracellular transport involves the collective action of molecular motor proteins. Experimental evidences suggest that microtubule (MT) filament bound motor proteins such as kinesins weakly interact among themselves during transport and with the surrounding cellular environment. Motivated by these observations we study a driven lattice gas model for collective unidirectional transport of molecular motors on open filament. This model incorporates short-range next-nearest-neighbour (NNN) interactions between the motors and couples the transport process on filament with surrounding cellular environment through adsorption-desorption Langmuir kinetics (LK) of the motors. We analyse this model within the framework of a mean-field (MF) theory in the limit of weak interactions between the motors. We point to the mapping of this model with the non-conserved version of the Katz-Lebowitz-Spohn (KLS) model. The system exhibits rich phase behavior with a variety of inhomogeneous phases including localized shocks in the bulk of the filament. We obtain the steady-state density and current profiles, analyse their variation as a function of the strength of interaction and construct the non-equilibrium MF phase diagram. We compare these MF results with Monte Carlo simulations and find that the MF analysis shows reasonably good agreement with simulation results as long as the motors are weakly interacting. For sufficently strong NNN interaction between the motors, the mean-field results deviate significantly, and for very strong NNN interaction in the absence of LK, the current in the lattice is determined solely by the NNN interaction parameter and it becomes independent of entry and exit rates of motors at the filament boundaries.

  5. In vitro assays of molecular motors--impact of motor-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Mansson, Alf; Balaz, Martina; Albet-Torres, Nuria; Rosengren, K Johan

    2008-05-01

    In many types of biophysical studies of both single molecules and ensembles of molecular motors the motors are adsorbed to artificial surfaces. Some of the most important assay systems of this type (in vitro motility assays and related single molecule techniques) will be briefly described together with an account of breakthroughs in the understanding of actomyosin function that have resulted from their use. A poorly characterized, but potentially important, entity in these studies is the mechanism of motor adsorption to surfaces and the effects of motor surface interactions on experimental results. A better understanding of these phenomena is also important for the development of commercially viable nanotechnological applications powered by molecular motors. Here, we will consider several aspects of motor surface interactions with a particular focus on heavy meromyosin (HMM) from skeletal muscle. These aspects will be related to heavy meromyosin structure and relevant parts of the vast literature on protein-surface interactions for non-motor proteins. An overview of methods for studying motor-surface interactions will also be given. The information is used as a basis for further development of a model for HMM-surface interactions and is discussed in relation to experiments where nanopatterning has been employed for in vitro reconstruction of actomyosin order. The challenges and potentials of this approach in biophysical studies, compared to the use of self-assembly of biological components into supramolecular protein aggregates (e.g. myosin filaments) will be considered. Finally, this review will consider the implications for further developments of motor-powered lab-on-a-chip devices.

  6. "Cargo-mooring" as an operating principle for molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Lisowski, Bartosz; Kuśmierz, Łukasz; Żabicki, Michał; Bier, Martin

    2015-06-07

    Navigating through an ever-changing and unsteady environment, and utilizing chemical energy, molecular motors transport the cell׳s crucial components, such as organelles and vesicles filled with neurotransmitter. They generate force and pull cargo, as they literally walk along the polymeric tracks, e.g. microtubules. What we suggest in this paper is that the motor protein is not really pulling its load. The load is subject to diffusion and the motor may be doing little else than rectifying the fluctuations, i.e. ratcheting the load׳s diffusion. Below we present a detailed model to show how such ratcheting can quantitatively account for observed data. The consequence of such a mechanism is the dependence of the transport׳s speed and efficacy not only on the motor, but also on the cargo (especially its size) and on the environment (i.e. its viscosity and structure). Current experimental works rarely provide this type of information for in vivo studies. We suggest that even small differences between assays can impact the outcome. Our results agree with those obtained in wet laboratories and provide novel insight in a molecular motor׳s functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Asymmetric Synthesis of Second-Generation Light-Driven Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Danowski, Wojciech; Otten, Edwin; Wezenberg, Sander J; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-05-19

    The enantiomeric homogeneity of light-driven molecular motors based on overcrowded alkenes is crucial in their application as either unidirectional rotors or as chiral multistate switches. It was challenging to obtain these compounds as single enantiomers via the established synthetic procedures due to loss of optical purity in the key step, i.e., the Barton-Kellogg olefination reaction. Searching for strategies to avoid racemization, a new class of light-driven molecular motors was designed, synthesized, and studied. The stereochemical integrity was fully preserved throughout the synthesis, and on the basis of photochemical and kinetic studies using UV/vis, CD, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, it was established that they still function properly as unidirectional molecular motors.

  8. Guiding Molecular Motors with Nano-Imprinted Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, Richard; Carlberg, Patrick; Månsson, Alf; Nicholls, Ian A.; Omling, Pär; Sundberg, Mark; Tågerud, Sven; Montelius, Lars

    2005-05-01

    This work, for the first time, demonstrates that nano-imprinted samples, with 100 nm wide polymer lines, can act as guides for molecular motors consisting of motor proteins actin and myosin. The motor protein function was characterized using fluorescence microscopy and compared to actomyosin motility on non-structured nitrocellulose surfaces. Our results open for further use of the nano-imprint technique in the production of disposable chips for bio-nanotechnological applications and miniaturized biological test systems. We discuss how the nano-imprinted motor protein assay system may be optimized and also how it compares to previously tested assay systems involving low-resolution UV-lithography and low throughput but high-resolution electron beam lithography.

  9. Debris control design achievements of the booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The stringent debris control requirements imposed on the design of the Space Shuttle booster separation motor are described along with the verification program implemented to ensure compliance with debris control objectives. The principal areas emphasized in the design and development of the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) relative to debris control were the propellant formulation and nozzle closures which protect the motors from aerodynamic heating and moisture. A description of the motor design requirements, the propellant formulation and verification program, and the nozzle closures design and verification are presented.

  10. Molecular beacon sequence design algorithm.

    PubMed

    Monroe, W Todd; Haselton, Frederick R

    2003-01-01

    A method based on Web-based tools is presented to design optimally functioning molecular beacons. Molecular beacons, fluorogenic hybridization probes, are a powerful tool for the rapid and specific detection of a particular nucleic acid sequence. However, their synthesis costs can be considerable. Since molecular beacon performance is based on its sequence, it is imperative to rationally design an optimal sequence before synthesis. The algorithm presented here uses simple Microsoft Excel formulas and macros to rank candidate sequences. This analysis is carried out using mfold structural predictions along with other free Web-based tools. For smaller laboratories where molecular beacons are not the focus of research, the public domain algorithm described here may be usefully employed to aid in molecular beacon design.

  11. High temperature superconducting synchronous motor design and test

    SciTech Connect

    Schiferl, R.; Zhang, B.; Shoykhet, B.

    1996-10-01

    High horsepower synchronous motors with high temperature superconducting (HTS) field windings offer the potential to cut motor operating losses in half compared to conventional energy efficient induction motors available today. The design, construction and test of a prototype, air core, synchronous motor with helium gas cooled HTS field coils will be described in this paper. The work described is part of a US Department of Energy, Superconductivity Partnership Initiative award. The motor uses a modified conventional motor armature combined with a vacuum insulated rotor that contains the four racetrack-shaped HTS field coils. The rotor is cooled by helium gas so that the HTS coils operate at a temperature of 30 K. This paper provides a status report on HTS motor research and development at Reliance Lab., Rockwell Automation that will lead to commercial HTS motors for utility and industrial applications.

  12. Time-dependent motor properties of multipedal molecular spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samii, Laleh; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth H. C.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2011-09-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic biomolecular walkers that use the asymmetry resulting from cleavage of their tracks to bias the direction of their stepping motion. Using Monte Carlo simulations that implement the Gillespie algorithm, we investigate the dependence of the biased motion of molecular spiders, along with binding time and processivity, on tunable experimental parameters, such as number of legs, span between the legs, and unbinding rate of a leg from a substrate site. We find that an increase in the number of legs increases the spiders’ processivity and binding time but not their mean velocity. However, we can increase the mean velocity of spiders with simultaneous tuning of the span and the unbinding rate of a spider leg from a substrate site. To study the efficiency of molecular spiders, we introduce a time-dependent expression for the thermodynamic efficiency of a molecular motor, allowing us to account for the behavior of spider populations as a function of time. Based on this definition, we find that spiders exhibit transient motor function over time scales of many hours and have a maximum efficiency on the order of 1%, weak compared to other types of molecular motors.

  13. Stochastic mechano-chemical kinetics of molecular motors: A multidisciplinary enterprise from a physicist’s perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2013-08-01

    A molecular motor is made of either a single macromolecule or a macromolecular complex. Just like their macroscopic counterparts, molecular motors “transduce” input energy into mechanical work. All the nano-motors considered here operate under isothermal conditions far from equilibrium. Moreover, one of the possible mechanisms of energy transduction, called Brownian ratchet, does not even have any macroscopic counterpart. But, molecular motor is not synonymous with Brownian ratchet; a large number of molecular motors execute a noisy power stroke, rather than operating as Brownian ratchet. We review not only the structural design and stochastic kinetics of individual single motors, but also their coordination, cooperation and competition as well as the assembly of multi-module motors in various intracellular kinetic processes. Although all the motors considered here execute mechanical movements, efficiency and power output are not necessarily good measures of performance of some motors. Among the intracellular nano-motors, we consider the porters, sliders and rowers, pistons and hooks, exporters, importers, packers and movers as well as those that also synthesize, manipulate and degrade “macromolecules of life”. We review mostly the quantitative models for the kinetics of these motors. We also describe several of those motor-driven intracellular stochastic processes for which quantitative models are yet to be developed. In part I, we discuss mainly the methodology and the generic models of various important classes of molecular motors. In part II, we review many specific examples emphasizing the unity of the basic mechanisms as well as diversity of operations arising from the differences in their detailed structure and kinetics. Multi-disciplinary research is presented here from the perspective of physicists.

  14. Rotation of artificial rotor axles in rotary molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Mihori; Iwamoto, Kousuke; Ueno, Hiroshi; Hara, Mayu; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Kishikawa, Jun-ichi; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Ken

    2016-01-01

    F1- and V1-ATPase are rotary molecular motors that convert chemical energy released upon ATP hydrolysis into torque to rotate a central rotor axle against the surrounding catalytic stator cylinder with high efficiency. How conformational change occurring in the stator is coupled to the rotary motion of the axle is the key unknown in the mechanism of rotary motors. Here, we generated chimeric motor proteins by inserting an exogenous rod protein, FliJ, into the stator ring of F1 or of V1 and tested the rotation properties of these chimeric motors. Both motors showed unidirectional and continuous rotation, despite no obvious homology in amino acid sequence between FliJ and the intrinsic rotor subunit of F1 or V1. These results showed that any residue-specific interactions between the stator and rotor are not a prerequisite for unidirectional rotation of both F1 and V1. The torque of chimeric motors estimated from viscous friction of the rotation probe against medium revealed that whereas the F1-FliJ chimera generates only 10% of WT F1, the V1-FliJ chimera generates torque comparable to that of V1 with the native axle protein that is structurally more similar to FliJ than the native rotor of F1. This suggests that the gross structural mismatch hinders smooth rotation of FliJ accompanied with the stator ring of F1. PMID:27647891

  15. Rotation of artificial rotor axles in rotary molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Baba, Mihori; Iwamoto, Kousuke; Iino, Ryota; Ueno, Hiroshi; Hara, Mayu; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Kishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Ken

    2016-10-04

    F1- and V1-ATPase are rotary molecular motors that convert chemical energy released upon ATP hydrolysis into torque to rotate a central rotor axle against the surrounding catalytic stator cylinder with high efficiency. How conformational change occurring in the stator is coupled to the rotary motion of the axle is the key unknown in the mechanism of rotary motors. Here, we generated chimeric motor proteins by inserting an exogenous rod protein, FliJ, into the stator ring of F1 or of V1 and tested the rotation properties of these chimeric motors. Both motors showed unidirectional and continuous rotation, despite no obvious homology in amino acid sequence between FliJ and the intrinsic rotor subunit of F1 or V1 These results showed that any residue-specific interactions between the stator and rotor are not a prerequisite for unidirectional rotation of both F1 and V1 The torque of chimeric motors estimated from viscous friction of the rotation probe against medium revealed that whereas the F1-FliJ chimera generates only 10% of WT F1, the V1-FliJ chimera generates torque comparable to that of V1 with the native axle protein that is structurally more similar to FliJ than the native rotor of F1 This suggests that the gross structural mismatch hinders smooth rotation of FliJ accompanied with the stator ring of F1.

  16. Design of a hybrid transducer type ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Kurosawa, M; Ueha, S

    1993-01-01

    The authors present a design method for a hybrid transducer-type ultrasonic motor (HTUSM) for practical use. They introduce a simple equivalent circuit that expresses the unique operation mechanism of the hybrid transducer-type motor. A numerical simulation based on the model enables them to predict the motor characteristics such as the maximum torque and the no-load revolution speed. In addition, for the purpose of efficient design and physical interpretation of the phenomena, they discuss analytically the maximum torque of a special case and develop two design charts for the prediction of the no-load speed of the motor.

  17. Computer aided design of multi-phase switched reluctance motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, N. K.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive computer-aided design (CAD) procedure of multiphase switched reluctance motor (SRM) is presented. Better approach for calculation of the outer dimensions, phase inductance, flux linkage and losses, and also a different concept for calculating the average torque of the motor are incorporated in the CAD program. The average torque is calculated based on the most effective 15° (for 8/6 SRM) of the static torque profile of the motor. A sample design of a 5hp SRM is presented in detail and the design is validated by conducting a two-dimensional finite element analysis of the motor.

  18. A finite element code for electric motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1994-01-01

    FEMOT is a finite element program for solving the nonlinear magnetostatic problem. This version uses nonlinear, Newton first order elements. The code can be used for electric motor design and analysis. FEMOT can be embedded within an optimization code that will vary nodal coordinates to optimize the motor design. The output from FEMOT can be used to determine motor back EMF, torque, cogging, and magnet saturation. It will run on a PC and will be available to anyone who wants to use it.

  19. Biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders.

    PubMed

    Samii, Laleh; Linke, Heiner; Zuckermann, Martin J; Forde, Nancy R

    2010-02-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic molecular motors featuring multiple legs that each can interact with a substrate through binding and cleavage. Experimental studies suggest the motion of the spider in a matrix is biased toward uncleaved substrates and that spider properties such as processivity can be altered by changing the binding strength of the legs to substrate [R. Pei, S. K. Taylor, D. Stefanovic, S. Rudchenko, T. E. Mitchell, and M. N. Stojanovic, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 12693 (2006)]. We investigate the origin of biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders using Monte Carlo simulations. Our simulations combine a realistic chemical kinetic model, hand-over-hand or inchworm modes of stepping, and the use of a one-dimensional track. We find that stronger binding to substrate, cleavage and spider detachment from the track are contributing mechanisms to population bias. We investigate the contributions of stepping mechanism to speed, randomness parameter, processivity, coupling, and efficiency, and comment on how these molecular motor properties can be altered by changing experimentally tunable kinetic parameters.

  20. Biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samii, Laleh; Linke, Heiner; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2010-02-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic molecular motors featuring multiple legs that each can interact with a substrate through binding and cleavage. Experimental studies suggest the motion of the spider in a matrix is biased toward uncleaved substrates and that spider properties such as processivity can be altered by changing the binding strength of the legs to substrate [R. Pei, S. K. Taylor, D. Stefanovic, S. Rudchenko, T. E. Mitchell, and M. N. Stojanovic, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 12693 (2006)]. We investigate the origin of biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders using Monte Carlo simulations. Our simulations combine a realistic chemical kinetic model, hand-over-hand or inchworm modes of stepping, and the use of a one-dimensional track. We find that stronger binding to substrate, cleavage and spider detachment from the track are contributing mechanisms to population bias. We investigate the contributions of stepping mechanism to speed, randomness parameter, processivity, coupling, and efficiency, and comment on how these molecular motor properties can be altered by changing experimentally tunable kinetic parameters.

  1. Myosin-I molecular motors at a glance.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Ostap, E Michael

    2016-07-15

    Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to play various cellular roles related to membrane dynamics and trafficking. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we review and illustrate the proposed cellular functions of metazoan myosin-I molecular motors by examining the structural, biochemical, mechanical and cell biological evidence for their proposed molecular roles. We highlight evidence for the roles of myosin-I isoforms in regulating membrane tension and actin architecture, powering plasma membrane and organelle deformation, participating in membrane trafficking, and functioning as a tension-sensitive dock or tether. Collectively, myosin-I motors have been implicated in increasingly complex cellular phenomena, yet how a single isoform accomplishes multiple types of molecular functions is still an active area of investigation. To fully understand the underlying physiology, it is now essential to piece together different approaches of biological investigation. This article will appeal to investigators who study immunology, metabolic diseases, endosomal trafficking, cell motility, cancer and kidney disease, and to those who are interested in how cellular membranes are coupled to the underlying actin cytoskeleton in a variety of different applications.

  2. Interferometric Scattering Microscopy for the Study of Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Andrecka, J; Takagi, Y; Mickolajczyk, K J; Lippert, L G; Sellers, J R; Hancock, W O; Goldman, Y E; Kukura, P

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of molecular motor function has been greatly improved by the development of imaging modalities, which enable real-time observation of their motion at the single-molecule level. Here, we describe the use of a new method, interferometric scattering microscopy, for the investigation of motor protein dynamics by attaching and tracking the motion of metallic nanoparticle labels as small as 20nm diameter. Using myosin-5, kinesin-1, and dynein as examples, we describe the basic assays, labeling strategies, and principles of data analysis. Our approach is relevant not only for motor protein dynamics but also provides a general tool for single-particle tracking with high spatiotemporal precision, which overcomes the limitations of single-molecule fluorescence methods. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Universal bound on the efficiency of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-12-01

    The thermodynamic uncertainty relation provides an inequality relating any mean current, the associated dispersion and the entropy production rate for arbitrary non-equilibrium steady states. Applying it here to a general model of a molecular motor running against an external force or torque, we show that the thermodynamic efficiency of such motors is universally bounded by an expression involving only experimentally accessible quantities. For motors pulling cargo through a viscous fluid, a universal bound for the corresponding Stokes efficiency follows as a variant. A similar result holds if mechanical force is used to synthesize molecules of high chemical potential. Crucially, no knowledge of the detailed underlying mechano-chemical mechanism is required for applying these bounds.

  4. Modelling interacting molecular motors with an internal degree of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkoviezky, Itai; Gov, Nir S.

    2013-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying the collective motion of molecular motors in living cells are not yet fully understood. One such open puzzle is the observed pulses of backward-moving myosin-X in the filopodia structure. Motivated by this phenomenon we introduce two generalizations of the ‘total asymmetric exclusion process’ (TASEP) that might be relevant to the formation of such pulses. The first is adding a nearest-neighbours attractive interaction between motors, while the second is adding an internal degree of freedom corresponding to a processive and immobile form of the motors. Switching between the two states occurs stochastically, without a conservation law. Both models show strong deviations from the mean field behaviour and lack particle-hole symmetry. We use approximations borrowed from the research on vehicular traffic models to calculate the current and jam size distribution in a system with periodic boundary conditions and introduce a novel modification to one of these approximation schemes.

  5. Interferometric Scattering Microscopy for the Study of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Andrecka, J.; Takagi, Y.; Mickolajczyk, K.J.; Lippert, L.G.; Sellers, J.R.; Hancock, W.O.; Goldman, Y.E.; Kukura, P.

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of molecular motor function has been greatly improved by the development of imaging modalities, which enable real-time observation of their motion at the single-molecule level. Here, we describe the use of a new method, interferometric scattering microscopy, for the investigation of motor protein dynamics by attaching and tracking the motion of metallic nanoparticle labels as small as 20 nm diameter. Using myosin-5, kinesin-1, and dynein as examples, we describe the basic assays, labeling strategies, and principles of data analysis. Our approach is relevant not only for motor protein dynamics but also provides a general tool for single-particle tracking with high spatiotemporal precision, which overcomes the limitations of single-molecule fluorescence methods. PMID:27793291

  6. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Modelling of a DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun; Xie, Ping; Xue, Xiao-Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2009-11-01

    During the assembly of many viruses, a powerful molecular motor packages the genome into a preassembled capsid. The Bacillus subtilis phage phi29 is an excellent model system to investigate the DNA packaging mechanism because of its highly efficient in vitro DNA packaging activity and the development of a single-molecule packaging assay. Here we make use of structural and biochemical experimental data to build a physical model of DNA packaging by the phi29 DNA packaging motor. Based on the model, various dynamic behaviours such as the packaging rate, pause frequency and slip frequency under different ATP concentrations, ADP concentrations, external loads as well as capsid fillings are studied by using Monte Carlo simulation. Good agreement is obtained between the simulated and available experimental results. Moreover, we make testable predictions that should guide future experiments related to motor function.

  7. Ford Motor Company NDE facility shielding design.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Robert L; Van Riper, Kenneth A; Jones, Martin H

    2005-01-01

    Ford Motor Company proposed the construction of a large non-destructive evaluation laboratory for radiography of automotive power train components. The authors were commissioned to design the shielding and to survey the completed facility for compliance with radiation doses for occupationally and non-occupationally exposed personnel. The two X-ray sources are Varian Linatron 3000 accelerators operating at 9-11 MV. One performs computed tomography of automotive transmissions, while the other does real-time radiography of operating engines and transmissions. The shield thickness for the primary barrier and all secondary barriers were determined by point-kernel techniques. Point-kernel techniques did not work well for skyshine calculations and locations where multiple sources (e.g. tube head leakage and various scatter fields) impacted doses. Shielding for these areas was determined using transport calculations. A number of MCNP [Briesmeister, J. F. MCNPCA general Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4B. Los Alamos National Laboratory Manual (1997)] calculations focused on skyshine estimates and the office areas. Measurements on the operational facility confirmed the shielding calculations.

  8. Optimal brushless DC motor design using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahideh, A.; Korakianitis, T.; Ruiz, P.; Keeble, T.; Rothman, M. T.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a method for the optimal design of a slotless permanent magnet brushless DC (BLDC) motor with surface mounted magnets using a genetic algorithm. Characteristics of the motor are expressed as functions of motor geometries. The objective function is a combination of losses, volume and cost to be minimized simultaneously. Electrical and mechanical requirements (i.e. voltage, torque and speed) and other limitations (e.g. upper and lower limits of the motor geometries) are cast into constraints of the optimization problem. One sample case is used to illustrate the design and optimization technique.

  9. Design of a Gated Molecular Proton Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei; Zhou, Bo; Geyer, Tihamer; Hutter, Michael C.; Fang, Haiping; Helms, Volkhard H.

    2011-01-17

    The generation of an electrochemical pH gradient across biological membranes using energy from photosynthesis and respiration provides the universal driving force in cells for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy unit of life. Creating such an electrochemical potential requires the transportation of protons against a thermodynamic gradient. In biological proton pumps, chemical energy is used to induce protein conformational changes during each catalytic cycle where one or a few protons are pumped against a proton concentration gradient across the membrane. On the other hand, membrane channels also exist that mediate continuous particle exchange and may be switched between open and closed states. Being able to design nanochannels with similar functions would be of great importance for creating novel molecular devices with a wide range of applications such as molecular motors, fuel cells, rechargeable nanobatteries that provide energy to other nanomachines, and the generation of locally and temporally controlled pH jumps on microfluidic chips.

  10. Molecular Motors and Efficient Motion in a Viscoelastic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Keith

    2005-11-01

    Molecular motors perform many critical functions for cells, including chromosome separation during mitosis, vesicle transport, and muscle contraction. In this talk, we will discuss the ways in which physics concepts and instrumentation are being used to determine the forces and efficiencies of two of these motors, kinesin and dynein, in cells. We will emphasize a) studies at Wake Forest University that focus on the force versus velocity curves (load curves) of kinesin in the neurites of live PC12 cells, and b) work at UNC-Chapel Hill that measures the forces developed by dynein motors within beating cilia on the outer surfaces of live lung cells during mucus transport. We will show how the viscoelastic properties of cytoplasm and mucus can be determined from the Brownian motion of vesicles and beads in these media.. We find that the load on these motors in vivo may exceed that in vitro by a factor of 1000, and that several motors can share the task of moving a single vesicle.

  11. Dynamics of molecular motors with finite processivity on heterogeneous tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David

    2006-03-01

    The dynamics of molecular motors which occasionally detach from a heterogeneous track like DNA or RNA is considered.[1] Motivated by recent single-molecule experiments, we study a simple model for a motor moving along a disordered track using chemical energy while an external force opposes its motion. The motors also have finite processivity, i.e., they can leave the track with a position-dependent rate. We show that the response of the system to disorder in the hopping-off rate depends on the value of the external force. For most values of the external force, strong disorder causes the motors which survive for long times on the track to be localized at preferred positions. However, near the stall force, localization occurs for any amount of disorder. To obtain these results, we study the complex eigenvalue spectrum of the time evolution operator. Existence of localized states near the top of the band implies a stretched exponential contribution to the decay of the survival probability. A similar spectral analysis also provides a very efficient method for studying the dynamics of motors with infinite processivity. 1. Y. Kafri D. K. Lubensky and D. R. Nelson Phys. Rev. E 71, 041906 (2005).

  12. Design, Synthesis, and Monitoring of Light-Activated Motorized Nanomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Pinn-Tsong

    Our group has developed a family of single molecules termed nanocars, which are aimed at performing controllable motion on surfaces. In this work, a series of light-activated motorized nanomachines incorporated with a MHz frequency light-activated unidirectional rotary motor were designed and synthesized. We hope the light-activated motor can serve as the powering unit for the nanomachines, and perform controllable translational motion on surfaces or in solution. A series of motorized nanovehicles intended for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging were designed and synthesized. A p-carborane-wheeled motorized nanocar was synthesized and monitored by STM. Single-molecule imaging was accomplished on a Cu(111) surface. However, further manipulations did lead to motor induced lateral motion. We attributed this result to the strong molecule-surface interactions between the p-carborane-wheeled nanocar and the Cu(111) surface and possible energy transfer between the rotary motor and the Cu(111) surface. To fine-tune the molecule-surface interactions, an adamantane-wheeled motorized nanocar and a three-wheel nanoroadster were designed and synthesized. In addition, the STM substrates will be varied and different combinations of molecule-surface interactions will be studied. As a complimentary imaging method to STM, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy (SMFM) also provides single-molecule level resolution. Unlike STM experiment requires ultra-high vacuum and conductive substrate, SMFM experiment is conducted at ambient conditions and uses non-conductive substrate. This imaging method allows us to study another category of molecule-surface interactions. We plan to design a fluorescent motorized nanocar that is suitable for SMFM studies. However, both the motor and fluorophore are photochemically active molecules. In proximity, some undesired energy transfer or interference could occur. A cyanine 5- (cy5-) tagged motorized nanocar incorporated with the MHz motor was

  13. Chemically optimizing operational efficiency of molecular rotary motors.

    PubMed

    Conyard, Jamie; Cnossen, Arjen; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L; Meech, Stephen R

    2014-07-09

    Unidirectional molecular rotary motors that harness photoinduced cis-trans (E-Z) isomerization are promising tools for the conversion of light energy to mechanical motion in nanoscale molecular machines. Considerable progress has been made in optimizing the frequency of ground-state rotation, but less attention has been focused on excited-state processes. Here the excited-state dynamics of a molecular motor with electron donor and acceptor substituents located to modify the excited-state reaction coordinate, without altering its stereochemistry, are studied. The substituents are shown to modify the photochemical yield of the isomerization without altering the motor frequency. By combining 50 fs resolution time-resolved fluorescence with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy the underlying excited-state dynamics are characterized. The Franck-Condon excited state relaxes in a few hundred femtoseconds to populate a lower energy dark state by a pathway that utilizes a volume conserving structural change. This is assigned to pyramidalization at a carbon atom of the isomerizing bridging double bond. The structure and energy of the dark state thus reached are a function of the substituent, with electron-withdrawing groups yielding a lower energy longer lived dark state. The dark state is coupled to the Franck-Condon state and decays on a picosecond time scale via a coordinate that is sensitive to solvent friction, such as rotation about the bridging bond. Neither subpicosecond nor picosecond dynamics are sensitive to solvent polarity, suggesting that intramolecular charge transfer and solvation are not key driving forces for the rate of the reaction. Instead steric factors and medium friction determine the reaction pathway, with the sterically remote substitution primarily influencing the energetics. Thus, these data indicate a chemical method of optimizing the efficiency of operation of these molecular motors without modifying their overall rotational frequency.

  14. Robotic endoscope motor module and gearing design.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jillian M; Chen, Yi; Hunter, Ian W

    2011-01-01

    Actuation of a robotic endoscope with increased torque output is presented. This paper will specifically focus on the motor module section of a robotic endoscope, which comprises of a pair of motors and gear reduction assemblies. The results for the endoscope and biopsy tool stiffness, as well as the stall force and force versus speed characteristics of the motor module assembly are shown. The scope stiffness was found to be 0.006 N/degree and additional stiffness of the biopsy tools were found to be in the range of 0.09 to 0.13 N/degree. Calculations for worm gearing and efficiency are discussed.

  15. Study of the Synchronous Reluctance Motor Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirba, J.; Lavrinovicha, L.; Dobriyan, R.

    2016-08-01

    The paper focuses on studying the external-rotor synchronous reluctance motor. The analysis is performed to estimate the influence of the number of stator slots and non-magnetic areas in the rotor (i.e., flux barriers) on the electromagnetic torque and torque ripple of the studied motor. It is concluded that the increase in the number of stator slots Z = 6 to Z = 18 causes an approximately twofold decrease in the ripple factor, but torque increases by 5 %. Electromagnetic torque will be increased approximately by 24 %, if non-magnetic flux barriers are created in the rotor of the studied synchronous reluctance motor.

  16. Dynamics of molecular motors and polymer translocation with sequence heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Kafri, Yariv; Lubensky, David K; Nelson, David R

    2004-06-01

    The effect of sequence heterogeneity on polynucleotide translocation across a pore and on simple models of molecular motors such as helicases, DNA polymerase/exonuclease, and RNA polymerase is studied in detail. Pore translocation of RNA or DNA is biased due to the different chemical environments on the two sides of the membrane, whereas the molecular motor motion is biased through a coupling to chemical energy. An externally applied force can oppose these biases. For both systems we solve lattice models exactly both with and without disorder. The models incorporate explicitly the coupling to the different chemical environments for polymer translocation and the coupling to the chemical energy (as well as nucleotide pairing energies) for molecular motors. Using the exact solutions and general arguments, we show that the heterogeneity leads to anomalous dynamics. Most notably, over a range of forces around the stall force (or stall tension for DNA polymerase/exonuclease systems) the displacement grows sublinearly as t(micro), with micro < 1. The range over which this behavior can be observed experimentally is estimated for several systems and argued to be detectable for appropriate forces and buffers. Similar sequence heterogeneity effects may arise in the packing of viral DNA.

  17. Mechanical transduction mechanisms of RecA-like molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jung-Chi

    2011-12-01

    A majority of ATP-dependent molecular motors are RecA-like proteins, performing diverse functions in biology. These RecA-like molecular motors consist of a highly conserved core containing the ATP-binding site. Here I examined how ATP binding within this core is coupled to the conformational changes of different RecA-like molecular motors. Conserved hydrogen bond networks and conformational changes revealed two major mechanical transduction mechanisms: (1) intra-domain conformational changes and (2) inter-domain conformational changes. The intra-domain mechanism has a significant hydrogen bond rearrangement within the domain containing the P-loop, causing relative motion between two parts of the protein. The inter-domain mechanism exhibits little conformational change in the P-loop domain. Instead, the major conformational change is observed between the P-loop domain and an adjacent domain or subunit containing the arginine finger. These differences in the mechanical transduction mechanisms may link to the underlying energy surface governing a Brownian ratchet or a power stroke.

  18. Rotary molecular motion at the nanoscale: motors, propellers, wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Lela; Wang, Boyang; Kral, Petr

    2009-03-01

    We describe by molecular dynamics simulations nanoscale systems that could realize rotary motion. First, we study molecular propellers formed by carbon nanotube rotors with attached aromatic blades [1]. We show that these propellers could pump different types of liquids, and their pumping efficiency strongly depends on the chemistry of the (hydrophobic or hydrophilic) liquid-blade interface. We also investigate nanoscopic wheels with hydrophobic surfaces that show rolling activity on water when driven. Finally, we model efficient molecular motors driven by electron tunneling, which could drive rotary molecular systems [2]. [3pt] [1] B. Wang and P. Kr'al, . Rev. Lett. 98, 266102 (2007).[0pt] [2] B. Wang, L. Vukovic and P. Kr'al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 186808 (2008).

  19. Synthesis of technomimetic molecules: towards rotation control in single-molecular machines and motors.

    PubMed

    Rapenne, Gwénaël

    2005-04-07

    Technomimetic molecules are molecules designed to imitate macroscopic objects at the molecular level, also transposing the motions that these objects are able to undergo. This article focuses on technomimetic molecules with rotary motions, including gears, wheelbarrows and motors. Following the bottom-up approach the synthesis of technomimetic molecules grants access to the study of mechanical properties at the molecular level. These molecules are designed to operate as single molecules on surfaces under the control of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope or atomic force microscope.

  20. Computationally Designed Molecularly Imprinted Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Dumitru; Lagowski, Jolanta; Faid, Karim

    2004-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for different molecular systems in order to predict the binding affinities, binding energies, binding distances and the active site groups between the simulated molecular systems and different bio-ligands (theophylline and its derivatives), which have been designed and minimized using molecular simulation techniques. The first simulated molecular systems consisted of a ligand and functional monomer, such as methacrylic acid and its derivatives. For each pair of molecular systems, (10 monomers with a ligand and 10 monomers without a ligand) a total energy difference was calculated in order to estimate the binding energy between a ligand and the corresponding monomers. The analysis of the simulated functional monomers with ligands indicates that the functional group of monomers interacting with ligands tends to be either COOH or CH2=CH. The distances between the ligand and monomer, in the most stable cases as indicated above, are between 2.0-4.5 Å. The second simulated molecular systems consisted of a ligand and a polymer. The polymers were obtained from monomers that were simulated above. And similar to monomer study, for each pair of molecular systems, (polymer with a ligand and polymer without a ligand) a total energy difference was calculated in order to estimate the binding energy between ligand and the corresponding polymer. The binding distance between the active site of a polymer and a ligand will also be discussed.

  1. Operating principles of rotary molecular motors: differences between F1 and V1 motors.

    PubMed

    Yamato, Ichiro; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Murata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Among the many types of bioenergy-transducing machineries, F- and V-ATPases are unique bio- and nano-molecular rotary motors. The rotational catalysis of F1-ATPase has been investigated in detail, and molecular mechanisms have been proposed based on the crystal structures of the complex and on extensive single-molecule rotational observations. Recently, we obtained crystal structures of bacterial V1-ATPase (A3B3 and A3B3DF complexes) in the presence and absence of nucleotides. Based on these new structures, we present a novel model for the rotational catalysis mechanism of V1-ATPase, which is different from that of F1-ATPases.

  2. Ultrafast Excited State Dynamics in Molecular Motors: Coupling of Motor Length to Medium Viscosity.

    PubMed

    Conyard, Jamie; Stacko, Peter; Chen, Jiawen; McDonagh, Sophie; Hall, Christopher R; Laptenok, Sergey P; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L; Meech, Stephen R

    2017-03-16

    Photochemically driven molecular motors convert the energy of incident radiation to intramolecular rotational motion. The motor molecules considered here execute four step unidirectional rotational motion. This comprises a pair of successive light induced isomerizations to a metastable state followed by thermal helix inversions. The internal rotation of a large molecular unit required in these steps is expected to be sensitive to both the viscosity of the medium and the volume of the rotating unit. In this work, we describe a study of motor motion in both ground and excited states as a function of the size of the rotating units. The excited state decay is ultrafast, highly non-single exponential, and is best described by a sum of three exponential relaxation components. The average excited state decay time observed for a series of motors with substituents of increasing volume was determined. While substitution does affect the lifetime, the size of the substituent has only a minor effect. The solvent polarity dependence is also slight, but there is a significant solvent viscosity effect. Increasing the viscosity has no effect on the fastest of the three decay components, but it does lengthen the two slower decay times, consistent with them being associated with motion along an intramolecular coordinate displacing a large solvent volume. However, these slower relaxation times are again not a function of the size of the substituent. We conclude that excited state decay arises from motion along a coordinate which does not necessarily require complete rotation of the substituents through the solvent, but is instead more localized in the core structure of the motor. The decay of the metastable state to the ground state through a helix inversion occurs 14 orders of magnitude more slowly than the excited state decay, and was measured as a function of substituent size, solvent viscosity and temperature. In this case neither substituent size nor solvent viscosity influences

  3. Chemical and thermal modulation of molecular motor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Weili

    Molecular motors of kinesin and dynein families are responsible for various intracellular activities, from long distance movement of organelles, vesicles, protein complexes, and mRNAs to powering mitotic processes. They can take nanometer steps using chemical energy from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and their dysfunction is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases that require long distance transport of cargos. Here I report on the study of the properties of molecular motors at a single-molecule level using optical trappings. I first studied the inhibition properties of kinesin motors by marine natural compound adociasulfates. I showed that adociasulfates compete with microtubules for binding to kinesins and thus inhibit kinesins' activity. Although adociasulfates are a strong inhibitor for all kinesin members, they show a much higher inhibition effect for conventional kinesins than for mitotic kinesins. Thus adociasulfates can be used to specifically inhibit conventional kinesins. By comparing the inhibition of kinesins by two structurally similar adociasulfates, one can see that the negatively charged sulfate residue of adociasulfates can be replaced by other negative residues and thus make it possible for adociasulfate-derived compounds to be more cell permeable. Kinesins and dyneins move cargos towards opposite directions along a microtubule. Cargos with both kinesins and dyneins attached often move bidirectionally due to undergoing a tug-of-war between the oppositely moving kinesin and dynein motors. Here I studied the effect of temperature on microtubule-based kinesin and dynein motor transport. While kinesins' and dyneins' velocities are closely matched above 15 °C, below this temperature the dyneins' velocity decreases much faster than the kinesins'. The kinesins' and dyneins' forces do not measurably change with temperature. The results suggest that temperature has significant effects on bidirectional transport and can be used to

  4. Microtubules and associated molecular motors in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Mouriño-Pérez, Rosa Reyna; Riquelme, Meritxell; Callejas-Negrete, Olga Alicia; Galván-Mendoza, José Iván

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton provides structure, shape and movement to various cells. Microtubules (MTs) are tubular structures made of α and β-tubulin heterodimers organized in 13 protofilaments, forming a hollow cylinder. A vast group of MT-associated proteins determines the function, behavior and interaction of the MTs with other cellular components. Among these proteins, molecular motors such as the dynein-dynactin complex and kinesin superfamily play roles in MT organization and organelle transport. This article focuses on the MT cytoskeleton and associated molecular motors in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa In addition to reviewing current available information for this fungus and contrasting it with knowledge of other fungal species, we present new experimental results that support the role of dynein, dynactin and conventional kinesin in MT organization, dynamics and transport of subcellular structures (nuclei and secretory vesicles). In wild type hyphae of N. crassa, cytoplasmic MTs are arranged longitudinally along hyphae and display a helical curvature. They interlace with one another to form a network throughout the cytoplasm. N. crassa dynein and dynactin mutants have a scant and disorganized MT cytoskeleton, an erratic and reduced Spitzenkörper (Spk) and distorted hyphal morphology. In contrast, hyphae of mutants with defective conventional kinesin exhibit only minor disruptions in MT and Spk organization. Although nuclear positioning is affected in all mutants, the MT-associated motor proteins are not major contributors to nuclear movement during hyphal growth. Cytoplasmic bulk flow is the vehicle for nuclear displacement in growing hyphal regions of N. crassa Motors are involved in nuclei saltatory movements in both retrograde or anterograde direction. In the dynein and kinesin mutants, micro and macrovesicles can reach the Spk, although growth is slightly impaired and the Spk displays an erratic path. Hyphal growth requires MTs, and their associated

  5. Directed motion of periodically driven molecular motors: a graph-theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Alexey V; Mandal, Dibyendu; Chernyak, Vladimir Y; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A

    2013-01-14

    We propose a numerical algorithm for calculation of quantized directed motion of a stochastic system of interacting particles induced by periodic changes of control parameters on the graph of microstates. As a main application, we consider models of catenane molecular motors, which demonstrated the possibility of a similar control of directed motion of molecular components. We show that our algorithm allows one to calculate the motion of a system in the space of its microstates even when the considered phase space is combinatorially large (~1 × 10(6) microscopic states). Several general observations are made about the structure of the phase diagram of the systems studied, which may be used for rational design and efficient control of new generations of molecular motors.

  6. Design of dual DC motor control system based on DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peicheng; Wang, Suo; Xu, Zengwei; Xiao, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Multi-motor control systems are widely used in actual production and life, such as lifting stages, robots, printing systems. This paper through serial communication between PC and DSP, dual DC motor control system consisting of PC as the host computer, DSP as the lower computer with synchronous PWM speed regulation, commutation and selection functions is designed. It sends digital control instructions with host computer serial debugger to lower computer, to instruct the motor to complete corresponding actions. The hardware and software design of the control system are given, and feasibility and validity of the control system are verified by experiments. The expected design goal is achieved.

  7. A Hopping Mechanism for Cargo Transport by Molecular Motors on Crowded Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Carla

    2010-05-01

    Most models designed to study the bidirectional movement of cargos as they are driven by molecular motors rely on the idea that motors of different polarities can be coordinated by external agents if arranged into a motor-cargo complex to perform the necessary work Gross, Hither and yon: a review of bidirectional microtubule-based transport (Gross in Phys. Biol. 1:R1-R11, 2004). Although these models have provided us with important insights into these phenomena, there are still many unanswered questions regarding the mechanisms through which the movement of the complex takes place on crowded microtubules. For example (i) how does cargo-binding affect motor motility? and in connection with that - (ii) how does the presence of other motors (and also other cargos) on the microtubule affect the motility of the motor-cargo complex? We discuss these questions from a different perspective. The movement of a cargo is conceived here as a hopping process resulting from the transference of cargo between neighboring motors. In the light of this, we examine the conditions under which cargo might display bidirectional movement even if directed by motors of a single polarity. The global properties of the model in the long-time regime are obtained by mapping the dynamics of the collection of interacting motors and cargos into an asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) which can be resolved using the matrix ansatz introduced by Derrida (Derrida and Evans in Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics in One Dimension, pp. 277-304, 1997; Derrida et al. in J. Phys. A 26:1493-1517, 1993).

  8. Traffic jams and shocks of molecular motors inside cellular protrusions.

    PubMed

    Pinkoviezky, I; Gov, N S

    2014-05-01

    Molecular motors are involved in key transport processes inside actin-based cellular protrusions. The motors carry cargo proteins to the protrusion tip which participate in regulating the actin polymerization and play a key role in facilitating the growth and formation of such protrusions. It is observed that the motors accumulate at the tips of cellular protrusions and form aggregates that are found to drift towards the protrusion base at the rate of actin treadmilling. We present a one-dimensional driven lattice model, where motors become inactive after delivering their cargo at the tip, or by loosing their cargo to a cargoless neighbor. The results suggest that the experimental observations may be explained by the formation of traffic jams that form at the tip. The model is solved using a novel application of mean-field and shock analysis. We find a new class of shocks that undergo intermittent collapses. Extensions with attachment and detachment events and relevance to experiments are briefly described.

  9. Molecular engineering of a backwards-moving myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2004-02-05

    All members of the diverse myosin superfamily have a highly conserved globular motor domain that contains the actin- and nucleotide-binding sites and produces force and movement. The light-chain-binding domain connects the motor domain to a variety of functionally specialized tail domains and amplifies small structural changes in the motor domain through rotation of a lever arm. Myosins move on polarized actin filaments either forwards to the barbed (+) or backwards to the pointed (-) end. Here, we describe the engineering of an artificial backwards-moving myosin from three pre-existing molecular building blocks. These blocks are: a forward-moving class I myosin motor domain, a directional inverter formed by a four-helix bundle segment of human guanylate-binding protein-1 and an artificial lever arm formed by two alpha-actinin repeats. Our results prove that reverse-direction movement of myosins can be achieved simply by rotating the direction of the lever arm 180 degrees.

  10. Facile assembly of light-driven molecular motors onto a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawen; Chen, Kuang-Yen; Carroll, Gregory T; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-10-28

    In order to improve the rotary motion of surface assembled light-driven molecular motors, tetra-acid-functionalized motors were bound to an amine-coated quartz surface without prior activation of the acid groups. In contrast to earlier bipodal motors, the tetravalent motor showed no significant reduction in the rotation speed when attached to a surface.

  11. Prototypes of molecular motors based on star-shaped organometallic ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Vives, Guillaume; de Rouville, Henri-Pierre Jacquot; Carella, Alexandre; Launay, Jean-Pierre; Rapenne, Gwénaël

    2009-06-01

    This tutorial review presents our strategy to control the rotation in a molecular rotary motor, and the family of star-shaped ruthenium complexes designed to perform such a task. The molecules have a piano-stool structure with a "stator" meant to be grafted on a surface, and a "rotor" bearing redox-active groups, so that addressing the molecule with nano-electrodes would trigger rotation.

  12. Macroscopic contraction of a gel induced by the integrated motion of light-driven molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Maaloum, Mounir; Rawiso, Michel; Kulic, Igor; Foy, Justin T.; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Making molecular machines that can be useful in the macroscopic world is a challenging long-term goal of nanoscience. Inspired by the protein machinery found in biological systems, and based on the theoretical understanding of the physics of motion at the nanoscale, organic chemists have developed a number of molecules that can produce work by contraction or rotation when triggered by various external chemical or physical stimuli. In particular, basic molecular switches that commute between at least two thermodynamic minima and more advanced molecular motors that behave as dissipative units working far from equilibrium when fuelled with external energy have been reported. However, despite recent progress, the ultimate challenge of coordinating individual molecular motors in a continuous mechanical process that can have a measurable effect at the macroscale has remained elusive. Here, we show that by integrating light-driven unidirectional molecular rotors as reticulating units in a polymer gel, it is possible to amplify their individual motions to achieve macroscopic contraction of the material. Our system uses the incoming light to operate under far-from-equilibrium conditions, and the work produced by the motor in the photostationary state is used to twist the entangled polymer chains up to the collapse of the gel. Our design could be a starting point to integrate nanomotors in metastable materials to store energy and eventually to convert it.

  13. Macroscopic contraction of a gel induced by the integrated motion of light-driven molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Maaloum, Mounir; Rawiso, Michel; Kulic, Igor; Foy, Justin T; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Making molecular machines that can be useful in the macroscopic world is a challenging long-term goal of nanoscience. Inspired by the protein machinery found in biological systems, and based on the theoretical understanding of the physics of motion at the nanoscale, organic chemists have developed a number of molecules that can produce work by contraction or rotation when triggered by various external chemical or physical stimuli. In particular, basic molecular switches that commute between at least two thermodynamic minima and more advanced molecular motors that behave as dissipative units working far from equilibrium when fuelled with external energy have been reported. However, despite recent progress, the ultimate challenge of coordinating individual molecular motors in a continuous mechanical process that can have a measurable effect at the macroscale has remained elusive. Here, we show that by integrating light-driven unidirectional molecular rotors as reticulating units in a polymer gel, it is possible to amplify their individual motions to achieve macroscopic contraction of the material. Our system uses the incoming light to operate under far-from-equilibrium conditions, and the work produced by the motor in the photostationary state is used to twist the entangled polymer chains up to the collapse of the gel. Our design could be a starting point to integrate nanomotors in metastable materials to store energy and eventually to convert it.

  14. Extracting the stepping dynamics of molecular motors in living cells from trajectories of single particles.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Augusto; Bruno, Luciana; Levi, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motors are responsible of transporting a wide variety of cargos in the cytoplasm. Current efforts are oriented to characterize the biophysical properties of motors in cells with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of these nanomachines in the complex cellular environment. In this study, we present an algorithm designed to extract motor step sizes and dwell times between steps from trajectories of motors or cargoes driven by motors in cells. The algorithm is based on finding patterns in the trajectory compatible with the behavior expected for a motor step, i.e., a region of confined motion followed by a jump in the position to another region of confined motion with similar characteristics to the previous one. We show that this algorithm allows the analysis of 2D trajectories even if they present complex motion patterns such as active transport interspersed with diffusion and does not require the assumption of a given step size or dwell period. The confidence on the step detection can be easily obtained and allows the evaluation of the confidence of the dwell and step size distributions. To illustrate the possible applications of this algorithm, we analyzed trajectories of myosin-V driven organelles in living cells.

  15. Thermal fluctuations biased for directional motion in molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoshiharu; Taniguchi, Yuichi; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Yanagida, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    Recently developed single molecule measurements have demonstrated that the mechanisms for numerous protein functions involve thermal fluctuation, or Brownian motion. Protein interactions bias the random thermal noise in a manner such that the protein can perform its given functions. This phenomenon has been observed in molecular motor unidirectional movement where Brownian motion is used to preferentially bind the motor heads in one direction causing directional motility. This is analogous to that used by proteins in which spontaneous structural fluctuations are used to switch function. Seeing that two very different systems implement similar mechanisms suggests there exists a general scheme applied by diverse proteins that exploits thermal fluctuations in order to achieve their respective functions.

  16. Mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kjelstrup, S; Rubi, J M; Pagonabarraga, I; Bedeaux, D

    2013-11-28

    We show that the kinetics of a molecular motor fueled by ATP and operating between a deactivated and an activated state can be derived from the principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics applied to the mesoscopic domain. The activation by ATP, the possible slip of the motor, as well as the forward stepping carrying a load are viewed as slow diffusion along a reaction coordinate. Local equilibrium is assumed in the reaction coordinate spaces, making it possible to derive the non-equilibrium thermodynamic description. Using this scheme, we find expressions for the velocity of the motor, in terms of the driving force along the spacial coordinate, and for the chemical reaction that brings about activation, in terms of the chemical potentials of the reactants and products which maintain the cycle. The second law efficiency is defined, and the velocity corresponding to maximum power is obtained for myosin movement on actin. Experimental results fitting with the description are reviewed, giving a maximum efficiency of 0.45 at a myosin headgroup velocity of 5 × 10(-7) m s(-1). The formalism allows the introduction and test of meso-level models, which may be needed to explain experiments.

  17. Actin-based motility propelled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadyayula, Sai Pramod; Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-09-01

    Actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes propelled by filament end-tracking molecular motors has been simulated. Such systems may act as potential nanoscale actuators and shuttles useful in sorting and sensing biomolecules. Filaments are modeled as three-dimensional elastic springs distributed on one end of the capsule and persistently attached to the motile bacterial surface through an end-tracking motor complex. Filament distribution is random, and monomer concentration decreases linearly as a function of position on the bacterial surface. Filament growth rate increases with monomer concentration but decreases with the extent of compression. The growing filaments exert push-pull forces on the bacterial surface. In addition to forces, torques arise due to two factors—distribution of motors on the bacterial surface, and coupling of torsion upon growth due to the right-handed helicity of F-actin—causing the motile object to undergo simultaneous translation and rotation. The trajectory of the bacterium is simulated by performing a force and torque balance on the bacterium. All simulations use a fixed value of torsion. Simulations show strong alignment of the filaments and the long axis of the bacterium along the direction of motion. In the absence of torsion, the bacterial surface essentially moves along the direction of the long axis. When a small amount of the torsion is applied to the bacterial surface, the bacterium is seen to move in right-handed helical trajectories, consistent with experimental observations.

  18. Microscale transport and sorting by kinesin molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lili; Moorjani, Samira G; Jackson, Thomas N; Hancock, William O

    2004-03-01

    As biomolecular detection systems shrink in size, there is an increasing demand for systems that transport and position materials at micron- and nanoscale dimensions. Our goal is to combine cellular transport machinery-kinesin molecular motors and microtubules-with integrated optoelectronics into a hybrid biological/engineered microdevice that will bind, transport, and detect specific proteins, DNA/RNA molecules, viruses, or cells. For microscale transport, 1.5 microm deep channels were created with SU-8 photoresist on glass, kinesin motors adsorbed to the bottom of the channels, and the channel walls used to bend and redirect microtubules moving over the immobilized motors. Novel channel geometries were investigated as a means to redirect and sort microtubules moving in these channels. We show that DC and AC electric fields are sufficient to transport microtubules in solution, establishing an approach for redirecting microtubules moving in channels. Finally, we inverted the geometry to demonstrate that kinesins can transport gold nanowires along surface immobilized microtubules, providing a model for nanoscale directed assembly.

  19. Visible-Light Excitation of a Molecular Motor with an Extended Aromatic Core

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Exploring routes to visible-light-driven rotary motors, the possibility of red-shifting the excitation wavelength of molecular motors by extension of the aromatic core is studied. Introducing a dibenzofluorenyl moiety in a standard molecular motor resulted in red-shifting of the absorption spectrum. UV/vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy showed that these motors could be isomerized with light of wavelengths up to 490 nm and that the structural modification did not impair the anticipated rotary behavior. Extension of the aromatic core is therefore a suitable strategy to apply in pursuit of visible-light-driven molecular motors. PMID:28248510

  20. Molecular Architecture of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The flagellum is one of the most sophisticated self-assembling molecular machines in bacteria. Powered by the proton-motive force, the flagellum rapidly rotates in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, which ultimately controls bacterial motility and behavior. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica have served as important model systems for extensive genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of the flagellum, providing unparalleled insights into its structure, function, and gene regulation. Despite these advances, our understanding of flagellar assembly and rotational mechanisms remains incomplete, in part because of the limited structural information available regarding the intact rotor–stator complex and secretion apparatus. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has become a valuable imaging technique capable of visualizing the intact flagellar motor in cells at molecular resolution. Because the resolution that can be achieved by cryo-ET with large bacteria (such as E. coli and S. enterica) is limited, analysis of small-diameter bacteria (including Borrelia burgdorferi and Campylobacter jejuni) can provide additional insights into the in situ structure of the flagellar motor and other cellular components. This review is focused on the application of cryo-ET, in combination with genetic and biophysical approaches, to the study of flagellar structures and its potential for improving the understanding of rotor–stator interactions, the rotational switching mechanism, and the secretion and assembly of flagellar components. PMID:24697492

  1. Stochastic thermodynamics of single enzymes and molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Seifert, U

    2011-03-01

    For a single enzyme or molecular motor operating in an aqueous solution of non-equilibrated solute concentrations, a thermodynamic description is developed on the level of an individual trajectory of transitions between states. The concept of internal energy, intrinsic entropy and free energy for states follows from a microscopic description using one assumption on time scale separation. A first-law energy balance then allows the unique identification of the heat dissipated in one transition. Consistency with the second law on the ensemble level enforces both stochastic entropy as third contribution to the entropy change involved in one transition and the local detailed balance condition for the ratio between forward and backward rates for any transition. These results follow without assuming weak coupling between the enzyme and the solutes, ideal solution behavior or mass action law kinetics. The present approach highlights both the crucial role of the intrinsic entropy of each state and the physically questionable role of chemiostats for deriving the first law for molecular motors subject to an external force under realistic conditions.

  2. Active fluidization of polymer networks through molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, D; Duggan, C; Saha, D; Smith, D; Käs, J

    2002-03-28

    Entangled polymer solutions and melts exhibit elastic, solid-like resistance to quick deformations and a viscous, fluid-like response to slow deformations. This viscoelastic behaviour reflects the dynamics of individual polymer chains driven by brownian motion: since individual chains can only move in a snake-like fashion through the mesh of surrounding polymer molecules, their diffusive transport, described by reptation, is so slow that the relaxation of suddenly imposed stress is delayed. Entangled polymer solutions and melts therefore elastically resist deforming motions that occur faster than the stress relaxation time. Here we show that the protein myosin II permits active control over the viscoelastic behaviour of actin filament solutions. We find that when each actin filament in a polymerized actin solution interacts with at least one myosin minifilament, the stress relaxation time of the polymer solution is significantly shortened. We attribute this effect to myosin's action as a 'molecular motor', which allows it to interact with randomly oriented actin filaments and push them through the solution, thus enhancing longitudinal filament motion. By superseding reptation with sliding motion, the molecular motors thus overcome a fundamental principle of complex fluids: that only depolymerization makes an entangled, isotropic polymer solution fluid for quick deformations.

  3. High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy of a Molecular Rotary Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingos, Sergio R.; Cnossen, Arjen; Perez, Cristobal; Buma, Wybren Jan; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Schnell, Melanie

    2017-06-01

    To develop synthetic molecular motors and machinery that can mimic their biological counterparts has become a stimulating quest in modern synthetic chemistry. Gas phase studies of these simpler synthetic model systems provide the necessary isolated conditions that facilitate the elucidation of their structural intricacies. We report the first high-resolution rotational study of a synthetic molecular rotary motor based on chiral overcrowded alkenes using chirp-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Rotational constants and quartic centrifugal distortion constants were determined based on a fit using more than two hundred rotational transitions spanning 5≤J≤21 in the 2-4 GHz frequency range. Despite the lack of polar groups, the rotor's asymmetry produces strong a- and b-type rotational transitions arising from a single predominant conformer. Evidence for fragmentation of the rotor allows for unambiguous identification of the isolated rotor components. The experimental spectroscopic parameters of the rotor are compared and discussed against current high-level ab initio and density functional theory methods. Vicario et al. Chem. Commun., 5910-5912 (2005) Brown et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum., 79, 053103 (2008)

  4. Protonmotive force: development of electrostatic drivers for synthetic molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Crowley, James D; Steele, Ian M; Bosnich, Brice

    2006-12-04

    Ferrocene has been investigated as a platform for developing protonmotive electrostatic drivers for molecular motors. When two 3-pyridine groups are substituted to the (rapidly rotating) cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings of ferrocene, one on each Cp, it is shown that the (Cp) eclipsed, pi-stacked rotameric conformation is preferred both in solution and in the solid state. Upon quaternization of both of the pyridines substituents, either by protonation or by alkylation, it is shown that the preferred rotameric conformation is one where the pyridinium groups are rotated away from the fully pi-stacked conformation. Electrostatic calculations indicate that the rotation is caused by the electrostatic repulsion between the charges. Consistently, when the pi-stacking energy is increased pi-stacked population increases, and conversely when the electrostatic repulsion is increased pi-stacked population is decreased. This work serves to provide an approximate estimate of the amount of torque that the electrostatically driven ferrocene platform can generate when incorporated into a molecular motor. The overall conclusion is that the electrostatic interaction energy between dicationic ferrocene dipyridyl systems is similar to the pi-stacking interaction energy and, consequently, at least tricationic systems are required to fully uncouple the pi-stacked pyridine substituents.

  5. Molecular modelling and drug design.

    PubMed

    Meyer, E F; Swanson, S M; Williams, J A

    2000-03-01

    Drug design is a creative act of the same magnitude as composing, sculpting, or writing. The results can touch the lives of millions, but the creator is rarely one scientist and the rewards are distributed differently in the arts than in the sciences. The mechanisms of creativity are the same, i.e., incremental (plodding from darkness to dawn) or sudden (the "Eureka" effect) realization, but both are poorly understood. Creativity remains a human characteristic, but it is directly related to the tools available, especially computer software and hardware. While modelling software continues to mature, very little new has evolved in terms of hardware. Here, we discuss the history of molecular modelling and describe two novel modelling tools, a haptic device and a program, SCULPT, to generate solid molecular models at atomic resolution.

  6. Design of a Mode Conversion Ultrasonic Motor for Position Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeLetty, Ronan; Bouchilloux, Philippe; Claeyssen, Frank; Lhermet, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    The many useful characteristics of ultrasonic motors, such as high holding torques, and high torque at low speeds, have made them the subject of increasing interest. In addition, several of their characteristics make them attractive for aerospace applications: they have a torque to weight ratio, and they require neither gearing mechanisms nor lubrication. Moreover, they create negligible magnetic fields, and conversely, they are not affected by external magnetic fields. Ultrasonic motors based on bolt-tightened structures offer simplicity and high stress capability. They use the inverse piezoelectric effect in the stator to produce vibrational energy, which is transferred to the rotor by friction. We designed a bolt-tightened ultrasonic motor using numerical modelling tools (finite element and electromechanical circuit analyses), creating an equivalent circuit model that takes into account the electromechanical energy conversion in the stator and the contact between the stator and the rotor. Analysis of the circuit gives insight into the behavior of the motor and allows its performance to be calculated. Two prototypes of the motor were built; their transient responses and other quantities, such as starting torque, were measured. In this paper, we discuss the numerical and the experimental results, and demonstrate the usefulness of numerical analysis in designing ultrasonic motors and estimating their performance.

  7. Design of a Mode Conversion Ultrasonic Motor for Position Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeLetty, Ronan; Bouchilloux, Philippe; Claeyssen, Frank; Lhermet, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    The many useful characteristics of ultrasonic motors, such as high holding torques, and high torque at low speeds, have made them the subject of increasing interest. In addition, several of their characteristics make them attractive for aerospace applications: they have a torque to weight ratio, and they require neither gearing mechanisms nor lubrication. Moreover, they create negligible magnetic fields, and conversely, they are not affected by external magnetic fields. Ultrasonic motors based on bolt-tightened structures offer simplicity and high stress capability. They use the inverse piezoelectric effect in the stator to produce vibrational energy, which is transferred to the rotor by friction. We designed a bolt-tightened ultrasonic motor using numerical modelling tools (finite element and electromechanical circuit analyses), creating an equivalent circuit model that takes into account the electromechanical energy conversion in the stator and the contact between the stator and the rotor. Analysis of the circuit gives insight into the behavior of the motor and allows its performance to be calculated. Two prototypes of the motor were built; their transient responses and other quantities, such as starting torque, were measured. In this paper, we discuss the numerical and the experimental results, and demonstrate the usefulness of numerical analysis in designing ultrasonic motors and estimating their performance.

  8. MOV motor and gearbox performance under design basis loads

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes the results of valve testing sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The research objective was to evaluate the capabilities of specific actuator motor and gearbox assemblies under various design basis loading conditions. The testing was performed using the motor-operated valve load simulator, a test fixture that simulates the stem load profiles a valve actuator would experience when closing a valve against flow and pressure loadings. The authors tested five typical motors (four ac motors and one dc motor) with three gearbox assemblies at conditions a motor might experience in a power plant, including such off-normal conditions as operation at high temperature and reduced voltage. The authors also determined the efficiency of the actuator gearbox. The testing produced the following significant results: all five motors operated at or above their rated torque during tests at full voltage and ambient temperature; for all five motors (dc as well as ac), the actual torque loss due to voltage degradation was greater than the torque loss predicted using common methods; startup torques in locked rotor tests compared well with stall torques in dynamometer-type tests; the methods commonly used to predict torque losses due to elevated operating temperatures sometimes bounded the actual losses, but not in all cases; the greatest discrepancy involved the prediction for the dc motor; running efficiencies published by the manufacturer for actuator gearboxes were higher than the actual efficiencies determined from testing, in some instances, the published pullout efficiencies were also higher than the actual values; operation of the gearbox at elevated temperature did not affect the operating efficiency.

  9. Kinesin molecular motors: Transport pathways, receptors, and human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2001-06-01

    Kinesin molecular motor proteins are responsible for many of the major microtubule-dependent transport pathways in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identity of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. Kinesin-II recently was found to be required for transport in motile and nonmotile cilia and flagella where it is essential for proper left-right determination in mammalian development, sensory function in ciliated neurons, and opsin transport and viability in photoreceptors. Thus, these pathways and proteins may be prominent contributors to several human diseases including ciliary dyskinesias, situs inversus, and retinitis pigmentosa. Kinesin-I is needed to move many different types of cargoes in neuronal axons. Two candidates for receptor proteins that attach kinesin-I to vesicular cargoes were recently found. One candidate, sunday driver, is proposed to both link kinesin-I to an unknown vesicular cargo and to bind and organize the mitogen-activated protein kinase components of a c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling module. A second candidate, amyloid precursor protein, is proposed to link kinesin-I to a different, also unknown, class of axonal vesicles. The finding of a possible functional interaction between kinesin-I and amyloid precursor protein may implicate kinesin-I based transport in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Optogenetic control of molecular motors and organelle distributions in cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liting; Che, Daphne; Zhang, Kai; Ong, Qunxiang; Guo, Shunling; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-05-21

    Intracellular transport and distribution of organelles play important roles in diverse cellular functions, including cell polarization, intracellular signaling, cell survival, and apoptosis. Here, we report an optogenetic strategy to control the transport and distribution of organelles by light. This is achieved by optically recruiting molecular motors onto organelles through the heterodimerization of Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) and its interacting partner CIB1. CRY2 and CIB1 dimerize within subseconds upon exposure to blue light, which requires no exogenous ligands and low intensity of light. We demonstrate that mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lysosomes can be driven toward the cell periphery upon light-induced recruitment of kinesin, or toward the cell nucleus upon recruitment of dynein. Light-induced motor recruitment and organelle movements are repeatable, reversible, and can be achieved at subcellular regions. This light-controlled organelle redistribution provides a new strategy for studying the causal roles of organelle transport and distribution in cellular functions in living cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stepping molecular motor amid Lévy white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, Bartosz; Valenti, Davide; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Bier, Martin; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2015-04-01

    We consider a model of a stepping molecular motor consisting of two connected heads. Directional motion of the stepper takes place along a one-dimensional track. Each head is subject to a periodic potential without spatial reflection symmetry. When the potential for one head is switched on, it is switched off for the other head. Additionally, the system is subject to the influence of symmetric, white Lévy noise that mimics the action of external random forcing. The stepper exhibits motion with a preferred direction which is examined by analyzing the median of the displacement of a midpoint between the positions of the two heads. We study the modified dynamics of the stepper by numerical simulations. We find flux reversals as noise parameters are changed. Speed and direction appear to very sensitively depend on characteristics of the noise.

  12. Stepping molecular motor amid Lévy white noise.

    PubMed

    Lisowski, Bartosz; Valenti, Davide; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Bier, Martin; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2015-04-01

    We consider a model of a stepping molecular motor consisting of two connected heads. Directional motion of the stepper takes place along a one-dimensional track. Each head is subject to a periodic potential without spatial reflection symmetry. When the potential for one head is switched on, it is switched off for the other head. Additionally, the system is subject to the influence of symmetric, white Lévy noise that mimics the action of external random forcing. The stepper exhibits motion with a preferred direction which is examined by analyzing the median of the displacement of a midpoint between the positions of the two heads. We study the modified dynamics of the stepper by numerical simulations. We find flux reversals as noise parameters are changed. Speed and direction appear to very sensitively depend on characteristics of the noise.

  13. Report on Toyota/Prius Motor Design and Manufacturing Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2004-07-28

    In today's hybrid vehicle market the Toyota Prius drive system is currently considered the leader in electrical, mechanical, and manufacturing innovations. It is significant that in today's marketplace Toyota is able to manufacture and sell the vehicle for a profit. This project's objective is to analyze and study the Prius drive system to understand the design and manufacturing mechanisms Toyota utilized to achieved their performance and cost goals. During the course of this research effort ORNL has dissected both the 2003 and 2004 Toyota/Prius drive motors. This study is focused primarily on motor design considerations and an assessment of manufacturing issues.

  14. On the way to rotaxane-based molecular motors: studies in molecular mobility and topological chirality.

    PubMed

    Schalley, C A; Beizai, K; Vögtle, F

    2001-06-01

    ATP synthase represents a machine at the molecular level which couples the rotation of an axle in a wheel with the endergonic production of ATP, the general source of chemical energy in the cell. The natural system prototypically bears all features of a macroscopic motor: a rotor within a stator held by a membrane and fueled by a difference in chemical potential in the form of a proton gradient combined with a machine for ATP production. The assembly of axle and wheel to a rotor device reminds one very much of a rotaxane. In this Account, we discuss some important features of motors and their (potential) realization in simpler artificial model systems, that is, the molecular mobility of mechanically bound molecules, the importance of chirality for unidirectional motion, the sources of energy for driving the rotation, and the potential of using membranes and surfaces for ordering a large number of devices to achieve macroscopic effects.

  15. A theoretical model of a molecular-motor-powered pump.

    PubMed

    Bull, Joseph L; Hunt, Alan J; Meyhöfer, Edgar

    2005-03-01

    The motion of a cylindrical bead in a fluid contained within a two-dimensional channel is investigated using the boundary element method as a model of a biomolecular-motor-powered microfluidics pump. The novelty of the pump lies in the use of motor proteins (kinesin) to power the bead motion and the few moving parts comprising the pump. The performance and feasibility of this pump design is investigated using two model geometries: a straight channel, and a curved channel with two concentric circular walls. In the straight channel geometry, it is shown that increasing the bead radius relative to the channel width, increases the flow rate at the expense of increasing the force the kinesins must generate in order to move the bead. Pump efficiency is generally higher for larger bead radii, and larger beads can support higher imposed loads. In the circular channel geometry, it is shown that bead rotation modifies the force required to move the bead and that shifting the bead inward slightly reduces the required force. Bead rotation has a minimal effect on flow rate. Recirculation regions, which can develop between the bead and the channel walls, influence the stresses and force on the bead. These results suggest this pump design is feasible, and the kinesin molecules provide sufficient force to deliver pico- to atto- l/s flows.

  16. Kinesin Motor Enzymology: Chemistry, Structure, and Physics of Nanoscale Molecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Cochran, J C

    2015-09-01

    Molecular motors are enzymes that convert chemical potential energy into controlled kinetic energy for mechanical work inside cells. Understanding the biophysics of these motors is essential for appreciating life as well as apprehending diseases that arise from motor malfunction. This review focuses on kinesin motor enzymology with special emphasis on the literature that reports the chemistry, structure and physics of several different kinesin superfamily members.

  17. Adhesion of photon-driven molecular motors to surfaces via 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions: effect of interfacial interactions on molecular motion.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Gregory T; London, Gábor; Landaluce, Tatiana Fernández; Rudolf, Petra; Feringa, Ben L

    2011-01-25

    We report the attachment of altitudinal light-driven molecular motors to surfaces using 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions. Molecular motors were designed containing azide or alkyne groups for attachment to alkyne- or azide-modified surfaces. Surface attachment was characterized by UV-vis, IR, XPS, and ellipsometry measurements. Surface-bound motors were found to undergo photochemical and thermal isomerizations consistent with unidirectional rotation in solution. Confinement at a surface was found to reduce the rate of the thermal isomerization process. The rate of thermal isomerization was also dependent on the surface coverage of the motors. In solution, changes in the UV-vis signal that accompany thermal isomerization can be fit with a single monoexponential decay. In contrast, thermal isomerization of the surface-bound motors does not follow a single monoexponential decay and was found to fit a biexponential decay. Both one- and two-legged motors were attached to surfaces. The kinetics of thermal isomerization was not affected by the valency of attachment, indicating that the changes in kinetics from solution to surface systems are related to interactions between the surface-bound motors.

  18. Design and use of brushless dc motor without detent torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wavre, N.

    1990-03-01

    Two applications of motors which cannot accept a residual detent torque due to the rotor magnets are presented. The first application concerns the joint mechanism of the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite/HERA project. The brushless torque motor drives a reversible harmonic drive with a high gear ratio of 500. The motor is designed to produce a stall torque of 3.0 Nm with a total imput power of 30 W for a total weight of 1.5 kg, with a no load speed of 500 rpm. The second application concerns the driving mechanism of an infrared sensor. The need to take all geometrical and magnetic parameters into consideration in designing space mechanisms is stressed.

  19. Motor Mania: Revving Up for Technological Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Wendy M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2008-01-01

    Students get very excited when confronted with problems that they find meaningful. Problem-based learning lets students solve problems using the strategies and tools that scientists use. While developing solutions via technological design and construction, students experience firsthand the relationship between science and technology. To capture…

  20. Design and Development of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging, the visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular, subcellular level, or even molecular level in living subjects, has rapidly gained importance in the dawning era of personalized medicine. Molecular imaging takes advantage of the traditional diagnostic imaging techniques and introduces molecular imaging probes to determine the expression of indicative molecular markers at different stages of diseases and disorders. As a key component of molecular imaging, molecular imaging probe must be able to specifically reach the target of interest in vivo while retaining long enough to be detected. A desirable molecular imaging probe with clinical translation potential is expected to have unique characteristics. Therefore, design and development of molecular imaging probe is frequently a challenging endeavor for medicinal chemists. This review summarizes the general principles of molecular imaging probe design and some fundamental strategies of molecular imaging probe development with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:20388106

  1. External forces influence the elastic coupling effects during cargo transport by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Cellular transport is achieved by the cooperative action of molecular motors which are elastically linked to a common cargo. When the motors pull on the cargo at the same time, they experience fluctuating elastic strain forces induced by the stepping of the other motors. These elastic coupling forces can influence the motors' stepping and unbinding behavior and thereby the ability to transport cargos. Based on a generic single motor description, we introduce a framework that explains the response of two identical molecular motors to a constant external force. In particular, we relate the single motor parameters, the coupling strength and the external load force to the dynamics of the motor pair. We derive four distinct transport regimes and determine how the crossover lines between the regimes depend on the load force. Our description of the overall cargo dynamics takes into account relaxational displacements of the cargo caused by the unbinding of one motor. For large forces and weak elastic coupling these back-shifts dominate the displacements. To develop an intuitive understanding about motor cooperativity during cargo transport, we introduce a time scale for load sharing. This time scale allows us to predict how the regulation of single motor parameters influences the cooperativity. As an example, we show that up-regulating the single motor processivity enhances load sharing of the motor pair.

  2. Design and optimization of a modal- independent linear ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengli; Yao, Zhiyuan

    2014-03-01

    To simplify the design of the linear ultrasonic motor (LUSM) and improve its output performance, a method of modal decoupling for LUSMs is proposed in this paper. The specific embodiment of this method is decoupling of the traditional LUSM stator's complex vibration into two simple vibrations, with each vibration implemented by one vibrator. Because the two vibrators are designed independently, their frequencies can be tuned independently and frequency consistency is easy to achieve. Thus, the method can simplify the design of the LUSM. Based on this method, a prototype modal- independent LUSM is designed and fabricated. The motor reaches its maximum thrust force of 47 N, maximum unloaded speed of 0.43 m/s, and maximum power of 7.85 W at applied voltage of 200 Vpp. The motor's structure is then optimized by controlling the difference between the two vibrators' resonance frequencies to reach larger output speed, thrust, and power. The optimized results show that when the frequency difference is 73 Hz, the output force, speed, and power reach their maximum values. At the input voltage of 200 Vpp, the motor reaches its maximum thrust force of 64.2 N, maximum unloaded speed of 0.76 m/s, maximum power of 17.4 W, maximum thrust-weight ratio of 23.7, and maximum efficiency of 39.6%.

  3. Computer-assisted design in perceptual-motor skills research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A categorization was made of independent variables previously found to be potent in simple perceptual-motor tasks. A computer was then used to generate hypothetical factorial designs. These were evaluated in terms of literature trends and pragmatic criteria. Potential side-effects of machine-assisted research strategy were discussed.

  4. Stator design of a new type of spherical piezoelectric motor.

    PubMed

    Ting, Yung; Tsai, Yu-Ren; Hou, Bing-Kuan; Lin, Shuo-Chun; Lu, Cheng-Chin

    2010-10-01

    The stator design of a new type of spherical motor driven by piezoelectric actuators is developed. A curved piezoelectric actuator is designed to attach to the spherical surface. A series of the curved piezoelectric actuators is laid in a line around a spherical surface. By applying an appropriate voltage signal with phase difference on neighboring actuators, a traveling wave is generated on the hemispherical shell. Each set of curved piezoelectric actuators is designed to provide motion with a single degree-of-freedom (DOF). With two or three sets of the piezoelectric actuators constructed to be mutually perpendicular, the motor can provide 2-DOF or 3-DOF motion. Stator design and analysis and experiment for the 1-, 2-, and 3-DOF conditions are presented in this article. Analytical calculation and experiment results of several fundamental characteristics of the stator are in good agreement. Performance evaluation of rotation speed and torque of the stator and some implementation problems are also addressed.

  5. Optimum linear synchronous motor design for high speed ground transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azukizawa, T.

    1983-10-01

    This paper decribes fundamental concepts pertinent to designing an optimum linear synchronous motor as the propulsion system for high speed ground transportation. The complicated interactions between the key parameters are systematically arranged to show what is essential to determine these parameters. Some important guideposts to determine these parameters are obtained. Particularly, 0.7 tau sub s - 0.75 tau sub s long superconducting magnets are recommended (tau sub s: pole pitch). Also, a control method for economical linear synchronous motor operation is discussed.

  6. Simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhiyuan; Karpeev, Dmitry; Aranson, Igor S.; Bates, Peter W.

    2008-05-01

    We perform Monte Carlo type simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules interacting with molecular motors. We model microtubules as stiff polar rods of equal length exhibiting anisotropic diffusion in the plane. The molecular motors are implicitly introduced by specifying certain probabilistic collision rules resulting in realignment of the rods. This approximation of the complicated microtubule-motor interaction by a simple instant collision allows us to bypass the “computational bottlenecks” associated with the details of the diffusion and the dynamics of motors and the reorientation of microtubules. Consequently, we are able to perform simulations of large ensembles of microtubules and motors on a very large time scale. This simple model reproduces all important phenomenology observed in in vitro experiments: Formation of vortices for low motor density and raylike asters and bundles for higher motor density.

  7. Simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules and molecular motors.

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, Z.; Karpeev, D.; Aranson, I. S.; Bates, P. W.; Michigan State Univ.

    2008-05-01

    We perform Monte Carlo type simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules interacting with molecular motors. We model microtubules as stiff polar rods of equal length exhibiting anisotropic diffusion in the plane. The molecular motors are implicitly introduced by specifying certain probabilistic collision rules resulting in realignment of the rods. This approximation of the complicated microtubule-motor interaction by a simple instant collision allows us to bypass the 'computational bottlenecks' associated with the details of the diffusion and the dynamics of motors and the reorientation of microtubules. Consequently, we are able to perform simulations of large ensembles of microtubules and motors on a very large time scale. This simple model reproduces all important phenomenology observed in in vitro experiments: Formation of vortices for low motor density and raylike asters and bundles for higher motor density.

  8. The reciprocal coordination and mechanics of molecular motors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Laib, Jeneva A; Marin, John A; Bloodgood, Robert A; Guilford, William H

    2009-03-03

    Molecular motors in living cells are involved in whole-cell locomotion, contractility, developmental shape changes, and organelle movement and positioning. Whether motors of different directionality are functionally coordinated in cells or operate in a semirandom "tug of war" is unclear. We show here that anterograde and retrograde microtubule-based motors in the flagella of Chlamydomonas are regulated such that only motors of a common directionality are engaged at any single time. A laser trap was used to position microspheres on the plasma membrane of immobilized paralyzed Chlamydomonas flagella. The anterograde and retrograde movements of the microsphere were measured with nanometer resolution as microtubule-based motors engaged the transmembrane protein FMG-1. An average of 10 motors acted to move the microsphere in either direction. Reversal of direction during a transport event was uncommon, and quiescent periods separated every transport event, suggesting the coordinated and exclusive action of only a single motor type. After a jump to 32 degrees C, temperature-sensitive mutants of kinesin-2 (fla10) showed exclusively retrograde transport events, driven by 7 motors on average. These data suggest that molecular motors in living cells can be reciprocally coordinated to engage simultaneously in large numbers and for exclusive transport in a single direction, even when a mixed population of motors is present. This offers a unique model for studying the mechanics, regulation, and directional coordination of molecular motors in a living intracellular environment.

  9. Design of chemically propelled nanodimer motors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yu-Guo; Kapral, Raymond

    2008-04-28

    The self-propelled motion of nanodimers fueled by a chemical reaction taking place under nonequilibrium steady state conditions is investigated. The nanodimer consists of a pair of catalytic and chemically inactive spheres, in general with different sizes, with a fixed internuclear separation. The solvent in which the dimer moves is treated at a particle-based mesoscopic level using multiparticle collision dynamics. The directed motion of the dimer can be controlled by adjusting the interaction potentials between the solvent molecules and the dimer spheres, the internuclear separation, and sphere sizes. Dimers can be designed so that the directed motion along the internuclear axis occurs in either direction and is much larger than the thermal velocity fluctuations, a condition needed for such nanodimers to perform tasks involving targeted dynamics.

  10. Solid propellant processing factor in rocket motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The ways are described by which propellant processing is affected by choices made in designing rocket engines. Tradeoff studies, design proof or scaleup studies, and special design features are presented that are required to obtain high product quality, and optimum processing costs. Processing is considered to include the operational steps involved with the lining and preparation of the motor case for the grain; the procurement of propellant raw materials; and propellant mixing, casting or extrusion, curing, machining, and finishing. The design criteria, recommended practices, and propellant formulations are included.

  11. Design Methodology for Low-Speed Variable Reluctance Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, John Riden

    Lowering the gear reduction in actuators by utilizing high-torque low-speed motors enables the use of less expensive and simpler gear systems and decreases the overall system inertia. Variable reluctance machines can produce high torque at low speeds. Their static torque, a critical quantity for determination of low speed operation, is compared for three variable reluctance motor design variations using linear analysis. Saturation effects, which are crucial to the accurate determination of static torque, are modeled using a dual energy technique first proposed by Lord Rayleigh. Dual energy techniques utilizing flux tubes and magnetomotive force slices are developed into a numerical method for predicting nonlinear three-dimensional magnetostatic field parameters. The dual energy method offers a compromise between the accurate but laborious finite element method and the speed of simplified lumped parameter magnetic circuit calculations. A two-dimensional dual energy model of a variable reluctance motor is developed. Results of calculations on a 4 kW Oulton machine are compared to measurements and other calculation methods. Finally, as a demonstration, the model is used to evaluate two competing variable reluctance motors for use as replacements for a DC windshield wiper motor.

  12. Enantiopure Functional Molecular Motors Obtained by a Switchable Chiral-Resolution Process.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Gan, Jefri; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-05-17

    Molecular switches, rotors, and motors play an important role in the development of nano-machines and devices, as well as responsive and adaptive functional materials. For unidirectional rotors based on chiral overcrowded alkenes, their stereochemical homogeneity is of crucial importance. Herein, a method to obtain new and functionalizable overcrowded alkenes in enantiopure form is presented. The procedure involves a short synthesis of three steps and a solvent-switchable chiral resolution by using a readily available resolving agent. X-ray crystallography revealed the mode of binding of the motor with the resolving agent, as well as the absolute configuration of the motor. (1) H NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy techniques were used to determine the dynamic behavior of this molecular motor. This method provides rapid access to ample amounts of enantiopure molecular motors, which will greatly facilitate the further development of responsive molecular systems based on chiral overcrowded alkenes.

  13. Myosin-V: a class of unconventional molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Larson, R E

    1996-03-01

    In this review we focus on the biochemical and structural properties of the myosin-V class of unconventional myosins as an example of the diversity of molecular motors within the myosin superfamily. A member of this class was first identified as a novel calmodulin-binding protein in mammalian brain (Larson RE, Pitta DE and Ferro JA (1988). Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, 21: 213-217). To date, the myosin-V class is represented by two molecules from yeast, one from nematodes, several from vertebrates (chickens, rats, mice and humans) and possibly one from plants. The domain structure of these myosins features a highly conserved head containing the ATP-hydrolysis and actin-binding sites, an extended neck composed of six tandem IQ-motifs which are sites for calmodulin binding and a large tail which has coiled-coil segments intercalated with globular regions of as yet unknown function. Biochemical studies on purified myosin-V from vertebrate brains and the description of myosin-V mutants in yeast and mice have made myosin-V one of the best characterized, unconventional myosin classes at the present time, surpassed only by the well-studied myosin-I class.

  14. Harnessing molecular motors for nanoscale pulldown in live cells.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jonathan E; Barzik, Melanie; Drummond, Meghan C; Sutton, Daniel C; Goodman, Spencer M; Morozko, Eva L; Cole, Stacey M; Boukhvalova, Alexandra K; Skidmore, Jennifer; Syam, Diana; Wilson, Elizabeth A; Fitzgerald, Tracy; Rehman, Atteeq U; Martin, Donna M; Boger, Erich T; Belyantseva, Inna A; Friedman, Thomas B

    2017-02-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) regulate assembly of macromolecular complexes, yet remain challenging to study within the native cytoplasm where they normally exert their biological effect. Here we miniaturize the concept of affinity pulldown, a gold-standard in vitro PPI interrogation technique, to perform nanoscale pulldowns (NanoSPDs) within living cells. NanoSPD hijacks the normal process of intracellular trafficking by myosin motors to forcibly pull fluorescently tagged protein complexes along filopodial actin filaments. Using dual-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate complex formation by showing that bait and prey molecules are simultaneously trafficked and actively concentrated into a nanoscopic volume at the tips of filopodia. The resulting molecular traffic jams at filopodial tips amplify fluorescence intensities and allow PPIs to be interrogated using standard epifluorescence microscopy. A rigorous quantification framework and software tool are provided to statistically evaluate NanoSPD data sets. We demonstrate the capabilities of NanoSPD for a range of nuclear and cytoplasmic PPIs implicated in human deafness, in addition to dissecting these interactions using domain mapping and mutagenesis experiments. The NanoSPD methodology is extensible for use with other fluorescent molecules, in addition to proteins, and the platform can be easily scaled for high-throughput applications.

  15. Fluctuation theorems for discrete kinetic models of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggionato, Alessandra; Silvestri, Vittoria

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by discrete kinetic models for non-cooperative molecular motors on periodic tracks, we consider random walks (also not Markov) on quasi one dimensional (1d) lattices, obtained by gluing several copies of a fundamental graph in a linear fashion. We show that, for a suitable class of quasi-1d lattices, the large deviation rate function associated to the position of the walker satisfies a Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry for any choice of the dynamical parameters defining the stochastic walk. This class includes the linear model considered in Lacoste et al (2008 Phys. Rev. E 78 011915). We also derive fluctuation theorems for the time-integrated cycle currents and discuss how the matrix approach of Lacoste et al (2008 Phys. Rev. E 78 011915) can be extended to derive the above Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry for any Markov random walk on {Z} with periodic jump rates. Finally, we review in the present context some large deviation results of Faggionato and Silvestri (2017 Ann. Inst. Henri Poincaré 53 46-78) and give some specific examples with explicit computations.

  16. Coarse-Grained Structural Modeling of Molecular Motors Using Multibody Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Parker, David; Bryant, Zev; Delp, Scott L

    2009-09-01

    Experimental and computational approaches are needed to uncover the mechanisms by which molecular motors convert chemical energy into mechanical work. In this article, we describe methods and software to generate structurally realistic models of molecular motor conformations compatible with experimental data from different sources. Coarse-grained models of molecular structures are constructed by combining groups of atoms into a system of rigid bodies connected by joints. Contacts between rigid bodies enforce excluded volume constraints, and spring potentials model system elasticity. This simplified representation allows the conformations of complex molecular motors to be simulated interactively, providing a tool for hypothesis building and quantitative comparisons between models and experiments. In an example calculation, we have used the software to construct atomically detailed models of the myosin V molecular motor bound to its actin track. The software is available at www.simtk.org.

  17. A chemically powered unidirectional rotary molecular motor based on a palladium redox cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Beatrice S. L.; Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L.

    2016-09-01

    The conversion of chemical energy to drive directional motion at the molecular level allows biological systems, ranging from subcellular components to whole organisms, to perform a myriad of dynamic functions and respond to changes in the environment. Directional movement has been demonstrated in artificial molecular systems, but the fundamental motif of unidirectional rotary motion along a single-bond rotary axle induced by metal-catalysed transformation of chemical fuels has not been realized, and the challenge is to couple the metal-centred redox processes to stepwise changes in conformation to arrive at a full unidirectional rotary cycle. Here, we present the design of an organopalladium-based motor and the experimental demonstration of a 360° unidirectional rotary cycle using simple chemical fuels. Exploiting fundamental reactivity principles in organometallic chemistry enables control of directional rotation and offers the potential of harnessing the wealth of opportunities offered by transition-metal-based catalytic conversions to drive motion and dynamic functions.

  18. DNA polymerase as a molecular motor and pump.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Samudra; Spiering, Michelle M; Dey, Krishna K; Duan, Wentao; Patra, Debabrata; Butler, Peter J; Astumian, R Dean; Benkovic, Stephen J; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-03-25

    DNA polymerase is responsible for synthesizing DNA, a key component in the running of biological machinery. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the diffusive movement of a molecular complex of DNA template and DNA polymerase enhances during nucleotide incorporation into the growing DNA template. The diffusion coefficient of the complex also shows a strong dependence on its inorganic cofactor, Mg2+ ions. When exposed to gradients of either nucleotide or cofactor concentrations, an ensemble of DNA polymerase complex molecules shows collective movement toward regions of higher concentrations. By immobilizing the molecular complex on a patterned gold surface, we demonstrate the fabrication of DNA polymerase-powered fluid pumps. These miniature pumps are capable of transporting fluid and tracer particles in a directional manner with the pumping speed increasing in the presence of the cofactor. The role of DNA polymerase as a micropump opens up avenues for designing miniature fluid pumps using enzymes as engines.

  19. Block 2 Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) conceptual design study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Segmented and monolithic Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) design concepts were evaluated with emphasis on joints and seals. Particular attention was directed to eliminating deficiencies in the SRM High Performance Motor (HPM). The selected conceptual design is described and discussed.

  20. Solid motor diagnostic instrumentation. [design of self-contained instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Arens, W. E.; Wuest, W. S.

    1973-01-01

    A review of typical surveillance and monitoring practices followed during the flight phases of representative solid-propellant upper stages and apogee motors was conducted to evaluate the need for improved flight diagnostic instrumentation on future spacecraft. The capabilities of the flight instrumentation package were limited to the detection of whether or not the solid motor was the cause of failure and to the identification of probable primary failure modes. Conceptual designs of self-contained flight instrumentation packages capable of meeting these reqirements were generated and their performance, typical cost, and unit characteristics determined. Comparisons of a continuous real time and a thresholded hybrid design were made on the basis of performance, mass, power, cost, and expected life. The results of this analysis substantiated the feasibility of a self-contained independent flight instrumentation module as well as the existence of performance margins by which to exploit growth option applications.

  1. Molecular motors robustly drive active gels to a critically connected state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, José; Sheinman, Michael; Sharma, Abhinav; Mackintosh, Fred C.; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2013-09-01

    Living systems naturally exhibit internal driving: active, molecular processes drive non-equilibrium phenomena such as metabolism or migration. Active gels constitute a fascinating class of internally driven matter, in which molecular motors exert localized stresses inside polymer networks. There is evidence that network crosslinking is required to allow motors to induce macroscopic contraction. Yet a quantitative understanding of how network connectivity enables contraction is lacking. Here we show experimentally that myosin motors contract crosslinked actin polymer networks to clusters with a scale-free size distribution. This critical behaviour occurs over an unexpectedly broad range of crosslink concentrations. To understand this robustness, we developed a quantitative model of contractile networks that takes into account network restructuring: motors reduce connectivity by forcing crosslinks to unbind. Paradoxically, to coordinate global contractions, motor activity should be low. Otherwise, motors drive initially well-connected networks to a critical state where ruptures form across the entire network.

  2. Design and construction of the lawnmower, an artificial burnt-bridges motor.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Suzana; Samii, Laleh; Curmi, Paul M G; Linke, Heiner; Zuckermann, Martin J; Forde, Nancy R

    2015-04-01

    Molecular motors of the cell are protein-based, nanoscale machines, which use a variety of strategies to transduce chemical energy into mechanical work in the presence of a large thermal background. The design and construction of artificial molecular motors is one approach to better understand their basic physical principles. Here, we propose the concept of a protein-based, burnt-bridges ratchet, inspired by biological examples. Our concept, the lawnmower, utilizes protease blades to cleave peptide substrates, and uses the asymmetric substrate-product interface arising from productive cleavage to bias subsequent diffusion on the track (lawn). Following experimental screening to select a protease to act as the motor's blades, we chemically couple trypsin to quantum dots and demonstrate activity of the resulting lawnmower construct in solution. Accompanying Brownian dynamics simulations illustrate the importance for processivity of correct protease density on the quantum dot and spacing of substrates on the track. These results lay the groundwork for future tests of the protein-based lawnmower's motor performance characteristics.

  3. Special Feature: Liquids and Structural Glasses Special Feature: An active biopolymer network controlled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Dogic, Zvonimir; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Bendix, Poul M.; MacKintosh, Frederick C.; Hartwig, John H.; Stossel, Thomas P.; Weitz, David A.

    2009-09-01

    We describe an active polymer network in which processive molecular motors control network elasticity. This system consists of actin filaments cross-linked by filamin A (FLNa) and contracted by bipolar filaments of muscle myosin II. The myosin motors stiffen the network by more than two orders of magnitude by pulling on actin filaments anchored in the network by FLNa cross-links, thereby generating internal stress. The stiffening response closely mimics the effects of external stress applied by mechanical shear. Both internal and external stresses can drive the network into a highly nonlinear, stiffened regime. The active stress reaches values that are equivalent to an external stress of 14 Pa, consistent with a 1-pN force per myosin head. This active network mimics many mechanical properties of cells and suggests that adherent cells exert mechanical control by operating in a nonlinear regime where cell stiffness is sensitive to changes in motor activity. This design principle may be applicable to engineering novel biologically inspired, active materials that adjust their own stiffness by internal catalytic control.

  4. Optimum design of electrical motors for multilink manipulators and automated manufacturing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, T.

    The problem of finding the optimum design of electric motors used as actuators in robotic manipulators and in manufacturing machines is addressed. The optimization may provide a minimum time of operation and/or minimum losses of energy for the actuator. The development of design technologies is reviewed, yielding a recommendation for a hierarchical procedure for motor design using small computers. Information from the catalogues of 1800 motors was organized into a computer database, MOTOR-USA. Analysis of the database shows that the DC PM motor has the best performance characteristics among all types of motors. The design of a generalized electric motor is formulated using a doubly excited magnetic field system. The generalized examples of transformer and synchronous motor designs lead to an important result: there exists an optimum machine configuration which remains unchanged when the power of the motor is changed over a broad range.

  5. How Molecular Motors Are Arranged on a Cargo Is Important for Vesicular Transport

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Robert P.; Jia, Zhiyuan; Gross, Steven P.; Yu, Clare C.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial organization of the cell depends upon intracellular trafficking of cargos hauled along microtubules and actin filaments by the molecular motor proteins kinesin, dynein, and myosin. Although much is known about how single motors function, there is significant evidence that cargos in vivo are carried by multiple motors. While some aspects of multiple motor function have received attention, how the cargo itself —and motor organization on the cargo—affects transport has not been considered. To address this, we have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of motors transporting a spherical cargo, subject to thermal fluctuations that produce both rotational and translational diffusion. We found that these fluctuations could exert a load on the motor(s), significantly decreasing the mean travel distance and velocity of large cargos, especially at large viscosities. In addition, the presence of the cargo could dramatically help the motor to bind productively to the microtubule: the relatively slow translational and rotational diffusion of moderately sized cargos gave the motors ample opportunity to bind to a microtubule before the motor/cargo ensemble diffuses out of range of that microtubule. For rapidly diffusing cargos, the probability of their binding to a microtubule was high if there were nearby microtubules that they could easily reach by translational diffusion. Our simulations found that one reason why motors may be approximately 100 nm long is to improve their ‘on’ rates when attached to comparably sized cargos. Finally, our results suggested that to efficiently regulate the number of active motors, motors should be clustered together rather than spread randomly over the surface of the cargo. While our simulation uses the specific parameters for kinesin, these effects result from generic properties of the motors, cargos, and filaments, so they should apply to other motors as well. PMID:21573204

  6. How molecular motors are arranged on a cargo is important for vesicular transport.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Robert P; Jia, Zhiyuan; Gross, Steven P; Yu, Clare C

    2011-05-01

    The spatial organization of the cell depends upon intracellular trafficking of cargos hauled along microtubules and actin filaments by the molecular motor proteins kinesin, dynein, and myosin. Although much is known about how single motors function, there is significant evidence that cargos in vivo are carried by multiple motors. While some aspects of multiple motor function have received attention, how the cargo itself--and motor organization on the cargo--affects transport has not been considered. To address this, we have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of motors transporting a spherical cargo, subject to thermal fluctuations that produce both rotational and translational diffusion. We found that these fluctuations could exert a load on the motor(s), significantly decreasing the mean travel distance and velocity of large cargos, especially at large viscosities. In addition, the presence of the cargo could dramatically help the motor to bind productively to the microtubule: the relatively slow translational and rotational diffusion of moderately sized cargos gave the motors ample opportunity to bind to a microtubule before the motor/cargo ensemble diffuses out of range of that microtubule. For rapidly diffusing cargos, the probability of their binding to a microtubule was high if there were nearby microtubules that they could easily reach by translational diffusion. Our simulations found that one reason why motors may be approximately 100 nm long is to improve their 'on' rates when attached to comparably sized cargos. Finally, our results suggested that to efficiently regulate the number of active motors, motors should be clustered together rather than spread randomly over the surface of the cargo. While our simulation uses the specific parameters for kinesin, these effects result from generic properties of the motors, cargos, and filaments, so they should apply to other motors as well.

  7. Engineering applications of biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Hess, Henry

    2011-08-15

    Biomolecular motors, in particular motor proteins from the kinesin and myosin families, can be used to explore engineering applications of molecular motors in general. Their outstanding performance enables the experimental study of hybrid systems, where bio-inspired functions such as sensing, actuation, and transport rely on the nanoscale generation of mechanical force. Scaling laws and theoretical studies demonstrate the optimality of biomolecular motor designs and inform the development of synthetic molecular motors.

  8. Defocused Imaging of UV-Driven Surface-Bound Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Krajnik, Bartosz; Chen, Jiawen; Watson, Matthew A; Cockroft, Scott L; Feringa, Ben L; Hofkens, Johan

    2017-05-31

    Synthetic molecular motors continue to attract great interest due to their ability to transduce energy into nanomechanical motion, the potential to do work and drive systems out-of-equilibrium. Of particular interest are unidirectional rotary molecular motors driven by chemical fuel or light. Probing the mechanistic details of their operation at the single-molecule level is hampered by the diffraction limit, which prevents the collection of dynamic positional information by traditional optical methods. Here, we use defocused wide-field imaging to examine the unidirectional rotation of individual molecular rotary motors on a quartz surface in unprecedented detail. The sequential occupation of nanomechanical states during the UV and heat-induced cycle of rotation are directly imaged in real-time. The approach will undoubtedly prove important in elucidating the mechanistic details and assessing the utility of novel synthetic molecular motors in the future.

  9. Rational design of DNA motors: fuel optimization through single-molecule fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Liber, Miran; Masoud, Rula; Plavner, Noa; Nir, Eyal

    2013-08-14

    While numerous DNA-based molecular machines have been developed in recent years, high operational yield and speed remain a major challenge. To understand the reasons for the limited performance, and to find rational solutions, we applied single-molecule fluorescence techniques and conducted a detailed study of the reactions involved in the operation of a model system comprised of a bipedal DNA walker that strides on a DNA origami track powered by interactions with fuel and antifuel strands. Analysis of the kinetic profiles of the leg-lifting reactions indicates a pseudo-first-order antifuel binding mechanism leading to a rapid and complete leg-lifting, indicating that the fuel-removal reaction is not responsible for the 1% operational yield observed after six steps. Analysis of the leg-placing reactions showed that although increased concentrations of fuel increase the reaction rate, they decrease the yield by consecutively binding the motor and leading to an undesirable trapped state. Recognizing this, we designed asymmetrical hairpin-fuels that by regulating the reaction hierarchy avoid consecutive binding. Motors operating with the improved fuels show 74% yield after 12 consecutive reactions, a dramatic increase over the 1% observed for motors operating with nonhairpin fuels. This work demonstrates that studying the mechanisms of the reactions involved in the operation of DNA-based molecular machines using single-molecule fluorescence can facilitate rationally designed improvements that increase yield and speed and promote the applicability of DNA-based machines.

  10. Effects of the chemomechanical stepping cycle on the traffic of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Stefan; Chai, Yan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2008-10-01

    We discuss effects of the stepping kinetics of molecular motors on their traffic behavior on crowded filaments using a simple two-state chemomechanical cycle. While the general traffic behavior is quite robust with respect to the detailed kinetics of the step, a few observable parameters exhibit a strong dependence on these parameters. Most strikingly, the effective unbinding rate of the motors may both increase and decrease with increasing traffic density, depending on the details of the motor step. Likewise the run length either exhibits a strong decrease or almost no dependence on the traffic density. We compare our theoretical results with recent experimental observations on motor traffic.

  11. Enhanced Diffusion of Molecular Motors in the Presence of Adenosine Triphosphate and External Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Ryota; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The diffusion of a molecular motor in the presence of a constant external force is considered on the basis of a simple theoretical model. The motor is represented by a Brownian particle moving in a series of parabolic potentials placed periodically on a line, and the potential is switched stochastically from one parabola to another by a chemical reaction, which corresponds to the hydrolysis or synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in motor proteins. It is found that the diffusion coefficient as a function of the force exhibits peaks. The mechanism of this diffusion enhancement and the possibility of observing it in F1-ATPase, a biological rotary motor, are discussed.

  12. Symposium FF: Molecular Motors, Nanomachines, and Active Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-23

    catalytic activity and HMM propelled actin filament sliding may be exploited for highly parallel, far-field light- microscopy based characterization of...stochastic model for motor cooperation based on the known properties of single motor molecules and in vitro bead assays with latex beads that were incubated...scientists from diverse fields working on the conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy. Topics presented spanned the nano- ( single molecule

  13. Transport dynamics of molecular motors that switch between an active and inactive state.

    PubMed

    Pinkoviezky, I; Gov, N S

    2013-08-01

    Molecular motors are involved in key transport processes in the cell. Many of these motors can switch from an active to a nonactive state, either spontaneously or depending on their interaction with other molecules. When active, the motors move processively along the filaments, while when inactive they are stationary. We treat here the simple case of spontaneously switching motors, between the active and inactive states, along an open linear track. We use our recent analogy with vehicular traffic, where we go beyond the mean-field description. We map the phase diagram of this system, and find that it clearly breaks the symmetry between the different phases, as compared to the standard total asymmetric exclusion process. We make several predictions that may be testable using molecular motors in vitro and in living cells.

  14. Towards dynamic control of wettability by using functionalized altitudinal molecular motors on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    London, Gábor; Chen, Kuang-Yen; Carroll, Gregory T; Feringa, Ben L

    2013-08-05

    We report the synthesis of altitudinal molecular motors that contain functional groups in their rotor part. In an approach to achieve dynamic control over the properties of solid surfaces, a hydrophobic perfluorobutyl chain and a relatively hydrophilic cyano group were introduced to the rotor part of the motors. Molecular motors were attached to quartz surfaces by using interfacial 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions. To test the effect of the functional groups on the rotary motion, photochemical and thermal isomerization studies of the motors were performed both in solution and when attached to the surface. We found that the substituents have no significant effect on the thermal and photochemical processes, and the functionalized motors preserved their rotary function both in solution and on a quartz surface. Preliminary results on the influence of the functional groups on surface wettability are also described.

  15. Electric motor designs for attenuating torque disturbance in sensitive space mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, David B.; Fink, Richard A.

    2003-09-01

    When a motion control system introduces unwanted torque jitter and motion anomalies into sensitive space flight optical or positioning mechanisms, the pointing accuracy, positioning capability, or scanning resolution of the mission suffers. Special motion control technology must be employed to provide attenuation of the harmful torque disturbances. Brushless DC (BLDC) Motors with low torque disturbance characteristics have been successfully used on such notable missions as the Hubble Space Telescope when conventional approaches to motor design would not work. Motor designs for low disturbance mechanisms can include two and three phase sinusoidal BLDC motors, BLDC motors without iron teeth, and sometimes skewed or non-integral slot designs for motors commutated with Hall effect devices. The principal components of motor torque disturbance, successful BLDC motor designs for attenuating disturbances, and design trade-offs for optimum performance are examined.

  16. Correlations and symmetry of interactions influence collective dynamics of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis-Garza, Daniel; Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-04-01

    Enzymatic molecules that actively support many cellular processes, including transport, cell division and cell motility, are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. Experimental studies indicate that they interact with each other and they frequently work together in large groups. To understand the mechanisms of collective behavior of motor proteins we study the effect of interactions in the transport of molecular motors along linear filaments. It is done by analyzing a recently introduced class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes that takes into account the intermolecular interactions via thermodynamically consistent approach. We develop a new theoretical method that allows us to compute analytically all dynamic properties of the system. Our analysis shows that correlations play important role in dynamics of interacting molecular motors. Surprisingly, we find that the correlations for repulsive interactions are weaker and more short-range than the correlations for the attractive interactions. In addition, it is shown that symmetry of interactions affect dynamic properties of molecular motors. The implications of these findings for motor proteins transport are discussed. Our theoretical predictions are tested by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations.

  17. Effectiveness, active energy produced by molecular motors, and nonlinear capacitance of the cochlear outer hair cell.

    PubMed

    Spector, Alexander A

    2005-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells are crucial for active hearing. These cells have a unique form of motility, named electromotility, whose main features are the cell's length changes, active force production, and nonlinear capacitance. The molecular motor, prestin, that drives outer hair cell electromotility has recently been identified. We reveal relationships between the active energy produced by the outer hair cell molecular motors, motor effectiveness, and the capacitive properties of the cell membrane. We quantitatively characterize these relationships by introducing three characteristics: effective capacitance, zero-strain capacitance, and zero-resultant capacitance. We show that zero-strain capacitance is smaller than zero-resultant capacitance, and that the effective capacitance is between the two. It was also found that the differences between the introduced capacitive characteristics can be expressed in terms of the active energy produced by the cell's molecular motors. The effectiveness of the cell and its molecular motors is introduced as the ratio of the motors'active energy to the energy of the externally applied electric field. It is shown that the effectiveness is proportional to the difference between zero-strain and zero-resultant capacitance. We analyze the cell and motor's effectiveness within a broad range of cellular parameters and estimate it to be within a range of 12%-30%.

  18. Exclusion and Hierarchy of Time Scales Lead to Spatial Segregation of Molecular Motors in Cellular Protrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkoviezky, I.; Gov, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular motors that carry cargo along biopolymer filaments within cells play a crucial role in the functioning of the cell. In particular, these motors are essential for the formation and maintenance of the cellular protrusions that play key roles in motility and specific functionalities, such as the stereocilia in hair cells. Typically, there are several species of motors, carrying different cargos, that share the same track. Furthermore, it was observed that in the mature stereocilia, the different motors occupy well-segregated bands as a function of distance from the tip. We use a totally asymmetric exclusion process model with two- and three-motor species, to study the conditions that give rise to such spatial patterns. We find that the well-segregated bands appear for motors with a strong hierarchy of attachment or detachment rates. This is a striking example of pattern formation in nonequilibrium, low-dimensional systems.

  19. Exclusion and Hierarchy of Time Scales Lead to Spatial Segregation of Molecular Motors in Cellular Protrusions.

    PubMed

    Pinkoviezky, I; Gov, N S

    2017-01-06

    Molecular motors that carry cargo along biopolymer filaments within cells play a crucial role in the functioning of the cell. In particular, these motors are essential for the formation and maintenance of the cellular protrusions that play key roles in motility and specific functionalities, such as the stereocilia in hair cells. Typically, there are several species of motors, carrying different cargos, that share the same track. Furthermore, it was observed that in the mature stereocilia, the different motors occupy well-segregated bands as a function of distance from the tip. We use a totally asymmetric exclusion process model with two- and three-motor species, to study the conditions that give rise to such spatial patterns. We find that the well-segregated bands appear for motors with a strong hierarchy of attachment or detachment rates. This is a striking example of pattern formation in nonequilibrium, low-dimensional systems.

  20. Mechanism of cooperative behaviour in systems of slow and fast molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Larson, Adam G; Landahl, Eric C; Rice, Sarah E

    2009-06-28

    Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [M. J. Muller, S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2008, 105(12), 4609-4614; S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2005, 102(48), 17284-17289]. Here, we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behaviour of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity approximately 15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behaviour depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors.

  1. Sculpting Molecular Potentials to Design Optimized Materials: The Inverse Design of New Molecular Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    REPORT Final Report on " Sculpting Molecular Potentials to Design Optimized Materials: The Inverse Design of New Molecular Structures" (Agreement...Beratan, Weitao Yang, Michael J. Therien, Koen Clays Duke University Office of Research Support Duke University Durham, NC 27705 - REPORT...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Jul-2009 Final Report on " Sculpting Molecular Potentials to Design Optimized Materials: The Inverse Design of New

  2. Molecular thermodynamics for chemical process design.

    PubMed

    Prausnitz, J M

    1979-08-24

    Chemical process design requires quantitative information on the equilibrium properties of a variety of fluid mixtures. Since the experimental effort needed to provide this information is often prohibitive in cost and time, chemical engineers must utilize rational estimation techniques based on limited experimental data. The basis for such techniques is molecular thermodynamics, a synthesis of classical and statistical thermodynamics, molecular physics, and physical chemistry.

  3. Novel stator design of fan motors using soft magnetic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yu-Sheng; Tsai, Mi-Ching; Hsieh, Min-Fu

    2008-04-01

    Cooling fans are an important device needed in consumer electronic products. To enhance the performance of cooling fans, this paper presents a novel brushless dc motor with a three dimensional stator structure using soft magnetic composite to reduce the hub size and allow more airflow. Four models are designed and their output characteristics are compared using finite element simulation. From the results, one of them is selected for prototyping whose performance appears to meet the requirement. The prototype has a 10% smaller diameter than that of conventional types. Moreover, the operation test shows that the required performance is achieved.

  4. Ultra high resolution stepper motors design, development, performance and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moll, H.; Roeckl, G.

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of stepper motors with steps in the 10 arc sec to 2 arc min range is described. Some of the problem areas, e.g. rotor suspension, tribology aspects and environmental conditions are covered. A summary of achieved test results and the employment in different mechanisms already developed and tested is presented to give some examples of the possible use of this interesting device. Adaptations to military and commercial requirements are proposed and show the wide range of possible applications.

  5. Efficient designs for powering microscale devices with nanoscale biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ting; Kao, Ming-Tse; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Meyhöfer, Edgar

    2006-02-01

    Current MEMS and microfluidic designs require external power sources and actuators, which principally limit such technology. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a number of microfluidic systems into which we can seamlessly integrate a biomolecular motor, kinesin, that transports microtubules by extracting chemical energy from its aqueous working environment. Here we establish that our microfabricated structures, the self-assembly of the bio-derived transducer, and guided, unidirectional transport of microtubules are ideally suited to create engineered arrays for efficiently powering nano- and microscale devices.

  6. Automatic Evolution of Molecular Nanotechnology Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes strategies for automatically generating designs for analog circuits at the molecular level. Software maps out the edges and vertices of potential nanotechnology systems on graphs, then selects appropriate ones through evolutionary or genetic paradigms.

  7. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells. PMID:23587993

  8. Pattern Formations in Polymer-Molecular Motor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Humphrey, David; Duggan, Cynthia; Käs, Josef

    2001-03-01

    In previous studies with the microtubule-kinesin system, organized patterns such as asters and rotating vortices have been seen (Nedelec et al, Nature 1997), which were of a dynamic nature and dependent on active motors. A similar system was constructed using actin and myosin, which displays similar patterns, however, with drastically different dynamics. These patterns arise independent of the initial amount of immediate use energy (in the form of ATP), assembling only upon the near exhaustion of available ATP. Further studies have clearly shown that in fact these patterns are not dependent upon the motor activity of the myosin but its propensity to serve as a cross-linking element in an actin network, with the motor activity serving to prevent the arising of order in the system. We believe the dynamic differences inherent between the two polymer-motor systems studied lies primarily in the structural nature of the motor complexes, with the kinesin complex ordering the system by pushing multiple filaments in a parallel direction, and the myosin complexes disordering the system by pushing filaments in an antiparallel manner.

  9. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, M D

    2013-06-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells.

  10. Kinetic Mechanism of DNA Translocation by the RSC Molecular Motor

    PubMed Central

    Eastlund, Allen; Malik, Shuja Shafi; Fischer, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by chromatin remodeling enzymes requires the translocation of these enzymes along the nucleosomal DNA. Using a fluorescence stopped-flow assay we monitored DNA translocation by a minimal RSC motor and through global analysis of these time courses we have determined that this motor has a macroscopic translocation rate of 2.9 bp/s with a step size of 1.24 bp. From the complementary quantitative analysis of the associated time courses of ATP consumption during DNA translocation we have determined that this motor has an efficiency of 3.0 ATP/bp, which is slightly less that the efficiency observed for several genetically related DNA helicases and which likely results from random pausing by the motor during translocation. Nevertheless, this motor is able to exert enough force during translocation to displace streptavidin from biotinylated DNA. Taken together these results are the necessary first step for quantifying both the role of DNA translocation in nucleosome repositioning by RSC and the efficiency at which RSC couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to nucleosome repositioning. PMID:23399434

  11. A Method to Determine Supply Voltage of Permanent Magnet Motor at Optimal Design Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matustomo, Shinya; Noguchi, So; Yamashita, Hideo; Tanimoto, Shigeya

    The permanent magnet motors (PM motors) are widely used in electrical machinery, such as air conditioner, refrigerator and so on. In recent years, from the point of view of energy saving, it is necessary to improve the efficiency of PM motor by optimization. However, in the efficiency optimization of PM motor, many design variables and many restrictions are required. In this paper, the efficiency optimization of PM motor with many design variables was performed by using the voltage driven finite element analysis with the rotating simulation of the motor and the genetic algorithm.

  12. Design, Modeling and Performance Optimization of a Novel Rotary Piezoelectric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Khanh A.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    1997-01-01

    This work has demonstrated a proof of concept for a torsional inchworm type motor. The prototype motor has shown that piezoelectric stack actuators can be used for rotary inchworm motor. The discrete linear motion of piezoelectric stacks can be converted into rotary stepping motion. The stacks with its high force and displacement output are suitable actuators for use in piezoelectric motor. The designed motor is capable of delivering high torque and speed. Critical issues involving the design and operation of piezoelectric motors were studied. The tolerance between the contact shoes and the rotor has proved to be very critical to the performance of the motor. Based on the prototype motor, a waveform optimization scheme was proposed and implemented to improve the performance of the motor. The motor was successfully modeled in MATLAB. The model closely represents the behavior of the prototype motor. Using the motor model, the input waveforms were successfully optimized to improve the performance of the motor in term of speed, torque, power and precision. These optimized waveforms drastically improve the speed of the motor at different frequencies and loading conditions experimentally. The optimized waveforms also increase the level of precision of the motor. The use of the optimized waveform is a break-away from the traditional use of sinusoidal and square waves as the driving signals. This waveform optimization scheme can be applied to any inchworm motors to improve their performance. The prototype motor in this dissertation as a proof of concept was designed to be robust and large. Future motor can be designed much smaller and more efficient with lessons learned from the prototype motor.

  13. Molecular motors: how to make models that can be used to convey the concept of molecular ratchets and thermal capture.

    PubMed

    DoHarris, Lindsay; Giesler, Amanda; Humber, Brent; Sukumar, Aravin; Janssen, Luke J

    2011-06-01

    A wide variety of cellular processes use molecular motors, including processive motors that move along some form of track (e.g., myosin with actin, kinesin or dynein with tubulin) and polymerases that move along a template (e.g., DNA and RNA polymerases, ribosomes). In trying to understand how these molecular motors actually move, many apply their understanding of how man-made motors work: the latter use some form of energy to exert a force or torque on its load. However, quite a different mechanism has been proposed to possibly account for the movement of molecular motors. Rather than hydrolyzing ATP to push or pull their load, they might use their own thermal vibrational energy as well as that of their load and their environment to move the load, capturing those movements that occur along a desired vector or axis and resisting others; ATP hydrolysis is required to make backward movements impossible. This intriguing thermal capture or Brownian ratchet model is relatively more difficult to convey to students. In this report, we describe several teaching aids that are very easily constructed using widely available household materials to convey the concept of a molecular ratchet.

  14. Intrinsic irreversibility limits the efficiency of multidimensional molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, M. W.; Tumlin, C.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the efficiency limits of Brownian motors able to extract work from the temperature difference between reservoirs or from external thermodynamic forces. These systems can operate in a variety of modes, including as isothermal engines, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps. We derive analytical results showing that certain classes of multidimensional Brownian motor, including the Smoluchowski-Feynman ratchet, are unable to attain perfect efficiency (Carnot efficiency for heat engines). This demonstrates the presence of intrinsic irreversibilities in their operating mechanism. We present numerical simulations showing that in some cases the loss process that limits efficiency is associated with vortices in the probability current.

  15. Intrinsic irreversibility limits the efficiency of multidimensional molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Jack, M W; Tumlin, C

    2016-05-01

    We consider the efficiency limits of Brownian motors able to extract work from the temperature difference between reservoirs or from external thermodynamic forces. These systems can operate in a variety of modes, including as isothermal engines, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps. We derive analytical results showing that certain classes of multidimensional Brownian motor, including the Smoluchowski-Feynman ratchet, are unable to attain perfect efficiency (Carnot efficiency for heat engines). This demonstrates the presence of intrinsic irreversibilities in their operating mechanism. We present numerical simulations showing that in some cases the loss process that limits efficiency is associated with vortices in the probability current.

  16. Molecular motors pulling cargos in the viscoelastic cytosol: how power strokes beat subdiffusion.

    PubMed

    Goychuk, Igor; Kharchenko, Vasyl O; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-08-21

    The discovery of anomalous diffusion of larger biopolymers and submicron tracers such as endogenous granules, organelles, or virus capsids in living cells, attributed to the viscoelastic nature of the cytoplasm, provokes the question whether this complex environment equally impacts the active intracellular transport of submicron cargos by molecular motors such as kinesins: does the passive anomalous diffusion of free cargo always imply its anomalously slow active transport by motors, the mean transport distance along microtubule growing sublinearly rather than linearly in time? Here we analyze this question within the widely used two-state Brownian ratchet model of kinesin motors based on the continuous-state diffusion along microtubules driven by a flashing binding potential, where the cargo particle is elastically attached to the motor. Depending on the cargo size, the loading force, the amplitude of the binding potential, the turnover frequency of the molecular motor enzyme, and the linker stiffness we demonstrate that the motor transport may turn out either normal or anomalous, as indeed measured experimentally. We show how a highly efficient normal active transport mediated by motors may emerge despite the passive anomalous diffusion of the cargo, and study the intricate effects of the elastic linker. Under different, well specified conditions the microtubule-based motor transport becomes anomalously slow and thus significantly less efficient.

  17. Tracing entire operation cycles of molecular motor hepatitis C virus helicase in structurally resolved dynamical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus helicase is a molecular motor that splits duplex DNA while actively moving over it. An approximate coarse-grained dynamical description of this protein, including its interactions with DNA and ATP, is constructed. Using such a mechanical model, entire operation cycles of an important protein machine could be followed in structurally resolved dynamical simulations. Ratcheting inchworm translocation and spring-loaded DNA unwinding, suggested by experimental data, were reproduced. Thus, feasibility of coarse-grained simulations, bridging a gap between full molecular dynamics and reduced phenomenological theories of molecular motors, has been demonstrated. PMID:21081697

  18. Allosteric control of kinesin's motor domain by tubulin: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Krukau, Aliaksei; Knecht, Volker; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2014-04-07

    Molecular motors such as kinesin are essential for many biological processes. These motors have two motor domains, which bind to tubulin filaments, hydrolyze ATP, and transduce the released chemical energy into directed movements. The general principles of this chemomechanical coupling are now well-established but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive because small conformational changes within large proteins are difficult to detect experimentally. Here, we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to monitor such changes within a single motor domain of KIF1A, which belongs to the kinesin-3 motor family. The nucleotide binding pocket of this domain can be empty or occupied by ATP or ADP. For these three nucleotide states, we determine the mobility of the backbone of the protein, both in solution and attached to tubulin. Only one subdomain of the motor domain is found to exhibit a strongly increased mobility upon binding to tubulin: the neck linker that presumably acts as a mechanical transmitter to the other motor domain in dimeric kinesin-3 motors. Furthermore, upon binding to tubulin, the neck linker mobility becomes sensitive to the bound nucleotide and is highly increased after phosphate release, which implies undocking of this linker from the core of the motor domain. These simulation results are consistent with experimental data from EPR spectroscopy, FRET, and cryo-electron microscopy. A detailed analysis of our simulation data also reveals that the undocking of the neck linker in the ADP-kinesin-tubulin state arises from allosteric interactions between the nucleotide and tubulin and that the β-sheet core undergoes a twist both during phosphate release and ATP binding. The computational approach used here can be applied to other motor domains and mechanoenzymes in order to identify allosteric interactions between the subdomains of these proteins.

  19. Design and simulation of HTS bulk linear synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2002-10-01

    A new type high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk linear synchronous motor (LSM) theory is proposed by authors which is based on an idea of considering the pinning force as a synchronizing one in using current-carrying-armature-winding instead of permanent magnets. Electromagnetic force which HTS bulk produces depends on strongly the space distribution of an applied magnetic field under field cooling. LSM thrust force distribution on HTS bulk which is essentially different from that on a permanent magnet. It is generally difficult to design HTS bulk LSM. This paper presents a design of HTS bulk LSM by the finite element method (FEM) and its dynamics simulation of propulsion motion. Dynamics simulation is carried out using an instantaneous-maximum-thrust-force control method proposed here which is based on an analytical formula of LSM thrust force derived from the FEM capable of modeling HTS bulk.

  20. A molecular brake, not a clutch, stops the Rhodobacter sphaeroides flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Pilizota, Teuta; Brown, Mostyn T.; Leake, Mark C.; Branch, Richard W.; Berry, Richard M.; Armitage, Judith P.

    2009-01-01

    Many bacterial species swim by employing ion-driven molecular motors that power the rotation of helical filaments. Signals are transmitted to the motor from the external environment via the chemotaxis pathway. In bidirectional motors, the binding of phosphorylated CheY (CheY-P) to the motor is presumed to instigate conformational changes that result in a different rotor-stator interface, resulting in rotation in the alternative direction. Controlling when this switch occurs enables bacteria to accumulate in areas favorable for their survival. Unlike most species that swim with bidirectional motors, Rhodobacter sphaeroides employs a single stop-start flagellar motor. Here, we asked, how does the binding of CheY-P stop the motor in R. sphaeroides—using a clutch or a brake? By applying external force with viscous flow or optical tweezers, we show that the R. sphaeroides motor is stopped using a brake. The motor stops at 27–28 discrete angles, locked in place by a relatively high torque, approximately 2–3 times its stall torque. PMID:19571004

  1. How molecular motors work in the crowded environment of living cells: coexistence and efficiency of normal and anomalous transport.

    PubMed

    Goychuk, Igor; Kharchenko, Vasyl O; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments reveal both passive subdiffusion of various nanoparticles and anomalous active transport of such particles by molecular motors in the molecularly crowded environment of living biological cells. Passive and active microrheology reveals that the origin of this anomalous dynamics is due to the viscoelasticity of the intracellular fluid. How do molecular motors perform in such a highly viscous, dissipative environment? Can we explain the observed co-existence of the anomalous transport of relatively large particles of 100 to 500 nm in size by kinesin motors with the normal transport of smaller particles by the same molecular motors? What is the efficiency of molecular motors in the anomalous transport regime? Here we answer these seemingly conflicting questions and consistently explain experimental findings in a generalization of the well-known continuous diffusion model for molecular motors with two conformational states in which viscoelastic effects are included.

  2. Increased speed of rotation for the smallest light-driven molecular motor.

    PubMed

    ter Wiel, Matthijs K J; van Delden, Richard A; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2003-12-10

    In this paper we present the smallest artificial light-driven molecular motor consisting of only 28 carbon and 24 hydrogen atoms. The concept of controlling directionality of rotary movement at the molecular level by introduction of a stereogenic center next to the central olefinic bond of a sterically overcrowded alkene does not only hold for molecular motors with six-membered rings, but is also applicable to achieve the unidirectional movement for molecular motors having five-membered rings. Although X-ray analyses show that the five-membered rings in the cis- and trans-isomer of the new molecular motor are nearly flat, the energy differences between the (pseudo-)diaxial and (pseudo-)diequatorial conformations of the methyl substituents in both isomers are still large enough to direct the rotation of one-half of the molecule with respect to the other half in a clockwise fashion. The full rotary cycle comprises four consecutive steps: two photochemical isomerizations each followed by a thermal helix inversion. Both photochemical cis-trans isomerizations proceed with a preference for the unstable diequatorial isomers over the stable diaxial isomers. The thermal barriers for helix inversion of this motor molecule have decreased dramatically compared to its six-membered ring analogue, the half-life of the fastest step being only 18 s at room temperature.

  3. Interplay between crosslinkers and dynamic molecular motor-induced instabilities in the moderation of biopolymer organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Humphrey, David; Ziebert, Falko; Zimmermann, Walter; Käs, Josef

    2006-03-01

    Structure and function of biological cells rely on the highly-dynamic self-organization of protein filaments to an intracellular cytoskeleton responsive to mechanical and chemical stimuli. While dissolving these complex cellular structures through Brownian motion is inherently slow (tens of minutes), changes in the activity of the molecular motor myosin II cause rapid order-disorder transitions within 1-2 minutes in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin networks. When motor-induced filament sliding decreases, actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies triggered by a nonlinear instability. Modulation of static crosslinker concentrations allow for a wide phase space of order ranging from nematics to compact asters & dense packing of motor-filament clusters. The observed isothermal transitions between disorder and self-organization illustrate that molecular motors can substantially contribute to dynamic cellular organization.

  4. Tug-of-war between opposing molecular motors explains chromosomal oscillation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, S; Paul, R

    2014-03-07

    Chromosomes move towards and away from the centrosomes during the mitosis. This oscillation is observed when the kinetochore, a specific protein structure on the chromosome is captured by centrosome-nucleated polymer called microtubules. We present a computational model, incorporating activities of various molecular motors and microtubule dynamics, to demonstrate the observed oscillation. The model is robust and is not restricted to any particular cell type. Quantifying the average velocity, amplitude and periodicity of the chromosomal oscillation, we compare numerical results with the available experimental data. Our analysis supports a tug-of-war like mechanism between opposing motors that changes the course of chromosomal oscillation. It turns out that, various modes of oscillation can be fully understood by assembling the dynamics of molecular motors. Near the stall regime, when opposing motors are engaged in a tug-of-war, sufficiently large kinetochore-microtubule generated force may prolong the stall durations.

  5. Motility States of Molecular Motors Engaged in a Stochastic Tug-of-War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Melanie J. I.; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular transport is mediated by molecular motors that pull cargos along cytoskeletal filaments. Many cargos move bidirectionally and are transported by two teams of motors which move into opposite directions along the filament. We have recently introduced a stochastic tug-of-war model for this situation. This model describes the motion of the cargo as a Markov process on a two-dimensional state space defined by the numbers of active plus and active minus motors. In spite of its simplicity, this tug-of-war model leads to a complex dependence of the cargo motility on the motor parameters. We present new numerical results for the dependence on the number of involved motors. In addition, we derive a simple and intuitive sharp maxima approximation, from which one obtains the cargo motility state from only four simple inequalities. This approach provides a fast and reliable method to determine the cargo motility.

  6. Z40 Solid Rocket Motor: Design Status of the Motor Case Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataloni, A.; Pantanella, G.; Perugini, P.; Di Vizio, F.; Cardelli, M.

    2014-06-01

    For the VEGA Launch system new developments are running in order to: a) performances increase b) cost reduction c) introduction of new technologies.The VEGA E configuration foresees the Z40 SRM as second stage, by replacing the Z23 and Z9 SRMs.The Z40 design is based on the consolidated AVIO heritage with important improvements both from the material and from the technological side.From the material side a top class fiber has been selected and the prepreg material is based on an in house resin formulation tailored to t he specific motor case process requirements.Important improvements in skirts manufacturing will be tested as well, with the development of a customized automatic tape laying machine.

  7. Future Challenges in Single-Molecule Fluorescence and Laser Trap Approaches to Studies of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Elting, Mary Williard; Spudich, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule analysis is a powerful modern form of biochemistry, in which individual kinetic steps of a catalytic cycle of an enzyme can be explored in exquisite detail. Both single-molecule fluorescence and single-molecule force techniques have been widely used to characterize a number of protein systems. We focus here on molecular motors as a paradigm. We describe two areas where we expect to see exciting developments in the near future: first, characterizing the coupling of force production to chemical and mechanical changes in motors, and second, understanding how multiple motors work together in the environment of the cell. PMID:23237942

  8. Surface Inclusion of Unidirectional Molecular Motors in Hexagonal Tris(o-phenylene)cyclotriphosphazene.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Jiří; Chen, Jiawen; Bastien, Guillaume; Dračínský, Martin; Mašát, Milan; Rogers, Charles T; Feringa, Ben L; Michl, Josef

    2017-08-02

    A new unidirectional light-driven molecular motor suitable for host-guest surface inclusion complexes with tris(o-phenylene)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) was synthesized. The motor molecules formed regular two-dimensional trigonal arrays covering the large facets of disc-shaped TPP nanocrystals. Photochemical and thermal isomerization studies demonstrated that the light-driven rotation of the anchored motors is similar to that observed in solution and is not compromised neither by either the surface confinement or the density of surface coverage (50 vs 100%).

  9. Future challenges in single-molecule fluorescence and laser trap approaches to studies of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Elting, Mary Williard; Spudich, James A

    2012-12-11

    Single-molecule analysis is a powerful modern form of biochemistry, in which individual kinetic steps of a catalytic cycle of an enzyme can be explored in exquisite detail. Both single-molecule fluorescence and single-molecule force techniques have been widely used to characterize a number of protein systems. We focus here on molecular motors as a paradigm. We describe two areas where we expect to see exciting developments in the near future: first, characterizing the coupling of force production to chemical and mechanical changes in motors, and second, understanding how multiple motors work together in the environment of the cell.

  10. Stepping and Crowding of Molecular Motors: Statistical Kinetics from an Exclusion Process Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ciandrini, Luca; Romano, M. Carmen; Parmeggiani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Motor enzymes are remarkable molecular machines that use the energy derived from the hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to generate mechanical movement, achieved through different steps that constitute their kinetic cycle. These macromolecules, nowadays investigated with advanced experimental techniques to unveil their molecular mechanisms and the properties of their kinetic cycles, are implicated in many biological processes, ranging from biopolymerization (e.g., RNA polymerases and ribosomes) to intracellular transport (motor proteins such as kinesins or dyneins). Although the kinetics of individual motors is well studied on both theoretical and experimental grounds, the repercussions of their stepping cycle on the collective dynamics still remains unclear. Advances in this direction will improve our comprehension of transport process in the natural intracellular medium, where processive motor enzymes might operate in crowded conditions. In this work, we therefore extend contemporary statistical kinetic analysis to study collective transport phenomena of motors in terms of lattice gas models belonging to the exclusion process class. Via numerical simulations, we show how to interpret and use the randomness calculated from single particle trajectories in crowded conditions. Importantly, we also show that time fluctuations and non-Poissonian behavior are intrinsically related to spatial correlations and the emergence of large, but finite, clusters of comoving motors. The properties unveiled by our analysis have important biological implications on the collective transport characteristics of processive motor enzymes in crowded conditions. PMID:25185553

  11. Influence of molecular motors on the motion of particles in viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Sebastián

    2014-06-01

    We study theoretically and by numerical simulations the motion of particles driven by molecular motors in a viscoelastic medium representing the cell cytoplasm. For this, we consider a generalized Langevin equation coupled to a stochastic stepping dynamics for the motors that takes into account the action of each motor separately. In the absence of motors, the model produces subdiffusive motion of particles characterized by a power-law scaling of the mean square displacement versus the lag time as t^{α}, with 0<α<1, similar to that observed in cells. Our results show how the action of the motors can induce a transition to a superdiffusive regime at large lag times with the characteristics of those found in experiments reported in the literature. We also show that at small lag times, the motors can act as static crosslinkers that slow down the natural subdiffusive transport. An analysis of previously reported experimental data in the relevant time scales provides evidence of this phenomenon. Finally, we study the effect of a harmonic potential representing an optical trap, and we show a way to approach to a macroscopic description of the active transport in cells. This last point stresses the relevance of the molecular motors for generating not only directed motion to specific targets, but also fast diffusivelike random motion.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of kinesin-14 motors in spindle assembly and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    She, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2017-07-01

    During eukaryote cell division, molecular motors are crucial regulators of microtubule organization, spindle assembly, chromosome segregation and intracellular transport. The kinesin-14 motors are evolutionarily conserved minus-end-directed kinesin motors that occur in diverse organisms from simple yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Members of the kinesin-14 motor family can bind to, crosslink or slide microtubules and, thus, regulate microtubule organization and spindle assembly. In this Commentary, we present the common subthemes that have emerged from studies of the molecular kinetics and mechanics of kinesin-14 motors, particularly with regard to their non-processive movement, their ability to crosslink microtubules and interact with the minus- and plus-ends of microtubules, and with microtubule-organizing center proteins. In particular, counteracting forces between minus-end-directed kinesin-14 and plus-end-directed kinesin-5 motors have recently been implicated in the regulation of microtubule nucleation. We also discuss recent progress in our current understanding of the multiple and fundamental functions that kinesin-14 motors family members have in important aspects of cell division, including the spindle pole, spindle organization and chromosome segregation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Yochelis, A.; Ebrahim, S.; Millis, B.; Cui, R.; Kachar, B.; Naoz, M.; Gov, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general. PMID:26335545

  14. Muscle activation described with a differential equation model for large ensembles of locally coupled molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam

    2014-10-01

    Molecular motors, by turning chemical energy into mechanical work, are responsible for active cellular processes. Often groups of these motors work together to perform their biological role. Motors in an ensemble are coupled and exhibit complex emergent behavior. Although large motor ensembles can be modeled with partial differential equations (PDEs) by assuming that molecules function independently of their neighbors, this assumption is violated when motors are coupled locally. It is therefore unclear how to describe the ensemble behavior of the locally coupled motors responsible for biological processes such as calcium-dependent skeletal muscle activation. Here we develop a theory to describe locally coupled motor ensembles and apply the theory to skeletal muscle activation. The central idea is that a muscle filament can be divided into two phases: an active and an inactive phase. Dynamic changes in the relative size of these phases are described by a set of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). As the dynamics of the active phase are described by PDEs, muscle activation is governed by a set of coupled ODEs and PDEs, building on previous PDE models. With comparison to Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the theory captures the behavior of locally coupled ensembles. The theory also plausibly describes and predicts muscle experiments from molecular to whole muscle scales, suggesting that a micro- to macroscale muscle model is within reach.

  15. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions.

    PubMed

    Yochelis, A; Ebrahim, S; Millis, B; Cui, R; Kachar, B; Naoz, M; Gov, N S

    2015-09-03

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general.

  16. Stepping and crowding of molecular motors: statistical kinetics from an exclusion process perspective.

    PubMed

    Ciandrini, Luca; Romano, M Carmen; Parmeggiani, Andrea

    2014-09-02

    Motor enzymes are remarkable molecular machines that use the energy derived from the hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to generate mechanical movement, achieved through different steps that constitute their kinetic cycle. These macromolecules, nowadays investigated with advanced experimental techniques to unveil their molecular mechanisms and the properties of their kinetic cycles, are implicated in many biological processes, ranging from biopolymerization (e.g., RNA polymerases and ribosomes) to intracellular transport (motor proteins such as kinesins or dyneins). Although the kinetics of individual motors is well studied on both theoretical and experimental grounds, the repercussions of their stepping cycle on the collective dynamics still remains unclear. Advances in this direction will improve our comprehension of transport process in the natural intracellular medium, where processive motor enzymes might operate in crowded conditions. In this work, we therefore extend contemporary statistical kinetic analysis to study collective transport phenomena of motors in terms of lattice gas models belonging to the exclusion process class. Via numerical simulations, we show how to interpret and use the randomness calculated from single particle trajectories in crowded conditions. Importantly, we also show that time fluctuations and non-Poissonian behavior are intrinsically related to spatial correlations and the emergence of large, but finite, clusters of comoving motors. The properties unveiled by our analysis have important biological implications on the collective transport characteristics of processive motor enzymes in crowded conditions.

  17. Rotor compound concept for designing an industrial HTS synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, M.; Hosseina, M.; Sarrafan, K.; Darabi, A.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, producing power with smaller amount of losses become as a goal in our daily life. Today, large amount of energy waste in power networks all around the world. The main reason is “resistive electric equipments” of power networks. Since early 1980s, simultaneous with the development of high temperature superconductive (HTS) technology, superconductors gently attracted the mankind attentions. Using superconductive equipments instead of conventional resistive ones are result in salient electric loss reduction in power systems. Especially to reduce losses in power networks superconductive industrial rotating machines can potentially perform a significant role. In early recent century, first generation of HTS rotating machines was born. But unfortunately they have long way to penetrate the commercial markets yet. In HTS rotating machines the conventional copper made windings are replaced with the HTS superconductors. In this paper an industrial HTS synchronous motor with YBCO coated conductor field windings was designed. As a new approach, model was equipped with a compound rotor that includes both magnetic and non-magnetic materials. So, large amount of heavy iron made part was replaced by light non-magnetic material such as G-10 fiberglass. Furthermore, in this structure iron loss in rotor could be reduced to its lowest value. Also less weight and more air gap energy density were the additional advantages. Regarding zero electric loss production in field windings and less iron loss in rotor construction, this model potentially is more effective than the other iron made HTS motors.

  18. The analysis and design of brushless D.C. motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benarous, Maamar

    In modern computer systems electrical drives are used to rotate hard discs. These motors require special torque- speed characteristics. The speed of the hard disc must be constant in order for the unit to function correctly. One type of drive, which is used for hard discs is the brushless-DC-motor. This machine has permanent magnet excitation and a polyphase armature winding. It therefore takes the form of a synchronous machine, and in order to be brushless the armature winding is stationary and the excitation rotates. To run at adjustable speed a variable frequency supply is required. In the brushless D.C form the inverter output is phase locked to the rotor position, it is therefore electro-magnetically similar to the D.C machine where fixed brushes determine the frequency and phase of the current in the armature winding. In order to perform the phase lock action signals measuring the rotor position are needed. In one form of machine Hall effect probes detect the position of the rotor poles, in a second given that the rotor is in motion the induced back emf is used. Experimentally it is convenient to replace these magnet systems with a photo- transistor and rotating shutter system and this was the approach used in this thesis. The objective of this research is to investigate different aspects of this motor. The generation, measurement, and placement of signals is described and illustrated, and the design and construction of an inverter supply circuit is described. Both 2D and 3D finite element analysis is used in order to find the machine parameters as well as cogging torque analysis, using the concept of permanent magnet magnetisation characteristics. It is shown that the cogging can be reduced for certain types of magnetisation. The finite element analysis is taken further by connecting the drive circuit needed to run the machine into the finite element mesh, the machine parameters are defined using this method. The close agreement between the simulation and

  19. An enantioselective synthetic route toward second-generation light-driven rotary molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Pijper, Thomas C; Pijper, Dirk; Pollard, Michael M; Dumur, Frédéric; Davey, Stephen G; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2010-02-05

    Controlling the unidirectional rotary process of second-generation molecular motors demands access to these motors in their enantiomerically pure form. In this paper, we describe an enantioselective route to three new second-generation light-driven molecular motors. Their synthesis starts with the preparation of an optically active alpha-methoxy-substituted upper-half ketone involving an enzymatic resolution. The subsequent conversion of this ketone to the corresponding hydrazone by treatment with hydrazine led to full racemization. However, conversion to a TBDMS-protected hydrazone by treatment with bis-TBDMS hydrazine, prepared according to a new procedure, proceeds with nearly full retention of the stereochemical integrity. Oxidation of the TBDMS-protected hydrazone and subsequent coupling to a lower-half thioketone followed by recrystallization provided the molecular motors with >99% ee. As these are the first molecular motors that have a methoxy substituent at the stereogenic center, the photochemical and thermal isomerization steps involved in the rotary cycle of one of these new molecules were studied in detail with various spectroscopic techniques.

  20. Molecular Nanotechnology and Designs of Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in the scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental molecular nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approach to the concepts of design and simulation of atomically precise materials in a variety of interdisciplinary areas will be presented. The concepts of hypothetical molecular machines and assemblers as explained in Drexler's and Merckle's already published work and Han et. al's WWW distributed molecular gears will be explained.

  1. Molecular Nanotechnology and Designs of Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in the scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental molecular nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approach to the concepts of design and simulation of atomically precise materials in a variety of interdisciplinary areas will be presented. The concepts of hypothetical molecular machines and assemblers as explained in Drexler's and Merckle's already published work and Han et. al's WWW distributed molecular gears will be explained.

  2. Mechanical properties of organelles driven by microtubule-dependent molecular motors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Luciana; Salierno, Marcelo; Wetzler, Diana E; Despósito, Marcelo A; Levi, Valeria

    2011-04-01

    The organization of the cytoplasm is regulated by molecular motors which transport organelles and other cargoes along cytoskeleton tracks. Melanophores have pigment organelles or melanosomes that move along microtubules toward their minus and plus end by the action of cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-2, respectively. In this work, we used single particle tracking to characterize the mechanical properties of motor-driven organelles during transport along microtubules. We tracked organelles with high temporal and spatial resolutions and characterized their dynamics perpendicular to the cytoskeleton track. The quantitative analysis of these data showed that the dynamics is due to a spring-like interaction between melanosomes and microtubules in a viscoelastic microenvironment. A model based on a generalized Langevin equation explained these observations and predicted that the stiffness measured for the motor complex acting as a linker between organelles and microtubules is ∼ one order smaller than that determined for motor proteins in vitro. This result suggests that other biomolecules involved in the interaction between motors and organelles contribute to the mechanical properties of the motor complex. We hypothesise that the high flexibility observed for the motor linker may be required to improve the efficiency of the transport driven by multiple copies of motor molecules.

  3. Ultra-fast force-clamp laser trapping of single molecular motors and DNA binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Monico, Carina; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-09-01

    Forces play a fundamental role in a wide array of biological processes, regulating enzymatic activity, kinetics of molecular bonds, and molecular motors mechanics. Single molecule force spectroscopy techniques have enabled the investigation of such processes, but they are inadequate to probe short-lived (millisecond and sub-millisecond) molecular complexes. We developed an ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy technique that uses a dual trap configuration to apply constant loads to a single intermittently interacting biological polymer and a binding protein. Our system displays a delay of only ˜10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. The force-clamp configuration in which our assay operates allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds. Moreover, conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors can be recorded with sub-nanometer accuracy and few tens of microseconds of temporal resolution. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  4. Molecular motors that digest their track to rectify Brownian motion: processive movement of exonuclease enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2009-09-16

    A general model is presented for the processive movement of molecular motors such as λ-exonuclease, RecJ and exonuclease I that use digestion of a DNA track to rectify Brownian motion along this track. Using this model, the translocation dynamics of these molecular motors is studied. The sequence-dependent pausing of λ-exonuclease, which results from a site-specific high affinity DNA interaction, is also studied. The theoretical results are consistent with available experimental data. Moreover, the model is used to predict the lifetime distribution and force dependence of these paused states.

  5. Efficiency bounds of molecular motors under a trade-off figure of merit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanchao; Huang, Chuankun; Lin, Guoxing; Chen, Jincan

    2017-05-01

    On the basis of the theory of irreversible thermodynamics and an elementary model of the molecular motors converting chemical energy by ATP hydrolysis to mechanical work exerted against an external force, the efficiencies of the molecular motors at two different optimization configurations for trade-off figure of merit representing a best compromise between the useful energy and the lost energy are calculated. The upper and lower bounds for the efficiency at two different optimization configurations are determined. It is found that the optimal efficiencies at the two different optimization configurations are always larger than 1 / 2.

  6. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, B. D.; Thijssen, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green’s function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  7. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Napitu, B D; Thijssen, J M

    2015-07-15

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  8. Beam finite-element model of a molecular motor for the simulation of active fibre networks

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Kei W.; Birzle, Anna M.; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular motors are proteins that excessively increase the efficiency of subcellular transport processes. They allow for cell division, nutrient transport and even macroscopic muscle movement. In order to understand the effect of motors in large biopolymer networks, e.g. the cytoskeleton, we require a suitable model of a molecular motor. In this contribution, we present such a model based on a geometrically exact beam finite-element formulation. We discuss the numerical model of a non-processive motor such as myosin II, which interacts with actin filaments. Based on experimental data and inspired by the theoretical understanding offered by the power-stroke model and the swinging-cross-bridge model, we parametrize our numerical model in order to achieve the effect that a physiological motor has on its cargo. To this end, we introduce the mechanical and mathematical foundations of the model, then discuss its calibration, prove its usefulness by conducting finite-element simulations of actin–myosin motility assays and assess the influence of motors on the rheology of semi-flexible biopolymer networks. PMID:26997891

  9. Bidirectional Transport by Molecular Motors: Enhanced Processivity and Response to External Forces

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Melanie J.I.; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Intracellular transport along cytoskeletal filaments is often mediated by two teams of molecular motors that pull on the same cargo and move in opposite directions along the filaments. We have recently shown theoretically that this bidirectional transport can be understood as a stochastic tug-of-war between the two motor teams. Here, we further develop our theory to investigate the experimentally accessible dynamic behavior of cargos transported by strong motors such as kinesin-1 or cytoplasmic dynein. By studying the run and binding times of such a cargo, we show that the properties of biological motors, such as the large ratio of stall/detachment force and the small ratio of superstall backward/forward velocity, are favorable for bidirectional cargo transport, leading to fast motion and enhanced diffusion. In addition, cargo processivity is shown to be strongly enhanced by transport via several molecular motors even if these motors are engaged in a tug-of-war. Finally, we study the motility of a bidirectional cargo under force. Frictional forces arising, e.g., from the viscous cytoplasm, lead to peaks in the velocity distribution, while external forces as exerted, e.g., by an optical trap, lead to hysteresis effects. Our results, in particular our explicit expressions for the cargo binding time and the distance of the peaks in the velocity relation under friction, are directly accessible to in vitro as well as in vivo experiments. PMID:20513405

  10. Bidirectional transport by molecular motors: enhanced processivity and response to external forces.

    PubMed

    Müller, Melanie J I; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-06-02

    Intracellular transport along cytoskeletal filaments is often mediated by two teams of molecular motors that pull on the same cargo and move in opposite directions along the filaments. We have recently shown theoretically that this bidirectional transport can be understood as a stochastic tug-of-war between the two motor teams. Here, we further develop our theory to investigate the experimentally accessible dynamic behavior of cargos transported by strong motors such as kinesin-1 or cytoplasmic dynein. By studying the run and binding times of such a cargo, we show that the properties of biological motors, such as the large ratio of stall/detachment force and the small ratio of superstall backward/forward velocity, are favorable for bidirectional cargo transport, leading to fast motion and enhanced diffusion. In addition, cargo processivity is shown to be strongly enhanced by transport via several molecular motors even if these motors are engaged in a tug-of-war. Finally, we study the motility of a bidirectional cargo under force. Frictional forces arising, e.g., from the viscous cytoplasm, lead to peaks in the velocity distribution, while external forces as exerted, e.g., by an optical trap, lead to hysteresis effects. Our results, in particular our explicit expressions for the cargo binding time and the distance of the peaks in the velocity relation under friction, are directly accessible to in vitro as well as in vivo experiments.

  11. Bounds and phase diagram of efficiency at maximum power for tight-coupling molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Tu, Z C

    2013-02-01

    The efficiency at maximum power (EMP) for tight-coupling molecular motors is investigated within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. It is found that the EMP depends merely on the constitutive relation between the thermodynamic current and force. The motors are classified into four generic types (linear, superlinear, sublinear, and mixed types) according to the characteristics of the constitutive relation, and then the corresponding ranges of the EMP for these four types of molecular motors are obtained. The exact bounds of the EMP are derived and expressed as the explicit functions of the free energy released by the fuel in each motor step. A phase diagram is constructed which clearly shows how the region where the parameters (the load distribution factor and the free energy released by the fuel in each motor step) are located can determine whether the value of the EMP is larger or smaller than 1/2. This phase diagram reveals that motors using ATP as fuel under physiological conditions can work at maximum power with higher efficiency (> 1/2) for a small load distribution factor (< 0.1).

  12. Assembly of bipolar microtubule structures by passive cross-linkers and molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Johann, D; Goswami, D; Kruse, K

    2016-06-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. The spindle contains the midzone, a stable region of overlapping antiparallel microtubules, that is essential for maintaining bipolarity. Although a lot is known about the molecular players involved, the mechanism underlying midzone formation and maintenance is still poorly understood. We study the interaction of polar filaments that are cross-linked by molecular motors moving directionally and by passive cross-linkers diffusing along microtubules. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross-linkers can generate a stable finite overlap between a pair of antiparallel polar filaments. We develop a mean-field theory to study this mechanism in detail and investigate the influence of steric interactions between motors and passive cross-linkers on the overlap dynamics. In the presence of interspecies steric interactions, passive cross-linkers mimic the behavior of molecular motors and stable finite overlaps are generated even for non-cross-linking motors. Finally, we develop a mean-field theory for a bundle of aligned polar filaments and show that they can self-organize into a spindlelike pattern. Our work suggests possible ways as to how cells can generate spindle midzones and control their extensions.

  13. Assembly of bipolar microtubule structures by passive cross-linkers and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johann, D.; Goswami, D.; Kruse, K.

    2016-06-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. The spindle contains the midzone, a stable region of overlapping antiparallel microtubules, that is essential for maintaining bipolarity. Although a lot is known about the molecular players involved, the mechanism underlying midzone formation and maintenance is still poorly understood. We study the interaction of polar filaments that are cross-linked by molecular motors moving directionally and by passive cross-linkers diffusing along microtubules. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross-linkers can generate a stable finite overlap between a pair of antiparallel polar filaments. We develop a mean-field theory to study this mechanism in detail and investigate the influence of steric interactions between motors and passive cross-linkers on the overlap dynamics. In the presence of interspecies steric interactions, passive cross-linkers mimic the behavior of molecular motors and stable finite overlaps are generated even for non-cross-linking motors. Finally, we develop a mean-field theory for a bundle of aligned polar filaments and show that they can self-organize into a spindlelike pattern. Our work suggests possible ways as to how cells can generate spindle midzones and control their extensions.

  14. En route to surface-bound electric field-driven molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Tour, James M

    2003-06-27

    Four caltrop-shaped molecules that might be useful as surface-bound electric field-driven molecular motors have been synthesized. The caltrops are comprised of a pair of electron donor-acceptor arms and a tripod base. The molecular arms are based on a carbazole or oligo(phenylene ethynylene) core with a strong net dipole. The tripod base uses a silicon atom as its core. The legs of the tripod bear sulfur-tipped bonding units, as acetyl-protected benzylic thiols, for bonding to a gold surface. The geometry of the tripod base allows the caltrop to project upward from a metallic surface after self-assembly. Ellipsometric studies show that self-assembled monolayers of the caltrops are formed on Au surfaces with molecular thicknesses consistent with the desired upright-shaft arrangement. As a result, the zwitterionic molecular arms might be controllable when electric fields are applied around the caltrops, thereby constituting field-driven motors.

  15. Design of a Driver of Two-phase Hybrid Stepper Motor Based on THB6064H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qi

    2017-05-01

    Stepper motor is a kind of motor which can change electric pulse signal into angular displacement or linear displacement, usually; it must have a driver in order to work effectively. A driver of two-phase hybrid stepper motor based on THB6064H and single-chip of STC89C52 is designed and proposed. The driver is with the function of driving the motor to start and stop, forward and reversal, adjusting the speed of the motor and realizing the step angle subdivided control. Moreover, the maximum output current of the proposed driver achieves 5 amperes which can drive 57 series stepper motor well. Touch keys are used to input the preset data and controlling instructions of the motor, and a 1602LCD display is also adopted to show the basic parameters of the stepper motor in operation.

  16. Effective rates from thermodynamically consistent coarse-graining of models for molecular motors with probe particles.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Eva; Seifert, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Many single-molecule experiments for molecular motors comprise not only the motor but also large probe particles coupled to it. The theoretical analysis of these assays, however, often takes into account only the degrees of freedom representing the motor. We present a coarse-graining method that maps a model comprising two coupled degrees of freedom which represent motor and probe particle to such an effective one-particle model by eliminating the dynamics of the probe particle in a thermodynamically and dynamically consistent way. The coarse-grained rates obey a local detailed balance condition and reproduce the net currents. Moreover, the average entropy production as well as the thermodynamic efficiency is invariant under this coarse-graining procedure. Our analysis reveals that only by assuming unrealistically fast probe particles, the coarse-grained transition rates coincide with the transition rates of the traditionally used one-particle motor models. Additionally, we find that for multicyclic motors the stall force can depend on the probe size. We apply this coarse-graining method to specific case studies of the F(1)-ATPase and the kinesin motor.

  17. Single-molecule and single-particle imaging of molecular motors in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fili, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Motor proteins are multi-potent molecular machines, whose localisation, function and regulation are achieved through tightly controlled processes involving conformational changes and interactions with their tracks, cargos and binding partners. Understanding how these complex machines work requires dissection of these processes both in space and time. Complementing the traditional ensemble measurements, single-molecule assays enable the detection of rare or short-lived intermediates and molecular heterogeneities, and the measurements of subpopulation dynamics. This chapter is focusing on the fluorescence imaging of single motors and their cargo. It discusses what is required in order to achieve single-molecule imaging with high temporal and spatial resolution and how these requirements are met both in vitro and in vivo. It also presents a general overview and applied examples of the major single-molecule imaging techniques and experimental assays which have been used to study motor proteins.

  18. Force Generation by Molecular-Motor-Powered Microtubule Bundles; Implications for Neuronal Polarization and Growth.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Maximilian; Franze, Kristian; Zemel, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    The heavily cross-linked microtubule (MT) bundles found in neuronal processes play a central role in the initiation, growth and maturation of axons and dendrites; however, a quantitative understanding of their mechanical function is still lacking. We here developed computer simulations to investigate the dynamics of force generation in 1D bundles of MTs that are cross-linked and powered by molecular motors. The motion of filaments and the forces they exert are investigated as a function of the motor type (unipolar or bipolar), MT density and length, applied load, and motor connectivity. We demonstrate that only unipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-1) can provide the driving force for bundle expansion, while bipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-5) oppose it. The force generation capacity of the bundles is shown to depend sharply on the fraction of unipolar motors due to a percolation transition that must occur in the bundle. Scaling laws between bundle length, force, MT length and motor fraction are presented. In addition, we investigate the dynamics of growth in the presence of a constant influx of MTs. Beyond a short equilibration period, the bundles grow linearly in time. In this growth regime, the bundle extends as one mass forward with most filaments sliding with the growth velocity. The growth velocity is shown to be dictated by the inward flux of MTs, to inversely scale with the load and to be independent of the free velocity of the motors. These findings provide important molecular-level insights into the mechanical function of the MT cytoskeleton in normal axon growth and regeneration after injury.

  19. Force Generation by Molecular-Motor-Powered Microtubule Bundles; Implications for Neuronal Polarization and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Maximilian; Franze, Kristian; Zemel, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    The heavily cross-linked microtubule (MT) bundles found in neuronal processes play a central role in the initiation, growth and maturation of axons and dendrites; however, a quantitative understanding of their mechanical function is still lacking. We here developed computer simulations to investigate the dynamics of force generation in 1D bundles of MTs that are cross-linked and powered by molecular motors. The motion of filaments and the forces they exert are investigated as a function of the motor type (unipolar or bipolar), MT density and length, applied load, and motor connectivity. We demonstrate that only unipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-1) can provide the driving force for bundle expansion, while bipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-5) oppose it. The force generation capacity of the bundles is shown to depend sharply on the fraction of unipolar motors due to a percolation transition that must occur in the bundle. Scaling laws between bundle length, force, MT length and motor fraction are presented. In addition, we investigate the dynamics of growth in the presence of a constant influx of MTs. Beyond a short equilibration period, the bundles grow linearly in time. In this growth regime, the bundle extends as one mass forward with most filaments sliding with the growth velocity. The growth velocity is shown to be dictated by the inward flux of MTs, to inversely scale with the load and to be independent of the free velocity of the motors. These findings provide important molecular-level insights into the mechanical function of the MT cytoskeleton in normal axon growth and regeneration after injury. PMID:26617489

  20. In situ control of polymer helicity with a non-covalently bound photoresponsive molecular motor dopant.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Heideman, G Henrieke; Zhao, Depeng; Wezenberg, Sander J; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-06-13

    The transfer of chirality from a molecular motor to a dynamic helical polymer via ionic interactions was investigated. A dopant with photoswitchable chirality was able to induce a preferred helicity in a poly(phenylacetylene) polymer and the helicity is inverted upon irradiation. The findings described herein will advance the development of functional and responsive polymeric systems.

  1. Molecular understanding and design of zwitterionic materials.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qing; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-01-07

    Zwitterionic materials have moieties possessing cationic and anionic groups. This molecular structure leads to unique properties that can be the solutions of various application problems. A typical example is that zwitterionic carboxybetaine (CB) and sulfobetaine (SB) materials resist nonspecific protein adsorption in complex media. Considering the vast number of cationic and anionic groups in the current chemical inventory, there are many possible structural variations of zwitterionic materials. The diversified structures provide the possibility to achieve many desired properties and urge a better understanding of zwitterionic materials to provide design principles. Molecular simulations and modeling are a versatile tool to understand the structure-property relationships of materials at the molecular level. This progress report summarizes recent simulation and modeling studies addressing two fundamental questions regarding zwitterionic materials and their applications as biomaterials. First, what are the differences between zwitterionic and nonionic materials? Second, what are the differences among zwitterionic materials? This report also demonstrates a molecular design of new protein-resistant zwitterionic moieties beyond conventional CB and SB based on design principles developed from these simulation studies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    PubMed Central

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective. PMID:25945702

  3. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-04-16

    In this review, current structural understanding of the apicomplexan glideosome and actin regulation is described. Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective.

  4. Characterizing the composition of molecular motors on moving axonal cargo using "cargo mapping" analysis.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Sylvia; Campbell, George E; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Encalada, Sandra E

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms by which molecular motors coordinate their activities to transport vesicular cargoes within neurons requires the quantitative analysis of motor/cargo associations at the single vesicle level. The goal of this protocol is to use quantitative fluorescence microscopy to correlate ("map") the position and directionality of movement of live cargo to the composition and relative amounts of motors associated with the same cargo. "Cargo mapping" consists of live imaging of fluorescently labeled cargoes moving in axons cultured on microfluidic devices, followed by chemical fixation during recording of live movement, and subsequent immunofluorescence (IF) staining of the exact same axonal regions with antibodies against motors. Colocalization between cargoes and their associated motors is assessed by assigning sub-pixel position coordinates to motor and cargo channels, by fitting Gaussian functions to the diffraction-limited point spread functions representing individual fluorescent point sources. Fixed cargo and motor images are subsequently superimposed to plots of cargo movement, to "map" them to their tracked trajectories. The strength of this protocol is the combination of live and IF data to record both the transport of vesicular cargoes in live cells and to determine the motors associated to these exact same vesicles. This technique overcomes previous challenges that use biochemical methods to determine the average motor composition of purified heterogeneous bulk vesicle populations, as these methods do not reveal compositions on single moving cargoes. Furthermore, this protocol can be adapted for the analysis of other transport and/or trafficking pathways in other cell types to correlate the movement of individual intracellular structures with their protein composition. Limitations of this protocol are the relatively low throughput due to low transfection efficiencies of cultured primary neurons and a limited field of view available for

  5. Traumatic brain injury and automotive design: making motor vehicles safer.

    PubMed

    Nirula, Ram; Kaufman, Rob; Tencer, Allan

    2003-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem in the United States. Identifying and modifying vehicle designs associated with TBI will have a significant impact on the frequency and severity of TBI in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs). Our objective, therefore, was to identify interior vehicle contact points associated with severe TBI (head Abbreviated Injury Scale score > 3) among drivers and determine the extent to which modifications of these contact points impact the likelihood of severe TBI. We analyzed drivers in MVCs from the 1993 to 2001 National Automotive Sampling System database. The odds of severe TBI with respect to various vehicle contact points were estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Using computer simulation software, the magnitude of driver head deceleration was modeled while manipulating vehicle design features. The potential impact of this design modification on the frequency and hospital charges of TBI cases was estimated. There were 18,313 drivers involved who were victims of TBI, equating to a national sample size of 3,275,472 cases. The most frequent contact point associated with severe TBI was the roof rail (odds ratio, 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.3). Increasing roof rail padding thickness to 5.0 cm reduced the peak acceleration from 700 g to 218 g, which would potentially reduce the attributable number of severe TBI cases per year from 2,730 to 210, thereby reducing annual acute care charges from $136.5 million to $10.5 million US dollars. Contact with the roof rail significantly increases the likelihood of TBI in MVCs. Minor increases in padding at these points may reduce the frequency of severe TBI, which would have a substantial effect on health care costs.

  6. Low processivity for DNA translocation by the ISWI molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Eastlund, Allen; Al-Ani, Gada; Fischer, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    The motor protein ISWI (Imitation SWItch) is the conserved catalytic ATPase domain of the ISWI family of chromatin remodelers. Members of the ISWI family are involved in regulating the structure of cellular chromatin during times of transcription, translation, and repair. Current models for the nucleosome repositioning activity of ISWI and other chromatin remodelers require the translocation of the remodeling protein along double-stranded DNA through an ATP-dependent mechanism. Here we report results from spectrofluorometric stopped-flow experiments which demonstrate that ISWI displays very low processivity for free DNA translocation. By combining these results with those from experiments monitoring the DNA stimulated ATPase activity of ISWI we further demonstrate that the DNA translocation by ISWI is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis. The calculated coupling efficiency of 0.067±0.018 ATP/ISWI/bp is seemingly quite low in comparison to similar DNA translocases and we present potential models to account for this. Nevertheless, the tight coupling of ATP hydrolysis to DNA translocation suggests that DNA translocation is not energetically rate limiting for nucleosome repositioning by ISWI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Block 2 Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) conceptual design study. Volume 1: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The design studies task implements the primary objective of developing a Block II Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) design offering improved flight safety and reliability. The SRM literature was reviewed. The Preliminary Development and Validation Plan is presented.

  8. Embryonic amygdalar transplants in adult rats with motor cortex lesions: a molecular and electrophysiological analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Díaz, Lydia; Nava-Mesa, Mauricio O; Heredia, Margarita; Riolobos, Adelaida S; Gómez-Álvarez, Marcelo; Criado, José María; de la Fuente, Antonio; Yajeya, Javier; Navarro-López, Juan D

    2011-01-01

    Transplants of embryonic nervous tissue ameliorate motor deficits induced by motor cortex lesions in adult animals. Restoration of lost brain functions has been recently shown in grafts of homotopic cortical origin, to be associated with a functional integration of the transplant after development of reciprocal host-graft connections. Nevertheless little is known about physiological properties or gene expression profiles of cortical implants with functional restorative capacity but no cortical origin. In this study, we show molecular and electrophysiological evidence supporting the functional development and integration of heterotopic transplants of embryonic amygdalar tissue placed into pre-lesioned motor cortex of adult rats. Grafts were analyzed 3 months post-transplantation. Using reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we found that key glutamatergic, GABAergic, and muscarinic receptors transcripts were expressed at different quantitative levels both in grafted and host tissues, but were all continuously present in the graft. Parallel sharp electrode recordings of grafted neurons in brain slices showed a regular firing pattern of transplanted neurons similar to host amygdalar pyramidal neurons. Synaptic connections from the adjacent host cortex on grafted neurons were electrophysiologically investigated and confirmed our molecular results. Taken together, our findings indicate that grafted neurons from a non-cortical, non-motor-related, but ontogenetical similar source, not only received functionally effective contacts from the adjacent motor cortex, but also developed electrophysiological and gene expression patterns comparable to host pyramidal neurons; suggesting an interesting tool for the field of neural repair and donor tissue in adults.

  9. Application of Quasi-Steady-State Methods to Nonlinear Models of Intracellular Transport by Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Zmurchok, Cole; Small, Tim; Ward, Michael J; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2017-07-13

    Molecular motors such as kinesin and dynein are responsible for transporting material along microtubule networks in cells. In many contexts, motor dynamics can be modelled by a system of reaction-advection-diffusion partial differential equations (PDEs). Recently, quasi-steady-state (QSS) methods have been applied to models with linear reactions to approximate the behaviour of the full PDE system. Here, we extend this QSS reduction methodology to certain nonlinear reaction models. The QSS method relies on the assumption that the nonlinear binding and unbinding interactions of the cellular motors occur on a faster timescale than the spatial diffusion and advection processes. The full system dynamics are shown to be well approximated by the dynamics on the slow manifold. The slow manifold is parametrized by a single scalar quantity that satisfies a scalar nonlinear PDE, called the QSS PDE. We apply the QSS method to several specific nonlinear models for the binding and unbinding of molecular motors, and we use the resulting approximations to draw conclusions regarding the parameter dependence of the spatial distribution of motors for these models.

  10. Measuring the number and spacing of molecular motors propelling a gliding microtubule.

    PubMed

    Fallesen, Todd L; Macosko, Jed C; Holzwarth, G

    2011-01-01

    The molecular motor gliding assay, in which a microtubule or other filament moves across a surface coated with motors, has provided much insight into how molecular motors work. The kinesin-microtubule system is also a strong candidate for the job of nanoparticle transporter in nanotechnology devices. In most cases, several motors transport each filament. Each motor serves both to bind the microtubule to a stationary surface and to propel the microtubule along the surface. By applying a uniform transverse force of 4-19 pN to a superparamagnetic bead attached to the trailing end of the microtubule, we have measured the distance d between binding points (motors). The average value of d was determined as a function of motor surface density σ. The measurements agree well with the scaling model of Duke, Holy, and Liebler, which predicts that (d)~σ(-2/5) if 0.05≤σ≤20 μm(-2) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 330 (1995)]. The distribution of d fits an extension of the model. The radius of curvature of a microtubule bent at a binding point by the force of the magnetic bead was ≈1 μm, 5000-fold smaller than the radius of curvature of microtubules subjected only to thermal forces. This is evidence that at these points of high bending stress, generated by the force on the magnetic bead, the microtubule is in the more flexible state of a two-state model of microtubule bending proposed by Heussinger, Schüller, and Frey [Phys. Rev. E 81, 021904 (2010)].

  11. Design, manufacture, and test of coolant pump-motor assembly for Brayton power conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabacz, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and testing of seven coolant circulating pump-motor assemblies are discussed. The pump-motor assembly is driven by the nominal 44.4-volt, 400-Hz, 3-phase output of a nominal 56-volt dc input inverter. The pump-motor assembly will be used to circulate Dow Corning 200 liquid coolant for use in a Brayton cycle space power system. The pump-motor assembly develops a nominal head of 70 psi at 3.7 gpm with an over-all efficiency of 26 percent. The design description, drawings, photographs, reliability results, and developmental and acceptance test results are included.

  12. The Design and its Verification of the Double Rotor Double Cage Induction Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sumita; Deb, Nirmal K.; Biswas, Sujit K.

    2017-02-01

    The concept of a double rotor motor presented earlier and its equivalent circuit has been developed, showing a non-linear parameter content. The two rotors (which are recommended to be double cage type for development of high starting torque) can run with equal or unequal speed independently, depending on their individual loading. This paper presents the elaborate design procedure, step-by-step, for the double rotor double cage motor and verifies the designed data with that obtained from three separate tests (compared to two for conventional motor) on a prototype, such that optimum performance can be obtained from the motor.

  13. Designed self-organization for molecular optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Michael; Neff, David; Towler, Ian; Day, Scott; Grambos, Zachary; Shremshock, Mikala; Butts, Heather; Meadows, Christiaan; Samiso, Yuko; Cao, Huan; Rahman, Mashiur

    2006-05-01

    The convergence of terahertz spectroscopy and single molecule experimentation offer significant promise of enhancement in sensitivity and selectivity in molecular recognition, identification and quantitation germane to military and security applications. This presentation reports the results of experiments which address fundamental barriers to the integration of large, patterned bio-compatible molecular opto-electronic systems with silicon based microelectronic systems. The central thrust of this approach is sequential epitaxy on surface bound single stranded DNA one-dimensional substrates. The challenge of producing highly structured macromolecular substrates, which are necessary in order to implement molecular nanolithography, has been addressed by combining "designer" synthetic DNA with biosynthetically derived plasmid components. By design, these one dimensional templates are composed of domains which contain sites which are recognized, and therefore addressable by either complementary DNA sequences and/or selected enzymes. Such design is necessary in order to access the nominal 2 nm linewidth potential resolution of nanolithography on these one-dimensional substrates. The recognition and binding properties of DNA ensure that the lithographic process is intrinsically self-organizing, and therefore self-aligning, a necessity for assembly processes at the requisite resolution. Another requirement of this molecular epitaxy approach is that the substrate must be immobilized. The challenge of robust surface immobilization is being addressed via the production of the equivalent of molecular tube sockets. In this application, multi-valent core-shell fluorescent quantum dots provide a mechanism to prepare surface attachment sites with a pre-determined 1:1 attachment site : substrate (DNA) molecule ratio.

  14. Memory, bias, and correlations in bidirectional transport of molecular-motor-driven cargoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2013-10-01

    Molecular motors are specialized proteins that perform active, directed transport of cellular cargoes on cytoskeletal filaments. In many cases, cargo motion powered by motor proteins is found to be bidirectional, and may be viewed as a biased random walk with fast unidirectional runs interspersed with slow tug-of-war states. The statistical properties of this walk are not known in detail, and here, we study memory and bias, as well as directional correlations between successive runs in bidirectional transport. We show, based on a study of the direction-reversal probabilities of the cargo using a purely stochastic (tug-of-war) model, that bidirectional motion of cellular cargoes is, in general, a correlated random walk. In particular, while the motion of a cargo driven by two oppositely pulling motors is a Markovian random walk, memory of direction appears when multiple motors haul the cargo in one or both directions. In the latter case, the Markovian nature of the underlying single-motor processes is hidden by internal transitions between degenerate run and pause states of the cargo. Interestingly, memory is found to be a nonmonotonic function of the number of motors. Stochastic numerical simulations of the tug-of-war model support our mathematical results and extend them to biologically relevant situations.

  15. Memory, bias, and correlations in bidirectional transport of molecular-motor-driven cargoes.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2013-10-01

    Molecular motors are specialized proteins that perform active, directed transport of cellular cargoes on cytoskeletal filaments. In many cases, cargo motion powered by motor proteins is found to be bidirectional, and may be viewed as a biased random walk with fast unidirectional runs interspersed with slow tug-of-war states. The statistical properties of this walk are not known in detail, and here, we study memory and bias, as well as directional correlations between successive runs in bidirectional transport. We show, based on a study of the direction-reversal probabilities of the cargo using a purely stochastic (tug-of-war) model, that bidirectional motion of cellular cargoes is, in general, a correlated random walk. In particular, while the motion of a cargo driven by two oppositely pulling motors is a Markovian random walk, memory of direction appears when multiple motors haul the cargo in one or both directions. In the latter case, the Markovian nature of the underlying single-motor processes is hidden by internal transitions between degenerate run and pause states of the cargo. Interestingly, memory is found to be a nonmonotonic function of the number of motors. Stochastic numerical simulations of the tug-of-war model support our mathematical results and extend them to biologically relevant situations.

  16. Insight into the molecular mechanism of the multitasking kinesin-8 motor

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Carsten; Brejc, Katjuša; Belmont, Lisa; Bodey, Andrew J; Lee, Yan; Yu, Ming; Guo, Jun; Sakowicz, Roman; Hartman, James; Moores, Carolyn A

    2010-01-01

    Members of the kinesin-8 motor class have the remarkable ability to both walk towards microtubule plus-ends and depolymerise these ends on arrival, thereby regulating microtubule length. To analyse how kinesin-8 multitasks, we studied the structure and function of the kinesin-8 motor domain. We determined the first crystal structure of a kinesin-8 and used cryo-electron microscopy to calculate the structure of the microtubule-bound motor. Microtubule-bound kinesin-8 reveals a new conformation compared with the crystal structure, including a bent conformation of the α4 relay helix and ordering of functionally important loops. The kinesin-8 motor domain does not depolymerise stabilised microtubules with ATP but does form tubulin rings in the presence of a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue. This shows that, by collaborating, kinesin-8 motor domain molecules can release tubulin from microtubules, and that they have a similar mechanical effect on microtubule ends as kinesin-13, which enables depolymerisation. Our data reveal aspects of the molecular mechanism of kinesin-8 motors that contribute to their unique dual motile and depolymerising functions, which are adapted to control microtubule length. PMID:20818331

  17. A design for improved performance of interior permanent magnet synchronous motor for hybrid electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seong Yeop; Lee, Ju

    2006-04-01

    This paper investigates the layout of a magnet shape on the performance of an interior permanent magnet (IPM) synchronous motor. The motor is used in a hybrid electric vehicle. The IPM motor is a pancake shaped motor that has permanent magnets inside the rotor. The motor acts as a rotational electrodynamic machine between the engine and transmission. The main purpose of redesigning the shape of the magnet is to improve the motor performance, especially the back-emf wave form, the efficiency, and the rated torque, within a restricted volume. The electromagnetic performance of the conventional model and the proposed design is analyzed using the finite element method. The theoretical results have been confirmed by comparing them with experimental results for the back-emf wave form, the torque versus current characteristics, and the motor efficiency.

  18. Complex restriction enzymes: NTP-driven molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Bourniquel, Aude A; Bickle, Thomas A

    2002-11-01

    Survival is assuredly the prime directive for all living organisms either as individuals or as a species. One of the main challenges encountered by bacterial populations is the danger of bacteriophage attacks, since infection of a single bacterium may rapidly propagate, decimating the entire population. In order to protect themselves against this acute threat, bacteria have developed an array of defence mechanisms, which range from preventing the infection itself via interference with bacteriophage adsorption to the cell surface and prevention of phage DNA injection, to degradation of the injected phage DNA. This last defence mechanism is catalysed by the bacterial restriction-modification (R-M) systems, and in particular, by nucleoside 5'-triphosphate (NTP)-dependent restriction enzymes, e.g. type I and type III R-M systems or the modification-dependent endonucleases. Type I and type III restriction systems have dual properties. They may either act as methylases and protect the host's own DNA against restriction by methylating specific residues, or they catalyse ATP-dependent endonuclease activity so that invading foreign DNA lacking the host-specific methylation is degraded. These defence mechanism systems are further complemented by the presence of methylation-dependent, GTP-dependent endonucleases, that restricts specifically methylated DNA. Although all three types of endonucleases are structurally very different, they share a common functional mechanism. They recognise and bind to specific DNA sequences but do not cleave DNA within those target sites. They belong to the general class of DNA motor proteins, which use the free energy associated with nucleoside 5'-triphosphate hydrolysis to translocate DNA so that the subsequent DNA cleavage event occurs at a distance from the endonuclease recognition site. Moreover, DNA cleavage appears to be a random process triggered upon stalling of the DNA translocation process and requiring dimerisation of the bound

  19. Saliency-Based Sensorless Drive of an Adequately Designed IPM Motor for Robot Vehicle Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Kozo; Takaki, Mamoru; Morimoto, Shinya; Kawazoe, Yosuke; Maemura, Akihiko; Ohto, Motomichi

    Technology fusion between motor design and control can produce new applications. This paper introduces a saliency-based sensorless drive of adequate designed IPM motor for a specific application in a robot vehicle. The motor is deliberately designed to meet the requirements of robot application and lend itself better for saliency based sensorless control. The speed and position of multiple wheel-motors are synchronously controlled by the drive amplifiers and a single motion controller over the speed range from zero to maximum speed for the robot vehicle application. Finally, two types of robot vehicles, one being a two-wheeled differential drive and the other being an omni directional drive, are developed to transport objects and human. This paper mainly focuses on the concept of motor design and its control. Some analysis and test data are given in this paper.

  20. Analysis of persistence during intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, C.; Despósito, M. A.; Levi, V.; Bruno, L.

    2010-09-01

    The displacement of particles or probes in the cell cytoplasm as a function of time is characterized by different anomalous diffusion regimes. The transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles or large proteins, involves the action of ATP-consuming molecular motors. We investigate the motion of pigment organelles driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the turning angles (phi) of the obtained 2D trajectories as a function of the time lag, we determine the critical time of the transition between anticorrelated and directed motion as the time when the turning angles begin to concentrate around phi = 0. We relate this transition with the crossover from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior observed in a previous work [5]. We also assayed the properties of the trajectories in cells with inhibited myosin activity, and we can compare the results in the presence and absence of active motors.

  1. Coordination of Molecular Motors: From in vitro Assays to Intracellular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary New technologies have emerged that enable the tracking of molecular motors and their cargos with very high resolution both in vitro and in live cells. Classic in vitro motility assays are being supplemented with assays of increasing complexity that more closely model the cellular environment. In cells, the introduction of probes such as quantum dots allows the high resolution tracking of both motors and vesicular cargos. The “bottom up” enhancement of in vitro assays and the “top down” analysis of motility inside cells are likely to converge over the next few years. Together, these studies are providing new insights into the coordination of motors during intracellular transport. PMID:20102789

  2. The effect of side motion in the dynamics of interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midha, Tripti; Gupta, Arvind Kumar; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2017-07-01

    To mimic the collective motion of interacting molecular motors, we propose and discuss an open two-lane symmetrically coupled interactive TASEP model that incorporates interaction in the thermodynamically consistent fashion. We study the effect of both repulsive and attractive interaction on the system’s dynamical properties using various cluster mean field analysis and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The interactions bring correlations into the system, which were found to be reduced due to the side motion of particles. We produce the steady-state phase diagrams for symmetrically split interaction strength. The behavior of the maximal particle current with respect to the interaction energy E is analyzed for different coupling rates and interaction splittings. The results suggest that for strong coupling and large splittings, the maximal flow of the motors occurs at a weak attractive interaction strength which matches with the known experimental results on kinesin motor protein.

  3. Active translocation of a semiflexible polymer assisted by an ATP-based molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Fiasconaro, A; Mazo, J J; Falo, F

    2017-06-23

    In this work we study the assisted translocation of a polymer across a membrane nanopore, inside which a molecular motor exerts a force fuelled by the hydrolysis of ATP molecules. In our model the motor switches to its active state for a fixed amount of time, while it waits for an ATP molecule which triggers the motor, during an exponentially distributed time lapse. The polymer is modelled as a beads-springs chain with both excluded volume and bending contributions, and moves in a stochastic three dimensional environment modelled with a Langevin dynamics at a fixed temperature. The resulting dynamics shows a Michaelis-Menten translocation velocity that depends on the chain flexibility. The scaling behavior of the mean translocation time with the polymer length for different bending values is also investigated.

  4. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas. 212.57 Section 212.57 Parks... Roads, Trails, and Areas for Motor Vehicle Use § 212.57 Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas. For each administrative unit of the National Forest...

  5. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas. 212.57 Section 212.57 Parks... Roads, Trails, and Areas for Motor Vehicle Use § 212.57 Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas. For each administrative unit of the National Forest...

  6. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas. 212.57 Section 212.57 Parks... Roads, Trails, and Areas for Motor Vehicle Use § 212.57 Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas. For each administrative unit of the National Forest...

  7. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas. 212.57 Section 212.57 Parks... Roads, Trails, and Areas for Motor Vehicle Use § 212.57 Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas. For each administrative unit of the National Forest...

  8. Molecular Rift: Virtual Reality for Drug Designers.

    PubMed

    Norrby, Magnus; Grebner, Christoph; Eriksson, Joakim; Boström, Jonas

    2015-11-23

    Recent advances in interaction design have created new ways to use computers. One example is the ability to create enhanced 3D environments that simulate physical presence in the real world--a virtual reality. This is relevant to drug discovery since molecular models are frequently used to obtain deeper understandings of, say, ligand-protein complexes. We have developed a tool (Molecular Rift), which creates a virtual reality environment steered with hand movements. Oculus Rift, a head-mounted display, is used to create the virtual settings. The program is controlled by gesture-recognition, using the gaming sensor MS Kinect v2, eliminating the need for standard input devices. The Open Babel toolkit was integrated to provide access to powerful cheminformatics functions. Molecular Rift was developed with a focus on usability, including iterative test-group evaluations. We conclude with reflections on virtual reality's future capabilities in chemistry and education. Molecular Rift is open source and can be downloaded from GitHub.

  9. A design of a two-phase permanent magnet vibration motor used for mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Shi-Uk; Hwang, Sang-Moon; Kim, Tae-Jong; Hwang, Gun-Yong; Kang, Beom-Soo

    2002-05-01

    With the advent of the telecommunications era, a mobile phone becomes a necessary communication device in modern society. However, a paging signal by a sound transducer often acts as an unpleasant noise, thus necessitating a paging signal by a vibration motor. The conventional flat type vibration motor uses three-phase windings with three phase coils. In this article, a new design of a vibration motor using a V connection with two phase coils is presented, increasing mass productivity. For electromagnetic field analysis, due to the motor symmetry, two-dimensional modeling can be implemented for fast computation, and performance is predicted by the finite element method. The winding distribution angle turns out to be the most important design parameter for the elimination of dead points, and a new coil configuration is suggested which has no adverse effect on motor size and weight. Experimental tests of vibration confirm the validity of the proposed design.

  10. Transition to superdiffusive behavior in intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, L.; Levi, V.; Brunstein, M.; Despósito, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    Intracellular transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles, or large proteins, is a complex dynamical process that involves the interplay of adenosine triphosphate-consuming molecular motors, cytoskeleton filaments, and the viscoelastic cytoplasm. In this work we investigate the motion of pigment organelles (melanosomes) driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high-spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the obtained trajectories, we show that the melanosomes mean-square displacement undergoes a transition from a subdiffusive to a superdiffusive behavior. A stochastic theoretical model, which explicitly considers the collective action of the molecular motors, is introduced to generalize the interpretation of our data. Starting from a generalized Langevin equation, we derive an analytical expression for the mean square displacement, which also takes into account the experimental noise. By fitting theoretical expressions to experimental data we were able to discriminate the exponents that characterize the passive and active contributions to the dynamics and to estimate the “global” motor forces correctly. Then, our model gives a quantitative description of active transport in living cells with a reduced number of parameters.

  11. Transition to superdiffusive behavior in intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Bruno, L; Levi, V; Brunstein, M; Despósito, M A

    2009-07-01

    Intracellular transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles, or large proteins, is a complex dynamical process that involves the interplay of adenosine triphosphate-consuming molecular motors, cytoskeleton filaments, and the viscoelastic cytoplasm. In this work we investigate the motion of pigment organelles (melanosomes) driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high-spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the obtained trajectories, we show that the melanosomes mean-square displacement undergoes a transition from a subdiffusive to a superdiffusive behavior. A stochastic theoretical model, which explicitly considers the collective action of the molecular motors, is introduced to generalize the interpretation of our data. Starting from a generalized Langevin equation, we derive an analytical expression for the mean square displacement, which also takes into account the experimental noise. By fitting theoretical expressions to experimental data we were able to discriminate the exponents that characterize the passive and active contributions to the dynamics and to estimate the "global" motor forces correctly. Then, our model gives a quantitative description of active transport in living cells with a reduced number of parameters.

  12. Operations and thermodynamics of an artificial rotary molecular motor in solution.

    PubMed

    Moro, Lorenzo; di Giosia, Matteo; Calvaresi, Matteo; Bakalis, Evangelos; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2014-06-23

    A general framework is provided that makes possible the estimation of time-dependent properties of a stochastic system moving far from equilibrium. The process is investigated and discussed in general terms of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The approach is simple and can be exploited to gain insight into the dynamics of any molecular-level machine. As a case study, the dynamics of an artificial molecular rotary motor, similar to the inversion of a helix, which drives the motor from a metastable state to equilibrium, are examined. The energy path that the motor walks was obtained from the results of atomistic calculations. The motor undergoes unidirectional rotation and its entropy, internal energy, free energy, and net exerted force are given as a function of time, starting from the solution of Smoluchowski's equation. The rather low value of the organization index, that is, the ratio of the work done by the particle against friction during the unidirectional motion per available free energy, reveals that the motion is mainly subject to randomness, and the amount of energy converted to heat due to the directional motion is very small.

  13. High molecular recognition: design of "Keys".

    PubMed

    Chen, Beining; Piletsky, Sergey; Turner, Anthony P F

    2002-09-01

    Molecular recognition between molecules is one of the most fundamental processes in biology and chemistry. The recognition process is largely driven by non-covalent forces such as hydrogen bonding, electrostatics, van der Waals forces, pi-pi interactions, and conformational energy. The complementarity between the receptor and substrate is very similar to the "lock and key" function, first described by Emil Fischer over 100 years ago, - the lock being the molecular receptor such as a protein or enzyme and the key being the substrate such as a drug, that is recognized to give a defined receptor-substrate complex. This review focuses on the design of specific ligand systems as "Keys" to enable the induced fit of these keys into the target macromolecules, protein/enzyme (Locks) with particular emphasis on protein recognition.

  14. Structural and Molecular Basis for Coordination in a Viral DNA Packaging Motor

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Aldrete, Emilio; Sherman, Michael B.; Woodson, Michael; Atz, Rockney; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Morais, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Ring NTPases are a class of ubiquitous molecular motors involved in basic biological partitioning processes. dsDNA viruses encode ring ATPases that translocate their genomes to near-crystalline densities within pre-assembled viral capsids. Here, X-ray crystallography, cryoEM, and biochemical analyses of the dsDNA packaging motor in bacteriophage phi29 show how individual subunits are arranged in a pentameric ATPase ring, and suggest how their activities are coordinated to translocate dsDNA. The resulting pseudo-atomic structure of the motor and accompanying functional analyses show how ATP is bound in the ATPase active site; identify two DNA contacts, including a potential DNA translocating loop; demonstrate that a trans-acting arginine finger is involved in coordinating hydrolysis around the ring; and suggest a functional coupling between the arginine finger and the DNA translocating loop. The ability to visualize the motor in action illuminates how the different motor components interact with each other and with their DNA substrate. PMID:26904950

  15. Allosteric Regulation of the Rotational Speed in a Light-Driven Molecular Motor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The rotational speed of an overcrowded alkene-based molecular rotary motor, having an integrated 4,5-diazafluorenyl coordination motif, can be regulated allosterically via the binding of metal ions. DFT calculations have been used to predict the relative speed of rotation of three different (i.e., zinc, palladium, and platinum) metal dichloride complexes. The photochemical and thermal isomerization behavior of these complexes has been studied in detail using UV–vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Our results confirm that metal coordination induces a contraction of the diazafluorenyl lower half, resulting in a reduction of the steric hindrance in the “fjord” region of the molecule, which causes an increase of the rotational speed. Importantly, metal complexation can be accomplished in situ and is found to be reversible upon the addition of a competing ligand. Consequently, the rotational behavior of these molecular motors can be dynamically controlled with chemical additives. PMID:27669358

  16. How molecular motors extract order from chaos (a key issues review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Peter M.

    2016-03-01

    Molecular motors are the workhorses of living cells. Seemingly by ‘magic’, these molecules are able to complete purposeful tasks while being immersed in a sea of thermal chaos. Here, we review the current understanding of how these machines work, present simple models based on thermal ratchets, discuss implications for statistical physics, and provide an overview of ongoing research in this important and fascinating field of study.

  17. How molecular motors extract order from chaos (a key issues review).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Peter M

    2016-03-01

    Molecular motors are the workhorses of living cells. Seemingly by 'magic', these molecules are able to complete purposeful tasks while being immersed in a sea of thermal chaos. Here, we review the current understanding of how these machines work, present simple models based on thermal ratchets, discuss implications for statistical physics, and provide an overview of ongoing research in this important and fascinating field of study.

  18. Design of a motor-generator for an energy storage flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, W. Leland; Studer, Philip A.

    1988-01-01

    The paper examines motor/generator designs in which the rotor is integrated into the flywheel. Rotational loss considerations tend to dominate the design tradeoffs to maintain high system storage efficiency with a directly coupled unit. Some of the design alternatives are described as a guide to the experimental and analytical program needed to finalize a design.

  19. Design of a motor-generator for an energy storage flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, W. Leland; Studer, Philip A.

    1988-01-01

    The paper examines motor/generator designs in which the rotor is integrated into the flywheel. Rotational loss considerations tend to dominate the design tradeoffs to maintain high system storage efficiency with a directly coupled unit. Some of the design alternatives are described as a guide to the experimental and analytical program needed to finalize a design.

  20. Computational Insight to Improve the Thermal Isomerisation Performance of Overcrowded Alkene-Based Molecular Motors through Structural Redesign.

    PubMed

    Oruganti, Baswanth; Wang, Jun; Durbeej, Bo

    2016-11-04

    Synthetic overcrowded alkene-based molecular motors achieve 360° unidirectional rotary motion of one motor half (rotator) relative to the other (stator) through sequential photochemical and thermal isomerisation steps. In order to facilitate and expand the use of these motors for various applications, it is important to investigate ways to increase the rates and efficiencies of the reactions governing the rotary motion. Here, we use computational methods to explore whether the thermal isomerisation performance of some of the fastest available motors of this type can be further improved by reducing the sizes of the motor halves. Presenting three new redesigned motors that combine an indanylidene rotator with a cyclohexadiene, pyran or thiopyran stator, we first use multiconfigurational quantum chemical methods to verify that the photoisomerisations of these motors sustain unidirectional rotary motion. Then, by performing density functional calculations, we identify both stepwise and concerted mechanisms for the thermal isomerisations of the motors and show that the rate-determining free-energy barriers of these processes are up to 25 kJ mol(-1) smaller than those of the original motors. Furthermore, the thermal isomerisations of the redesigned motors proceed in fewer steps. Altogether, the results suggest that the redesigned motors are useful templates for improving the thermal isomerisation performance of existing overcrowded alkene-based motors.

  1. Insights into the mechanisms of myosin and kinesin molecular motors from the single-molecule unbinding force measurements.

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, Sergey V; Oguchi, Yusuke; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2010-06-06

    In cells, ATP (adenosine triphosphate)-driven motor proteins, both cytoskeletal and nucleic acid-based, operate on their corresponding 'tracks', that is, actin, microtubules or nucleic acids, by converting the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work. During each mechanochemical cycle, a motor proceeds via several nucleotide states, characterized by different affinities for the 'track' filament and different nucleotide (ATP or ADP) binding kinetics, which is crucial for a motor to efficiently perform its cellular functions. The measurements of the rupture force between the motor and the track by applying external loads to the individual motor-substrate bonds in various nucleotide states have proved to be an important tool to obtain valuable insights into the mechanism of the motors' performance. We review the application of this technique to various linear molecular motors, both processive and non-processive, giving special attention to the importance of the experimental geometry.

  2. Molecular motor-driven abrupt anisotropic shape change in a single crystal of a Ni complex.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zi-Shuo; Mito, Masaki; Kamachi, Takashi; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Azuma, Nobuaki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Zhang, Kuirun; Nakanishi, Takumi; Kang, Soonchul; Kanegawa, Shinji; Sato, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Many molecular machines with controllable molecular-scale motors have been developed. However, transmitting molecular movement to the macroscopic scale remains a formidable challenge. Here we report a single crystal of a Ni complex whose shape changes abruptly and reversibly in response to thermal changes at around room temperature. Variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the crystalline shape change is induced by an unusual 90° rotation of uniaxially aligned oxalate molecules. The oxalate dianions behave as molecular-scale rotors, with their movement propagated through the entire crystalline material via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Consequently, the subnanometre-scale changes in the oxalate molecules are instantly amplified to a micrometre-scale contraction or expansion of the crystal, accompanied by a thermal hysteresis loop. The shape change in the crystal was clearly detected under an optical microscope. The large directional deformation and prompt response suggest a role for this material in microscale or nanoscale thermal actuators.

  3. Molecular motor-driven abrupt anisotropic shape change in a single crystal of a Ni complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zi-Shuo; Mito, Masaki; Kamachi, Takashi; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Azuma, Nobuaki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Zhang, Kuirun; Nakanishi, Takumi; Kang, Soonchul; Kanegawa, Shinji; Sato, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Many molecular machines with controllable molecular-scale motors have been developed. However, transmitting molecular movement to the macroscopic scale remains a formidable challenge. Here we report a single crystal of a Ni complex whose shape changes abruptly and reversibly in response to thermal changes at around room temperature. Variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the crystalline shape change is induced by an unusual 90° rotation of uniaxially aligned oxalate molecules. The oxalate dianions behave as molecular-scale rotors, with their movement propagated through the entire crystalline material via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Consequently, the subnanometre-scale changes in the oxalate molecules are instantly amplified to a micrometre-scale contraction or expansion of the crystal, accompanied by a thermal hysteresis loop. The shape change in the crystal was clearly detected under an optical microscope. The large directional deformation and prompt response suggest a role for this material in microscale or nanoscale thermal actuators.

  4. Design and simulation of a novel impact piezoelectric linear-rotary motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Liling; Zhao, Yahui; Pan, Chengliang; Yu, Liandong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel impact piezoelectric linear-rotary motor which is driven by a single piezoceramic tube with two parts of electrodes. From the inner and outer electrodes, longitudinal displacement of the tube is generated and used to actuate the shaft with linear motion ability. From the grooved helical interdigitated electrodes, torsional displacement is generated and used to actuate the shaft with rotary motion ability. Working principle and structural design of the motor are introduced and quasi-static longitudinal and torsional displacements of the tube are estimated. With established kinematics model of the motor, the working behaviors of the motor are investigated numerically with MATLAB/Simulink software. The stepping characteristics of the linear and rotary motions are analyzed, compared, and discussed. With optimized material selection, structural design, and driving parameters, the proposed linear-rotary motor will provide remarkable performances as a miniaturized multi-degree driving device for complex positioning and manipulation applications.

  5. Genetic algorithm based design optimization of a permanent magnet brushless dc motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, P. R.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2005-05-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) based design optimization of a permanent magnet brushless dc motor is presented in this paper. A 70 W, 350 rpm, ceiling fan motor with radial-filed configuration is designed by considering the efficiency as the objective function. Temperature-rise and motor weight are the constraints and the slot electric loading, magnet-fraction, slot-fraction, airgap, and airgap flux density are the design variables. The efficiency and the phase-inductance of the motor designed using the developed CAD program are improved by using the GA based optimization technique; from 84.75% and 5.55 mH to 86.06% and 2.4 mH, respectively.

  6. Automatic Molecular Design using Evolutionary Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Molecular nanotechnology is the precise, three-dimensional control of materials and devices at the atomic scale. An important part of nanotechnology is the design of molecules for specific purposes. This paper describes early results using genetic software techniques to automatically design molecules under the control of a fitness function. The fitness function must be capable of determining which of two arbitrary molecules is better for a specific task. The software begins by generating a population of random molecules. The population is then evolved towards greater fitness by randomly combining parts of the better individuals to create new molecules. These new molecules then replace some of the worst molecules in the population. The unique aspect of our approach is that we apply genetic crossover to molecules represented by graphs, i.e., sets of atoms and the bonds that connect them. We present evidence suggesting that crossover alone, operating on graphs, can evolve any possible molecule given an appropriate fitness function and a population containing both rings and chains. Prior work evolved strings or trees that were subsequently processed to generate molecular graphs. In principle, genetic graph software should be able to evolve other graph representable systems such as circuits, transportation networks, metabolic pathways, computer networks, etc.

  7. Microporous solids designed from molecular building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Charles Earnest

    The synthesis, characterization, and application of porous materials has experienced explosive growth in the last fifty years. An increased number of technologies are based on the unique properties of rigid, open framework solids in areas such as molecular and ionic separations, sensors, and catalysts. However, until recently, the only well characterized solids that have seen extensive application were metal oxide frameworks such as the aluminosilicate zeolites and aluminophosphates. The syntheses of these materials have lacked the ability to design and control the properties of the solid. Therefore, this work has focused on the concept of directed synthesis employing molecular building blocks in an attempt to tailor open framework systems based on simple chemical functionality. Towards this goal, highly symmetric molecular species with well defined reactive sites have been polymerized through metal centers in the presence of templating agents and potential guests. Highly crystalline solids were obtained using a variety of techniques including vapor and gel diffusion, recrystallization, and hydrothermal synthesis. Complete characterization of the structure and properties has been achieved using elemental microanalysis, infrared spectroscopy, powder and single crystal x-ray analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and gas chromatography. These new materials are based on the linking of germanium sulfide cages and polycarboxylic aromatic rings with transition metal ions. The fundamental problems of interpenetrating networks, poor structural rigidity in the absence of guests, and low crystallinity have been overcome to produce highly selective, stable frameworks capable of ion exchange, molecular selectivity, and potentially catalysis. Furthermore, the concept of selectivity based on electronic character and functionality has been introduced and demonstrated. This unique property is believed to be the result of metal center accessibility in

  8. Using Motor-Learning Theory to Design More Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rukavina, Paul B.; Foxworth, K. Randell

    2009-01-01

    Choosing which teaching approach to use and when to use it is a complex decision, especially for preservice teachers learning to teach individuals with a variety of skill levels and abilities. One source of information that teachers can use to help select an approach is motor-learning theory. This article describes an early field experience in…

  9. Using Motor-Learning Theory to Design More Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rukavina, Paul B.; Foxworth, K. Randell

    2009-01-01

    Choosing which teaching approach to use and when to use it is a complex decision, especially for preservice teachers learning to teach individuals with a variety of skill levels and abilities. One source of information that teachers can use to help select an approach is motor-learning theory. This article describes an early field experience in…

  10. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Jonathan E.; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R.; Friedman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin–specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end–directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼430 nm·s−1 at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (kcat ∼6 s−1) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (kdet = 6.2 s−1) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  11. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: the parallel cluster model.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  12. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  13. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-01

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  14. A new method for the design optimization of three-phase induction motors

    SciTech Connect

    Daidone, A.; Parasiliti, F.; Villani, M.; Lucidi, S.

    1998-09-01

    The paper deals with the optimization problem of induction motors design. In particular a new global minimization algorithm is described; it tries to take into account all the features of these particular problems. A first numerical comparison between this new algorithm and a method widely used in the design optimization of induction motors has been performed. The obtained results show that the proposed approach is promising.

  15. A.C. motors for high-performance drives: A design-based comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Vagati, A.; Fratta, A.; Franceschini, G.; Rosso, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Three AC motors are compared, for application in high-performance controlled drives: induction, brushless and synchronous reluctance motors. Their design is optimized, under common design assumptions. Then, the given stall-torques are compared to each other. In addition, the quadrature reactances are compared, as affecting overload and flux-weakening performances. Last, applicative considerations are given, thus defining the most suitable solution for each field.

  16. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations.

  17. Design of motion adjusting system for space camera based on ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai; Jin, Guang; Gu, Song; Yan, Yong; Sun, Zhiyuan

    2011-08-01

    Drift angle is a transverse intersection angle of vector of image motion of the space camera. Adjusting the angle could reduce the influence on image quality. Ultrasonic motor (USM) is a new type of actuator using ultrasonic wave stimulated by piezoelectric ceramics. They have many advantages in comparison with conventional electromagnetic motors. In this paper, some improvement was designed for control system of drift adjusting mechanism. Based on ultrasonic motor T-60 was designed the drift adjusting system, which is composed of the drift adjusting mechanical frame, the ultrasonic motor, the driver of Ultrasonic Motor, the photoelectric encoder and the drift adjusting controller. The TMS320F28335 DSP was adopted as the calculation and control processor, photoelectric encoder was used as sensor of position closed loop system and the voltage driving circuit designed as generator of ultrasonic wave. It was built the mathematic model of drive circuit of the ultrasonic motor T-60 using matlab modules. In order to verify the validity of the drift adjusting system, was introduced the source of the disturbance, and made simulation analysis. It designed the control systems of motor drive for drift adjusting system with the improved PID control. The drift angle adjusting system has such advantages as the small space, simple configuration, high position control precision, fine repeatability, self locking property and low powers. It showed that the system could accomplish the mission of drift angle adjusting excellent.

  18. Molecular design and QSARs/QSPRs with molecular descriptors family.

    PubMed

    Bolboacă, Sorana D; Jäntschi, Lorentz; Diudea, Mircea V

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present paper is to present the methodology of the molecular descriptors family (MDF) as an integrative tool in molecular modeling and its abilities as a multivariate QSAR/QSPR modeling tool. An algorithm for extracting useful information from the topological and geometrical representation of chemical compounds was developed and integrated to calculate MDF members. The MDF methodology was implemented and the software is available online (http://l.academicdirect.org/Chemistry/SARs/MDF_SARs/). This integrative tool was developed in order to maximize performance, functionality, efficiency and portability. The MDF methodology is able to provide reliable and valid multiple linear regression models. Furthermore, in many cases, the MDF models were better than the published results in the literature in terms of correlation coefficients (statistically significant Steiger's Z test at a significance level of 5%) and/or in terms of values of information criteria and Kubinyi function. The MDF methodology developed and implemented as a platform for investigating and characterizing quantitative relationships between the chemical structure and the activity/property of active compounds was used on more than 50 study cases. In almost all cases, the methodology allowed obtaining of QSAR/QSPR models improved in explanatory power of structure-activity and structure-property relationships. The algorithms applied in the computation of geometric and topological descriptors (useful in modeling physicochemical or biological properties of molecules) and those used in searching for reliable and valid multiple linear regression models certain enrich the pool of low-cost low-time drug design tools.

  19. Design sensitivity analysis of dynamic responses for a BLDC motor with mechanical and electromagnetic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hyungbin; Bae, Dae Sung; Chung, Jintai

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a design sensitivity analysis of dynamic responses of a BLDC motor with mechanical and electromagnetic interactions. Based on the equations of motion which consider mechanical and electromagnetic interactions of the motor, the sensitivity equations for the dynamic responses were derived by applying the direct differential method. From the sensitivity equation along with the equations of motion, the time responses for the sensitivity analysis were obtained by using the Newmark time integration method. The sensitivities of the motor performances such as the electromagnetic torque, rotating speed, and vibration level were analyzed for the six design parameters of rotor mass, shaft/bearing stiffness, rotor eccentricity, winding resistance, coil turn number, and residual magnetic flux density. Furthermore, to achieve a higher torque, higher speed, and lower vibration level, a new BLDC motor was designed by applying the multi-objective function method. It was found that all three performances are sensitive to the design parameters in the order of the coil turn number, magnetic flux density, rotor mass, winding resistance, rotor eccentricity, and stiffness. It was also found that the torque and vibration level are more sensitive to the parameters than the rotating speed. Finally, by applying the sensitivity analysis results, a new optimized design of the motor resulted in better performances. The newly designed motor showed an improved torque, rotating speed, and vibration level.

  20. Visualisation in the SPROUT molecular design program.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A P; Zsoldos, Z

    1996-01-01

    SPROUT is an interactive computer system for structure based molecular design. The system consists of several modules that address the different subproblems of structure based drug design. This paper describes the visualisation techniques applied in the program: the display of the novel (geometric region) representation of the interaction sites and the molecular surface display based on a 3D grid representation of the cavity. The hydrogen bonding regions are represented by set operations (subtraction and intersection) of simple spherical and conical 3D objects (with given radii and opening angle) Some complex hydrogen bonding regions are represented by intersections of six or more basic objects. A method for calculating a triangular mesh representation (with normal vectors) of the analytical surfaces of the objects, that have sharp edges and corners because of the intersections, is presented in the paper. The geometric parameters of the interaction regions can be changed interactively in which case the surface display is updated real-time. The volume of space that is available for ligand generation (the cavity of the receptor site) is represented on a 3D grid within SPROUT. The surface of the available space is visualised using an algorithm presented in the paper, that generates a polygonial mesh of the grid points. The grid is also used to cut out stericaly forbidden parts of the interaction site regions. The surface of the reduced object is also visualised using further sphere subtractions. The presented algorithms are fast, aplicable in interactive visualisation programs. Result images of the rendering of the surfaces, calculated by the algorithms, are demonstrated on examples taken from applications of SPROUT to practical ligand design problems.

  1. Improved hidden Markov models for molecular motors, part 2: extensions and application to experimental data.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sheyum; Müllner, Fiona E; Selvin, Paul R; Sigworth, Fred J

    2010-12-01

    Unbiased interpretation of noisy single molecular motor recordings remains a challenging task. To address this issue, we have developed robust algorithms based on hidden Markov models (HMMs) of motor proteins. The basic algorithm, called variable-stepsize HMM (VS-HMM), was introduced in the previous article. It improves on currently available Markov-model based techniques by allowing for arbitrary distributions of step sizes, and shows excellent convergence properties for the characterization of staircase motor timecourses in the presence of large measurement noise. In this article, we extend the VS-HMM framework for better performance with experimental data. The extended algorithm, variable-stepsize integrating-detector HMM (VSI-HMM) better models the data-acquisition process, and accounts for random baseline drifts. Further, as an extension, maximum a posteriori estimation is provided. When used as a blind step detector, the VSI-HMM outperforms conventional step detectors. The fidelity of the VSI-HMM is tested with simulations and is applied to in vitro myosin V data where a small 10 nm population of steps is identified. It is also applied to an in vivo recording of melanosome motion, where strong evidence is found for repeated, bidirectional steps smaller than 8 nm in size, implying that multiple motors simultaneously carry the cargo.

  2. When size does matter: organelle size influences the properties of transport mediated by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, María Cecilia; Bruno, Luciana; Wolosiuk, Alejandro; Despósito, Marcelo A; Levi, Valeria

    2013-11-01

    Organelle transport is driven by the action of molecular motors. In this work, we studied the dynamics of organelles of different sizes with the aim of understanding the complex relation between organelle motion and microenvironment. We used single particle tracking to obtain trajectories of melanosomes (pigmented organelles in Xenopus laevis melanophores). In response to certain hormones, melanosomes disperse in the cytoplasm or aggregate in the perinuclear region by the combined action of microtubule and actin motors. Melanosome trajectories followed an anomalous diffusion model in which the anomalous diffusion exponent (α) provided information regarding the trajectories' topography and thus of the processes causing it. During aggregation, the directionality of big organelles was higher than that of small organelles and did not depend on the presence of either actin or intermediate filaments (IF). Depolymerization of IF significantly reduced α values of small organelles during aggregation but slightly affect their directionality during dispersion. Our results could be interpreted considering that the number of copies of active motors increases with organelle size. Transport of big organelles was not influenced by actin or IF during aggregation showing that these organelles are moved processively by the collective action of dynein motors. Also, we found that intermediate filaments enhance the directionality of small organelles suggesting that this network keeps organelles close to the tracks allowing their efficient reattachment. The higher directionality of small organelles during dispersion could be explained considering the better performance of kinesin-2 vs. dynein at the single molecule level. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of beads for tracking small-scale molecular motor dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lade, Steven J.; Craig, Erin M.; Linke, Heiner

    2011-08-01

    Investigations into molecular motor dynamics are increasingly focused on small-scale features of the motor’s motion. We define performance measures of a common type of single-molecule motility assay, the bead assay, for its ability to detect such features. Using numerical models, we explore the dependence of assay performance on a number of experimentally controllable parameters, including bead size, optical force, and the method of attaching the bead to the motor. We find that the best parameter choice depends on the objective of the experiments, and give a guide to parameter selection. Comparison of the models against experimental data from a recent bead assay of myosin V exemplifies how our methods can also be used to extract additional information from bead assays, particularly that related to small-scale features. By analyzing the experimental data we find evidence for previously undetected multiple waiting states of the bead-motor complex. Furthermore, from numerical simulations we find that equilibrium bead dynamics display features previously attributed to aborted motor steps, and that bead dynamics alone can produce multiple subphases during a step.

  4. A minimal system allowing tubulation with molecular motors pulling on giant liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Aurélien; Cappello, Giovanni; Cartaud, Jean; Prost, Jacques; Goud, Bruno; Bassereau, Patricia

    2002-04-01

    The elucidation of physical and molecular mechanisms by which a membrane tube is generated from a membrane reservoir is central to the understanding of the structure and dynamics of intracellular organelles and of transport intermediates in eukaryotic cells. Compelling evidence exists that molecular motors of the dynein and kinesin families are involved in the tubulation of organelles. Here, we show that lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), to which kinesin molecules have been attached by means of small polystyrene beads, give rise to membrane tubes and to complex tubular networks when incubated in vitro with microtubules and ATP. Similar tubes and networks are obtained with GUVs made of purified Golgi lipids, as well as with Golgi membranes. No tube formation was observed when kinesins were directly bound to the GUV membrane, suggesting that it is critical to distribute the load on both lipids and motors by means of beads. A kinetic analysis shows that network growth occurs in two phases: a phase in which membrane-bound beads move at the same velocity than free beads, followed by a phase in which the tube growth rate decreases and strongly fluctuates. Our work demonstrates that the action of motors bound to a lipid bilayer is sufficient to generate membrane tubes and opens the way to well controlled experiments aimed at the understanding of basic mechanisms in intracellular transport.

  5. The myosin family: unconventional roles of actin-dependent molecular motors in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Maravillas-Montero, José L; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo

    2012-01-01

    Myosins comprise a family of ATP-dependent motor proteins that are best known for their role in muscle contraction and their involvement in a wide range of other eukaryotic motility processes. Recent phylogenetic analysis places myosins into 35 highly diverse classes. Although these actin-based molecular motors have been characterized extensively, and much is known about their function in different cellular compartments, there is little information available about these molecules in hematopoietic cells. The available data establish that myosins expressed by immune cells are able to support general tasks, such as maintaining plasma membrane tension, moving and secreting vesicles, aiding in endo- and exocytotic processes, and promoting the adhesion and motility of cells. Additionally, however, myosins are involved in highly specialized functions, such as regulating cell activation, IS-induced signaling, and the severing of microfilaments via the control of GTPases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of myosins in leukocytes, with emphasis on the emerging roles of these molecular motors in immune functions.

  6. Mechanochemical coupling of the motion of molecular motors to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R D; Bier, M

    1996-02-01

    The typical biochemical paradigm for coupling between hydrolysis of ATP and the performance of chemical or mechanical work involves a well-defined sequence of events (a kinetic mechanism) with a fixed stoichiometry between the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed and the turnover of the output reaction. Recent experiments show, however, that such a deterministic picture of coupling may not be adequate to explain observed behavior of molecular motor proteins in the presence of applied forces. Here we present a general model in which the binding of ATP and release of ADP serve to modulate the binding energy of a motor protein as it travels along a biopolymer backbone. The mechanism is loosely coupled--the average number of ATPs hydrolyzed to cause a single step from one binding site to the next depends strongly on the magnitude of an applied force and on the effective viscous drag force. The statistical mechanical perspective described here offers insight into how local anisotrophy along the "track" for a molecular motor, combined with an energy-releasing chemical reaction to provide a source of nonequilibrium fluctuations, can lead to macroscopic motion.

  7. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force.

    PubMed

    Vu, Huong T; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-08-12

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F)-dependent velocity [P(v)] and run length [P(n)] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P(n) and P(v) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F, P(v) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v, which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  8. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Huong T.; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F )-dependent velocity [P (v )] and run length [P (n )] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P (n ) and P (v ) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F , P (v ) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v , which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  9. Molecular motor-induced instabilities and cross linkers determine biopolymer organization.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.; Ziebert, F.; Humphrey, D.; Duggan, C.; Steinbeck, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Kas, J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Leipzig; Univ. of Texas at Austin; Univ. Bayreuth

    2007-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells rely on the active self-organization of protein filaments to form a responsive intracellular cytoskeleton. The necessity of motility and reaction to stimuli additionally requires pathways that quickly and reversibly change cytoskeletal organization. While thermally driven order-disorder transitions are, from the viewpoint of physics, the most obvious method for controlling states of organization, the timescales necessary for effective cellular dynamics would require temperatures exceeding the physiologically viable temperature range. We report a mechanism whereby the molecular motor myosin II can cause near-instantaneous order-disorder transitions in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin solutions. When motor-induced filament sliding diminishes, the actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies. Addition of stable cross linkers was found to alter the architectures of ordered assemblies. These isothermal transitions between dynamic disorder and self-assembled ordered states illustrate that the interplay between passive crosslinking and molecular motor activity plays a substantial role in dynamic cellular organization.

  10. Mechanochemical coupling of the motion of molecular motors to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R D; Bier, M

    1996-01-01

    The typical biochemical paradigm for coupling between hydrolysis of ATP and the performance of chemical or mechanical work involves a well-defined sequence of events (a kinetic mechanism) with a fixed stoichiometry between the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed and the turnover of the output reaction. Recent experiments show, however, that such a deterministic picture of coupling may not be adequate to explain observed behavior of molecular motor proteins in the presence of applied forces. Here we present a general model in which the binding of ATP and release of ADP serve to modulate the binding energy of a motor protein as it travels along a biopolymer backbone. The mechanism is loosely coupled--the average number of ATPs hydrolyzed to cause a single step from one binding site to the next depends strongly on the magnitude of an applied force and on the effective viscous drag force. The statistical mechanical perspective described here offers insight into how local anisotrophy along the "track" for a molecular motor, combined with an energy-releasing chemical reaction to provide a source of nonequilibrium fluctuations, can lead to macroscopic motion. Images Scheme 1 FIGURE 1 PMID:8789082

  11. A minimal system allowing tubulation with molecular motors pulling on giant liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Aurélien; Cappello, Giovanni; Cartaud, Jean; Prost, Jacques; Goud, Bruno; Bassereau, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The elucidation of physical and molecular mechanisms by which a membrane tube is generated from a membrane reservoir is central to the understanding of the structure and dynamics of intracellular organelles and of transport intermediates in eukaryotic cells. Compelling evidence exists that molecular motors of the dynein and kinesin families are involved in the tubulation of organelles. Here, we show that lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), to which kinesin molecules have been attached by means of small polystyrene beads, give rise to membrane tubes and to complex tubular networks when incubated in vitro with microtubules and ATP. Similar tubes and networks are obtained with GUVs made of purified Golgi lipids, as well as with Golgi membranes. No tube formation was observed when kinesins were directly bound to the GUV membrane, suggesting that it is critical to distribute the load on both lipids and motors by means of beads. A kinetic analysis shows that network growth occurs in two phases: a phase in which membrane-bound beads move at the same velocity than free beads, followed by a phase in which the tube growth rate decreases and strongly fluctuates. Our work demonstrates that the action of motors bound to a lipid bilayer is sufficient to generate membrane tubes and opens the way to well controlled experiments aimed at the understanding of basic mechanisms in intracellular transport. PMID:11959994

  12. Molecular Motor-Induced Instabilities and Cross Linkers Determine Biopolymer Organization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D.; Ziebert, F.; Humphrey, D.; Duggan, C.; Steinbeck, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Käs, J.

    2007-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells rely on the active self-organization of protein filaments to form a responsive intracellular cytoskeleton. The necessity of motility and reaction to stimuli additionally requires pathways that quickly and reversibly change cytoskeletal organization. While thermally driven order-disorder transitions are, from the viewpoint of physics, the most obvious method for controlling states of organization, the timescales necessary for effective cellular dynamics would require temperatures exceeding the physiologically viable temperature range. We report a mechanism whereby the molecular motor myosin II can cause near-instantaneous order-disorder transitions in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin solutions. When motor-induced filament sliding diminishes, the actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies. Addition of stable cross linkers was found to alter the architectures of ordered assemblies. These isothermal transitions between dynamic disorder and self-assembled ordered states illustrate that the interplay between passive crosslinking and molecular motor activity plays a substantial role in dynamic cellular organization. PMID:17604319

  13. Structure of the torque ring of the flagellar motor and the molecular basis for rotational switching

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lawrence K.; Ginsburg, Michael A.; Crovace, Claudia; Donohoe, Mhairi; Stock, Daniela

    2010-09-13

    The flagellar motor drives the rotation of flagellar filaments at hundreds of revolutions per second, efficiently propelling bacteria through viscous media. The motor uses the potential energy from an electrochemical gradient of cations across the cytoplasmic membrane to generate torque. A rapid switch from anticlockwise to clockwise rotation determines whether a bacterium runs smoothly forward or tumbles to change its trajectory. A protein called FliG forms a ring in the rotor of the flagellar motor that is involved in the generation of torque through an interaction with the cation-channel-forming stator subunit MotA. FliG has been suggested to adopt distinct conformations that induce switching but these structural changes and the molecular mechanism of switching are unknown. Here we report the molecular structure of the full-length FliG protein, identify conformational changes that are involved in rotational switching and uncover the structural basis for the formation of the FliG torque ring. This allows us to propose a model of the complete ring and switching mechanism in which conformational changes in FliG reverse the electrostatic charges involved in torque generation.

  14. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... steam and/or motor vessels. 11.524 Section 11.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Engineer Officer § 11.524 Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels... requirements for endorsements as DDE are: (1) For designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels of...

  15. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... steam and/or motor vessels. 11.524 Section 11.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Engineer Officer § 11.524 Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels... requirements for endorsements as DDE are: (1) For designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels of...

  16. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... steam and/or motor vessels. 11.524 Section 11.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Engineer Officer § 11.524 Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels... requirements for endorsements as DDE are: (1) For designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels of...

  17. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... steam and/or motor vessels. 11.524 Section 11.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Engineer Officer § 11.524 Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels... requirements for endorsements as DDE are: (1) For designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels of...

  18. Design Method of ILQ Robust Current Control System for Synchronous Reluctance Electrical Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Yoko; Takami, Hiroshi; Fujii, Takao

    In this paper, a robust current control system for a synchronous reluctance electrical motor by an ILQ (Inverse Linear Quadratic) design method is proposed newly. First, for performing simultaneously decouple and large region linearization of an d-q axes system in the synchronous reluctance electrical motor using nonlinear state feedback, it is derived that a linear current-voltage state equation linearized model by the d-q axes decouple of the synchronous reluctance electrical motor. Next, according to the ILQ design method, an optimum solution and an optimal condition that achieve the robust current control system for the synchronous reluctance electrical motor are analytically derived, then the robust current control system can be designed. Finally, in practical experiments, we compare the proposed method with the PI (Proportional Integral) control method, the creativity and the usefulness of the proposed method are confirmed by experimental results.

  19. Design and performance testing of an ultrasonic linear motor with dual piezoelectric actuators.

    PubMed

    Smithmaitrie, Pruittikorn; Suybangdum, Panumas; Laoratanakul, Pitak; Muensit, Nantakan

    2012-05-01

    In this work, design and performance testing of an ultrasonic linear motor with dual piezoelectric actuator patches are studied. The motor system consists of a linear stator, a pre-load weight, and two piezoelectric actuator patches. The piezoelectric actuators are bonded with the linear elastic stator at specific locations. The stator generates propagating waves when the piezoelectric actuators are subjected to harmonic excitations. Vibration characteristics of the linear stator are analyzed and compared with finite element and experimental results. The analytical, finite element, and experimental results show agreement. In the experiments, performance of the ultrasonic linear motor is tested. Relationships between velocity and pre-load weight, velocity and applied voltage, driving force and applied voltage, and velocity and driving force are reported. The design of the dual piezoelectric actuators yields a simpler structure with a smaller number of actuators and lower stator stiffness compared with a conventional design of an ultrasonic linear motor with fully laminated piezoelectric actuators.

  20. Proportional Motor Recovery After Stroke: Implications for Trial Design.

    PubMed

    Stinear, Cathy M; Byblow, Winston D; Ackerley, Suzanne J; Smith, Marie-Claire; Borges, Victor M; Barber, P Alan

    2017-03-01

    Recovery of upper-limb motor impairment after first-ever ischemic stroke is proportional to the degree of initial impairment in patients with a functional corticospinal tract (CST). This study aimed to investigate whether proportional recovery occurs in a more clinically relevant sample including patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and previous stroke. Patients with upper-limb weakness were assessed 3 days and 3 months poststroke with the Fugl-Meyer scale. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to test CST function, and patients were dichotomized according to the presence of motor evoked potentials in the paretic wrist extensors. Linear regression modeling of Δ Fugl-Meyer score between 3 days and 3 months was performed, with predictors including initial impairment (66 - baseline Fugl-Meyer score), age, sex, stroke type, previous stroke, comorbidities, and upper-limb therapy dose. One hundred ninety-two patients were recruited, and 157 completed 3-month follow-up. Patients with a functional CST made a proportional recovery of 63% (95% confidence interval, 55%-70%) of initial motor impairment. The recovery of patients without a functional CST was not proportional to initial impairment and was reduced by greater CST damage. Recovery of motor impairment in patients with intact CST is proportional to initial impairment and unaffected by previous stroke, type of stroke, or upper-limb therapy dose. Novel interventions that interact with the neurobiological mechanisms of recovery are needed. The generalizability of proportional recovery is such that patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and previous stroke may usefully be included in interventional rehabilitation trials. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au. Unique identifier: ANZCTR12611000755932. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Design of single-phase driven screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lien-Kai; Tsai, Mi-Ching

    2016-05-01

    Most screw-thread-type ultrasonic motors are designed to be two-phase driven. This paper aims to present a novel single phase driven design that generates the required wobble motion, thus significantly simplifying the driving circuit of the ultrasonic motor. The proposed single-phase driven screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor works with two orthogonal bending modes generated by an asymmetric stator design. The novel stator design can improve the vibration displacement and further enhance the performance of the single phase driven motor. The vibration characteristics of the asymmetric stator structure were analyzed by ANSYS finite element analysis software. Based on the design and analysis processes, a prototype of the desired screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor was fabricated and tested. When the operating voltage is 200 Vpp, the obtained main characteristics of the proposed motor are as follows: the working frequency is between 28.3 and 29.5 kHz; the maximum no-load velocity is approximately 4.1 mm s-1; and the thrust force is 1.6 N.

  2. Design of single-phase driven screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lien-Kai; Tsai, Mi-Ching

    2016-05-01

    Most screw-thread-type ultrasonic motors are designed to be two-phase driven. This paper aims to present a novel single phase driven design that generates the required wobble motion, thus significantly simplifying the driving circuit of the ultrasonic motor. The proposed single-phase driven screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor works with two orthogonal bending modes generated by an asymmetric stator design. The novel stator design can improve the vibration displacement and further enhance the performance of the single phase driven motor. The vibration characteristics of the asymmetric stator structure were analyzed by ANSYS finite element analysis software. Based on the design and analysis processes, a prototype of the desired screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor was fabricated and tested. When the operating voltage is 200 Vpp, the obtained main characteristics of the proposed motor are as follows: the working frequency is between 28.3 and 29.5 kHz; the maximum no-load velocity is approximately 4.1 mm s(-1); and the thrust force is 1.6 N.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  5. Design of a Subscale Propellant Slag Evaluation Motor Using Two-Phase Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Dill, Richard A.; Purinton, David C.; Sambamurthi, Jay K.

    1996-01-01

    Small pressure perturbations in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) are caused by the periodic expulsion of molten aluminum oxide slag from a pool that collects in the aft end of the motor around the submerged nozzle nose during the last half of motor operation. It is suspected that some motors produce more slag than others due to differences in aluminum oxide agglomerate particle sizes that may relate to subtle differences in propellant ingredient characteristics such as particle size distributions or processing variations. A subscale motor experiment was designed to determine the effect of propellant ingredient characteristics on the propensity for slag production. An existing 5 inch ballistic test motor was selected as the basic test vehicle. The standard converging/diverging nozzle was replaced with a submerged nose nozzle design to provide a positive trap for the slag that would increase the measured slag weights. Two-phase fluid dynamic analyses were performed to develop a nozzle nose design that maintained similitude in major flow field features with the full scale RSRM. The 5 inch motor was spun about its longitudinal axis to further enhance slag collection and retention. Two-phase flow analysis was used to select an appropriate spin rate along with other considerations, such as avoiding bum rate increases due to radial acceleration effects. Aluminum oxide particle distributions used in the flow analyses were measured in a quench bomb for RSRM type propellants with minor variations in ingredient characteristics. Detailed predictions for slag accumulation weights during motor bum compared favorably with slag weight data taken from defined zones in the subscale motor and nozzle. The use of two-phase flow analysis proved successful in gauging the viability of the experimental program during the planning phase and in guiding the design of the critical submerged nose nozzle.

  6. Molecularly designed architectures--the metalloligand way.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Girijesh; Gupta, Rajeev

    2013-12-21

    Designed materials offer noteworthy applications which are often architecture dependent. Despite knowing such a fact, one of the major challenges faced by the scientific community is to find ways to predict and, if possible, control the resultant architecture of a network. If such an exercise is fruitful, it creates enormous opportunities to synthesize exotic materials with tailor-made applications. Any network is composed of individual molecules and the transition from a single molecule to a network can be achieved through several routes taking advantage of synthetic chemistry. There exists a molecular building block at the heart of such a transition which mediates such a process from a single molecule to a network. Although a large number of building blocks have created assorted materials, utilization of a well-defined coordination complex as the building block (i.e., metalloligand) is unique for the construction of a designed architecture. A coordination complex as the building block offers structural rigidity that places the auxiliary functional groups to a pre-organized conformation. Such auxiliary functional groups could then coordinate a secondary metal ion or be involved in the self-assembly via weak interactions, such as hydrogen bonds. This review focuses on the recent progress achieved through assorted molecular building blocks towards generating ordered networks. Broadly, two classes of metalloligands will be discussed: those offering hydrogen bond sensitive functional groups and those tendering coordination bond responsive groups. Nevertheless, the result is the construction of networks of a highly-ordered nature in both cases. The present review is expected to provide new strategies for constructing functional materials through metalloligands for challenging and practical applications.

  7. A metal switch for controlling the activity of molecular motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Jared C; Zhao, Yu Cheng; Wilcox, Dean E; Kull, F Jon

    2011-12-25

    Kinesins are molecular motors that require a divalent metal ion (for example, Mg(2+)) to convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into directed force production along microtubules. Here we present the crystal structure of a recombinant kinesin motor domain bound to Mn(2+) and ADP and report on a serine-to-cysteine substitution in the switch 1 motif of kinesin that allows its ATP hydrolysis activity to be controlled by adjusting the ratio of Mn(2+) to Mg(2+). This mutant kinesin binds ATP similarly in the presence of either metal ion, but its ATP hydrolysis activity is greatly diminished in the presence of Mg(2+). In human kinesin-1 and kinesin-5 as well as Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-10 and kinesin-14, this defect is rescued by Mn(2+), providing a way to control both the enzymatic activity and force-generating ability of these nanomachines.

  8. An exact approach for studying cargo transport by an ensemble of molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracellular transport is crucial for many cellular processes where a large fraction of the cargo is transferred by motor-proteins over a network of microtubules. Malfunctions in the transport mechanism underlie a number of medical maladies. Existing methods for studying how motor-proteins coordinate the transfer of a shared cargo over a microtubule are either analytical or are based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Approaches that yield analytical results, while providing unique insights into transport mechanism, make simplifying assumptions, where a detailed characterization of important transport modalities is difficult to reach. On the other hand, Monte-Carlo based simulations can incorporate detailed characteristics of the transport mechanism; however, the quality of the results depend on the number and quality of simulation runs used in arriving at results. Here, for example, it is difficult to simulate and study rare-events that can trigger abnormalities in transport. Results In this article, a semi-analytical methodology that determines the probability distribution function of motor-protein behavior in an exact manner is developed. The method utilizes a finite-dimensional projection of the underlying infinite-dimensional Markov model, which retains the Markov property, and enables the detailed and exact determination of motor configurations, from which meaningful inferences on transport characteristics of the original model can be derived. Conclusions Under this novel probabilistic approach new insights about the mechanisms of action of these proteins are found, suggesting hypothesis about their behavior and driving the design and realization of new experiments. The advantages provided in accuracy and efficiency make it possible to detect rare events in the motor protein dynamics, that could otherwise pass undetected using standard simulation methods. In this respect, the model has allowed to provide a possible explanation for possible mechanisms

  9. Design and performance of an axial air-gap solution pump motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawsey, R. A.; Sohns, C. W.; Daniel, D. S.; Bailey, J. M.

    1990-05-01

    An axial air gap, permanent magnet, brushless dc motor was designed and was evaluated on a dynamometer to measure operating characteristics. The motor must deliver 0.167 hp (approx. 120 W) to the pump rotor at 1800 rpm. Initial performance data with a half-bridge, Hall-probe synchronized drive system and a dry motor bearing did not achieve the desired motor performance. Subsequently, a commercial full-bridge, speed regulated sensorless drive system was used to test the motor. The motor delivered the required 90 oz-in. of torque at 1800 rpm. These data revealed the need for rewinding the stator core to improve motor efficiency. A second stator core, with deeper slots and additional turns of wire, was subsequently fabricated and tested. At 1800 rpm, the drive system could produce only 60 oz-in. of torque due to an unexpectedly high generated voltage. Motor efficiency was 60 to 70 pct. at this torque level when the data were corrected for bearing and coupling drag.

  10. Design of high precision motor driving system for circular scanning ultrasonic endoscopic imaging equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Haoran; Bai, Baoping; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Yanan; Wang, Yi; Yu, Daoyin

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a motor driving system for circular scanning ultrasonic endoscopic imaging equipment. It was designed to guarantee the motor rotating at a relatively constant speed in load fluctuation conditions, which result from the bending and twisting of the flexible shaft which connects the probe to the motor. A hardware feedback circuit based on Frequency-To-Voltage Converter LM331 and Step-Down Voltage Regulator LM2576-ADJ was designed to ensure steady rotation of motor in load fluctuation conditions, and a D/A module offered by MCU was used to regulate the real-time rotary speed. The feedback response cycle is about 20 μs according to theoretical analysis. Experimental results show that the maximum error is +/-1 r/min under the normal running environment (300 ~1500 r/min) and load fluctuation conditions, which means the average instability is reduced to 0.11% as compared with that of the motor drive simply based on MCU which is 0.94%. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that the motor driving system has high accuracy, fast response, excellent reliability and good versatility and portability, and can precisely guarantee the smooth movement of load-changing PMW (Pulse Width Modulation) motor, so as to ensure the imaging quality, and can effectively improve the efficiency and accuracy of the diagnosis.

  11. Design of permanent magnet synchronous motor speed control system based on SVPWM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo

    2017-04-01

    The control system is designed to realize TMS320F28335 based on the permanent magnet synchronous motor speed control system, and put it to quoting all electric of injection molding machine. The system of the control method used SVPWM, through the sampling motor current and rotating transformer position information, realize speed, current double closed loop control. Through the TMS320F28335 hardware floating-point processing core, realize the application for permanent magnet synchronous motor in the floating point arithmetic, to replace the past fixed-point algorithm, and improve the efficiency of the code.

  12. Design of a directed molecular network.

    PubMed

    Ashkenasy, Gonen; Jagasia, Reshma; Yadav, Maneesh; Ghadiri, M Reza

    2004-07-27

    An ability to rationally design complex networks from the bottom up can offer valuable quantitative model systems for use in gaining a deeper appreciation for the principles governing the self-organization and functional characteristics of complex systems. We report herein the de novo design, graph prediction, experimental analysis, and characterization of simple self-organized, nonlinear molecular networks. Our approach makes use of the sequence-dependent auto- and cross-catalytic functional characteristics of template-directed peptide fragment condensation reactions in neutral aqueous solutions. Starting with an array of 81 sequence similar 32-residue coiled-coil peptides, we estimated the relative stability difference between all plausible A(2)B-type coiled-coil ensembles and used this information to predict the auto- and cross-catalysis pathways and the resulting plausible network motif and connectivities. Similar to most complex systems, the generated graph displays clustered nodes with an overall hierarchical architecture. To test the validity of the design principles used, nine nodes composing a main segment of the graph were experimentally analyzed for their capacity in establishing the predicted network connectivity. The resulting self-organized chemical network is shown to display 25 directed edges in good agreement with the graph analysis estimations. Moreover, we show that by varying the system parameters (presence or absence of certain substrates or templates), its operating network motif can be altered, even to the extremes of turning pathways on or off. We suggest that this approach can be expanded for the construction of large-scale networks, offering a means to study and to understand better the emergent, collective behaviors of networks.

  13. Design of a directed molecular network

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenasy, Gonen; Jagasia, Reshma; Yadav, Maneesh; Ghadiri, M. Reza

    2004-01-01

    An ability to rationally design complex networks from the bottom up can offer valuable quantitative model systems for use in gaining a deeper appreciation for the principles governing the self-organization and functional characteristics of complex systems. We report herein the de novo design, graph prediction, experimental analysis, and characterization of simple self-organized, nonlinear molecular networks. Our approach makes use of the sequence-dependant auto- and cross-catalytic functional characteristics of template-directed peptide fragment condensation reactions in neutral aqueous solutions. Starting with an array of 81 sequence similar 32-residue coiled-coil peptides, we estimated the relative stability difference between all plausible A2B-type coiled-coil ensembles and used this information to predict the auto- and cross-catalysis pathways and the resulting plausible network motif and connectivities. Similar to most complex systems, the generated graph displays clustered nodes with an overall hierarchical architecture. To test the validity of the design principles used, nine nodes composing a main segment of the graph were experimentally analyzed for their capacity in establishing the predicted network connectivity. The resulting self-organized chemical network is shown to display 25 directed edges in good agreement with the graph analysis estimations. Moreover, we show that by varying the system parameters (presence or absence of certain substrates or templates), its operating network motif can be altered, even to the extremes of turning pathways on or off. We suggest that this approach can be expanded for the construction of large-scale networks, offering a means to study and to understand better the emergent, collective behaviors of networks. PMID:15256596

  14. 180 degree unidirectional bond rotation in a biaryl lactone artificial molecular motor prototype.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Bart J; Branchaud, Bruce P

    2006-12-07

    A bifunctional biaryl lactone has been synthesized that should be capable of iterative unidirectional aryl-aryl bond rotation via: (1) a diastereoselective lactone ring opening, (S)-1 to (P,S)-2 or (M,S)-2; (2) a chemoselective lactonization, (P,S)-2 or (M,S)-2 to (S)-3; and (3) a chemoselective hydrolysis, (S)-3 to (S)-1. Preliminary results of a racemic sample have indicated unidirectional 180 degrees rotation with very high directional selectivity per individual artificial molecular motor molecule through the first two steps of this sequence. [reaction: see text

  15. Discrete Kinetic Models for Molecular Motors: Asymptotic Velocity and Gaussian Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggionato, Alessandra; Silvestri, Vittoria

    2014-12-01

    We consider random walks on quasi one dimensional lattices, as introduced in Faggionato and Silvestri (Random Walks on Quasi One Dimensional Lattices: Large Deviations and Fluctuation Theorems, 2014). This mathematical setting covers a large class of discrete kinetic models for non-cooperative molecular motors on periodic tracks. We derive general formulas for the asymptotic velocity and diffusion coefficient, and we show how to reduce their computation to suitable linear systems of the same degree of a single fundamental cell, with possible linear chain removals. We apply the above results to special families of kinetic models, also catching some errors in the biophysics literature.

  16. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Final report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.

    1997-02-01

    The normal growth and development of plant cells depends on the precise organization and distribution of the cellular contents. The basic goal of this investigation was to define a group of the molecules that are involved in organizing and transporting plant cell components. Based largely on studies of animal and fungal cells, one of the molecules thought to be involved in intracellular trafficking in plants is the actin-based motor protein myosin. Therefore, the major aim of this study was to isolate and analyze plant genes encoding myosin proteins. The plant of choice for these experiments was Arabidopsis thaliana, which offers numerous advantages for molecular genetics research.

  17. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel molecular motor, Leishmania myosin-XXI.

    PubMed

    Batters, Christopher; Woodall, Katy A; Toseland, Christopher P; Hundschell, Christian; Veigel, Claudia

    2012-08-10

    The genome of the Leishmania parasite contains two classes of myosin. Myosin-XXI, seemingly the only myosin isoform expressed in the protozoan parasite, has been detected in both the promastigote and amastigote stages of the Leishmania life cycle. It has been suggested to perform a variety of functions, including roles in membrane anchorage, but also long-range directed movements of cargo. However, nothing is known about the biochemical or mechanical properties of this motor. Here we designed and expressed various myosin-XXI constructs using a baculovirus expression system. Both full-length (amino acids 1-1051) and minimal motor domain constructs (amino acids 1-800) featured actin-activated ATPase activity. Myosin-XXI was soluble when expressed either with or without calmodulin. In the presence of calcium (pCa 4.1) the full-length motor could bind a single calmodulin at its neck domain (probably amino acids 809-823). Calmodulin binding was required for motility but not for ATPase activity. Once bound, calmodulin remained stably attached independent of calcium concentration (pCa 3-7). In gliding filament assays, myosin-XXI moved actin filaments at ∼15 nm/s, insensitive to both salt (25-1000 mm KCl) and calcium concentrations (pCa 3-7). Calmodulin binding to the neck domain might be involved in regulating the motility of the myosin-XXI motor for its various cellular functions in the different stages of the Leishmania parasite life cycle.

  18. Design and test of a four channel motor for electromechanical flight control actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    To provide a suitable electromagnetic torque summing approach to flight control system redundancy, a four channel motor capable of sustaining full performance after any two credible failures was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design consists of a single samarium cobalt permanent magnet rotor with four separate three phase windings arrayed in individual stator quadrants around the periphery. Trade studies established the sensitivities of weight and performance to such parameters as design speed, winding pattern, number of poles, magnet configuration, and strength. The motor electromagnetically sums the torque of the individual channels on a single rotor and eliminate complex mechanical gearing arrangements.

  19. Affinity of molecular interactions in the bacteriophage φ29 DNA packaging motor

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark A.; Wood, Jonathan P.A.; Capaldi, Stephanie A.; Baron, Andrew J.; Gell, Christopher; Smith, D. Alastair; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    DNA packaging in the bacteriophage φ29 involves a molecular motor with protein and RNA components, including interactions between the viral connector protein and molecules of pRNA, both of which form multimeric complexes. Data are presented to demonstrate the higher order assembly of pRNA together with the affinity of pRNA:pRNA and pRNA:connector interactions, which are used to propose a model for motor function. In solution, pRNA can form dimeric and trimeric multimers in a magnesium-dependent manner, with dissociation constants for multimerization in the micromolar range. pRNA:connector binding is also facilitated by the presence of magnesium ions, with a nanomolar apparent dissociation constant for the interaction. From studies with a mutant pRNA, it appears that multimerization of pRNA is not essential for connector binding and it is likely that connector protein is involved in the stabilization of higher order RNA multimers. It is proposed that magnesium ions may promote conformational change that facilitate pRNA:connector interactions, essential for motor function. PMID:16714447

  20. Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function.

    PubMed

    Otero, Maria G; Alloatti, Matías; Cromberg, Lucas E; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Encalada, Sandra E; Pozo Devoto, Victorio M; Bruno, Luciana; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Falzone, Tomás L

    2014-04-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurons depends on the correct delivery of the proteasome complex. In neurodegenerative diseases, aggregation and accumulation of proteins in axons link transport defects with degradation impairments; however, the transport properties of proteasomes remain unknown. Here, using in vivo experiments, we reveal the fast anterograde transport of assembled and functional 26S proteasome complexes. A high-resolution tracking system to follow fluorescent proteasomes revealed three types of motion: actively driven proteasome axonal transport, diffusive behavior in a viscoelastic axonema and proteasome-confined motion. We show that active proteasome transport depends on motor function because knockdown of the KIF5B motor subunit resulted in impairment of the anterograde proteasome flux and the density of segmental velocities. Finally, we reveal that neuronal proteasomes interact with intracellular membranes and identify the coordinated transport of fluorescent proteasomes with synaptic precursor vesicles, Golgi-derived vesicles, lysosomes and mitochondria. Taken together, our results reveal fast axonal transport as a new mechanism of proteasome delivery that depends on membrane cargo 'hitch-hiking' and the function of molecular motors. We further hypothesize that defects in proteasome transport could promote abnormal protein clearance in neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Myosin Va molecular motors manoeuvre liposome cargo through suspended actin filament intersections in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Andrew T.; Nelson, Shane R.; Ali, M. Yusuf; Kennedy, Guy G.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Walcott, Sam; Warshaw, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular cargo transport relies on myosin Va molecular motor ensembles to travel along the cell's three-dimensional (3D) highway of actin filaments. At actin filament intersections, the intersecting filament is a structural barrier to and an alternate track for directed cargo transport. Here we use 3D super-resolution fluorescence imaging to determine the directional outcome (that is, continues straight, turns or terminates) for an ∼10 motor ensemble transporting a 350 nm lipid-bound cargo that encounters a suspended 3D actin filament intersection in vitro. Motor–cargo complexes that interact with the intersecting filament go straight through the intersection 62% of the time, nearly twice that for turning. To explain this, we develop an in silico model, supported by optical trapping data, suggesting that the motors' diffusive movements on the vesicle surface and the extent of their engagement with the two intersecting actin tracks biases the motor–cargo complex on average to go straight through the intersection. PMID:28569841

  2. The molecular basis of frictional loads in the in vitro motility assay with applications to the study of the loaded mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael J; Moore, Jeffrey R

    2010-05-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy into mechanical movement, generating forces necessary to accomplish an array of cellular functions. Since molecular motors generate force, they typically work under loaded conditions where the motor mechanochemistry is altered by the presence of a load. Several biophysical techniques have been developed to study the loaded behavior and force generating capabilities of molecular motors yet most of these techniques require specialized equipment. The frictional loading assay is a modification to the in vitro motility assay that can be performed on a standard epifluorescence microscope, permitting the high-throughput measurement of the loaded mechanochemistry of molecular motors. Here, we describe a model for the molecular basis of the frictional loading assay by modeling the load as a series of either elastic or viscoelastic elements. The model, which calculates the frictional loads imposed by different binding proteins, permits the measurement of isotonic kinetics, force-velocity relationships, and power curves in the motility assay. We show computationally and experimentally that the frictional load imposed by alpha-actinin, the most widely employed actin binding protein in frictional loading experiments, behaves as a viscoelastic rather than purely elastic load. As a test of the model, we examined the frictional loading behavior of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin under normal and fatigue-like conditions using alpha-actinin as a load. We found that, consistent with fiber studies, fatigue-like conditions cause reductions in myosin isometric force, unloaded sliding velocity, maximal power output, and shift the load at which peak power output occurs.

  3. Paddling mechanism for the substrate translocation by AAA+ motor revealed by multiscale molecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Nobuyasu; Kameda, Tomoshi; Okazaki, Kei-ichi; Takada, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Hexameric ring-shaped AAA+ molecular motors have a key function of active translocation of a macromolecular chain through the central pore. By performing multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we revealed that HslU, a AAA+ motor in a bacterial homologue of eukaryotic proteasome, translocates its substrate polypeptide via paddling mechanism during ATP-driven cyclic conformational changes. First, fully atomistic MD simulations showed that the HslU pore grips the threaded signal peptide by the highly conserved Tyr-91 and Val-92 firmly in the closed form and loosely in the open form of the HslU. The grip depended on the substrate sequence. These features were fed into a coarse-grained MD, and conformational transitions of HslU upon ATP cycles were simulated. The simulations exhibited stochastic unidirectional translocation of a polypeptide. This unidirectional translocation is attributed to paddling motions of Tyr-91s between the open and the closed forms: downward motions of Tyr-91s with gripping the substrate and upward motions with slipping on it. The paddling motions were caused by the difference between the characteristic time scales of the pore-radius change and the up-down displacements of Tyr-91s. Computational experiments on mutations at the pore and the substrate were in accord with several experiments. PMID:19828442

  4. Are two-station biased random walkers always potential molecular motors?

    PubMed

    Bakalis, Evangelos; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2015-01-12

    The short answer to the title question is no. Despite their tremendous complexity, many nanomachines are simply one-dimensional systems undergoing a biased, that is, unidirectional, walk on a two-minima potential energy curve. The initially prepared state, or station, is higher in energy than the final equilibrium state that is reached after overcoming an energy barrier. All chemical reactions comply with this scheme, which does not necessarily imply that a generic chemical reaction is a potential molecular motor. If the barrier is low, the system may walk back and the motion will have a large purely Brownian component. Alternatively, a large distance from the barrier of either of the two stations may introduce a Brownian component. Starting from a general inequality that leverages on the idea that the amount of heat dissipated along the potential energy curve is a good indication of the effectiveness of the biased walk, we provide guidelines for the selection of the features of artificial molecular motors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The molecular motor Myosin Va interacts with the cilia-centrosomal protein RPGRIP1L

    PubMed Central

    Assis, L. H. P.; Silva-Junior, R. M. P.; Dolce, L. G.; Alborghetti, M. R.; Honorato, R. V.; Nascimento, A. F. Z.; Melo-Hanchuk, T. D.; Trindade, D. M.; Tonoli, C. C. C.; Santos, C. T.; Oliveira, P. S. L.; Larson, R. E.; Kobarg, J.; Espreafico, E. M.; Giuseppe, P. O.; Murakami, M. T.

    2017-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is an actin-based molecular motor abundantly found at the centrosome. However, the role of MyoVa at this organelle has been elusive due to the lack of evidence on interacting partners or functional data. Herein, we combined yeast two-hybrid screen, biochemical studies and cellular assays to demonstrate that MyoVa interacts with RPGRIP1L, a cilia-centrosomal protein that controls ciliary signaling and positioning. MyoVa binds to the C2 domains of RPGRIP1L via residues located near or in the Rab11a-binding site, a conserved site in the globular tail domain (GTD) from class V myosins. According to proximity ligation assays, MyoVa and RPGRIP1L can interact near the cilium base in ciliated RPE cells. Furthermore, we showed that RPE cells expressing dominant-negative constructs of MyoVa are mostly unciliated, providing the first experimental evidence about a possible link between this molecular motor and cilia-related processes. PMID:28266547

  6. Mouse Myosin-19 Is a Plus-end-directed, High-duty Ratio Molecular Motor*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zekuan; Ma, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Hai-Man; Ji, Huan-Hong; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Dan; Sun, Yujie; Li, Xiang-dong

    2014-01-01

    Class XIX myosin (Myo19) is a vertebrate-specific unconventional myosin, responsible for the transport of mitochondria. To characterize biochemical properties of Myo19, we prepared recombinant mouse Myo19-truncated constructs containing the motor domain and the IQ motifs using the baculovirus/Sf9 expression system. We identified regulatory light chain (RLC) of smooth muscle/non-muscle myosin-2 as the light chain of Myo19. The actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding velocity of Myo19-truncated constructs were about one-third and one-sixth as those of myosin-5a, respectively. The apparent affinity of Myo19 to actin was about the same as that of myosin-5a. The RLCs bound to Myo19 could be phosphorylated by myosin light chain kinase, but this phosphorylation had little effect on the actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Using dual fluorescence-labeled actin filaments, we determined that Myo19 is a plus-end-directed molecular motor. We found that, similar to that of the high-duty ratio myosin, such as myosin-5a, ADP release rate was comparable with the maximal actin-activated ATPase activity of Myo19, indicating that ADP release is a rate-limiting step for the ATPase cycle of acto-Myo19. ADP strongly inhibited the actin-activated ATPase activity and actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Based on the above results, we concluded that Myo19 is a high-duty ratio molecular motor moving to the plus-end of the actin filament. PMID:24825904

  7. A Molecular Tweezer Ameliorates Motor Deficits in Mice Overexpressing α-Synuclein.

    PubMed

    Richter, Franziska; Subramaniam, Sudhakar R; Magen, Iddo; Lee, Patrick; Hayes, Jane; Attar, Aida; Zhu, Chunni; Franich, Nicholas R; Bove, Nicholas; De La Rosa, Krystal; Kwong, Jacky; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Bitan, Gal

    2017-06-05

    Aberrant accumulation and self-assembly of α-synuclein are tightly linked to several neurodegenerative diseases called synucleinopathies, including idiopathic Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. Deposition of fibrillar α-synuclein as insoluble inclusions in affected brain cells is a pathological hallmark of synucleinopathies. However, water-soluble α-synuclein oligomers may be the actual culprits causing neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in synucleinopathies. Accordingly, therapeutic approaches targeting the toxic α-synuclein assemblies are attractive for these incurable disorders. The "molecular tweezer" CLR01 selectively remodels abnormal protein self-assembly through reversible binding to Lys residues. Here, we treated young male mice overexpressing human wild-type α-synuclein under control of the Thy-1 promoter (Thy1-aSyn mice) with CLR01 and examined motor behavior and α-synuclein in the brain. Intracerebroventricular administration of CLR01 for 28 days to the mice improved motor dysfunction in the challenging beam test and caused a significant decrease of buffer-soluble α-synuclein in the striatum. Proteinase-K-resistant, insoluble α-synuclein deposits remained unchanged in the substantia nigra, whereas levels of diffuse cytoplasmic α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons increased in mice receiving CLR01 compared with vehicle. More moderate improvement of motor deficits was also achieved by subcutaneous administration of CLR01, in 2/5 trials of the challenging beam test and in the pole test, which requires balance and coordination. The data support further development of molecular tweezers as therapeutic agents for synucleinopathies.

  8. Totally asymmetric simple exclusion process simulations of molecular motor transport on random networks with asymmetric exit rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, D. V.; Miedema, D. M.; Nienhuis, B.; Schall, P.

    2015-11-01

    Using the totally asymmetric simple-exclusion-process and mean-field transport theory, we investigate the transport in closed random networks with simple crossing topology—two incoming, two outgoing segments, as a model for molecular motor motion along biopolymer networks. Inspired by in vitro observation of molecular motor motion, we model the motor behavior at the intersections by introducing different exit rates for the two outgoing segments. Our simulations of this simple network reveal surprisingly rich behavior of the transport current with respect to the global density and exit rate ratio. For asymmetric exit rates, we find a broad current plateau at intermediate motor densities resulting from the competition of two subnetwork populations. This current plateau leads to stabilization of transport properties within such networks.

  9. Design and performance analysis of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor with double vibrators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaopeng; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhangqi; Xu, Liang; Meng, Fan; Ou, Wenchu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor, in which a vibrating stator and vibrating rotor are combined in one motor. The stator and rotor are designed as similar structures an elastic body and a piezoelectric ceramic ring. In exciting of the piezoelectric ceramics, the elastic body of the stator and rotor will generate respective traveling waves, which force each other forward in the contact zone. Based on the elliptical rule of particle motion and matching principle of vibration, the design rules of two vibrators are determined. The finite element method is used to design the sizes of vibrators to ensure that they operate in resonance, and the simulation is verified by measuring the vibration with an impedance analyzer. It is found out that to maintain an appropriate contact between the stator and rotor, two vibrators need to be designed with close resonance frequencies, different vibration amplitudes, and be driven by an identical driving frequency. To analyze this innovative contact mechanism, particle velocity synthesis theory and contact force analysis using Hertz contact model are carried out. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and tested to verify the theoretical results. The test results show that the output performance of the motor driven by the two vibrators is significantly improved compared to the motor driven by a sole stator or rotor, which confirms the validity of the double-vibrator motor concept.

  10. Characteristic analysis and shape optimal design of a ring-type traveling wave ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Jong-Suk; Yi, Kyung-Pyo; Chung, Tae-Kyung; Jung, Hyun-Kyo

    2013-07-01

    The contact mechanism should be analyzed for an estimation of the performance of a traveling wave ultra-sonic motor (TWUSM), because the operation of this type of motor depends on the frictional force between the rotor and the stator. However, the nonlinearity of the contact mechanism of the TWUSM makes it difficult to proposed a proper contact model, a characteristic analysis method and an optimal design method. To address these problems, a characteristic analysis and optimal design method using a cylindrical dynamic contact model (CDCM), an analytical method, a numerical method and an evolutionary strategy algorithm (ESA) is proposed in this research. The feasibility and usefulness of the proposed characteristic analysis and optimal design method are verified through experimental data. Furthermore, the importance of the shape of the teeth and the reason for the improvement of motor performances by the chamfering at the teeth are proposed and verified in this paper.

  11. Techniques for molecular imaging probe design.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease-specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology--all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we discuss target selection, screening techniques, and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents.

  12. Techniques for Molecular Imaging Probe Design

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology; all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we will discuss target selection, screening techniques and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents. PMID:22201532

  13. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for national endorsement as designated duty engineer (DDE) of steam, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... qualified member of the engine department or equivalent position; (2) For designated duty engineer of steam... engine department or equivalent position; and (3) For designated duty engineer of steam, motor, and/or... designated duty engineer (DDE) of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.524 Section...

  14. Drug design using comparative molecular surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2006-12-01

    Chemists have eagerly extended a concept of shape into the molecular scale in an attempt to explain molecular effects. Although the molecular surface that shapes a molecule is a fuzzy category, which makes important theoretical problems with its precise interpretation, shape analysis appears to be an efficient method providing an explanation for a variety of effects. Comparative molecular surface analysis (CoMSA) is a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) method used for the comparison of molecular surfaces and shapes. In this review, the authors demonstrate that 3D QSAR basically works as a visualisation tool that investigates molecular similarity and indicates pharmacophoric sites. In this context, CoMSA that is based on the Kohonen self-organising maps that allow the projection of three-dimensional molecular data into two-dimensional maps without topological distortion has an important advantage over the traditional 3D QSAR methods. However, It should be remembered that the majority of the 3D QSAR limitations are still important for this technique and consequently a strategy to use the molecular data to produce drugs in this way still maps a 'far and bumpy road'.

  15. Designing Electronic Components and Devices from Inorganic Molecular Scaffolds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-04

    REPORT Designing Electronic Components and Devices from Inorganic Molecular Scaffolds 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The synthesis of new...photo and electrical materials for molecular devices was completed comprising a signaling moiety (fluorophore), a spacer group and a guest-binding...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 7-Mar-2012 Designing Electronic Components and Devices from Inorganic Molecular Scaffolds Report Title

  16. Optimization of brushless direct current motor design using an intelligent technique.

    PubMed

    Shabanian, Alireza; Tousiwas, Armin Amini Poustchi; Pourmandi, Massoud; Khormali, Aminollah; Ataei, Abdolhay

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a method for the optimal design of a slotless permanent magnet brushless DC (BLDC) motor with surface mounted magnets using an improved bee algorithm (IBA). The characteristics of the motor are expressed as functions of motor geometries. The objective function is a combination of losses, volume and cost to be minimized simultaneously. This method is based on the capability of swarm-based algorithms in finding the optimal solution. One sample case is used to illustrate the performance of the design approach and optimization technique. The IBA has a better performance and speed of convergence compared with bee algorithm (BA). Simulation results show that the proposed method has a very high/efficient performance.

  17. Design, modeling and control of a novel multi functional translational-rotary micro ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncdemir, Safakcan

    The major goal of this thesis was to design and develop an actuator, which is capable of producing translational and rotary output motions in a compact structure with simple driving conditions, for the needs of small-scale actuators for micro robotic systems. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors were selected as the target actuator schemes because of their unbeatable characteristics in the meso-scale range, which covers the structure sizes from hundred micrometers to ten millimeters and with operating ranges from few nanometers to centimeters. In order to meet the objectives and the design constraints, a number of key research tasks had to be undertaken. The design constraints and objectives were so stringent and entangled that none of the existing methods in literature could solve the research problems individually. Therefore, several unique methods were established to accomplish the research objectives. The methods produced novel solutions at every stage of design, development and modeling of the multi functional micro ultrasonic motor. Specifically, an ultrasonic motor utilizing slanted ceramics on a brass rod was designed. Because of the unique slanted ceramics design, longitudinal and torsional mode vibration modes could be obtained on the same structure. A ring shaped mobile element was loosely fitted on the metal rod stator. The mobile element moved in translational or rotational, depending on whether the vibration mode was longitudinal or torsional. A new ultrasonic motor drive method was required because none of the existing ultrasonic motor drive techniques were able to provide both output modes in a compact and cylindrical structure with the use of single drive source. By making use of rectangular wave drive signals, saw-tooth shaped displacement profile could be obtained at longitudinal and torsional resonance modes. Thus, inheriting the operating principle of smooth impact drive method, a new resonance type inertial drive was introduced. This new technique

  18. Synthetic Molecular Motors: Thermal N Inversion and Directional Photoinduced C=N Bond Rotation of Camphorquinone Imines.

    PubMed

    Greb, Lutz; Eichhöfer, Andreas; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2015-11-23

    The thermal and photochemical E/Z isomerization of camphorquinone-derived imines was studied by a combination of kinetic, structural, and computational methods. The thermal isomerization proceeds by linear N inversion, whereas the photoinduced process occurs through C=N bond rotation with preferred directionality as a result of diastereoisomerism. Thereby, these imines are arguably the simplest example of synthetic molecular motors. The generality of the orthogonal trajectories of the thermal and photochemical pathways allows for the postulation that every suitable chiral imine qualifies, in principle, as a molecular motor driven by light or heat.

  19. Design and Implementation of a Motor Incremental Shaft Encoder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited DESIGN AND...La Valley 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Naval Postgraduate School continuously

  20. Metastasis suppressor, NDRG1, mediates its activity through signaling pathways and molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Zhang, Daohai; Bae, Dong-Hun; Sahni, Sumit; Jansson, Patric; Zheng, Ying; Zhao, Qian; Yue, Fei; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2013-09-01

    The metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), is negatively correlated with tumor progression in multiple neoplasms, being a promising new target for cancer treatment. However, the precise molecular effects of NDRG1 remain unclear. Herein, we summarize recent advances in understanding the impact of NDRG1 on cancer metastasis with emphasis on its interactions with the key oncogenic nuclear factor-kappaB, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/phosphorylated AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin and Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways. Recent studies demonstrating the inhibitory effects of NDRG1 on the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a key initial step in metastasis, TGF-β pathway and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway are also described. Furthermore, NDRG1 was also demonstrated to regulate molecular motors in cancer cells, leading to inhibition of F-actin polymerization, stress fiber formation and subsequent reduction of cancer cell migration. Collectively, this review summarizes the underlying molecular mechanisms of the antimetastatic effects of NDRG1 in cancer cells.

  1. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA(+) ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named 'the ADP model' and 'the ATP model', where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA(+) ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results.

  2. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA+ ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named ‘the ADP model’ and ‘the ATP model’, where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA+ ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. PMID:27334455

  3. Lattice-gas model for active vesicle transport by molecular motors with opposite polarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhuri, Sudipto; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a multispecies lattice-gas model for motor protein driven collective cargo transport on cellular filaments. We use this model to describe and analyze the collective motion of interacting vesicle cargos being carried by oppositely directed molecular motors, moving on a single biofilament. Building on a totally asymmetric exclusion process to characterize the motion of the interacting cargos, we allow for mass exchange with the environment, input, and output at filament boundaries and focus on the role of interconversion rates and how they affect the directionality of the net cargo transport. We quantify the effect of the various different competing processes in terms of nonequilibrium phase diagrams. The interplay of interconversion rates, which allow for flux reversal and evaporation-deposition processes, introduces qualitatively unique features in the phase diagrams. We observe regimes of three-phase coexistence, the possibility of phase re-entrance, and a significant flexibility in how the different phase boundaries shift in response to changes in control parameters. The moving steady-state solutions of this model allows for different possibilities for the spatial distribution of cargo vesicles, ranging from homogeneous distribution of vesicles to polarized distributions, characterized by inhomogeneities or shocks. Current reversals due to internal regulation emerge naturally within the framework of this model. We believe that this minimal model will clarify the understanding of many features of collective vesicle transport, apart from serving as the basis for building more exact quantitative models for vesicle transport relevant to various in vivo situations.

  4. Reaction-diffusion-advection approach to spatially localized treadmilling aggregates of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Bar-On, Tomer; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional myosins belong to a class of molecular motors that walk processively inside cellular protrusions towards the tips, on top of actin filament. Surprisingly, in addition, they also form retrograde moving self-organized aggregates. The qualitative properties of these aggregates are recapitulated by a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model and admit two distinct families of modes: traveling waves and pulse trains. Unlike the traveling waves that are generated by a linear instability, pulses are nonlinear structures that propagate on top of linearly stable uniform backgrounds. Asymptotic analysis of isolated pulses via a simplified reaction-diffusion-advection variant on large periodic domains, allows to draw qualitative trends for pulse properties, such as the amplitude, width, and propagation speed. The results agree well with numerical integrations and are related to available empirical observations.

  5. Basic properties of rotary dynamics of the molecular motor Enterococcus hirae V1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Hiroshi; Hara, Mayu; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamato, Ichiro; Muneyuki, Eiro; Noji, Hiroyuki; Murata, Takeshi; Iino, Ryota

    2013-11-08

    V-ATPases are rotary molecular motors that generally function as proton pumps. We recently solved the crystal structures of the V1 moiety of Enterococcus hirae V-ATPase (EhV1) and proposed a model for its rotation mechanism. Here, we characterized the rotary dynamics of EhV1 using single-molecule analysis employing a load-free probe. EhV1 rotated in a counterclockwise direction, exhibiting two distinct rotational states, namely clear and unclear, suggesting unstable interactions between the rotor and stator. The clear state was analyzed in detail to obtain kinetic parameters. The rotation rates obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a maximal rotation rate (Vmax) of 107 revolutions/s and a Michaelis constant (Km) of 154 μM at 26 °C. At all ATP concentrations tested, EhV1 showed only three pauses separated by 120°/turn, and no substeps were resolved, as was the case with Thermus thermophilus V1-ATPase (TtV1). At 10 μM ATP (Km), the distribution of the durations of the catalytic pause was reproduced by a consecutive reaction with two time constants of 2.6 and 0.5 ms. These kinetic parameters were similar to those of TtV1. Our results identify the common properties of rotary catalysis of V1-ATPases that are distinct from those of F1-ATPases and will further our understanding of the general mechanisms of rotary molecular motors.

  6. A study of some non-equilibrium driven models and their contribution to the understanding of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, Irina; Gonzalez, Joshua

    2008-03-01

    From the point of view of a physicist, a bio-molecular motor represents an interesting non-equilibrium system and it is directly amenable to an analysis using standard methods of non-equilibrium statistical physics. We conduct a rigorous Monte Carlo study of three different driven lattice gas models that retain the basic behavior of three types of cytoskeletal molecular motors. Our models incorporate novel features such as realistic dynamics rules and complex motor-motor interactions. We are interested to have a deeper understanding of how various parameters influence the macroscopic behavior of these systems, what is the density profile and if the system undergoes a phase transition. On the analytical front, we computed the steady-state probability distributions exactly for the one of the models using the matrix method that was established in 1993 by B. Derrida et al. We also explored the possibilities offered by the ``Bethe ansatz'' method by mapping some well studied spin models into asymmetric simple exclusion models (already analyzed using computer simulations), and to use the results obtained for the spin models in finding an exact solution for our problem. We have exhaustive computational studies of the kinesin and dynein molecular motor models that prove to be very useful in checking our analytical work.

  7. Tug-of-war between two elastically coupled molecular motors: a case study on force generation and force balance.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Mehmet Can; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2017-01-04

    Intracellular transport is performed by molecular motors that pull cargos along cytoskeletal filaments. Many cellular cargos are observed to move bidirectionally, with fast transport in both directions. This behaviour can be understood as a stochastic tug-of-war between two teams of antagonistic motors. The first theoretical model for such a tug-of-war, the Müller-Klumpp-Lipowsky (MKL) model, was based on two simplifying assumptions: (i) both motor teams move with the same velocity in the direction of the stronger team, and (ii) this velocity matching and the associated force balance arise immediately after the rebinding of an unbound motor to the filament. In this study, we extend the MKL model by including an elastic coupling between the antagonistic motors, and by allowing the motors to perform discrete motor steps. Each motor step changes the elastic interaction forces experienced by the motors. In order to elucidate the basic concepts of force balance and force fluctuations, we focus on the simplest case of two antagonistic motors, one kinesin against one dynein. We calculate the probability distribution for the spatial separation of the motors and the dependence of this distribution on the motors' unbinding rate. We also compute the probability distribution for the elastic interaction forces experienced by the motors, which determines the average elastic force 〈F〉 and the standard deviation of the force fluctuations around this average value. The average force 〈F〉 is found to decrease monotonically with increasing unbinding rate ε0. The behaviour of the MKL model is recovered in the limit of small ε0. In the opposite limit of large ε0, 〈F〉 is found to decay to zero as 1/ε0. Finally, we study the limiting case with ε0 = 0 for which we determine both the force statistics and the time needed to attain the steady state. Our theoretical predictions are accessible to experimental studies of in vitro systems consisting of two antagonistic motors

  8. Design of multi-motor distributed control system for optical fibers positioning based on CAN bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiancheng; Gu, Yonggang; Guo, Liang; Zhai, Chao

    2016-07-01

    In fiber spectroscopic telescopes, we propose a method of wire communication to control the fiber positioning nodes which are driven by two stepping motors. Taking the integration CAN control chip as main controller, the hardware of CAN intelligent node and adapter is designed to be the bottom hardware platform for the multi-motor distributed control system. The results proved that the system has good real-time performance and stability, and is able to realize not only CAN bus communication but also PC supervisory control, fundamentally meet the requirements of real-time precise position measurement of the optical fibers.

  9. Unravelling the electronic structure and dynamics of an isolated molecular rotary motor in the gas-phase† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of molecular motor synthesis and NMR data; geometrical data of optimised structures used in computational chemistry calculations; natural orbitals of the active space used in state-averaged CASSCF calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc01997a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Beekmeyer, Reece; Parkes, Michael A.; Ridgwell, Luke; Riley, Jamie W.; Chen, Jiawen; Feringa, Ben L.; Kerridge, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Light-driven molecular motors derived from chiral overcrowded alkenes are an important class of compounds in which sequential photochemical and thermal rearrangements result in unidirectional rotation of one part of the molecule with respect to another. Here, we employ anion photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of a unidirectional molecular rotary motor anion in the gas-phase and quantum chemistry calculations to guide the interpretation of our results. We find that following photoexcitation of the first electronically excited state, the molecule rotates around its axle and some population remains on the excited potential energy surface and some population undergoes internal conversion back to the electronic ground state. These observations are similar to those observed in time-resolved measurements of rotary molecular motors in solution. This work demonstrates the potential of anion photoelectron spectroscopy for studying the electronic structure and dynamics of molecular motors in the gas-phase, provides important benchmarks for theory and improves our fundamental understanding of light-activated molecular rotary motors, which can be used to inform the design of new photoactivated nanoscale devices.

  10. Design of small-size pouch motors for rat gait rehabilitation device.

    PubMed

    Shih-Yin Chang; Takashima, Kenta; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Niiyama, Ryuma; Someya, Takao; Onodera, Hiroshi; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that active gait training can recover voluntary locomotive ability of paralyzed rats. Rehabilitation devices used for studying spinal cord injury to date are usually fixed on a treadmill, but they have been used only slightly for active training. To process active rehabilitation, a wearable, lightweight device with adequate output is needed. Pouch motors, soft pneumatic actuators, are extremely light and have other benefits such as low cost, easy fabrication, and highly customizable design. They can be used to develop active gait rehabilitation devices. However, performance details of different motor designs have not been examined. As described herein, to build a wearable gait assistive device for rat study, we specifically examine how to design small pouch motors with a good contraction ratio and force output. Results show that pouch performance decreases dramatically with size, but better output is obtainable by separation into small 0.8 length-to-width ratio rooms. We used this knowledge to produce an assistive robot suit for gait rehabilitation and to test it with paralyzed rats. Results show that these small pouches can produce sufficient power to control hip joint movements during gait training. They can reveal the potential for new pouch motor applications for spinal cord injury studies.

  11. Controlled Directional Motions of Molecular Vehicles, Rotors, and Motors: From Metallic to Silicon Surfaces, a Strategy to Operate at Higher Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chérioux, Frédéric; Galangau, Olivier; Palmino, Frank; Rapenne, Gwénaël

    2016-06-17

    In the last decade, many nanomachines with controlled molecular motions have been studied, mainly on metallic surfaces, which are easy to obtain very clean, and are stable over months. However, the studies of mechanical properties of nanomachines are mainly performed at very low temperatures, usually between 5 and 80 K, which prevents any kind of applications. In this Minireview, we will present our strategy to operate at higher temperatures, in particular through the use of semiconducting silicon surfaces. We also review our best achievements in the field through some examples of rotating molecular machines that have been designed, synthesized, and studied in our groups. On metallic surfaces, the nanovehicles are molecules with two or four triptycenes as wheels and the molecular motor is built around a ruthenium organometallic center with a piano-stool geometry and peripheric ferrocenyl groups. On semiconducting silicon surfaces, vehicles are also made from triptycene fragments and the rotor is a pentaphenylbenzene molecule.

  12. DESIGN OF A MOLECULAR AMPLIFIER GROUP.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    would be capable of field operation. The Molecular Amplifier Group consists of a traveling -wave amplifier and sufficient support equipment to provide...Ferrite disks of yttrium iron garnet are incorporated in the traveling -wave maser structure to provide sufficient reverse loss for short-circuit

  13. Analysis, design, and control of a novel optically commutated adjustable-speed motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Wyatt S.; Risch, Ivan; Zhang, Yuandao; Garverick, Steven; Inerfield, Michael

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes the analysis, design and control of a novel, single-phase motor with a unique behavior resulting from the use of rotating power electronics mounted to the motor armature. Coils on the armature are selectively shorted by power MOSFET's which rotate with the armature, and torque is produced by interaction between currents induced in the shorted coils and the magnetic field produced by a stationary field coil. Control is limited to the timing of which armature coils are to be shorted as a function of armature speed and angle, it is possible to modulate torque production and obtain torque or speed control using only single-phase ac power and without the use of brushes or permanent magnets. An electro-mechanical model for this type of motor is presented and validated with respect to experimentation. The results show promise for achieving low- cost, adjustable-speed drives using this novel method of rotating electronics, optical communications, and computed commutation.

  14. Effect of design variables on irreversible magnet demagnetization in brushless dc motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Heoung; Lee, Ju

    2005-05-01

    The large demagnetizing currents in brushless dc (BLdc) motor are generated by the short-circuited stator windings and the fault of a drive circuit. So, irreversible magnet demagnetization occurs due to the external demagnetizing field by these currents. In this paper, we deal with the effect of design variables on irreversible magnet demagnetization in BLdc motor through the modeling approach using a two-dimensional finite-element method (2D FEM). The nonlinear analysis of a permanent magnet is added to 2D FEM to consider irreversible demagnetization. As a result, it is shown that magnet thickness, teeth surface width, and rotor back yoke thickness are the most important geometrical dimensions of BLdc motor in terms of irreversible magnet demagnetization.

  15. A novel ring type ultrasonic motor with multiple wavenumbers: design, fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, W. H.; Quek, S. T.; Wang, Q.

    2009-12-01

    A novel ring type traveling wave ultrasonic motor (USM) with multiple wavenumbers has been designed, fabricated and characterized. This multiple wavenumber operation is realized by means of a new electrode configuration of the piezoelectric element. The experimental and numerical performance results for the multiple wavenumbers show that USM with multiple wavenumbers significantly outperform the single wavenumber motor as regards the range of speed and torque output. This novel implementation of the traveling wave motor also offers extra control for stable operation of USM. The performances of the control variables, the wavenumber and the amplitude, are compared to show their advantages and disadvantages. The speed control range for the wavenumber is larger than that for amplitude control; wavenumber control has better stability at low speed while amplitude control can work continuously with less wear. Hybrid control using both methods may result in better performance of USM.

  16. The Utilization of Sensori-motor Experiences for Introducing Young Pupils to Molecular Motion: A Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Does a sensori-motor experience help a physics student understand the movement of molecules in solids, liquids, and gases? Students aged 9-10 were given either traditional demonstrations of solids, liquids, and gases and the variation of molecular motion with temperature (iconic presentation), or they were involved in physical activities as they…

  17. Specific Transformation of Assembly with Actin Filaments and Molecular Motors in a Cell-Sized Self-Emerged Liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Kingo; Negishi, Makiko; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Hayashi, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    Eukaryotes, by the same combination of cytoskeleton and molecular motor, for example actin filament and myosin, can generate a variety of movements. For this diversity, the organization of biological machineries caused by the confinement and/or crowding effects of internal living cells, may play very important roles.

  18. The Utilization of Sensori-motor Experiences for Introducing Young Pupils to Molecular Motion: A Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Does a sensori-motor experience help a physics student understand the movement of molecules in solids, liquids, and gases? Students aged 9-10 were given either traditional demonstrations of solids, liquids, and gases and the variation of molecular motion with temperature (iconic presentation), or they were involved in physical activities as they…

  19. Synchronization controller design of two coupling permanent magnet synchronous motors system with nonlinear constraints.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenhua; Shang, Jing; Nian, Xiaohong

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, two coupling permanent magnet synchronous motors system with nonlinear constraints is studied. First of all, the mathematical model of the system is established according to the engineering practices, in which the dynamic model of motor and the nonlinear coupling effect between two motors are considered. In order to keep the two motors synchronization, a synchronization controller based on load observer is designed via cross-coupling idea and interval matrix. Moreover, speed, position and current signals of two motor all are taken as self-feedback signal as well as cross-feedback signal in the proposed controller, which is conducive to improving the dynamical performance and the synchronization performance of the system. The proposed control strategy is verified by simulation via Matlab/Simulink program. The simulation results show that the proposed control method has a better control performance, especially synchronization performance, than that of the conventional PI controller. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Study on the Ring Type Stator Design Technique for a Traveling Wave Rotary Type Ultrasonic Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jin-Heon; Yuk, Hyung-Sang; Lim, Kee-Joe

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, the technique of design for the stator of traveling wave rotary type ultrasonic motor was proposed. To establish the design technique, the distribution of internal stresses of the stator was analyzed by applying the cylindrical bodies contact model of Hertz theory and the concept of “horn effect” was used to consider the influence of the projection structure. To verify the proposed technique, the prototype motor was fabricated on the authority of the projection shape dimension and the design specification. And its performance was evaluated. According to the estimate production of the experiment results using the extrapolation, we confirmed that the values obtained through the verification experiment were similar to those deduced by the proposed method properly.

  1. Design of active whole-spacecraft vibration isolation based on voice-coil motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Weichao; Cao, Dengqing; Huang, Wenhu

    2014-03-01

    In the launching process of a spacecraft, the dynamic environment is very complex, so a vibration isolator is widely used for preventing the spacecraft from being damaged. This paper focused on a whole-spacecraft vibration isolation platform with the purpose of isolating the shock and noise transmitting directly to the spacecraft in the process of launching. The isolator is designed based on a model of circular payload adapter fitting. A voice-coil motor is designed and optimized as the active control actuator to provide proper feedback force to reduce the amplitude of the vibration, and is fixed in the whole-spacecraft vibration isolation platform, with sensors collocated on one side of the voice-coil motor in the vertical direction. The LQR control strategy is designed for the preliminary model of the isolation system in the vertical direction. Numerical simulation results are given to verify the effectiveness of the proposed isolation unit consisted of the voicecoil actuators.

  2. Biorefinery: a design tool for molecular gelators.

    PubMed

    John, George; Shankar, Balachandran Vijai; Jadhav, Swapnil R; Vemula, Praveen Kumar

    2010-12-07

    Molecular gels, the macroscopic products of a nanoscale bottom-up strategy, have emerged as a promising functional soft material. The prospects of tailoring the architecture of gelator molecules have led to the formation of unique, highly tunable gels for a wide spectrum of applications from medicine to electronics. Biorefinery is a concept that integrates the processes of converting biomass/renewable feedstock and the associated infrastructure used to produce chemicals and materials, which is analogous to petroleum-based refinery. The current review assimilates the successful efforts to demonstrate the prospects of the biorefinery concept for developing new amphiphiles as molecular gelators. Amphiphiles based on naturally available raw materials such as amygdalin, vitamin C, cardanol, arjunolic acid, and trehalose that possess specific functionality were synthesized using biocatalysis and/or chemical synthesis. The hydrogels and organogels obtained from such amphiphiles were conceptually demonstrated for diverse applications including drug-delivery systems and the templated synthesis of hybrid materials.

  3. Simplified Evaluation Method of Drive Characteristics for Computer-Aided Design of Switched Reluctance Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Yoshiaki; Fubuki, Shingo; Kosaka, Takashi; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    Since Switched Reluctance Motors (SRM) have simple and rugged construction, they are suitable for low-cost variable speed drives in many industrial applications. However, it is rather difficult to design the motor and to predict the drive performance because of high magnetic non-linearity of the motors. Although FEM is useful for the SRM design, one of disadvantages is a long computation time. This paper proposes a simplified and fast evaluation method of the drive characteristics of SRM whose dimensions are given. The proposed method is composed of an analytical expression of magnetizing curvebased modeling approach and a simple non-linear magnetic analysis. At first, the comparative studies using 12/8 SRM show that the calculated current waveform and stiffness characteristic of the proposed modeling approach are in good agreement with those of experiment. Secondly, it is shown that the proposed magnetic analysis provides accurate and extremely fast magnetizing curves computation for the given motor dimensions compared to 3D-FEM. From the standpoints of analytical accuracy and the required computation time, the effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through the comparisons with 3D-FEM using two SRMs with different specifications.

  4. Designing conical intersections for light-driven single molecule rotary motors: from precessional to axial motion.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Olivucci, Massimo

    2014-04-18

    In the past, the design of light-driven single molecule rotary motors has been mainly guided by the modification of their ground-state conformational properties. Further progress in this field is thus likely to be achieved through a detailed understanding of light-induced dynamics of the system and the ways of modulating it by introducing chemical modifications. In the present theoretical work, the analysis of model organic chromophores and synthesized rotary motors is used for rationalizing the effect of electron-withdrawing heteroatoms (such as a cationic nitrogen) on the topography and branching plane of mechanistically relevant conical intersections. Such an analysis reveals how the character of rotary motion could be changed from a precessional motion to an axial rotational motion. These concepts are then used to design and build quantum chemical models of three distinct types of Schiff base rotary motors. One of these models, featuring the synthetically viable indanylidenepyrroline framework, has conical intersection structures consistent with an axial rotation not hindered by ground-state conformational barriers. It is expected that this type of motor should be capable of funneling the photon energy into specific rotary modes, thus achieving photoisomerization quantum efficiencies comparable to those seen in visual pigments.

  5. Molecular Thermodynamics for Chemical Process Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prausnitz, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses that aspect of thermodynamics which is particularly important in chemical process design: the calculation of the equilibrium properties of fluid mixtures, especially as required in phase-separation operations. (MLH)

  6. Molecular Thermodynamics for Chemical Process Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prausnitz, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses that aspect of thermodynamics which is particularly important in chemical process design: the calculation of the equilibrium properties of fluid mixtures, especially as required in phase-separation operations. (MLH)

  7. [Origin of motion in the human ureter: mechanics, energetics and kinetics of the myosin molecular motors].

    PubMed

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; De Lisa, Antonello; Tintrup, Frank; Manca, Francesco; Mancinelli, Rino

    2012-01-01

    Ureteral peristalsis is the result of coordinated mechanical motor performance of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle layer of the ureter wall. The main aim of this study was to characterize in smooth muscle of proximal segments of human ureter, the mechanical properties at level of muscle tissue and at level of myosin molecular motors. Ureteral samples were collected from 15 patients, who underwent nephrectomy for renal cancer. Smooth muscle strips longitudinally and circularly oriented from proximal segments of human ureter were used for the in vitro experiments. Mechanical indices including the maximum unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax), and the maximum isometric tension (P0) normalized per cross-sectional area, were determined in vitro determined in electrically evoked contractions of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle strips. Myosin cross-bridge (CB) number per mm2 (Ψ) the elementary force per single CB (Ψ) and kinetic parameters were calculated in muscle strips, using Huxley's equations adapted to nonsarcomeric muscles. Longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited a significantly (p<0.05) faster Vmax (63%) and a higher P0 (40%), if compared to circular strips. Moreover, longitudinal muscle strips showed a significantly higher unitary force (Ψ) per CB. However, no significant differences were observed in CB number, the attachment (f1) and the detachment (g2) rate constants between longitudinal and circular muscle strips. The main result obtained in the present work documents that the mechanical, energetic and unitary forces per CB of longitudinal layer of proximal ureter are better compared to the circular one; these preliminary findings suggested, unlike intestinal smooth muscle, a major role of longitudinal smooth muscle layer in the ureter peristalsis.

  8. Design optimization of an axial gap permanent magnet brushless dc motor for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wijenayake, A.H.; Bailey, J.M.; McCleer, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a method of design and multiobjective optimization of an axial field permanent magnet brushless dc machine (BDCM), primarily aimed for electric vehicle propulsion applications. The disc type permanent magnet brushless dc motor has two stator windings connected in parallel with its rotor sandwiched between them. The simplified design equations for an axial gap trapezoidal back emf motor are obtained and programmed using the software package QPRO. Then using classical design approach, design parameters for a 100 Hp, 3,200 Rpm, 216 Volts BDCM are obtained. This design configuration is then used as the starting design point for the multiobjective optimization process, where the objective is to maximize the efficiency and the specific power.The feasibility frontier is obtained as a set of optimal solutions, from which a most suitable design parameters can be selected depending on the user preferences. A specific power as high as 4.54 Hp/Lb. (at 94% efficiency) and an efficiency as high as 98.06% (at specific power of 0.69 Hp/Lb.) have been achieved during the optimization process. The cost factors in the respective cases being 223$ and 649$. A very high and relatively flat efficiency curve over the torque speed plane is also achieved during the process, especially when the weighting coefficient related to efficiency function is made bigger. Advantage of this method is that much time is saved in developing the optimization program. Also, the motor design engineer does not have to be an expert in optimization theory in order to obtain a superior design with a very short time.

  9. Design of a Single Motor Based Leg Structure with the Consideration of Inherent Mechanical Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha Manzoor, Muhammad; Sohail, Umer; Noor-e-Mustafa; Nizami, Muhammad Hamza Asif; Ayaz, Yasar

    2017-07-01

    The fundamental aspect of designing a legged robot is constructing a leg design that is robust and presents a simple control problem. In this paper, we have successfully designed a robotic leg based on a unique four bar mechanism with only one motor per leg. The leg design parameters used in our platform are extracted from design principles used in biological systems, multiple iterations and previous research findings. These principles guide a robotic leg to have minimal mechanical passive impedance, low leg mass and inertia, a suitable foot trajectory utilizing a practical balance between leg kinematics and robot usage, and the resultant inherent mechanical stability. The designed platform also exhibits the key feature of self-locking. Theoretical tools and software iterations were used to derive these practical features and yield an intuitive sense of the required leg design parameters.

  10. Design and testing of piezo motors for non-magnetic and/or fine positioning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, M. F.; Le Letty, R.; Seiler, R.; Coste, P.

    2005-07-01

    Piezoelectric motors offer several outstanding characteristics that may be very interesting for new scientific instruments in space applications. Piezo motors use a combination of electro-mechanical and frictional forces for generating a progressive motion; they are well suited for positioning applications because they exhibit a large force at rest without any power supply, and they often do not require any reduction gear. They are increasingly used in optical applications. Using piezo motors in space applications may become more and more relevant because of the continuous trend towards adaptive optics in future scientific payloads. In general, piezoelectric actuators are more and more used in space. Piezoelectric motors exhibit a number of advantages compared to conventional electromagnetic (stepping) motors, e.g. superior force/mass ratio, improved direct drive capability, no power supply to maintain a position, feasibility of a fully non-magnetic motor design. In this context, two complementary concepts have been designed and evaluated in the frame of ESA funded research and development activities: a resonant concept, called Rotary Piezo Actuator (RPA), a quasi-static concept, called Rotary Piezo Motor for High Precision Pointing (RPMHPP). The developed Rotary Piezo Actuator (RPA) is based on a Ultrasonic Piezo Drive (UPD) unit that drives a friction ring on the rotor part supported by a ball bearing assembly. This new motorization principle offers excellent motion dynamics and positioning accuracy combined with a high un-powered torque at standstill, and it does not rely on any magnetic features. A rotary piezo motor compliant with the requirements of a reference space application has been designed and tested. The technology remains challenging to be mastered, since the interdisciplinary aspects of the concept include, among others, drive electronics and controller design, piezo-electricity, contact mechanics and tribology. The conceptual design has lead to a

  11. Electric dipole theory and thermodynamics of actomyosin molecular motor in muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Lampinen, Markku J; Noponen, Tuula

    2005-10-21

    Movements in muscles are generated by the myosins which interact with the actin filaments. In this paper we present an electric theory to describe how the chemical energy is first stored in electrostatic form in the myosin system and how it is then released and transformed into work. Due to the longitudinal polarized molecular structure with the negative phosphate group tail, the ATP molecule possesses a large electric dipole moment (p(0)), which makes it an ideal energy source for the electric dipole motor of the actomyosin system. The myosin head contains a large number of strongly restrained water molecules, which makes the ATP-driven electric dipole motor possible. The strongly restrained water molecules can store the chemical energy released by ATP binding and hydrolysis processes in the electric form due to their myosin structure fixed electric dipole moments (p(i)). The decrease in the electric energy is transformed into mechanical work by the rotational movement of the myosin head, which follows from the interaction of the dipoles p(i) with the potential field V(0) of ATP and with the potential field Psi of the actin. The electrical meaning of the hydrolysis reaction is to reduce the dipole moment p(0)-the remaining dipole moment of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is appropriately smaller to return the low negative value of the electric energy nearly back to its initial value, enabling the removal of ADP from the myosin head so that the cycling process can be repeated. We derive for the electric energy of the myosin system a general equation, which contains the potential field V(0) with the dipole moment p(0), the dipole moments p(i) and the potential field psi. Using the previously published experimental data for the electric dipole of ATP (p(0) congruent with 230 debye) and for the amount of strongly restrained water molecules (N congruent with 720) in the myosin subfragment (S1), we show that the Gibbs free energy changes of the ATP binding and

  12. Design improvement of permanent magnet flux switching motor with dual rotor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soomro, H. A.; Sulaiman, E.; Kumar, R.; Rahim, N. S.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents design enhancement to reduce permanent magnet (PM) volume for 7S-6P-7S dual rotor permanent magnet flux-switching machines (DRPMFSM) for electric vehicle application. In recent years, Permanent magnet flux switching (PMFS) motor and a new member of brushless permanent magnet machine are prominently used for the electric vehicle. Though, more volume of Rare-Earth Permanent Magnet (REPM) is used to increase the cost and weight of these motors. Thus, to overcome the issue, new configuration of 7S-6P- 7S dual rotor permanent magnet flux-switching machine (DRPMFSM) has been proposed and investigated in this paper. Initially proposed 7S-6P-7S DRPMFSM has been optimized using “deterministic optimization” to reduce the volume of PM and to attain optimum performances. In addition, the performances of initial and optimized DRPMFSM have been compared such that back-emf, cogging torque, average torque, torque and power vs speed performances, losses and efficiency have been analysed by 2D-finite element analysis (FEA) using the JMAG- Designer software ver. 14.1. Consequently, the final design 7S-6P-7S DRPMFSM has achieved the efficiency of 83.91% at reduced PM volume than initial design to confirm the better efficient motor for HEVs applications.

  13. Design, analysis, fabrication and test of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The motor case used in the solid propellant booster for the Space Shuttle is unique in many respects, most of which are indigenous to size and special design requirements. The evolution of the case design from initial requirements to finished product is discussed, with increased emphasis of reuse capability, special design features, fracture mechanics and corrosion control. Case fabrication history and the resulting procedure are briefly reviewed with respect to material development, processing techniques and special problem areas. Case assembly, behavior and performance during the DM-1 static firing are reviewed, with appropriate comments and conclusions.

  14. Design, manufacture and test of the composite case for ERINT-1 solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mard, Francis

    1993-06-01

    SEP is in charge since 1989 of the ERINT-1 motor case and nozzle. The stringent missile weight and volume requirements coupled with the specification to provide an aerodynamically stable configuration over a very large Mach number range led to the need to develop a high-performance composite motor case. Development of this SRM case presented a variety of technical challenges that were solved by an original design: (1) integral skirts, high bending stiffness, and bending loads are required; (2) high temperature composite stiffness and loads are required up to 160 C; (3) integral fin lugs attachments high aerodynamic loading is required on fin lugs; (4) enclosed fore dome; and (5) aft-pinned joint: a large rear opening is required to cast the propellant. Structural testing in ultimate conditions confirmed the soundness of the design. Positive safety margins were demonstrated on both internal pressure and mechanical loads requirements.

  15. PI controller design for indirect vector controlled induction motor: A decoupling approach.

    PubMed

    Jain, Jitendra Kr; Ghosh, Sandip; Maity, Somnath; Dworak, Pawel

    2017-09-01

    Decoupling of the stator currents is important for smoother torque response of indirect vector controlled induction motors. Typically, feedforward decoupling is used to take care of current coupling that requires exact knowledge of motor parameters, additional circuitry and signal processing. In this paper, a method is proposed to design the regulating proportional-integral gains that minimize coupling without any requirement of the additional decoupler. The variation of the coupling terms for change in load torque is considered as the performance measure. An iterative linear matrix inequality based H∞ control design approach is used to obtain the controller gains. A comparison between the feedforward and the proposed decoupling schemes is presented through simulation and experimental results. The results show that the proposed scheme is simple yet effective even without additional block or burden on signal processing. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ab Initio Reactive Computer Aided Molecular Design.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Todd J

    2017-03-21

    Few would dispute that theoretical chemistry tools can now provide keen insights into chemical phenomena. Yet the holy grail of efficient and reliable prediction of complex reactivity has remained elusive. Fortunately, recent advances in electronic structure theory based on the concepts of both element- and rank-sparsity, coupled with the emergence of new highly parallel computer architectures, have led to a significant increase in the time and length scales which can be simulated using first principles molecular dynamics. This opens the possibility of new discovery-based approaches to chemical reactivity, such as the recently proposed ab initio nanoreactor. We argue that due to these and other recent advances, the holy grail of computational discovery for complex chemical reactivity is rapidly coming within our reach.

  17. Elastomeric Thermal Insulation Design Considerations in Long, Aluminized Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Heath T.

    2017-01-01

    An all-new sounding rocket was designed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center that featured an aft finocyl, aluminized solid propellant grain and silica-filled ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (SFEPDM) internal insulation. Upon the initial static firing of the first of this new design, the solid rocket motor (SRM) case failed thermally just upstream of the aft closure early in the burn time. Subsequent fluid modeling indicated that the high-velocity combustion-product jets emanating from the fin-slots in the propellant grain were likely inducing a strongly swirling flow, thus substantially increasing the severity of the convective environment on the exposed portion of the SFEPDM insulation in this region. The aft portion of the fin-slots in another of the motors were filled with propellant to eliminate the possibility of both direct jet impingement on the exposed SFEPDM and the appearance of strongly swirling flow in the aft region of the motor. When static-fired, this motor's case still failed in the same axial location, and, though somewhat later than for the first static firing, still in less than 1/3rd of the desired burn duration. These results indicate that the extreme material decomposition rates of the SFEPDM in this application are not due to gas-phase convection or shear but rather to interactions with burning aluminum or alumina slag. Further comparisons with between SFEPDM performance in this design and that in other hot-fire tests provide insight into the mechanisms of SFEPDM decomposition in SRM aft domes that can guide the upcoming redesign effort, as well as other future SRM designs. These data also highlight the current limitations of modeling elastomeric insulators solely with diffusion-controlled, gas-phase thermochemistry in SRM regions with significant viscous shear and/or condense-phase impingement or flow.

  18. Optimal design of switched reluctance motor using two-dimensional finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youn-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Hak; Jung, Sung-In; Chun, Yon-Do; Kim, Sol; Lee, Ju; Chu, Min-Sik; Hong, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Dong-Hoon

    2002-05-01

    Switched reluctance motor (SRM) has some advantages such as low cost, high torque density, etc., but SRM has essentially high torque ripple due to its salient structure. To apply SRM to the industrial field, we have to minimize torque ripple, which is the weak point of SRM. This article introduces optimal design process of SRM using a numerical method such as two-dimensional (2D) finite element method. The electrical and geometrical design parameters have been adopted as 2D design variables. From this work, we can obtain the optimal design, which minimizes the torque ripple. We also can obtain the optimal design, which maximizes the average torque. Finally, this article presents performance comparison of two optimal designs, the minimized torque ripple, and the maximized average torque.

  19. Design and Development of a Smart Exercise Bike for Motor Rehabilitation in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Abdar, Hassan; Ridgel, Angela L; Discenzo, Fred M; Loparo, Kenneth A

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies in rehabilitation of Parkinson's disease (PD) have shown that cycling on a tandem bike at a high pedaling rate can reduce the symptoms of the disease. In this research, a smart motorized bicycle has been designed and built for assisting Parkinson's patients with exercise to improve motor function. The exercise bike can accurately control the rider's experience at an accelerated pedaling rate while capturing real-time test data. Here, the design and development of the electronics and hardware as well as the software and control algorithms are presented. Two control algorithms have been developed for the bike; one that implements an inertia load (static mode) and one that implements a speed reference (dynamic mode). In static mode the bike operates as a regular exercise bike with programmable resistance (load) that captures and records the required signals such as heart rate, cadence and power. In dynamic mode the bike operates at a user-selected speed (cadence) with programmable variability in speed that has been shown to be essential to achieving the desired motor performance benefits for PD patients. In addition, the flexible and extensible design of the bike permits readily changing the control algorithm and incorporating additional I/O as needed to provide a wide range of riding experiences. Furthermore, the network-enabled controller provides remote access to bike data during a riding session.

  20. Prototype design of a wearable metal hydride actuator using a soft bellows for motor rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ino, Shuichi; Sato, Mitsuru; Hosono, Minako; Nakajima, Sawako; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Izumi, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    A bedside and home rehabilitation system for people with motor disabilities due to stroke or the aging process requires a human-compatible actuator with softness, low noise and a high power-to-weight ratio. To achieve these types of joint motor rehabilitation systems, we designed a wearable metal hydride (MH) actuator using a soft bellows. The purpose of the current study is the development the soft and light bellows made of a polymer laminate film for the MH actuator. As a result of experimental tests, this soft bellows weighs 20 times less and stretches 30 times longer than the metal bellows used in a conventional MH actuator, and it has hydrogen impermeability, flex durability and adequate compliance for human joints. The MH actuator using the soft bellows can drive at a slow and safe enough speed for motor rehabilitation of patients' limbs. These preliminary findings support the efficacy of an MH actuator with a soft bellows for the purpose of developing a system for motor rehabilitation or human power assist.

  1. Adaptive learning control design for robotic manipulators driven by permanent magnet synchronous motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrelli, Cristiano Maria

    2011-06-01

    On the basis of the ideas recently presented in Tomei and Verrelli (Tomei, P., and Verrelli, C.M. (2010), 'Learning Control for Induction Motor Servo Drives with Uncertain Rotor Resistance', International Journal of Control, 83, 1515-1528) and Marino et al. (Marino, R., Tomei, P., and Verrelli, C.M. (2011), 'Robust Adaptive Learning Control for Nonlinear Systems with Extended Matching Unstructured Uncertainties', International Journal of Robust and Nonlinear Control, Early View, doi: 10.1002/rnc.1720), we briefly show how the adaptive learning control design proposed in Liuzzo and Tomei (Liuzzo, S., and Tomei, P. (2009), Global Adaptive Learning Control of Robotic Manipulators by Output Error Feedback, International Journal of Adaptive Control and Signal Processing, 23, 97-109) can be extended to robotic manipulators driven by nonsalient-pole (surface) permanent magnet synchronous motors. Unstructured uncertain dynamics (that is no parameterisation is available for the uncertainties) of the rigid robot with rotational joints are considered as well as uncertainties in stator resistances of the synchronous motors are taken into account. Two solutions with clear stability proofs are presented: a global decentralised control via state feedback and a semi-global control via output feedback. Output tracking of known periodic reference signals and learning of corresponding uncertain input reference signals are achieved. Available results in the literature are thus improved since no simplification concerning negligible electrical motor dynamics is used.

  2. 40 CFR 52.2348 - National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs. 52.2348 Section 52.2348 Protection of... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2348 National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection..., 1999, the State of Utah submitted an evaluation of the Utah County inspection and maintenance...

  3. 40 CFR 52.2348 - National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs. 52.2348 Section 52.2348 Protection of... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2348 National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection..., 1999, the State of Utah submitted an evaluation of the Utah County inspection and maintenance...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2348 - National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs. 52.2348 Section 52.2348 Protection of... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2348 National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection..., 1999, the State of Utah submitted an evaluation of the Utah County inspection and maintenance...

  5. Web Based Learning Support for Experimental Design in Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmsen, Tinri; Bisseling, Ton; Hartog, Rob

    An important learning goal of a molecular biology curriculum is a certain proficiency level in experimental design. Currently students are confronted with experimental approaches in textbooks, in lectures and in the laboratory. However, most students do not reach a satisfactory level of competence in the design of experimental approaches. This…

  6. MOLECULAR THERMODYNAMICS IN THE DESIGN OF SUBSTITUTE SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of physical properties and fluid behavior from molecular thermodynamics can lead to better decision making in the design of substitute solvents and can greatly reduce the expense and time required to find substitutes compared to designing solvents by experiment. this pape...

  7. MOLECULAR THERMODYNAMICS IN THE DESIGN OF SUBSTITUTE SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of physical properties and fluid behavior from molecular thermodynamics can lead to better decision making in the design of substitute solvents and can greatly reduce the expense and time required to find substitutes compared to designing solvents by experiment. this pape...

  8. Physics of transport and traffic phenomena in biology: from molecular motors and cells to organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2005-12-01

    Traffic-like collective movements are observed at almost all levels of biological systems. Molecular motor proteins like, for example, kinesin and dynein, which are the vehicles of almost all intra-cellular transport in eukaryotic cells, sometimes encounter traffic jam that manifests as a disease of the organism. Similarly, traffic jam of collagenase MMP-1, which moves on the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, has also been observed in recent experiments. Novel efforts have been made to utilize some uni-cellular organisms as “micro-transporters”. Traffic-like movements of social insects like ants and termites on trails are, perhaps, more familiar in our everyday life. Experimental, theoretical and computational investigations in the last few years have led to a deeper understanding of the generic or common physical principles involved in these phenomena. In this review we critically examine the current status of our understanding, expose the limitations of the existing methods, mention open challenging questions and speculate on the possible future directions of research in this interdisciplinary area where physics meets not only chemistry and biology but also (nano-)technology.

  9. Reactions driving conformational movements (molecular motors) in gels: conformational and structural chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Otero, Toribio F

    2017-01-18

    In this perspective the empirical kinetics of conducting polymers exchanging anions and solvent during electrochemical reactions to get dense reactive gels is reviewed. The reaction drives conformational movements of the chains (molecular motors), exchange of ions and solvent with the electrolyte and structural (relaxation, swelling, shrinking and compaction) gel changes. Reaction-driven structural changes are identified and quantified from electrochemical responses. The empirical reaction activation energy (Ea), the reaction coefficient (k) and the reaction orders (α and β) change as a function of the conformational energy variation during the reaction. This conformational energy becomes an empirical magnitude. Ea, k, α and β include and provide quantitative conformational and structural information. The chemical kinetics becomes structural chemical kinetics (SCK) for reactions driving conformational movements of the reactants. The electrochemically stimulated conformational relaxation model describes empirical results and some results from the literature for biochemical reactions. In parallel the development of an emerging technological world of soft, wet, multifunctional and biomimetic tools and anthropomorphic robots driven by reactions of the constitutive material, as in biological organs, can be now envisaged being theoretically supported by the kinetic model.

  10. Back-stepping, hidden substeps, and conditional dwell times in molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Tsygankov, Denis; Lindén, Martin; Fisher, Michael E

    2007-02-01

    Processive molecular motors take more-or-less uniformly sized steps, along spatially periodic tracks, mostly forwards but increasingly backwards under loads. Experimentally, the major steps can be resolved clearly within the noise but one knows biochemically that one or more mechanochemical substeps remain hidden in each enzymatic cycle. In order to properly interpret experimental data for back-to-forward step ratios, mean conditional step-to-step dwell times, etc., a first-passage analysis has been developed that takes account of hidden substeps in N -state sequential models. The explicit, general results differ significantly from previous treatments that identify the observed steps with complete mechanochemical cycles; e.g., the mean dwell times tau(+) and tau(-) prior to forward and back steps, respectively, are normally unequal although the dwell times tau(++) and tau(--) between successive forward and back steps are equal. Illustrative (N=2) -state examples display a wide range of behavior. The formulation extends to the case of two or more detectable transitions in a multistate cycle with hidden substeps.

  11. A theoretical model of a molecular-motor-powered microfluidics pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Joseph L.

    2003-11-01

    Flow induced by translating and rotating beads within a circular channel is investigated as a model of a novel molecular-motor-powered microfluidics pump. Micro flows are often generated by external pumps, rather than by devices that are integral to the microfluidics chip. We are currently developing a micro-scale pump that could be part of a biosensor, "lab on a chip" device, drug delivery system, or other bio-microfluidics device. The pump consists of a kinesin-coated bead moving along a microtubule track in a circular channel. The model is developed from the Stokes equation subject to wall and bead boundary conditions, and is solved using the boundary element method. It is shown that the pump can generate flows in the atto- to pico-l/s range, and that there is an optimal loading for a given pump geometry that results in maximum pump efficiency. Increasing the diameter of the bead relative to the channel width increases the flow generated at the expense of requiring a higher force to move the bead. It is found that bead rotation can increase or reduce the power required, depending on the direction of rotation, and that positioning the bead slightly off center can reduce the required power input. This work is funded by DARPA.

  12. Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, Dan V.; Lard, Mercy; Korten, Till; van Delft, Falco C. M. J. M.; Persson, Malin; Bengtsson, Elina; Månsson, Alf; Diez, Stefan; Linke, Heiner; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2016-01-01

    The combinatorial nature of many important mathematical problems, including nondeterministic-polynomial-time (NP)-complete problems, places a severe limitation on the problem size that can be solved with conventional, sequentially operating electronic computers. There have been significant efforts in conceiving parallel-computation approaches in the past, for example: DNA computation, quantum computation, and microfluidics-based computation. However, these approaches have not proven, so far, to be scalable and practical from a fabrication and operational perspective. Here, we report the foundations of an alternative parallel-computation system in which a given combinatorial problem is encoded into a graphical, modular network that is embedded in a nanofabricated planar device. Exploring the network in a parallel fashion using a large number of independent, molecular-motor-propelled agents then solves the mathematical problem. This approach uses orders of magnitude less energy than conventional computers, thus addressing issues related to power consumption and heat dissipation. We provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of such a device by solving, in a parallel fashion, the small instance {2, 5, 9} of the subset sum problem, which is a benchmark NP-complete problem. Finally, we discuss the technical advances necessary to make our system scalable with presently available technology. PMID:26903637

  13. Actuating Mechanism and Design of a Cylindrical Traveling Wave Ultrasonic Motor Using Cantilever Type Composite Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2010-01-01

    Background Ultrasonic motors (USM) are based on the concept of driving the rotor by a mechanical vibration excited on the stator via piezoelectric effect. USM exhibit merits such as simple structure, quick response, quiet operation, self-locking when power off, nonelectromagnetic radiation and higher position accuracy. Principal Findings A cylindrical type traveling wave ultrasonic motor using cantilever type composite transducer was proposed in this paper. There are two cantilevers on the outside surface of cylinder, four longitudinal PZT ceramics are set between the cantilevers, and four bending PZT ceramics are set on each outside surface of cantilevers. Two degenerate flexural vibration modes spatially and temporally orthogonal to each other in the cylinder are excited by the composite transducer. In this new design, a single transducer can excite a flexural traveling wave in the cylinder. Thus, elliptical motions are achieved on the teeth. The actuating mechanism of proposed motor was analyzed. The stator was designed with FEM. The two vibration modes of stator were degenerated. Transient analysis was developed to gain the vibration characteristic of stator, and results indicate the motion trajectories of nodes on the teeth are nearly ellipses. Conclusions The study results verify the feasibility of the proposed design. The wave excited in the cylinder isn't an ideal traveling wave, and the vibration amplitudes are inconsistent. The distortion of traveling wave is generated by the deformation of bending vibration mode of cylinder, which is caused by the coupling effect between the cylinder and transducer. Analysis results also prove that the objective motions of nodes on the teeth are three-dimensional vibrations. But, the vibration in axial direction is minute compared with the vibrations in circumferential and radial direction. The results of this paper can guide the development of this new type of motor. PMID:20368809

  14. Actuating mechanism and design of a cylindrical traveling wave ultrasonic motor using cantilever type composite transducer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2010-04-02

    Ultrasonic motors (USM) are based on the concept of driving the rotor by a mechanical vibration excited on the stator via piezoelectric effect. USM exhibit merits such as simple structure, quick response, quiet operation, self-locking when power off, nonelectromagnetic radiation and higher position accuracy. A cylindrical type traveling wave ultrasonic motor using cantilever type composite transducer was proposed in this paper. There are two cantilevers on the outside surface of cylinder, four longitudinal PZT ceramics are set between the cantilevers, and four bending PZT ceramics are set on each outside surface of cantilevers. Two degenerate flexural vibration modes spatially and temporally orthogonal to each other in the cylinder are excited by the composite transducer. In this new design, a single transducer can excite a flexural traveling wave in the cylinder. Thus, elliptical motions are achieved on the teeth. The actuating mechanism of proposed motor was analyzed. The stator was designed with FEM. The two vibration modes of stator were degenerated. Transient analysis was developed to gain the vibration characteristic of stator, and results indicate the motion trajectories of nodes on the teeth are nearly ellipses. The study results verify the feasibility of the proposed design. The wave excited in the cylinder isn't an ideal traveling wave, and the vibration amplitudes are inconsistent. The distortion of traveling wave is generated by the deformation of bending vibration mode of cylinder, which is caused by the coupling effect between the cylinder and transducer. Analysis results also prove that the objective motions of nodes on the teeth are three-dimensional vibrations. But, the vibration in axial direction is minute compared with the vibrations in circumferential and radial direction. The results of this paper can guide the development of this new type of motor.

  15. Design and characteristic analysis of L1B4 ultrasonic motor considering contact mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rho, Jong-Seok; Kim, Byung-Jai; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Joo, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Hyun-Kyo

    2005-11-01

    Up to the present time, the analysis and design of ultrasonic motors (USMs) have been performed using rough analytic methods or commercial analysis tools without considering the complex contact mechanisms. As a result, it was impossible to achieve an exact analysis and design of a USM. In order to address the problem, we proposed the analysis and design methodology of an L1B4 USM using a three-dimensional finite element method combined with an analytic method that considers complex contact mechanisms in linear operation. This methodology is applicable to many other kinds of USMs which use resonance modes and contact mechanisms. Also, we designed and prototyped the mechanical system and driving circuit of the L1B4 USM, and finally validated the proposed analysis and design methodology by comparing their outcomes with experimental data.

  16. Computer-aided design studies of the homopolar linear synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, G. E.; Eastham, A. R.; Ong, R.

    1984-09-01

    The linear induction motor (LIM), as an urban transit drive, can provide good grade-climbing capabilities and propulsion/braking performance that is independent of steel wheel-rail adhesion. In view of its 10-12 mm airgap, the LIM is characterized by a low power factor-efficiency product of order 0.4. A synchronous machine offers high efficiency and controllable power factor. An assessment of the linear homopolar configuration of this machine is presented as an alternative to the LIM. Computer-aided design studies using the finite element technique have been conducted to identify a suitable machine design for urban transit propulsion.

  17. MOLECULAR DESIGN OF COLLOIDS IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Keith P. Johnston

    2009-04-06

    The environmentally benign, non-toxic, non-flammable fluids water and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the two most abundant and inexpensive solvents on earth. Emulsions of these fluids are of interest in many industrial processes, as well as CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Until recently, formation of these emulsions required stabilization with fluorinated surfactants, which are expensive and often not environmentally friendly. In this work we overcame this severe limitation by developing a fundamental understanding of the properties of surfactants the CO2-water interface and using this knowledge to design and characterize emulsions stabilized with either hydrocarbon-based surfactants or nanoparticle stabilizers. We also discovered a new concept of electrostatic stabilization for CO2-based emulsions and colloids. Finally, we were able to translate our earlier work on the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and nanowires from high temperatures and pressures to lower temperatures and ambient pressure to make the chemistry much more accessible.

  18. Coupled Solid Rocket Motor Ballistics and Trajectory Modeling for Higher Fidelity Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ables, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Multi-stage launch vehicles with solid rocket motors (SRMs) face design optimization challenges, especially when the mission scope changes frequently. Significant performance benefits can be realized if the solid rocket motors are optimized to the changing requirements. While SRMs represent a fixed performance at launch, rapid design iterations enable flexibility at design time, yielding significant performance gains. The streamlining and integration of SRM design and analysis can be achieved with improved analysis tools. While powerful and versatile, the Solid Performance Program (SPP) is not conducive to rapid design iteration. Performing a design iteration with SPP and a trajectory solver is a labor intensive process. To enable a better workflow, SPP, the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST), and the interfaces between them have been improved and automated, and a graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed. The GUI enables real-time visual feedback of grain and nozzle design inputs, enforces parameter dependencies, removes redundancies, and simplifies manipulation of SPP and POST's numerous options. Automating the analysis also simplifies batch analyses and trade studies. Finally, the GUI provides post-processing, visualization, and comparison of results. Wrapping legacy high-fidelity analysis codes with modern software provides the improved interface necessary to enable rapid coupled SRM ballistics and vehicle trajectory analysis. Low cost trade studies demonstrate the sensitivities of flight performance metrics to propulsion characteristics. Incorporating high fidelity analysis from SPP into vehicle design reduces performance margins and improves reliability. By flying an SRM designed with the same assumptions as the rest of the vehicle, accurate comparisons can be made between competing architectures. In summary, this flexible workflow is a critical component to designing a versatile launch vehicle model that can accommodate a volatile

  19. Silanization of quartz, silicon and mica surfaces with light-driven molecular motors: construction of surface-bound photo-active nanolayers.

    PubMed

    London, Gábor; Carroll, Gregory T; Feringa, Ben L

    2013-06-07

    The attachment of molecular rotary motors containing triethoxysilane functional groups to quartz, silicon and mica surfaces is described. Motors containing silane coupling agents in their structure form stable molecular layers on quartz and silicon surfaces. Motors attached to these surfaces were found to undergo photochemical and thermal isomerization steps similar to those observed in solution. Additionally, successful formation of molecular "carpets" on atomically flat mica extending micrometer-sized length scales is presented. These "carpets" were found to undergo morphological changes upon irradiation with UV-light.

  20. Exchange of microtubule molecular motors during melanosome transport in Xenopus laevis melanophores is triggered by collisions with intracellular obstacles.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Luciana; Echarte, Maria Mercedes; Levi, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    The observation that several cargoes move bidirectionally along microtubules in vivo raised the question regarding how molecular motors with opposed polarity coordinate during transport. In this work, we analyzed the switch of microtubule motors during the transport of melanosomes in Xenopus melanophores by registering trajectories of these organelles moving along microtubules using a fast and precise tracking method. We analyzed in detail the intervals of trajectories showing reversions in the original direction of transport and processive motion in the opposite direction for at least 250 nm. In most of the cases, the speed of the melanosome before the reversion slowly decreases with time approaching zero then, the organelle returns over the same path moving initially at a very high speed and slowing down with time. These results could be explained according to a model in which reversions are triggered by an elastic collision of the cargo with obstacles in the cytosol. This interaction generates a force opposed to the movement of the motor-driven organelle increasing the probability of detaching the active motors from the track. The model can explain reversions in melanosome trajectories as well as other characteristics of in vivo transport along microtubules observed by other authors. Our results suggest that the crowded cytoplasm plays a key role in regulating the coordination of microtubules-dependent motors.

  1. Motor imaginary-based brain-machine interface design using programmable logic controllers for the disabled.

    PubMed

    Jeyabalan, Vickneswaran; Samraj, Andrews; Loo, Chu Kiong

    2010-10-01

    Aiming at the implementation of brain-machine interfaces (BMI) for the aid of disabled people, this paper presents a system design for real-time communication between the BMI and programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to control an electrical actuator that could be used in devices to help the disabled. Motor imaginary signals extracted from the brain’s motor cortex using an electroencephalogram (EEG) were used as a control signal. The EEG signals were pre-processed by means of adaptive recursive band-pass filtrations (ARBF) and classified using simplified fuzzy adaptive resonance theory mapping (ARTMAP) in which the classified signals are then translated into control signals used for machine control via the PLC. A real-time test system was designed using MATLAB for signal processing, KEP-Ware V4 OLE for process control (OPC), a wireless local area network router, an Omron Sysmac CPM1 PLC and a 5 V/0.3A motor. This paper explains the signal processing techniques, the PLC's hardware configuration, OPC configuration and real-time data exchange between MATLAB and PLC using the MATLAB OPC toolbox. The test results indicate that the function of exchanging real-time data can be attained between the BMI and PLC through OPC server and proves that it is an effective and feasible method to be applied to devices such as wheelchairs or electronic equipment.

  2. Design and motion control of bioinspired humanoid robot head from servo motors toward artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almubarak, Yara; Tadesse, Yonas

    2017-04-01

    The potential applications of humanoid robots in social environments, motivates researchers to design, and control biomimetic humanoid robots. Generally, people are more interested to interact with robots that have similar attributes and movements to humans. The head is one of most important part of any social robot. Currently, most humanoid heads use electrical motors, pneumatic actuators, and shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for actuation. Electrical and pneumatic actuators take most of the space and would cause unsmooth motions. SMAs are expensive to use in humanoids. Recently, in many robotic projects, Twisted and Coiled Polymer (TCP) artificial muscles are used as linear actuators which take up little space compared to the motors. In this paper, we will demonstrate the designing process and motion control of a robotic head with TCP muscles. Servo motors and artificial muscles are used for actuating the head motion, which have been controlled by a cost efficient ARM Cortex-M7 based development board. A complete comparison between the two actuators is presented.

  3. Passivity-based current controller design for a permanent-magnet synchronous motor.

    PubMed

    Achour, A Y; Mendil, B; Bacha, S; Munteanu, I

    2009-07-01

    The control of a permanent-magnet synchronous motor is a nontrivial issue in AC drives, because of its nonlinear dynamics and time-varying parameters. Within this paper, a new passivity-based controller designed to force the motor to track time-varying speed and torque trajectories is presented. Its design avoids the use of the Euler-Lagrange model and destructuring since it uses a flux-based dq modelling, independent of the rotor angular position. This dq model is obtained through the three-phase abc model of the motor, using a Park transform. The proposed control law does not compensate the model's workless force terms which appear in the machine's dq model, as they have no effect on the system's energy balance and they do not influence the system's stability properties. Another feature is that the cancellation of the plant's primary dynamics and nonlinearities is not done by exact zeroing, but by imposing a desired damped transient. The effectiveness of the proposed control is illustrated by numerical simulation results.

  4. A curved ultrasonic actuator optimized for spherical motors: design and experiments.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Edouard; Lozada, José; Hafez, Moustapha

    2014-08-01

    Multi-degree-of-freedom angular actuators are commonly used in numerous mechatronic areas such as omnidirectional robots, robot articulations or inertially stabilized platforms. The conventional method to design these devices consists in placing multiple actuators in parallel or series using gimbals which are bulky and difficult to miniaturize. Motors using a spherical rotor are interesting for miniature multidegree-of-freedom actuators. In this paper, a new actuator is proposed. It is based on a curved piezoelectric element which has its inner contact surface adapted to the diameter of the rotor. This adaptation allows to build spherical motors with a fully constrained rotor and without a need for additional guiding system. The work presents a design methodology based on modal finite element analysis. A methodology for mode selection is proposed and a sensitivity analysis of the final geometry to uncertainties and added masses is discussed. Finally, experimental results that validate the actuator concept on a single degree-of-freedom ultrasonic motor set-up are presented.

  5. Covalent Immobilization of Microtubules on Glass Surfaces for Molecular Motor Force Measurements and Other Single-Molecule Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Rao, Lu; Gennerich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Rigid attachment of microtubules (MTs) to glass cover slip surfaces is a prerequisite for a variety of microscopy experiments in which MTs are used as substrates for MT-associated proteins, such as the molecular motors kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. We present an MT-surface coupling protocol in which aminosilanized glass is formylated using the cross-linker glutaraldehyde, fluorescence-labeled MTs are covalently attached, and the surface is passivated with highly pure beta-casein. The technique presented here yields rigid MT immobilization while simultaneously blocking the remaining glass surface against nonspecific binding by polystyrene optical trapping microspheres. This surface chemistry is straightforward and relatively cheap and uses a minimum of specialized equipment or hazardous reagents. These methods provide a foundation for a variety of optical tweezers experiments with MT-associated molecular motors and may also be useful in other assays requiring surface-immobilized proteins. PMID:24633798

  6. Molecular design of conducting polymer for electrochromic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sze C.; Clark, R. L.; Liao, H.; Sun, L.

    1995-09-01

    The electrochromism of polyaniline in the near infrared spectral range is studied. Spectroelectrochemical data are used to construct optically monitored cyclic voltamograms (o- CV). Details of the electrochromic effects are clarified by comparing o-CV with the ordinary current monitored cyclic voltamograms (i-CV). Components of Faradaic currents to the cyclic voltamogram can be resolved by comparing o-CV with i-CV. We discuss molecular designs for modifying the properties of polyaniline. By a template-guided polymerization scheme, we synthesize the double strand polymeric complex of polyaniline. The first strand is a conducting polymer and the second strand is a polyelectrolyte. This molecular complex has the advantage of being more stable, more processable than the conventional polyaniline. The double strand molecular complex offers increased flexibility in molecular design of electrochromic and electroactive polymers.

  7. Synchronization of elastically coupled processive molecular motors and regulation of cargo transport.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Felix; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The collective work of motor proteins plays an important role in cellular transport processes. Since measuring intermotor coupling and hence a comparison to theoretical predictions is difficult, we introduce the synchronization as an alternative observable for motor cooperativity. This synchronization can be determined from the ratio of the mean times of motor resting and stepping. Results from a multistate Markov chain model and Brownian dynamics simulations, describing the elastically coupled motors, coincide well. Our model can explain the experimentally observed effect of strongly increased transport velocities and powers by the synchronization and coupling of myosin V and kinesin I.

  8. Design strategies for organic semiconductors beyond the molecular formula.

    PubMed

    Henson, Zachary B; Müllen, Klaus; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2012-09-01

    Organic semiconducting materials based on polymers and molecular systems containing an electronically delocalized structure are the basis of emerging optoelectronic technologies such as plastic solar cells and flexible transistors. For isolated molecules, guidelines exist that rely on the molecular formula to tailor the frontier (highest occupied or lowest unoccupied) molecular orbital energy levels and optical absorption profiles. Much less control can be achieved over relevant properties, however, as one makes the transition to the ensemble behaviour characteristic of the solid state. Polymeric materials are also challenging owing to the statistical description of the average number of repeat units. Here we draw attention to the limitations of molecular formulae as predictive tools for achieving properties relevant to device performances. Illustrative examples highlight the relevance of organization across multiple length scales, and how device performances--although relevant for practical applications--poorly reflect the success of molecular design.

  9. "Watching" the Dark State in Ultrafast Nonadiabatic Photoisomerization Process of a Light-Driven Molecular Rotary Motor.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaojuan; Cui, Xueyan; Hu, Deping; Jiang, Chenwei; Zhao, Di; Lan, Zhenggang; Li, Fuli

    2017-02-16

    Photoisomerization dynamics of a light-driven molecular rotary motor, 9-(2-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-cyclopenta[a]naphthalen-1-ylidene)-9H-fluorene, is investigated with trajectory surface-hopping dynamics at the semiempirical OM2/MRCI level. The rapid population decay of the S1 excited state for the M isomer is observed, with two different decay time scales (500 fs and 1.0 ps). By weighting the contributions of fast and slow decay trajectories, the averaged lifetime of the S1 excited state is about 710 fs. The calculated quantum yield of the M-to-P photoisomerization of this molecular rotary motor is about 59.9%. After the S0 → S1 excitation, the dynamical process of electronic decay is followed by twisting about the central C═C double bond and the motion of pyramidalization at the carbon atom of the stator-axle linkage. Although two S0/S1 minimum-energy conical intersections are obtained at the OM2/MRCI level, only one conical intersection is found to be responsible for the nonadiabatic dynamics. The existence of "dark state" in the molecular rotary motor is confirmed through the simulated time-resolved fluorescence emission spectrum. Both quenching and red shift of fluorescence emission spectrum observed by Conyard et al. [ Conyard, J.; Addison, K.; Heisler, I. A.; Cnossen, A.; Browne, W. R.; Feringa, B. L.; Meech, S. R. Nat. Chem. 2012 , 4 , 547 - 551 ; Conyard, J.; Conssen, A.; Browne, W. R.; Feringa, B. L.; Meech, S. R. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014 , 136 , 9692 - 9700 ] are well understood. We find that this "dark state" in the molecular rotary motor is not a new electronic state, but the "dark region" with low oscillator strength on the initial S1 state.

  10. Design and Function of Molecular and Bioelectronics Devices (Editorial)

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, Predrag S; Forzani, Erica; Tao, Nongjian; Korkin, Anatoli

    2007-01-01

    Further rapid progress of electronics, in particular the increase of computer power and breakthroughs in sensor technology for industrial, medical diagnostics and environmental applications, strongly depends on the scaling of electronic devices, ultimately to the size of molecules. Design of controllable molecular-scale devices may resolve the problem of energy dissipation at the nanoscale and take advantage of molecular self-assembly in the so-called bottom-up approach.

  11. Interrogating Emergent Transport Properties for Molecular Motor Ensembles: A Semi-analytical Approach.

    PubMed

    Bhaban, Shreyas; Materassi, Donatello; Li, Mingang; Hays, Thomas; Salapaka, Murti

    2016-11-01

    Intracellular transport is an essential function in eucaryotic cells, facilitated by motor proteins-proteins converting chemical energy into kinetic energy. It is understood that motor proteins work in teams enabling unidirectional and bidirectional transport of intracellular cargo over long distances. Disruptions of the underlying transport mechanisms, often caused by mutations that alter single motor characteristics, are known to cause neurodegenerative diseases. For example, phosphorylation of kinesin motor domain at the serine residue is implicated in Huntington's disease, with a recent study of phosphorylated and phosphomimetic serine residues indicating lowered single motor stalling forces. In this article we report the effects of mutations of this nature on transport properties of cargo carried by multiple wild-type and mutant motors. Results indicate that mutants with altered stall forces might determine the average velocity and run-length even when they are outnumbered by wild type motors in the ensemble. It is shown that mutants gain a competitive advantage and lead to an increase in the expected run-length when the load on the cargo is in the vicinity of the mutant's stalling force or a multiple of its stalling force. A separate contribution of this article is the development of a semi-analytic method to analyze transport of cargo by multiple motors of multiple types. The technique determines transition rates between various relative configurations of motors carrying the cargo using the transition rates between various absolute configurations. This enables a computation of biologically relevant quantities like average velocity and run-length without resorting to Monte Carlo simulations. It can also be used to introduce alterations of various single motor parameters to model a mutation and to deduce effects of such alterations on the transport of a common cargo by multiple motors. Our method is easily implementable and we provide a software package for

  12. Interrogating Emergent Transport Properties for Molecular Motor Ensembles: A Semi-analytical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Materassi, Donatello; Li, Mingang; Hays, Thomas; Salapaka, Murti

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is an essential function in eucaryotic cells, facilitated by motor proteins—proteins converting chemical energy into kinetic energy. It is understood that motor proteins work in teams enabling unidirectional and bidirectional transport of intracellular cargo over long distances. Disruptions of the underlying transport mechanisms, often caused by mutations that alter single motor characteristics, are known to cause neurodegenerative diseases. For example, phosphorylation of kinesin motor domain at the serine residue is implicated in Huntington’s disease, with a recent study of phosphorylated and phosphomimetic serine residues indicating lowered single motor stalling forces. In this article we report the effects of mutations of this nature on transport properties of cargo carried by multiple wild-type and mutant motors. Results indicate that mutants with altered stall forces might determine the average velocity and run-length even when they are outnumbered by wild type motors in the ensemble. It is shown that mutants gain a competitive advantage and lead to an increase in the expected run-length when the load on the cargo is in the vicinity of the mutant’s stalling force or a multiple of its stalling force. A separate contribution of this article is the development of a semi-analytic method to analyze transport of cargo by multiple motors of multiple types. The technique determines transition rates between various relative configurations of motors carrying the cargo using the transition rates between various absolute configurations. This enables a computation of biologically relevant quantities like average velocity and run-length without resorting to Monte Carlo simulations. It can also be used to introduce alterations of various single motor parameters to model a mutation and to deduce effects of such alterations on the transport of a common cargo by multiple motors. Our method is easily implementable and we provide a software package

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations and cross-link analysis of the rotary molecular motor F(o) of ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol

    The protein F1Fo ATP synthase is responsible for the generation of the molecule adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP). It consists of two coupled rotary motors, F1 and Fo. ATP is generated via a rotary mechanism that couples the synthesis of ATP in F1 to the proton translocation across Fo which is driven by the electrochemical proton gradient across the membrane. F1 consists of three different subunits in the stoichiometry a1b2c10. So far, only the structure of the c-subunit and a partial structure of the b-subunit have been solved at atomic level detail. However, enough biochemical and structural information is available to construct an atomic model of Fo. There are still many open questions about Fo operation ranging from the subunit arrangement to the proton pathway and proton conduction mechanism to the rotary mechanism that couples the proton conduction to the rotation of its rotor. In this thesis study, I investigated the following four aspects of Fo: the proton pathway in Fo; the motion of F o subunits during its rotation; the rotation of the C-terminal helix of the c-subunit induced by a pH change; the forced rotation of a c10 ring in a membrane. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, I was able to identify a proton pathway formed as two half proton channels in F o, i.e., a proton entrance channel and a proton exit channel. This is in good agreement with experiment. Furthermore, based on the diagramatic cross-link analysis, I propose a new Fo rotary mechanism which shows the cooperative movement of helices in Fo during proton transport and can explain experimental results which could not be explained by previous models. The investigation of the C-terminal helix rotation by NM simulations showed no pH induced rotation of the helix of the c-subunit. Finally, using steered MD simulations, I found that the c10 ring is mechanically robust against forced rotation in vacuum but not in a membrane on the MD time scale. Overall, structural information combined with my

  14. Lightweight structural design of a bolted case joint for the space shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Stein, Peter A.; Bush, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    The structural design of a bolted joint with a static face seal which can be used to join Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) case segments is given. Results from numerous finite element parametric studies indicate that the bolted joint meets the design requirement of preventing joint opening at the O-ring locations during SRM pressurization. A final design recommended for further development has the following parameters: 180 one-in.-diam. studs, stud centerline offset of 0.5 in radially inward from the shell wall center line, flange thickness of 0.75 in, bearing plate thickness of 0.25 in, studs prestressed to 70 percent of ultimate load, and the intermediate alcove. The design has a mass penalty of 1096 lbm, which is 164 lbm greater than the currently proposed capture tang redesign.

  15. Intrinsic Hardware Evolution for the Design and Reconfiguration of Analog Speed Controllers for a DC Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Ferguson, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    Evolvable hardware provides the capability to evolve analog circuits to produce amplifier and filter functions. Conventional analog controller designs employ these same functions. Analog controllers for the control of the shaft speed of a DC motor are evolved on an evolvable hardware platform utilizing a second generation Field Programmable Transistor Array (FPTA2). The performance of an evolved controller is compared to that of a conventional proportional-integral (PI) controller. It is shown that hardware evolution is able to create a compact design that provides good performance, while using considerably less functional electronic components than the conventional design. Additionally, the use of hardware evolution to provide fault tolerance by reconfiguring the design is explored. Experimental results are presented showing that significant recovery of capability can be made in the face of damaging induced faults.

  16. Intrinsic Hardware Evolution for the Design and Reconfiguration of Analog Speed Controllers for a DC Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Ferguson, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    Evolvable hardware provides the capability to evolve analog circuits to produce amplifier and filter functions. Conventional analog controller designs employ these same functions. Analog controllers for the control of the shaft speed of a DC motor are evolved on an evolvable hardware platform utilizing a second generation Field Programmable Transistor Array (FPTA2). The performance of an evolved controller is compared to that of a conventional proportional-integral (PI) controller. It is shown that hardware evolution is able to create a compact design that provides good performance, while using considerably less functional electronic components than the conventional design. Additionally, the use of hardware evolution to provide fault tolerance by reconfiguring the design is explored. Experimental results are presented showing that significant recovery of capability can be made in the face of damaging induced faults.

  17. Study on Optimum Design of Multi-Pole Interior Permanent Magnet Motor with Concentrated Windings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Yoshiaki; Kosaka, Takashi; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors (IPMSM) have been found in many applications because of their high-power density and high-efficiency. The existence of a complex magnetic circuit, however, makes the design of this machine quite complicated. Although FEM is commonly used in the IPMSM design, one of disadvantages is long CPU times. This paper presents a simple non-linear magnetic analysis for a multi-pole IPMSM as a preliminary design tool of FEM. The proposed analysis consists of the geometric-flux-tube-based equivalent-magnetic-circuit model. The model includes saturable permeances taking into account the local magnetic saturation in the core. As a result, the proposed analysis is capable of calculating the flux distribution and the torque characteristics in the presence of magnetic saturation. The effectiveness of the proposed analysis is verified by comparing with FEM in terms of the analytical accuracy and the computation time for two IPMSMs with different specifications. After verification, the proposed analysis-based optimum design is examined, by which the minimization of motor volume is realized while satisfying the necessary maximum torque for target applications.

  18. The nonlinear chemo-mechanic coupled dynamics of the F 1 -ATPase molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lizhong; Liu, Fang

    2012-03-01

    The ATP synthase consists of two opposing rotary motors, F0 and F1, coupled to each other. When the F1 motor is not coupled to the F0 motor, it can work in the direction hydrolyzing ATP, as a nanomotor called F1-ATPase. It has been reported that the stiffness of the protein varies nonlinearly with increasing load. The nonlinearity has an important effect on the rotating rate of the F1-ATPase. Here, considering the nonlinearity of the γ shaft stiffness for the F1-ATPase, a nonlinear chemo-mechanical coupled dynamic model of F1 motor is proposed. Nonlinear vibration frequencies of the γ shaft and their changes along with the system parameters are investigated. The nonlinear stochastic response of the elastic γ shaft to thermal excitation is analyzed. The results show that the stiffness nonlinearity of the γ shaft causes an increase of the vibration frequency for the F1 motor, which increases the motor's rotation rate. When the concentration of ATP is relatively high and the load torque is small, the effects of the stiffness nonlinearity on the rotating rates of the F1 motor are obvious and should be considered. These results are useful for improving calculation of the rotating rate for the F1 motor and provide insight about the stochastic wave mechanics of F1-ATPase.

  19. Design theory and performance of cryogenic molecular adsorption refrigeration systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, W. H.; Woltman, A. W.; Masson, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Closed-cycle operation of molecular adsorption refrigeration systems (MARS) has been demonstrated by using thermally cycled zeolites to adsorb and desorb various gases under pressures of 20-60 atm. This paper develops three aspects of the design theory: the physical theory of molecular adsorption of small molecules such as A, N2, N2O and NH3, the design relations for closed-cycle flow for three or more compressors, and the coefficient of performance. This work is intended to demonstrate nonmechanical gas compression for various cryogenic gases than can compete with mechanical systems with a different mix of advantages and disadvantages.

  20. Molecular rectifiers: a new design based on asymmetric anchoring moieties.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Colin; Ratner, Mark A

    2015-03-11

    The quest for a molecular rectifier is among the major challenges of molecular electronics. We introduce three simple rules to design an efficient rectifying molecule and demonstrate its functioning at the theoretical level, relying on the NEGF-DFT technique. The design rules notably require both the introduction of asymmetric anchoring moieties and a decoupling bridge. They lead to a new rectification mechanism based on the compression and control of the HOMO/LUMO gap by the electrode Fermi levels, arising from a pinning effect. Significant rectification ratios up to 2 orders of magnitude are theoretically predicted as the mechanism opposes resonant to nonresonant tunneling.