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Sample records for molecular recognition scaffolds

  1. Ion and Molecular Recognition Using Aryl–Ethynyl Scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    Vonnegut, Chris L.; Tresca, Blakely W.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl–ethynyl linkage has been extensively employed in the construction of hosts for a variety of guests. Uses range from ion detection (e.g., of metal cations in the environment or industrial waste and of anions prevalent in nature), to molecular mimics for biological systems, and to applications targeting future safety issues (such as CO2 capture and indicators for the manufacture of chemical weapons). This Focus Review examines the utilization of the aryl–ethynyl linkage in engineering host molecules for a variety of different guests, and how the alkyne unit plays an integral part as both a rigid scaffolding section in host geometry design as well as a linker to allow conjugative communication between discrete π-electron systems. PMID:25586943

  2. Adhiron: a stable and versatile peptide display scaffold for molecular recognition applications.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Christian; Tang, Anna A S; Deacon, Sarah E; Mandal, Upasana; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owen, Robin L; George, Suja E; Harrison, David J; Owens, Raymond J; Tomlinson, Darren C; McPherson, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    We have designed a novel non-antibody scaffold protein, termed Adhiron, based on a phytocystatin consensus sequence. The Adhiron scaffold shows high thermal stability (Tm ca. 101°C), and is expressed well in Escherichia coli. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Adhiron scaffold to 1.75 Å resolution revealing a compact cystatin-like fold. We have constructed a phage-display library in this scaffold by insertion of two variable peptide regions. The library is of high quality and complexity comprising 1.3 × 10(10) clones. To demonstrate library efficacy, we screened against the yeast Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO). In selected clones, variable region 1 often contained sequences homologous to the known SUMO interactive motif (V/I-X-V/I-V/I). Four Adhirons were further characterised and displayed low nanomolar affinities and high specificity for yeast SUMO with essentially no cross-reactivity to human SUMO protein isoforms. We have identified binders against >100 target molecules to date including as examples, a fibroblast growth factor (FGF1), platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1; CD31), the SH2 domain Grb2 and a 12-aa peptide. Adhirons are highly stable and well expressed allowing highly specific binding reagents to be selected for use in molecular recognition applications. PMID:24668773

  3. Adhiron: a stable and versatile peptide display scaffold for molecular recognition applications

    PubMed Central

    Tiede, Christian; Tang, Anna A. S.; Deacon, Sarah E.; Mandal, Upasana; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owen, Robin L.; George, Suja E.; Harrison, David J.; Owens, Raymond J.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; McPherson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed a novel non-antibody scaffold protein, termed Adhiron, based on a phytocystatin consensus sequence. The Adhiron scaffold shows high thermal stability (Tm ca. 101°C), and is expressed well in Escherichia coli. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Adhiron scaffold to 1.75 Å resolution revealing a compact cystatin-like fold. We have constructed a phage-display library in this scaffold by insertion of two variable peptide regions. The library is of high quality and complexity comprising 1.3 × 1010 clones. To demonstrate library efficacy, we screened against the yeast Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO). In selected clones, variable region 1 often contained sequences homologous to the known SUMO interactive motif (V/I-X-V/I-V/I). Four Adhirons were further characterised and displayed low nanomolar affinities and high specificity for yeast SUMO with essentially no cross-reactivity to human SUMO protein isoforms. We have identified binders against >100 target molecules to date including as examples, a fibroblast growth factor (FGF1), platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1; CD31), the SH2 domain Grb2 and a 12-aa peptide. Adhirons are highly stable and well expressed allowing highly specific binding reagents to be selected for use in molecular recognition applications. PMID:24668773

  4. Construction of proteins with molecular recognition capabilities using α3β3 de novo protein scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hiromichi; Mihara, Hisakazu; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi

    2013-10-01

    The molecular recognition ability of proteins is essential in biological systems, and therefore a considerable amount of effort has been devoted to constructing desired target-binding proteins using a variety of naturally occurring proteins as scaffolds. However, since generating a binding site in a native protein can often affect its structural properties, highly stable de novo protein scaffolds may be more amenable than the native proteins. We previously reported the generation of de novo proteins comprising three α-helices and three β-strands (α3β3) from a genetic library coding simplified amino acid sets. Two α3β3 de novo proteins, vTAJ13 and vTAJ36, fold into a native-like stable and molten globule-like structures, respectively, even though the proteins have similar amino acid compositions. Here, we attempted to create binding sites for the vTAJ13 and vTAJ36 proteins to prove the utility of de novo designed artificial proteins as a molecular recognition tool. Randomization of six amino acids at two linker sites of vTAJ13 and vTAJ36 followed by biopanning generated binding proteins that recognize the target molecules, fluorescein and green fluorescent protein, with affinities of 10(-7)-10(-8) M. Of note, the selected proteins from the vTAJ13-based library tended to recognize the target molecules with high specificity, probably due to the native-like stable structure of vTAJ13. Our studies provide an example of the potential of de novo protein scaffolds, which are composed of a simplified amino acid set, to recognize a variety of target compounds.

  5. Tracking Molecular Recognition at the Atomic Level with a New Protein Scaffold Based on the OB-Fold

    PubMed Central

    Steemson, John D.; Baake, Matthias; Rakonjac, Jasna; Arcus, Vickery L.; Liddament, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    The OB-fold is a small, versatile single-domain protein binding module that occurs in all forms of life, where it binds protein, carbohydrate, nucleic acid and small-molecule ligands. We have exploited this natural plasticity to engineer a new class of non-immunoglobulin alternatives to antibodies with unique structural and biophysical characteristics. We present here the engineering of the OB-fold anticodon recognition domain from aspartyl tRNA synthetase taken from the thermophile Pyrobaculum aerophilum. For this single-domain scaffold we have coined the term OBody. Starting from a naïve combinatorial library, we engineered an OBody with 3 nM affinity for hen egg-white lysozyme, by optimising the affinity of a naïve OBody 11,700-fold over several affinity maturation steps, using phage display. At each maturation step a crystal structure of the engineered OBody in complex with hen egg-white lysozyme was determined, showing binding elements in atomic detail. These structures have given us an unprecedented insight into the directed evolution of affinity for a single antigen on the molecular scale. The engineered OBodies retain the high thermal stability of the parental OB-fold despite mutation of up to 22% of their residues. They can be expressed in soluble form and also purified from bacteria at high yields. They also lack disulfide bonds. These data demonstrate the potential of OBodies as a new scaffold for the engineering of specific binding reagents and provide a platform for further development of future OBody-based applications. PMID:24465865

  6. The menagerie of human lipocalins: a natural protein scaffold for molecular recognition of physiological compounds.

    PubMed

    Schiefner, André; Skerra, Arne

    2015-04-21

    While immunoglobulins are well-known for their characteristic ability to bind macromolecular antigens (i.e., as antibodies during an immune response), the lipocalins constitute a family of proteins whose role is the complexation of small molecules for various physiological processes. In fact, a number of low-molecular-weight substances in multicellular organisms show poor solubility, are prone to chemical decomposition, or play a pathophysiological role and thus require specific binding proteins for transport through body fluids, storage, or sequestration. In many cases, lipocalins are involved in such tasks. Lipocalins are small, usually monomeric proteins with 150-180 residues and diameters of approximately 40 Å, adopting a compact fold that is dominated by a central eight-stranded up-and-down β-barrel. At the amino-terminal end, this core is flanked by a coiled polypeptide segment, while its carboxy-terminal end is followed by an α-helix that leans against the β-barrel as well as an amino acid stretch in a more-or-less extended conformation, which finally is fixed by a disulfide bond. Within the β-barrel, the antiparallel strands (designated A to H) are arranged in a (+1)7 topology and wind around a central axis in a right-handed manner such that part of strand A is hydrogen-bonded to strand H again. Whereas the lower region of the β-barrel is closed by short loops and densely packed hydrophobic side chains, including many aromatic residues, the upper end is usually open to solvent. There, four long loops, each connecting one pair of β-strands, together form the entrance to a cup-shaped cavity. Depending on the individual structure of a lipocalin, and especially on the lengths and amino acid sequences of its four loops, this pocket can accommodate chemical ligands of various sizes and shapes, including lipids, steroids, and other chemical hormones as well as secondary metabolites such as vitamins, cofactors, or odorants. While lipocalins are ubiquitous in

  7. The menagerie of human lipocalins: a natural protein scaffold for molecular recognition of physiological compounds.

    PubMed

    Schiefner, André; Skerra, Arne

    2015-04-21

    While immunoglobulins are well-known for their characteristic ability to bind macromolecular antigens (i.e., as antibodies during an immune response), the lipocalins constitute a family of proteins whose role is the complexation of small molecules for various physiological processes. In fact, a number of low-molecular-weight substances in multicellular organisms show poor solubility, are prone to chemical decomposition, or play a pathophysiological role and thus require specific binding proteins for transport through body fluids, storage, or sequestration. In many cases, lipocalins are involved in such tasks. Lipocalins are small, usually monomeric proteins with 150-180 residues and diameters of approximately 40 Å, adopting a compact fold that is dominated by a central eight-stranded up-and-down β-barrel. At the amino-terminal end, this core is flanked by a coiled polypeptide segment, while its carboxy-terminal end is followed by an α-helix that leans against the β-barrel as well as an amino acid stretch in a more-or-less extended conformation, which finally is fixed by a disulfide bond. Within the β-barrel, the antiparallel strands (designated A to H) are arranged in a (+1)7 topology and wind around a central axis in a right-handed manner such that part of strand A is hydrogen-bonded to strand H again. Whereas the lower region of the β-barrel is closed by short loops and densely packed hydrophobic side chains, including many aromatic residues, the upper end is usually open to solvent. There, four long loops, each connecting one pair of β-strands, together form the entrance to a cup-shaped cavity. Depending on the individual structure of a lipocalin, and especially on the lengths and amino acid sequences of its four loops, this pocket can accommodate chemical ligands of various sizes and shapes, including lipids, steroids, and other chemical hormones as well as secondary metabolites such as vitamins, cofactors, or odorants. While lipocalins are ubiquitous in

  8. UFSRAT: Ultra-Fast Shape Recognition with Atom Types –The Discovery of Novel Bioactive Small Molecular Scaffolds for FKBP12 and 11βHSD1

    PubMed Central

    Shave, Steven; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Adie, Jillian; Houston, Douglas R.; Auer, Manfred; Webster, Scott P.; Taylor, Paul; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Using molecular similarity to discover bioactive small molecules with novel chemical scaffolds can be computationally demanding. We describe Ultra-fast Shape Recognition with Atom Types (UFSRAT), an efficient algorithm that considers both the 3D distribution (shape) and electrostatics of atoms to score and retrieve molecules capable of making similar interactions to those of the supplied query. Results Computational optimization and pre-calculation of molecular descriptors enables a query molecule to be run against a database containing 3.8 million molecules and results returned in under 10 seconds on modest hardware. UFSRAT has been used in pipelines to identify bioactive molecules for two clinically relevant drug targets; FK506-Binding Protein 12 and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. In the case of FK506-Binding Protein 12, UFSRAT was used as the first step in a structure-based virtual screening pipeline, yielding many actives, of which the most active shows a KD, app of 281 µM and contains a substructure present in the query compound. Success was also achieved running solely the UFSRAT technique to identify new actives for 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, for which the most active displays an IC50 of 67 nM in a cell based assay and contains a substructure radically different to the query. This demonstrates the valuable ability of the UFSRAT algorithm to perform scaffold hops. Availability and Implementation A web-based implementation of the algorithm is freely available at http://opus.bch.ed.ac.uk/ufsrat/. PMID:25659145

  9. Scaffolding Learning from Molecular Visualizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Linn, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    Powerful online visualizations can make unobservable scientific phenomena visible and improve student understanding. Instead, they often confuse or mislead students. To clarify the impact of molecular visualizations for middle school students we explored three design variations implemented in a Web-based Inquiry Science Environment (WISE) unit on…

  10. Versatility in phospho-dependent molecular recognition of the XRCC1 and XRCC4 DNA-damage scaffolds by aprataxin-family FHA domains

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Amy L.; Nott, Timothy J.; Kelly, Geoffrey; Rulten, Stuart L.; Caldecott, Keith W.; Smerdon, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Aprataxin, aprataxin and PNKP-like factor (APLF) and polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNKP) are key DNA-repair proteins with diverse functions but which all contain a homologous forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. Their primary binding targets are casein kinase 2-phosphorylated forms of the XRCC1 and XRCC4 scaffold molecules which respectively coordinate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA break repair pathways. Here, we present the high-resolution X-ray structure of a complex of phosphorylated XRCC4 with APLF, the most divergent of the three FHA domain family members. This, combined with NMR and biochemical analysis of aprataxin and APLF binding to singly and multiply-phosphorylated forms of XRCC1 and XRCC4, and comparison with PNKP reveals a pattern of distinct but overlapping binding specificities that are differentially modulated by multi-site phosphorylation. Together, our data illuminate important differences between activities of the three phospho-binding domains, in spite of a close evolutionary relationship between them. PMID:26519825

  11. Versatility in phospho-dependent molecular recognition of the XRCC1 and XRCC4 DNA-damage scaffolds by aprataxin-family FHA domains.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Amy L; Nott, Timothy J; Kelly, Geoffrey; Rulten, Stuart L; Caldecott, Keith W; Smerdon, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    Aprataxin, aprataxin and PNKP-like factor (APLF) and polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNKP) are key DNA-repair proteins with diverse functions but which all contain a homologous forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. Their primary binding targets are casein kinase 2-phosphorylated forms of the XRCC1 and XRCC4 scaffold molecules which respectively coordinate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA break repair pathways. Here, we present the high-resolution X-ray structure of a complex of phosphorylated XRCC4 with APLF, the most divergent of the three FHA domain family members. This, combined with NMR and biochemical analysis of aprataxin and APLF binding to singly and multiply-phosphorylated forms of XRCC1 and XRCC4, and comparison with PNKP reveals a pattern of distinct but overlapping binding specificities that are differentially modulated by multi-site phosphorylation. Together, our data illuminate important differences between activities of the three phospho-binding domains, in spite of a close evolutionary relationship between them. PMID:26519825

  12. Molecular Recognition and Ligand Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Riccardo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-04-01

    We review recent developments in our understanding of molecular recognition and ligand association, focusing on two major viewpoints: (a) studies that highlight new physical insight into the molecular recognition process and the driving forces determining thermodynamic signatures of binding and (b) recent methodological advances in applications to protein-ligand binding. In particular, we highlight the challenges posed by compensating enthalpic and entropic terms, competing solute and solvent contributions, and the relevance of complex configurational ensembles comprising multiple protein, ligand, and solvent intermediate states. As more complete physics is taken into account, computational approaches increase their ability to complement experimental measurements, by providing a microscopic, dynamic view of ensemble-averaged experimental observables. Physics-based approaches are increasingly expanding their power in pharmacology applications.

  13. Polyvalent carbocyanine molecular beacons for molecular recognitions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yunpeng; Bloch, Sharon; Achilefu, Samuel

    2004-06-30

    Polyvalent carboxylate-terminating near-infrared (NIR) carbocyanine molecular beacons were prepared by homologation of reactive carboxyl groups of the beacon with imino diacetic acid. Their conjugation with unprotected d-(+)-glucosamine gave dendritic arrays of the carbohydrate on an inner NIR chromophore core. In vivo evaluation of the dendritic glucosamine constructs shows enhanced uptake in proliferating tumor cells relative to surrounding normal tissue. The structural framework of these polyvalent beacons permits the amplification by synergistic effects of a variety of bioactive motifs or chemical sensors in molecular recognition interactions without dramatic change of their desirable NIR spectral properties.

  14. Muscle Giants: Molecular Scaffolds in Sarcomerogenesis

    PubMed Central

    KONTROGIANNI-KONSTANTOPOULOS, AIKATERINI; ACKERMANN, MAEGEN A.; BOWMAN, AMBER L.; YAP, SOLOMON V.; BLOCH, ROBERT J.

    2011-01-01

    Myofibrillogenesis in striated muscles is a highly complex process that depends on the coordinated assembly and integration of a large number of contractile, cytoskeletal, and signaling proteins into regular arrays, the sarcomeres. It is also associated with the stereotypical assembly of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the transverse tubules around each sarcomere. Three giant, muscle-specific proteins, titin (3–4 MDa), nebulin (600–800 kDa), and obscurin (~720–900 kDa), have been proposed to play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of sarcomeres. There is a large amount of data showing that each of these molecules interacts with several to many different protein ligands, regulating their activity and localizing them to particular sites within or surrounding sarcomeres. Consistent with this, mutations in each of these proteins have been linked to skeletal and cardiac myopathies or to muscular dystrophies. The evidence that any of them plays a role as a “molecular template,” “molecular blueprint,” or “molecular ruler” is less definitive, however. Here we review the structure and function of titin, nebulin, and obscurin, with the literature supporting a role for them as scaffolding molecules and the contradictory evidence regarding their roles as molecular guides in sarcomerogenesis. PMID:19789381

  15. Molecular mobility of scaffolds' biopolymers influences cell growth.

    PubMed

    Podlipec, Rok; Gorgieva, Selestina; Jurašin, Darija; Urbančič, Iztok; Kokol, Vanja; Strancar, Janez

    2014-09-24

    Understanding biocompatibility of materials and scaffolds is one of the main challenges in the field of tissue engineering and regeneration. The complex nature of cell-biomaterial interaction requires extensive preclinical functionality testing by studying specific cell responses to different biomaterial properties, from morphology and mechanics to surface characteristics at the molecular level. Despite constant improvements, a more general picture of biocompatibility is still lacking and tailormade scaffolds are not yet available. The scope of our study was thus the investigation of the correlation of fibroblast cell growth on different gelatin scaffolds with their morphological, mechanical as well as surface molecular properties. The latter were thoroughly investigated via polymer molecular mobility studied by site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) for the first time. Anisotropy of the rotational motion of the gelatin side chain mobility was identified as the most correlated quantity with cell growth in the first days after adhesion, while weaker correlations were found with scaffold viscoelasticity and no correlations with scaffold morphology. Namely, the scaffolds with highly mobile or unrestricted polymers identified with the cell growth being five times less efficient (N(cells) = 60 ± 25 mm(-2)) as compared to cell growth on the scaffolds with considerable part of polymers with the restricted rotational motion (N(cells) = 290 ± 25 mm(-2)). This suggests that molecular mobility of scaffold components could play an important role in cell response to medical devices, reflecting a new aspect of the biocompatibility concept.

  16. Molecular Recognition of Natural Products by Resorc[4]arene Receptors.

    PubMed

    D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Ghirga, Francesca; Quaglio, Deborah; Cerreto, Antonella; Ingallina, Cinzia; Tafi, Andrea; Botta, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    This review is aimed at providing an overview of the up-to-now published literature on resorc[4]arene macrocycles exploited as artificial receptors for the molecular recognition of some classes of natural products. A concise illustration of the main synthetic strategies developed to afford the resorc[4]arene scaffold is followed by a report on the principles of the gas-phase investigation of recognition phenomena by mass spectrometry (MS). Emphasis is placed on gas-phase studies of diastereoisomeric complexes generated inside a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer by resorc[4]arene receptors towards a series of natural products, namely amino acids, amphetamine, ethanolamine neurotransmitters, dipeptides, vinca alkaloids and nucleosides. The literature outcomes discussed here, taken largely from our own revisited work, have been completed by references to other studies, in order to draw a broader picture of this rapidly evolving field of research. PMID:26654589

  17. Plastic Antibodies: Molecular Recognition with Imprinted Polymers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Furmanski, Brian; Shimizu, Ken D.

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are prepared and tested in a study for their molecular recognition properties of an adenine derivative, ethyl adenine-9-acetate (EA9A), within two laboratory periods. The procedure introduces undergraduate chemistry students to noncovalent molecular imprinting as well as the analytical techniques for assessing their recognition…

  18. Chalcone Scaffold in Anticancer Armamentarium: A Molecular Insight

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Kuntal

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is an inevitable matter of concern in the medicinal chemistry era. Chalcone is the well exploited scaffold in the anticancer domain. The molecular mechanism of chalcone at cellular level was explored in past decades. This mini review provides the most recent updates on anticancer potential of chalcones. PMID:26880913

  19. Molecular recognition driven catalysis using polymeric nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Cotanda, Pepa; O'Reilly, Rachel K

    2012-10-25

    The concept of using polymeric micelles to catalyze organic reactions in water is presented and compared to surfactant based micelles in the context of molecular recognition. We report for the first time enzyme-like specific catalysis by tethering the catalyst in the well-defined hydrophobic core of a polymeric micelle.

  20. Photoswitchable gel assembly based on molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2012-01-03

    The formation of effective and precise linkages in bottom-up or top-down processes is important for the development of self-assembled materials. Self-assembly through molecular recognition events is a powerful tool for producing functionalized materials. Photoresponsive molecular recognition systems can permit the creation of photoregulated self-assembled macroscopic objects. Here we demonstrate that macroscopic gel assembly can be highly regulated through photoisomerization of an azobenzene moiety that interacts differently with two host molecules. A photoregulated gel assembly system is developed using polyacrylamide-based hydrogels functionalized with azobenzene (guest) or cyclodextrin (host) moieties. Reversible adhesion and dissociation of the host gel from the guest gel may be controlled by photoirradiation. The differential affinities of α-cyclodextrin or β-cyclodextrin for the trans-azobenzene and cis-azobenzene are employed in the construction of a photoswitchable gel assembly system.

  1. Photoswitchable gel assembly based on molecular recognition

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The formation of effective and precise linkages in bottom-up or top-down processes is important for the development of self-assembled materials. Self-assembly through molecular recognition events is a powerful tool for producing functionalized materials. Photoresponsive molecular recognition systems can permit the creation of photoregulated self-assembled macroscopic objects. Here we demonstrate that macroscopic gel assembly can be highly regulated through photoisomerization of an azobenzene moiety that interacts differently with two host molecules. A photoregulated gel assembly system is developed using polyacrylamide-based hydrogels functionalized with azobenzene (guest) or cyclodextrin (host) moieties. Reversible adhesion and dissociation of the host gel from the guest gel may be controlled by photoirradiation. The differential affinities of α-cyclodextrin or β-cyclodextrin for the trans-azobenzene and cis-azobenzene are employed in the construction of a photoswitchable gel assembly system. PMID:22215078

  2. Supramolecular Polymerization Engineered with Molecular Recognition.

    PubMed

    Haino, Takeharu

    2015-10-01

    Supramolecular polymeric assemblies represent an emerging, promising class of molecular assemblies with enormous versatility compared with their covalent polymeric counterparts. Although a large number of host-guest motifs have been produced over the history of supramolecular chemistry, only a limited number of recognition motifs have been utilized as supramolecular connections in polymeric assemblies. This account describes the molecular recognition of host molecules based on calix[5]arene and bisporphyrin that demonstrate unique guest encapsulations; subsequently, these host-guest motifs are applied to the synthesis of supramolecular polymers that display polymer-like properties in solution and solid states. In addition, new bisresorcinarenes are developed to form supramolecular polymers that are connected via a rim-to-rim hydrogen-bonded dimeric structure, which is composed of two resorcinarene moieties. PMID:26178364

  3. Photoswitchable gel assembly based on molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The formation of effective and precise linkages in bottom-up or top-down processes is important for the development of self-assembled materials. Self-assembly through molecular recognition events is a powerful tool for producing functionalized materials. Photoresponsive molecular recognition systems can permit the creation of photoregulated self-assembled macroscopic objects. Here we demonstrate that macroscopic gel assembly can be highly regulated through photoisomerization of an azobenzene moiety that interacts differently with two host molecules. A photoregulated gel assembly system is developed using polyacrylamide-based hydrogels functionalized with azobenzene (guest) or cyclodextrin (host) moieties. Reversible adhesion and dissociation of the host gel from the guest gel may be controlled by photoirradiation. The differential affinities of α-cyclodextrin or β-cyclodextrin for the trans-azobenzene and cis-azobenzene are employed in the construction of a photoswitchable gel assembly system. PMID:22215078

  4. An artificial PPR scaffold for programmable RNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Coquille, Sandrine; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Chia, Tiongsun; Rajappa, Lional; Lingford, James P; Razif, Muhammad F M; Thore, Stéphane; Rackham, Oliver

    2014-12-17

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins control diverse aspects of RNA metabolism in eukaryotic cells. Although recent computational and structural studies have provided insights into RNA recognition by PPR proteins, their highly insoluble nature and inconsistencies between predicted and observed modes of RNA binding have restricted our understanding of their biological functions and their use as tools. Here we use a consensus design strategy to create artificial PPR domains that are structurally robust and can be programmed for sequence-specific RNA binding. The atomic structures of these artificial PPR domains elucidate the structural basis for their stability and modelling of RNA-protein interactions provides mechanistic insights into the importance of RNA-binding residues and suggests modes of PPR-RNA association. The modular mode of RNA binding by PPR proteins holds great promise for the engineering of new tools to target RNA and to understand the mechanisms of gene regulation by natural PPR proteins.

  5. Molecular Recognition and Free Energy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, William Robert

    This dissertation describes the study of molecular recognition processes by free energy computer simulations. The introductory chapter briefly outlines the scientific development and significance of molecular recognition, and then describes statistical thermodynamic approaches to computer simulations. Chapter 1 analyzes the relationship of small guest molecules to a synthetic host in which one guest molecule is preorganized to be structurally complementary to the host while the second guest molecule must organize itself in order to obtain the same complementarity. The preferential recognition of imidazolidone over N,N^' -dimethylurea to the host is described in terms of the energetic cost of preorganizing the N,N^' -dimethylurea which can exist in several rotationally isomeric states. Chapter 2 describes the development of potential functions for molecular simulations and analyzes the structural, dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of sulfate anion solvation. Finally, chapter 3 describes the binding of sulfate anion to a periplasmic receptor and analyzes three mutants that have anomalous binding affinities for sulfate. Two of the mutants that have a greater than expected affinity for the anion are proposed to recognize and bind a water-anion complex rather than the anion alone, and the third mutant is proposed to have a dramatically decreased affinity for the anion due to steric and polarization effects.

  6. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D; Iverson, Nicole M; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T; Landry, Markita P; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications. PMID:26742890

  7. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D.; Iverson, Nicole M.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T.; Landry, Markita P.; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications. PMID:26742890

  8. Developments in Molecular Recognition and Sensing at Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Hill, Jonathan P.; Endo, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    In biological systems, molecular recognition events occur mostly within interfacial environments such as at membrane surfaces, enzyme reaction sites, or at the interior of the DNA double helix. Investigation of molecular recognition at model interfaces provides great insights into biological phenomena. Molecular recognition at interfaces not only has relevance to biological systems but is also important for modern applications such as high sensitivity sensors. Selective binding of guest molecules in solution to host molecules located at solid surfaces is crucial for electronic or photonic detection of analyte substances. In response to these demands, molecular recognition at interfaces has been investigated extensively during the past two decades using Langmuir monolayers, self-assembled monolayers, and lipid assemblies as recognition media. In this review, advances of molecular recognition at interfaces are briefly summarized.

  9. Method for Systematic Assessment of Chemical Changes in Molecular Scaffolds with Conserved Topology and Application to the Analysis of Scaffold-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Zhang, Bijun; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Sets of scaffolds with conserved molecular topology are abundant among drugs and bioactive compounds. Core structure topology is one of the determinants of biological activity. Heteroatom replacements and/or bond order variation render topologically equivalent scaffolds chemically distinct and also contribute to differences in the biological activity of compounds containing these scaffolds. Relationships between core structure topology, chemical modifications, and observed activity profiles are difficult to analyze. A computational method is introduced to consistently assess chemical transformations that distinguish scaffolds with conserved topology. The methodology is applied to quantify chemical differences in conserved topological environments and systematically relate chemical changes in topologically equivalent scaffolds to associated activity profiles.

  10. Method for Systematic Assessment of Chemical Changes in Molecular Scaffolds with Conserved Topology and Application to the Analysis of Scaffold-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Zhang, Bijun; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Sets of scaffolds with conserved molecular topology are abundant among drugs and bioactive compounds. Core structure topology is one of the determinants of biological activity. Heteroatom replacements and/or bond order variation render topologically equivalent scaffolds chemically distinct and also contribute to differences in the biological activity of compounds containing these scaffolds. Relationships between core structure topology, chemical modifications, and observed activity profiles are difficult to analyze. A computational method is introduced to consistently assess chemical transformations that distinguish scaffolds with conserved topology. The methodology is applied to quantify chemical differences in conserved topological environments and systematically relate chemical changes in topologically equivalent scaffolds to associated activity profiles. PMID:27490499

  11. Molecular Recognition: Detection of Colorless Compounds Based on Color Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalafi, Lida; Kashani, Samira; Karimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which students measure the amount of cetirizine in allergy-treatment tablets based on molecular recognition. The basis of recognition is competition of cetirizine with phenolphthalein to form an inclusion complex with ß-cyclodextrin. Phenolphthalein is pinkish under basic condition, whereas it's complex form…

  12. Relating pore size variation of poly (ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds to molecular weight of porogen and evaluation of scaffold properties after degradation.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Soumya; Krishnan, Lissy K; Kalliyana Krishnan, V

    2014-05-01

    The major challenge in designing a scaffold for fabricating tissue engineered blood vessels is optimization of its microstructure for supporting uniform cellular in-growth with good mechanical integrity and degradation kinetics suitable for long-term implantation. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of varying the pore size of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold by altering the molecular weight of porogen and studied the effect of degradation on morphological characteristics and mechanical properties of scaffolds by correlating to the extent of degradation. Scaffolds with two different pore sizes were prepared by solvent casting and particulate leaching where poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) porogens having two molecular weights (3400 and 8000) were used and subjected to in vitro degradation in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) upto six months. Microcomputed tomography studies of scaffolds revealed narrower pore size distribution when PEG-3400 was used as porogen and had 78% pores in the 12-24 µ range, whereas incorporation of PEG-8000 resulted in broader distribution with only 65% pores in the same range. Degradation resulted in scaffolds with narrower pore size distribution to have better retention of morphological and mechanical characteristics compared to scaffolds with broader distribution. Gravimetric and molecular weight studies also showed that scaffold degradation in both cases was only in initial stages after 6 months and PCL scaffolds had potential to be recommended for vascular tissue engineering applications.

  13. Gamma Peptide Nucleic Acids: As Orthogonal Nucleic Acid Recognition Codes for Organizing Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Sacui, Iulia; Hsieh, Wei-Che; Manna, Arunava; Sahu, Bichismita; Ly, Danith H

    2015-07-01

    Nucleic acids are an attractive platform for organizing molecular self-assembly because of their specific nucleobase interactions and defined length scale. Routinely employed in the organization and assembly of materials in vitro, however, they have rarely been exploited in vivo, due to the concerns for enzymatic degradation and cross-hybridization with the host's genetic materials. Herein we report the development of a tight-binding, orthogonal, synthetically versatile, and informationally interfaced nucleic acid platform for programming molecular interactions, with implications for in vivo molecular assembly and computing. The system consists of three molecular entities: the right-handed and left-handed conformers and a nonhelical domain. The first two are orthogonal to each other in recognition, while the third is capable of binding to both, providing a means for interfacing the two conformers as well as the natural nucleic acid biopolymers (i.e., DNA and RNA). The three molecular entities are prepared from the same monomeric chemical scaffold, with the exception of the stereochemistry or lack thereof at the γ-backbone that determines if the corresponding oligo adopts a right-handed or left-handed helix, or a nonhelical motif. These conformers hybridize to each other with exquisite affinity, sequence selectivity, and level of orthogonality. Recognition modules as short as five nucleotides in length are capable of organizing molecular assembly.

  14. Visual-size molecular recognition based on gels.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tao; Fang, Weiwei; Sun, Zheming

    2013-10-01

    Since their discovery, stimuli-responsive organogels have garnered considerable and increasing attention from a broad range of research fields. In consideration of an one-dimensional ordered relay in anisotropic phase, the assembled gel networks can amplify various properties of the functional moieties possessed by the gelator molecules. Recently, substantial efforts have been focused on the development of facile, straightforward, and low-cost molecular recognition approaches by using nanostructured gel matrices as visual sensing platforms. In this research news, the recent progresses in macroscopic or visual-size molecular recognition for a number of homologues, isomers, and anions, as well as extremely challenging chiral enantiomers, using polymer and molecular gels are reviewed. Several strategies--including guest molecular competition, hydrogen-bonding blocking, and metal-coordination--for visual discrimination are included. Finally, the future trends and potential application in facile visual-size molecular recognition based on organogel matrices are highlighted. PMID:24089348

  15. Nucleic Acid Conjugated Nanomaterials for Enhanced Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Ronghua; Yang, Liu; Tan, Weihong

    2009-01-01

    Nucleic acids, whether designed or selected in vitro, play important roles in biosensing, medical diagnostics and therapy. Specifically, the conjugation of functional nucleic acid-based probe molecules and nanomaterials has resulted in an unprecedented improvement in the field of molecular recognition. With their unique physical and chemical properties, nanomaterials facilitate the sensing process and amplify the signal of recognition events. Thus, the coupling of nucleic acids with various nanomaterials opens up a promising future for molecular recognition. The literature offers a broad spectrum of recent advances in biosensing by employing different nano-platforms with designed nucleic acids, especially gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, silica nanoparticles and quantum dots. The advantages of these novel combinations are discussed from the perspective of molecular recognition in chemistry, biology and medicine, along with the problems confronting future applications. PMID:19658387

  16. Molecular recognition by gold, silver and copper nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tauran, Yannick; Brioude, Arnaud; Coleman, Anthony W; Rhimi, Moez; Kim, Beonjoom

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic physical properties of the noble metal nanoparticles, which are highly sensitive to the nature of their local molecular environment, make such systems ideal for the detection of molecular recognition events. The current review describes the state of the art concerning molecular recognition of Noble metal nanoparticles. In the first part the preparation of such nanoparticles is discussed along with methods of capping and stabilization. A brief discussion of the three common methods of functionalization: Electrostatic adsorption; Chemisorption; Affinity-based coordination is given. In the second section a discussion of the optical and electrical properties of nanoparticles is given to aid the reader in understanding the use of such properties in molecular recognition. In the main section the various types of capping agents for molecular recognition; nucleic acid coatings, protein coatings and molecules from the family of supramolecular chemistry are described along with their numerous applications. Emphasis for the nucleic acids is on complementary oligonucleotide and aptamer recognition. For the proteins the recognition properties of antibodies form the core of the section. With respect to the supramolecular systems the cyclodextrins, calix[n]arenes, dendrimers, crown ethers and the cucurbitales are treated in depth. Finally a short section deals with the possible toxicity of the nanoparticles, a concern in public health. PMID:23977421

  17. Polymer side-chains as arms for molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Clinton Ray

    This thesis describes research based on synthetic protocols, methodologies, and applications of polymers containing side-chain molecular recognition elements. The motivation for the thesis lies in the belief among many in the field that a strict covalent paradigm for polymer chemistry is reaching its limit. The use of molecular recognition, in lieu of covalent chemistry, potentially presents a path through the current limits of polymer science. The work described in the following chapters of this thesis is, at least in part, a testament to this proposal. The first two chapters present a basic introduction and survey of the fundamental noncovalent interactions that are ubiquitous in the research of supramolecular polymers and molecular recognition. A hierarchy of noncovalent interactions, molecular recognition, and self-assembly is outlined and discussed. Chapter 2 lays the foundation for the remaining chapters of this thesis by presenting several examples of prior work related specifically to the use of molecular recognition on the side-chains of polymers. The next two chapters present research focused on advancing the functionalization of polymers through molecular recognition. The goal of this research is primarily to develop a general polymer backbone that both site-specifically and strongly associates noncovalently with small molecular substrates. These chapters demonstrate that both architecturally controlled block copolymers and random terpolymers can accept a full load of different substrates without interference among distinct molecular recognition elements along the polymer backbone. Chapters 5 and 6 present a unique application of polymers containing molecular recognition elements, templated synthesis. Chapter 5 first discusses lessons learned from small molecule based templated synthesis in which a template and a substrate are held together by metal coordination and a subsequent bond forming reaction occurs. Ultimately, the results of this chapter

  18. Molecular scaffold analysis of natural products databases in the public domain.

    PubMed

    Yongye, Austin B; Waddell, Jacob; Medina-Franco, José L

    2012-11-01

    Natural products represent important sources of bioactive compounds in drug discovery efforts. In this work, we compiled five natural products databases available in the public domain and performed a comprehensive chemoinformatic analysis focused on the content and diversity of the scaffolds with an overview of the diversity based on molecular fingerprints. The natural products databases were compared with each other and with a set of molecules obtained from in-house combinatorial libraries, and with a general screening commercial library. It was found that publicly available natural products databases have different scaffold diversity. In contrast to the common concept that larger libraries have the largest scaffold diversity, the largest natural products collection analyzed in this work was not the most diverse. The general screening library showed, overall, the highest scaffold diversity. However, considering the most frequent scaffolds, the general reference library was the least diverse. In general, natural products databases in the public domain showed low molecule overlap. In addition to benzene and acyclic compounds, flavones, coumarins, and flavanones were identified as the most frequent molecular scaffolds across the different natural products collections. The results of this work have direct implications in the computational and experimental screening of natural product databases for drug discovery.

  19. Universal Molecular Scaffold for Facile Construction of Multivalent and Multimodal Imaging Probes.

    PubMed

    Gai, Yongkang; Xiang, Guangya; Ma, Xiang; Hui, Wenqi; Ouyang, Qin; Sun, Lingyi; Ding, Jiule; Sheng, Jing; Zeng, Dexing

    2016-03-16

    Multivalent and multimodal imaging probes are rapidly emerging as powerful chemical tools for visualizing various biochemical processes. Herein, we described a bifunctional chelator (BFC)-based scaffold that can be used to construct such promising probes concisely. Compared to other reported similar scaffolds, this new BFC scaffold demonstrated two major advantages: (1) significantly simplified synthesis due to the use of this new BFC that can serve as chelator and linker simultaneously; (2) highly efficient synthesis rendered by using either click chemistry and/or total solid-phase synthesis. In addition, the versatile utility of this molecular scaffold has been demonstrated by constructing several multivalent/multimodal imaging probes labeled with various radioisotopes, and the resulting radiotracers demonstrated substantially improved in vivo performance compared to the two individual monomeric counterparts.

  20. Supramolecular polymers constructed by crown ether-based molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bo; Wang, Feng; Dong, Shengyi; Huang, Feihe

    2012-03-01

    Supramolecular polymers, polymeric systems beyond the molecule, have attracted more and more attention from scientists due to their applications in various fields, including stimuli-responsive materials, healable materials, and drug delivery. Due to their good selectivity and convenient enviro-responsiveness, crown ether-based molecular recognition motifs have been actively employed to fabricate supramolecular polymers with interesting properties and novel applications in recent years. In this tutorial review, we classify supramolecular polymers based on their differences in topology and cover recent advances in the marriage between crown ether-based molecular recognition and polymer science.

  1. Creating molecular macrocycles for anion recognition

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary The creation and functionality of new classes of macrocycles that are shape persistent and can bind anions is described. The genesis of triazolophane macrocycles emerges out of activity surrounding 1,2,3-triazoles made using click chemistry; and the same triazoles are responsible for anion capture. Mistakes made and lessons learnt in anion recognition provide deeper understanding that, together with theory, now provides for computer-aided receptor design. The lessons are acted upon in the creation of two new macrocycles. First, cyanostars are larger and like to capture large anions. Second is tricarb, which also favors large anions but shows a propensity to self-assemble in an orderly and stable manner, laying a foundation for future designs of hierarchical nanostructures. PMID:27340452

  2. Molecular Handshake: Recognition through Weak Noncovalent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthy, Parvathi S.

    2006-01-01

    The weak noncovalent interactions between substances, the handshake in the form of electrostatic interactions, van der Waals' interactions or hydrogen bonding is universal to all living and nonliving matter. They significantly influence the molecular and bulk properties and behavior of matter. Their transient nature affects chemical reactions and…

  3. Molecular recognition using nanotube-adsorbed polymer phases: nanotube antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P.; Barone, Paul W.; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W.; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Heller, Daniel A.; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Hilmer, Andrew J.; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C.; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A.; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Sen, Fatih; Sen, Selda; Croy, Robert G.; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Essigmann, John M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is central to the design of therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensors. Motifs for doing so most commonly involve biological structures such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to such biological recognition consists of a folded and constrained heteropolymer that, via intra-molecular forces, forms a unique three dimensional structure that creates a binding pocket or an interface able to recognize a specific molecule. In this work, we demonstrate that synthetic heteropolymers can be alternatively constrained by adsorption around a nanoparticle, and specifically a single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), forming a corona phase and resulting in a new form of molecular recognition of specific molecules. The phenomenon is shown to be generic, with new heteropolymer recognition complexes demonstrated for three distinct examples: Riboflavin, l-thyroxine, and estradiol, each predicted using a 2D thermodynamic model of surface interactions. The dissociation constants are continuously tunable by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatial-temporal sensors based on modulation of SWNT photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages. PMID:24270641

  4. Structures of pattern recognition receptors reveal molecular mechanisms of autoinhibition, ligand recognition and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Jin, Tengchuan; Ravilious, Geoffrey; Xiao, T Sam

    2014-02-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are essential sentinels for pathogens or tissue damage and integral components of the innate immune system. Recent structural studies have provided unprecedented insights into the molecular mechanisms of ligand recognition and signal transduction by several PRR families at distinct subcellular compartments. Here we highlight some of the recent discoveries and summarize the common themes that are emerging from these exciting studies. Better mechanistic understanding of the structure and function of the PRRs will improve future prospects of therapeutic targeting of these important innate immune receptors.

  5. Recent Progress in Molecular Recognition Imaging Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Subhadip; Lindsay, Stuart

    2016-03-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an extremely powerful tool in the field of bionanotechnology because of its ability to image single molecules and make measurements of molecular interaction forces with piconewton sensitivity. It works in aqueous media, enabling studies of molecular phenomenon taking place under physiological conditions. Samples can be imaged in their near-native state without any further modifications such as staining or tagging. The combination of AFM imaging with the force measurement added a new feature to the AFM technique, that is, molecular recognition imaging. Molecular recognition imaging enables mapping of specific interactions between two molecules (one attached to the AFM tip and the other to the imaging substrate) by generating simultaneous topography and recognition images (TREC). Since its discovery, the recognition imaging technique has been successfully applied to different systems such as antibody-protein, aptamer-protein, peptide-protein, chromatin, antigen-antibody, cells, and so forth. Because the technique is based on specific binding between the ligand and receptor, it has the ability to detect a particular protein in a mixture of proteins or monitor a biological phenomenon in the native physiological state. One key step for recognition imaging technique is the functionalization of the AFM tips (generally, silicon, silicon nitrides, gold, etc.). Several different functionalization methods have been reported in the literature depending on the molecules of interest and the material of the tip. Polyethylene glycol is routinely used to provide flexibility needed for proper binding as a part of the linker that carries the affinity molecule. Recently, a heterofunctional triarm linker has been synthesized and successfully attached with two different affinity molecules. This novel linker, when attached to AFM tip, helped to detect two different proteins simultaneously from a mixture of proteins using a so-called "two

  6. Molecular recognition in protein modification with rhodium metallopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical manipulation of natural, unengineered proteins is a daunting challenge which tests the limits of reaction design. By combining transition-metal or other catalysts with molecular recognition ideas, it is possible to achieve site-selective protein reactivity without the need for engineered recognition sequences or reactive sites. Some recent examples in this area have used ruthenium photocatalysis, pyridine organocatalysis, and rhodium(II) metallocarbene catalysis, indicating that the fundamental ideas provide opportunities for using diverse reactivity on complex protein substrates and in complex cell-like environments. PMID:25588960

  7. Modulating mechanical behaviour of 3D-printed cartilage-mimetic PCL scaffolds: influence of molecular weight and pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Olubamiji, Adeola D; Izadifar, Zohreh; Si, Jennifer L; Cooper, David M L; Eames, B Frank; Chen, Daniel X B

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-printed poly(ε)-caprolactone (PCL)-based scaffolds are increasingly being explored for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) applications. However, ensuring that the mechanical properties of these PCL-based constructs are comparable to that of articular cartilage that they are meant to regenerate is an area that has been under-explored. This paper presents the effects of PCL's molecular weight (MW) and scaffold's pore geometric configurations; strand size (SZ), strand spacing (SS), and strand orientation (SO), on mechanical properties of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds. The results illustrate that MW has significant effect on compressive moduli and yield strength of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds. Specifically, PCL with MW of 45 K was a more feasible choice for fabrication of visco-elastic, flexible and load-bearing PCL scaffolds. Furthermore, pore geometric configurations; SZ, SS, and SO, all significantly affect on tensile moduli of scaffolds. However, only SZ and SS have statistically significant effects on compressive moduli and porosity of these scaffolds. That said, inverse linear relationship was observed between porosity and mechanical properties of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds in Pearson's correlation test. Altogether, this study illustrates that modulating MW of PCL and pore geometrical configurations of the scaffolds enabled design and fabrication of PCL scaffolds with mechanical and biomimetic properties that better mimic mechanical behaviour of human articular cartilage. Thus, the modulated PCL scaffold proposed in this study is a framework that offers great potentials for CTE applications. PMID:27328736

  8. Alternative Non-Antibody Protein Scaffolds for Molecular Imaging of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Lawrence A.; Case, Brett A.; Hackel, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    The development of improved methods for early detection and characterization of cancer presents a major clinical challenge. One approach that has shown excellent potential in preclinical and clinical evaluation is molecular imaging with small-scaffold, non-antibody based, engineered proteins. These novel diagnostic agents produce high contrast images due to their fast clearance from the bloodstream and healthy tissues, can be evolved to bind a multitude of cancer biomarkers, and are easily functionalized by site-specific bioconjugation methods. Several small protein scaffolds have been verified for in vivo molecular imaging including affibodies and their two-helix variants, knottins, fibronectins, DARPins, and several natural ligands. Further, the biodistribution of these engineered ligands can be optimized through rational mutation of the conserved regions, careful selection and placement of chelator, and modification of molecular size. PMID:24358455

  9. The Role of Conformational Changes in Molecular Recognition.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mazen; Helms, Volkhard; Kalinina, Olga V; Lengauer, Thomas

    2016-03-10

    Conformational changes of molecules are crucial elements in many biochemical processes, and also in molecular recognition. Here, we present a novel exact mathematical equation for the binding free energy of a receptor-ligand pair. It shows that the energetic contribution due to conformational changes upon molecular recognition is defined by the so-called Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence between the probability distributions of the conformational ensemble of the biomolecule in the bound and free states. We show that conformational changes always contribute positively to the change in free energy and therefore disfavor the association process. Using the example of ligands binding to a flexible cavity of T4 lysozyme, we illustrate that, due to enthalpy-entropy compensation, the conformational entropy is a misleading quantity for assessing the conformational contribution to the binding free energy, in contrast to the KL divergence, which is the correct quantity to use in this context. PMID:26901699

  10. Experimental Tools to Study Molecular Recognition within the Nanoparticle Corona

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Markita P.; Kruss, Sebastian; Nelson, Justin T.; Bisker, Gili; Iverson, Nicole M.; Reuel, Nigel F.; Strano, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in optical nanosensor development have enabled the design of sensors using syntheticmolecular recognition elements through a recently developed method called Corona Phase MolecularRecognition (CoPhMoRe). The synthetic sensors resulting from these design principles are highly selective for specific analytes, and demonstrate remarkable stability for use under a variety of conditions. An essential element of nanosensor development hinges on the ability to understand the interface between nanoparticles and the associated corona phase surrounding the nanosensor, an environment outside of the range of traditional characterization tools, such as NMR. This review discusses the need for new strategies and instrumentation to study the nanoparticle corona, operating in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Approaches to instrumentation must have the capacity to concurrently monitor nanosensor operation and the molecular changes in the corona phase. A detailed overview of new tools for the understanding of CoPhMoRe mechanisms is provided for future applications. PMID:25184487

  11. Method of assembly of molecular-sized nets and scaffolding

    DOEpatents

    Michl, Josef; Magnera, Thomas F.; David, Donald E.; Harrison, Robin M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and starting materials for forming molecular-sized grids or nets, or other structures based on such grids and nets, by creating molecular links between elementary molecular modules constrained to move in only two directions on an interface or surface by adhesion or bonding to that interface or surface. In the methods of this invention, monomers are employed as the building blocks of grids and more complex structures. Monomers are introduced onto and allowed to adhere or bond to an interface. The connector groups of adjacent adhered monomers are then polymerized with each other to form a regular grid in two dimensions above the interface. Modules that are not bound or adhered to the interface are removed prior to reaction of the connector groups to avoid undesired three-dimensional cross-linking and the formation of non-grid structures. Grids formed by the methods of this invention are useful in a variety of applications, including among others, for separations technology, as masks for forming regular surface structures (i.e., metal deposition) and as templates for three-dimensional molecular-sized structures.

  12. Method of assembly of molecular-sized nets and scaffolding

    DOEpatents

    Michl, J.; Magnera, T.F.; David, D.E.; Harrison, R.M.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention relates to methods and starting materials for forming molecular-sized grids or nets, or other structures based on such grids and nets, by creating molecular links between elementary molecular modules constrained to move in only two directions on an interface or surface by adhesion or bonding to that interface or surface. In the methods of this invention, monomers are employed as the building blocks of grids and more complex structures. Monomers are introduced onto and allowed to adhere or bond to an interface. The connector groups of adjacent adhered monomers are then polymerized with each other to form a regular grid in two dimensions above the interface. Modules that are not bound or adhered to the interface are removed prior to reaction of the connector groups to avoid undesired three-dimensional cross-linking and the formation of non-grid structures. Grids formed by the methods of this invention are useful in a variety of applications, including among others, for separations technology, as masks for forming regular surface structures (i.e., metal deposition) and as templates for three-dimensional molecular-sized structures. 9 figs.

  13. Molecular recognition of HER-1 in whole-blood samples.

    PubMed

    Moldoveanu, Iuliana; Stanciu Gavan, Camelia; Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana

    2014-11-01

    Multimode sensing was proposed for molecular screening and recognition of HER-1 in whole blood. The tools used for molecular recognition were platforms based on nanostructured materials such as the complex of Mn(III) with meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin, and maltodextrin (dextrose equivalence between 4 and 7), immobilized in diamond paste, graphite paste or C60 fullerene paste. The identification of HER-1 in whole-blood samples, at molecular level, is performed using stochastic mode and is followed by the quantification of it using stochastic and differential pulse voltammetry modes. HER-1 can be identified in the concentration range between 280 fg/ml and 4.86 ng/ml using stochastic mode, this making possible the early detection of cancers such as gastrointestinal, pancreatic and lung cancers. The recovery tests performed using whole-blood samples proved that the platforms can be used for identification and quantification of HER-1 with high sensitivity and reliability in such samples, these making them good molecular screening tools.

  14. Molecular recognition of HER-1 in whole-blood samples.

    PubMed

    Moldoveanu, Iuliana; Stanciu Gavan, Camelia; Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana

    2014-11-01

    Multimode sensing was proposed for molecular screening and recognition of HER-1 in whole blood. The tools used for molecular recognition were platforms based on nanostructured materials such as the complex of Mn(III) with meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin, and maltodextrin (dextrose equivalence between 4 and 7), immobilized in diamond paste, graphite paste or C60 fullerene paste. The identification of HER-1 in whole-blood samples, at molecular level, is performed using stochastic mode and is followed by the quantification of it using stochastic and differential pulse voltammetry modes. HER-1 can be identified in the concentration range between 280 fg/ml and 4.86 ng/ml using stochastic mode, this making possible the early detection of cancers such as gastrointestinal, pancreatic and lung cancers. The recovery tests performed using whole-blood samples proved that the platforms can be used for identification and quantification of HER-1 with high sensitivity and reliability in such samples, these making them good molecular screening tools. PMID:25277089

  15. Novel chiral recognition elements for molecularly imprinted polymer preparation.

    PubMed

    Knutsson, M; Andersson, H S; Nicholls, I A

    1998-01-01

    The use of a novel chiral functional monomer system in molecular imprinting protocols is described. The monomer, dibenzyl (2R,3R)-O-monoacryloyl tartrate, possesses a hydroxyl moiety which can be used to direct template-functional monomer interactions during molecular imprinting polymerization. This system simultaneously positions benzyl ester-protected carboxyl groups in close proximity to the template, which upon deprotection yield recognition sites with stronger ligand-binding capacities. Furthermore, the inherent chirality of the monomer engenders the polymer with an inbuilt preference for a given stereoisomer. Application of the system to the molecular imprinting of the cinchonidine alkaloids (+)-cinchonine and (-)-cinchonidine yielded stereoselective polymers. The effect of imprinting (+)-cinchonine produced a polymer which more than reversed the inherent chiral selectivity of the chiral monomer residues present in the matrix.

  16. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Xianwen; Geng, Zhirong; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Zhilin; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  17. Molecular aptamer beacons for real-time protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianwei J; Fang, Xiaohong; Tan, Weihong

    2002-03-22

    One of the most pressing problems facing those attempting to understand the regulation of gene expression and translation is the necessity to monitor protein production in a variety of metabolic states. Thus far, there is no easy solution that will either identify or quantitate proteins in real time. Here we introduce a novel protein probe, molecular aptamer beacon (MAB), for real time protein recognition and quantitative analysis. The MAB combines the signal transduction mechanism of molecular beacons and the molecular recognition specificity of aptamers. An MAB based on a thrombin-binding aptamer was prepared as a model to demonstrate the feasibility. Significant fluorescent signal change was observed when MAB was bound to thrombin, which is attributed to a significant conformational change in MAB from a loose random coil to a compact unimolecular quadruplex. The MAB recognizes its target protein with high specificity and high sensitivity (112 picomolar thrombin concentration) in homogeneous solutions. Ratiometric imaging has been conducted with MAB labeled with two fluorophores, which makes it feasible for protein quantitation in living specimen. The unique properties of the MAB will enable the development of a class of protein probes for real time protein tracing in living specimen and for efficient biomedical diagnosis in homogeneous solutions.

  18. Quantum origins of molecular recognition and olfaction in drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Eric R.; Madalan, Adrian; Czader, Arkadiusz; Roman, Gregg

    2012-12-01

    The standard model for molecular recognition of an odorant is that receptor sites discriminate by molecular geometry as evidenced that two chiral molecules may smell very differently. However, recent studies of isotopically labeled olfactants indicate that there may be a molecular vibration-sensing component to olfactory reception, specifically in the spectral region around 2300 cm-1. Here, we present a donor-bridge-acceptor model for olfaction which attempts to explain this effect. Our model, based upon accurate quantum chemical calculations of the olfactant (bridge) in its neutral and ionized states, posits that internal modes of the olfactant are excited impulsively during hole transfer from a donor to acceptor site on the receptor, specifically those modes that are resonant with the tunneling gap. By projecting the impulsive force onto the internal modes, we can determine which modes are excited at a given value of the donor-acceptor tunneling gap. Only those modes resonant with the tunneling gap and are impulsively excited will give a significant contribution to the inelastic transfer rate. Using acetophenone as a test case, our model and experiments on D. melanogaster suggest that isotopomers of a given olfactant give rise to different odorant qualities. These results support the notion that inelastic scattering effects may play a role in discriminating between isotopomers but that this is not a general spectroscopic effect.

  19. Investigation of synthetic molecular recognition for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; McMasters, Sun; Sooter, Letha J.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2007-04-01

    A fundamental understanding of the factors which influence binding performance is critical to any technology or methodology relying on molecular recognition of a specific target species. For the Army, there is a growing need for a basic understanding of these interactions with traditional recognition elements (e.g., antibodies) in non-traditional environmental conditions, such as with new and emerging threats. There is a similar need for building a base of knowledge on non-traditional affinity ligands that are biomimetic or biosynthetic in nature. In this paper, specific research at the Army Research Laboratory towards the development, evaluation and use of synthetic affinity ligands for sensing applications is discussed. This includes the results of our investigations of aptamer-based affinity ligands targeting Campylobacter jejuni. Using capillary electrophoretic techniques, the relative binding affinities of the aptamer ligands towards the target pathogen as well as the degree of cross-reactivity with other food borne-pathogens (i.e., Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium) were evaluated. Current progress towards the development of synthetic affinity ligands for sensing applications will also be discussed.

  20. Metabolite Recognition Principles and Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Riboswitch Function

    PubMed Central

    Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are mRNA elements capable of modulating gene expression in response to specific binding by cellular metabolites. Riboswitches exert their function through the interplay of alternative ligand-free and ligand-bound conformations of the metabolite-sensing domain, which in turn modulate the formation of adjacent gene expression controlling elements. X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy have determined three-dimensional structures of virtually all the major riboswitch classes in the ligand-bound state and, for several riboswitches, in the ligand-free state. The resulting spatial topologies have demonstrated the wide diversity of riboswitch folds and revealed structural principles for specific recognition by cognate metabolites. The available three-dimensional information, supplemented by structure-guided biophysical and biochemical experimentation, has led to an improved understanding of how riboswitches fold, what RNA conformations are required for ligand recognition, and how ligand binding can be transduced into gene expression modulation. These studies have greatly facilitated the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying riboswitch action and should in turn guide the anticipated development of tools for manipulating gene regulatory circuits. PMID:22577823

  1. Conformational homogeneity in molecular recognition by proteolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tyndall, J D; Fairlie, D P

    1999-01-01

    Crystal structures for several hundred protease-inhibitor complexes have been analysed and their superimpositions have been used to demonstrate a universal relationship between inhibitor/substrate conformation and molecular recognition by all aspartic, serine, cysteine and metallo proteases. Proteases universally recognize an extended beta strand conformation in all their peptidic (and non-peptidic) inhibitors and substrate analogues without significant exceptions. This conformational homogeneity is illustrated here for a subset of 180 protease-inhibitor structures which are displayed as (a) structural overlays of multiple inhibitors for each of eight aspartic, eight serine, six metallo and five cysteine proteases; (b) single inhibitors each bound to different proteases; and (c) Ramachandran plots of peptide or pseudo-peptide dihedral angle pairs which demonstrate beta strands (Phi -54 degrees to -173 degrees, Psi 24 degrees to 174 degrees ) like those normally found paired in proteins as beta sheets. However, unlike beta sheets, alpha and 3(10) helices, beta and gamma turns, where the folded main chain amide components are intramolecularly hydrogen bonded and thus unavailable for interaction with proteins, an inhibitor/substrate in an isolated beta strand conformation provides maximum exposure of its hydrogen bonding donors/acceptors and side chain components to a putative protease receptor. This analysis highlights the advantages of a strand conformation over other elements of secondary structure for protease recognition and may lead to generic strategies for inhibitor design.

  2. Surface molecularly imprinted magnetic microspheres for the recognition of albumin.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Fatma; Denizli, Adil

    2014-08-01

    A new approach, combining metal coordination with the molecular imprinting technique, was developed to prepare affinity materials. Magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres in monosize form were used for specific recognition toward the target protein. The magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres were prepared by dispersion polymerization in the presence of magnetite nanopowder. Surface imprinted magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres based on metal coordination were prepared and used for the selective recognition of human serum albumin. Iminodiacetic acid was used as the metal coordinating agent and human serum albumin was anchored by Cu(2+) ions on the surface of magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres by metal coordination. The magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres were coated with a polymer formed by condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate and 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane. The human serum albumin imprinted magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and particle size analysis. The maximum adsorption capacity of human serum albumin imprinted magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres was 37.7 mg/g polymer at pH 6.0. The selectivity experiments of human serum albumin imprinted magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres prepared with different concentrations in the presence of lysozyme, bovine serum albumin and cytochrome C were performed in order to determine the relative selectivity coefficients.

  3. Using photo-initiated polymerization reactions to detect molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Kaastrup, K; Sikes, H D

    2016-02-01

    Widely used medical diagnostic devices and assays that sense the presence of a particular molecule in a bodily fluid often rely on either a nanoparticle label or an enzymatic reaction to generate a signal that is easily detectable. In many cases, it is desirable if the magnitude of the signal correlates with the concentration of the molecule of interest. Photo-initiated polymerization reactions are an alternative means of generating amplified signals that can be used to quantify biological molecules in complex fluids. In this case, the formation of a polymer, typically a cross-linked hydrogel, signifies the presence of the molecule of interest. This tutorial review explains how photo-initiated polymerization reactions have been used in a conditional manner to detect and quantify molecular recognition events. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of using photo-initiated reactions in comparison with other approaches and highlight exciting directions and opportunities in this area. PMID:26671512

  4. Dynamics and functional differences between dendroaspin and rhodostomin: insights into protein scaffolds in integrin recognition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chun-Ho; Chen, Yi-Chun; Shiu, Jia-Hau; Chang, Yao-Tsung; Chang, Yung-Sheng; Huang, Chun-Hau; Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2012-12-01

    Dendroaspin (Den) and rhodostomin (Rho) are snake venom proteins containing a PRGDMP motif. Although Den and Rho have different 3D structures, they are highly potent integrin inhibitors. To study their structure, function, and dynamics relationships, we expressed Den and Rho in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant Den and Rho inhibited platelet aggregation with the K(I) values of 149.8 and 83.2 nM. Cell adhesion analysis showed that Den was 3.7 times less active than Rho when inhibiting the integrin αIIbβ3 and 2.5 times less active when inhibiting the integrin αvβ3. In contrast, Den and Rho were similarly active when inhibiting the integrin α5β1 with the IC₅₀ values of 239.8 and 256.8 nM. NMR analysis showed that recombinant Den and Rho have different 3D conformations for their arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid (RGD) motif. However, the comparison with Rho showed that the docking of Den into integrin αvβ3 resulted in a similar number of contacts. Analysis of the dynamic properties of the RGD loop in Den and Rho showed that they also had different dynamic properties. These results demonstrate that protein scaffolds affect the function, structure, and dynamics of their RGD motif. PMID:23033223

  5. Molecular investigation of iron-sulfur cluster assembly scaffolds under stress.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Béatrice; Clémancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Fontecave, Marc; Ollagnier de Choudens, Sandrine

    2014-12-23

    Fe/S biosynthesis is controlled in Escherichia coli by two machineries, the housekeeping ISC machinery and the SUF system that is functional under stress conditions. Despite many in vivo studies showing that SUF is more adapted for Fe/S assembly under stress, no molecular data supporting this concept have been provided so far. This work focuses on molecular studies of key actors in Fe/S assembly, the SufB and IscU scaffolds under oxidative stress and iron limitation. We show that the IscU Fe2S2 cluster is less stable than the SufB Fe2S2 cluster in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen, and an iron chelator.

  6. Molecular Recognition at the Protein-Hydroxyapatite Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Stayton, Partick S.; Drobny, G. P.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Long, Joanna R.; Gilbert, Michelle R.

    2003-09-01

    Proteins found in mineralized tissues act as nature's crystal engineers, where they play a key role in promoting or inhibiting the growth of minerals, such as hydroxyapitite (bones/teeth) and calcium oxalate (kidney stones). Despite their importance in hard-tissue formation and remodeling, and in pathological processes such as stone formation and arterial calcification, there is little known of the protein structure-function relationships that govern hard-tissue engineering. Here we review early studies that have utilized solid-state NMR (ssNMR) techniques to provide in situ secondary-structure determination of statherin and statherin peptides on their biologically relevant hydroxyapatite (HAP) surfaces. In addition to direct structural study, molecular dynamics studies have provided considerable insight into the protein-binding footprint on hydroxyapatite. The molecular insight provided by these studies has also led to the design of biomimetic fusion peptides that utilize nature's crystal-recognition mechanism to display accessible and dynamic bioactive sequences from the HAP surface. These peptides selectively engage adhesion receptors and direct specific outside-in signaling pathway activation in osteoblast-like cells.

  7. Molecular Mechanism for LAMP1 Recognition by Lassa Virus

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Cohen, Nadav; Israeli, Hadar

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is a notorious human pathogen that infects many thousands of people each year in West Africa, causing severe viral hemorrhagic fevers and significant mortality. The surface glycoprotein of Lassa virus mediates receptor recognition through its GP1 subunit. Here we report the crystal structure of GP1 from Lassa virus, which is the first representative GP1 structure for Old World arenaviruses. We identify a unique triad of histidines that forms a binding site for LAMP1, a known lysosomal protein recently discovered to be a critical receptor for internalized Lassa virus at acidic pH. We demonstrate that mutation of this histidine triad, which is highly conserved among Old World arenaviruses, impairs LAMP1 recognition. Our biochemical and structural data further suggest that GP1 from Lassa virus may undergo irreversible conformational changes that could serve as an immunological decoy mechanism. Together with a variable region that we identify on the surface of GP1, those could be two distinct mechanisms that Lassa virus utilizes to avoid antibody-based immune response. IMPORTANCE Structural data at atomic resolution for viral proteins is key for understanding their function at the molecular level and can facilitate novel avenues for combating viral infections. Here we used X-ray protein crystallography to decipher the crystal structure of the receptor-binding domain (GP1) from Lassa virus. This is a pathogenic virus that causes significant illness and mortality in West Africa. This structure reveals the overall architecture of GP1 domains from the group of viruses known as the Old World arenaviruses. Using this structural information, we elucidated the mechanisms for pH switch and binding of Lassa virus to LAMP1, a recently identified host receptor that is critical for successful infection. Lastly, our structural analysis suggests two novel immune evasion mechanisms that Lassa virus may utilize to escape antibody-based immune response. PMID

  8. Comparison of two molecular scaffolds, 5-methylisoxazole-3-carboxamide and 5-methylisoxazole-4-carboxamide.

    PubMed

    Song, Yaoming; Zhang, Yiguan; Lee, An-Rong; Huang, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Ben; Palfey, Bruce; Shaw, Jiajiu

    2014-01-01

    Leflunomide is a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Structurally, it is a derivative of 5-methylisoxazole-4-carboxamide. Upon metabolism, the N-O bond in the isoxazole ring is cleaved to form the active metabolite, teriflunomide, which was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Both leflunomide and teriflunomide inhibit dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) thereby inhibiingt the synthesis of pyrimidine. For both drugs, the two major concerns are potential liver toxicity and teratogenicity. It was suspected that these undesirable effects might be related to the cleavage of the N-O bond. We herein summarize the metabolites-toxicity issues related to leflunomide/teriflunomide and discuss two related molecular platforms, UTL-4 and UTL-5. UTL-4 compounds are based on the same scaffold of leflunomide; their toxicological and pharmacological effects are not significantly different from those of leflunomide/teriflunomide. In UTL-5 series, the leflunomide scaffold is changed into 5-methylisoxazole-3-carboxamide. Unlike leflunomide, the N-O bond of a UTL-5 compound, UTL-5b, is not cleaved upon metabolism; instead, the peptide bond is cleaved to form its major metabolites. UTL-5b and its metabolites do not inhibit DHODH in vitro. In addition, UTL-5b and all other UTL-5 compounds have lower acute toxicity than leflunomide/teriflunomide. Furthermore, from leflunomide to UTL-5b/UTL-5g, the potential liver toxicity becomes liver protective effect. With the reduced toxicity, UTL-5 compounds still maintain significant pharmacological effects including anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic effects. In summary, our observations provide a valuable direction in drug optimization based on the modification of the leflunomide scaffold. PMID:23944378

  9. Recent advances in molecular recognition based on nanoengineered platforms.

    PubMed

    Mu, Bin; Zhang, Jingqing; McNicholas, Thomas P; Reuel, Nigel F; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S

    2014-04-15

    Nanoparticles and nanoengineered platforms have great potential for technologies involving biomoleuclar detection or cell-related biosensing, and have provided effective chemical interfaces for molecular recognition. Typically, chemists work on the modification of synthetic polymers or macromolecules, which they link to the nanoparticles by covalent or noncovalent approaches. The motivation for chemical modification is to enhance the selectivity and sensitivity, and to improve the biocompatibility for the in vivo applications. In this Account, we present recent advances in the development and application of chemical interfaces for molecular recognition for nanoparticles and nanoengineered platforms, in particular single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We discuss emerging approaches for recognizing small molecules, glycosylated proteins, and serum biomarkers. For example, we compare and discuss detection methods for ATP, NO, H2O2, and monosaccharides for recent nanomaterials. Fluorometric detection appears to have great potential for quantifying concentration gradients and determining their location in living cells. For macromolecular detection, new methods for glycoprofiling using such interfaces appear promising, and benefit specifically from the potential elimination of cumbersome labeling and liberation steps during conventional analysis of glycans, augmenting the currently used mass spectrometry (MS), capillary electrophoresis (CE), and liquid chromatography (LC) methods. In particular, we demonstrated the great potential of fluorescent SWNTs for glycan-lectin interactions sensing. In this case, SWNTs are noncovalently functionalized to introduce a chelated nickel group. This group provides a docking site for the His-tagged lectin and acts as the signal modulator. As the nickel proximity to the SWNT surface changes, the fluorescent signal is increased or attenuated. When a free glycan or glycosylated probe interacts with the lectin, the signal increases and

  10. Molecular insight into the role of the N-terminal extension in the maturation, substrate recognition, and catalysis of a bacterial alginate lyase from polysaccharide lyase family 18.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sheng; Wei, Tian-Di; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Li, Chun-Yang; Wang, Peng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Pang, Xiu-Hua; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-10-24

    Bacterial alginate lyases, which are members of several polysaccharide lyase (PL) families, have important biological roles and biotechnological applications. The mechanisms for maturation, substrate recognition, and catalysis of PL18 alginate lyases are still largely unknown. A PL18 alginate lyase, aly-SJ02, from Pseudoalteromonas sp. 0524 displays a β-jelly roll scaffold. Structural and biochemical analyses indicated that the N-terminal extension in the aly-SJ02 precursor may act as an intramolecular chaperone to mediate the correct folding of the catalytic domain. Molecular dynamics simulations and mutational assays suggested that the lid loops over the aly-SJ02 active center serve as a gate for substrate entry. Molecular docking and site-directed mutations revealed that certain conserved residues at the active center, especially those at subsites +1 and +2, are crucial for substrate recognition. Tyr(353) may function as both a catalytic base and acid. Based on our results, a model for the catalysis of aly-SJ02 in alginate depolymerization is proposed. Moreover, although bacterial alginate lyases from families PL5, 7, 15, and 18 adopt distinct scaffolds, they share the same conformation of catalytic residues, reflecting their convergent evolution. Our results provide the foremost insight into the mechanisms of maturation, substrate recognition, and catalysis of a PL18 alginate lyase.

  11. Chiral diaminopyrrolic receptors for selective recognition of mannosides, part 2: a 3D view of the recognition modes by X-ray, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Ardá, Ana; Cañada, F Javier; Nativi, Cristina; Francesconi, Oscar; Gabrielli, Gabriele; Ienco, Andrea; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Roelens, Stefano

    2011-04-18

    The structural features of a representative set of five complexes of octyl α- and β-mannosides with some members of a new generation of chiral tripodal diaminopyrrolic receptors, namely, (R)-5 and (S)- and (R)-7, have been investigated in solution and in the solid state by a combined X-ray, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling approach. In the solid state, the binding arms of the free receptors 7 delimit a cleft in which two solvent molecules are hydrogen bonded to the pyrrolic groups and to the benzenic scaffold. In a polar solvent (CD(3)CN), chemical shift and intermolecular NOE data, assisted by molecular modeling calculations, ascertained the binding modes of the interaction between the receptor and the glycoside for these complexes. Although a single binding mode was found to adequately describe the complex of the acyclic receptor 5 with the α-mannoside, for the complexes of the cyclic receptors 7 two different binding modes were required to simultaneously fit all the experimental data. In all cases, extensive binding through hydrogen bonding and CH-π interactions is responsible for the affinities measured in the same solvent. Furthermore, the binding modes closely account for the recognition preferences observed toward the anomeric glycosides and for the peculiar enantiodiscrimination properties exhibited by the chiral receptors.

  12. A Fluorescent Hypochlorite Probe Built on 1,10-Phenanthroline Scaffold and its Ion Recognition Features.

    PubMed

    Algi, Melek Pamuk

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the synthesis of 7-((Hydroxyimino)methyl)-1,10-phenanthroline-4-carbaldehyde oxime (1) in two steps starting from 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (2) is reported. It is found that compound 1 can be used as a fluorogenic probe for the detection of hypochlorite ion in aqueous solution. NMR and mass spectral analysis indicate that probe 1 undergoes a chemical transformation through its oxime units upon treatment with hypochlorite, which results in a remarkable enhancement of the emission intensity. Also, metal ion recognition properties of probe 1 is investigated. It is noted that compound 1 is responsive to Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) metal ions, which reduced the emission intensity under identical conditions. Graphical Abstract The design, synthesis and properties of a new fluorescent hypochlorite probe is described. It is found that probe 1 immediately undergoes an oxidation reaction with NaClO through its oxime units in 0.1 M Na2CO3-NaHCO3 buffer containing DMF (pH = 9.0, 30:1 v/v) at room temperature, which resulted in a remarkable enhancement of the emission intensity. It is noteworthy that this novel probe 1 is highly selective to hypochlorite ion when compared to some other ROS and anions. On the other hand, probe 1 also induces turn-off fluorogenic responses to metal ions such as Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) ions under identical conditions. PMID:26670687

  13. Nanoparticle-Templated Molecular Recognition Platforms for Detection of Biological Analytes.

    PubMed

    Beyene, Abraham G; Demirer, Gozde S; Landry, Markita P

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition of biological analytes with optical nanosensors provides both spatial and temporal biochemical information. A recently developed sensing platform exploits near-infrared fluorescent single-wall carbon nanotubes combined with electrostatically pinned heteropolymers to yield a synthetic molecular recognition technique that is maximally transparent through biological matter. This molecular recognition technique is known as corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe). In CoPhMoRe, the specificity of a folded polymer toward an analyte does not arise from a pre-existing polymer-analyte chemical affinity. Rather, specificity is conferred through conformational changes undergone by a polymer that is pinned to the surface of a nanoparticle in the presence of an analyte and the subsequent modifications in fluorescence readout of the nanoparticles. The protocols in this article describe a novel single-molecule microscopy tool (near-infrared fluorescence and total internal reflection fluorescence [nIRF TIRF] hybrid microscope) to visualize the CoPhMoRe recognition process, enabling a better understanding of synthetic molecular recognition. We describe this requisite microscope for simultaneous single-molecule visualization of optical molecular recognition and signal transduction. We elaborate on the general procedures for synthesizing and identifying single-walled carbon nanotube-based sensors that employ CoPhMoRe via two biologically relevant examples of single-molecule recognition for the hormone estradiol and the neurotransmitter dopamine. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27622569

  14. Aptamers: versatile molecular recognition probes for cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongguang; Tan, Weihong; Zu, Youli

    2015-01-01

    In the past two decades, aptamers have emerged as a novel class of molecular recognition probes comprising uniquely-folded short RNA or single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that bind to their cognate targets with high specificity and affinity. Aptamers, often referred to as “chemical antibodies”, possess several highly desirable features for clinical use. They can be chemically synthesized and are easily conjugated to a wide range of reporters for different applications, and are able to rapidly penetrate tissues. These advantages significantly enhance their clinical applicability, and render them excellent alternatives to antibody-based probes in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Aptamer probes based on fluorescence, colorimetry, magnetism, electrochemistry, and in conjunction with nanomaterials (e.g., nanoparticles, quantum dots, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and magnetic nanoparticles) have provided novel ultrasensitive cancer diagnostic strategies and assays. Furthermore, promising aptamer targeted-multimodal tumor imaging probes have been recently developed in conjunction with fluorescence, positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The capabilities of the aptamer-based platforms described herein underscore the great potential they hold for the future of cancer detection. In this review, we highlight the most prominent recent developments in this rapidly advancing field. PMID:26618445

  15. Use of ultra-high molecular weight polycaprolactone scaffolds for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Natalie L; Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Jiang, Jie; Wu, Ben M; Petrigliano, Frank A; McAllister, David R

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we reported on the implantation of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) grafts for use in ACL tissue engineering in a small animal model. In the present study, we hypothesized that grafts fabricated from ultra-high molecular weight polycaprolactone (UHMWPCL) would have similarly favorable biologic properties but superior mechanical properties as compared to grafts fabricated from PCL. Two forms of polycaprolactone were obtained (UHMWPCL, MW = 500 kD, and PCL, MW = 80 kD) and electrospun into scaffolds that were used to perform ACL reconstruction in 7-8 week old male Lewis rats. The following groups were examined: UHMWPCL, PCL, flexor digitorum longus (FDL) allograft, native ACL, as well as sham surgery in which the ACL was transsected. At 16 weeks post-operatively, biomechanical testing, histology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed. Analysis of cellularity indicated that there was no significant difference among the UHMWPCL, PCL, and FDL allograft groups. Quantification of birefringence from picrosirius red staining demonstrated significantly more aligned collagen fibers in the allograft than the PCL group, but no difference between the UHMWPCL and allograft groups. The peak load to failure of the UHMWPCL grafts was significantly higher than PCL, and not significantly different from FDL allograft. This in vivo study establishes the superiority of the higher molecular weight version of polycaprolactone over PCL as a scaffold material for ACL reconstruction. By 16 weeks after implantation, the UHMWPCL grafts were not significantly different from the FDL allografts in terms of cellularity, peak load to failure, stiffness, and collagen fiber alignment. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:828-835, 2016. PMID:26497133

  16. Dissecting the molecular origins of specific protein-nucleic acid recognition: hydrostatic pressure and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas W; Kosztin, Dorina; McLean, Mark A; Schulten, Klaus; Sligar, Stephen G

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental processes by which proteins recognize and bind to nucleic acids are critical to understanding cellular function. To explore the factors involved in protein-DNA recognition, we used hydrostatic pressure to perturb the binding of the BamHI endonuclease to cognate DNA, both in experiment and in molecular dynamic simulations. A new technique of high-pressure gel mobility shift analysis was used to test the effects of elevated hydrostatic pressure on the binding of BamHI to its cognate recognition sequence. Upon application of a pressure of 500 bar, the equilibrium dissociation constant of BamHI binding to the cognate site was found to increase nearly 10-fold. A challenge has been to link this type of pure thermodynamic measurement to functional events occurring at the molecular level. Thus, we used molecular dynamic simulations at both ambient and elevated pressures to reveal details of the direct and water-mediated interactions between BamHI and cognate DNA, which allow explanation of the effects of pressure on site-specific protein-DNA binding and complex stability. PMID:11751298

  17. HSP90 canonical content organizes a molecular scaffold mechanism to progress flowering.

    PubMed

    Margaritopoulou, Theoni; Kryovrysanaki, Nikoleta; Megkoula, Panagiota; Prassinos, Constantinos; Samakovli, Despoina; Milioni, Dimitra; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis

    2016-07-01

    Highly interactive signaling processes constitute a set of parameters intertwining in a continuum mode to shape body formation and development. A sophisticated gene network is required to integrate environmental and endogenous cues in order to modulate flowering. However, the molecular mechanisms that coordinate the circuitries of flowering genes remain unclear. Here using complemented experimental approaches, we uncover the decisive and essential role of HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 90 (HSP90) in restraining developmental noise to an acceptable limit. Localized depletion of HSP90 mRNAs in the shoot apex resulted in low penetrance of vegetative-to-reproductive phase transition and completely abolished flower formation. Extreme variation in expression of flowering genes was also observed in HSP90 mRNA-depleted transformed plants. Transient heat-shock treatments moderately increased HSP90 mRNA levels and rescued flower arrest. The offspring had a low, nevertheless noticeable failure to promote transition from vegetative into the reproductive phase and showed flower morphological heterogeneity. In floral tissues a moderate variation in HSP90 transcript levels and in the expression of flowering genes was detected. Key flowering proteins comprised clientele of the molecular chaperone demonstrating that the HSP90 is essential during vegetative-to-reproductive phase transition and flower development. Our results uncover that HSP90 consolidates a molecular scaffold able to arrange and organize flowering gene network and protein circuitry, and effectively counterbalance the extent to which developmental noise perturbs phenotypic traits. PMID:27121421

  18. Towards a universal polymer backbone: design and synthesis of polymeric scaffolds containing terminal hydrogen-bonding recognition motifs at each repeating unit.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Ludger P; Weck, Marcus

    2003-02-17

    Polymers containing terminal hydrogen-bonding recognition motifs based on diaminotriazine and diaminopyridine groups in their side chains for the self-assembly of appropriate receptors have been prepared by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of norbornenes. A new synthetic method for the preparation of norbornene monomers based on pure alkyl spacers is introduced. These monomers show unprecedented high reactivity using ROMP. To suppress self-association of diaminotriazine-based polymers, polymerizations were run in presence of N-butylthymine. The butylthymine acts as a protecting group via self-assembly onto the hydrogen-bonding sites of the polymeric scaffold, thereby solubilizing the polymer. Diaminopyridine monomers do not require the presence of a protecting group due to their low propensity to dimerize. In addition, they exhibit a high affinity for hydrogen-bonded receptors on both monomeric and polymeric level. These polymers present our first building blocks towards the design and synthesis of a "universal polymer scaffold".

  19. Phage randomization in a charybdotoxin scaffold leads to CD4-mimetic recognition motifs that bind HIV-1 envelope through non-aromatic sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Dowd, C S; Zhang, W; Chaiken, I M

    2001-06-01

    Binding of HIV-1 gp120 to T-cell receptor CD4 initiates conformational changes in the viral envelope that trigger viral entry into host cells. Phage epitope randomization of a beta-turn loop of a charybdotoxin-based miniprotein scaffold was used to identify peptides that can bind gp120 and block the gp120-CD4 interaction. We describe here the display of the charybdotoxin scaffold on the filamentous phage fUSE5, its use to construct a beta-turn library, and miniprotein sequences identified through library panning with immobilized Env gp120. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) identified high-frequency phage selectants for which specific gp120 binding was competed by sCD4. Several of these selectants contain hydrophobic residues in place of the Phe that occurs in the gp120-binding beta-turns of both CD4 and previously identified scorpion toxin CD4 mimetics. One of these selectants, denoted TXM[24GQTL27], contains GQTL in place of the CD4 beta-turn sequence 40QGSF43. TXM[24GQTL27] peptide was prepared using solid-phase chemical synthesis, its binding to gp120 demonstrated by optical biosensor kinetics analysis and its affinity for the CD4 binding site of gp120 confirmed by competition ELISA. The results demonstrate that aromatic-less loop-containing CD4 recognition mimetics can be formed with detectable envelope protein binding within a beta-turn of the charybdotoxin miniprotein scaffold. The results of this work establish a methodology for phage display of a charybdotoxin miniprotein scaffold and point to the potential value of phage-based epitope randomization of this miniprotein for identifying novel CD4 mimetics. The latter are potentially useful in deconvoluting structural determinants of CD4-HIV envelope recognition and possibly in designing antagonists of viral entry. PMID:11437954

  20. Carbon Nanomaterials and DNA: from Molecular Recognition to Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanjun; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-03-15

    DNA is polymorphic. Increasing evidence has indicated that many biologically important processes are related to DNA's conformational transition and assembly states. In particular, noncanonical DNA structures, such as the right-handed A-form, the left-handed Z-form, the triplex, the G-quadruplex, the i-motif, and so forth, have been specific targets for the diagnosis and therapy of human diseases. Meanwhile, they have been widely used in the construction of smart DNA nanomaterials and nanoarchitectures. As rising stars in materials science, the family of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), including two-dimensional graphene, one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and zero-dimensional graphene or carbon quantum dots (GQDs or CQDs), interact with DNA and are able to regulate the conformational transitions of DNA. The interaction of DNA with CNMs not only opens new opportunities for specific molecular recognition, but it also expands the promising applications of CNMs from materials science to biotechnology and biomedicine. In this Account, we focus on our contributions to the field of interactions between CNMs and DNA in which we have explored their promising applications in nanodevices, sensing, materials synthesis, and biomedicine. For one-dimensional CNTs, two-dimensional graphene, and zero-dimensional GQDs and CQDs, the basic principles, binding modes, and applications of the interactions between CNMs and DNA are reviewed. We aim to give prominence to the important status of CNMs in the field of molecular recognition for DNA. First, we summarized our discovery of the interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with duplex, triplex, and human telomeric i-motif DNA and their interesting applications. For example, SWNTs are the first chemical agents that can selectively stabilize human telomeric i-motif DNA and induce its formation under physiological conditions. On the basis of this principle, two types of nanodevices were designed. One was used for

  1. Carbon Nanomaterials and DNA: from Molecular Recognition to Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanjun; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-03-15

    DNA is polymorphic. Increasing evidence has indicated that many biologically important processes are related to DNA's conformational transition and assembly states. In particular, noncanonical DNA structures, such as the right-handed A-form, the left-handed Z-form, the triplex, the G-quadruplex, the i-motif, and so forth, have been specific targets for the diagnosis and therapy of human diseases. Meanwhile, they have been widely used in the construction of smart DNA nanomaterials and nanoarchitectures. As rising stars in materials science, the family of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), including two-dimensional graphene, one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and zero-dimensional graphene or carbon quantum dots (GQDs or CQDs), interact with DNA and are able to regulate the conformational transitions of DNA. The interaction of DNA with CNMs not only opens new opportunities for specific molecular recognition, but it also expands the promising applications of CNMs from materials science to biotechnology and biomedicine. In this Account, we focus on our contributions to the field of interactions between CNMs and DNA in which we have explored their promising applications in nanodevices, sensing, materials synthesis, and biomedicine. For one-dimensional CNTs, two-dimensional graphene, and zero-dimensional GQDs and CQDs, the basic principles, binding modes, and applications of the interactions between CNMs and DNA are reviewed. We aim to give prominence to the important status of CNMs in the field of molecular recognition for DNA. First, we summarized our discovery of the interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with duplex, triplex, and human telomeric i-motif DNA and their interesting applications. For example, SWNTs are the first chemical agents that can selectively stabilize human telomeric i-motif DNA and induce its formation under physiological conditions. On the basis of this principle, two types of nanodevices were designed. One was used for

  2. Molecular Recognition of Biomolecules by Chiral CdSe Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhina, Maria V.; Korsakov, Ivan V.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Purcell-Milton, Finn; Govan, Joseph; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun’Ko, Yurii K.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular recognition is one of the most important phenomena in Chemistry and Biology. Here we present a new way of enantiomeric molecular recognition using intrinsically chiral semiconductor nanocrystals as assays. Real-time confocal microscopy studies supported by circular dichroism spectroscopy data and theoretical modelling indicate an ability of left-handed molecules of cysteine and, to a smaller extent, histidine and arginine to discriminate between surfaces of left- and right-handed nanocrystals.

  3. Molecular Recognition of Biomolecules by Chiral CdSe Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Mukhina, Maria V.; Korsakov, Ivan V.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Purcell-Milton, Finn; Govan, Joseph; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun’ko, Yurii K.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is one of the most important phenomena in Chemistry and Biology. Here we present a new way of enantiomeric molecular recognition using intrinsically chiral semiconductor nanocrystals as assays. Real-time confocal microscopy studies supported by circular dichroism spectroscopy data and theoretical modelling indicate an ability of left-handed molecules of cysteine and, to a smaller extent, histidine and arginine to discriminate between surfaces of left- and right-handed nanocrystals. PMID:27063962

  4. Tetraarylboronic acid resorcinarenes: Synthesis, molecular recognition, and templates for the construction of three-dimensional electronic organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Patrick Tyrone

    The resorcinarenes are remarkable cyclic aromatic tetramers whose impressive impact in the disciplines of molecular recognition, materials science and supramolecular chemistry has been the subject of extensive study and recent review. The potential utility of these materials as chemosensors, catalysts, energy storage and drug delivery agents has been studied or proposed. Research involving resorcinarene molecular containers (careceplexes, carecerands, hemicarcerands) has resulted in landmark achievements including the stabilization of encapusulated cyclobutadiene and benzyne. Functionalization of the resorcinarene lower rim has begun to attract attention as a means to enhance the properties of the parent macrocycles. There has been only one report (1989), however, describing the extension of their lower cavity conjugation. We have performed direct, fourfold conjugation extension of the lower rim. Our findings would allow for the fabrication of heteropolyfunctional, directional molecular scaffolds embodying new receptors and supramolecular materials. We have thus (1) performed a gram scale synthesis and direct isolation of boronic acid functionalized stereoisomeric resorcinarenes; (2) polyfunctionalized at divergent macrocyclic sites, affording chiral and achiral resorcinarene octols and cavitands; (3) presented preliminary evidence that the relatively little-explored C2h resorcinarenes can compete effectively with their C4v counterparts in both covalent and non-covalent binding of polar guests; (4) reported their use in the colorimetric differentiation of carbohydrates; and (5) extended the lower cavity by fourfold aryl coupling under Suzuki conditions.

  5. Specificity of Furanoside–Protein Recognition through Antibody Engineering and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lak, Parnian; Makeneni, Spandana; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of furanosides (five-membered ring sugars) by proteins plays important roles in host–pathogen interactions. In comparison to their six-membered ring counterparts (pyranosides), detailed studies of the molecular motifs involved in the recognition of furanosides by proteins are scarce. Here the first in-depth molecular characterization of a furanoside–protein interaction system, between an antibody (CS-35) and cell wall polysaccharides of mycobacteria, including the organism responsible for tuberculosis is reported. The approach was centered on the generation of the single chain variable fragment of CS-35 and a rational library of its mutants. Investigating the interaction from various aspects revealed the structural motifs that govern the interaction, as well as the relative contribution of molecular forces involved in the recognition. The specificity of the recognition was shown to originate mainly from multiple CH–π interactions and, to a lesser degree, hydrogen bonds formed in critical distances and geometries. PMID:25413161

  6. The DBHS proteins SFPQ, NONO and PSPC1: a multipurpose molecular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Gavin J.; Bond, Charles S.; Fox, Archa H.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear proteins are often given a concise title that captures their function, such as ‘transcription factor,’ ‘polymerase’ or ‘nuclear-receptor.’ However, for members of the Drosophila behavior/human splicing (DBHS) protein family, no such clean-cut title exists. DBHS proteins are frequently identified engaging in almost every step of gene regulation, including but not limited to, transcriptional regulation, RNA processing and transport, and DNA repair. Herein, we present a coherent picture of DBHS proteins, integrating recent structural insights on dimerization, nucleic acid binding modalities and oligomerization propensity with biological function. The emerging paradigm describes a family of dynamic proteins mediating a wide range of protein–protein and protein–nucleic acid interactions, on the whole acting as a multipurpose molecular scaffold. Overall, significant steps toward appreciating the role of DBHS proteins have been made, but we are only beginning to understand the complexity and broader importance of this family in cellular biology. PMID:27084935

  7. Scaffolding Students' Online Critiquing of Expert- and Peer-generated Molecular Models of Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Chang, Hsiang-Chi

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we developed online critiquing activities using an open-source computer learning environment. We investigated how well the activities scaffolded students to critique molecular models of chemical reactions made by scientists, peers, and a fictitious peer, and whether the activities enhanced the students' understanding of science models and chemical reactions. The activities were implemented in an eighth-grade class with 28 students in a public junior high school in southern Taiwan. The study employed mixed research methods. Data collected included pre- and post-instructional assessments, post-instructional interviews, and students' electronic written responses and oral discussions during the critiquing activities. The results indicated that these activities guided the students to produce overall quality critiques. Also, the students developed a more sophisticated understanding of chemical reactions and scientific models as a result of the intervention. Design considerations for effective model critiquing activities are discussed based on observational results, including the use of peer-generated artefacts for critiquing to promote motivation and collaboration, coupled with critiques of scientific models to enhance students' epistemological understanding of model purpose and communication.

  8. Corona Phase Molecular Recognition (CoPhMoRe) to Enable New Nanosensor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Our lab at MIT has been interested in how the 1D and 2D electronic structures of carbon nanotubes and graphene respectively can be utilized to advance new concepts in molecular detection. We introduce CoPhMoRe or corona phase molecular recognition as a method of discovering synthetic antibodies, or nanotube-templated recognition sites from a heteropolymer library. We show that certain synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained onto a single-walled carbon nanotube by chemical adsorption, also form a new corona phase that exhibits highly selective recognition for specific molecules. To prove the generality of this phenomenon, we report three examples of heteropolymers-nanotube recognition complexes for riboflavin, L-thyroxine and estradiol. The platform opens new opportunities to create synthetic recognition sites for molecular detection. We have also extended this molecular recognition technique to neurotransmitters, producing the first fluorescent sensor for dopamine. Another area of advancement in biosensor development is the use of near infrared fluorescent carbon nanotube sensors for in-vivo detection. Here, we show that PEG-ligated d(AAAT)7 DNA wrapped SWNT are selective for nitric oxide, a vasodilator of blood vessels, and can be tail vein injected into mice and localized within the viable mouse liver. We use an SJL mouse model to study liver inflammation in vivo using the spatially and spectrally resolved nIR signature of the localized SWNT sensors.

  9. pH response and molecular recognition in a low molecular weight peptide hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Lange, Stefanie C; Unsleber, Jan; Drücker, Patrick; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Waller, Mark P; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2015-01-14

    In this article we report the preparation and characterization of a peptide-based hydrogel, which possesses characteristic rheological properties, is pH responsive and can be functionalized at its thiol function. The tripeptide N-(fluorenyl-9-methoxycarbonyl)-L-Cys(acetamidomethyl)-L-His-L-Cys-OH 1 forms stable supramolecular aggregates in water leading to hydrogels above 1.5 wt%. Rheological analysis of the hydrogel revealed visco-elastic and shear thinning properties of samples containing 1.5 wt% of peptide 1. The hydrogel reversibly responds to pH changes. Below and above pH 6, electrostatic repulsion of the peptide results in a weakening of the three-dimensional gel network. Based on atomic force microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations, it is proposed that the peptide assembles into nanostructures that tend to entangle at higher concentrations in water. The development of functional materials based on the peptide assemblies was possible via thiol-ene-click chemistry of the free thiol function at the C-terminal cysteine unit. As a proof of concept, the functionalization with adamantyl units to give 1-Ad was shown by molecular recognition of β-cyclodextrin vesicles. These vesicles were used as supramolecular cross-linkers of the assemblies of peptide 1 mixed with peptide 1-Ad leading to gel networks at a reduced peptide concentration.

  10. Molecular Recognition of Insulin by a Synthetic Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Chinai, Jordan M.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Ryno, Lisa M.; Hargreaves, Nicholas D.; Morris, Christopher A.; Hart, P. John; Urbach, Adam R.

    2011-08-29

    The discovery of molecules that bind tightly and selectively to desired proteins continues to drive innovation at the interface of chemistry and biology. This paper describes the binding of human insulin by the synthetic receptor cucurbit[7]uril (Q7) in vitro. Isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy experiments show that Q7 binds to insulin with an equilibrium association constant of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} and with 50-100-fold selectivity versus proteins that are much larger but lack an N-terminal aromatic residue, and with >1000-fold selectivity versus an insulin variant lacking the N-terminal phenylalanine (Phe) residue. The crystal structure of the Q7{center_dot}insulin complex shows that binding occurs at the N-terminal Phe residue and that the N-terminus unfolds to enable binding. These findings suggest that site-selective recognition is based on the properties inherent to a protein terminus, including the unique chemical epitope presented by the terminal residue and the greater freedom of the terminus to unfold, like the end of a ball of string, to accommodate binding. Insulin recognition was predicted accurately from studies on short peptides and exemplifies an approach to protein recognition by targeting the terminus.

  11. Supramolecular Scaffold for Tailoring the Two-Dimensional Assembly of Functional Molecular Units into Organic Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Leung, Franco King-Chi; Ishiwari, Fumitaka; Kajitani, Takashi; Shoji, Yoshiaki; Hikima, Takaaki; Takata, Masaki; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Yamada, Yoichi M A; Fukushima, Takanori

    2016-09-14

    Tailoring structurally anisotropic molecular assemblies while controlling their orientation on solid substrates is an important subject for advanced technologies that use organic thin films. Here we report a supramolecular scaffold based on tripodal triptycene assemblies, which enables functional molecular units to assemble into a highly oriented, multilayered two-dimensional (2D) structure on solid substrates. The triptycene building block carries an ethynyl group and three flexible side chains at the 10- and 1,8,13-positions, respectively. These bridgehead-substituted tripodal triptycenes self-assembled on solid substrates to form a well-defined "2D hexagonal + 1D lamellar" structure, which developed parallel to the surface of the substrates. Remarkably, the assembling properties of the triptycene building blocks, particularly for a derivative with tri(oxyethylene)-containing side chains, were not impaired when the alkyne terminal was functionalized with a large molecular unit such as C60, which is comparable in diameter to the triptycene framework. Consequently, thin films with a multilayered 2D assembly of the C60 unit were obtained. Flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity (FP-TRMC) measurements revealed that the C60 film exhibits highly anisotropic charge-transport properties. Bridgehead-substituted tripodal triptycenes may provide a versatile supramolecular scaffold for tailoring the 2D assembly of molecular units into a highly oriented thin film, and in turn for exploiting the full potential of anisotropic molecular functions. PMID:27549349

  12. Protected amine labels: a versatile molecular scaffold for multiplexed nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue quantitative proteomic reagents.

    PubMed

    Ficarro, Scott B; Biagi, Jessica M; Wang, Jinhua; Scotcher, Jenna; Koleva, Rositsa I; Card, Joseph D; Adelmant, Guillaume; He, Huan; Askenazi, Manor; Marshall, Alan G; Young, Nicolas L; Gray, Nathanael S; Marto, Jarrod A

    2014-04-01

    We assemble a versatile molecular scaffold from simple building blocks to create binary and multiplexed stable isotope reagents for quantitative mass spectrometry. Termed Protected Amine Labels (PAL), these reagents offer multiple analytical figures of merit including, (1) robust targeting of peptide N-termini and lysyl side chains, (2) optimal mass spectrometry ionization efficiency through regeneration of primary amines on labeled peptides, (3) an amino acid-based mass tag that incorporates heavy isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to ensure matched physicochemical and MS/MS fragmentation behavior among labeled peptides, and (4) a molecularly efficient architecture, in which the majority of hetero-atom centers can be used to synthesize a variety of nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue stable isotope reagents. We demonstrate the performance of these reagents in well-established strategies whereby up to four channels of peptide isotopomers, each separated by 4 Da, are quantified in MS-level scans with accuracies comparable to current commercial reagents. In addition, we utilize the PAL scaffold to create isotopologue reagents in which labeled peptide analogs differ in mass based on the binding energy in carbon and nitrogen nuclei, thereby allowing quantification based on MS or MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate accurate quantification for reagents that support 6-plex labeling and propose extension of this scheme to 9-channels based on a similar PAL scaffold. Finally, we provide exemplar data that extend the application of isotopologe-based quantification reagents to medium resolution, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers.

  13. Molecular recognition of human ephrinB2 cell surface receptor by an emergent African henipavirus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Benhur; Pernet, Olivier; Ahmed, Asim A.; Zeltina, Antra; Beaty, Shannon M.; Bowden, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of African henipaviruses (HNVs) related to pathogenic Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) from Southeast Asia and Australia presents an open-ended health risk. Cell receptor use by emerging African HNVs at the stage of host-cell entry is a key parameter when considering the potential for spillover and infection of human populations. The attachment glycoprotein from a Ghanaian bat isolate (GhV-G) exhibits <30% sequence identity with Asiatic NiV-G/HeV-G. Here, through functional and structural analysis of GhV-G, we show how this African HNV targets the same human cell-surface receptor (ephrinB2) as the Asiatic HNVs. We first characterized this virus−receptor interaction crystallographically. Compared with extant HNV-G–ephrinB2 structures, there was significant structural variation in the six-bladed β-propeller scaffold of the GhV-G receptor-binding domain, but not the Greek key fold of the bound ephrinB2. Analysis revealed a surprisingly conserved mode of ephrinB2 interaction that reflects an ongoing evolutionary constraint among geographically distal and phylogenetically divergent HNVs to maintain the functionality of ephrinB2 recognition during virus–host entry. Interestingly, unlike NiV-G/HeV-G, we could not detect binding of GhV-G to ephrinB3. Comparative structure–function analysis further revealed several distinguishing features of HNV-G function: a secondary ephrinB2 interaction site that contributes to more efficient ephrinB2-mediated entry in NiV-G relative to GhV-G and cognate residues at the very C terminus of GhV-G (absent in Asiatic HNV-Gs) that are vital for efficient receptor-induced fusion, but not receptor binding per se. These data provide molecular-level details for evaluating the likelihood of African HNVs to spill over into human populations. PMID:25825759

  14. A thermosensitive low molecular weight hydrogel as scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ziane, Sophia; Schlaubitz, Silke; Miraux, Sylvain; Patwa, Amit; Lalande, Charlotte; Bilem, Ibrahim; Lepreux, Sébastien; Rousseau, Benoît; Le Meins, Jean-François; Latxague, Laurent; Barthélémy, Philippe; Chassande, Olivier

    2012-02-23

    Hydrogels that are non-toxic, easy to use, cytocompatible, injectable and degradable are valuable biomaterials for tissue engineering and tissue repair. However, few compounds currently fulfil these requirements. In this study, we describe the biological properties of a new type of thermosensitive hydrogel based on low-molecular weight glycosyl-nucleosyl-fluorinated (GNF) compound. This gel forms within 25 min by self-assembly of monomers as temperature decreases. It degrades slowly in vitro and in vivo. It induces moderate chronic inflammation and is progressively invaded by host cells and vessels, suggesting good integration to the host environment. Although human adult mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue (ASC) cannot adhere on the gel surface or within a 3D gel scaffold, cell aggregates grow and differentiate normally when entrapped in the GNF-based gel. Moreover, this hydrogel stimulates osteoblast differentiation of ASC in the absence of osteogenic factors. When implanted in mice, gel-entrapped cell aggregates survive for several weeks in contrast with gel-free spheroids. They are maintained in their original site of implantation where they interact with the host tissue and adhere on the extracellular matrix. They can differentiate in situ into alkaline phosphatase positive osteoblasts, which deposit a calcium phosphate-rich matrix. When injected into subcutaneous sites, gel-encapsulated cells show similar biological properties as implanted gel-cells complexes. These data point GNF-based gels as a novel class of hydrogels with original properties, in particular osteogenic potential, susceptible of providing new therapeutic solutions especially for bone tissue engineering applications.

  15. Molecular recognition of organic ammonium ions in solution using synthetic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Späth, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Summary Ammonium ions are ubiquitous in chemistry and molecular biology. Considerable efforts have been undertaken to develop synthetic receptors for their selective molecular recognition. The type of host compounds for organic ammonium ion binding span a wide range from crown ethers to calixarenes to metal complexes. Typical intermolecular interactions are hydrogen bonds, electrostatic and cation–π interactions, hydrophobic interactions or reversible covalent bond formation. In this review we discuss the different classes of synthetic receptors for organic ammonium ion recognition and illustrate the scope and limitations of each class with selected examples from the recent literature. The molecular recognition of ammonium ions in amino acids is included and the enantioselective binding of chiral ammonium ions by synthetic receptors is also covered. In our conclusion we compare the strengths and weaknesses of the different types of ammonium ion receptors which may help to select the best approach for specific applications. PMID:20502608

  16. Effect of the solvent on recognition properties of molecularly imprinted polymer specific for ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nicholas W; Piletska, Elena V; Karim, Khalku; Whitcombe, Michael; Malecha, Michael; Magan, Naresh; Baggiani, Claudio; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2004-12-15

    A molecularly imprinted polymer specific for the mycotoxin ochratoxin A has been synthesised using a non-covalent approach. The polymer has shown an excellent affinity and specificity for the target template in aqueous solutions. The binding experiments, NMR study and molecular modelling have proven that the template recognition by polymer originates from the shape complementarity of binding sites. The binding mechanism is critically depended on factors that affect the polymer conformation. Thus the variation in buffer concentration, pH and presence of organic solvent, which affect the polymer swelling or shrinking, had a profound effect on the polymer recognition properties.

  17. The Molecular Basis of N-End Rule Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.H.; Roman-Hernandez, G.; Grant, R.A.; Sauer, R.T.; Baker, T.A.

    2009-03-27

    The N-end rule targets specific proteins for destruction in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we report a crystal structure of a bacterial N-end rule adaptor, ClpS, bound to a peptide mimic of an N-end rule substrate. This structure, which was solved at a resolution of 1.15 {angstrom}, reveals specific recognition of the peptide {alpha}-amino group via hydrogen bonding and shows that the peptide's N-terminal tyrosine side chain is buried in a deep hydrophobic cleft that pre-exists on the surface of ClpS. The adaptor side chains that contact the peptide's N-terminal residue are highly conserved in orthologs and in E3 ubiquitin ligases that mediate eukaryotic N-end rule recognition. We show that mutation of critical ClpS contact residues abrogates substrate delivery to and degradation by the AAA+ protease ClpAP, demonstrate that modification of the hydrophobic pocket results in altered N-end rule specificity, and discuss functional implications for the mechanism of substrate delivery.

  18. The Molecular Basis of N-end Rule Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kevin H.; Roman-Hernandez, Giselle; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The N-end rule targets specific proteins for destruction in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we report a crystal structure of a bacterial N-end rule adaptor, ClpS, bound to a peptide mimic of an N-end rule substrate. This structure, which was solved at a resolution of 1.15 Å, reveals specific recognition of the peptide α-amino group via hydrogen bonding and shows that the peptide’s N-terminal tyrosine side chain is buried in a deep hydrophobic cleft that preexists on the surface of ClpS. The adaptor side chains that contact the peptide’s N-terminal residue are highly conserved in orthologs and in E3 ubiquitin ligases that mediate eukaryotic N-end rule recognition. We show that mutation of critical ClpS contact residues abrogates substrate delivery to and degradation by the AAA+ protease ClpAP, demonstrate that modification of the hydrophobic pocket results in altered N-end rule specificity, and discuss functional implications for the mechanism of substrate delivery. PMID:18995838

  19. Transfer of molecular recognition information from DNA nanostructures to gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwardson, Thomas G. W.; Lau, Kai Lin; Bousmail, Danny; Serpell, Christopher J.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2016-02-01

    DNA nanotechnology offers unparalleled precision and programmability for the bottom-up organization of materials. This approach relies on pre-assembling a DNA scaffold, typically containing hundreds of different strands, and using it to position functional components. A particularly attractive strategy is to employ DNA nanostructures not as permanent scaffolds, but as transient, reusable templates to transfer essential information to other materials. To our knowledge, this approach, akin to top-down lithography, has not been examined. Here we report a molecular printing strategy that chemically transfers a discrete pattern of DNA strands from a three-dimensional DNA structure to a gold nanoparticle. We show that the particles inherit the DNA sequence configuration encoded in the parent template with high fidelity. This provides control over the number of DNA strands and their relative placement, directionality and sequence asymmetry. Importantly, the nanoparticles produced exhibit the site-specific addressability of DNA nanostructures, and are promising components for energy, information and biomedical applications.

  20. Strategy for molecular beacon binding readout: separating molecular recognition element and signal reporter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Jin, Jianyu; Wang, Hao; Tang, Hongxing; Yang, Ronghua; Wang, Kemin

    2009-12-01

    A new strategy for molecular beacon binding readout is proposed by using separation of the molecular recognition element and signal reporter. The signal transduction of the target binding event is based on displacing interaction between the target DNA and a competitor, the signal transducer. The target-free capture DNA is first interacted with the competitor, forming an assembled complex. In the presence of a target DNA that the affinity is stronger than that of the competitor, hybridization between capture DNA and the target disassembles the assembled complex and releases the free competitor to change the readout of the signal reporter. To demonstrate the feasibility of the design, a thymine-rich oligonucleotide was examined as a model system. Hg2+ was selected as the competitor, and mercaptoacetic acid-coated CdTe/ZnS quantum dots served as the fluorescent reporter. Selective binding of Hg2+ between the two thymine bases of the capture DNA forms a hairpin-structure. Hybridization between the capture DNA and target DNA destroys the hairpin-structure, releasing Hg2+ ions to quench the quantum dots fluorescence. Under the optimal conditions, fluorescence intensity of the quantum dots against the concentration of perfect cDNA was linear over the concentration range of 0.1-1.6 microM, with a limit of detection of 25 nM. This new assay method is simple in design, avoiding any oligonucleotide labeling. Furthermore, this strategy is generalizable since any target binding can in principle release the signal transducer and be detected with separated signal reporter.

  1. Molecular Recognition and Structural Influences on Function in Bio-nanosystems of Nucleic Acids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda

    This work examines smart material properties of rational self-assembly and molecular recognition found in nano-biosystems. Exploiting the sequence and structural information encoded within nucleic acids and proteins will permit programmed synthesis of nanomaterials and help create molecular machines that may carry out new roles involving chemical catalysis and bioenergy. Responsive to different ionic environments thru self-reorgnization, nucleic acids (NA) are nature's signature smart material; organisms such as viruses and bacteria use features of NAs to react to their environment and orchestrate their lifecycle. Furthermore, nucleic acid systems (both RNA and DNA) are currently exploited as scaffolds; recent applications have been showcased to build bioelectronics and biotemplated nanostructures via directed assembly of multidimensional nanoelectronic devices 1. Since the most stable and rudimentary structure of nucleic acids is the helical duplex, these were modeled in order to examine the influence of the microenvironment, sequence, and cation-dependent perturbations of their canonical forms. Due to their negatively charged phosphate backbone, NA's rely on counterions to overcome the inherent repulsive forces that arise from the assembly of two complementary strands. As a realistic model system, we chose the HIV-TAR helix (PDB ID: 397D) to study specific sequence motifs on cation sequestration. At physiologically relevant concentrations of sodium and potassium ions, we observed sequence based effects where purine stretches were adept in retaining high residency cations. The transitional space between adenine and guanosine nucleotides (ApG step) in a sequence proved the most favorable. This work was the first to directly show these subtle interactions of sequence based cationic sequestration and may be useful for controlling metallization of nucleic acids in conductive nanowires. Extending the study further, we explored the degree to which the structure of NA

  2. All-organic microelectromechanical systems integrating specific molecular recognition--a new generation of chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Ayela, Cédric; Dubourg, Georges; Pellet, Claude; Haupt, Karsten

    2014-09-01

    Cantilever-type all-organic microelectromechanical systems based on molecularly imprinted polymers for specific analyte recognition are used as chemical sensors. They are produced by a simple spray-coating-shadow-masking process. Analyte binding to the cantilever generates a measurable change in its resonance frequency. This allows label-free detection by direct mass sensing of low-molecular-weight analytes at nanomolar concentrations.

  3. Molecular Recognition of Agonist and Antagonist for Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengyuan; Wang, Lushan; Zhao, Xian; Sun, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) is a ligand-activated transcription factor which plays important roles in lipid and glucose metabolism. The aim of this work is to find residues which selectively recognize PPAR-α agonists and antagonists. To achieve this aim, PPAR-α/13M and PPAR-α/471 complexes were subjected to perform molecular dynamics simulations. This research suggests that several key residues only participate in agonist recognition, while some other key residues only contribute to antagonist recognition. It is hoped that such work is useful for medicinal chemists to design novel PPAR-α agonists and antagonists. PMID:24837836

  4. Molecular recognition in homogeneous transition metal catalysis: a biomimetic strategy for high selectivity.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddartha; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2008-01-28

    Traditional methods for selectivity control in homogeneous transition metal catalysis either employ steric effects in a binding pocket or chelate control. In a supramolecular strategy, encapsulation of the substrate can provide useful shape and size selectivity. A fully developed molecular recognition strategy involving hydrogen bonding or solvophobic forces has given almost completely regioselective functionalization of remote, unactivated C-H bonds.

  5. Dynamic combinatorial libraries: from exploring molecular recognition to systems chemistry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianwei; Nowak, Piotr; Otto, Sijbren

    2013-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is a subset of combinatorial chemistry where the library members interconvert continuously by exchanging building blocks with each other. Dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) are powerful tools for discovering the unexpected and have given rise to many fascinating molecules, ranging from interlocked structures to self-replicators. Furthermore, dynamic combinatorial molecular networks can produce emergent properties at systems level, which provide exciting new opportunities in systems chemistry. In this perspective we will highlight some new methodologies in this field and analyze selected examples of DCLs that are under thermodynamic control, leading to synthetic receptors, catalytic systems, and complex self-assembled supramolecular architectures. Also reviewed are extensions of the principles of DCC to systems that are not at equilibrium and may therefore harbor richer functional behavior. Examples include self-replication and molecular machines.

  6. Molecular recognition of nitrated fatty acids by PPAR[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Jifeng; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Martynowski, Dariusz; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Baker, Paul R.S.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Y. Eugene; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation, and it is activated by oxidized and nitrated fatty acids. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPAR{gamma} ligand binding domain bound to nitrated linoleic acid, a potent endogenous ligand of PPAR{gamma}. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis of PPAR{gamma} discrimination of various naturally occurring fatty acid derivatives.

  7. Molecular mechanism underlying promiscuous polyamine recognition by spermidine acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Sae; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Niiyama, Mayumi; Hirose, Mika; Miyazaki, Yuma; Higashi, Kyohei; Murata, Michio; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Spermidine acetyltransferase (SAT) from Escherichia coli, which catalyses the transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-CoA to spermidine, is a key enzyme in controlling polyamine levels in prokaryotic cells. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of SAT in complex with spermidine (SPD) and CoA at 2.5Å resolution. SAT is a dodecamer organized as a hexamer of dimers. The secondary structural element and folding topology of the SAT dimer resemble those of spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), suggesting an evolutionary link between SAT and SSAT. However, the polyamine specificity of SAT is distinct from that of SSAT and is promiscuous. The SPD molecule is also located at the inter-dimer interface. The distance between SPD and CoA molecules is 13Å. A deep, highly acidic, water-filled cavity encompasses the SPD and CoA binding sites. Structure-based mutagenesis and in-vitro assays identified SPD-bound residues, and the acidic residues lining the walls of the cavity are mostly essential for enzymatic activities. Based on mutagenesis and structural data, we propose an acetylation mechanism underlying promiscuous polyamine recognition for SAT. PMID:27163532

  8. Molecular recognition of α-cyclodextrin (CD) to choral amino acids based on methyl orange as a molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuexian, Fan; Yu, Yang; Shaomin, Shuang; Chuan, Dong

    2005-03-01

    The molecular recognition interaction of α-CD to chiral amino acids was investigated by using spectrophotometry based on methyl orange as a molecular probe. The molecular recognition ability depended on the inclusion formation constants. The molecular recognition of α-CD to aromatic amino acids was the order: DL-tryptophan > L-tryptophan > L-phenylalanine > L-tyrosine ≈ DL-β-3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine; whereas for aliphatic amino acids, the order was: L- iso-leucine > L-leucine ≈ L-methionine ≈ DL-mehtionine > D-leucine. The effect of temperature on the inclusion interaction was examined and the thermodynamic parameters of inclusion process, Δ G, Δ H, Δ S, were determined. The experimental results indicated that the inclusion process was an exothermic and enthalpy-driven process accompanied with a negative or minor positive entropic contribution. The inclusion interaction between α-CD and amino acids satisfied the law of enthalpy-entropy compensation. The compensation temperature was 291 K.

  9. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla Pareja, Maria Eugenia; Colombo, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance. PMID:24137567

  10. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

  11. Protected Amine Labels: A Versatile Molecular Scaffold for Multiplexed Nominal Mass and Sub-Da Isotopologue Quantitative Proteomic Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Ficarro, Scott B.; Biagi, Jessica M.; Wang, Jinhua; Scotcher, Jenna; Koleva, Rositsa I.; Card, Joseph D.; Adelmant, Guillaume; He, Huan; Askenazi, Manor; Marshall, Alan G.; Young, Nicolas L.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Marto, Jarrod A.

    2014-01-01

    We assemble a versatile molecular scaffold from simple building blocks to create binary and multiplexed stable isotope reagents for quantitative mass spectrometry. Termed Protected Amine Labels (PAL), these reagents offer multiple analytical figures of merit including, (i) robust targeting of peptide N-termini and lysyl side chains, (ii) optimal mass spectrometry ionization efficiency through regeneration of primary amines on labeled peptides, (iii) an amino acid-based mass tag that incorporates heavy isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to ensure matched physicochemical and MS/MS fragmentation behavior among labeled peptides, and (iv) a molecularly efficient architecture, in which the majority of hetero-atom centers can be used to synthesize a variety of nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue stable isotope reagents. We demonstrate the performance of these reagents in well-established strategies whereby up to four channels of peptide isotopomers, each separated by 4 Da are quantified in MS-level scans with accuracies comparable to current commercial reagents. In addition we utilize the PAL scaffold to create isotopologue reagents in which labeled peptide analogs differ in mass based on the binding energy in carbon and nitrogen nuclei, thereby allowing quantification based on MS or MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate accurate quantification for reagents that support 6-plex labeling and propose extension of this scheme to 9-channels based on a similar PAL scaffold. Finally we provide exemplar data that extends the application of isotopologe-based quantification reagents to medium resolution, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers. PMID:24496597

  12. Systematic assessment of scaffold hopping versus activity cliff formation across bioactive compound classes following a molecular hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Scaffold hopping and activity cliff formation define opposite ends of the activity landscape feature spectrum. To rationalize these events at the level of scaffolds, active compounds involved in scaffold hopping were required to contain topologically distinct scaffolds but have only limited differences in potency, whereas compounds involved in activity cliffs were required to share the same scaffold but have large differences in potency. A systematic search was carried out for compounds involved in scaffold hopping and/or activity cliff formation. Results obtained for compound data sets covering more than 300 human targets revealed clear trends. If scaffolds represented multiple but fewer than 10 active compounds, nearly 90% of all scaffolds were exclusively involved in hopping events. With increasing compound coverage, the fraction of scaffolds involved in both scaffold hopping and activity cliff formation significantly increased to more than 50%. However, ∼40% of the scaffolds representing large numbers of active compounds continued to be exclusively involved in scaffold hopping. More than 200 scaffolds with broad target coverage were identified that consistently represented potent compounds and yielded an abundance of scaffold hops in the low-nanomolar range. These and other subsets of scaffolds we characterized are of prime interest for structure-activity relationship (SAR) exploration and compound design. Therefore, the complete scaffold classification generated in the course of our analysis is made freely available.

  13. Energetics, Thermodynamics, and Molecular Recognition of Piperine with DNA.

    PubMed

    Haris, P; Mary, Varughese; Haridas, M; Sudarsanakumar, C

    2015-12-28

    Piperine, the bioactive phytochemical from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), is a nontoxic natural compound exhibiting many physiological and pharmacological properties. They include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, antitumor, antiapoptotic, antigenotoxic, antiarthritic, antifungal, antimicrobial, antidepressant, anti-HBV, and gastro-protective activities. It also enhances the bioavailability of phytochemicals and drugs. The molecular mechanism of action of piperine with DNA has not yet been addressed, while its pharmacological activities have been reported. In this work we report for the first time the interaction of piperine molecule with DNA duplex. We have carried out UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy to confirm the binding of piperine with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA). The energetics of interaction of piperine with ctDNA was monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and melting temperature (Tm) analysis were also performed, confirming a minor groove mode of binding of piperine with ctDNA. The binding free energy ΔG values obtained from molecular dynamics simulation studies agree well with ITC values and reveal a sequence dependent minor groove binding exhibiting a specificity toward AT rich sequences. PMID:26523930

  14. Energetics, Thermodynamics, and Molecular Recognition of Piperine with DNA.

    PubMed

    Haris, P; Mary, Varughese; Haridas, M; Sudarsanakumar, C

    2015-12-28

    Piperine, the bioactive phytochemical from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), is a nontoxic natural compound exhibiting many physiological and pharmacological properties. They include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, antitumor, antiapoptotic, antigenotoxic, antiarthritic, antifungal, antimicrobial, antidepressant, anti-HBV, and gastro-protective activities. It also enhances the bioavailability of phytochemicals and drugs. The molecular mechanism of action of piperine with DNA has not yet been addressed, while its pharmacological activities have been reported. In this work we report for the first time the interaction of piperine molecule with DNA duplex. We have carried out UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy to confirm the binding of piperine with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA). The energetics of interaction of piperine with ctDNA was monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and melting temperature (Tm) analysis were also performed, confirming a minor groove mode of binding of piperine with ctDNA. The binding free energy ΔG values obtained from molecular dynamics simulation studies agree well with ITC values and reveal a sequence dependent minor groove binding exhibiting a specificity toward AT rich sequences.

  15. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs signals. In this respect, depending on the subcellular localization from which the activating signals emanate, defined scaffolds specify which substrates are amenable to be phosphorylated. Recent evidence has unveiled direct interactions among different scaffold protein species. These scaffold-scaffold macro-complexes could constitute an additional level of regulation for ERK signals and may serve as nodes for the integration of incoming signals and the subsequent diversification of the outgoing signals with respect to substrate engagement. PMID:27303664

  16. Adsorption and recognition characteristics of surface molecularly imprinted polymethacrylic acid/silica toward genistein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Gao, Baojiao; An, Fuqiang; Xu, Zeqing; Zhang, Tingting

    2014-09-12

    In this paper, on the basis of surface-initiated graft polymerization, a new surface molecular imprinting technique is established by molecular design. And molecularly imprinted polymer MIP-PMAA/SiO2 is successfully prepared with genistein as template. The adsorption and recognition characteristics of MIP-PMAA/SiO2 for genistein are studied in depth by using static method, dynamic method and competitive adsorption experiment. The experimental results show that MIP-PMAA/SiO2 possesses very strong adsorption affinity and specific recognition for genistein. The saturated adsorption capacity could reach to 0.36mmolg(-1). The selectivity coefficients relative to quercetin and rutin are 5.4 and 11.8, respectively. Besides, MIP-PMAA/SiO2 is regenerated easily and exhibits excellent reusability. PMID:25085816

  17. Design, synthesis and decoration of molecular scaffolds for exploitation in the production of alkaloid-like libraries.

    PubMed

    Craven, Philip; Aimon, Anthony; Dow, Mark; Fleury-Bregeot, Nicolas; Guilleux, Rachel; Morgentin, Remy; Roche, Didier; Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Foster, Richard; Marsden, Stephen P; Nelson, Adam

    2015-06-01

    The design, synthesis and decoration of six small molecule libraries is described. Each library was inspired by structures embedded in the framework of specific alkaloid natural products. The development of optimised syntheses of the required molecular scaffolds is described, in which reactions including Pd-catalysed aminoarylation and diplolar cycloadditions have been exploited as key steps. The synthesis of selected exemplar screening compounds is also described. In five cases, libraries were subsequently nominated for production on the basis of the scope and limitations of the validation work, as well as predicted molecular properties. In total, the research has led to the successful synthesis of >2500 novel alkaloid-like compounds for addition to the screening collection (the Joint European Compound Library, JECL) of the European Lead Factory.

  18. Toxocara canis: Molecular basis of immune recognition and evasion

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Toxocara canis has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in the tissues of diverse vertebrate species, as well as to develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive canid host. Human disease is caused by larval stages invading musculature, brain and the eye, and immune mechanisms appear to be ineffective at eliminating the infection. Survival of T. canis larvae can be attributed to two molecular strategies evolved by the parasite. Firstly, it releases quantities of ‘excretory–secretory’ products which include lectins, mucins and enzymes that interact with and modulate host immunity. For example, one lectin (CTL-1) is very similar to mammalian lectins, required for tissue inflammation, suggesting that T. canis may interfere with leucocyte extravasation into infected sites. The second strategy is the elaboration of a specialised mucin-rich surface coat; this is loosely attached to the parasite epicuticle in a fashion that permits rapid escape when host antibodies and cells adhere, resulting in an inflammatory reaction around a newly vacated focus. The mucins have been characterised as bearing multiple glycan side-chains, consisting of a blood-group-like trisaccharide with one or two O-methylation modifications. Both the lectins and these trisaccharides are targeted by host antibodies, with anti-lectin antibodies showing particular diagnostic promise. Antibodies to the mono-methylated trisaccharide appear to be T. canis-specific, as this epitope is not found in the closely related Toxocara cati, but all other antigenic determinants are very similar between the two species. This distinction may be important in designing new and more accurate diagnostic tests. Further tools to control toxocariasis could also arise from understanding the molecular cues and steps involved in larval development. In vitro-cultivated larvae express high levels of four mRNAs that are translationally silenced, as the proteins they encode are not detectable in

  19. Synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer with 7-chloroethyl-theophylline-immobilized silica gel as template and its molecular recognition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhui; Tong, Aijun; Li, Longdi

    2004-01-01

    By reaction of 7-chloroethyl-theophylline with aminopropylsilanized silica gel we synthesized a 7-chloroethyl-theophylline-immobilized silica gel as template molecule and prepared a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP-Si), which had special recognition sites to 7-chloroethyl-theophylline. A conventional molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) using 7-chloroethyl-theophylline as template was also prepared for comparison. Binding abilities to 7-chloroethyl-theophylline and its structural analogs revealed that the MIP-Si shows much higher binding speed and much more binding capacity than the MIP does.

  20. Molecular Recognition: Use of Metal-Containing Molecular Clefts for Supramolecular Self-Assembly and Host-Guest Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, James D.; Bosnich, Brice

    2008-10-03

    Molecular clefts consisting of a rigid spacer linked to two parallel cofacially disposed terpy-M-X (M = Pd{sup 2+}, Pt{sup 2+}) units, which can vary in separation from 6.6 to 7.2 {angstrom}, have been used as molecular receptors and for self-assembly with linear and triangular linkers to produce rectangles and trigonal prisms, respectively. Aromatic molecules form multiple host-guest adducts with the molecular cleft receptors and with the rectangles and trigonal prisms. Planar complexes of Pt{sup 2+} also form host-guest adducts. The forces that control this molecular recognition, namely, {pi}-{pi} interactions, charge-induced dipole interactions, charge-charge forces, weak metal-metal interactions and solvation effects, are discussed and assigned to the various adducts.

  1. Development and characterisation of molecularly imprinted polymers based on methacrylic acid for selective recognition of drugs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xizhi; Wu, Aibo; Qu, Guorun; Li, Rongxiu; Zhang, Dabing

    2007-09-01

    Specific molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the drug reserpine (RES) using methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer were developed and characterised for the first time in this study. Evaluation of the various polymers by binding assays indicated that the optimum ratio of functional monomer to template was 4:1. Furthermore, the imprinting effect of the MIPs was assessed by the chromatographic method, which demonstrated that the MIPs had better chromatographic behavior and selectivity than those of the corresponding NIPs. A combination of BET, NMR, UV spectroscopy, and MISPE analyses for investigation of the imprinting and recognition properties revealed that strong specific interactions between the functional monomer and RES in the prepolymerization solutions and the aqueous solutions were probably responsible for RES recognition. The preparation of RES MIPs and elucidation of imprinting and recognition mechanisms may serve as useful references for other drug MIPs.

  2. Molecular basis of the structural stability of a Top7-based scaffold at extreme pH and temperature conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Thereza A.; Boschek, Curt B.; Apiyo, David O.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Straatsma, TP

    2010-07-01

    The development of stable scaffolds that can tolerate environmental extremes has an immense potential for applications in industry and defense. Recently, we have engineered an eight-residue loop into the de novo designed Top7 protein, which specifically binds the glycoprotein CD4. The robust properties of the Top7, coupled with the ease in production, make it a robust scaffold to design novel functionalities for use under extreme environmental conditions. In the present work, a series of explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations are reported which investigates the effect of mutations and extreme conditions of temperature and pH on the structure, stability, and dynamics of the native and engineered Top7. These simulations indicate that i. The structural dynamics of the engineered and native Top7 in solution are equivalent under corresponding conditions of pH and temperature. Ensemble-averaged structures of the native and engineered Top7 maintain the overall tertiary structure pattern, albeit with loss of helical content when at low pH and high-temperature conditions. Mutations of residues E43A, D46A, E67A, E69A, EA81A along the ?-helices of the engineered Top7 did not lead to significant changes in the native fold under pH 2 and 400 K, suggesting that the helices can accommodate varying sequences. iii. The anti-parallel ?-sheet is the structural core responsible for the stability of the native and engineered Top7 and is well maintained under extreme pH and temperature conditions. These findings indicate that the insertion of an eight-residue loop into the structure of Top7 does not adversely affect the global fold or the structural stability of the Top7 scaffold.

  3. Pyrrolic tripodal receptors for the molecular recognition of carbohydrates: ditopic receptors for dimannosides.

    PubMed

    Francesconi, Oscar; Nativi, Cristina; Gabrielli, Gabriele; Gentili, Matteo; Palchetti, Marco; Bonora, Beatrice; Roelens, Stefano

    2013-08-26

    Synthetic ditopic receptors, designed for the molecular recognition of dimannosides, have been prepared by bridging two monotopic units effectively recognizing mannosides with linkers of the appropriate size and flexibility, endowed with hydrogen-bonding groups. Affinities toward the α and β glycosides of the biologically relevant Manα(1-2)Man disaccharide were measured by NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in polar organic media (30-40 % DMF in chloroform). Significant selectivities and affinities in the micromolar range were observed in most cases, with two newly designed receptors being the most effective receptors of the set, together with a distinct preference of the dimannosides for the (S) enantiomer of the receptor in all cases. A 3D view of the recognition mode was elucidated by a combined NMR spectroscopic/molecular modeling approach, showing the dimannoside included in the cleft of the receptor. Compared to the monotopic precursors, the ditopic receptors showed markedly improved recognition properties, proving the efficacy of the modular receptor design for the recognition of disaccharides.

  4. Molecular recognition using corona phase complexes made of synthetic polymers adsorbed on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P; Barone, Paul W; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Boghossian, Ardemis A; Hilmer, Andrew J; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Şen, Fatih; Şen, Selda; Croy, Robert G; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Heller, Daniel A; Essigmann, John M; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Understanding molecular recognition is of fundamental importance in applications such as therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensor design. The most common recognition motifs involve biological macromolecules such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to biorecognition consists of a unique three-dimensional structure formed by a folded and constrained bioheteropolymer that creates a binding pocket, or an interface, able to recognize a specific molecule. Here, we show that synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained onto a single-walled carbon nanotube by chemical adsorption, also form a new corona phase that exhibits highly selective recognition for specific molecules. To prove the generality of this phenomenon, we report three examples of heteropolymer-nanotube recognition complexes for riboflavin, L-thyroxine and oestradiol. In each case, the recognition was predicted using a two-dimensional thermodynamic model of surface interactions in which the dissociation constants can be tuned by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatiotemporal sensors based on modulation of the carbon nanotube photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages.

  5. Molecular recognition using corona phase complexes made of synthetic polymers adsorbed on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P.; Barone, Paul W.; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W.; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Hilmer, Andrew J.; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C.; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A.; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Şen, Fatih; Şen, Selda; Croy, Robert G.; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Heller, Daniel A.; Essigmann, John M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding molecular recognition is of fundamental importance in applications such as therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensor design. The most common recognition motifs involve biological macromolecules such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to biorecognition consists of a unique three-dimensional structure formed by a folded and constrained bioheteropolymer that creates a binding pocket, or an interface, able to recognize a specific molecule. Here, we show that synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained onto a single-walled carbon nanotube by chemical adsorption, also form a new corona phase that exhibits highly selective recognition for specific molecules. To prove the generality of this phenomenon, we report three examples of heteropolymer-nanotube recognition complexes for riboflavin, L-thyroxine and oestradiol. In each case, the recognition was predicted using a two-dimensional thermodynamic model of surface interactions in which the dissociation constants can be tuned by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatiotemporal sensors based on modulation of the carbon nanotube photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages.

  6. Macrocyclic peptides self-assemble into robust vesicles with molecular recognition capabilities.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo-jin; Lim, Yong-beom

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we developed macrocyclic peptide building blocks that formed self-assembled peptide vesicles with molecular recognition capabilities. Macrocyclic peptides were significantly different from conventional amphiphiles, in that they could self-assemble into vesicles at very high hydrophilic-to-total mass ratios. The flexibility of the hydrophobic self-assembly segment was critical for vesicle formation. The unique features of this peptide vesicle system include a homogeneous size distribution, unusually small size, and robust structural and thermal stability. The peptide vesicles successfully entrapped a hydrophilic model drug, released the payload very slowly, and were internalized by cells in a highly efficient manner. Moreover, the peptide vesicles exhibited molecular recognition capabilities, in that they selectively bound to target RNA through surface-displayed peptides. This study demonstrates that self-assembled peptide vesicles can be used as strong intracellular delivery vehicles that recognize specific biomacromolecular targets.

  7. Aminoglycosides: Molecular Insights on the Recognition of RNA and Aminoglycoside Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Chittapragada, Maruthi; Roberts, Sarah; Ham, Young Wan

    2009-01-01

    RNA is increasingly recognized for its significant functions in biological systems and has recently become an important molecular target for therapeutics development. Aminoglycosides, a large class of clinically significant antibiotics, exert their biological functions by binding to prokaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and interfering with protein translation, resulting in bacterial cell death. They are also known to bind to viral mRNAs such as HIV-1 RRE and TAR. Consequently, aminoglycosides are accepted as the single most important model in understanding the principles that govern small molecule-RNA recognition, which is essential for the development of novel antibacterial, antiviral or even anti-oncogenic agents. This review outlines the chemical structures and mechanisms of molecular recognition and antibacterial activity of aminoglycosides and various aminoglycoside mimics that have recently been devised to improve biological efficacy, binding affinity and selectivity, or to circumvent bacterial resistance. PMID:19812740

  8. Quantification of extracellular matrix proteins from a rat lung scaffold to provide a molecular readout for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ryan C; Calle, Elizabeth A; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Niklason, Laura E; Hansen, Kirk C

    2015-04-01

    The use of extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds, derived from decellularized tissues for engineered organ generation, holds enormous potential in the field of regenerative medicine. To support organ engineering efforts, we developed a targeted proteomics method to extract and quantify extracellular matrix components from tissues. Our method provides more complete and accurate protein characterization than traditional approaches. This is accomplished through the analysis of both the chaotrope-soluble and -insoluble protein fractions and using recombinantly generated stable isotope labeled peptides for endogenous protein quantification. Using this approach, we have generated 74 peptides, representing 56 proteins to quantify protein in native (nondecellularized) and decellularized lung matrices. We have focused on proteins of the ECM and additional intracellular proteins that are challenging to remove during the decellularization procedure. Results indicate that the acellular lung scaffold is predominantly composed of structural collagens, with the majority of these proteins found in the insoluble ECM, a fraction that is often discarded using widely accepted proteomic methods. The decellularization procedure removes over 98% of intracellular proteins evaluated and retains, to varying degrees, proteoglycans and glycoproteins of the ECM. Accurate characterization of ECM proteins from tissue samples will help advance organ engineering efforts by generating a molecular readout that can be correlated with functional outcome to drive the next generation of engineered organs.

  9. Quantification of Extracellular Matrix Proteins from a Rat Lung Scaffold to Provide a Molecular Readout for Tissue Engineering*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ryan C.; Calle, Elizabeth A.; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Niklason, Laura E.; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2015-01-01

    The use of extracellular matrix (ECM)1 scaffolds, derived from decellularized tissues for engineered organ generation, holds enormous potential in the field of regenerative medicine. To support organ engineering efforts, we developed a targeted proteomics method to extract and quantify extracellular matrix components from tissues. Our method provides more complete and accurate protein characterization than traditional approaches. This is accomplished through the analysis of both the chaotrope-soluble and -insoluble protein fractions and using recombinantly generated stable isotope labeled peptides for endogenous protein quantification. Using this approach, we have generated 74 peptides, representing 56 proteins to quantify protein in native (nondecellularized) and decellularized lung matrices. We have focused on proteins of the ECM and additional intracellular proteins that are challenging to remove during the decellularization procedure. Results indicate that the acellular lung scaffold is predominantly composed of structural collagens, with the majority of these proteins found in the insoluble ECM, a fraction that is often discarded using widely accepted proteomic methods. The decellularization procedure removes over 98% of intracellular proteins evaluated and retains, to varying degrees, proteoglycans and glycoproteins of the ECM. Accurate characterization of ECM proteins from tissue samples will help advance organ engineering efforts by generating a molecular readout that can be correlated with functional outcome to drive the next generation of engineered organs. PMID:25660013

  10. A purification method for a molecular complex in which a scaffold molecule is fully loaded with heterogeneous molecules.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Shoji J; Sagawa, Fumihiko; Ohno, Hirohisa; Inoue, Tan

    2015-01-01

    An affinity resin-based pull-down method is convenient for the purification of biochemical materials. However, its use is difficult for the isolation of a molecular complex fully loaded with multiple components from a reaction mixture containing the starting materials and intermediate products. To overcome this problem, we have developed a new purification procedure that depends on sequential elimination of the residues. In practice, two affinity resins were used for purifying a triangular-shaped RNP (RNA-protein complex) consisting of three ribosomal proteins (L7Ae) bound to an RNA scaffold. First, a resin with immobilized L7Ae protein captured the incomplete RNP complexes and the free RNA scaffold. Next, another resin with an immobilized chemically modified RNA of a derivative of Box C/D motif, the binding partner of L7Ae, was used to capture free protein. The complete triangular RNP was successfully purified from the mixture by these two steps. Obviously, the purified triangular RNP displaying three protein-binding peptides exhibited an improved performance when compared with the unrefined product. Conceptually, this purification procedure should be applicable for the purification of a variety of complexes consisting of multiple components other than RNP.

  11. Molecular recognition study of Carbamazepine, antiseizure drug, by p-t-butyl calix(8)arene.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, C; Jayabal, P; Ramakrishnan, V

    2014-03-25

    The formation of inclusion complex of Carbamazepine, a antiseizure drug molecule, with the supra molecule, p-t-butyl calix(8)arene was studied. p-t-Butyl calix(8)arene was the host molecule and Carbamazepine was the guest molecule. Optical absorption spectral studies were carried out to study the molecular recognition properties of p-t-butyl calix(8)arene with Carbamazepine. The stochiometry of the host-guest complex and the binding constant were determined.

  12. Magnetic deep eutectic solvents molecularly imprinted polymers for the selective recognition and separation of protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjin; Wang, Yuzhi; Dai, Qingzhou; Zhou, Yigang

    2016-09-14

    A novel and facile magnetic deep eutectic solvents (DES) molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the selective recognition and separation of Bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was prepared. The new-type DES was adopted as the functional monomer which would bring molecular imprinted technology to a new direction. The amounts of DES were optimized. The obtained magnetic DES-MIPs were characterized with fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), elemental analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results suggested that the imprinted polymers were successfully formed and possessed a charming magnetism. The maximum adsorption capability (Qmax) and dissociation constant (KL) were analyzed by Langmuir isotherms (R(2) = 0.9983) and the value were estimated to be 175.44 mg/g and 0.035 mg/mL for the imprinted particles. And the imprinted particles showed a high imprinting factor of 4.77. In addition, the magnetic DES-MIPs presented outstanding recognition specificity and selectivity so that it can be utilized to separate template protein from the mixture of proteins and real samples. Last but not least, the combination of deep eutectic solvents and molecular imprinted technology in this paper provides a new perspective for the recognition and separation of proteins. PMID:27566352

  13. Organization of Inorganic Nanomaterials via Programmable DNA Self-Assembly and Peptide Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Joshua D.; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An interesting alternative to top-down nanofabrication is to imitate biology, where nanoscale materials frequently integrate organic molecules for self-assembly and molecular recognition with ordered, inorganic minerals to achieve mechanical, sensory, or other advantageous functions. Using biological systems as inspiration, researchers have sought to mimic the nanoscale composite materials produced in nature. Here, we describe a combination of self-assembly, molecular recognition, and templating, relying on an oligonucleotide covalently conjugated to a high-affinity gold-binding peptide. After integration of the peptide-coupled DNA into a self-assembling superstructure, the templated peptides recognize and bind gold nanoparticles. In addition to providing new ways of building functional multi-nanoparticle systems, this work provides experimental proof that a single peptide molecule is sufficient for immobilization of a nanoparticle. This molecular construction strategy, combining DNA assembly and peptide recognition, can be thought of as programmable, granular, artificial biomineralization. We also describe the important observation that the addition of 1–2% Tween 20 surfactant to the solution during gold particle binding allows the gold nanoparticles to remain soluble within the magnesium containing DNA assembly buffer under conditions that usually lead to the aggregation and precipitation of the nanoparticles. PMID:21314176

  14. Role of aromatic rings in the molecular recognition of aminoglycoside antibiotics: implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Tatiana; Corzana, Francisco; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; González, Carlos; Gómez, Ana M; Bastida, Agatha; Revuelta, Julia; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2010-09-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics participate in a large variety of binding processes involving both RNA and proteins. The description, in recent years, of several clinically relevant aminoglycoside/receptor complexes has greatly stimulated the structural-based design of new bioactive derivatives. Unfortunately, design efforts have frequently met with limited success, reflecting our incomplete understanding of the molecular determinants for the antibiotic recognition. Intriguingly, aromatic rings of the protein/RNA receptors seem to be key actors in this process. Indeed, close inspection of the structural information available reveals that they are frequently involved in CH/pi stacking interactions with sugar/aminocyclitol rings of the antibiotic. While the interaction between neutral carbohydrates and aromatic rings has been studied in detail during past decade, little is known about these contacts when they involve densely charged glycosides. Herein we report a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of the role played by CH/pi stacking interactions in the molecular recognition of aminoglycosides. Our study aims to determine the influence that the antibiotic polycationic character has on the stability, preferred geometry, and dynamics of these particular contacts. With this purpose, different aminoglycoside/aromatic complexes have been selected as model systems. They varied from simple bimolecular interactions to the more stable intramolecular CH/pi contacts present in designed derivatives. The obtained results highlight the key role played by electrostatic forces and the desolvation of charged groups in the molecular recognition of polycationic glycosides and have clear implications for the design of improved antibiotics.

  15. Structure and modeling of knottins, a promising molecular scaffold for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Gracy, Jérôme; Chiche, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    The knottins are extremely stable miniproteins present in many species and are able to perform various tasks. Owing to its small size and its amazing stability, the knottin structural domain is considered as an excellent scaffold for drug development. Several recent databases and web servers dedicated to or aware of knottins have appeared and are shortly described. Altogether they provide a valuable ensemble of data and of specific tools that greatly facilitate knottin-based studies. The essential structural features of the knottin scaffold, which heavily rest on the three knotted disulfide bridges for its stability, are reviewed. These include small but well-conserved secondary structures and hydrogen bonding networks, but also several further interactions that have been shown to be essential for stability and/or activity. Examples are supplementary disulfide bridges, side chain hydrogen bonds, or circularization. General structure prediction and modeling tools are not well fitted to knottins, and several specific tools have been developed. Specifically, methods to assign a disulfide connectivity pattern to small disulfide-rich sequences or to build accurate 3D models of knottins are available and are discussed in the review. Although more works are still needed to better understand sequence-structure-function relationships, recent studies strongly suggest that existing applications of knottins as drugs (i.e. painkillers), molecules for diagnosis, or insecticidal crop treatment should rapidly generalize and extend to other fields as well, e.g. as antimicrobials. PMID:22204432

  16. Identification of a novel V1-type AVP receptor based on the molecular recognition theory.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, V. L.; Ruiz-Opazo, N.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The molecular recognition theory predicts that binding domains of peptide hormones and their corresponding receptor binding domains evolved from complementary strands of genomic DNA, and that a process of selective evolutionary mutational events within these primordial domains gave rise to the high affinity and high specificity of peptide hormone-receptor interactions observed today in different peptide hormone-receptor systems. Moreover, this theory has been broadened as a general hypothesis that could explain the evolution of intermolecular protein-protein and intramolecular peptide interactions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Applying a molecular cloning strategy based on the molecular recognition theory, we screened a rat kidney cDNA library with a vasopressin (AVP) antisense oligonucleotide probe, expecting to isolate potential AVP receptors. RESULTS: We isolated a rat kidney cDNA encoding a functional V1-type vasopressin receptor. Structural analysis identified a 135 amino acid-long polypeptide with a single transmembrane domain, quite distinct from the rhodopsin-based G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Functional analysis of the expressed V1-type receptor in Cos-1 cells revealed AVP-specific binding, AVP-specific coupling to Ca2+ mobilizing transduction system, and characteristic V1-type antagonist inhibition. CONCLUSIONS: This is the second AVP receptor cDNA isolated using AVP antipeptide-based oligonucleotide screening, thus providing compelling evidence in support of the molecular recognition theory as the basis of the evolution of this peptide hormone-receptor system, as well as adds molecular complexity and diversity to AVP receptor systems. PMID:11683375

  17. Triplex molecular beacons for sensitive recognition of melamine based on abasic-site-containing DNA and fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Sun, Qianqian; Zhu, Linling; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Fengyang; Lu, Linlin; Yu, Haijun; Xu, Zhiai; Zhang, Wen

    2015-05-01

    A melamine aptamer derived from an abasic-site-containing triplex molecular beacon (tMB) was designed and developed for sensitive recognition of melamine by integrating tMBs and fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs).

  18. Hydrophilic Molecularly Imprinted Resorcinol-Formaldehyde-Melamine Resin Prepared in Water with Excellent Molecular Recognition in Aqueous Matrices.

    PubMed

    Lv, Tianwei; Yan, Hongyuan; Cao, Jiankun; Liang, Shiru

    2015-11-01

    Hydrophilic molecularly imprinted resorcinol-formaldehyde-melamine resin (MIRFM) is synthesized in water and shows excellent molecular recognition in aqueous matrices. The double functional monomers resorcinol and melamine, and the cross-linker formaldehyde, are all hydrophilic, and then the hydrophilic groups (such as hydroxyls, imino groups, and ether linkages) can be introduced into MIRFM, which make the material compatible with aqueous samples. The general principle is demonstrated by the synthesis of MIRFM using sulfanilamide as a dummy template for the selective recognition to sulfonamides (SAs) in milk samples. Resorcinol and melamine can interact with the template mainly by hydrogen bonding and π-π interaction, which makes MIRFM and the analytes have strong affinity. Besides, melamine can improve the rigidity of MIRFM and accelerate the polymerization process, so there is no need to add base or acid as a catalyst, which guarantees the success of molecular imprinting. MIRFM shows higher recovery and improved purification effect for SAs, in comparison to silica, HLB, C18, and SCX. Because of its excellent hydrophilicity and specificity, MIRFM is promising to be applied in biological, environmental, and clinical fields. PMID:26441379

  19. Hydrophilic Molecularly Imprinted Resorcinol-Formaldehyde-Melamine Resin Prepared in Water with Excellent Molecular Recognition in Aqueous Matrices.

    PubMed

    Lv, Tianwei; Yan, Hongyuan; Cao, Jiankun; Liang, Shiru

    2015-11-01

    Hydrophilic molecularly imprinted resorcinol-formaldehyde-melamine resin (MIRFM) is synthesized in water and shows excellent molecular recognition in aqueous matrices. The double functional monomers resorcinol and melamine, and the cross-linker formaldehyde, are all hydrophilic, and then the hydrophilic groups (such as hydroxyls, imino groups, and ether linkages) can be introduced into MIRFM, which make the material compatible with aqueous samples. The general principle is demonstrated by the synthesis of MIRFM using sulfanilamide as a dummy template for the selective recognition to sulfonamides (SAs) in milk samples. Resorcinol and melamine can interact with the template mainly by hydrogen bonding and π-π interaction, which makes MIRFM and the analytes have strong affinity. Besides, melamine can improve the rigidity of MIRFM and accelerate the polymerization process, so there is no need to add base or acid as a catalyst, which guarantees the success of molecular imprinting. MIRFM shows higher recovery and improved purification effect for SAs, in comparison to silica, HLB, C18, and SCX. Because of its excellent hydrophilicity and specificity, MIRFM is promising to be applied in biological, environmental, and clinical fields.

  20. Molecular recognition in myxobacterial outer membrane exchange: Functional, social and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Through cooperative interactions, bacteria can build multicellular communities. To ensure that productive interactions occur, bacteria must recognize their neighbors and respond accordingly. Molecular recognition between cells is thus a fundamental behavior, and in bacteria important discoveries have been made. This MicroReview focuses on a recently described recognition system in myxobacteria that is governed by a polymorphic cell surface receptor called TraA. TraA regulates outer membrane exchange (OME), whereby myxobacterial cells transiently fuse their OMs to efficiently transfer proteins and lipids between cells. Unlike other transport systems, OME is rather indiscriminate in what OM goods are transferred. In contrast, the recognition of partnering cells is discriminatory and only occurs between cells that bear identical or closely related TraA proteins. Therefore TraA functions in kin recognition and, in turn, OME helps regulate social interactions between myxobacteria. Here, I discuss and speculate on the social and evolutionary implications of OME and suggest it helps to guide their transition from free-living cells into coherent and functional populations. PMID:24261719

  1. Design Molecular Recognition Materials for Chiral Sensors, Separtations and Catalytic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, S.; Nenoff, T.M.; Provencio, P.; Qiu, Y.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Thoma, S.G.; Zhang, J.

    1998-11-01

    The goal is the development of materials that are highly sensitive and selective for chid chemicals and biochemical (such as insecticides, herbicides, proteins, and nerve agents) to be used as sensors, catalysts and separations membranes. Molecular modeling methods are being used to tailor chiral molecular recognition sites with high affinity and selectivity for specified agents. The work focuses on both silicate and non-silicate materials modified with chirally-pure fictional groups for the catalysis or separations of enantiomerically-pure molecules. Surfactant and quaternary amine templating is being used to synthesize porous frameworks, containing mesopores of 30 to 100 angstroms. Computer molecukw modeling methods are being used in the design of these materials, especially in the chid surface- modi~ing agents. Molecular modeling is also being used to predict the catalytic and separations selectivities of the modified mesoporous materials. The ability to design and synthesize tailored asymmetric molecular recognition sites for sensor coatings allows a broader range of chemicals to be sensed with the desired high sensitivity and selectivity. Initial experiments target the selective sensing of small molecule gases and non-toxic model neural compounds. Further efforts will address designing sensors that greatly extend the variety of resolvable chemical species and forming a predictive, model-based method for developing advanced sensors.

  2. Surface-imprinted nanostructured layer-by-layer film for molecular recognition of theophylline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jia; Liu, Zhihua; Fu, Long; Shi, Feng; Ma, Hongwei; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Zhang, Xi

    2008-10-21

    In this article we report the introduction of the cooperativity of various specific interactions combined with photo-cross-linking of the interlayers to yield binding sites that can realize better selectivity and imprinting efficiency of a surface molecularly imprinted LbL film (SMILbL), thus providing a new approach toward fabrication of nanostructured molecularly imprinted thin films. It involves preassembly of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) conjugated of the theophylline residue template via a disulfide bridge, denoted as PAAtheo 15, in solution, and layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of PAAtheo 15 and a positively charged photoreactive diazo resin (DAR) to form multilayer thin film with designed architecture. After photo-cross-linking of the film and template removal, binding sites specific to 7-(beta-hydroxyethyl)theophylline (Theo-ol) molecules are introduced within the film. Binding assay demonstrates that the SMILbL has a high selectivity of SMILbL to Theo-ol over caffeine. A control experiment demonstrates that the selectivity of SMILbL derives from nanostructured recognition sites among the layers. The imprinting amount per unit mass of the film can be 1 order of magnitude larger than that of the conventional bulk molecular imprinting systems. As this concept of construction SMILbL can be easily extended to the other molecules by the following similar protocol: its applications in building many other different molecular recognition systems are greatly anticipated. PMID:18788771

  3. Molecularly imprinted titania nanoparticles for selective recognition and assay of uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujahid, Adnan; Khan, Aimen Idrees; Afzal, Adeel; Hussain, Tajamal; Raza, Muhammad Hamid; Shah, Asma Tufail; uz Zaman, Waheed

    2015-06-01

    Molecularly imprinted titania nanoparticles are su ccessfully synthesized by sol-gel method for the selective recognition of uric acid. Atomic force microscopy is used to study the morphology of uric acid imprinted titania nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 100-150 nm. Scanning electron microscopy images of thick titania layer indicate the formation of fine network of titania nanoparticles with uniform distribution. Molecular imprinting of uric acid as well as its subsequent washing is confirmed by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy measurements. Uric acid rebinding studies reveal the recognition capability of imprinted particles in the range of 0.01-0.095 mmol, which is applicable in monitoring normal to elevated levels of uric acid in human blood. The optical shift (signal) of imprinted particles is six times higher in comparison with non-imprinted particles for the same concentration of uric acid. Imprinted titania particles have shown substantially reduced binding affinity toward interfering and structurally related substances, e.g. ascorbic acid and guanine. These results suggest the possible application of titania nanoparticles in uric acid recognition and quantification in blood serum.

  4. Molecular Basis for Phosphorylation-dependent SUMO Recognition by the DNA Repair Protein RAP80.

    PubMed

    Anamika; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2016-02-26

    Recognition and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSB) involves the targeted recruitment of BRCA tumor suppressors to damage foci through binding of both ubiquitin (Ub) and the Ub-like modifier SUMO. RAP80 is a component of the BRCA1 A complex, and plays a key role in the recruitment process through the binding of Lys(63)-linked poly-Ub chains by tandem Ub interacting motifs (UIM). RAP80 also contains a SUMO interacting motif (SIM) just upstream of the tandem UIMs that has been shown to specifically bind the SUMO-2 isoform. The RAP80 tandem UIMs and SIM function collectively for optimal recruitment of BRCA1 to DSBs, although the molecular basis of this process is not well understood. Using NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the RAP80 SIM binds SUMO-2, and that both specificity and affinity are enhanced through phosphorylation of the canonical CK2 site within the SIM. The affinity increase results from an enhancement of electrostatic interactions between the phosphoserines of RAP80 and the SIM recognition module within SUMO-2. The NMR structure of the SUMO-2·phospho-RAP80 complex reveals that the molecular basis for SUMO-2 specificity is due to isoform-specific sequence differences in electrostatic SIM recognition modules.

  5. Ligand scaffold hopping combining 3D maximal substructure search and molecular similarity

    PubMed Central

    Quintus, Flavien; Sperandio, Olivier; Grynberg, Julien; Petitjean, Michel; Tuffery, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background Virtual screening methods are now well established as effective to identify hit and lead candidates and are fully integrated in most drug discovery programs. Ligand-based approaches make use of physico-chemical, structural and energetics properties of known active compounds to search large chemical libraries for related and novel chemotypes. While 2D-similarity search tools are known to be fast and efficient, the use of 3D-similarity search methods can be very valuable to many research projects as integration of "3D knowledge" can facilitate the identification of not only related molecules but also of chemicals possessing distant scaffolds as compared to the query and therefore be more inclined to scaffolds hopping. To date, very few methods performing this task are easily available to the scientific community. Results We introduce a new approach (LigCSRre) to the 3D ligand similarity search of drug candidates. It combines a 3D maximum common substructure search algorithm independent on atom order with a tunable description of atomic compatibilities to prune the search and increase its physico-chemical relevance. We show, on 47 experimentally validated active compounds across five protein targets having different specificities, that for single compound search, the approach is able to recover on average 52% of the co-actives in the top 1% of the ranked list which is better than gold standards of the field. Moreover, the combination of several runs on a single protein target using different query active compounds shows a remarkable improvement in enrichment. Such Results demonstrate LigCSRre as a valuable tool for ligand-based screening. Conclusion LigCSRre constitutes a new efficient and generic approach to the 3D similarity screening of small compounds, whose flexible design opens the door to many enhancements. The program is freely available to the academics for non-profit research at: . PMID:19671127

  6. DNA aptamers are functional molecular recognition sensors in protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Machado, Isabel; Özalp, Veli Cengiz; Rezabal, Elixabete; Schäfer, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The function and structural changes of an AMP molecular aptamer beacon and its molecular recognition capacity for its target, adenosine monophosphate (AMP), was systematically explored in solution with a protic ionic liquid, ethylammonium nitrate (EAN). It could be proven that up to 2 M of EAN in TBS buffer, the AMP molecular aptamer beacon was still capable of recognizing AMP while also maintaining its specificity. The specificity was proven by using the guanosine monophosphate (GMP) as target; GMP is structurally similar to AMP but was not recognized by the aptamer. We also found that in highly concentrated EAN solutions the overall amount of double stranded DNA formed, as well as its respective thermal stability, diminished gradually, but surprisingly the hybridization rate (kh ) of single stranded DNA was significantly accelerated in the presence of EAN. The latter may have important implications in DNA technology for the design of biosensing and DNA-based nanodevices in nonconventional solvents, such as ionic liquids.

  7. Selective Nitrate Recognition by a Halogen-Bonding Four-Station [3]Rotaxane Molecular Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Barendt, Timothy A; Docker, Andrew; Marques, Igor; Félix, Vítor; Beer, Paul D

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of the first halogen bonding [3]rotaxane host system containing a bis-iodo triazolium-bis-naphthalene diimide four station axle component is reported. Proton NMR anion binding titration experiments revealed the halogen bonding rotaxane is selective for nitrate over the more basic acetate, hydrogen carbonate and dihydrogen phosphate oxoanions and chloride, and exhibits enhanced recognition of anions relative to a hydrogen bonding analogue. This elaborate interlocked anion receptor functions via a novel dynamic pincer mechanism where upon nitrate anion binding, both macrocycles shuttle from the naphthalene diimide stations at the periphery of the axle to the central halogen bonding iodo-triazolium station anion recognition sites to form a unique 1:1 stoichiometric nitrate anion-rotaxane sandwich complex. Molecular dynamics simulations carried out on the nitrate and chloride halogen bonding [3]rotaxane complexes corroborate the (1) H NMR anion binding results.

  8. Molecular recognition of arginine by supramolecular complexation with calixarene crown ether based on surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxia; Gu, Limin; Yin, Yongmei; Koh, Kwangnak; Lee, Jaebeom

    2011-01-01

    Arginine plays an important role in cell division and the functioning of the immune system. We describe a novel method by which arginine can be identified using an artificial monolayer based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The affinity of arginine binding its recognition molecular was compared to that of lysine. In fabrication of an arginine sensing interface, a calix[4]crown ether monolayer was anchored onto a gold surface and then characterized by Fourier Transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction between arginine and its host compound was investigated by SPR. The calix[4]crown ether was found to assemble as a monolayer on the gold surface. Recognition of calix[4]crown monolayer was assessed by the selective binding of arginine. Modification of the SPR chip with the calix[4]crown monolayer provides a reliable and simple experimental platform for investigation of arginine under aqueous conditions.

  9. Selective Nitrate Recognition by a Halogen-Bonding Four-Station [3]Rotaxane Molecular Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Barendt, Timothy A; Docker, Andrew; Marques, Igor; Félix, Vítor; Beer, Paul D

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of the first halogen bonding [3]rotaxane host system containing a bis-iodo triazolium-bis-naphthalene diimide four station axle component is reported. Proton NMR anion binding titration experiments revealed the halogen bonding rotaxane is selective for nitrate over the more basic acetate, hydrogen carbonate and dihydrogen phosphate oxoanions and chloride, and exhibits enhanced recognition of anions relative to a hydrogen bonding analogue. This elaborate interlocked anion receptor functions via a novel dynamic pincer mechanism where upon nitrate anion binding, both macrocycles shuttle from the naphthalene diimide stations at the periphery of the axle to the central halogen bonding iodo-triazolium station anion recognition sites to form a unique 1:1 stoichiometric nitrate anion-rotaxane sandwich complex. Molecular dynamics simulations carried out on the nitrate and chloride halogen bonding [3]rotaxane complexes corroborate the (1) H NMR anion binding results. PMID:27436297

  10. High-resolution crystal structure reveals molecular details of target recognition by bacitracin

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacitracin is a metalloantibiotic agent that is widely used as a medicine and feed additive. It interferes with bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding undecaprenyl-pyrophosphate, a lipid carrier that serves as a critical intermediate in cell wall production. Despite bacitracin’s broad use, the molecular details of its target recognition have not been elucidated. Here we report a crystal structure for the ternary complex of bacitracin A, zinc, and a geranyl-pyrophosphate ligand at a resolution of 1.1 Å. The antibiotic forms a compact structure that completely envelopes the ligand’s pyrophosphate group, together with flanking zinc and sodium ions. The complex adopts a highly amphipathic conformation that offers clues to antibiotic function in the context of bacterial membranes. Bacitracin’s efficient sequestration of its target represents a previously unseen mode for the recognition of lipid pyrophosphates, and suggests new directions for the design of next-generation antimicrobial agents. PMID:23940351

  11. Molecular Recognition in Glycolaldehyde, the Simplest Sugar: Two Isolated Hydrogen Bonds Win Over One Cooperative Pair

    PubMed Central

    Altnöder, Jonas; Lee, Juhyon J; Otto, Katharina E; Suhm, Martin A

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates are used in nature as molecular recognition tools. Understanding their conformational behavior upon aggregation helps in rationalizing the way in which cells and bacteria use sugars to communicate. Here, the simplest α-hydroxy carbonyl compound, glycolaldehyde, was used as a model system. It was shown to form compact polar C2-symmetric dimers with intermolecular O–H⋅⋅⋅O=C bonds, while sacrificing the corresponding intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Supersonic jet infrared (IR) and Raman spectra combined with high-level quantum chemical calculations provide a consistent picture for the preference over more typical hydrogen bond insertion and addition patterns. Experimental evidence for at least one metastable dimer is presented. A rotational spectroscopy investigation of these dimers is encouraged, also in view of astrophysical searches. The binding motif competition of aldehydic sugars might play a role in chirality recognition phenomena of more complex derivatives in the gas phase. PMID:24551516

  12. Molecular recognition of parathyroid hormone by its G protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Xu, H. Eric

    2008-08-07

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is central to calcium homeostasis and bone maintenance in vertebrates, and as such it has been used for treating osteoporosis. It acts primarily by binding to its receptor, PTH1R, a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family that also includes receptors for glucagon, calcitonin, and other therapeutically important peptide hormones. Despite considerable interest and much research, determining the structure of the receptor-hormone complex has been hindered by difficulties in purifying the receptor and obtaining diffraction-quality crystals. Here, we present a method for expression and purification of the extracellular domain (ECD) of human PTH1R engineered as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion that readily crystallizes. The 1.95-{angstrom} structure of PTH bound to the MBP-PTH1R-ECD fusion reveals that PTH docks as an amphipathic helix into a central hydrophobic groove formed by a three-layer {alpha}-{beta}-{beta}{alpha} fold of the PTH1R ECD, resembling a hot dog in a bun. Conservation in the ECD scaffold and the helical structure of peptide hormones emphasizes this hot dog model as a general mechanism of hormone recognition common to class B GPCRs. Our findings reveal critical insights into PTH actions and provide a rational template for drug design that targets this hormone signaling pathway.

  13. Molecular recognition with nanostructures fabricated by photopolymerization within metallic subwavelength apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urraca, J. L.; Barrios, C. A.; Canalejas-Tejero, V.; Orellana, G.; Moreno-Bondi, M. C.

    2014-07-01

    The first demonstration of fabrication of submicron lateral resolution molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) patterns by photoinduced local polymerization within metal subwavelength apertures is reported. The size of the photopolymerized MIP features is finely tuned by the dose of 532 nm radiation. Rhodamine 123 (R123) has been selected as a fluorescent model template to prove the recognition capability of the MIP nanostructures, which has been evaluated by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with single photon timing measurements. The binding selectivity provided by the imprinting effect has been confirmed in the presence of compounds structurally related to R123. These results pave the way to the development of nanomaterial architectures with biomimetic artificial recognition properties for environmental, clinical and food testing.The first demonstration of fabrication of submicron lateral resolution molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) patterns by photoinduced local polymerization within metal subwavelength apertures is reported. The size of the photopolymerized MIP features is finely tuned by the dose of 532 nm radiation. Rhodamine 123 (R123) has been selected as a fluorescent model template to prove the recognition capability of the MIP nanostructures, which has been evaluated by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with single photon timing measurements. The binding selectivity provided by the imprinting effect has been confirmed in the presence of compounds structurally related to R123. These results pave the way to the development of nanomaterial architectures with biomimetic artificial recognition properties for environmental, clinical and food testing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. SI.1: chemical structure and acronyms of the different fluorescent dyes; optimization of polymer composition; Table SI.1. Template recovery after polymerization; determination of the binding capacity by equilibrium rebinding

  14. Molecular recognition between glyconectins as an adhesion self-assembly pathway to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Misevic, Gradimir N; Guerardel, Yann; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Demarty, Maurice; Ripoll, Camille; Karamanos, Yannis; Maes, Emmanuel; Popescu, Octavian; Strecker, Gerard

    2004-04-01

    The appearance of multicellular forms of life has been tightly coupled to the ability of an organism to retain its own anatomical integrity and to distinguish self from non-self. Large glycoconjugates, which make up the outermost cell surface layer of all Metazoans, are the primary candidates for the primordial adhesion and recognition functions in biological self-assembly systems. Atomic force microscopy experiments demonstrated that the binding strength between a single pair of Porifera cell surface glyconectin 1 glycoconjugates from Microciona prolifera can hold the weight of 1600 cells, proving their adhesion functions. Here, measurement of molecular self-recognition of glyconectins (GNs) purified from three Porifera species was used as an experimental model for primordial xenogeneic self/non-self discrimination. Physicochemical and biochemical characterization of the three glyconectins, their glycans, and peptides using gel electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, NMR, mass spectrometry, glycosaminoglycan-degrading enzyme treatment, amino acid and carbohydrate analyses, and peptide mapping showed that GNs define a new family of proteoglycan-like molecules exhibiting species-specific structures with complex and repetitive acidic carbohydrate motives different from the classical proteoglycans and mucins. In functional self-assembly color-coded bead, cell, and blotting assays, glyconectins displayed species-specific recognition and adhesion. Affinity-purified monospecific polyclonal antibodies prepared against GN1, -2, and -3 glycans selectively inhibited cell adhesion of the respective sponge species. These results together with species-specific coaggregation of GN carbohydrate-coated beads with cells showed that GN glycans are functional in cell recognition and adhesion. The specificity of carbohydrate-mediated homophilic GN interactions in Porifera approaches the binding selectivity of the evolutionarily advanced immunoglobulin superfamily. Xenoselectivity of

  15. Two dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy for molecular fingerprinting, DNA sequencing, and cancerous DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Arunkumar Chitteth; Rezapour, Mohammad Reza; Yun, Jeonghun; Cho, Yeonchoo; Cho, Woo Jong; Min, Seung Kyu; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-02-25

    Laser-driven molecular spectroscopy of low spatial resolution is widely used, while electronic current-driven molecular spectroscopy of atomic scale resolution has been limited because currents provide only minimal information. However, electron transmission of a graphene nanoribbon on which a molecule is adsorbed shows molecular fingerprints of Fano resonances, i.e., characteristic features of frontier orbitals and conformations of physisorbed molecules. Utilizing these resonance profiles, here we demonstrate two-dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy (2D MES). The differential conductance with respect to bias and gate voltages not only distinguishes different types of nucleobases for DNA sequencing but also recognizes methylated nucleobases which could be related to cancerous cell growth. This 2D MES could open an exciting field to recognize single molecule signatures at atomic resolution. The advantages of the 2D MES over the one-dimensional (1D) current analysis can be comparable to those of 2D NMR over 1D NMR analysis.

  16. Biophysical exploration of protein-flavonol recognition: effects of molecular properties and conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Peng, Wei; Peng, Yu-Kui

    2016-04-28

    The current work explores the biomolecular recognition of a series of flavonols by a protein and then uncovers the influences of the structural features of flavonols and the protein's own characteristics, e.g. the dynamics and flexibility, on the bioavailability of flavonols by using the pivotal biomacromolecule hemoglobin as a model. The experimental results revealed that flavonol may lead to a notable decrease in the steady-state fluorescence intensity of the β-37 Trp residue, and in the meantime the R-T transition of the protein transpired. Such noncovalent recognition forms the ground-state adduct, with an association intensity of 3.991 × 10(4) M(-1) in the reaction process, which has already been authenticated by the detailed analysis of time-resolved fluorescence and UV/vis absorption spectra. Furthermore, flavonol can form hydrogen bonds and π-conjugation effects with several amino acid residues on the polypeptide chain, for example, Trp-37, Arg-40, Asp-99 and Asn-102, and this event would induce self-regulation of the compact, regular conformation of the protein to a certain extent, which explicitly corroborates the results of circular dichroism. According to the study of molecular docking and structure-activity relationships, we could see that the recognition capacities of the protein-flavonols are inversely interrelated with the C log P values of the flavonol molecules. Moreover, the properties of the substituents in the structural B-ring unit of flavonols, i.e. polarity, position and number, will also prominently affect the degree of affinity and bioavailability of the protein-flavonol complexes. The analytical results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation testified that the discussions of the structure-activity relationships are entirely logical, and the conformations of the amino acid residues forming noncovalent interactions tend to be stable in the MD simulation, as further elucidated from the dynamics data. Plainly, molecular recognition of

  17. Exploiting β-Cyclodextrin in Molecular Imprinting for Achieving Recognition of Benzylparaben in Aqueous Media

    PubMed Central

    Asman, Saliza; Mohamad, Sharifah; Muhamad Sarih, Norazilawati

    2015-01-01

    The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based on methacrylic acid functionalized β-cyclodextrin (MAA-β-CD) monomer was synthesized for the purpose of selective recognition of benzylparaben (BzP). The MAA-β-CD monomer was produced by bridging a methacrylic acid (MAA) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) using toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) by reacting the –OH group of MAA and one of the primary –OH groups of β-CD. This monomer comprised of triple interactions that included an inclusion complex, π–π interaction, and hydrogen bonding. To demonstrate β-CD performance in MIPs, two MIPs were prepared; molecularly imprinted polymer-methacrylic acid functionalized β-cyclodextrin, MIP(MAA-β-CD), and molecularly imprinted polymer-methacrylic acid, MIP(MAA); both prepared by a reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) in the bulk polymerization process. Both MIPs were characterized using the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The presence of β-CD not only influenced the morphological structure, it also affected the specific surface area, average pore diameter, and total pore volume of the MIP. The rebinding of the imprinting effect was evaluated in binding experiments, which proved that the β-CD contributed significantly to the enhancement of the recognition affinity and selective adsorption of the MIP. PMID:25667978

  18. Improvement of DNA recognition through molecular imprinting: hybrid oligomer imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (oligoMIP NPs).

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, H; Poma, A; Pendergraff, H M; Watts, J K; Turner, N W

    2016-02-01

    High affinity and specific binding are cardinal properties of nucleic acids in relation to their biological function and their role in biotechnology. To this end, structural preorganization of oligonucleotides can significantly improve their binding performance, and numerous examples of this can be found in Nature as well as in artificial systems. Here we describe the production and characterization of hybrid DNA-polymer nanoparticles (oligoMIP NPs) as a system in which we have preorganized the oligonucleotide binding by molecular imprinting technology. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are cost-effective "smart" polymeric materials capable of antibody-like detection, but characterized by superior robustness and the ability to work in extreme environmental conditions. Especially in the nanoparticle format, MIPs are dubbed as one of the most suitable alternatives to biological antibodies due to their selective molecular recognition properties, improved binding kinetics as well as size and dispersibility. Nonetheless, there have been very few attempts at DNA imprinting in the past due to structural complexity associated with these templates. By introducing modified thymine bases into the oligonucleotide sequences, which allow establishing covalent bonds between the DNA and the polymer, we demonstrate that such hybrid oligoMIP NPs specifically recognize their target DNA, and that the unique strategy of incorporating the complementary DNA strands as "preorganized selective monomers" improves the recognition properties without affecting the NPs physical properties such as size, shape or dispersibility. PMID:26509192

  19. Probing Molecular Recognition at the Solid-Gas Interface by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Arianna; Ciuchi, Federica; Pinalli, Roberta; Dalcanale, Enrico; Pagliusi, Pasquale

    2016-08-01

    Molecular recognition is among the most important chemical events in living systems and has been emulated in supramolecular chemistry, driven by chemical and biochemical sensing potential. Identifying host-guest association in situ at the interface, between the substrate-bound receptors and the analyte-containing media, is essential to predict complexation performances in term of the receptor conformation, orientation and organization. Herein, we report the first sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy study of molecular recognition at the solid-gas interface. The binding capability of tetraquinoxaline cavitands toward volatile aromatic and aliphatic compounds, namely benzonitrile and acetonitrile, is investigated as test system. We prove the selective complexation of the receptors, organized in a solid-supported hybrid bilayer, toward aromatic compounds. Quantitative analysis allows to correlate the average orientations of the guest molecules and the host binding pockets, establishing "on-axis" complexation of benzonitrile within the cavitand cavity. The study is readily applicable to other receptors, molecular architectures, interfaces and analytes. PMID:27438350

  20. Label-Free Sensing of Adenosine Based on Force Variations Induced by Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingfeng; Li, Qing; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio; Wei, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple force-based label-free strategy for the highly sensitive sensing of adenosine. An adenosine ssDNA aptamer was bound onto an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe by covalent modification, and the molecular-interface adsorption force between the aptamer and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). In the presence of adenosine, the molecular recognition between adenosine and the aptamer resulted in the formation of a folded, hairpin-like DNA structure and hence caused a variation of the adsorption force at the graphite/water interface. The sensitive force response to molecular recognition provided an adenosine detection limit in the range of 0.1 to 1 nM. The addition of guanosine, cytidine, and uridine had no significant interference with the sensing of adenosine, indicating a strong selectivity of this sensor architecture. In addition, operational parameters that may affect the sensor, such as loading rate and solution ionic strength, were investigated. PMID:25808841

  1. Metal Oxide Nanosensors Using Polymeric Membranes, Enzymes and Antibody Receptors as Ion and Molecular Recognition Elements

    PubMed Central

    Willander, Magnus; Khun, Kimleang; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain

    2014-01-01

    The concept of recognition and biofunctionality has attracted increasing interest in the fields of chemistry and material sciences. Advances in the field of nanotechnology for the synthesis of desired metal oxide nanostructures have provided a solid platform for the integration of nanoelectronic devices. These nanoelectronics-based devices have the ability to recognize molecular species of living organisms, and they have created the possibility for advanced chemical sensing functionalities with low limits of detection in the nanomolar range. In this review, various metal oxides, such as ZnO-, CuO-, and NiO-based nanosensors, are described using different methods (receptors) of functionalization for molecular and ion recognition. These functionalized metal oxide surfaces with a specific receptor involve either a complex formation between the receptor and the analyte or an electrostatic interaction during the chemical sensing of analytes. Metal oxide nanostructures are considered revolutionary nanomaterials that have a specific surface for the immobilization of biomolecules with much needed orientation, good conformation and enhanced biological activity which further improve the sensing properties of nanosensors. Metal oxide nanostructures are associated with certain unique optical, electrical and molecular characteristics in addition to unique functionalities and surface charge features which shows attractive platforms for interfacing biorecognition elements with effective transducing properties for signal amplification. There is a great opportunity in the near future for metal oxide nanostructure-based miniaturization and the development of engineering sensor devices. PMID:24841244

  2. Role for the propofol hydroxyl in anesthetic protein target molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Woll, Kellie A; Weiser, Brian P; Liang, Qiansheng; Meng, Tao; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Pinch, Benika; Dailey, William P; Gao, Wei Dong; Covarrubias, Manuel; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2015-06-17

    Propofol is a widely used intravenous general anesthetic. We synthesized 2-fluoro-1,3-diisopropylbenzene, a compound that we call "fropofol", to directly assess the significance of the propofol 1-hydroxyl for pharmacologically relevant molecular recognition in vitro and for anesthetic efficacy in vivo. Compared to propofol, fropofol had a similar molecular volume and only a small increase in hydrophobicity. Isothermal titration calorimetry and competition assays revealed that fropofol had higher affinity for a protein site governed largely by van der Waals interactions. Within another protein model containing hydrogen bond interactions, propofol demonstrated higher affinity. In vivo, fropofol demonstrated no anesthetic efficacy, but at high concentrations produced excitatory activity in tadpoles and mice; fropofol also antagonized propofol-induced hypnosis. In a propofol protein target that contributes to hypnosis, α1β2γ2L GABAA receptors, fropofol demonstrated no significant effect alone or on propofol positive allosteric modulation of the ion channel, suggesting an additional requirement for the 1-hydroxyl within synaptic GABAA receptor site(s). However, fropofol caused similar adverse cardiovascular effects as propofol by a dose-dependent depression of myocardial contractility. Our results directly implicate the propofol 1-hydroxyl as contributing to molecular recognition within protein targets leading to hypnosis, but not necessarily within protein targets leading to side effects of the drug.

  3. Label-free sensing of adenosine based on force variations induced by molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingfeng; Li, Qing; Ciacchi, Lucio Colombi; Wei, Gang

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple force-based label-free strategy for the highly sensitive sensing of adenosine. An adenosine ssDNA aptamer was bound onto an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe by covalent modification, and the molecular-interface adsorption force between the aptamer and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). In the presence of adenosine, the molecular recognition between adenosine and the aptamer resulted in the formation of a folded, hairpin-like DNA structure and hence caused a variation of the adsorption force at the graphite/water interface. The sensitive force response to molecular recognition provided an adenosine detection limit in the range of 0.1 to 1 nM. The addition of guanosine, cytidine, and uridine had no significant interference with the sensing of adenosine, indicating a strong selectivity of this sensor architecture. In addition, operational parameters that may affect the sensor, such as loading rate and solution ionic strength, were investigated.

  4. Self-assembly of [3]catenanes and a [4]molecular necklace based on a cryptand/paraquat recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yang; Wang, Shu-Ping; Zhu, Bin; Cook, Timothy R; Wu, Jing; Li, Shijun; Stang, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Hierarchical self-assembly centered on metallacyclic scaffolds greatly facilitates the construction of mechanically interlocked structures. The formation of two [3]catenanes and one [4]molecular necklace is presented by utilizing the orthogonality of coordination-driven self-assembly and crown ether-based cryptand/paraquat derivative complexation. The threaded [3]catenanes and [4]molecular necklace were fabricated by using ten and nine total molecular components, respectively, from four and three unique species in solution, respectively. In all cases single supramolecular ensembles were obtained, attesting to the high degree of structural complexity made possible via self-assembly approaches. PMID:25996900

  5. Self-assembly of [3]catenanes and a [4]molecular necklace based on a cryptand/paraquat recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yang; Wang, Shu-Ping; Zhu, Bin; Cook, Timothy R; Wu, Jing; Li, Shijun; Stang, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Hierarchical self-assembly centered on metallacyclic scaffolds greatly facilitates the construction of mechanically interlocked structures. The formation of two [3]catenanes and one [4]molecular necklace is presented by utilizing the orthogonality of coordination-driven self-assembly and crown ether-based cryptand/paraquat derivative complexation. The threaded [3]catenanes and [4]molecular necklace were fabricated by using ten and nine total molecular components, respectively, from four and three unique species in solution, respectively. In all cases single supramolecular ensembles were obtained, attesting to the high degree of structural complexity made possible via self-assembly approaches.

  6. Towards understanding the molecular recognition process in prokaryotic zinc-finger domain.

    PubMed

    Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Caso, Jolanda Valentina; D'Abrosca, Gianluca; Diana, Donatella; Malgieri, Gaetano; Baglivo, Ilaria; Isernia, Carla; Pedone, Paolo V; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2015-02-16

    Eukaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger domain is one of the most common and important structural motifs involved in protein-DNA interaction. The recognition motif is characterized by the tetrahedral coordination of a zinc ion by conserved cysteine and histidine residues. We have characterized the prokaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger motif, included in the DNA binding region (Ros87) of Ros protein from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, demonstrating that, although possessing a similar zinc coordination sphere, this domain presents significant differences from its eukaryotic counterpart. Furthermore, basic residues flanking the zinc binding region on either side have been demonstrated, by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) experiments, to be essential for Ros DNA binding. In spite of this wealth of knowledge, the structural details of the mechanism through which the prokaryotic zinc fingers recognize their target genes are still unclear. Here, to gain insights into the molecular DNA recognition process of prokaryotic zinc finger domains we applied a strategy in which we performed molecular docking studies using a combination of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations data. The results demonstrate that the MD ensemble provides a reasonable picture of Ros87 backbone dynamics in solution. The Ros87-DNA model indicates that the interaction involves the first two residue of the first α-helix, and several residues located in the basic regions flanking the zinc finger domain. Interestingly, the prokaryotic zinc finger domain, mainly with the C-terminal tail that is wrapped around the DNA, binds a more extended recognition site than the eukaryotic counterpart. Our analysis demonstrates that the introduction of the protein flexibility in docking studies can improve, in terms of accuracy, the quality of the obtained models and could be particularly useful for protein showing high conformational heterogeneity as well as for computational drug design

  7. Molecular Recognition Analyzed by Docking Simulations: The Aspartate Receptor and Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Barry L.; Koshland, Daniel E., Jr.

    1993-02-01

    Protein docking protocols are used for the prediction of both small molecule binding to DNA and protein macromolecules and of complexes between macromolecules. These protocols are becoming increasingly automated and powerful tools for computer-aided drug design. We review the basic methodologies and strategies used for analyzing molecular recognition by computer docking algorithms and discuss recent experiments in which (i) substrate and substrate analogues are docked to the active site of isocitrate dehydrogenase and (ii) maltose binding protein is docked to the extracellular domain of the receptor, which signals maltose chemotaxis.

  8. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element Specific for Bromacil

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Kulick, Amanda R.; Yedlapalli, Srilakshmi; Battistella, Louisa; Hajiran, Cyrus J.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2014-01-01

    Bromacil is a widely used herbicide that is known to contaminate environmental systems. Due to the hazards it presents and inefficient detection methods, it is necessary to create a rapid and efficient sensing device. Towards this end, we have utilized a stringent in vitro selection method to identify single-stranded DNA molecular recognition elements (MRE) specific for bromacil. We have identified one MRE with high affinity (Kd = 9.6 nM) and specificity for bromacil compared to negative targets of selection and other pesticides. The selected ssDNA MRE will be useful as the sensing element in a field-deployable bromacil detection device. PMID:25400940

  9. In Vitro Selection of Cancer Cell-Specific Molecular Recognition Elements from Amino Acid Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Differential cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an in vitro selection method for obtaining molecular recognition elements (MREs) that specifically bind to individual cell types with high affinity. MREs are selected from initial large libraries of different nucleic or amino acids. This review outlines the construction of peptide and antibody fragment libraries as well as their different host types. Common methods of selection are also reviewed. Additionally, examples of cancer cell MREs are discussed, as well as their potential applications. PMID:26436100

  10. Unprecedented selectivity in molecular recognition of carbohydrates by a metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Yabushita, Mizuho; Li, Peng; Bernales, Varinia; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Fukuoka, Atsushi; Gagliardi, Laura; Farha, Omar K; Katz, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) material NU-1000 adsorbs dimers cellobiose and lactose from aqueous solution, in amounts exceeding 1250 mg gNU-1000(-1) while completely excluding the adsorption of the monomer glucose, even in a competitive mode with cellobiose. The MOF also discriminates between dimers consisting of α and β linkages, showing no adsorption of maltose. Electronic structure calculations demonstrate that key to this selective molecular recognition is the number of favorable CH-π interactions made by the sugar with pyrene units of the MOF. PMID:27184781

  11. Molecular Basis for Unidirectional Scaffold Switching of Human Plk4 in Centriole Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Suk-Youl; Park, Jung-Eun; Kim, Tae-Sung; Kim, Ju Hee; Kwak, Mi-Jeong; Ku, Bonsu; Tian, Lan; Murugan, Ravichandran N.; Ahn, Mija; Komiya, Shinobu; Hojo, Hironobu; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Bo Yeon; Bang, Jeong K.; Erikson, Raymond L.; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Seung Jun; Oh, Byung-Ha; Yang, Wei; Lee, Kyung S.

    2014-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 4 (Plk4) is a key regulator of centriole duplication, an event critical for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we showed that Plk4 relocalizes from the inner Cep192 ring to the outer Cep152 ring as newly recruited Cep152 assembles around the Cep192-encircled daughter centriole. Crystal structure analyses revealed that Cep192 - and Cep152-derived peptides bind the cryptic polo box (CPB) of Plk4 in opposite orientations and in a mutually exclusive manner. The Cep152-peptide bound to the CPB markedly better than the Cep192-peptide and effectively snatched the CPB away from a preformed CPB–Cep192-peptide complex. A cancer-associated Cep152 mutation impairing the Plk4 interaction induced defects in procentriole assembly and chromosome segregation. Thus, Plk4 is intricately regulated in time and space through ordered interactions with two distinct scaffolds, Cep192 and Cep152, and a failure in this process may lead to human cancer. PMID:24997597

  12. Investigation of imprinting parameters and their recognition nature for quinine-molecularly imprinted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian-feng; Zhu, Quan-hong; Deng, Qin-ying

    2007-08-01

    A series of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was prepared using quinine as the template molecules by bulk polymerization. The presence of monomer-template solution complexes in non-covalent MIPs systems has been verified by both fluorescence and UV-vis spectrometric detection. The influence of different synthetic conditions (porogen, functional monomer, cross-linkers, initiation methods, monomer-template ratio, etc.) on recognition properties of the polymers was investigated. Scatchard analysis revealed that two classes of binding sites were formed in the imprinted polymer. The corresponding dissociation constants were estimated to be 45.00 μmol l -1 and 1.42 mmol l -1, respectively, by utilizing a multi-site recognition model. The binding characteristics of the imprinted polymers were explored in various solvents using equilibrium binding experiments. In the organic media, results suggested that polar interactions (hydrogen bonding, ionic interactions, etc.) between acidic monomer/polymer and template molecules were mainly responsible for the recognition, whereas in aqueous media, hydrophobic interactions had a remarkable non-specific contribution to the overall binding. The specificity of MIP was evaluated by rebinding the other structurally similar compounds. The results indicated that the imprinted polymers exhibited an excellent stereo-selectivity toward quinine.

  13. Molecular Recognition by a Polymorphic Cell Surface Receptor Governs Cooperative Behaviors in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Arup; Wall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell recognition is a fundamental process that allows cells to coordinate multicellular behaviors. Some microbes, such as myxobacteria, build multicellular fruiting bodies from free-living cells. However, how bacterial cells recognize each other by contact is poorly understood. Here we show that myxobacteria engage in recognition through interactions between TraA cell surface receptors, which leads to the fusion and exchange of outer membrane (OM) components. OM exchange is shown to be selective among 17 environmental isolates, as exchange partners parsed into five major recognition groups. TraA is the determinant of molecular specificity because: (i) exchange partners correlated with sequence conservation within its polymorphic PA14-like domain and (ii) traA allele replacements predictably changed partner specificity. Swapping traA alleles also reprogrammed social interactions among strains, including the regulation of motility and conferred immunity from inter-strain killing. We suggest that TraA helps guide the transition of single cells into a coherent bacterial community, by a proposed mechanism that is analogous to mitochondrial fusion and fission cycling that mixes contents to establish a homogenous population. In evolutionary terms, traA functions as a rare greenbeard gene that recognizes others that bear the same allele to confer beneficial treatment. PMID:24244178

  14. Molecular recognition of malachite green by hemoglobin and their specific interactions: insights from in silico docking and molecular spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Ding, Fei; Peng, Yu-Kui; Sun, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Malachite green is an organic compound that can be widely used as a dyestuff for various materials; it has also emerged as a controversial agent in aquaculture. Since malachite green is proven to be carcinogenic and mutagenic, it may become a hazard to public health. For this reason, it is urgently required to analyze this controversial dye in more detail. In our current research, the interaction between malachite green and hemoglobin under physiological conditions was investigated by the methods of molecular modeling, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) as well as hydrophobic ANS displacement experiments. From the molecular docking, the central cavity of hemoglobin was assigned to possess high-affinity for malachite green, this result was corroborated by time-resolved fluorescence and hydrophobic ANS probe results. The recognition mechanism was found to be of static type, or rather the hemoglobin-malachite green complex formation occurred via noncovalent interactions such as π-π interactions, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions with an association constant of 10(4) M(-1). Moreover, the results also show that the spatial structure of the biopolymer was changed in the presence of malachite green with a decrease of the α-helix and increase of the β-sheet, turn and random coil suggesting protein damage, as derived from far-UV CD and three-dimensional fluorescence. Results of this work will help to further comprehend the molecular recognition of malachite green by the receptor protein and the possible toxicological profiles of other compounds, which are the metabolites and ramifications of malachite green.

  15. Force-field development and molecular dynamics simulations of ferrocene-peptide conjugates as a scaffold for hydrogenase mimics.

    SciTech Connect

    De Hatten, Xavier; Cournia, Zoe; Smith, Jeremy C; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2007-08-01

    The increasing importance of hydrogenase enzymes in the new energy research field has led us to examine the structure and dynamics of potential hydrogenase mimics, based on a ferrocene-peptide scaffold, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To enable this MD study, a molecular mechanics force field for ferrocene-bearing peptides was developed and implemented in the CHARMM simulation package, thus extending the usefulness of the package into peptide-bioorganometallic chemistry. Using the automated frequency-matching method (AFMM), optimized intramolecular force-field parameters were generated through quantum chemical reference normal modes. The partial charges for ferrocene were derived by fitting point charges to quantum-chemically computed electrostatic potentials. The force field was tested against experimental X-ray crystal structures of dipeptide derivatives of ferrocene-1,1{prime}-dicarboxylic acid. The calculations reproduce accurately the molecular geometries, including the characteristic C2-symmetrical intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern, that were stable over 0.1{micro}s MD simulations. The crystal packing properties of ferrocene-1-(D)alanine-(D)proline{prime}-1-(D)alanine-(D)proline were also accurately reproduced. The lattice parameters of this crystal were conserved during a 0.1 s MD simulation and match the experimental values almost exactly. Simulations of the peptides in dichloromethane are also in good agreement with experimental NMR and circular dichroism (CD) data in solution. The developed force field was used to perform MD simulations on novel, as yet unsynthesized peptide fragments that surround the active site of [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase. The results of this simulation lead us to propose an improved design for synthetic peptide-based hydrogenase models. The presented MD simulation results of metallocenes thereby provide a convincing validation of our proposal to use ferrocene-peptides as minimal enzyme mimics.

  16. Force-field development and molecular dynamics simulations of ferrocene-peptide conjugates as a scaffold for hydrogenase mimics

    SciTech Connect

    De Hatten, Xavier; Cournia, Zoe; Smith, Jeremy C; Huc, I; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2007-08-01

    The increasing importance of hydrogenase enzymes in the new energy research field has led us to examine the structure and dynamics of potential hydrogenase mimics, based on a ferrocene-peptide scaffold, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To enable this MD study, a molecular mechanics force field for ferrocene-bearing peptides was developed and implemented in the CHARMM simulation package, thus extending the usefulness of the package into peptide-bioorganometallic chemistry. Using the automated frequency-matching method (AFMM), optimized intramolecular force-field parameters were generated through quantum chemical reference normal modes. The partial charges for ferrocene were derived by fitting point charges to quantum-chemically computed electrostatic potentials. The force field was tested against experimental X-ray crystal structures of dipeptide derivatives of ferrocene-1,1'-dicarboxylic acid. The calculations reproduce accurately the molecular geometries, including the characteristic C{sub 2}-symmetrical intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern, that were stable over 0.1 {micro}s MD simulations. The crystal packing properties of ferrocene-1-(D)alanine-(D)proline-1'-(D)alanine-(D)proline were also accurately reproduced. The lattice parameters of this crystal were conserved during a 0.1 {micro}s MD simulation and match the experimental values almost exactly. Simulations of the peptides in dichloromethane are also in good agreement with experimental NMR and circular dichroism (CD) data in solution. The developed force field was used to perform MD simulations on novel, as yet unsynthesized peptide fragments that surround the active site of [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase. The results of this simulation lead us to propose an improved design for synthetic peptide-based hydrogenase models. The presented MD simulation results of metallocenes thereby provide a convincing validation of our proposal to use ferrocene-peptides as minimal enzyme mimics.

  17. Universal statistical fluctuations in thermodynamics and kinetics of single molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin

    2016-03-28

    We investigated the main universal statistical distributions of single molecular recognition. The distributions of the single molecule binding free energy spectrum or density of states were characterized in the ligand-receptor binding energy landscape. The analytical results are consistent with the microscopic molecular simulations. The free energy distribution of different binding modes or states for a single molecule ligand receptor pair is approximately Gaussian near the mean and exponential at the tail. The equilibrium constant of single molecule binding is log-normal distributed near the mean and power law distributed near the tail. Additionally, we found that the kinetics distribution of single molecule ligand binding can be characterized by log-normal around the mean and power law distribution near the tail. This distribution is caused by exploration of the underlying inhomogeneous free energy landscape. Different ligand-receptor binding complexes have the same universal form of distribution but differ in parameters. PMID:26947972

  18. The ribosome as an optimal decoder: a lesson in molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlusty, Tsvi; Savir, Yonatan

    2013-03-01

    The ribosome is a complex molecular machine that, in order to synthesize proteins, has to decode mRNAs by pairing their codons with matching tRNAs. Decoding is a major determinant of fitness and requires accurate and fast selection of correct tRNAs among many similar competitors. However, it is unclear whether the present ribosome, and in particular its large deformations during decoding, are the outcome of adaptation to its task as a decoder or the result of other constraints. Here, we derive the energy landscape that provides optimal discrimination between competing substrates, and thereby optimal tRNA decoding. We show that the measured landscape of the prokaryotic ribosome is indeed sculpted in this way. This suggests that conformational changes of the ribosome and tRNA during decoding are means to obtain an optimal decoder. Our analysis puts forward a generic mechanism that may be utilized by other ribosomes and other molecular recognition systems.

  19. Molecular surface recognition: determination of geometric fit between proteins and their ligands by correlation techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Katchalski-Katzir, E; Shariv, I; Eisenstein, M; Friesem, A A; Aflalo, C; Vakser, I A

    1992-01-01

    A geometric recognition algorithm was developed to identify molecular surface complementarity. It is based on a purely geometric approach and takes advantage of techniques applied in the field of pattern recognition. The algorithm involves an automated procedure including (i) a digital representation of the molecules (derived from atomic coordinates) by three-dimensional discrete functions that distinguishes between the surface and the interior; (ii) the calculation, using Fourier transformation, of a correlation function that assesses the degree of molecular surface overlap and penetration upon relative shifts of the molecules in three dimensions; and (iii) a scan of the relative orientations of the molecules in three dimensions. The algorithm provides a list of correlation values indicating the extent of geometric match between the surfaces of the molecules; each of these values is associated with six numbers describing the relative position (translation and rotation) of the molecules. The procedure is thus equivalent to a six-dimensional search but much faster by design, and the computation time is only moderately dependent on molecular size. The procedure was tested and validated by using five known complexes for which the correct relative position of the molecules in the respective adducts was successfully predicted. The molecular pairs were deoxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin, tRNA synthetase-tyrosinyl adenylate, aspartic proteinase-peptide inhibitor, and trypsin-trypsin inhibitor. A more realistic test was performed with the last two pairs by using the structures of uncomplexed aspartic proteinase and trypsin inhibitor, respectively. The results are indicative of the extent of conformational changes in the molecules tolerated by the algorithm. Images PMID:1549581

  20. A Case for Molecular Recognition in Nuclear Separations: Sulfate Separation from Nuclear Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A; Custelcean, Radu; Hay, Benjamin; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Bowman-James, Kristin; Day, Victor W.; Kang, S.O.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the case for molecular-recognition approaches for sulfate removal from radioactive wastes via the use of anion-sequestering systems selective for sulfate, using either liquid liquid extraction or crystallization. Potential benefits of removing sulfate from the waste include improved vitrification of the waste, reduced waste-form volume, and higher waste-form performance, all of which lead to potential cleanup schedule acceleration and cost savings. The need for sulfate removal from radioactive waste, especially legacy tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, is reviewed in detail and primarily relates to the low solubility of sulfate in borosilicate glass. Traditional methods applicable to the separation of sulfate from radioactive wastes are also reviewed, with the finding that currently no technology has been identified and successfully demonstrated to meet this need. Fundamental research in the authors laboratories targeting sulfate as an important representative of the class of oxoanions is based on the hypothesis that designed receptors may provide the needed ability to recognize sulfate under highly competitive conditions, in particular where the nitrate anion concentration is high. Receptors that have been shown to have promising affinity for sulfate, either in extraction or in crystallization experiments, include hexaurea tripods, tetraamide macrocycles, cyclo[8]pyrroles, calixpyrroles, and self-assembled urea-lined cages. Good sulfate selectivity observed in the laboratory provides experimental support for the proposed molecular-recognition approach.

  1. A case for molecular recognition in nuclear separations: sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Bruce A; Custelcean, Radu; Hay, Benjamin P; Sessler, Jonathan L; Bowman-James, Kristin; Day, Victor W; Kang, Sung-Ok

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present the case for molecular-recognition approaches for sulfate removal from radioactive wastes via the use of anion-sequestering systems selective for sulfate, using either liquid-liquid extraction or crystallization. Potential benefits of removing sulfate from the waste include improved vitrification of the waste, reduced waste-form volume, and higher waste-form performance, all of which lead to potential cleanup schedule acceleration and cost savings. The need for sulfate removal from radioactive waste, especially legacy tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, is reviewed in detail and primarily relates to the low solubility of sulfate in borosilicate glass. Traditional methods applicable to the separation of sulfate from radioactive wastes are also reviewed, with the finding that currently no technology has been identified and successfully demonstrated to meet this need. Fundamental research in the authors' laboratories targeting sulfate as an important representative of the class of oxoanions is based on the hypothesis that designed receptors may provide the needed ability to recognize sulfate under highly competitive conditions, in particular where the nitrate anion concentration is high. Receptors that have been shown to have promising affinity for sulfate, either in extraction or in crystallization experiments, include hexaurea tripods, tetraamide macrocycles, cyclo[8]pyrroles, calixpyrroles, and self-assembled urea-lined cages. Good sulfate selectivity observed in the laboratory provides experimental support for the proposed molecular-recognition approach.

  2. Molecular recognition of surface-immobilized carbohydrates by a synthetic lectin.

    PubMed

    Rauschenberg, Melanie; Fritz, Eva-Corrina; Schulz, Christian; Kaufmann, Tobias; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-01-01

    The molecular recognition of carbohydrates and proteins mediates a wide range of physiological processes and the development of synthetic carbohydrate receptors ("synthetic lectins") constitutes a key advance in biomedical technology. In this article we report a synthetic lectin that selectively binds to carbohydrates immobilized in a molecular monolayer. Inspired by our previous work, we prepared a fluorescently labeled synthetic lectin consisting of a cyclic dimer of the tripeptide Cys-His-Cys, which forms spontaneously by air oxidation of the monomer. Amine-tethered derivatives of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), β-D-galactose, β-D-glucose and α-D-mannose were microcontact printed on epoxide-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Successive prints resulted in simple microarrays of two carbohydrates. The selectivity of the synthetic lectin was investigated by incubation on the immobilized carbohydrates. Selective binding of the synthetic lectin to immobilized NANA and β-D-galactose was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The selectivity and affinity of the synthetic lectin was screened in competition experiments. In addition, the carbohydrate binding of the synthetic lectin was compared with the carbohydrate binding of the lectins concanavalin A and peanut agglutinin. It was found that the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity towards the synthetic and natural lectins and that the recognition of synthetic and natural lectins is strictly orthogonal.

  3. Syntheses of molecularly imprinted polymers: Molecular recognition of cyproheptadine using original print molecules and azatadine as dummy templates.

    PubMed

    Feás, X; Seijas, J A; Vázquez-Tato, M P; Regal, P; Cepeda, A; Fente, C

    2009-01-12

    The use of custom-made polymeric materials with high selectivities as target molecules in solid-phase extraction (SPE), known as molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE), is becoming an increasingly important sample preparation technique. However, the potential risk of leakage of the imprinting molecules during the desorption phase has limited application. The use of a mimicking template, called a dummy molecular imprinting polymer (DMIP), that bears the structure of a related molecule and acts as a putative imprinting molecule may provide a useful solution to this problem. In the current study, cyproheptadine (CPH) and azatadine (AZA) were used as templates in the development of an MIP and DMIP for acrylic acid and methacrylic acid monomers. Our results indicate that DMIPs have equal recognition of CPH, avoiding the problem of leakage of original template during the desorption phase relative to MIPs synthesized in presence of the print molecule CPH. Examination of the surface structure of the two polymer products by SEM shows appreciable differences in structural morphology and function of the monomers employed. These results are well supplemented by data obtained for swelling ratios and solvent uptake. Molecular modelling of CPH and AZA suggests that both substrates are similar in shape and volume.

  4. Physical, Spatial, and Molecular Aspects of Extracellular Matrix of In Vivo Niches and Artificial Scaffolds Relevant to Stem Cells Research.

    PubMed

    Akhmanova, Maria; Osidak, Egor; Domogatsky, Sergey; Rodin, Sergey; Domogatskaya, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix can influence stem cell choices, such as self-renewal, quiescence, migration, proliferation, phenotype maintenance, differentiation, or apoptosis. Three aspects of extracellular matrix were extensively studied during the last decade: physical properties, spatial presentation of adhesive epitopes, and molecular complexity. Over 15 different parameters have been shown to influence stem cell choices. Physical aspects include stiffness (or elasticity), viscoelasticity, pore size, porosity, amplitude and frequency of static and dynamic deformations applied to the matrix. Spatial aspects include scaffold dimensionality (2D or 3D) and thickness; cell polarity; area, shape, and microscale topography of cell adhesion surface; epitope concentration, epitope clustering characteristics (number of epitopes per cluster, spacing between epitopes within cluster, spacing between separate clusters, cluster patterns, and level of disorder in epitope arrangement), and nanotopography. Biochemical characteristics of natural extracellular matrix molecules regard diversity and structural complexity of matrix molecules, affinity and specificity of epitope interaction with cell receptors, role of non-affinity domains, complexity of supramolecular organization, and co-signaling by growth factors or matrix epitopes. Synergy between several matrix aspects enables stem cells to retain their function in vivo and may be a key to generation of long-term, robust, and effective in vitro stem cell culture systems. PMID:26351461

  5. First example of a modular porphyrinoid assembly capable of stabilizing different metal ions in a single molecular scaffold.

    PubMed

    Murugavel, Muthuchamy; Reddy, R V Ramana; Dey, Dhananjay; Sankar, Jeyaraman

    2015-10-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of porphyrin-corrole-porphyrin (Por-Cor-Por) hybrids directly linked at the meso-meso positions for the first time. The stability and solubility of the trimer are carefully balanced by adding electron-withdrawing substituents to the corrole ring and sterically bulky groups on the porphyrins. The new hybrids are capable of stabilizing more than one metal ion in a single molecular scaffold. The versatility of the triad has been demonstrated by successfully stabilizing homo- (Ni) and heterotrinuclear (Ni-Cu-Ni) coordination motifs. The solid-state structure of the NiPor-CuCor-PorNi hybrid was revealed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The Ni(II) porphyrins are significantly ruffled and tilted by 83° from the plane of corrole. The robustness of the synthesized hybrids was reflected in the electrochemical investigations and the redox behaviour of the hybrids show that the oxidation processes are mostly corrole-centred. In particular it is worth noting that the Por-Cor-Por hybrid can further be manipulated due to the presence of substituent-free meso-positions on both the terminals. PMID:26242294

  6. Physical, Spatial, and Molecular Aspects of Extracellular Matrix of In Vivo Niches and Artificial Scaffolds Relevant to Stem Cells Research

    PubMed Central

    Akhmanova, Maria; Osidak, Egor; Domogatsky, Sergey; Rodin, Sergey; Domogatskaya, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix can influence stem cell choices, such as self-renewal, quiescence, migration, proliferation, phenotype maintenance, differentiation, or apoptosis. Three aspects of extracellular matrix were extensively studied during the last decade: physical properties, spatial presentation of adhesive epitopes, and molecular complexity. Over 15 different parameters have been shown to influence stem cell choices. Physical aspects include stiffness (or elasticity), viscoelasticity, pore size, porosity, amplitude and frequency of static and dynamic deformations applied to the matrix. Spatial aspects include scaffold dimensionality (2D or 3D) and thickness; cell polarity; area, shape, and microscale topography of cell adhesion surface; epitope concentration, epitope clustering characteristics (number of epitopes per cluster, spacing between epitopes within cluster, spacing between separate clusters, cluster patterns, and level of disorder in epitope arrangement), and nanotopography. Biochemical characteristics of natural extracellular matrix molecules regard diversity and structural complexity of matrix molecules, affinity and specificity of epitope interaction with cell receptors, role of non-affinity domains, complexity of supramolecular organization, and co-signaling by growth factors or matrix epitopes. Synergy between several matrix aspects enables stem cells to retain their function in vivo and may be a key to generation of long-term, robust, and effective in vitro stem cell culture systems. PMID:26351461

  7. Molecular recognition and colorimetric detection of cholera toxin by poly(diacetylene) liposomes incorporating G{sub m1} ganglioside

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, J.J.; Charych, D.

    1997-03-19

    Molecular recognition sites on cell membranes serve as the main communication channels between the inside of a cell and its surroundings. Upon receptor binding, cellular messages such as ion channel opening or activation of enzymes are triggered. In this report, we demonstrate that artificial cell membranes made from conjugated lipid polymers (poly(diacetylene)) can, on a simple level, mimic membrane processes of molecular recognition and signal transduction. The ganglioside GM1 was incorporated into poly(diacetylene) liposomes. Molecular recognition of cholera toxin at the interface of the liposome resulted in a change of the membrane color due to conformational charges in the conjugated (ene-yne) polymer backbone. The `colored liposomes` might be used as simple colorimetric sensors for drug screening or as new tools to study membrane-membrane or membrane-receptor interactions. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  8. γ-Cyclodextrin capped silver nanoparticles for molecular recognition and enhancement of antibacterial activity of chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Gannimani, Ramesh; Ramesh, Muthusamy; Mtambo, Sphamandla; Pillay, Karen; Soliman, Mahmoud E; Govender, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Computational studies were conducted to identify the favourable formation of the inclusion complex of chloramphenicol with cyclodextrins. The results of molecular docking and molecular dynamics predicted the strongest interaction of chloramphenicol with γ-cyclodextrin. Further, the inclusion complex of chloramphenicol with γ-cyclodextrin was experimentally prepared and a phenomenon of inclusion was verified by using different characterization techniques such as thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and two dimensional nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. From these results it was concluded that γ-cyclodextrins could be an appropriate cyclodextrin polymer which can be used to functionalize chloramphenicol on the surface of silver nanoparticles. In addition, γ-cyclodextrin capped silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and zeta potential analysis. Molecular recognition of chloramphenicol by these cyclodextrin capped silver nanoparticles was confirmed by surface enhanced raman spectroscopy (SERS) experiments. Synergistic antibacterial effect of chloramphenicol with γ-cyclodextrin capped silver nanoparticles was evaluated against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 5129), Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 700603) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 43300). The results from the antibacterial experiment were favourable thus allowing us to conclude that the approach of modifying organic drug molecules with cyclodextrin capped inorganic silver nanoparticles could help to enhance the antibacterial activity of them.

  9. Electrospun Nanofibers from a Tricyanofuran-Based Molecular Switch for Colorimetric Recognition of Ammonia Gas.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Tawfik A; Abdelmoez, Sherif; Klapötke, Thomas M

    2016-03-14

    A chromophore based on tricyanofuran (TCF) with a hydrazone (H) recognition moiety was developed. Its molecular-switching performance is reversible and has differential sensitivity towards aqueous ammonia at comparable concentrations. Nanofibers were fabricated from the TCF-H chromophore by electrospinning. The film fabricated from these nanofibers functions as a solid-state optical chemosensor for probing ammonia vapor. Recognition of ammonia vapor occurs by proton transfer from the hydrazone fragment of the chromophore to the ammonia nitrogen atom and is facilitated by the strongly electron withdrawing TCF fragment. The TCF-H chromophore was added to a solution of poly(acrylic acid), which was electrospun to obtain a nanofibrous sensor device. The morphology of the nanofibrous sensor was determined by SEM, which showed that nanofibers with a diameter range of 200-450 nm formed a nonwoven mat. The resultant nanofibrous sensor showed very good sensitivity in ammonia-vapor detection. Furthermore, very good reversibility and short response time were also observed.

  10. Electrochemical molecular beacon biosensor for sequence-specific recognition of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiangmin; Guo, Xiaoting; Xiao, Zhiyou; Ling, Liansheng

    2014-09-15

    Direct recognition of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was crucial to disease diagnosis and gene therapy, because DNA in its natural state is double stranded. Here, a novel sensor for the sequence-specific recognition of dsDNA was developed based on the structure change of ferrocene (Fc) redox probe modified molecular beacon (MB). For constructing such a sensor, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were initially electrochemical-deposited onto glass carbon electrode (GCE) surface to immobilize thiolated MB in their folded states with Au-S bond. Hybridization of MB with target dsDNA induced the formation of parallel triplex DNA and opened the stem-loop structure of it, which resulted in the redox probe (Fc) away from the electrode and triggered the decrease of current signals. Under optimal conditions, dsDNA detection could be realized in the range from 350 pM to 25 nM, with a detection limit of 275 pM. Moreover, the proposed method has good sequence-specificity for target dsDNA compared with single base pair mismatch and two base pairs mismatches.

  11. Preparation and recognition of surface molecularly imprinted core-shell microbeads for protein in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan; Yan, Chang-Ling; Gao, Shu-Yan

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, a surface molecular imprinting technique was reported for preparing core-shell microbeads of protein imprinting, and bovine hemoglobin or bovine serum albumin were used as model proteins for studying the imprinted core-shell microbeads. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) was polymerized onto the surface of polystyrene microbead in the presence of the protein templates to create protein-imprinted core-shell microbeads. The various samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The effect of pH on rebinding of the template hemoglobin, the specific binding and selective recognition were studied for the imprinted microbeads. The results show that the bovine hemoglobin-imprinted core-shell microbeads were successfully created. The shell was a sort of imprinted thin films with porous structure and larger surface areas. The imprinted microbeads have good selectivity for templates and high stability. Due to the recognition sites locating at or closing to the surface, these imprinted microbeads have good property of mass-transport. Unfortunately, the imprint technology was not successfully applied to imprinting bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  12. Preparation of a magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for selective recognition of rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiuying; Yu, Dan; Yu, Yingchao; Ji, Shujuan

    2014-11-01

    A novel magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MMIP) was developed as an adsorbent to selectively remove rhodamine B from real samples. The polymer was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Static adsorption, kinetic adsorption, and selective recognition experiments were also performed to investigate the specific adsorption equilibrium, kinetics, and selective recognition ability of the MMIP. The MMIPs had outstanding thermal stability, large adsorption capacity, and high competitive selectivity. When they were used as dispersed solid-phase extraction adsorbents in real samples, rhodamine B recovery was 79.97-81.88% and 75.56-79.74% in intra-day and inter-day reproducibility experiments with relative standard deviations lower than 2.62% and 4.28%, respectively. Extraction was optimized for yield and efficiency. Precision, accuracy, and linear working range were determined under optimal experimental conditions. The limits of detection and quantification were 1.05 and 3.49 μg L-1, respectively. These results suggest MMIPs may be used for determination of rhodamine B in real samples.

  13. Determination of hydralazine with flow injection chemiluminescence sensor using molecularly imprinted polymer as recognition element.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Zhou, Houjiang; Zhang, Zhujun; He, Deyong; He, Chao

    2006-06-01

    A novel flow injection chemiluminescence (CL) sensor for hydralazine determination using molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) as recognition element is reported. Hydralazine-MIP was prepared through non-covalent copolymerization using methacrylic acid (MAA) monomer, hydralazine template and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) cross-linker. Particles of the MIP were packed into a v-shape glass tube for on-line adsorption of the analyte of hydralazine. The adsorbed hydralazine could be sensed by its great enhancing effect on the CL reaction between luminol and periodate. The CL intensity is linear to hydralazine concentration in the range from 2x10(-9) to 8x10(-7) g/mL. The detection limit is 6x10(-10) g/mL (3sigma) and the relative standard deviation is 2.8% (n=7) for 8x10(-9) g/mL hydralazine. The selective experiment showed that the selectivity and sensitivity of the CL method could be greatly improved when MIP was used as recognition element in the flow-injection CL sensor. The sensor was reversible and reusable. It could be used for more than 100 times. It has been used directly to determine the hydralazine in human urine.

  14. Modeling of Nanoparticular Magnetoresistive Systems and the Impact on Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Teich, Lisa; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Meyer, Judith; Schröder, Christian; Hütten, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The formation of magnetic bead or nanoparticle superstructures due to magnetic dipole dipole interactions can be used as configurable matter in order to realize low-cost magnetoresistive sensors with very high GMR-effect amplitudes. Experimentally, this can be realized by immersing magnetic beads or nanoparticles in conductive liquid gels and rearranging them by applying suitable external magnetic fields. After gelatinization of the gel matrix the bead or nanoparticle positions are fixed and the resulting system can be used as a magnetoresistive sensor. In order to optimize such sensor structures we have developed a simulation tool chain that allows us not only to study the structuring process in the liquid state but also to rigorously calculate the magnetoresistive characteristic curves for arbitrary nanoparticle arrangements. As an application, we discuss the role of magnetoresistive sensors in finding answers to molecular recognition. PMID:25903554

  15. Similarity recognition of molecular structures by optimal atomic matching and rotational superposition.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Benjamin; Sierka, Marek

    2012-01-15

    An algorithm for similarity recognition of molecules and molecular clusters is presented which also establishes the optimum matching among atoms of different structures. In the first step of the algorithm, a set of molecules are coarsely superimposed by transforming them into a common reference coordinate system. The optimum atomic matching among structures is then found with the help of the Hungarian algorithm. For this, pairs of structures are represented as complete bipartite graphs with a weight function that uses intermolecular atomic distances. In the final step, a rotational superposition method is applied using the optimum atomic matching found. This yields the minimum root mean square deviation of intermolecular atomic distances with respect to arbitrary rotation and translation of the molecules. Combined with an effective similarity prescreening method, our algorithm shows robustness and an effective quadratic scaling of computational time with the number of atoms.

  16. Molecular basis for oncohistone H3 recognition by SETD2 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Zheng, Xiangdong; Lu, Chao; Li, Guo-Min; Allis, C David; Li, Haitao

    2016-07-15

    High-frequency point mutations of genes encoding histones have been identified recently as novel drivers in a number of tumors. Specifically, the H3K36M/I mutations were shown to be oncogenic in chondroblastomas and undifferentiated sarcomas by inhibiting H3K36 methyltransferases, including SETD2. Here we report the crystal structures of the SETD2 catalytic domain bound to H3K36M or H3K36I peptides with SAH (S-adenosylhomocysteine). In the complex structure, the catalytic domain adopts an open conformation, with the K36M/I peptide snuggly positioned in a newly formed substrate channel. Our structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis underying oncohistone recognition by and inhibition of SETD2. PMID:27474439

  17. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of the Breast Cancer Neovasculature using Engineered Fibronectin Scaffold Ligands: A Novel Class of Targeted Contrast Ultrasound Agent

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Johnson, Sadie M.; Chowdhury, Sayan M.; Bachawal, Sunitha; Hackel, Benjamin J.; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly-targeted microbubbles (MBs) are increasingly being recognized as promising contrast agents for oncological molecular imaging with ultrasound. With the detection and validation of new molecular imaging targets, novel binding ligands are needed that bind to molecular imaging targets with high affinity and specificity. In this study we assessed a novel class of potentially clinically translatable MBs using an engineered 10th type III domain of human-fibronectin (MB-FN3VEGFR2) scaffold-ligand to image VEGFR2 on the neovasculature of cancer. The in vitro binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 to a soluble VEGFR2 was assessed by flow-cytometry (FACS) and binding to VEGFR2-expressing cells was assessed by flow-chamber cell attachment studies under flow shear stress conditions. In vivo binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 was tested in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N Tg(MMTV/PyMT634Mul) of breast cancer and control litter mates with normal mammary glands. In vitro FACS and flow-chamber cell attachment studies showed significantly (P<0.01) higher binding to VEGFR2 using MB-FN3VEGFR2 than control agents. In vivo ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) studies using MB-FN3VEGFR2 demonstrated specific binding to VEGFR2 and was significantly higher (P<0.01) in breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. Ex vivo immunofluorescence-analysis showed significantly (P<0.01) increased VEGFR2-expression in breast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Our results suggest that MBs coupled to FN3-scaffolds can be designed and used for USMI of breast cancer neoangiogenesis. Due to their small size, stability, solubility, the lack of glycosylation and disulfide bonds, FN3-scaffolds can be recombinantly produced with the advantage of generating small, high affinity ligands in a cost efficient way for USMI. PMID:27570547

  18. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of the Breast Cancer Neovasculature using Engineered Fibronectin Scaffold Ligands: A Novel Class of Targeted Contrast Ultrasound Agent.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Wilson, Katheryne E; Johnson, Sadie M; Chowdhury, Sayan M; Bachawal, Sunitha; Hackel, Benjamin J; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly-targeted microbubbles (MBs) are increasingly being recognized as promising contrast agents for oncological molecular imaging with ultrasound. With the detection and validation of new molecular imaging targets, novel binding ligands are needed that bind to molecular imaging targets with high affinity and specificity. In this study we assessed a novel class of potentially clinically translatable MBs using an engineered 10(th) type III domain of human-fibronectin (MB-FN3VEGFR2) scaffold-ligand to image VEGFR2 on the neovasculature of cancer. The in vitro binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 to a soluble VEGFR2 was assessed by flow-cytometry (FACS) and binding to VEGFR2-expressing cells was assessed by flow-chamber cell attachment studies under flow shear stress conditions. In vivo binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 was tested in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N Tg(MMTV/PyMT634Mul) of breast cancer and control litter mates with normal mammary glands. In vitro FACS and flow-chamber cell attachment studies showed significantly (P<0.01) higher binding to VEGFR2 using MB-FN3VEGFR2 than control agents. In vivo ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) studies using MB-FN3VEGFR2 demonstrated specific binding to VEGFR2 and was significantly higher (P<0.01) in breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. Ex vivo immunofluorescence-analysis showed significantly (P<0.01) increased VEGFR2-expression in breast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Our results suggest that MBs coupled to FN3-scaffolds can be designed and used for USMI of breast cancer neoangiogenesis. Due to their small size, stability, solubility, the lack of glycosylation and disulfide bonds, FN3-scaffolds can be recombinantly produced with the advantage of generating small, high affinity ligands in a cost efficient way for USMI. PMID:27570547

  19. Antigenic peptide molecular recognition by the DRB1-DQB1 haplotype modulates multiple sclerosis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Melis, Paola; Genna, Vito; Cocco, Eleonora; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Pieroni, Enrico

    2014-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that has a notably high incidence in Sardinia. Our study focuses on two HLA class II haplotypes associated with the disease in Sardinia, the rare predisposing DRB1*15:01-DQB1*06:02 and the widespread protective DRB1*16:01-DQB1*05:02. This framework enabled the highlighting of HLA binding pocket specificity and peptide recognition mechanisms by employing molecular dynamics simulations of the whole DRB1-DQB1 haplotype interacting with MBP- and EBV-derived peptides. We analyzed peptide-protein interaction networks and temporal evolution of the original complexes and after key amino acid mutations. The mutation G86V of the protective DRB1 allele exerted its effect mainly in the presence of the EBV viral peptide, with local and long range outcomes. However, the V38A mutation of the protective DQB1 showed a long range effect only in the case of the MBP myelin peptide. Our findings also demonstrate a DRB1/DQB1 complementary molecular recognition of peptides. This mechanism could provide a robust synergistic action and a differential role of DRB1 and DQB1 in tissues and in the time-steps towards autoimmunity. In addition, we demonstrate that negatively charged residues in pockets 4 and 9 play a role in MS susceptibility. Our findings are supported by recent experiments using a closely related MS animal model. Overall, our analysis confirms the role of the DRB1-DQB1 haplotype in conferring disease predisposition and could provide a valuable aid in designing optimal therapeutic peptides for MS therapy.

  20. Engineering responsive polymer building blocks with host-guest molecular recognition for functional applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: All living organisms and soft matter are intrinsically responsive and adaptive to external stimuli. Inspired by this fact, tremendous effort aiming to emulate subtle responsive features exhibited by nature has spurred the invention of a diverse range of responsive polymeric materials. Conventional stimuli-responsive polymers are constructed via covalent bonds and can undergo reversible or irreversible changes in chemical structures, physicochemical properties, or both in response to a variety of external stimuli. They have been imparted with a variety of emerging applications including drug and gene delivery, optical sensing and imaging, diagnostics and therapies, smart coatings and textiles, and tissue engineering. On the other hand, in comparison with molecular chemistry held by covalent bonds, supramolecular chemistry built on weak and reversible noncovalent interactions has emerged as a powerful and versatile strategy for materials fabrication due to its facile accessibility, extraordinary reversibility and adaptivity, and potent applications in diverse fields. Typically involving more than one type of noncovalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding, metal coordination, hydrophobic association, electrostatic interactions, van der Waals forces, and π-π stacking), host-guest recognition refers to the formation of supramolecular inclusion complexes between two or more entities connected together in a highly controlled and cooperative manner. The inherently reversible and adaptive nature of host-guest molecular recognition chemistry, stemming from multiple noncovalent interactions, has opened up a new platform to construct novel types of stimuli-responsive materials. The introduction of host-guest chemistry not only enriches the realm of responsive materials but also confers them with promising new applications. Most intriguingly, the integration of responsive polymer building blocks with host-guest recognition motifs will endow the former with

  1. Engineering responsive polymer building blocks with host-guest molecular recognition for functional applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: All living organisms and soft matter are intrinsically responsive and adaptive to external stimuli. Inspired by this fact, tremendous effort aiming to emulate subtle responsive features exhibited by nature has spurred the invention of a diverse range of responsive polymeric materials. Conventional stimuli-responsive polymers are constructed via covalent bonds and can undergo reversible or irreversible changes in chemical structures, physicochemical properties, or both in response to a variety of external stimuli. They have been imparted with a variety of emerging applications including drug and gene delivery, optical sensing and imaging, diagnostics and therapies, smart coatings and textiles, and tissue engineering. On the other hand, in comparison with molecular chemistry held by covalent bonds, supramolecular chemistry built on weak and reversible noncovalent interactions has emerged as a powerful and versatile strategy for materials fabrication due to its facile accessibility, extraordinary reversibility and adaptivity, and potent applications in diverse fields. Typically involving more than one type of noncovalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding, metal coordination, hydrophobic association, electrostatic interactions, van der Waals forces, and π-π stacking), host-guest recognition refers to the formation of supramolecular inclusion complexes between two or more entities connected together in a highly controlled and cooperative manner. The inherently reversible and adaptive nature of host-guest molecular recognition chemistry, stemming from multiple noncovalent interactions, has opened up a new platform to construct novel types of stimuli-responsive materials. The introduction of host-guest chemistry not only enriches the realm of responsive materials but also confers them with promising new applications. Most intriguingly, the integration of responsive polymer building blocks with host-guest recognition motifs will endow the former with

  2. Tailoring molecularly imprinted polymer beads for alternariol recognition and analysis by a screening with mycotoxin surrogates.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hany, Rahma A G; Urraca, Javier L; Descalzo, Ana B; Gómez-Arribas, Lidia N; Moreno-Bondi, María C; Orellana, Guillermo

    2015-12-18

    Molecularly imprinted porous polymer microspheres have been prepared for selective binding of alternariol (AOH), a phenolic mycotoxin produced by Alternaria fungi. In order to lead the synthesis of recognition materials, four original AOH surrogates have been designed, prepared and characterized. They bear different number of phenol groups in various positions and different degree of O-methylation on the dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one skeleton. A comprehensive library of mixtures of basic, acidic or neutral monomers, with divinylbenzene or ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate as cross-linkers, were polymerized at a small scale in the presence of the four molecular mimics of the toxin molecule. This polymer screening has allowed selection of the optimal composition of the microbeads (N-(2-aminoethyl)methacrylamide, EAMA, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate). The latter are able to bind AOH in water-acetonitrile (80:20, v/v) with an affinity constant of 109±10mM(-1) and a total number of binding sites of 35±2μmolg(-1), being alternariol monomethylether the only competitor species. Moreover, (1)H NMR titrations have unveiled a 1:2 surrogate-to-EAMA stoichiometry, the exact interaction sites and a binding constant of 1.5×10(4)M(-2). A molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) method has been optimized for selective isolation of the mycotoxin from aqueous samples upon a discriminating wash with 3mL of acetonitrile/water (20:80, v/v) followed by determination by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The method has been applied, in combination to ultrasound-assisted extraction, to the analysis of AOH in tomato samples fortified with the mycotoxin at five concentration levels (33-110μgkg(-1)), with recoveries in the range of 81-103% (RSD n=6). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first imprinted material capable of molecularly recognizing this widespread food contaminant. PMID:26632518

  3. Tailoring molecularly imprinted polymer beads for alternariol recognition and analysis by a screening with mycotoxin surrogates.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hany, Rahma A G; Urraca, Javier L; Descalzo, Ana B; Gómez-Arribas, Lidia N; Moreno-Bondi, María C; Orellana, Guillermo

    2015-12-18

    Molecularly imprinted porous polymer microspheres have been prepared for selective binding of alternariol (AOH), a phenolic mycotoxin produced by Alternaria fungi. In order to lead the synthesis of recognition materials, four original AOH surrogates have been designed, prepared and characterized. They bear different number of phenol groups in various positions and different degree of O-methylation on the dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one skeleton. A comprehensive library of mixtures of basic, acidic or neutral monomers, with divinylbenzene or ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate as cross-linkers, were polymerized at a small scale in the presence of the four molecular mimics of the toxin molecule. This polymer screening has allowed selection of the optimal composition of the microbeads (N-(2-aminoethyl)methacrylamide, EAMA, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate). The latter are able to bind AOH in water-acetonitrile (80:20, v/v) with an affinity constant of 109±10mM(-1) and a total number of binding sites of 35±2μmolg(-1), being alternariol monomethylether the only competitor species. Moreover, (1)H NMR titrations have unveiled a 1:2 surrogate-to-EAMA stoichiometry, the exact interaction sites and a binding constant of 1.5×10(4)M(-2). A molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) method has been optimized for selective isolation of the mycotoxin from aqueous samples upon a discriminating wash with 3mL of acetonitrile/water (20:80, v/v) followed by determination by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The method has been applied, in combination to ultrasound-assisted extraction, to the analysis of AOH in tomato samples fortified with the mycotoxin at five concentration levels (33-110μgkg(-1)), with recoveries in the range of 81-103% (RSD n=6). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first imprinted material capable of molecularly recognizing this widespread food contaminant.

  4. Site-specific basicities regulate molecular recognition in receptor binding: in silico docking of thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gergő; Baska, Ferenc; Schretner, András; Rácz, Akos; Noszál, Béla

    2013-09-01

    Interactions between thyroid hormone α and β receptors and the eight protonation microspecies of each of the main thyroid hormones (thyroxine, liothyronine, and reverse liothyronine) were investigated and quantitated by molecular modeling. Flexible docking of the various protonation forms of thyroid hormones and high-affinity thyromimetics to the two thyroid receptors was carried out. In this method the role of the ionization state of each basic site could be studied in the composite process of molecular recognition. Our results quantitate at the molecular level how the ionization state and the charge distribution influence the protein binding. The anionic form of the carboxyl group (i.e., carboxylate site) is essential for protein binding, whereas the protonated form of amino group worsens the binding. The protonation state of the phenolate plays a less important role in the receptor affinity; its protonation, however, alters the electron density and the concomitant stacking propensity of the aromatic rings, resulting in a different binding score. The combined results of docking and microspeciation studies show that microspecies with the highest concentration at the pH of blood are not the strongest binding ones. The calculated binding free energy values can be well interpreted in terms of the interactions between the actual sites of the microspecies and the receptor amino acids. Our docking results were validated and compared with biological data from the literature. Since the thyroid hormone receptors influence several physiologic functions, such as metabolic rate, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and heart frequency, our binding results provide a molecular basis for drug design and development in related therapeutic indications. PMID:23907234

  5. Linear Supramolecular Polymers via Connecting Telechelic Polycaprolactone through Alkynylplatinum(II) Terpyridine Molecular Tweezer/Pyrene Recognition Motif.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaqing; Han, Xiaohang; Gao, Zongchun; Gao, Zhao; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    By anchoring alkynylplatinum(II) terpyridine molecular tweezer/pyrene recognition motif on the chain-ends of telechelic polycaprolactone, high-molecular-weight supramolecular polymers have been successfully constructed via noncovalent chain extension, which demonstrate fascinating rheological and thermal properties. Moreover, the resulting assemblies exhibit interesting temperature- and solvent-responsive behaviors, which are promising for the development of adaptive functional materials. PMID:26924177

  6. Phylogenetic analysis and expression profiling of the pattern recognition receptors: Insights into molecular recognition of invading pathogens in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiufeng; He, Yan; Cao, Xiaolong; Gunaratna, Ramesh T; Chen, Yun-ru; Blissard, Gary; Kanost, Michael R; Jiang, Haobo

    2015-07-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect microbial pathogens and trigger innate immune responses. Previous biochemical studies have elucidated the physiological functions of eleven PRRs in Manduca sexta but our understanding of the recognition process is still limited, lacking genomic perspectives. While 34 C-type lectin-domain proteins and 16 Toll-like receptors are reported in the companion papers, we present here 120 other putative PRRs identified through the genome annotation. These include 76 leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins, 14 peptidoglycan recognition proteins, 6 EGF/Nim-domain proteins, 5 β-1,3-glucanase-related proteins, 4 galectins, 4 fibrinogen-related proteins, 3 thioester proteins, 5 immunoglobulin-domain proteins, 2 hemocytins, and 1 Reeler. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis reveal the evolution history of a diverse repertoire of proteins for pathogen recognition. While functions of insect LRR proteins are mostly unknown, their structure diversification is phenomenal: In addition to the Toll homologs, 22 LRR proteins with a signal peptide are expected to be secreted; 18 LRR proteins lacking signal peptides may be cytoplasmic; 36 LRRs with a signal peptide and a transmembrane segment may be non-Toll receptors on the surface of cells. Expression profiles of the 120 genes in 52 tissue samples reflect complex regulation in various developmental stages and physiological states, including some likely by Rel family transcription factors via κB motifs in the promoter regions. This collection of information is expected to facilitate future biochemical studies detailing their respective roles in this model insect. PMID:25701384

  7. Responsive supramolecular polymers based on the bis[alkynylplatinum(II)] terpyridine molecular tweezer/arene recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu-Kui; Shi, Yong-Gang; Yang, Zhi-Shuai; Wang, Feng

    2014-06-10

    Supramolecular polymers are constructed based on the novel bis[alkynylplatinum(II)] terpyridine molecular tweezer/pyrene recognition motif. Successive addition of anthracene as the diene and cyano-functionalized dienophile triggers the reversible supramolecular polymerization process, thus advancing the concept of utilizing Diels-Alder chemistry to access stimuli-responsive materials in compartmentalized systems.

  8. Multibody cofactor and substrate molecular recognition in the myo-inositol monophosphatase enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ferruz, Noelia; Tresadern, Gary; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is rarely a two-body protein-ligand problem, as it often involves the dynamic interplay of multiple molecules that together control the binding process. Myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), a drug target for bipolar disorder, depends on 3 Mg2+ ions as cofactor for its catalytic activity. Although the crystallographic pose of the pre-catalytic complex is well characterized, the binding process by which substrate, cofactor and protein cooperate is essentially unknown. Here, we have characterized cofactor and substrate cooperative binding by means of large-scale molecular dynamics. Our study showed the first and second Mg2+ ions identify the binding pocket with fast kinetics whereas the third ion presents a much higher energy barrier. Substrate binding can occur in cooperation with cofactor, or alone to a binary or ternary cofactor-IMPase complex, although the last scenario occurs several orders of magnitude faster. Our atomic description of the three-body mechanism offers a particularly challenging example of pathway reconstruction, and may prove particularly useful in realistic contexts where water, ions, cofactors or other entities cooperate and modulate the binding process. PMID:27440438

  9. Multibody cofactor and substrate molecular recognition in the myo-inositol monophosphatase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ferruz, Noelia; Tresadern, Gary; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-07-21

    Molecular recognition is rarely a two-body protein-ligand problem, as it often involves the dynamic interplay of multiple molecules that together control the binding process. Myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), a drug target for bipolar disorder, depends on 3 Mg(2+) ions as cofactor for its catalytic activity. Although the crystallographic pose of the pre-catalytic complex is well characterized, the binding process by which substrate, cofactor and protein cooperate is essentially unknown. Here, we have characterized cofactor and substrate cooperative binding by means of large-scale molecular dynamics. Our study showed the first and second Mg(2+) ions identify the binding pocket with fast kinetics whereas the third ion presents a much higher energy barrier. Substrate binding can occur in cooperation with cofactor, or alone to a binary or ternary cofactor-IMPase complex, although the last scenario occurs several orders of magnitude faster. Our atomic description of the three-body mechanism offers a particularly challenging example of pathway reconstruction, and may prove particularly useful in realistic contexts where water, ions, cofactors or other entities cooperate and modulate the binding process.

  10. Structure and Behavior of Human α-Thrombin upon Ligand Recognition: Thermodynamic and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Giesel, Guilherme M.; Palmieri, Leonardo C.; Monteiro, Robson Q.; Verli, Hugo; Lima, Luis Mauricio T. R.

    2011-01-01

    Thrombin is a serine proteinase that plays a fundamental role in coagulation. In this study, we address the effects of ligand site recognition by alpha-thrombin on conformation and energetics in solution. Active site occupation induces large changes in secondary structure content in thrombin as shown by circular dichroism. Thrombin-D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (PPACK) exhibits enhanced equilibrium and kinetic stability compared to free thrombin, whose difference is rooted in the unfolding step. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements in solution reveal an overall similarity in the molecular envelope of thrombin and thrombin-PPACK, which differs from the crystal structure of thrombin. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with thrombin lead to different conformations than the one observed in the crystal structure. These data shed light on the diversity of thrombin conformers not previously observed in crystal structures with distinguished catalytic and conformational behaviors, which might have direct implications on novel strategies to design direct thrombin inhibitors. PMID:21935446

  11. Molecular basis of non-self recognition by the horseshoe crab tachylectins.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Tsuda, Ryoko

    2002-09-19

    The self/non-self discrimination by innate immunity through simple ligands universally expressed both on pathogens and hosts, such as monosaccharides and acetyl group, depends on the density or clustering patterns of the ligands. The specific recognition by the horseshoe crab tachylectins with a propeller-like fold or a propeller-like oligomeric arrangement is reinforced by the short distance between the individual binding sites that interact with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). There is virtually no conformational change in the main or side chains of tachylectins upon binding with the ligands. This low structural flexibility of the propeller structures must be very important for specific interaction with PAMPs. Mammalian lectins, such as mannose-binding lectin and ficolins, trigger complement activation through the lectin pathway in the form of opsonins. However, tachylectins have no effector collagenous domains and no lectin-associated serine proteases found in the mammalian lectins. Furthermore, no complement-like proteins have been found in horseshoe crabs, except for alpha(2)-macroglobulin. The mystery of the molecular mechanism of the scavenging pathway of pathogens in horseshoe crabs remains to be solved.

  12. Electrochemical sensor for dopamine based on a novel graphene-molecular imprinted polymers composite recognition element.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yan; Bao, Yu; Gan, Shiyu; Li, Fenghua; Niu, Li

    2011-10-15

    A novel composite of graphene sheets/Congo red-molecular imprinted polymers (GSCR-MIPs) was synthesized through free radical polymerization (FRP) and applied as a molecular recognition element to construct dopamine (DA) electrochemical sensor. The template molecules (DA) were firstly absorbed at the GSCR surface due to their excellent affinity, and subsequently, selective copolymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was further achieved at the GSCR surface. Potential scanning was presented to extract DA molecules from the imprinted polymers film, and as a result, DA could be rapidly and completely removed by this way. With regard to the traditional MIPs, the GSCR-MIPs not only possessed a faster desorption and adsorption dynamics, but also exhibited a higher selectivity and binding capacity toward DA molecule. As a consequence, an electrochemical sensor for highly sensitive and selective detection of DA was successfully constructed as demonstration based on the synthesized GSCR-MIPs nanocomposites. Under experimental conditions, selective detection of DA in a linear concentration range of 1.0 × 10(-7)-8.3 × 10(-4)M was obtained, which revealed a lower limit of detection and wider linear response compared to some previously reported DA electrochemical MIPs sensors. The new DA electrochemical sensor based on GSCR-MIPs composites also exhibited excellent repeatability, which expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) was about 2.50% for 30 repeated analyses of 20 μM DA. PMID:21824760

  13. The Importance of Being Tyrosine: Lessons in Molecular Recognition from Minimalist Synthetic Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Shohei; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Combinatorial libraries built with severely restricted chemical diversity have yielded highly functional synthetic binding proteins. Structural analyses of these minimalist binding sites have revealed the dominant role of large tyrosine residues for mediating molecular contacts and of small serine/glycine residues for providing space and flexibility. The concept of using limited residue types to construct optimized binding proteins mirrors findings in the field of small molecule drug development, where it has been proposed that most drugs are built from a limited set of side chains presented by diverse frameworks. The physicochemical properties of tyrosine make it the amino acid that is most effective for mediating molecular recognition, and protein engineers have taken advantage of these characteristics to build tyrosine-rich protein binding sites that outperform natural proteins in terms of affinity and specificity. Knowledge from preceding studies can be used to improve current designs, and thus, synthetic protein libraries will continue to evolve and improve. In the near future, it seems likely that synthetic binding proteins will supersede natural antibodies for most purposes, and moreover, synthetic proteins will enable many new applications beyond the scope of natural proteins. PMID:19298050

  14. Molecular recognition on acoustic wave devices: Sorption in chemically anchored zeolite monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yongan; Bein, T.

    1992-11-12

    Zeolite crystals were attached to the gold electrodes of quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Monolayers of thiol-alkoxysilanes on the gold surface served as interfacial layers for the subsequent adhesion of the zeolite crystals to the QCM. The process of anchoring the zeolite crystals via the thiol-silane monolayers was studied by reflection adsorption infrared (IR) spectroscopy, contact angle, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The siloxane linkages between the microporous zeolite crystals and the terminal cross-linked polysiloxane groups of the interfacial monolayer play an important role in enhancing the packing density of microporous crystals and the thermal stability (up to at least 350 {degrees}C) of the film on the gold surface. Dynamic sorption isotherms of organic vapors and nitrogen as well as the transient sorption behavior of organic vapor pulses were studied to characterize the zeolite-coated QCMs. The resonance frequency response of zeolite-coated QCMs to vapor pulses could be increased up to 500-fold compared to the bare sensor. The regular micropores (0.3-0.75 nm) of the QCM-attached zeolite crystals were found to efficiently control molecular access into the coating. Selectivity of the frequency response in excess of 100:1 toward molecules of different size and/or shape could be demonstrated. The kinetics of vapor desorption from the zeolite layers are strongly dependent on the adsorbate/zeolite combination, thus providing an additional capability for molecular recognition. 33 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Phthalocyanines as Molecular Scaffolds to Block Disease-Associated Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Miotto, Marco C; Chesta, María E; Lombardo, Verónica; Binolfi, Andres; Fernández, Claudio O

    2016-05-17

    amyloidogenic proteins. Analysis of the structure-activity relationship in phthalocyanines revealed that their anti-amyloid activity is highly dependent on the type of metal ion coordinated to the tetrapyrrolic system but is not sensitive to the number of peripheral charged substituents. The tendency of phthalocyanines to oligomerize (self-association) via aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions correlates precisely with their binding capabilities to target proteins and, more importantly, determines their efficiency as anti-amyloid agents. The ability to block different types of disease-associated protein aggregation raises the possibility that these cyclic tetrapyrrole compounds have a common mechanism of action to impair the formation of a variety of pathological aggregates. Because the structural and molecular basis for the anti-amyloid effects of these molecules is starting to emerge, combined efforts from the fields of structural, cellular, and animal biology will result critical for the rational design and discovery of new drugs for the treatment of amyloid related neurological disorders. PMID:27136297

  16. Phthalocyanines as Molecular Scaffolds to Block Disease-Associated Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Miotto, Marco C; Chesta, María E; Lombardo, Verónica; Binolfi, Andres; Fernández, Claudio O

    2016-05-17

    amyloidogenic proteins. Analysis of the structure-activity relationship in phthalocyanines revealed that their anti-amyloid activity is highly dependent on the type of metal ion coordinated to the tetrapyrrolic system but is not sensitive to the number of peripheral charged substituents. The tendency of phthalocyanines to oligomerize (self-association) via aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions correlates precisely with their binding capabilities to target proteins and, more importantly, determines their efficiency as anti-amyloid agents. The ability to block different types of disease-associated protein aggregation raises the possibility that these cyclic tetrapyrrole compounds have a common mechanism of action to impair the formation of a variety of pathological aggregates. Because the structural and molecular basis for the anti-amyloid effects of these molecules is starting to emerge, combined efforts from the fields of structural, cellular, and animal biology will result critical for the rational design and discovery of new drugs for the treatment of amyloid related neurological disorders.

  17. pH-responsive supramolecular polymerization in aqueous media driven by electrostatic attraction-enhanced crown ether-based molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofan; Zhu, Kelong; Yan, Xuzhou; Ma, Yingjie; Li, Jinying; Hu, Bingjie; Yu, Yihua; Huang, Feihe

    2012-07-26

    All the previously reported supramolecular polymers based on crown ether-based molecular recognition have been prepared in anhydrous organic solvents. This is mainly due to the weakness of crown ether-based molecular recognition in the presence of water. Here we report a linear supramolecular polymer constructed from a heteroditopic monomer in an aqueous medium driven by crown ether-based molecular recognition through the introduction of electrostatic attraction. In addition, the reversible transition between the linear supramolecular polymer and oligomers is achieved by adding acid and base. This study realizes the breakthrough of the solvent for supramolecular polymerization driven by crown ether-based molecular recognition from anhydrous organic solvents to aqueous media. It is helpful for achieving supramolecular polymerization driven by crown ether-based molecular recognition in a completely aqueous medium.

  18. Designing and preparation of cytisine alkaloid surface-imprinted material and its molecular recognition characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Baojiao; Bi, Concon; Fan, Li

    2015-03-01

    Based on molecular design, a cytisine surface-imprinted material was prepared using the new surface-imprinting technique of "pre-graft polymerizing and post-imprinting". The graft-polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) on the surfaces of micron-sized silica gel particles was first performed with a surface-initiating system, preparing the grafted particles PGMA/SiO2. Subsequently, a polymer reaction, the ring-opening reaction of the epoxy groups of the grafted PGMA, was conducted with sodium 2,4-diaminobenzene sulfonate (SAS) as reagent, resulting in the functional grafted particles SAS-PGMA/SiO2. The adsorption of cytisine on SAS-PGMA/SiO2 particles reached saturation via strong electrostatic interaction between the sulfonate groups of SAS-PGMA/SiO2 particles and the protonated N atoms in cytisine molecule. Finally, cytisine surface-imprinting was successfully carried out with glutaraldehyde as crosslinker, obtaining cytisine surface-imprinted material MIP-SASP/SiO2. The binding and recognition characteristics of MIP-SASP/SiO2 towards cytisine were investigated in depth. The experimental results show that there is strong electrostatic interaction between particles and cytisine molecules, and on this basis, cytisine surface-imprinting can be smoothly performed. The surface-imprinted MIP-SASP/SiO2 has special recognition selectivity and excellent binding affinity for cytisine, and the selectivity coefficients of MIP-SASP/SiO2 particles for cytisine relative to matrine and oxymatrine, which were used as two contrast alkaloids, are 9.5 and 6.5, respectively.

  19. Molecularly imprinted nanopatterns for the recognition of biological warfare agent ricin.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Santwana; Boopathi, M; Kumar, Om; Baghel, Anuradha; Pandey, Pratibha; Mahato, T H; Singh, Beer; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2009-11-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for biological warfare agent (BWA) ricin was synthesized using silanes in order to avoid harsh environments during the synthesis of MIP. The synthesized MIP was utilized for the recognition of ricin. The complete removal of ricin from polymer was confirmed by fluorescence spectrometer and SEM-EDAX. SEM and EDAX studies confirmed the attachment of silane polymer on the surface of silica gel matrix. SEM image of Ricin-MIP exhibited nanopatterns and it was found to be entirely different from the SEM image of non-imprinted polymer (NIP). BET surface area analysis revealed more surface area (227 m(2)/g) for Ricin-MIP than that of NIP (143 m(2)/g). In addition, surface area study also showed more pore volume (0.5010 cm(3)/g) for Ricin-MIP than that of NIP (0.2828 cm(3)/g) at 12 nm pore diameter confirming the presence of imprinted sites for ricin as the reported diameter of ricin is 12 nm. The recognition and rebinding ability of the Ricin-MIP was tested in aqueous solution. Ricin-MIP rebound more ricin when compared to the NIP. Chromatogram obtained with Ricin-MIP exhibited two peaks due to imprinting, however, chromatogram of NIP exhibited only one peak for free ricin. SDS-PAGE result confirmed the second peak observed in chromatogram of Ricin-MIP as ricin peak. Ricin-MIP exhibited an imprinting efficiency of 1.76 and it also showed 10% interference from the structurally similar protein abrin.

  20. Molecular Dissection of Xyloglucan Recognition in a Prominent Human Gut Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Tauzin, Alexandra S.; Kwiatkowski, Kurt J.; Orlovsky, Nicole I.; Smith, Christopher J.; Creagh, A. Louise; Haynes, Charles A.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polysaccharide utilization loci (PUL) within the genomes of resident human gut Bacteroidetes are central to the metabolism of the otherwise indigestible complex carbohydrates known as “dietary fiber.” However, functional characterization of PUL lags significantly behind sequencing efforts, which limits physiological understanding of the human-bacterial symbiosis. In particular, the molecular basis of complex polysaccharide recognition, an essential prerequisite to hydrolysis by cell surface glycosidases and subsequent metabolism, is generally poorly understood. Here, we present the biochemical, structural, and reverse genetic characterization of two unique cell surface glycan-binding proteins (SGBPs) encoded by a xyloglucan utilization locus (XyGUL) from Bacteroides ovatus, which are integral to growth on this key dietary vegetable polysaccharide. Biochemical analysis reveals that these outer membrane-anchored proteins are in fact exquisitely specific for the highly branched xyloglucan (XyG) polysaccharide. The crystal structure of SGBP-A, a SusD homolog, with a bound XyG tetradecasaccharide reveals an extended carbohydrate-binding platform that primarily relies on recognition of the β-glucan backbone. The unique, tetra-modular structure of SGBP-B is comprised of tandem Ig-like folds, with XyG binding mediated at the distal C-terminal domain. Despite displaying similar affinities for XyG, reverse-genetic analysis reveals that SGBP-B is only required for the efficient capture of smaller oligosaccharides, whereas the presence of SGBP-A is more critical than its carbohydrate-binding ability for growth on XyG. Together, these data demonstrate that SGBP-A and SGBP-B play complementary, specialized roles in carbohydrate capture by B. ovatus and elaborate a model of how vegetable xyloglucans are accessed by the Bacteroidetes. PMID:27118585

  1. Molecular recognition features (MoRFs) in three domains of life.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and protein regions offer numerous advantages in the context of protein-protein interactions when compared to the structured proteins and domains. These advantages include ability to interact with multiple partners, to fold into different conformations when bound to different partners, and to undergo disorder-to-order transitions concomitant with their functional activity. Molecular recognition features (MoRFs) are widespread elements located in disordered regions that undergo disorder-to-order transition upon binding to their protein partners. We characterize abundance, composition, and functions of MoRFs and their association with the disordered regions across 868 species spread across Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea. We found that although disorder is substantially elevated in Eukaryota, MoRFs have similar abundance and amino acid composition across the three domains of life. The abundance of MoRFs is highly correlated with the amount of intrinsic disorder in Bacteria and Archaea but only modestly correlated in Eukaryota. Proteins with MoRFs have significantly more disorder and MoRFs are present in many disordered regions, with Eukaryota having more MoRF-free disordered regions. MoRF-containing proteins are enriched in the ribosome, nucleus, nucleolus and microtubule and are involved in translation, protein transport, protein folding, and interactions with DNAs. Our insights into the nature and function of MoRFs enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the disorder-to-order transition and protein-protein recognition and interactions. The fMoRFpred method that we used to annotate MoRFs is available at http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/fMoRFpred/. PMID:26651072

  2. Production of anti-amoxicillin ScFv antibody and simulation studying its molecular recognition mechanism for penicillins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Hui C; Duan, Chang F; Dong, Jun; Zhao, Guo X; Wang, Jian P; Li, Nan; Liu, Jin Z; Li, Yu W

    2016-11-01

    The molecular recognition mechanism of an antibody for its hapten is very interesting. The objective of this research was to study the intermolecular interactions of an anti-amoxicillin antibody with penicillin drugs. The single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibody was generated from a hybridoma cell strain excreting the monoclonal antibody for amoxicillin. The recombinant ScFv antibody showed similar recognition ability for penicillins to its parental monoclonal antibody: simultaneous recognizing 11 penicillins with cross-reactivities of 18-107%. The three-dimensional structure of the ScFv antibody was simulated by using homology modeling, and its intermolecular interactions with 11 penicillins were studied by using molecular docking. Results showed that three CDRs are involved in antibody recognition; CDR L3 Arg 100, CDR H3 Tyr226, and CDR H3 Arg 228 were the key contact amino acid residues; hydrogen bonding was the main antibody-drug intermolecular force; and the core structure of penicillin drugs was the main antibody binding position. These results could explain the recognition mechanism of anti-amoxicillin antibody for amoxicillin and its analogs. This is the first study reporting the production of ScFv antibody for penicillins and stimulation studying its recognition mechanism.

  3. Molecular Recognition of Methyl α-d-Mannopyranoside by Antifreeze (Glyco)Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins and glycoproteins [AF(G)Ps] have been well-known for more than three decades for their ability to inhibit the growth and recrystallization of ice through binding to specific ice crystal faces, and they show remarkable structural compatibility with specific ice crystal faces. Here, we show that the crystal growth faces of methyl α-d-mannopyranoside (MDM), a representative pyranose sugar, also show noteworthy structural compatibility with the known periodicities of AF(G)Ps. We selected fish AFGPs (AFGP8, AFGP1–5), and a beetle AFP (DAFP1) with increasing antifreeze activity as potential additives for controlling MDM crystal growth. Similar to their effects on ice growth, the AF(G)Ps can inhibit MDM crystal growth and recrystallization, and more significantly, the effectiveness for the AF(G)Ps are well correlated with their antifreeze activity. MDM crystals grown in the presence of AF(G)Ps are smaller and have better defined shapes and are of higher quality as indicated by single crystal X-ray diffraction and polarized microscopy than control crystals, but no new polymorphs of MDM were identified by single crystal X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR, and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy. The observed changes in the average sizes of the MDM crystals can be related to the changes in the number of the MDM nuclei in the presence of the AF(G)Ps. The critical free energy change differences of the MDM nucleation in the absence and presence of the additives were calculated. These values are close to those of the ice nucleation in the presence of AF(G)Ps suggesting similar interactions are involved in the molecular recognition of MDM by the AF(G)Ps. To our knowledge this is the first report where AF(G)Ps have been used to control crystal growth of carbohydrates and on AFGPs controlling non-ice-like crystals. Our finding suggests MDM might be a possible alternative to ice for studying the detailed mechanism of AF

  4. Molecular Dynamics of β-Hairpin Models of Epigenetic Recognition Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiange; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2012-01-01

    The conformations and stabilities of the β-hairpin model peptides of Waters1,2 have been experimentally characterized as a function of lysine ε-methylation. These models were developed to explore molecular recognition of known epigenetic recognition motifs. This system offered an opportunity to computationally examine the role of cation-π interactions, desolvation of the ε-methylated ammonium groups, and aromatic/aromatic interactions on the observed differences in NMR spectra. AMOEBA, a second-generation force field4, was chosen as it includes both multipole electrostatics and polarizability thought to be essential to accurately characterize such interactions. Independent parameterization of ε-methylated amines was required from which aqueous solvation free energies were estimated and shown to agree with literature values. Molecular dynamics simulations (100 ns) using the derived parameters with model peptides, such as Ac-R-W-V-W-V-N-G-Orn-K(Me)n -I-L-Q-NH2, where n = 0, 1, 2, or 3, were conducted in explicit solvent. Distances between the centers of the indole rings of the two-tryptophan residues, 2 and 4, and the ε-methylated ammonium group on Lys-9 as well as the distance between the N- and C-termini were monitored to estimate the strength and orientation of the cation-π and aromatic/aromatic interactions. In agreement with the experimental data, the stability of the β-hairpin increased significantly with lysine ε-methylation. The ability of MD simulations to reproduce the observed NOEs for the four peptides was further estimated for the monopole-based force fields, AMBER, CHARMM, and OPLSAA. AMOEBA correctly predicted over 80% of the observed NOEs for all four peptides, while the three-monopole force fields were 40–50% predictive in only two cases and approximately 10% in the other ten examples. Preliminary analysis suggests that the decreased cost of desolvation of the substituted ammonium group significantly compensated for the reduced cation

  5. Genetic and molecular requirements for function of the Pto/Prf effector recognition complex in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Balmuth, Alexi; Rathjen, John P

    2007-09-01

    The Pto gene of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) confers specific recognition of the unrelated bacterial effector proteins AvrPto and AvrPtoB. Pto resides in a constitutive molecular complex with the nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeats protein Prf. Prf is absolutely required for specific recognition of both effectors. Here, using stable transgenic lines, we show that expression of Pto from its genomic promoter in susceptible tomatoes was sufficient to complement recognition of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) bacteria expressing either avrPto or avrPtoB. Pto kinase activity was absolutely required for specific immunity. Expression of the Pto N-myristoylation mutant, pto(G2A), conferred recognition of Pst (avrPtoB), but not Pst (avrPto), although bacterial growth in these lines was intermediate between resistant and susceptible lines. Overexpression of pto(G2A) complemented recognition of avrPto. Transgenic tomato plants overexpressing wild-type Pto exhibited constitutive growth phenotypes, but these were absent in lines overexpressing pto(G2A). Therefore, Pto myristoylation is a quantitative factor for effector recognition in tomato, but is absolutely required for overexpression phenotypes. Native expression of Pto in the heterologous species Nicotiana benthamiana did not confer resistance to P. syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) expressing avrPto or avrPtoB, but recognition of both effectors was complemented by Prf co-expression. Thus, specific resistance conferred solely by Pto in N. benthamiana is an artefact of overexpression. Finally, pto(G2A) did not confer recognition of either avrPto or avrPtoB in N. benthamiana, regardless of the presence of Prf. Thus, co-expression of Prf in N. benthamiana complements many but not all aspects of normal Pto function.

  6. Iptycene-derived crown ether hosts for molecular recognition and self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Meng, Zheng; Ma, Ying-Xian; Chen, Chuan-Feng

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Synthetic macrocyclic hosts have played key roles in the development of host-guest chemistry. Crown ethers are a class of macrocyclic molecules with unique flexible structures. They have served as the first generation of synthetic hosts, and researchers have extensively studied them in molecular recognition. However, the flexible structures of simple crown ethers and their relatively limited modes of complexation with guests have limited the further applications of these molecules. In recent years, researchers have moved toward fabricating interlocking molecules, supramolecular polymers, and other assemblies with specific structures and properties. Therefore, researchers have developed more complex crown ether-based macrocyclic hosts with multicavity structures and multicomplexation modes that provide more diverse and sophisticated host-guest systems. In this Account, we summarize our research on the synthesis and characterization of iptycene-derived crown ether hosts, their use as host molecules, and their applications in self-assembled complexes. Iptycenes including triptycenes and pentiptycenes are a class of aromatic compounds with unique rigid three-dimensional structures. As a result, they are promising building blocks for the synthesis of novel macrocyclic hosts and the construction of novel self-assembled complexes with specific structures and properties. During the last several years, we have designed and synthesized a new class of iptycene-derived crown ether hosts including macrotricyclic polyethers, molecular tweezer-like hosts, and tritopic tris(crown ether) hosts, which are all composed of rigid iptycene building blocks linked by flexible crown ether chains. We have examined the complexation behavior of these hosts with different types of organic guest molecules. Unlike with conventional crown ethers, the combination of iptycene moieties and crown ether chains provides the iptycene-derived crown ether hosts with complexation properties

  7. Iptycene-derived crown ether hosts for molecular recognition and self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Meng, Zheng; Ma, Ying-Xian; Chen, Chuan-Feng

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Synthetic macrocyclic hosts have played key roles in the development of host-guest chemistry. Crown ethers are a class of macrocyclic molecules with unique flexible structures. They have served as the first generation of synthetic hosts, and researchers have extensively studied them in molecular recognition. However, the flexible structures of simple crown ethers and their relatively limited modes of complexation with guests have limited the further applications of these molecules. In recent years, researchers have moved toward fabricating interlocking molecules, supramolecular polymers, and other assemblies with specific structures and properties. Therefore, researchers have developed more complex crown ether-based macrocyclic hosts with multicavity structures and multicomplexation modes that provide more diverse and sophisticated host-guest systems. In this Account, we summarize our research on the synthesis and characterization of iptycene-derived crown ether hosts, their use as host molecules, and their applications in self-assembled complexes. Iptycenes including triptycenes and pentiptycenes are a class of aromatic compounds with unique rigid three-dimensional structures. As a result, they are promising building blocks for the synthesis of novel macrocyclic hosts and the construction of novel self-assembled complexes with specific structures and properties. During the last several years, we have designed and synthesized a new class of iptycene-derived crown ether hosts including macrotricyclic polyethers, molecular tweezer-like hosts, and tritopic tris(crown ether) hosts, which are all composed of rigid iptycene building blocks linked by flexible crown ether chains. We have examined the complexation behavior of these hosts with different types of organic guest molecules. Unlike with conventional crown ethers, the combination of iptycene moieties and crown ether chains provides the iptycene-derived crown ether hosts with complexation properties

  8. Molecular insights into the recognition of N-terminal histone modifications by the BRPF1 bromodomain

    PubMed Central

    Poplawski, Amanda; Hu, Kaifeng; Lee, Woonghee; Natesan, Senthil; Peng, Danni; Carlson, Samuel; Shi, Xiaobing; Balaz, Stefan; Markley, John L.; Glass, Karen C.

    2014-01-01

    The monocytic leukemic zinc-finger (MOZ) histone acetyltransferase (HAT) acetylates free histones H3, H4, H2A, and H2B in vitro and is associated with up-regulation of gene transcription. The MOZ HAT functions as a quaternary complex with the bromodomain-PHD finger protein 1 (BRPF1), inhibitor of growth 5 (ING5), and hEaf6 subunits. BRPF1 links the MOZ catalytic subunit to the ING5 and hEaf6 subunits, thereby promoting MOZ HAT activity. Human BRPF1 contains multiple effector domains with known roles in gene transcription, and chromatin binding and remodeling. However, the biological function of the BRPF1 bromodomain remains unknown. Our findings reveal novel interactions of the BRPF1 bromodomain with multiple acetyllysine residues on the N-terminus of histones, and show it preferentially selects for H2AK5ac, H4K12ac and H3K14ac. We used chemical shift perturbation data from NMR titration experiments to map the BRPF1 bromodomain ligand binding pocket and identified key residues responsible for coordination of the post-translationally modified histones. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations were used to generate structural models of bromodomain-histone ligand complexes, to analyze H-bonding and other interactions, and to calculate the binding free energies. Our results outline the molecular mechanism driving binding specificity of the BRPF1 bromodomain for discrete acetyllysine residues on the N-terminal histone tails. Together these data provide insights on how histone recognition by the bromodomain directs the biological function of BRPF1, ultimately targeting the MOZ HAT complex to chromatin substrates. PMID:24333487

  9. Molecular recognition of DNA by ligands: Roughness and complexity of the free energy profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenwei; Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Rohrdanz, Mary A.; Carloni, Paolo; Clementi, Cecilia

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism by which probes and chemotherapeutic agents bind to nucleic acids is a fundamental issue in modern drug design. From a computational perspective, valuable insights are gained by the estimation of free energy landscapes as a function of some collective variables (CVs), which are associated with the molecular recognition event. Unfortunately the choice of CVs is highly non-trivial because of DNA's high flexibility and the presence of multiple association-dissociation events at different locations and/or sliding within the grooves. Here we have applied a modified version of Locally-Scaled Diffusion Map (LSDMap), a nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique for decoupling multiple-timescale dynamics in macromolecular systems, to a metadynamics-based free energy landscape calculated using a set of intuitive CVs. We investigated the binding of the organic drug anthramycin to a DNA 14-mer duplex. By performing an extensive set of metadynamics simulations, we observed sliding of anthramycin along the full-length DNA minor groove, as well as several detachments from multiple sites, including the one identified by X-ray crystallography. As in the case of equilibrium processes, the LSDMap analysis is able to extract the most relevant collective motions, which are associated with the slow processes within the system, i.e., ligand diffusion along the minor groove and dissociation from it. Thus, LSDMap in combination with metadynamics (and possibly every equivalent method) emerges as a powerful method to describe the energetics of ligand binding to DNA without resorting to intuitive ad hoc reaction coordinates.

  10. Carbohydrate Recognition by RpfB from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Unveiled by Crystallographic and Molecular Dynamics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Squeglia, Flavia; Romano, Maria; Ruggiero, Alessia; Vitagliano, Luigi; De Simone, Alfonso; Berisio, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Resuscitation of Mtb is crucial to the etiology of Tuberculosis, because latent tuberculosis is estimated to affect one-third of the world population. The resuscitation-promoting factor RpfB is mainly responsible for Mtb resuscitation from dormancy. Given the impact of latent Tuberculosis, RpfB represents an interesting target for tuberculosis drug discovery. However, no molecular models of substrate binding and catalysis are hitherto available for this enzyme. Here, we identified key interactions involved in substrate binding to RpfB by combining x-ray diffraction studies and computational approaches. The crystal structure of RpfB catalytic domain in complex with N,N′,N″-triacetyl-chitotriose, as described here, provides the first, to our knowledge, atomic representation of ligand recognition by RpfB and demonstrates that the strongest interactions are established by the N-acetylglucosamine moiety in the central region of the enzyme binding cleft. Molecular dynamics analyses provided information on the dynamic behavior of protein-substrate interactions and on the role played by the solvent in RpfB function. These data combined with sequence conservation analysis suggest that Glu-292 is the sole residue crucial for catalysis, implying that RpfB acts via the formation of an oxocarbenium ion rather than a covalent intermediate. Present data represent a solid base for the design of effective drug inhibitors of RpfB. Moreover, homology models were generated for the catalytic domains of all members of the Mtb Rpf family (RpfA-E). The analysis of these models unveiled analogies and differences among the different members of the Rpf protein family. PMID:23746526

  11. Conformational Melding Permits a Conserved Binding Geometry in TCR Recognition of Foreign and Self Molecular Mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-03-16

    Molecular mimicry between foreign and self Ags is a mechanism of TCR cross-reactivity and is thought to contribute to the development of autoimmunity. The {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 recognizes the foreign Ag Tax from the human T cell leukemia virus-1 when presented by the class I MHC HLA-A2. In a possible link with the autoimmune disease human T cell leukemia virus-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, A6 also recognizes a self peptide from the neuronal protein HuD in the context of HLA-A2. We found in our study that the complexes of the HuD and Tax epitopes with HLA-A2 are close but imperfect structural mimics and that in contrast with other recent structures of TCRs with self Ags, A6 engages the HuD Ag with the same traditional binding mode used to engage Tax. Although peptide and MHC conformational changes are needed for recognition of HuD but not Tax and the difference of a single hydroxyl triggers an altered TCR loop conformation, TCR affinity toward HuD is still within the range believed to result in negative selection. Probing further, we found that the HuD-HLA-A2 complex is only weakly stable. Overall, these findings help clarify how molecular mimicry can drive self/nonself cross-reactivity and illustrate how low peptide-MHC stability can permit the survival of T cells expressing self-reactive TCRs that nonetheless bind with a traditional binding mode.

  12. Leukemia-Associated Mutations in Nucleophosmin Alter Recognition by CRM1: Molecular Basis of Aberrant Transport

    PubMed Central

    Arregi, Igor; Falces, Jorge; Olazabal-Herrero, Anne; Alonso-Mariño, Marián; Taneva, Stefka G.; Rodríguez, José A.; Urbaneja, María A.; Bañuelos, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein, normally enriched in nucleoli, that performs several activities related to cell growth. NPM mutations are characteristic of a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where mutant NPM seems to play an oncogenic role. AML-associated NPM mutants exhibit altered subcellular traffic, being aberrantly located in the cytoplasm of leukoblasts. Exacerbated export of AML variants of NPM is mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1, and due, in part, to a mutationally acquired novel nuclear export signal (NES). To gain insight on the molecular basis of NPM transport in physiological and pathological conditions, we have evaluated the export efficiency of NPM in cells, and present new data indicating that, in normal conditions, wild type NPM is weakly exported by CRM1. On the other hand, we have found that AML-associated NPM mutants efficiently form complexes with CRM1HA (a mutant CRM1 with higher affinity for NESs), and we have quantitatively analyzed CRM1HA interaction with the NES motifs of these mutants, using fluorescence anisotropy and isothermal titration calorimetry. We have observed that the affinity of CRM1HA for these NESs is similar, which may help to explain the transport properties of the mutants. We also describe NPM recognition by the import machinery. Our combined cellular and biophysical studies shed further light on the determinants of NPM traffic, and how it is dramatically altered by AML-related mutations. PMID:26091065

  13. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Michael; Stock, Lorenz G; Traxler, Lukas; Leclercq, Laurent; Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot; Cottet, Hervé; Stutz, Hanno; Ebner, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27265903

  14. An improved microfluidics approach for monitoring real-time interaction profiles of ultrafast molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Rakshit, Surajit; Kar, Shantimoy; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Our study illustrates the development of a microfluidics (MF) platform combining fluorescence microscopy and femtosecond/picosecond-resolved spectroscopy to investigate ultrafast chemical processes in liquid-phase diffusion-controlled reactions. By controlling the flow rates of two reactants in a specially designed MF chip, sub-100 ns time resolution for the exploration of chemical intermediates of the reaction in the MF channel has been achieved. Our system clearly rules out the possibility of formation of any intermediate reaction product in a so-called fast ionic reaction between sodium hydroxide and phenolphthalein, and reveals a microsecond time scale associated with the formation of the reaction product. We have also used the developed system for the investigation of intermediate states in the molecular recognition of various macromolecular self-assemblies (micelles) and genomic DNA by small organic ligands (Hoechst 33258 and ethidium bromide). We propose our MF-based system to be an alternative to the existing millisecond-resolved "stopped-flow" technique for a broad range of time-resolved (sub-100 ns to minutes) experiments on complex chemical/biological systems.

  15. Atomic interactions of neonicotinoid agonists with AChBP: Molecular recognition of the distinctive electronegative pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, Todd T.; Harel, Michal; Hibbs, Ryan E.; Radi, Zoran; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.; Taylor, Palmer

    2008-07-28

    Acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) from mollusks are suitable structural and functional surrogates of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when combined with transmembrane spans of the nicotinic receptor. These proteins assemble as a pentamer with identical ACh binding sites at the subunit interfaces and show ligand specificities resembling those of the nicotinic receptor for agonists and antagonists. A subset of ligands, termed the neonicotinoids, exhibit specificity for insect nicotinic receptors and selective toxicity as insecticides. AChBPs are of neither mammalian nor insect origin and exhibit a distinctive pattern of selectivity for the neonicotinoid ligands. We define here the binding orientation and determinants of differential molecular recognition for the neonicotinoids and classical nicotinoids by estimates of kinetic and equilibrium binding parameters and crystallographic analysis. Neonicotinoid complex formation is rapid and accompanied by quenching of the AChBP tryptophan fluorescence. Comparisons of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and thiacloprid in the binding site from Aplysia californica AChBP at 2.48 and 1.94 {angstrom} in resolution reveal a single conformation of the bound ligands with four of the five sites occupied in the pentameric crystal structure. The neonicotinoid electronegative pharmacophore is nestled in an inverted direction compared with the nicotinoid cationic functionality at the subunit interfacial binding pocket. Characteristic of several agonists, loop C largely envelops the ligand, positioning aromatic side chains to interact optimally with conjugated and hydrophobic regions of the neonicotinoid. This template defines the association of interacting amino acids and their energetic contributions to the distinctive interactions of neonicotinoids.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Taste Recognition: Considerations about the Role of Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Fábián, Tibor Károly; Beck, Anita; Fejérdy, Pál; Hermann, Péter; Fábián, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    The gustatory system plays a critical role in determining food preferences and food intake, in addition to nutritive, energy and electrolyte balance. Fine tuning of the gustatory system is also crucial in this respect. The exact mechanisms that fine tune taste sensitivity are as of yet poorly defined, but it is clear that various effects of saliva on taste recognition are also involved. Specifically those metabolic polypeptides present in the saliva that were classically considered to be gut and appetite hormones (i.e., leptin, ghrelin, insulin, neuropeptide Y, peptide YY) were considered to play a pivotal role. Besides these, data clearly indicate the major role of several other salivary proteins, such as salivary carbonic anhydrase (gustin), proline-rich proteins, cystatins, alpha-amylases, histatins, salivary albumin and mucins. Other proteins like glucagon-like peptide-1, salivary immunoglobulin-A, zinc-α-2-glycoprotein, salivary lactoperoxidase, salivary prolactin-inducible protein and salivary molecular chaperone HSP70/HSPAs were also expected to play an important role. Furthermore, factors including salivary flow rate, buffer capacity and ionic composition of saliva should also be considered. In this paper, the current state of research related to the above and the overall emerging field of taste-related salivary research alongside basic principles of taste perception is reviewed. PMID:25782158

  17. On the energy components governing molecular recognition in the framework of continuum approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Wang, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Molecular recognition is a process that brings together several biological macromolecules to form a complex and one of the most important characteristics of the process is the binding free energy. Various approaches exist to model the binding free energy, provided the knowledge of the 3D structures of bound and unbound molecules. Among them, continuum approaches are quite appealing due to their computational efficiency while at the same time providing predictions with reasonable accuracy. Here we review recent developments in the field emphasizing on the importance of adopting adequate description of physical processes taking place upon the binding. In particular, we focus on the efforts aiming at capturing some of the atomistic details of the binding phenomena into the continuum framework. When possible, the energy components are reviewed independently of each other. However, it is pointed out that rigorous approaches should consider all energy contributions on the same footage. The two major schemes for utilizing the individual energy components to predict binding affinity are outlined as well. PMID:25988173

  18. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Michael; Stock, Lorenz G; Traxler, Lukas; Leclercq, Laurent; Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot; Cottet, Hervé; Stutz, Hanno; Ebner, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated.

  19. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element against Atrazine

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Crihfield, Cassandra L.; Gattu, Srikanth; Holland, Lisa A.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2014-01-01

    Widespread use of the chlorotriazine herbicide, atrazine, has led to serious environmental and human health consequences. Current methods of detecting atrazine contamination are neither rapid nor cost-effective. In this work, atrazine-specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecular recognition elements (MRE) were isolated. We utilized a stringent Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) methodology that placed the greatest emphasis on what the MRE should not bind to. After twelve rounds of SELEX, an atrazine-specific MRE with high affinity was obtained. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of the ssDNA sequence is 0.62 ± 0.21 nM. It also has significant selectivity for atrazine over atrazine metabolites and other pesticides found in environmentally similar locations and concentrations. Furthermore, we have detected environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations in river water using this MRE. The strong affinity and selectivity of the selected atrazine-specific ssDNA validated the stringent SELEX methodology and identified a MRE that will be useful for rapid atrazine detection in environmental samples. PMID:25196435

  20. A metal–ion-responsive adhesive material via switching of molecular recognition properties

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takashi; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Common adhesives stick to a wide range of materials immediately after they are applied to the surfaces. To prevent indiscriminate sticking, smart adhesive materials that adhere to a specific target surface only under particular conditions are desired. Here we report a polymer hydrogel modified with both β-cyclodextrin (βCD) and 2,2′-bipyridyl (bpy) moieties (βCD–bpy gel) as a functional adhesive material responding to metal ions as chemical stimuli. The adhesive property of βCD–bpy gel based on interfacial molecular recognition is expressed by complexation of metal ions to bpy that controlled dissociation of supramolecular cross-linking of βCD–bpy. Moreover, adhesion of βCD–bpy gel exhibits selectivity on the kinds of metal ions, depending on the efficiency of metal–bpy complexes in cross-linking. Transduction of two independent chemical signals (metal ions and host–guest interactions) is achieved in this adhesion system, which leads to the development of highly orthogonal macroscopic joining of multiple objects. PMID:25099995

  1. Molecular mechanisms of taste recognition: considerations about the role of saliva.

    PubMed

    Fábián, Tibor Károly; Beck, Anita; Fejérdy, Pál; Hermann, Péter; Fábián, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    The gustatory system plays a critical role in determining food preferences and food intake, in addition to nutritive, energy and electrolyte balance. Fine tuning of the gustatory system is also crucial in this respect. The exact mechanisms that fine tune taste sensitivity are as of yet poorly defined, but it is clear that various effects of saliva on taste recognition are also involved. Specifically those metabolic polypeptides present in the saliva that were classically considered to be gut and appetite hormones (i.e., leptin, ghrelin, insulin, neuropeptide Y, peptide YY) were considered to play a pivotal role. Besides these, data clearly indicate the major role of several other salivary proteins, such as salivary carbonic anhydrase (gustin), proline-rich proteins, cystatins, alpha-amylases, histatins, salivary albumin and mucins. Other proteins like glucagon-like peptide-1, salivary immunoglobulin-A, zinc-α-2-glycoprotein, salivary lactoperoxidase, salivary prolactin-inducible protein and salivary molecular chaperone HSP70/HSPAs were also expected to play an important role. Furthermore, factors including salivary flow rate, buffer capacity and ionic composition of saliva should also be considered. In this paper, the current state of research related to the above and the overall emerging field of taste-related salivary research alongside basic principles of taste perception is reviewed.

  2. Molecular basis for specific recognition of bacterial ligands by NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Tenthorey, Jeannette L; Kofoed, Eric M; Daugherty, Matthew D; Malik, Harmit S; Vance, Russell E

    2014-04-10

    NLR (nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]- and leucine-rich repeat [LRR]-containing) proteins mediate innate immune sensing of pathogens in mammals and plants. How NLRs detect their cognate stimuli remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed ligand recognition by NLR apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) inflammasomes. Mice express multiple highly related NAIP paralogs that recognize distinct bacterial proteins. We analyzed a panel of 43 chimeric NAIPs, allowing us to map the NAIP domain responsible for specific ligand detection. Surprisingly, ligand specificity was mediated not by the LRR domain, but by an internal region encompassing several NBD-associated α-helical domains. Interestingly, we find that the ligand specificity domain has evolved under positive selection in both rodents and primates. We further show that ligand binding is required for the subsequent co-oligomerization of NAIPs with the downstream signaling adaptor NLR family, CARD-containing 4 (NLRC4). These data provide a molecular basis for how NLRs detect ligands and assemble into inflammasomes. PMID:24657167

  3. In vitro selection of a single-stranded DNA molecular recognition element against atrazine.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ryan M; Crihfield, Cassandra L; Gattu, Srikanth; Holland, Lisa A; Sooter, Letha J

    2014-08-18

    Widespread use of the chlorotriazine herbicide, atrazine, has led to serious environmental and human health consequences. Current methods of detecting atrazine contamination are neither rapid nor cost-effective. In this work, atrazine-specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecular recognition elements (MRE) were isolated. We utilized a stringent Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) methodology that placed the greatest emphasis on what the MRE should not bind to. After twelve rounds of SELEX, an atrazine-specific MRE with high affinity was obtained. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of the ssDNA sequence is 0.62 ± 0.21 nM. It also has significant selectivity for atrazine over atrazine metabolites and other pesticides found in environmentally similar locations and concentrations. Furthermore, we have detected environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations in river water using this MRE. The strong affinity and selectivity of the selected atrazine-specific ssDNA validated the stringent SELEX methodology and identified a MRE that will be useful for rapid atrazine detection in environmental samples.

  4. Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions Studied by NMR: From Molecular Recognition to Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alonso, María del Carmen; Díaz, Dolores; Berbis, Manuel Álvaro; Marcelo, Filipa; Cañada, Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Diseases that result from infection are, in general, a consequence of specific interactions between a pathogenic organism and the cells. The study of host-pathogen interactions has provided insights for the design of drugs with therapeutic properties. One area that has proved to be promising for such studies is the constituted by carbohydrates which participate in biological processes of paramount importance. On the one hand, carbohydrates have shown to be information carriers with similar, if not higher, importance than traditionally considered carriers as amino acids and nucleic acids. On the other hand, the knowledge on molecular recognition of sugars by lectins and other carbohydrate-binding proteins has been employed for the development of new biomedical strategies. Biophysical techniques such as X-Ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy lead currently the investigation on this field. In this review, a description of traditional and novel NMR methodologies employed in the study of sugar-protein interactions is briefly presented in combination with a palette of NMR-based studies related to biologically and/or pharmaceutically relevant applications. PMID:23305367

  5. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  6. Recombinase-based isothermal amplification of nucleic acids with self-avoiding molecular recognition systems (SAMRS).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Hoshika, Shuichi; Hutter, Daniel; Bradley, Kevin M; Benner, Steven A

    2014-10-13

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal method to amplify nucleic acid sequences without the temperature cycling that classical PCR uses. Instead of using heat to denature the DNA duplex, RPA uses recombination enzymes to swap single-stranded primers into the duplex DNA product; these are then extended using a strand-displacing polymerase to complete the cycle. Because RPA runs at low temperatures, it never forces the system to recreate base-pairs following Watson-Crick rules, and therefore it produces undesired products that impede the amplification of the desired product, complicating downstream analysis. Herein, we show that most of these undesired side products can be avoided if the primers contain components of a self-avoiding molecular recognition system (SAMRS). Given the precision that is necessary in the recombination systems for them to function biologically, it is surprising that they accept SAMRS. SAMRS-RPA is expected to be a powerful tool within the range of amplification techniques available to scientists.

  7. Synthesis and Molecular Recognition of Water-Soluble S6-Corona[3]arene[3]pyridazines.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing-Hui; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Mei-Xiang

    2015-07-13

    We report the efficient and scalable synthesis and molecular-recognition properties of novel and water-soluble S6-corona[3]arene[3]pyridazines. The synthesis comprises a one-pot nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction between diesters of 2,5-dimercaptoterephthalate and 3,6-dichlorotetrazine followed by the inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction of the tetrazine moieties with an enamine and exhaustive saponification of esters. The resulting S6-corona[3]arene[3]pyridazines, which adopt a 1,3,5-alternate conformation in the crystalline state, are able to selectively form stable 1:1 complexes with dicationic guest species in water with association constants ranging from (1.10±0.06)×10(3)  M(-1) to (1.18±0.06)×10(5)  M(-1). The easy availability, large cavity size, strong and selective binding power render the water-soluble S6-corona[3]arene[3]pyridazines useful macrocyclic hosts in various disciplines of supramolecular chemistry.

  8. Facile synthesis of polydopamine-coated molecularly imprinted silica nanoparticles for protein recognition and separation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhiwei; Lin, Zian; Xiao, Yun; Wang, Ling; Zheng, Jiangnan; Yang, Huanghao; Chen, Guonan

    2013-09-15

    Surface imprinting over nanostructured matrices is an effective solution to overcome template removal and achieve high binding capacity. In this work, a facile method was developed for synthesis of polydopamine-coated molecularly imprinted silica nanoparticles (PDA-coated MIP silica NPs) based on self-polymerization of dopamine (DA) on the surface of silica NPs in the presence of template protein. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that PDA layers were successfully attached on the surface of silica NPs and the corresponding thickness was about 5nm, which enabled the MIP silica NPs to have fast binding kinetics and high binding capacity. Under the aqueous media, the imprinted silica NPs showed much higher binding affinity toward template than non-imprinted (NIP) silica NPs. The protein recognition properties were examined by single-protein or competitive batch rebinding experiments and rebinding kinetics study, validating that the imprinted silica NPs have high selectivity for the template. The resultant BHb-MIP silica NPs could not only selectively separate BHb from the protein mixture, but also specifically deplete high-abundance BHb from cattle whole blood. In addition, the stability and regeneration were also investigated, which indicated that the imprinted silica NPs had excellent reusability. PMID:23567631

  9. Molecular Recognition of Ligands by Native Viruses and Virus-Like Particles as Studied by NMR Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Christoph; Peters, Thomas

    Viral entry into host cells is a process that in the majority of cases is not understood in its molecular details. The first step of viral entry is the recognition of cellular receptors on host cells by viruses, and although X-ray crystallography had yielded some spectacular results in individual cases, in general there is little data available to unravel the principles of virus-ligand recognition at atomic resolution. Therefore, new techniques that uncover the molecular details of these recognition processes are needed. The investigation of virus-ligand interactions using ligand-based NMR techniques is an emerging field with the potential to substantially contribute to a deeper understanding of the molecular aspects of viral entry into host cells. Here, we give an overview that covers some of the systems studied so far. This comprises native viruses as well as virus-like particles (VLPs). We will not address studies that have been performed with individual proteins that are not in a native environment. It turns out that STD NMR in particular has a great potential to shine light on the viral entry process as this technique requires only very moderate amounts of viruses or VLPs and corresponding ligands. As a further advantage, this approach is also applicable to ligands that bind to viruses with medium to low affinity. Therefore, STD NMR is extremely well suited for development of antiviral entry inhibitors utilizing fragment-based approaches with low molecular weight compounds.

  10. Enhanced Molecular Recognition between Nucleobases and Guanine-5'-monophosphate-disodium (GMP) by Surfactant Aggregates in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhang; Wang, Dong; Cao, Meiwen; Han, Yuchun; Xu, Hai; Wang, Yilin

    2015-07-15

    Only specific base pairs on DNA can bind with each other through hydrogen bonds, which is called the Watson-Crick (W/C) pairing rule. However, without the constraint of DNA chains, the nucleobases in bulk aqueous solution usually do not follow the W/C pairing rule anymore because of the strong competitive effect of water and the multi-interaction edges of nucleobases. The present work applied surfactant aggregates noncovalently functionalized by nucleotide to enhance the recognition between nucleobases without DNA chains in aqueous solution, and it revealed the effects of their self-assembling ability and morphologies on the recognition. The cationic ammonium monomeric, dimeric, and trimeric surfactants DTAB, 12-3-12, and 12-3-12-3-12 were chosen. The surfactants with guanine-5'-monophosphate-disodium (GMP) form micelles, vesicles, and fingerprint-like and plate-like aggregates bearing the hydrogen-bonding sites of GMP, respectively. The binding parameters of these aggregates with adenine (A), uracil (U), guanine (G), and cytosine(C) indicate that the surfactants can promote W/C recognitions in aqueous solution when they form vesicles (GMP/DTAB) or plate-like aggregates (GMP/12-3-12) with proper molecular packing compactness, which not only provide hydrophobic environments but also shield non-W/C recognition edges. However, the GMP/12-3-12 micelles with loose molecular packing, the GMP/12-3-12 fingerprint-like aggregates where the hydrogen bond sites of GMP are occupied by itself, and the GMP/12-3-12-3-12 vesicles with too strong self-assembling ability cannot promote W/C recognition. This work provides insight into how to design self-assemblies with the performance of enhanced molecule recognition.

  11. Molecular basis of mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation by CD1c and its recognition by αβ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sobhan; Ly, Dalam; Li, Nan-Sheng; Altman, John D.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Moody, D. Branch; Adams, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    CD1c is a member of the group 1 CD1 family of proteins that are specialized for lipid antigen presentation. Despite high cell surface expression of CD1c on key antigen-presenting cells and the discovery of its mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation capability, the molecular basis of CD1c recognition by T cells is unknown. Here we present a comprehensive functional and molecular analysis of αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of CD1c presenting mycobacterial phosphomycoketide antigens. Our structure of CD1c with the mycobacterial phosphomycoketide (PM) shows similarities to that of CD1c-mannosyl-β1-phosphomycoketide in that the A' pocket accommodates the mycoketide alkyl chain; however, the phosphate head-group of PM is shifted ∼6 Å in relation to that of mannosyl-β1-PM. We also demonstrate a bona fide interaction between six human TCRs and CD1c-mycoketide complexes, measuring high to moderate affinities. The crystal structure of the DN6 TCR and mutagenic studies reveal a requirement of five complementarity determining region (CDR) loops for CD1c recognition. Furthermore, mutagenesis of CD1c reveals residues in both the α1 and α2 helices involved in TCR recognition, yet not entirely overlapping among the examined TCRs. Unlike patterns for MHC I, no archetypical binding footprint is predicted to be shared by CD1c-reactive TCRs, even when recognizing the same or similar antigens. PMID:25298532

  12. Designs for the self-assembly of open and closed macromolecular structures and a molecular switch using DNA methyltransferases to order proteins on nucleic acid scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven S.

    2002-06-01

    The methyltransferase-directed addressing of fusion proteins to DNA scaffolds offers an approach to the construction of protein/nucleic acid biostructures with potential in a variety of applications. The technology is currently only limited by the yield of high occupancy structures. However, current evidence shows that DNA scaffolds that contain three or four targeted proteins can be reliably constructed. This permits a variety of macromolecular designs, several of which are given in this paper. Designs for open and closed two-dimensional and three-dimensional assemblies and a design for a molecular switch are discussed. The closed two-dimensional assembly takes the form of a square, and could find application as a component of other systems including a macromolecular rotaxane. The closed three-dimensional system takes the form of a trigonal bipyramid and could find application as a macromolecular carcerand. The molecular switch could find application as a peptide biosensor. Guidelines for the construction and structural verification of these designs are reported.

  13. Inverse opal spheres based on polyionic liquids as functional microspheres with tunable optical properties and molecular recognition capabilities.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiecheng; Zhu, Wei; Gao, Ning; Li, Jian; Yang, Haowei; Jiang, Yin; Seidel, Philipp; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Li, Guangtao

    2014-04-01

    Based on the combination of the unique features of both polyionic liquids and spherical colloidal crystals, a new class of inverse opaline spheres with a series of distinct properties was fabricated. It was found that such photonic spheres could not only be used as stimuli-responsive photonic microgels, but also serve as multifunctional microspheres that mimic the main characteristics of conventional molecules, including intrinsic optical properties, specific molecular recognition, reactivity and derivatization, and anisotropy. PMID:24596228

  14. A core-shell surface magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers with fluorescence for λ-cyhalothrin selective recognition.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Wang, Jixiang; Li, Xiuying; Yan, Yongsheng; Li, Chunxiang; Pan, Jianming

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we report here a general protocol for making core-shell magnetic Fe3O4/SiO2-MPS/MIPs (MPS = 3-(methacryloxyl) propyl trimethoxysilane, MIPs = molecularly imprinted polymers, Fe3O4/SiO2-MPS as core, MIPs as shell) via a surface molecular imprinting technique for optical detection of trace λ-cyhalothrin. The fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer shell was first prepared by copolymerization of acrylamide with a small quantity of allyl fluorescein in the presence of λ-cyhalothrin to form recognition sites without doping. The magnetic Fe3O4/SiO2-MPS/MIPs exhibited paramagnetism, high fluorescence intensity, and highly selective recognition. Using fluorescence quenching as a detecting tool, Fe3O4/SiO2-MPS/MIPs were successfully applied to selectively and sensitively detect λ-cyhalothrin, and a linear relationship could be obtained covering a wide concentration range of 0-50 nM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9962 described by the Stern-Volmer equation. The experimental results of practical detection revealed that magnetic Fe3O4/SiO2-MPS/MIPs as an attractive recognition element was satisfactory for determination of trace λ-cyhalothrin in honey samples. This study, therefore, demonstrated the potential of MIPs for detection of λ-cyhalothrin in food. PMID:25200071

  15. High-Throughput Screen in Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Novel Molecular Scaffold That Inhibits Cell Wall Integrity Pathway Signaling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the most important human fungal pathogens; however, no new therapies have been developed in over 50 years. Fungicidal activity is crucially important for an effective anticryptococal agent and, therefore, we screened 361,675 molecules against C. neoformans using an adenylate kinase release assay that specifically detects fungicidal activity. A set of secondary assays narrowed the set of hits to molecules that interfere with fungal cell wall integrity and identified three benzothioureas with low in vitro mammalian toxicity and good in vitro anticryptococcal (minimum inhibitory concentration = 4 μg/mL). This scaffold inhibits signaling through the cell wall integrity MAP kinase cascade. Structure–activity studies indicate that the thiocarbonyl moiety is crucial for activity. Genetic and biochemical data suggest that benzothioureas inhibit signaling upstream of the kinase cascade. Thus, the benzothioureas appear to be a promising new scaffold for further exploration in the search for new anticryptococcal agents. PMID:26807437

  16. Molecular Determinants of T Cell Epitope Recognition to the Common Timothy Grass Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Oseroff, Carla; Sidney, John; Kotturi, Maya F.; Kolla, Ravi; Alam, Rafeul; Broide, David H.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Weiskopf, Daniela; McKinney, Denise M.; Chung, Jo L.; Petersen, Arnd; Grey, Howard; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the molecular determinants of allergen-derived T cell epitopes in humans utilizing the Phleum pratense (Timothy grass) allergens (Phl p). PBMCs from allergic individuals were tested in ELISPOT assays with overlapping peptides spanning known Phl p allergens. A total of 43 distinct antigenic regions were recognized, illustrating the large breadth of grass-specific T cell epitopes. Th2 cytokines (as represented by IL-5) were predominant, whereas IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-17 were detected less frequently. Responses from specific immunotherapy treatment individuals were weaker and less consistent, yet similar in epitope specificity and cytokine pattern to allergic donors, whereas nonallergic individuals were essentially nonreactive. Despite the large breadth of recognition, nine dominant antigenic regions were defined, each recognized by multiple donors, accounting for 51% of the total response. Multiple HLA molecules and loci restricted the dominant regions, and the immunodominant epitopes could be predicted using bioinformatic algorithms specific for 23 common HLA-DR, DP, and DQ molecules. Immunodominance was also apparent at the Phl p Ag level. It was found that 52, 19, and 14% of the total response was directed to Phl p 5, 1, and 3, respectively. Interestingly, little or no correlation between Phl p-specific IgE levels and T cell responses was found. Thus, certain intrinsic features of the allergen protein might influence immunogenicity at the level of T cell reactivity. Consistent with this notion, different Phl p Ags were associated with distinct patterns of IL-5, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-17 production. PMID:20554959

  17. Direct monitoring of molecular recognition processes using fluorescence enhancement at colloid-coated microplates.

    PubMed

    Lobmaier, C; Hawa, G; Götzinger, M; Wirth, M; Pittner, F; Gabor, F

    2001-01-01

    Direct monitoring of recognition processes at the molecular level is a valuable tool for studying reaction kinetics to assess affinity constants (e.g. drugs to receptors) and for designing rapid single step immunoassays. Methods currently used to gain information about binding processes predominantly depend on surface plasmon resonance. These systems use excitation with coherent light in attenuated total reflection geometry to obtain discrimination between surface-bound and free molecules in solution. Therefore labeling of the compounds is not necessary, but due to the complexity of the measuring setup the method is rather costly. In this contribution we present a simple method for performing kinetic single step biorecognition assays with fluorophore labeled compounds using the fluorescence enhancement properties of surface bound silver colloids. Silver colloids are bound to standard microplates via silanization of the plastic surface. Fluorophores close to this colloid coated surface show a significant gain in fluorescence compared to fluorophores farther away in the bulk solution. Therefore discrimination between surface bound and free fluorophores is possible and the binding of, for example, fluorophore labeled antibodies to antigens immobilized on the colloid surface results in increasing fluorescence intensity. Utilization of standard microplates makes this method fully compatible with conventional microplate processing and reading devices. Neither excitation with coherent laser light nor ATR geometry is required, the measurement is performed in a standard fluorescence microplate reader in front face geometry with a xenon flash lamp as excitation source. Methods for the preparation of colloid-coated microplates and fluorescence-enhanced biorecognition assays are presented. Additionally the dependence of the system performance on the structure and properties of the metal colloid coated surface is described. A two-component biorecognition model system shows a

  18. The NTA-His6 bond is strong enough for AFM single-molecular recognition studies.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Claire; Gruber, Hermann J; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2007-01-01

    There is a need in current atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecular recognition studies for generic methods for the stable, functional attachment of proteins on tips and solid supports. In the last few years, the site-directed nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-polyhistidine (Hisn) system has been increasingly used towards this goal. Yet, a crucial question in this context is whether the NTA-Hisn bond is sufficiently strong for ensuring stable protein immobilization during force spectroscopy measurements. Here, we measured the forces between AFM tips modified with NTA-terminated alkanethiols and solid supports functionalized with His6-Gly-Cys peptides in the presence of Ni2+. The force histogram obtained at a loading rate of 6600 pN s(-1) showed three maxima at rupture forces of 153 +/- 57 pN, 316 +/- 50 pN and 468 +/- 44 pN, that we attribute primarily to monovalent and multivalent interactions between a single His6 moiety and one, two and three NTA groups, respectively. The measured forces are well above the 50-100 pN unbinding forces typically observed by AFM for receptor-ligand pairs. The plot of adhesion force versus log (loading rate) revealed a linear regime, from which we deduced a kinetic off-rate constant of dissociation, k(off) approximately 0.07 s(-1). This value is in the range of that estimated for the multivalent interaction involving two NTA, using fluorescence measurements, and may account for an increased binding stability of the NTA-His6 bond. We conclude that the NTA-His6 system is a powerful, well-suited platform for the stable, oriented immobilization of proteins in AFM single-molecule studies. PMID:17712775

  19. The molecular basis for Mucosal-Associated Invariant T cell recognition of MR1 proteins

    PubMed Central

    López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Dulberger, Charles L.; Crooks, James E.; Parks, Chelsea D.; Luoma, Adrienne M.; McFedries, Amanda; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Saghatelian, Alan; Adams, Erin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are an evolutionarily conserved αβ T-cell lineage that express a semi-invariant T-cell receptor (TCR) restricted to the MHC related-1 (MR1) protein. MAIT cells are dependent upon MR1 expression and exposure to microbes for their development and stimulation, yet these cells can exhibit microbial-independent stimulation when responding to MR1 from different species. We have used this microbial-independent, cross-species reactivity of MAIT cells to define the molecular basis of MAIT-TCR/MR1 engagement and present here a 2.85 Å complex structure of a human MAIT-TCR bound to bovine MR1. The MR1 binding groove is similar in backbone structure to classical peptide-presenting MHC class I molecules (MHCp), yet is partially occluded by large aromatic residues that form cavities suitable for small ligand presentation. The docking of the MAIT-TCR on MR1 is perpendicular to the MR1 surface and straddles the MR1 α1 and α2 helices, similar to classical αβ TCR engagement of MHCp. However, the MAIT-TCR contacts are dominated by the α-chain, focused on the MR1 α2 helix. TCR β-chain contacts are mostly through the variable CDR3β loop that is positioned proximal to the CDR3α loop directly over the MR1 open groove. The elucidation of the MAIT TCR/MR1 complex structure explains how the semi-invariant MAIT-TCR engages the nonpolymorphic MR1 protein, and sheds light onto ligand discrimination by this cell type. Importantly, this structure also provides a critical link in our understanding of the evolution of αβ T-cell recognition of MHC and MHC-like ligands. PMID:23613577

  20. Molecular recognition of neonicotinoid insecticides: the determinants of life or death.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    2009-02-17

    azidopyridinyl neonicotinoid and nicotinoid photoprobes bind in a single conformation with Aplysia AChBP; this is consistent with high-resolution crystal structures. Surprisingly, though, the electronegative nitro or cyano moiety of the neonicotinoid faced in a reversed orientation relative to the cationic nicotinoid functionality. For the Lymnaea AChBP, the azidoneonicotinoid probes modified two distinct and distant sites, while the azidonicotinoid probes, surprisingly, derivatized only one point. This meant that the neonicotinoids have two bound conformations in the vertebrate receptor model, which are completely inverted relative to each other, whereas nicotinoids appear buried in only one conserved conformation. Therefore, the unique binding conformations of nicotinic agonists in these insect and vertebrate receptor homologues define the basis for molecular recognition of neonicotinoid insecticides as the determinants of life or death.

  1. Scaffolding and Metacognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Derek; Clarke, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes an expanded conception of scaffolding with four key elements: (1) scaffolding agency--expert, reciprocal, and self-scaffolding; (2) scaffolding domain--conceptual and heuristic scaffolding; (3) the identification of self-scaffolding with metacognition; and (4) the identification of six zones of scaffolding activity; each zone…

  2. Development and molecular characterization of polymeric micro-nanofibrous scaffold of a defined 3-D niche for in vitro chemosensitivity analysis against acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Maya S; Mony, Ullas; Menon, Deepthy; Koyakutty, Manzoor; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Pavithran, Keechilat; Nair, Shantikumar V; Menon, Krishnakumar N

    2015-01-01

    Standard in vitro drug testing employs 2-D tissue culture plate systems to test anti-leukemic drugs against cell adhesion-mediated drug-resistant leukemic cells that harbor in 3-D bone marrow microenvironments. This drawback necessitates the fabrication of 3-D scaffolds that have cell adhesion-mediated drug-resistant properties similar to in vivo niches. We therefore aimed at exploiting the known property of polyurethane (PU)/poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) in forming a micro-nanofibrous structure to fabricate unique, not presented before, as far as we are aware, 3-D micro-nanofibrous scaffold composites using a thermally induced phase separation technique. Among the different combinations of PU/PLLA composites generated, the unique PU/PLLA 60:40 composite displayed micro-nanofibrous morphology similar to decellularized bone marrow with increased protein and fibronectin adsorption. Culturing of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) KG1a cells in FN-coated PU/PLLA 60:40 shows increased cell adhesion and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance to the drugs cytarabine and daunorubicin without changing the original CD34+/CD38−/CD33− phenotype for 168 hours compared to fibronectin tissue culture plate systems. Molecularly, as seen in vivo, increased chemoresistance is associated with the upregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl2 and the cell cycle regulatory protein p27Kip1 leading to cell growth arrest. Abrogation of Bcl2 activity by the Bcl2-specific inhibitor ABT 737 led to cell death in the presence of both cytarabine and daunorubicin, demonstrating that the cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance induced by Bcl2 and p27Kip1 in the scaffold was similar to that seen in vivo. These results thus show the utility of a platform technology, wherein drug testing can be performed before administering to patients without the necessity for stromal cells. PMID:26028971

  3. Sequence-specific recognition of double-stranded DNA with molecular beacon with the aid of Ag(+) under neutral pH environment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiyou; Guo, Xiaoting; Ling, Liansheng

    2013-05-01

    A sensitive fluorescent sensor for sequence-specific recognition of dsDNA was established with a molecular beacon (MB) based upon the formation of parallel triplex DNA in the presence of Ag(+) under neutral pH environment.

  4. Water-compatible temperature and magnetic dual-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers for recognition and extraction of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaqing; Wang, Xiaoyan; Lu, Wenhui; Wang, Xinran; Li, Jinhua; You, Huiyan; Xiong, Hua; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-02-26

    Versatile molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been widely applied to various sample matrices, however, molecular recognition in aqueous media is still difficult. Stimuli-responsive MIPs have received increasing attentions due to their unique feature that the molecular recognition is regulated by specific external stimuli. Herein, water-compatible temperature and magnetic dual-responsive MIPs (WC-TMMIPs) with hydrophilic brushes were prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer precipitation polymerization for reversible and selective recognition and extraction of bisphenol A (BPA). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) as characterization methods were used to examine the successful synthesis of polymers, and the resultant WC-TMMIPs showed excellent thermosensitivity and simple rapid magnetic separation. Controlled adsorption and release of BPA by temperature regulation were investigated systematically, and the maximum adsorption and removal efficiency toward BPA in aqueous solutions were attained at 35 °C and 45 °C, respectively, as well as a good recoverability was exhibited with the precision less than 5% through five adsorption-desorption cycles. Phenolic structural analogs were tested and good recognition specificity for BPA was displayed. Accordingly, the WC-TMMIPs were employed as adsorbents for magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) and packed SPE of BPA from seawater samples. Using the two modes followed by HPLC-UV determination, excellent linearity was attained in the range of 0.1-14.5 μM and 1.3-125 nM, with low detection limits of 0.02 μM and 0.18 nM, respectively. Satisfactory recoveries for spiked seawater samples were achieved ranging from 86.3-103.5% and 96.2-104.3% with RSD within 2.12-4.33%. The intelligent WC-TMMIPs combining water-compatibility, molecular recognition, magnetic separation, and temperature regulation proved

  5. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized oxygen heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Dongamanti, Ashok; Aamate, Vikas Kumar; Devulapally, Mohan Gandhi; Gundu, Srinivas; Kotni, Meena Kumari; Manga, Vijjulatha; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Ernala, Prasad

    2015-02-15

    A convenient approach for the synthesis of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized heterocyclic rings (eight-, nine-, ten- and eleven-membered rings) containing two oxygen atoms from flavonols through alkylation using different dibromoalkanes was described. The synthesized compounds were established based on the spectral data and X-ray crystal structure for 6c. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Docking studies were carried out for most active two compounds 6f and 6i. PMID:25592711

  6. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized oxygen heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Dongamanti, Ashok; Aamate, Vikas Kumar; Devulapally, Mohan Gandhi; Gundu, Srinivas; Kotni, Meena Kumari; Manga, Vijjulatha; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Ernala, Prasad

    2015-02-15

    A convenient approach for the synthesis of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized heterocyclic rings (eight-, nine-, ten- and eleven-membered rings) containing two oxygen atoms from flavonols through alkylation using different dibromoalkanes was described. The synthesized compounds were established based on the spectral data and X-ray crystal structure for 6c. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Docking studies were carried out for most active two compounds 6f and 6i.

  7. Synthesis and molecular recognition of novel oligo(ethylenediamino) bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s and their copper(II) complexes: enhanced molecular binding ability and selectivity by multiple recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; You, C C; Li, B

    2001-03-16

    Four bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s tethered by different lengths of oligo(ethylenediamine)s have been synthesized and their inclusion complexation behavior with selected substrates elucidated by circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence decay. In order to study their binding ability quantitatively, inclusion complexation stability constants with four dye guests, that is, brilliant green (BG), methyl orange (MO), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toluidino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been determined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C with spectrophotometric, spectropolarimetric, or spectrofluorometric titrations. The results obtained indicate that the two tethered cyclodextrin units might cooperatively bind to a guest, and the molecular binding ability toward model substrates, especially linear guests such as TNS and MO, could be extended. The tether length plays a crucial role in the molecular recognition, the binding constants for ANS and TNS decrease linearly with an increase in the tether length of dimeric cyclodextrin. The Gibbs free energy changes (-deltaGo) for the unit increment per ethylene are 0.99 kJ mol(-1) for ANS and 0.44 kJmol(-1) for TNS, respectively. On the other hand, the presence of a copper(II) ion in metallobis(beta-cyclodextrin)s oligo(ethylenediamino) tethers enhances not only the original binding ability, but also the molecular selectivity through triple or multiple recognition, as compared with the parent bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s.

  8. Structural insight into the mechanism of amyloid precursor protein recognition by β-secretase 1: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Basu, Soumalee

    2015-07-01

    β-secretase 1 (BACE1) initiates the proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP) to generate Aβ, aggregation of which has been considered to be the main histopathological feature of Alzheimer's Disease. Here, we have explored the conformational switching of BACE1 during APP recognition using molecular dynamics simulation thereby suggesting the recognition to be a conformational selection process. Free BACE1 is highly flexible and exists as an ensemble of conformations. The β-hairpin flap that covers the active site of BACE1 visits numerous conformations during the simulation. Essential dynamics reveal that concerted movements in several loops including the flap region lead to a conformational switching from open to closed form. During the simulation, free BACE1 visits both the open and closed forms multiple times. Binding of APP to the BACE1 cavity shifts the equilibrium towards a stable complex stabilized by strong electrostatic surface complementarity along with several van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions.

  9. Scaffolded biology.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Descriptions and interpretations of the natural world are dominated by dichotomies such as organism vs. environment, nature vs. nurture, genetic vs. epigenetic, but in the last couple of decades strong dissatisfaction with those partitions has been repeatedly voiced and a number of alternative perspectives have been suggested, from perspectives such as Dawkins' extended phenotype, Turner's extended organism, Oyama's Developmental Systems Theory and Odling-Smee's niche construction theory. Last in time is the description of biological phenomena in terms of hybrids between an organism (scaffolded system) and a living or non-living scaffold, forming unit systems to study processes such as reproduction and development. As scaffold, eventually, we can define any resource used by the biological system, especially in development and reproduction, without incorporating it as happens in the case of resources fueling metabolism. Addressing biological systems as functionally scaffolded systems may help pointing to functional relationships that can impart temporal marking to the developmental process and thus explain its irreversibility; revisiting the boundary between development and metabolism and also regeneration phenomena, by suggesting a conceptual framework within which to investigate phenomena of regular hypermorphic regeneration such as characteristic of deer antlers; fixing a periodization of development in terms of the times at which a scaffolding relationship begins or is terminated; and promoting plant galls to legitimate study objects of developmental biology. PMID:27287514

  10. Scaffolded biology.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Descriptions and interpretations of the natural world are dominated by dichotomies such as organism vs. environment, nature vs. nurture, genetic vs. epigenetic, but in the last couple of decades strong dissatisfaction with those partitions has been repeatedly voiced and a number of alternative perspectives have been suggested, from perspectives such as Dawkins' extended phenotype, Turner's extended organism, Oyama's Developmental Systems Theory and Odling-Smee's niche construction theory. Last in time is the description of biological phenomena in terms of hybrids between an organism (scaffolded system) and a living or non-living scaffold, forming unit systems to study processes such as reproduction and development. As scaffold, eventually, we can define any resource used by the biological system, especially in development and reproduction, without incorporating it as happens in the case of resources fueling metabolism. Addressing biological systems as functionally scaffolded systems may help pointing to functional relationships that can impart temporal marking to the developmental process and thus explain its irreversibility; revisiting the boundary between development and metabolism and also regeneration phenomena, by suggesting a conceptual framework within which to investigate phenomena of regular hypermorphic regeneration such as characteristic of deer antlers; fixing a periodization of development in terms of the times at which a scaffolding relationship begins or is terminated; and promoting plant galls to legitimate study objects of developmental biology.

  11. Molecular recognition of PTS-1 cargo proteins by Pex5p: implications for protein mistargeting in primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Torres, Noel; Tomic, Nenad; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo; Pey, Angel L

    2015-02-13

    Peroxisomal biogenesis and function critically depends on the import of cytosolic proteins carrying a PTS1 sequence into this organelle upon interaction with the peroxin Pex5p. Recent structural studies have provided important insights into the molecular recognition of cargo proteins by Pex5p. Peroxisomal import is a key feature in the pathogenesis of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), where alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) undergoes mitochondrial mistargeting in about a third of patients. Here, we study the molecular recognition of PTS1 cargo proteins by Pex5p using oligopeptides and AGT variants bearing different natural PTS1 sequences, and employing an array of biophysical, computational and cell biology techniques. Changes in affinity for Pex5p (spanning over 3-4 orders of magnitude) reflect different thermodynamic signatures, but overall bury similar amounts of molecular surface. Structure/energetic analyses provide information on the contribution of ancillary regions and the conformational changes induced in Pex5p and the PTS1 cargo upon complex formation. Pex5p stability in vitro is enhanced upon cargo binding according to their binding affinities. Moreover, we provide evidence that the rational modulation of the AGT: Pex5p binding affinity might be useful tools to investigate mistargeting and misfolding in PH1 by pulling the folding equilibria towards the native and peroxisomal import competent state.

  12. Allosteric Inhibitory Molecular Recognition of a Photochromic Dye by a Digestive Enzyme: Dihydroindolizine makes α-chymotrypsin Photo-responsive

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, Damayanti; Ghosh, Abhijit; Singh, Priya; Dutta, Shreyasi; Polley, Nabarun; Althagafi, Ismail.I.; Jassas, Rabab S.; Ahmed, Saleh A.; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The structural-functional regulation of enzymes by the administration of an external stimulus such as light could create photo-switches that exhibit unique biotechnological applications. However, molecular recognition of small ligands is a central phenomenon involved in all biological processes. We demonstrate herein that the molecular recognition of a photochromic ligand, dihydroindolizine (DHI), by serine protease α-chymotrypsin (CHT) leads to the photo-control of enzymatic activity. We synthesized and optically characterized the photochromic DHI. Light-induced reversible pyrroline ring opening and a consequent thermal back reaction via 1,5-electrocyclization are responsible for the photochromic behavior. Furthermore, DHI inhibits the enzymatic activity of CHT in a photo-controlled manner. Simultaneous binding of the well-known inhibitors 4-nitrophenyl anthranilate (NPA) or proflavin (PF) in the presence of DHI displays spectral overlap between the emission of CHT-NPA or CHT-PF with the respective absorption of cis or trans DHI. The results suggest an opportunity to explore the binding site of DHI using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Moreover, to more specifically evaluate the DHI binding interactions, we employed molecular docking calculations, which suggested binding near the hydrophobic site of Cys-1-Cys-122 residues. Variations in the electrostatic interactions of the two conformers of DHI adopt unfavorable conformations, leading to the allosteric inhibition of enzymatic activity. PMID:27677331

  13. Allosteric Inhibitory Molecular Recognition of a Photochromic Dye by a Digestive Enzyme: Dihydroindolizine makes α-chymotrypsin Photo-responsive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Damayanti; Ghosh, Abhijit; Singh, Priya; Dutta, Shreyasi; Polley, Nabarun; Althagafi, Ismail. I.; Jassas, Rabab S.; Ahmed, Saleh A.; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    The structural-functional regulation of enzymes by the administration of an external stimulus such as light could create photo-switches that exhibit unique biotechnological applications. However, molecular recognition of small ligands is a central phenomenon involved in all biological processes. We demonstrate herein that the molecular recognition of a photochromic ligand, dihydroindolizine (DHI), by serine protease α-chymotrypsin (CHT) leads to the photo-control of enzymatic activity. We synthesized and optically characterized the photochromic DHI. Light-induced reversible pyrroline ring opening and a consequent thermal back reaction via 1,5-electrocyclization are responsible for the photochromic behavior. Furthermore, DHI inhibits the enzymatic activity of CHT in a photo-controlled manner. Simultaneous binding of the well-known inhibitors 4-nitrophenyl anthranilate (NPA) or proflavin (PF) in the presence of DHI displays spectral overlap between the emission of CHT-NPA or CHT-PF with the respective absorption of cis or trans DHI. The results suggest an opportunity to explore the binding site of DHI using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Moreover, to more specifically evaluate the DHI binding interactions, we employed molecular docking calculations, which suggested binding near the hydrophobic site of Cys-1-Cys-122 residues. Variations in the electrostatic interactions of the two conformers of DHI adopt unfavorable conformations, leading to the allosteric inhibition of enzymatic activity.

  14. Selective photoelectrocatalytic degradation of recalcitrant contaminant driven by an n-P heterojunction nanoelectrode with molecular recognition ability.

    PubMed

    Chai, Shouning; Zhao, Guohua; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Yujing; Nong, Fuqiao; Li, Mingfang; Li, Dongming

    2012-09-18

    With in situ molecular imprinting technique, a novel nanoelectrode (MI, n-P)-TiO(2) with n-P heterojunction and molecular recognition ability was fabricated by liquid phase deposition at low temperature. Using bisphenol A (BPA) as template, the spindle-like TiO(2) particles 40-80 nm in size compactly grew on the boron-doped diamond (BDD) substrate. Several spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that the BPA molecules were successfully imprinted on the TiO(2) matrix and numerous specific recognition sites to template were formed after calcination. The transient photocurrent response experiments have confirmed that the (MI, n-P)-TiO(2) nanoelectrode displays outstanding photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) activity and selectivity. The (MI, n-P)-TiO(2) is further employed in degrading the mixture containing BPA and interference 2-naphthol (2-NP). After 2 h, BPA removal reaches 97%, and corresponding kinetic constant is 1.76 h(-1), which is 4.6 times that of 2-NP removal even if 2-NP is much more concentrated. On the electrode without molecular imprint, the removal rate constants of BPA and 2-NP approximately equal, only about 0.5 h(-1). The results indicate that selective PEC oxidation can be realized readily on the (MI, n-P)-TiO(2) nanoelectrode due to the synergetic effects including strong recognition adsorption, formation of n-P heteojunction, and external electrostatic field. The effect of formation of n-P heterojunction on the enhanced PEC performances is also discussed. PMID:22920667

  15. Dynamics and recognition within a protein–DNA complex: a molecular dynamics study of the SKN-1/DNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Etheve, Loïc; Martin, Juliette; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the Caenorhabditis elegans transcription factor SKN-1 bound to its cognate DNA site show that the protein–DNA interface undergoes significant dynamics on the microsecond timescale. A detailed analysis of the simulation shows that movements of two key arginine side chains between the major groove and the backbone of DNA generate distinct conformational sub-states that each recognize only part of the consensus binding sequence of SKN-1, while the experimentally observed binding specificity results from a time-averaged view of the dynamic recognition occurring within this complex. PMID:26721385

  16. Supramolecular Alternating Polymer from Crown Ether and Pillar[5]arene-Based Double Molecular Recognition for Preparation of Hierarchical Materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Fan, Xiaodong; Qi, Miao; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Haitao; Tian, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A novel supramolecular alternating polymer is constructed based on double molecular recognition events of benzo-21-crown-7 with a secondary ammonium salt and of pillar[5]arene with a neutral guest. The resulting polymer is utilized to prepare hierarchical materials with different dimensionalities for the first time. These materials included zero-dimensional spherical aggregates, one-dimensional nanofibers, two-dimensional microstructured films, and three-dimensional ordered glue. This development will be helpful for designing and preparing supramolecular hierarchical materials with different dimensionalities. PMID:26555439

  17. The scaffold tree: an efficient navigation in the scaffold universe.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Peter; Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Renner, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    The Scaffold Tree algorithm (J Chem Inf Model 47:47-58, 2007) allows to organize large molecular data sets by arranging sets of molecules into a unique tree hierarchy based on their scaffolds, with scaffolds forming leaf nodes of such tree. The hierarchy is created by iterative removal of rings from more complex scaffolds using chemically meaningful set of rules, until a single, root ring is obtained. The classification is deterministic, data set independent, and scales linearly with the number of compounds included in the data set. In this review we summarize the basic principles of the Scaffold Tree methodology and review its applications, which appeared in recent medicinal chemistry literature, including the use of Scaffold Trees for visualization of large chemical data sets, compound clustering, and the identification of novel bioactive molecules. References to several computer programs, including also free tools available on the Internet, allowing to perform classification and visualization of molecules based on their scaffolds are also provided. PMID:20838972

  18. The Molecular Basis for Different Recognition of Substrates by Phosphodiesterase Families 4 and 10

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,H.; Robinson, H.; Ke, H.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are key enzymes that control the cellular concentrations of the second messengers cAMP and cGMP. The mechanism for selective recognition of substrates cAMP and cGMP by individual PDE families remains a puzzle. To understand the mechanism for substrate recognition by PDE enzymes, the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of an inactive D201N mutant of PDE4D2 in complex with substrate cAMP has been determined at 1.56 Angstroms resolution. The structure shows that Gln369 forms only one hydrogen bond with the adenine of cAMP. This finding provides experimental evidence against the hypothesis of two hydrogen bonds between the invariant glutamine and the substrate cAMP in PDE4, and thus suggests that the widely circulated 'glutamine switch' model is unlikely the mechanism for substrate recognition by PDEs. A structure comparison between PDE4D2-cAMP and PDE10A2-cAMP reveals an anti configuration of cAMP in PDE4D2 but syn in PDE10A2, in addition to different contact patterns of cAMP in these two structures. These observations imply that individual PDE families have their characteristic mechanisms for substrate recognition.

  19. Toward an understanding of the acceleration of Diels-Alder reactions by a pseudo-intramolecular process achieved by molecular recognition. A DFT study.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Aurell, M José; Arnó, Manuel; Saez, José A

    2007-05-25

    The pseudo-intramolecular Diels-Alder (DA) reaction between a 2-substituted furan (1) and a N-maleimide derivative (2) has been analyzed using DFT methods. Formation of two hydrogen bonds between the appendages on furan and maleimide derivatives favors thermodynamically the formation of a molecular complex (MC1) through an efficient molecular recognition process. The large enthalpy stabilization associated with the molecular recognition overcomes the unfavorable activation entropy associated with the bimolecular process. As a consequence, the subsequent DA reaction is clearly accelerated through a pseudo-intramolecular process.

  20. Selectivity of pyoverdine recognition by the FpvA receptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Benjamin; Cézard, Christine; Sonnet, Pascal

    2015-07-21

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous human opportunistic pathogen, has developed resistances to multiple antibiotics. It uses its primary native siderophore, pyoverdine, to scavenge the iron essential to its growth in the outside medium and transport it back into its cytoplasm. The FpvA receptor on the bacterial outer membrane recognizes and internalizes pyoverdine bearing its iron payload, but can also bind pyoverdines from other Pseudomonads or synthetic analogues. Pyoverdine derivatives could therefore be used as vectors to deliver antibiotics into the bacterium. In this study, we use molecular dynamics and free energy calculations to characterize the mechanisms and thermodynamics of the recognition of the native pyoverdines of P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens by FpvA. Based on these results, we delineate the features that pyoverdines with high affinity for FpvA should possess. In particular, we show that (i) the dynamics and interaction of the unbound pyoverdines with water should be optimized with equal care as the interface contacts in the complex with FpvA; (ii) the C-terminal extremity of the pyoverdine chain, which appears to play no role in the bound complex, is involved in the intermediate stages of recognition; and (iii) the length and cyclicity of the pyoverdine chain can be used to fine-tune the kinetics of the recognition mechanism. PMID:26098682

  1. Determination of association constant of host-guest supramolecular complex (molecular recognition of carbamazepine, antiseizure drug, with calix(4)arene).

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, C; Jayabal, P; Ramakrishnan, V

    2015-12-01

    The thermodynamic property of the host-guest, inclusion complex formed between p-t-butyl calix(4)arene which is a supramolecule, and the antiseizure drug, carbamazepine was studied. p-t-Butyl calix(4)arene has been used as a host molecule and carbamazepine as a guest molecule. Optical absorption spectral studies were carried out to investigate the molecular recognition properties of p-t-butyl calix(4)arene with carbamazepine. The stochiometry of the host-guest complexes formed and the association constant were determined. An interesting 1:2 stochiometric host-guest complex was formed. Job's continuous method of variation and Benesi-Hildebrand expression were used for the determination of binding constant and the stochiometry of the host-guest complex formed. Molecular dimension of the host molecule plays a vital role in the formation of the host-guest stochiometric complexes.

  2. Single cell molecular recognition of migrating and invading tumor cells using a targeted fluorescent probe to receptor PTPmu.

    PubMed

    Burden-Gulley, Susan M; Qutaish, Mohammed Q; Sullivant, Kristin E; Tan, Mingqian; Craig, Sonya E L; Basilion, James P; Lu, Zheng-Rong; Wilson, David L; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2013-04-01

    Detection of an extracellular cleaved fragment of a cell-cell adhesion molecule represents a new paradigm in molecular recognition and imaging of tumors. We previously demonstrated that probes that recognize the cleaved extracellular domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPmu) label human glioblastoma brain tumor sections and the main tumor mass of intracranial xenograft gliomas. In this article, we examine whether one of these probes, SBK2, can label dispersed glioma cells that are no longer connected to the main tumor mass. Live mice with highly dispersive glioma tumors were injected intravenously with the fluorescent PTPmu probe to test the ability of the probe to label the dispersive glioma cells in vivo. Analysis was performed using a unique three-dimensional (3D) cryo-imaging technique to reveal highly migratory and invasive glioma cell dispersal within the brain and the extent of colabeling by the PTPmu probe. The PTPmu probe labeled the main tumor site and dispersed cells up to 3.5 mm away. The cryo-images of tumors labeled with the PTPmu probe provide a novel, high-resolution view of molecular tumor recognition, with excellent 3D detail regarding the pathways of tumor cell migration. Our data demonstrate that the PTPmu probe recognizes distant tumor cells even in parts of the brain where the blood-brain barrier is likely intact. The PTPmu probe has potential translational significance for recognizing tumor cells to facilitate molecular imaging, a more complete tumor resection and to serve as a molecular targeting agent to deliver chemotherapeutics to the main tumor mass and distant dispersive tumor cells.

  3. Single cell molecular recognition of migrating and invading tumor cells using a targeted fluorescent probe to receptor PTPmu.

    PubMed

    Burden-Gulley, Susan M; Qutaish, Mohammed Q; Sullivant, Kristin E; Tan, Mingqian; Craig, Sonya E L; Basilion, James P; Lu, Zheng-Rong; Wilson, David L; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2013-04-01

    Detection of an extracellular cleaved fragment of a cell-cell adhesion molecule represents a new paradigm in molecular recognition and imaging of tumors. We previously demonstrated that probes that recognize the cleaved extracellular domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPmu) label human glioblastoma brain tumor sections and the main tumor mass of intracranial xenograft gliomas. In this article, we examine whether one of these probes, SBK2, can label dispersed glioma cells that are no longer connected to the main tumor mass. Live mice with highly dispersive glioma tumors were injected intravenously with the fluorescent PTPmu probe to test the ability of the probe to label the dispersive glioma cells in vivo. Analysis was performed using a unique three-dimensional (3D) cryo-imaging technique to reveal highly migratory and invasive glioma cell dispersal within the brain and the extent of colabeling by the PTPmu probe. The PTPmu probe labeled the main tumor site and dispersed cells up to 3.5 mm away. The cryo-images of tumors labeled with the PTPmu probe provide a novel, high-resolution view of molecular tumor recognition, with excellent 3D detail regarding the pathways of tumor cell migration. Our data demonstrate that the PTPmu probe recognizes distant tumor cells even in parts of the brain where the blood-brain barrier is likely intact. The PTPmu probe has potential translational significance for recognizing tumor cells to facilitate molecular imaging, a more complete tumor resection and to serve as a molecular targeting agent to deliver chemotherapeutics to the main tumor mass and distant dispersive tumor cells. PMID:22987116

  4. Meniscal scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kevin R; Sgaglione, Nicholas A; Goodwillie, Andrew D

    2014-12-01

    There are two scaffold products designed for meniscal reconstruction or substitution of partial meniscal defects that are currently available in the Europe: the collagen meniscal implant (CMI; Ivy Sports Medicine, Gräfelfing, Germany) and the polymer scaffold (PS; Actifit, Orteq Bioengineering, London, United Kingdom). The CMI has demonstrated improved clinical outcomes compared with baseline in patients with chronic postmeniscectomy symptoms with follow-up ranging from 5 to more than 10 years. There are also several comparative studies that report improved clinical scores in patients with chronic medial meniscus symptoms treated with CMI versus repeat partial meniscectomy, and a lower reoperation rate. Recently, PS insertion was shown to result in improved clinical outcomes in patients with chronic postmeniscectomy symptoms of the medial or lateral meniscus at short-term follow-up. However, there is currently no medium- or long-term data available for the PS. The use of meniscal scaffolds in the acute setting has not been found to result in improved outcomes in most studies. The authors' surgical indications for meniscal scaffold implantation, preferred surgical technique, and postoperative rehabilitation protocol are described. PMID:25172967

  5. Multivalent display of proteins on viral nanoparticles using molecular recognition and chemical ligation strategies.

    PubMed

    Venter, P Arno; Dirksen, Anouk; Thomas, Diane; Manchester, Marianne; Dawson, Philip E; Schneemann, Anette

    2011-06-13

    Multivalent display of heterologous proteins on viral nanoparticles forms a basis for numerous applications in nanotechnology, including vaccine development, targeted therapeutic delivery, and tissue-specific bioimaging. In many instances, precise placement of proteins is required for optimal functioning of the supramolecular assemblies, but orientation- and site-specific coupling of proteins to viral scaffolds remains a significant technical challenge. We have developed two strategies that allow for controlled attachment of a variety of proteins on viral particles using covalent and noncovalent principles. In one strategy, an interaction between domain 4 of anthrax protective antigen and its receptor was used to display multiple copies of a target protein on virus-like particles. In the other, expressed protein ligation and aniline-catalyzed oximation was used to display covalently a model protein. The latter strategy, in particular, yielded nanoparticles that induced potent immune responses to the coupled protein, suggesting potential applications in vaccine development. PMID:21545187

  6. Applying pattern recognition methods to analyze the molecular properties of a homologous series of nitrogen mustard agents.

    PubMed

    Bartzatt, Ronald; Donigan, Laura

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyze the pharmacological properties of a homologous series of nitrogen mustard (N-mustard) agents formed after inserting 1 to 9 methylene groups (-CH2-) between 2 -N(CH2CH2Cl)2 groups. These compounds were shown to have significant correlations and associations in their properties after analysis by pattern recognition methods including hierarchical classification, cluster analysis, nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (MDS), detrended correspondence analysis, K-means cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, and self-organizing tree algorithm (SOTA) analysis. Detrended correspondence analysis showed a linear-like association of the 9 homologs, and hierarchical classification showed that each homolog had great similarity to at least one other member of the series-as did cluster analysis using paired-group distance measure. Nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling was able to discriminate homologs 2 and 3 (by number of methylene groups) from homologs 4, 5, and 6 as a group, and from homologs 7, 8, and 9 as a group. Discriminant analysis, K-means cluster analysis, and hierarchical classification distinguished the high molecular weight homologs from low molecular weight homologs. As the number of methylene groups increased the aqueous solubility decreased, dermal permeation coefficient increased, Log P increased, molar volume increased, parachor increased, and index of refraction decreased. Application of pattern recognition methods discerned useful interrelationships within the homologous series that will determine specific and beneficial clinical applications for each homolog and methods of administration. PMID:16796353

  7. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2) in regulating human sperm-egg recognition.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Brett; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Dun, Matthew D; Redgrove, Kate A; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Aitken, R John

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2), as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  8. Molecular isoforms of murine CD44 and evidence that the membrane proximal domain is not critical for hyaluronate recognition

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We previously found that the CD44 glycoprotein on some lymphocytes can mediate adhesion to hyaluronate (HA) bearing cells. However, many questions remain about the molecular heterogeneity of CD44 and mechanisms which control its recognition of this ligand. In vitro mutagenesis and DNA sequencing have now been used to investigate the importance of the membrane proximal region of murine CD44 for recognition of soluble or cell surface HA. CD44 with an 83 amino acid deletion in this region mediated binding to soluble ligand and the apparent avidity increased markedly in the presence of a particular antibody to CD44, IRAWB14. The shortened CD44 was however inefficient in mediating adhesion of transfected cells to HA immobilized on cell surfaces. Four new murine isoforms of CD44 were isolated from a carcinoma line by use of the polymerase chain reaction. Only two of them correspond to ones recently discovered in rat and human cells. The longest variant nearly doubled the length of the extracellular portion of the molecule and introduced an additional 20 potential sites for glycosylation. When expressed on T lymphoma cells, all four of the new murine CD44 isoforms were capable of mediating adhesion to HA bearing cells. This result contrasts with a report that a related human CD44 isoform lacks this ability when expressed on B lineage lymphoma cells. The new murine isoforms also conferred the ability to recognize soluble HA and were very responsive to the IRAWB14 antibody. A brief survey of normal murine cell lines and tissues revealed that the hemopoietic isoform was the most abundant species. These findings indicate that the NH2-terminal portion of CD44 is sufficient for HA recognition and that this function is not necessarily abrogated by variations which occur in the membrane proximal domain. They add to the known molecular diversity of CD44 and provide another experimental model in which isoform specific functions can be investigated. PMID:1469058

  9. Dynamic chemistry of anion recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu

    2012-01-01

    In the past 40 years, anion recognition by synthetic receptors has grown into a rich and vibrant research topic, developing into a distinct branch of Supramolecular Chemistry. Traditional anion receptors comprise organic scaffolds functionalized with complementary binding groups that are assembled by multistep organic synthesis. Recently, a new approach to anion receptors has emerged, in which the host is dynamically self-assembled in the presence of the anionic guest, via reversible bond formation between functional building units. While coordination bonds were initially employed for the self-assembly of the anion hosts, more recent studies demonstrated that reversible covalent bonds can serve the same purpose. In both cases, due to their labile connections, the molecular constituents have the ability to assemble, dissociate, and recombine continuously, thereby creating a dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) of receptors. The anionic guests, through specific molecular recognition, may then amplify (express) the formation of a particular structure among all possible combinations (real or virtual) by shifting the equilibria involved towards the most optimal receptor. This approach is not limited to solution self-assembly, but is equally applicable to crystallization, where the fittest anion-binding crystal may be selected. Finally, the pros and cons of employing dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) vs molecular design for developing anion receptors, and the implications of both approaches to selective anion separations, will be discussed.

  10. Polymer-based separations: Synthesis and application of polymers for ionic and molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandratos, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    Polymer-based separations have utilized resins such as sulfonic, acrylic, and iminodiacetic acid resins and the XAD series. Selective polymeric reagents for reaction with a targeted metal ion were synthesized as polymers with two different types of functional groups, each operating on the ions through a different mechanism. There are 3 classes of DMBPs (dual mechanism bifunctional polymers). Research during this period dealing with metal ion recognition focused on two of these classes (reduction of metal ions to metal; selective complexation).

  11. Line-Based Object Recognition using Hausdorff Distance: From Range Images to Molecular Secondary Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra, C; Pascucci, V

    2004-12-13

    Object recognition algorithms are fundamental tools in automatic matching of geometric shapes within a background scene. Many approaches have been proposed in the past to solve the object recognition problem. Two of the key aspects that distinguish them in terms of their practical usability are: (i) the type of input model description and (ii) the comparison criteria used. In this paper we introduce a novel scheme for 3D object recognition based on line segment representation of the input shapes and comparison using the Hausdor distance. This choice of model representation provides the flexibility to apply the scheme in different application areas. We define several variants of the Hausdor distance to compare the models within the framework of well defined metric spaces. We present a matching algorithm that efficiently finds a pattern in a 3D scene. The algorithm approximates a minimization procedure of the Hausdor distance. The output error due to the approximation is guaranteed to be within a known constant bound. Practical results are presented for two classes of objects: (i) polyhedral shapes extracted from segmented range images and (ii) secondary structures of large molecules. In both cases the use of our approximate algorithm allows to match correctly the pattern in the background while achieving the efficiency necessary for practical use of the scheme. In particular the performance is improved substantially with minor degradation of the quality of the matching.

  12. Molecular determinants of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels for recognition of local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Takushi; Irie, Katsumasa; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-08-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) inhibit mammalian voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Navs) and are thus clinically important. LAs also inhibit prokaryotic Navs (BacNavs), which have a simpler structure than mammalian Navs. To elucidate the detailed mechanisms of LA inhibition to BacNavs, we used NavBh, a BacNav from Bacillus halodurans, to analyze the interactions of several LAs and quaternary ammoniums (QAs). Based on the chemical similarity of QA with the tertiary-alkylamine (TAA) group of LAs, QAs were used to determine the residues required for the recognition of TAA by NavBh. We confirmed that two residues, Thr220 and Phe227, are important for LA binding; a methyl group of Thr220 is important for recognizing both QAs and LAs, whereas Phe227 is involved in holding blockers at the binding site. In addition, we found that NavBh holds blockers in a closed state, consistent with the large inner cavity observed in the crystal structures of BacNavs. These findings reveal the inhibition mechanism of LAs in NavBh, where the methyl group of Thr220 provides the main receptor site for the TAA group and the bulky phenyl group of Phe227 holds the blockers inside the large inner cavity. These two residues correspond to the two LA recognition residues in mammalian Navs, which suggests the relevance of the LA recognition between BacNavs and mammalian Navs. PMID:27273848

  13. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    DOE PAGES

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test thismore » strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.« less

  14. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  15. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-28

    Reengineering protein-protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of "second-site suppressors," where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein-protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to "transplant" existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein-protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain-peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein-protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. Although the context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein-protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  16. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-28

    Reengineering protein-protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of "second-site suppressors," where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein-protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to "transplant" existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein-protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain-peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein-protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. Although the context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein-protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context. PMID:25313039

  17. Discrimination of herbal medicines by molecular spectroscopy and chemical pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jianjiang; Xu, Jingwei

    2006-10-01

    The molecular spectroscopy (including near infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy) with OPUS/Ident software was applied to clustering ginsengs according to species and processing methods. The results demonstrate that molecular spectroscopic analysis could provide a rapid, nondestructive and reliable method for identification of Chinese traditional medicine. It's found that the result of Raman spectroscopic analysis was the best one among these three methods. Comparing with traditional methods, which are laborious and time consuming, the molecular spectroscopic analysis is more effective.

  18. A molecular switch in the scaffold NHERF1 enables misfolded CFTR to evade the peripheral quality control checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Cláudia A; Matos, Ana Margarida; Dias-Alves, Ângela; Pereira, Joana F; Uliyakina, Inna; Barros, Patrícia; Amaral, Margarida D; Matos, Paulo

    2015-05-19

    The peripheral protein quality control (PPQC) checkpoint removes improperly folded proteins from the plasma membrane through a mechanism involving the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein). PPQC limits the efficacy of some cystic fibrosis (CF) drugs, such as VX-809, that improve trafficking to the plasma membrane of misfolded mutants of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), including F508del-CFTR, which retains partial functionality. We investigated the PPQC checkpoint in lung epithelial cells with F508del-CFTR that were exposed to VX-809. The conformation of the scaffold protein NHERF1 (Na(+)/H(+) exchange regulatory factor 1) determined whether the PPQC recognized "rescued" F508del-CFTR (the portion that reached the cell surface in VX-809-treated cells). Activation of the cytoskeletal regulator Rac1 promoted an interaction between the actin-binding adaptor protein ezrin and NHERF1, triggering exposure of the second PDZ domain of NHERF1, which interacted with rescued F508del-CFTR. Because binding of F508del-CFTR to the second PDZ of NHERF1 precluded the recruitment of CHIP, the coexposure of airway cells to Rac1 activator nearly tripled the efficacy of VX-809. Interference with the NHERF1-ezrin interaction prevented the increase of efficacy of VX-809 by Rac1 activation, but the actin-binding domain of ezrin was not required for the increase in efficacy. Thus, rather than mainly directing anchoring of F508del-CFTR to the actin cytoskeleton, induction of ezrin activation by Rac1 signaling triggered a conformational change in NHERF1, which was then able to bind and stabilize misfolded CFTR at the plasma membrane. These insights into the cell surface stabilization of CFTR provide new targets to improve treatment of CF.

  19. Superhydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymers based on a water-soluble functional monomer for the recognition of gastrodin in water media.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenhua; Zhang, Mingming; Wang, Daijie; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Jianhua; Huang, Luqi

    2015-12-18

    In this study, the first successfully developed superhydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for gastrodin recognition have been described. MIPs were prepared via the bulk polymerization process in an aqueous solution using alkenyl glycosides glucose (AGG) as the water-soluble functional monomer. The non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) were also synthesized using the same method without the use of the template. The dynamic water contact angles and photographs of the dispersion properties confirmed that the molecularly imprinted polymers displayed excellent superhydrophilicity. The results demonstrated that the MIPs exhibited high selectivity and an excellent imprinting effect. A molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) method was established. Optimization of various parameters affecting MISPE was investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a wide linear range (0.001-100.0μgmL(-1)) and low limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) (0.03 and 0.09ngmL(-1), respectively) were achieved. When compared with the NIPs, higher recoveries (90.5% to 97.6%) of gastrodin with lower relative standard deviations values (below 6.4%) using high performance liquid chromatography were obtained at three spiked levels in three blank samples. These results demonstrated one efficient, highly selective and environmentally-friendly MISPE technique with excellent reproducibility for the purification and pre-concentration of gastrodin from an aqueous extract of Gastrodia elata roots.

  20. Superhydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymers based on a water-soluble functional monomer for the recognition of gastrodin in water media.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenhua; Zhang, Mingming; Wang, Daijie; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Jianhua; Huang, Luqi

    2015-12-18

    In this study, the first successfully developed superhydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for gastrodin recognition have been described. MIPs were prepared via the bulk polymerization process in an aqueous solution using alkenyl glycosides glucose (AGG) as the water-soluble functional monomer. The non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) were also synthesized using the same method without the use of the template. The dynamic water contact angles and photographs of the dispersion properties confirmed that the molecularly imprinted polymers displayed excellent superhydrophilicity. The results demonstrated that the MIPs exhibited high selectivity and an excellent imprinting effect. A molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) method was established. Optimization of various parameters affecting MISPE was investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a wide linear range (0.001-100.0μgmL(-1)) and low limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) (0.03 and 0.09ngmL(-1), respectively) were achieved. When compared with the NIPs, higher recoveries (90.5% to 97.6%) of gastrodin with lower relative standard deviations values (below 6.4%) using high performance liquid chromatography were obtained at three spiked levels in three blank samples. These results demonstrated one efficient, highly selective and environmentally-friendly MISPE technique with excellent reproducibility for the purification and pre-concentration of gastrodin from an aqueous extract of Gastrodia elata roots. PMID:26627582

  1. New conjugated molecular scaffolds based on [2,2]paracyclophane as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Guanxin; Yu, Chenmin; He, Chang; Wang, Jianguo; Chen, Xin; Yao, Jingjing; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Deqing

    2014-09-01

    Two conjugated molecules with a [2,2]paracyclophane core were designed as non-fullerene electron acceptors for photovoltaic cells. Using as the donor, a high power conversion efficiency (2.69%) is achieved for the blending thin film of with , which is relatively high for solution-processed OPVs based on small molecular non-fullerene acceptors and as the electron donor.

  2. Assessing the potential of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to probe reversible protein-protein recognition and binding

    PubMed Central

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein recognition and binding are governed by diffusion, noncovalent forces and conformational flexibility, entangled in a way that only molecular dynamics simulations can dissect at high resolution. Here we exploited ubiquitin’s noncovalent dimerization equilibrium to assess the potential of atomistic simulations to reproduce reversible protein-protein binding, by running submicrosecond simulations of systems with multiple copies of the protein at millimolar concentrations. The simulations essentially fail because they lead to aggregates, yet they reproduce some specificity in the binding interfaces as observed in known covalent and noncovalent ubiquitin dimers. Following similar observations in literature we hint at electrostatics and water descriptions as the main liable force field elements, and propose that their optimization should consider observables relevant to multi-protein systems and unfolded proteins. Within limitations, analysis of binding events suggests salient features of protein-protein recognition and binding, to be retested with improved force fields. Among them, that specific configurations of relative direction and orientation seem to trigger fast binding of two molecules, even over 50 Å distances; that conformational selection can take place within surface-to-surface distances of 10 to 40 Å i.e. well before actual intermolecular contact; and that establishment of contacts between molecules further locks their conformations and relative orientations. PMID:26023027

  3. Tragacanth gum-based nanogel as a superparamagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for quercetin recognition and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Khadijeh; Masoumi, Arameh; Ghaemy, Mousa

    2016-01-20

    A highly selective magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MMIP) with core-shell structure has been synthesized by a sol-gel process composed of Tragacanth Gum (TG) crosslinker, Fe3O4/SiO2 nanoparticles, and N-vinyl imidazole(VI) functional monomer in the presence of template Quercetin (QC). Different techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to verify the successful synthesis of MIP on the surface of Fe3O4/SiO2 nanoparticles. The swelling behavior of MMIP, its recognition and selectivity for QC and structural analog, Catechin (CT), were tested and compared with magnetic non imprinted polymer (MNIP). MMIP adsorbs the template drug quickly and equilibrium could be reached in 2h. The mechanism for adsorption was found to follow the Langmuir model with the maximum capacity of 175.43 mg g(-1). The MMIP indicated excellent recognition and binding affinity toward QC, selectivity factor (ɛ) relative to CT was 2.16. Finally, the MMIP was evaluated as a drug delivery device by performing in vitro release studies in PBS.

  4. Molecular basis for the wide range of affinity found in Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Duss, Olivier; Michel, Erich; Diarra dit Konté, Nana; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2014-04-01

    The carbon storage regulator/regulator of secondary metabolism (Csr/Rsm) type of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) is widespread throughout bacteria and acts by sequestering the global translation repressor protein CsrA/RsmE from the ribosome binding site of a subset of mRNAs. Although we have previously described the molecular basis of a high affinity RNA target bound to RsmE, it remains unknown how other lower affinity targets are recognized by the same protein. Here, we have determined the nuclear magnetic resonance solution structures of five separate GGA binding motifs of the sRNA RsmZ of Pseudomonas fluorescens in complex with RsmE. The structures explain how the variation of sequence and structural context of the GGA binding motifs modulate the binding affinity for RsmE by five orders of magnitude (∼10 nM to ∼3 mM, Kd). Furthermore, we see that conformational adaptation of protein side-chains and RNA enable recognition of different RNA sequences by the same protein contributing to binding affinity without conferring specificity. Overall, our findings illustrate how the variability in the Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition allows a fine-tuning of the competition between mRNAs and sRNAs for the CsrA/RsmE protein.

  5. Relationship between enantioselectivity of alternative molecularly imprinted polymeric membranes and species of amino acid residues composing chiral recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, M; Kondo, Y; Morita, Y

    2001-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymeric membranes with tetrapeptide residue H-Asp(OcHex)-Asp(OcHex)-Asp(OcHex)-Asp(OcHex)-CH2- (DDDD) or H-Glu(OBzl)-Glu(OBzl)-Glu(OBzl)-Glu(OBzl)-CH2- (EEEE) were prepared during membrane preparation (casting) processing in the presence of print molecules. The Boc-L-Trp imprinted polymeric membranes thus obtained showed adsorption selectivity toward Ac-L-Trp from its racemic mixtures. From adsorption isotherms of Ac-Trp, the chiral recognition site, that had been formed by the presence of print molecules in the membrane preparation process, exclusively recognized Ac-L-Trp that possessed the same configuration of the print molecule. The affinity constants between chiral recognition sites in the membrane and Ac-L-Trp was determined to be 1.00 x 10(4) mol(-1) dm3 and 1.08 x 10(4) mol(-1) dm3 for the DDDD and EEEE membranes, respectively. Enantioselective electrodialysis could be attained by applying an optimum potential difference to give permselectivity, with a value close to its adsorption selectivity.

  6. Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-12-09

    To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.

  7. The challenges involved in elucidating the molecular basis of sperm-egg recognition in mammals and approaches to overcome them.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gavin J; Bianchi, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is used by many different organisms to create a new generation of genetically distinct progeny. Cells originating from separate sexes or mating types segregate their genetic material into haploid gametes which must then recognize and fuse with each other in a process known as fertilization to form a diploid zygote. Despite the central importance of fertilization, we know remarkably little about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in how gametes recognize each other, particularly in mammals, although the proteins that are displayed on their surfaces are almost certainly involved. This paucity of knowledge is largely due to both the unique biological properties of mammalian gametes (sperm and egg) which make them experimentally difficult to manipulate, and the technical challenges of identifying interactions between membrane-embedded cell surface receptor proteins. In this review, we will discuss our current knowledge of animal gamete recognition, highlighting where important contributions to our understanding were made, why particular model systems were helpful, and why progress in mammals has been particularly challenging. We discuss how the development of mammalian in vitro fertilization and targeted gene disruption in mice were important technological advances that triggered progress. We argue that approaches employed to discover novel interactions between cell surface gamete recognition proteins should account for the unusual biochemical properties of membrane proteins and the typically highly transient nature of their interactions. Finally, we describe how these principles were applied to identify Juno as the egg receptor for sperm Izumo1, an interaction that is essential for mammalian fertilization.

  8. The challenges involved in elucidating the molecular basis of sperm-egg recognition in mammals and approaches to overcome them.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gavin J; Bianchi, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is used by many different organisms to create a new generation of genetically distinct progeny. Cells originating from separate sexes or mating types segregate their genetic material into haploid gametes which must then recognize and fuse with each other in a process known as fertilization to form a diploid zygote. Despite the central importance of fertilization, we know remarkably little about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in how gametes recognize each other, particularly in mammals, although the proteins that are displayed on their surfaces are almost certainly involved. This paucity of knowledge is largely due to both the unique biological properties of mammalian gametes (sperm and egg) which make them experimentally difficult to manipulate, and the technical challenges of identifying interactions between membrane-embedded cell surface receptor proteins. In this review, we will discuss our current knowledge of animal gamete recognition, highlighting where important contributions to our understanding were made, why particular model systems were helpful, and why progress in mammals has been particularly challenging. We discuss how the development of mammalian in vitro fertilization and targeted gene disruption in mice were important technological advances that triggered progress. We argue that approaches employed to discover novel interactions between cell surface gamete recognition proteins should account for the unusual biochemical properties of membrane proteins and the typically highly transient nature of their interactions. Finally, we describe how these principles were applied to identify Juno as the egg receptor for sperm Izumo1, an interaction that is essential for mammalian fertilization. PMID:26224538

  9. Ion and molecule sensors using molecular recognition in luminescent, conductive polymers. FY 1997 year-end progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    'The purpose of this project is to use molecular recognition strategies to develop sensor technology based on luminescent, conductive polymers that contain sites for binding specific molecules or ions in the presence of related molecules or ions. Selective binding of a particular molecule or ion of interest to these polymers will result in a large change in their luminescence and/or conductivity, which can be used to both qualitatively and quantitatively sense the presence of the bound molecules or ions. The main thrusts and accomplishments in the first year of this project involve developing polymer syntheses that yield conjugated polymers to which a wide variety of ligands for metal ion binding can be readily incorporated.'

  10. Molecular recognition of amino acids with some fluorescent ditopic pyrylium- and pyridinium-based crown ether receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, A.; Maddah, B.; Yari, A.; Shamsipur, M.; Boostani, M.; Fall Rastegar, M.; Ghaderi, A. R.

    2005-10-01

    The molecular recognition of L-amino acids such as asparagine, glutamine, lysine and arginine with some crownpyryliums, CP's, and a crownpyridinium compound, as receptors, were examined in methanol. 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to examine the structural stability of the receptors in the presence of the amino acids. The fluorimetric titration of the receptors by specified amino acids, other than arginine, was followed within a few minutes and the stoichiometry and stability of the resulting amino acid complexes were evaluated. The data analysis clearly demonstrated the critical role of the terminal amino group to carboxylic acid distance of amino acids for their proper fixation on the receptor molecules. Ion pairing for the two oppositely charged carboxylate anion and pyrylium (or pyridinium) cation, as well as the hydrogen bonding between crown ethers' oxygens and ammonium hydrogens are expected as the main interaction sources in the host-guest complexations.

  11. Molecular recognition of curcumin (Indian Ayurvedic medicine) by the supramolecular probe, p-t-butyl calix(8)arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenakshi, C.; Jayabal, P.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-06-01

    The thermodynamic property of the host-guest complexes formed between the curcumin, component of Indian Ayurvedic medicine turmeric, a drug molecule, with the supra molecule, p-t-butyl calix(8)arene was studied. p-t-Butyl calix(8)arene has been used as a host molecule and curcumin as a guest molecule. Optical absorption spectral studies were carried out to investigate the molecular recognition properties of p-t-butyl calix(8)arene with curcumin. The stochiometry of the host-guest complexes formed and the binding constant were determined. An interesting 1:1 and 4:1 stochiometric host-guest complexes were formed. Job's continuous method of variation and Benesi-Hildebrand expression were used for the determination of binding constant and the stochiometry of the host-guest complex formed.

  12. Electrochemical impedimetric sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymers/sol-gel chemistry for methidathion organophosphorous insecticide recognition.

    PubMed

    Bakas, Idriss; Hayat, Akhtar; Piletsky, Sergey; Piletska, Elena; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Noguer, Thierry; Rouillon, Régis

    2014-12-01

    We report here a novel method to detect methidathion organophosphorous insecticides. The sensing platform was architected by the combination of molecularly imprinted polymers and sol-gel technique on inexpensive, portable and disposable screen printed carbon electrodes. Electrochemical impedimetric detection technique was employed to perform the label free detection of the target analyte on the designed MIP/sol-gel integrated platform. The selection of the target specific monomer by electrochemical impedimetric methods was consistent with the results obtained by the computational modelling method. The prepared electrochemical MIP/sol-gel based sensor exhibited a high recognition capability toward methidathion, as well as a broad linear range and a low detection limit under the optimized conditions. Satisfactory results were also obtained for the methidathion determination in waste water samples.

  13. Competitive fluorescence assay for specific recognition of atrazine by magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer based on Fe3O4-chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangyang; Li, Tengfei; Yang, Xin; She, Yongxin; Wang, Miao; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Wang, Shanshan; Jin, Fen; Jin, Maojun; Shao, Hua; Jiang, Zejun; Yu, Hailong

    2016-02-10

    A novel fluorescence sensing strategy for determination of atrazine in tap water involving direct competition between atrazine and 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (5-DTAF), and which exploits magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MMIP), has been developed. The MMIP, based on Fe3O4-chitosan nanoparticles, was synthesized to recognize specific binding sites of atrazine. The recognition capability and selectivity of the MMIP for atrazine and other triazine herbicides was investigated. Under optimal conditions, the competitive reaction between 5-DTAF and atrazine was performed to permit quantitation. Fluorescence intensity changes at 515 nm was linearly related to the logarithm of the atrazine concentration for the range 2.32-185.4 μM. The detection limit for atrazine was 0.86μM (S/N=3) and recoveries were 77.6-115% in spiked tap water samples.

  14. Molecular recognition of curcumin (Indian Ayurvedic medicine) by the supramolecular probe, p-t-butyl calix(8)arene.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, C; Jayabal, P; Ramakrishnan, V

    2014-06-01

    The thermodynamic property of the host-guest complexes formed between the curcumin, component of Indian Ayurvedic medicine turmeric, a drug molecule, with the supra molecule, p-t-butyl calix(8)arene was studied. p-t-Butyl calix(8)arene has been used as a host molecule and curcumin as a guest molecule. Optical absorption spectral studies were carried out to investigate the molecular recognition properties of p-t-butyl calix(8)arene with curcumin. The stochiometry of the host-guest complexes formed and the binding constant were determined. An interesting 1:1 and 4:1 stochiometric host-guest complexes were formed. Job's continuous method of variation and Benesi-Hildebrand expression were used for the determination of binding constant and the stochiometry of the host-guest complex formed.

  15. Balancing the initiation and molecular recognition capabilities of eosin macroinitiators of polymerization-based signal amplification reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungkyu K; Sikes, Hadley D

    2014-05-01

    Coupling polymerization initiators to molecular recognition events provide the ability to amplify these events and detect them using the formation of a cross-linked polymer as an inexpensive readout that is visible to the unaided eye. The eosin-tertiary amine co-initiation system, activated by visible light, has proven utility in this context when an average of three eosin molecules are coupled to a protein detection reagent. The present work addresses the question of how detection sensitivity is impacted when the number of eosin molecules per binding event increases in the range of two to fifteen. Unlike in other initiation systems, a non-monotonic relationship is observed between the number of initiators per binding event and the observed detection sensitivity.

  16. Discovery of novel quinoline-based mTOR inhibitors via introducing intra-molecular hydrogen bonding scaffold (iMHBS): The design, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaodong; Lv, Xiaoqing; Qiu, Ni; Yang, Bo; He, Qiaojun; Hu, Yongzhou

    2015-12-15

    A series of quinoline derivatives featuring the novelty of introducing intra-molecular hydrogen bonding scaffold (iMHBS) were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated for their mTOR inhibitory activity, as well as anti-proliferative efficacies against HCT-116, PC-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. As a result, six compounds exhibited significant inhibition against mTOR with IC50 values below 35nM. Compound 15a, the most potent mTOR inhibitor reported herein (IC50=14nM), also displayed the most favorable cellular activities, with the IC50 values of 0.46, 0.61 and 0.24μM against HCT-116, PC-3 and MCF-7, respectively. Besides, several compounds in this series were identified to be selective over class I PI3Ks. Further western blot analysis of 16b, a representative compound in this series, highlighted their advantage in surmounting the S6K/IRS1/PI3K negative feedback loop upon dual inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2. In addition to the remarkable activity, 15a demonstrated acceptable stability in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) and liver microsome, thereby being valuable for extensive in vivo investigation.

  17. Density functional theory based study of molecular interactions, recognition, engineering, and quantum transport in π molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yeonchoo; Cho, Woo Jong; Youn, Il Seung; Lee, Geunsik; Singh, N Jiten; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: In chemical and biological systems, various interactions that govern the chemical and physical properties of molecules, assembling phenomena, and electronic transport properties compete and control the microscopic structure of materials. The well-controlled manipulation of each component can allow researchers to design receptors or sensors, new molecular architectures, structures with novel morphology, and functional molecules or devices. In this Account, we describe the structures and electronic and spintronic properties of π-molecular systems that are important for controlling the architecture of a variety of carbon-based systems. Although DFT is an important tool for describing molecular interactions, the inability of DFT to accurately represent dispersion interactions has made it difficult to properly describe π-interactions. However, the recently developed dispersion corrections for DFT have allowed us to include these dispersion interactions cost-effectively. We have investigated noncovalent interactions of various π-systems including aromatic-π, aliphatic-π, and non-π systems based on dispersion-corrected DFT (DFT-D). In addition, we have addressed the validity of DFT-D compared with the complete basis set (CBS) limit values of coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] and Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2). The DFT-D methods are still unable to predict the correct ordering in binding energies within the benzene dimer and the cyclohexane dimer. Nevertheless, the overall DFT-D predicted binding energies are in reasonable agreement with the CCSD(T) results. In most cases, results using the B97-D3 method closely reproduce the CCSD(T) results with the optimized energy-fitting parameters. On the other hand, vdW-DF2 and PBE0-TS methods estimate the dispersion energies from the calculated electron density. In these approximations, the interaction energies around the equilibrium

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Substrate Recognition and Specificity of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Jiachi; Leung, Thomas Yun-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenems are one of the last lines of defense for Gram-negative pathogens, such as members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Despite the fact that most carbapenems are resistant to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), emerging metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), including New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1), that can hydrolyze carbapenems have become prevalent and are frequently associated with the so-called “superbugs,” for which treatments are extremely limited. Crystallographic study sheds light on the modes of antibiotic binding to NDM-1, yet the mechanisms governing substrate recognition and specificity are largely unclear. This study provides a connection between crystallographic study and the functional significance of NDM-1, with an emphasis on the substrate specificity and catalysis of various β-lactams. L1 loop residues L59, V67, and W87 were important for the activity of NDM-1, most likely through maintaining the partial folding of the L1 loop or active site conformation through hydrophobic interaction with the R groups of β-lactams or the β-lactam ring. Substitution of alanine for L59 showed greater reduction of MICs to ampicillin and selected cephalosporins, whereas substitutions of alanine for V67 had more impact on the MICs of carbapenems. K224 and N233 on the L3 loop played important roles in the recognition of substrate and contributed to substrate hydrolysis. These data together with the structure comparison of the B1 and B2 subclasses of MBLs revealed that the broad substrate specificity of NDM-1 could be due to the ability of its wide active site cavity to accommodate a wide range of β-lactams. This study provides insights into the development of efficient inhibitors for NDM-1 and offers an efficient tactic with which to study the substrate specificities of other β-lactamases. PMID:24982075

  19. Cardiac-Oxidized Antigens Are Targets of Immune Recognition by Antibodies and Potential Molecular Determinants in Chagas Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Zago, Maria Paola; Nunez, Sonia; Amoroso, Alejandro; Rementeria, Hugo; Dousset, Pierre; Burgos, Federico Nunez; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2012-01-01

    conclude that ROS-induced, cardiac-oxidized antigens are targets of immune recognition by antibodies and molecular determinants for pathogenesis during Chagas disease. PMID:22238578

  20. Application of Machine Learning tools to recognition of molecular patterns in STM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksov, Artem; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu; Higashibayashi, Shuhei; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Kalinin, Sergei; Sumpter, Bobby

    The ability to utilize individual molecules and molecular assemblies as data storage elements has motivated scientist for years, concurrent with the continuous effort to shrink a size of data storage devices in microelectronics industry. One of the critical issues in this effort lies in being able to identify individual molecular assembly units (patterns), on a large scale in an automated fashion of complete information extraction. Here we present a novel method of applying machine learning techniques for extraction of positional and rotational information from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of π-bowl sumanene molecules on gold. We use Markov Random Field (MRF) model to decode the polar rotational states for each molecule in a large scale STM image of molecular film. We further develop an algorithm that uses a convolutional Neural Network combined with MRF and input from density functional theory to classify molecules into different azimuthal rotational classes. Our results demonstrate that a molecular film is partitioned into distinctive azimuthal rotational domains consisting typically of 20-30 molecules. In each domain, the ``bowl-down'' molecules are generally surrounded by six nearest neighbor molecules in ``bowl-up'' configuration, and the resultant overall structure form a periodic lattice of rotational and polar states within each domain. Research was supported by the US Department of Energy.

  1. Molecular recognition in gas sensing: Results from acoustic wave and in-situ FTIR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.; Bodenhoefer, K.; Goepel, W.

    1998-06-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements were combined with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopy to understand the interactions of surface-confined sensing films with gas-phase analytes. This was accomplished by collecting Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their specifically coated surfaces with key analytes.

  2. Electron sharing and anion-π recognition in molecular triangular prisms.

    PubMed

    Schneebeli, Severin T; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Zhichang; Wu, Yilei; Gardner, Daniel M; Strutt, Nathan L; Cheng, Chuyang; Carmieli, Raanan; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2013-12-01

    Stacking on a full belly: Triangular molecular prisms display electron sharing among their triangularly arranged naphthalenediimide (NDI) redox centers. Their electron-deficient cavities encapsulate linear triiodide anions, leading to the formation of supramolecular helices in the solid state. Chirality transfer is observed from the six chiral centers of the filled prisms to the single-handed helices.

  3. Electron sharing and anion-π recognition in molecular triangular prisms.

    PubMed

    Schneebeli, Severin T; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Zhichang; Wu, Yilei; Gardner, Daniel M; Strutt, Nathan L; Cheng, Chuyang; Carmieli, Raanan; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2013-12-01

    Stacking on a full belly: Triangular molecular prisms display electron sharing among their triangularly arranged naphthalenediimide (NDI) redox centers. Their electron-deficient cavities encapsulate linear triiodide anions, leading to the formation of supramolecular helices in the solid state. Chirality transfer is observed from the six chiral centers of the filled prisms to the single-handed helices. PMID:24227594

  4. Fullerene recognition with molecular tweezers made up of efficient buckybowls: a dispersion-corrected DFT study.

    PubMed

    Josa, Daniela; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús; Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M

    2015-05-28

    In 2007, Sygula and co-workers introduced a novel type of molecular tweezers with buckybowl pincers that have attracted the substantial interest of researchers due to their ideal architecture for recognizing fullerenes by concave-convex π∙∙∙π interactions (A. Sygula et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 3842). Although in recent years some modifications have been performed on these original molecular tweezers to improve their ability for catching fullerenes, very few improvements were achieved to date. For that reason, in the present work a series of molecular tweezers have been devised and their supramolecular complexes with C60 studied at the B97-D2/TZVP//SCC-DFTB-D and B97-D2/TZVP levels. Three different strategies have been tested: (1) changing the corannulene pincers to other buckybowls, (2) replacing the tetrabenzocyclooctatetraene tether by a buckybowl, and (3) adding methyl groups on the molecular tweezers. According to the results, all the three approaches are effective, in such a way that a combination of the three strategies results in buckycatchers with complexation energies (with C60) up to 2.6 times larger than that of the original buckycatcher, reaching almost -100 kcal mol(-1). The B97-D2/TZVP//SCC-DFTB-D approach can be a rapid screening tool for testing new molecular tweezers. However, since this approach does not reproduce correctly the deformation energy and this energy represents an important contribution to the total complexation energy of complexes, subsequent higher-level re-optimization is compulsory to achieve reliable results (the full B97-D2/TZVP level is used herein). This re-optimization could be superfluous when quite rigid buckycatchers are studied.

  5. The molecular recognition of dipeptide by oligoglycyl head group of amphiphile: a quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Thirumoorthy, Krishnan; Soni, Kiran; Nandi, Nilashis

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, we presented an analysis of the unusual recognition specificity exhibited by marked difference in the binding behavior of dipeptide with amphiphilic head group when subtle relative change of N-terminal and C-terminal of the dipeptide are made. Recently, in a series of detailed experiments, binding of aqueous dipeptides, GlyX and X/Gly (X = Leu, Phe, Pro, Ala; X/ = Leu, Phe) with dialkyl oligoglycyl amphiphiles is studied [X. Cha, K. Ariga, M. Onda, and T. Kunitake, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117, 11833 (1995)]. It is observed that GlyX are specifically bound to 2C18BGly2NH2 while X/Gly are insignificantly bound. We first studied the conformational energy variation of GlyPhe, PheGly and model of 2C18BGly2NH2 amphiphile using semi-empirical and ab-initio methods in vacuum. Using the individual energy optimized monomer structure of amphiphile and peptide, we studied the binding energy of optimized GlyPhe: amphiphile pair and PheGly: amphiphile pair structures at 1:1 and 1:2 ratio at the same level of theory using a population of structures. Binding of GlyPhe is favorable over the binding of PheGly at various levels of theory (semi-empirical and ab-initio). It is noted that the hydrogen bonding pattern in the GlyPhe binding is more effective than that in the PheGly binding. In the population of low energy structures, PheGly: amphiphile structures have more exposed area around the hydrophobic Phe group than the GlyPhe: amphiphile structures. Relatively more PheGly: amphiphile structures have intermolecular orientation unsuitable to contribute to the population of head group structures relevant in aqueous interface. Summarizing, significantly better binding capacity of GlyPhe over the PheGly with amphiphile, is due to the difference in hydrogen bonding interaction pattern, hydrophobic effect and possible orientations of the amphiphile and peptide at interface, relevant to the condensed phase monolayer structure. All the three factors cooperatively lead to

  6. A phosphonic acid appended naphthalene diimide motif for self-assembly into tunable nanostructures through molecular recognition with arginine in water.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Kamalakar P; Bhosale, Sheshanath V; Rama Krishna, K V S; Gupta, Akhil; Bhosale, Sidhanath V

    2013-06-18

    A naphthalene diimide motif bearing phosphonic acid functionalities has been found to be self-assembled with L- and D-arginine through chirality induced molecular recognitions and leads to the formation of micrometre long nanobelts and spherical aggregates at pH 9 in water, respectively. PMID:23589823

  7. Thioredoxin from Escherichia coli as a Role Model of Molecular Recognition, Folding, Dynamics and Function.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Diego S; Delfino, Jose Maria; Santos, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) catalyzes redox reactions via the reversible oxidation of the conserved active center CGPC and it is involved in multiple biological processes, some of them linked to redox activity while others not. TRX is a globular, thermodynamically stable and monomeric alpha/beta protein with a structure characterized by a central beta-sheet surrounded by alpha-helices. In this review we discuss central aspects of folding, dynamics and function of Escherichia coli TRX (EcTRX), pointing to the characterization of the full-length protein and of relevant fragments. In addition, we focus on the critical role that the C-terminal alpha-helical element plays in a late event in the consolidation of the overall EcTRX fold. Furthermore, we address the characterization of internal molecular motions by NMR and molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Finally, we review important aspects of the relationship among structure, dynamics and enzymatic function of this key redox protein. PMID:26149400

  8. Motifs for molecular recognition exploiting hydrophobic enclosure in protein–ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Young, Tom; Abel, Robert; Kim, Byungchan; Berne, Bruce J.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties and phase behavior of water in confined regions can vary significantly from that observed in the bulk. This is particularly true for systems in which the confinement is on the molecular-length scale. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and a powerful solvent analysis technique based on inhomogenous solvation theory to investigate the properties of water molecules that solvate the confined regions of protein active sites. Our simulations and analysis indicate that the solvation of protein active sites that are characterized by hydrophobic enclosure and correlated hydrogen bonds induce atypical entropic and enthalpic penalties of hydration. These penalties apparently stabilize the protein–ligand complex with respect to the independently solvated ligand and protein, which leads to enhanced binding affinities. Our analysis elucidates several challenging cases, including the super affinity of the streptavidin–biotin system. PMID:17204562

  9. Molecular recognition of DNA-protein complexes: a straightforward method combining scanning force and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Humberto; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2010-06-01

    Combining scanning force and fluorescent microscopy allows simultaneous identification of labeled biomolecules and analysis of their nanometer level architectural arrangement. Fluorescent polystyrene nano-spheres were used as reliable objects for alignment of optical and topographic images. This allowed the precise localization of different fluorescence particles within complex molecular assemblies whose structure was mapped in nanometer detail topography. Our experiments reveal the versatility of this method for analysis of proteins and protein-DNA complexes.

  10. Self-Assembly of Nano Hydroxyapatite or Aragonite Induced by Molecular Recognition to Soy Globulin 7S or 11S.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dagang; Tian, Huafeng; Kumar, Rakesh; Zhang, Lina

    2009-09-01

    Molecular self-assembly is emerging as a viable 'bottom-up' approach to build stable organic/inorganic nanometer-scale blocks. Herein, under the conditions of appropriate pH and ionic strength, soy globulin 7S or 11S were coprecipitated with hydroxyapatite (HAp) or aragonite (Arag), respectively, to fabricate two organic/inorganic hybrids: 7S/HAp and 11S/Arag. Results from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the hybrids exhibit a nanosized core-shell structure with globulin monomer 7S or 11S as core and HAp or Arag as shells. 7S/HAp and 11S/Arag present a disk and hexagon shape, respectively. After calcinations, monodispersed HAp without support from globulins existed as nanospheres. It was revealed that the globulin as host induces the self-assembly and growth layer by layer of HAp or Arag nanocrystals. The factors of molecular recognition and surface potential definitely affected the size and shape of the hierarchical blocks. This work provided a novel pathway to controllably synthesize a wide variety of precise plant protein/biomineral hybrid biomaterials.

  11. Characterisation and application of molecularly imprinted polymers for group-selective recognition of antibiotics in food samples.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xizhi; Song, Suquan; Sun, Aili; Liu, Jinghua; Li, Dexiang; Chen, Jiong

    2012-07-21

    Group-selective molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for amphenicol antibiotics, including chloramphenicol (CAP), thiamphenicol (TAP), florfenicol (FF), and florfenicol amine (FFA), were developed for the first time using TAP as the template molecule. The characteristics of the obtained MIPs were systematically evaluated by chromatographic methods and frontal analysis, demonstrating that the MIPs had excellent chromatographic behaviors, good selectivity, and high-binding capability. A molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) procedure was developed based on the chromatography results. The MIPs exhibited better group selectivity for CAP, TAP, FF, and FFA than non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) under the optimized washing conditions of 10% acetonitrile in PBS buffer (25 mmol L(-1), pH = 5). Compared with conventional solid-phase extraction, significant recoveries ranging from 92.4% to 98.8% with lower relative standard deviation values in the range of 3.2-7.3% for both intraday- and interday-assays were obtained. The limits of detection (LODs) of MISPE for CAP, TAP, FF, and FFA in shrimp were found to be 0.016, 0.093, 0.102, and 0.029 μg kg(-1), respectively. The results acquired in this study contribute to the strategic development of MIPs and MISPE methods for the multi-residual recognition of antibiotics from complex matrices.

  12. Gelation or molecular recognition; is the bis-(α,β-dihydroxy ester)s motif an omnigelator?

    PubMed Central

    Knight, David W; Morgan, Ian R; Ford, Amy; Brown, James; Davies, Ben; Heenan, Richard K; King, Stephen M; Dalgliesh, Robert M; Tomkinson, John; Prescott, Stuart; Schweins, Ralf; Paul, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Summary Understanding the gelation of liquids by low molecular weight solutes at low concentrations gives an insight into many molecular recognition phenomena and also offers a simple route to modifying the physical properties of the liquid. Bis-(α,β-dihydroxy ester)s are shown here to gel thermoreversibly a wide range of solvents, raising interesting questions as to the mechanism of gelation. At gelator concentrations of 5–50 mg ml−1, gels were successfully formed in acetone, ethanol/water mixtures, toluene, cyclohexane and chloroform (the latter, albeit at a higher gelator concentration). A range of neutron techniques – in particular small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) – have been employed to probe the structure of a selection of these gels. The universality of gelation in a range of solvent types suggests the gelation mechanism is a feature of the bis-(α,β-dihydroxy ester) motif, with SANS demonstrating the presence of regular structures in the 30–40 Å range. A correlation between the apparent rodlike character of the structures formed and the polarity of the solvent is evident. Preliminary spin-echo neutron scattering studies (SESANS) indicated the absence of any larger scale structures. Inelastic neutron spectroscopy (INS) studies demonstrated that the solvent is largely unaffected by gelation, but does reveal insights into the thermal history of the samples. Further neutron studies of this kind (particularly SESANS and INS) are warranted, and it is hoped that this work will stimulate others to pursue this line of research. PMID:21160568

  13. Molecular recognition of RhlB and RNase D in the Caulobacter crescentus RNA degradosome.

    PubMed

    Voss, Jarrod E; Luisi, Ben F; Hardwick, Steven W

    2014-12-01

    The endoribonuclease RNase E is a key enzyme in RNA metabolism for many bacterial species. In Escherichia coli, RNase E contributes to the majority of RNA turnover and processing events, and the enzyme has been extensively characterized as the central component of the RNA degradosome assembly. A similar RNA degradosome assembly has been described in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, with the interacting partners of RNase E identified as the Kreb's cycle enzyme aconitase, a DEAD-box RNA helicase RhlB and the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase. Here we report that an additional degradosome component is the essential exoribonuclease RNase D, and its recognition site within RNase E is identified. We show that, unlike its E. coli counterpart, C. crescentus RhlB interacts directly with a segment of the N-terminal catalytic domain of RNase E. The crystal structure of a portion of C. crescentus RNase E encompassing the helicase-binding region is reported. This structure reveals that an inserted segment in the S1 domain adopts an α-helical conformation, despite being predicted to be natively unstructured. We discuss the implications of these findings for the organization and mechanisms of the RNA degradosome.

  14. Characterization of the molecular basis of group II intron RNA recognition by CRS1-CRM domains.

    PubMed

    Keren, Ido; Klipcan, Liron; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Kolton, Max; Shaya, Felix; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2008-08-22

    CRM (chloroplast RNA splicing and ribosome maturation) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain of ancient origin that has been retained in eukaryotic genomes only within the plant lineage. Whereas in bacteria CRM domains exist as single domain proteins involved in ribosome maturation, in plants they are found in a family of proteins that contain between one and four repeats. Several members of this family with multiple CRM domains have been shown to be required for the splicing of specific plastidic group II introns. Detailed biochemical analysis of one of these factors in maize, CRS1, demonstrated its high affinity and specific binding to the single group II intron whose splicing it facilitates, the plastid-encoded atpF intron RNA. Through its association with two intronic regions, CRS1 guides the folding of atpF intron RNA into its predicted "catalytically active" form. To understand how multiple CRM domains cooperate to achieve high affinity sequence-specific binding to RNA, we analyzed the RNA binding affinity and specificity associated with each individual CRM domain in CRS1; whereas CRM3 bound tightly to the RNA, CRM1 associated specifically with a unique region found within atpF intron domain I. CRM2, which demonstrated only low binding affinity, also seems to form specific interactions with regions localized to domains I, III, and IV. We further show that CRM domains share structural similarities and RNA binding characteristics with the well known RNA recognition motif domain.

  15. Molecular Basis of mRNA Cap Recognition by Influenza B Polymerase PB2 Subunit.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lili; Wartchow, Charles; Shia, Steven; Uehara, Kyoko; Steffek, Micah; Warne, Robert; Sutton, James; Muiru, Gladys T; Leonard, Vincent H J; Bussiere, Dirksen E; Ma, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus polymerase catalyzes the transcription of viral mRNAs by a process known as "cap-snatching," where the 5'-cap of cellular pre-mRNA is recognized by the PB2 subunit and cleaved 10-13 nucleotides downstream of the cap by the endonuclease PA subunit. Although this mechanism is common to both influenza A (FluA) and influenza B (FluB) viruses, FluB PB2 recognizes a wider range of cap structures including m(7)GpppGm-, m(7)GpppG-, and GpppG-RNA, whereas FluA PB2 utilizes methylated G-capped RNA specifically. Biophysical studies with isolated PB2 cap-binding domain (PB2(cap)) confirm that FluB PB2 has expanded mRNA cap recognition capability, although the affinities toward m(7)GTP are significantly reduced when compared with FluA PB2. The x-ray co-structures of the FluB PB2(cap) with bound cap analogs m(7)GTP and GTP reveal an inverted GTP binding mode that is distinct from the cognate m(7)GTP binding mode shared between FluA and FluB PB2. These results delineate the commonalities and differences in the cap-binding site between FluA and FluB PB2 and will aid structure-guided drug design efforts to identify dual inhibitors of both FluA and FluB PB2.

  16. A new electrochemical biosensor for DNA detection based on molecular recognition and lead sulfide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hao; Zhao, Kun; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Wu, Bo; Li, Qianggen; Cheng, Lin

    2011-12-15

    In this paper, we constructed a new electrochemical biosensor for DNA detection based on a molecule recognition technique. In this sensing protocol, a novel dual-labeled DNA probe (DLP) in a stem-loop structure was employed, which was designed with dabcyl labeled at the 3' end as a guest molecule, and with a Pb nanoparticle labeled at the 5' end as electrochemical tag to indicate hybridization. One α-cyclodextrin-modified electrode (α-CD/MCNT/GCE) was used for capturing the DNA hybridization. Initially, the DLP was in the "closed" state in the absence of the target, which shielded dabcyl from the bulky α-CD/MCNT/GCE conjugate due to a steric effect. After hybridization, the loop sequence (16 bases) formed a rigid duplex with the target, breaking the relatively shorter stem duplex (6 bases). Consequently, dabcyl was forced away from the Pb nanoparticle and became accessible by the electrode. Therefore, the target hybridization event can be sensitively transduced via detecting the electrochemical reduction current signal of Pb. Using this method, as low as 7.1×10(-10)M DNA target had been detected with excellent differentiation ability for even a single mismatch.

  17. Molecular basis for complement recognition by integrin αXβ2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Yu, Yamei; Mi, Li-Zhi; Walz, Thomas; Springer, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Integrin αXβ2 functions as complement receptor for iC3b and mediates recognition and phagocytosis of pathogens. We used negative-stain EM to examine the αXβ2 interaction with iC3b. EM class averages of αXβ2 in complex with iC3b define the binding sites on both the integrin and iC3b. iC3b contains C3c and thioester domain moieties linked by a long flexible linker. The binding site is on the key ring of the C3c moiety, at the interface between the MG3 and MG4 domains. Similar complexes are seen between αXβ2 and the C3c fragment. αXβ2 binds through the αX αI domain, on the face known to bear the metal ion-dependent adhesion site, at the opposite end of the αI domain from its site of insertion in the β-propeller domain. PMID:22393018

  18. High sensitivity detection of molecular recognition using magnetically labelled biomolecules and magnetoresistive sensors.

    PubMed

    Graham, D L; Ferreira, H A; Freitas, P P; Cabral, J M S

    2003-04-01

    Small magnetoresistive spin valve sensors (2 x 6 microm(2)) were used to detect the binding of single streptavidin functionalized 2 microm magnetic microspheres to a biotinylated sensor surface. The sensor signals, using 8 mA sense current, were in the order of 150-400 microV for a single microsphere depending on sensor sensitivity and the thickness of the passivation layer over the sensor surface. Sensor saturation signals were 1-2 mV representing an estimated 6-20 microspheres, with a noise level of approximately 10 microV. The detection of biomolecular recognition for the streptavidin-biotin model was shown using both single and differential sensor architectures. The signal data compares favourably with previously reported signals for high numbers of magnetic microspheres detected using larger multilayered giant magnetoresistance sensors. A wide range of applications is foreseen for this system in the development of biochips, high sensitivity biosensors and the detection of single molecules and single molecule interactions. PMID:12604266

  19. Statistical Analysis of the Impact of Molecular Descriptors on Cytotoxicity of Thiourea Derivatives Incorporating 2-Aminothiazole Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Filipowska, Anna; Filipowski, Wojciech; Tkacz, Ewaryst; Nowicka, Grażyna; Struga, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Chemical reactivity descriptors and lipophilicyty (log P) were evaluated via semi-empirical method for the quantum calculation of molecular electronic structure (PM3) in order to clarify the structure-cytotoxic activity relationships of disubstutited thioureas. Analysed compounds were obtained by the linkage of 2-aminothiazole ring, thiourea and substituted phenyl ring. The detailed examination was carried out to establish correlation between descriptors and cytotoxic activity against the MT-4 cells for 11 compounds. For the most active compounds (6 compounds) cytotoxic activity against three cancer cell lines (CCRF-CEM, WIL-2NS, CCRF-SB) and normal human cell (HaCaT) was determined. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were assessed. Regression analysis revealed that electrophilicity index and chemical potential significantly contributed to expain the thioureas cytotoxic potential. PMID:27477660

  20. Association, intrinsic shape, and molecular recognition: Elucidating DNA biophysics through coarse-grained simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Gordon Samuel

    DNA is of central importance in biology as it is responsible for carrying, copying, and translating the genetic code into the building blocks that comprise life. In order to accomplish these tasks, the DNA molecule must be versatile and robust. Indeed, the underlying molecular interactions that allow DNA to execute these tasks are complex and their origins are only beginning to be understood. While experiments are able to elucidate many key biophysical phenomena, there remain many unanswered questions. Molecular simulation is able to shed light on phenomena at the molecular scale and provide information that is missing from experimental views of DNA behavior. In this dissertation I use state-of-the-art coarse-grained DNA models to address two key problems. In the first, metadynamics calculations are employed to uncover the free energy surface of two complimentary DNA strands. This free energy surface takes on the appearance of a hybridization funnel and reveals candidates for intermediate states in the hybridization of short DNA oligomers. Such short oligomers are important building blocks for DNA-driven self-assembly and the mechanism of hybridization in this regime is not well understood. The second problem is that of nucleosome formation. Nucleosomes are the fundamental subunit of genome compaction in the nucleus of a cell. As such, nucleosomes are a key epigenetic factor and affect gene expression and the ability of DNA-binding proteins to locate and bind to the appropriate position in the genome. However, the factors that drive nucleosome positioning are not well understood. While DNA sequence is known to affect nucleosome formation, the mechanism by which it does so has not been established and a number of hypotheses explaining this sequence-dependence exist in the literature. I demonstrate that DNA shape dominates this process with contributions arising from both intrinsic DNA curvature as well as DNA-protein interactions driven by sequence

  1. A dumbbell molecular beacon for the specific recognition of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Lv, Cong; Yu, Lili; Wang, Jie; Tang, Xinjing

    2010-11-15

    A dumbbell molecular beacon (DMB) was designed and synthesized with the attachment of a fluorophore and a quencher at two ends. This DMB probe can be used to detect single mismatch of a 20mer oligodeoxynucleotide in two different buffers and discrimination factors were as high as 60 at 37°C. Statistics of single substitutions of analytes showed that both substituted positions and substituted nucleotides have important contributions for this probe to efficiently distinguish the true analyte from mismatched ones. Hybridization kinetics of DMB with the target oligonucleotide was also studied.

  2. Molecular Recognition of Fluorine Impacts Substrate Selectivity in the Fluoroacetyl-CoA Thioesterase FlK

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The fluoroacetate-producing bacterium Streptomyces cattleya has evolved a fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase (FlK) that exhibits a remarkably high level of discrimination for its cognate substrate compared to the cellularly abundant analogue acetyl-CoA, which differs only by the absence of the fluorine substitution. A major determinant of FlK specificity derives from its ability to take advantage of the unique properties of fluorine to enhance the reaction rate, allowing fluorine discrimination under physiological conditions where both substrates are likely to be present at saturating concentrations. Using a combination of pH–rate profiles, pre-steady-state kinetic experiments, and Taft analysis of wild-type and mutant FlKs with a set of substrate analogues, we explore the role of fluorine in controlling the enzyme acylation and deacylation steps. Further analysis of chiral (R)- and (S)-[2H1]fluoroacetyl-CoA substrates demonstrates that a kinetic isotope effect (1.7 ± 0.2) is observed for only the (R)-2H1 isomer, indicating that deacylation requires recognition of the prochiral fluoromethyl group to position the α-carbon for proton abstraction. Taken together, the selectivity for the fluoroacetyl-CoA substrate appears to rely not only on the enhanced polarization provided by the electronegative fluorine substitution but also on molecular recognition of fluorine in both formation and breakdown of the acyl-enzyme intermediate to control active site reactivity. These studies provide insights into the basis of fluorine selectivity in a naturally occurring enzyme–substrate pair, with implications for drug design and the development of fluorine-selective biocatalysts. PMID:24635371

  3. Nanosilica-based molecularly imprinted polymer nanoshell for specific recognition and determination of rhodamine B in red wine and beverages.

    PubMed

    Long, Zerong; Xu, Weiwei; Lu, Yi; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-09-01

    A new and facile rhodamine B (RhB)-imprinted polymer nanoshell coating for SiO2 nanoparticles was readily prepared by a combination of silica gel modification and molecular surface imprinting. The RhB-imprinted polymers (RhB-MIPs) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy; the binding properties and selectivity of these MIPs were investigated in detail. The uniformly imprinted nanoparticles displayed a rather thin shell thickness (23nm) with highly effective recognition sites, showing homogenous distribution and monolayer adsorption. The maximum MIP adsorption capacity (Qm) was as high as 45.2mgg(-1), with an adsorption equilibrium time of about 15min at ambient temperature. Dynamic rebinding experiments showed that chemical adsorption is crucial for RhB binding to RhB-MIPs. The adsorption isotherm for RhB-MIPs binding could also be described by the Langmuir equation at different temperatures and pH values. Increasing temperature led to an enhanced Qm, a decreased dissociation constant (K'd), and a more negative free energy (ΔG), indicating that adsorption is favored at higher temperatures. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of RhB was remarkably affected by pH. At pH>7, the adsorption of RhB was driven by hydrogen bonding interactions, while at pH<7 electrostatic forces were dominant. Additionally, the MIPs also showed specific recognition of RhB from the standard mixture solution containing five structurally analogs. This method was also successfully employed to determine RhB content in red wine and beverages using three levels of spiking, with recoveries in the range of 91.6-93.1% and relative standard deviations lower than 4.1%. PMID:27372912

  4. Molecular recognition of fluorine impacts substrate selectivity in the fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase FlK.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Amy M; Keddie, Neil S; Wadoux, Rudy D P; O'Hagan, David; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-04-01

    The fluoroacetate-producing bacterium Streptomyces cattleya has evolved a fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase (FlK) that exhibits a remarkably high level of discrimination for its cognate substrate compared to the cellularly abundant analogue acetyl-CoA, which differs only by the absence of the fluorine substitution. A major determinant of FlK specificity derives from its ability to take advantage of the unique properties of fluorine to enhance the reaction rate, allowing fluorine discrimination under physiological conditions where both substrates are likely to be present at saturating concentrations. Using a combination of pH-rate profiles, pre-steady-state kinetic experiments, and Taft analysis of wild-type and mutant FlKs with a set of substrate analogues, we explore the role of fluorine in controlling the enzyme acylation and deacylation steps. Further analysis of chiral (R)- and (S)-[(2)H1]fluoroacetyl-CoA substrates demonstrates that a kinetic isotope effect (1.7 ± 0.2) is observed for only the (R)-(2)H1 isomer, indicating that deacylation requires recognition of the prochiral fluoromethyl group to position the α-carbon for proton abstraction. Taken together, the selectivity for the fluoroacetyl-CoA substrate appears to rely not only on the enhanced polarization provided by the electronegative fluorine substitution but also on molecular recognition of fluorine in both formation and breakdown of the acyl-enzyme intermediate to control active site reactivity. These studies provide insights into the basis of fluorine selectivity in a naturally occurring enzyme-substrate pair, with implications for drug design and the development of fluorine-selective biocatalysts.

  5. Multiscaled exploration of coupled folding and binding of an intrinsically disordered molecular recognition element in measles virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Chu, Xiakun; Longhi, Sonia; Roche, Philippe; Han, Wei; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-10-01

    Numerous relatively short regions within intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) serve as molecular recognition elements (MoREs). They fold into ordered structures upon binding to their partner molecules. Currently, there is still a lack of in-depth understanding of how coupled binding and folding occurs in MoREs. Here, we quantified the unbound ensembles of the α-MoRE within the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein. We developed a multiscaled approach by combining a physics-based and an atomic hybrid model to decipher the mechanism by which the α-MoRE interacts with the X domain of the measles virus phosphoprotein. Our multiscaled approach led to remarkable qualitative and quantitative agreements between the theoretical predictions and experimental results (e.g., chemical shifts). We found that the free α-MoRE rapidly interconverts between multiple discrete partially helical conformations and the unfolded state, in accordance with the experimental observations. We quantified the underlying global folding-binding landscape. This leads to a synergistic mechanism in which the recognition event proceeds via (minor) conformational selection, followed by (major) induced folding. We also provided evidence that the α-MoRE is a compact molten globule-like IDP and behaves as a downhill folder in the induced folding process. We further provided a theoretical explanation for the inherent connections between "downhill folding," "molten globule," and "intrinsic disorder" in IDP-related systems. Particularly, we proposed that binding and unbinding of IDPs proceed in a stepwise way through a "kinetic divide-and-conquer" strategy that confers them high specificity without high affinity. PMID:24043820

  6. Preparation of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for selective recognition of resveratrol in wine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang-Fang; Xie, Xiao-Yu; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2013-07-26

    The magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) for resveratrol were prepared by using surface molecular imprinting technique with a super paramagnetic core-shell nanoparticle as a supporter. Rhapontigenin, which is the analogues of resveratrol, was selected as dummy template molecules to avoid the leakage of trace amount of resveratrol. Acrylamide and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate were chosen as functional monomers and cross-linker, respectively. The obtained MMIPs were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrum, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometer. High performance liquid chromatography was used to analyze the target analytes. The resulting MMIPs exhibited high saturation magnetization of 53.14emug(-1) leading to the fast separation. The adsorption test showed that the MMIPs had high adsorption capacity for resveratrol and contained homogeneous binding sites. The MMIPs were employed as adsorbent of solid phase extraction for determination of resveratrol in real wine samples, and the recoveries of spiked samples ranged from 79.3% to 90.6% with the limit of detection of 4.42ngmL(-1). The prepared MMIPs could be employed to selectively pre-concentrate and determine resveratrol from wine samples. PMID:23481473

  7. Three-dimensional fiber-deposited PEOT/PBT copolymer scaffolds for tissue engineering: influence of porosity, molecular network mesh size, and swelling in aqueous media on dynamic mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Moroni, L; de Wijn, J R; van Blitterswijk, C A

    2005-12-15

    Among novel scaffold fabrication techniques, 3D fiber deposition (3DF) has recently emerged as a means to fabricate well-defined and custom-made scaffolds for tissue regeneration, with 100% interconnected pores. The mechanical behavior of these constructs is dependent not only on different three-dimensional architectural and geometric features, but also on the intrinsic chemical properties of the material used. These affect the mechanics of the solid material and eventually of 3D porous constructs derived from them. For instance, poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) block copolymers are known to have mechanical properties, depending on the PEOT/PBT weight ratio in block form and on the molecular weight of the initial poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) blocks. These differences are enhanced even more by their different swelling properties in aqueous media. Therefore, this article examines the influence of copolymer compositions in terms of their swelling on dynamic mechanical properties of solid material and porous 3DF scaffolds. The molecular weight of the starting PEG blocks used in the copolymer synthesis varied from 300 to 1000 g/mol. The PEOT/PBT weight ratio in the blocks used varied from 55/45 to 80/20. This corresponded to an increase of the swelling ratio Q from 1.06 to 2.46, and of the mesh size xi from approximately 9 Angstrom to approximately 47 Angstrom. With increased swelling, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) revealed a decrease in elastic response and an increase of viscoelasticity. Thus, by coupling structural and chemical characteristics, the viscoelastic properties of PEOT/PBT 3DF scaffolds may be fine tuned to achieve mechanical requirements for a variety of engineered tissues. Ultimately, the combination of 3DF and DMA may be useful to validate the hypothesis that mimicking the biomechanical behavior of a specific tissue for its optimal replacement is an important issue for at least some tissue

  8. Molecular recognition using receptor-free nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonghwan; Lee, Dongkyu; Liu, Xunchen; Van Neste, Charles; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Speciation of complex mixtures of trace explosives presents a formidable challenge for sensors that rely on chemoselective interfaces due to the unspecific nature of weak intermolecular interactions. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides higher selectivity in molecular detection without using chemoselective interfaces by measuring the photothermal effect of adsorbed molecules on a thermally sensitive microcantilever. In addition, unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, the detection sensitivity is drastically enhanced by increasing the IR laser power, since the photothermal signal comes from the absorption of IR photons and nonradiative decay processes. By using a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser for the resonant excitation of molecules, we increased the detection sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to the use of a conventional IR monochromator. Here, we demonstrate the successful speciation and quantification of picogram levels of ternary mixtures of similar explosives (trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using nanomechanical IR spectroscopy. PMID:23346368

  9. Molecular recognition using receptor-free nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonghwan; Lee, Dongkyu; Liu, Xunchen; Van Neste, Charles; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Speciation of complex mixtures of trace explosives presents a formidable challenge for sensors that rely on chemoselective interfaces due to the unspecific nature of weak intermolecular interactions. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides higher selectivity in molecular detection without using chemoselective interfaces by measuring the photothermal effect of adsorbed molecules on a thermally sensitive microcantilever. In addition, unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, the detection sensitivity is drastically enhanced by increasing the IR laser power, since the photothermal signal comes from the absorption of IR photons and nonradiative decay processes. By using a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser for the resonant excitation of molecules, we increased the detection sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to the use of a conventional IR monochromator. Here, we demonstrate the successful speciation and quantification of picogram levels of ternary mixtures of similar explosives (trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using nanomechanical IR spectroscopy.

  10. Supramolecular adhesives to hard surfaces: adhesion between host hydrogels and guest glass substrates through molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yoshinori; Sahara, Taiga; Sekine, Tomoko; Kakuta, Takahiro; Nakahata, Masaki; Otsubo, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Harada, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Supramolecular materials based on host-guest interactions should exhibit high selectivity and external stimuli-responsiveness. Among various stimuli, redox and photo stimuli are useful for its wide application. An external stimuli-responsive adhesive system between CD host-gels (CD gels) and guest molecules modified glass substrates (guest Sub) is focused. Here, the selective adhesion between host gels and guest substrates where adhesion depends on molecular complementarity is reported. Initially, it is thought that adhesion of a gel material onto a hard material might be difficult unless many guest molecules modified linear polymers immobilize on the surface of hard materials. However, reversible adhesion of the CD gels is observed by dissociating and re-forming inclusion complex in response to redox and photo stimuli.

  11. Molecular recognition using receptor-free nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seonghwan; Lee, Dongkyu; Liu, Xunchen; van Neste, Charles; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Speciation of complex mixtures of trace explosives presents a formidable challenge for sensors that rely on chemoselective interfaces due to the unspecific nature of weak intermolecular interactions. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides higher selectivity in molecular detection without using chemoselective interfaces by measuring the photothermal effect of adsorbed molecules on a thermally sensitive microcantilever. In addition, unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, the detection sensitivity is drastically enhanced by increasing the IR laser power, since the photothermal signal comes from the absorption of IR photons and nonradiative decay processes. By using a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser for the resonant excitation of molecules, we increased the detection sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to the use of a conventional IR monochromator. Here, we demonstrate the successful speciation and quantification of picogram levels of ternary mixtures of similar explosives (trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using nanomechanical IR spectroscopy.

  12. Phage display selection of tight specific binding variants from a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold protein library.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies, the quintessential biological recognition molecules, are not ideal for many applications because of their large size, complex modifications, and thermal and chemical instability. Identifying alternative scaffolds that may be evolved into tight, specific binding molecules with improved physical properties is of increasing interest, particularly for biomedical applications in resource-limited environments. Hyperthermophilic organisms, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus, are an attractive source of highly stable proteins that may serve as starting points for alternative molecular recognition scaffolds. We describe the first application of phage display to identify binding proteins based on the S. solfataricus protein Sso7d scaffold. Sso7d is a small cysteine-free DNA-binding protein (approximately 7 kDa, 63 amino acids), with a melting temperature of nearly 100 °C. Tight-binding Sso7d variants were selected for a diverse set of protein targets from a 10(10) member library, demonstrating the versatility of the scaffold. These Sso7d variants are able to discriminate among closely related human, bovine and rabbit serum albumins. Equilibrium dissociation constants in the nanomolar to low micromolar range were measured via competitive ELISA. Importantly, the Sso7d variants continue to bind their targets in the absence of the phage context. Furthermore, phage-displayed Sso7d variants retain their binding affinity after exposure to temperatures up to 70 °C. Taken together, our results suggest that the Sso7d scaffold will be a complementary addition to the range of non-antibody scaffold proteins that may be utilized in phage display. Variants of hyperthermostable binding proteins have potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics for environments with extreme conditions of storage and deployment. PMID:26835881

  13. Phage display selection of tight specific binding variants from a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold protein library.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies, the quintessential biological recognition molecules, are not ideal for many applications because of their large size, complex modifications, and thermal and chemical instability. Identifying alternative scaffolds that may be evolved into tight, specific binding molecules with improved physical properties is of increasing interest, particularly for biomedical applications in resource-limited environments. Hyperthermophilic organisms, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus, are an attractive source of highly stable proteins that may serve as starting points for alternative molecular recognition scaffolds. We describe the first application of phage display to identify binding proteins based on the S. solfataricus protein Sso7d scaffold. Sso7d is a small cysteine-free DNA-binding protein (approximately 7 kDa, 63 amino acids), with a melting temperature of nearly 100 °C. Tight-binding Sso7d variants were selected for a diverse set of protein targets from a 10(10) member library, demonstrating the versatility of the scaffold. These Sso7d variants are able to discriminate among closely related human, bovine and rabbit serum albumins. Equilibrium dissociation constants in the nanomolar to low micromolar range were measured via competitive ELISA. Importantly, the Sso7d variants continue to bind their targets in the absence of the phage context. Furthermore, phage-displayed Sso7d variants retain their binding affinity after exposure to temperatures up to 70 °C. Taken together, our results suggest that the Sso7d scaffold will be a complementary addition to the range of non-antibody scaffold proteins that may be utilized in phage display. Variants of hyperthermostable binding proteins have potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics for environments with extreme conditions of storage and deployment.

  14. Molecular Recognition of Human Liver Cancer Cells Using DNA Aptamers Generated via Cell-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqin; Delgado, Stefanie; Champanhac, Carole; Cansiz, Sena; Wu, Cuichen; Shan, Hong; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Most clinical cases of liver cancer cannot be diagnosed until they have evolved to an advanced stage, thus resulting in high mortality. It is well recognized that the implementation of early detection methods and the development of targeted therapies for liver cancer are essential to reducing the high mortality rates associated with this disease. To achieve these goals, molecular probes capable of recognizing liver cancer cell-specific targets are needed. Here we describe a panel of aptamers able to distinguish hepatocarcinoma from normal liver cells. The aptamers, which were selected by cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), have Kd values in the range of 64-349 nM toward the target human hepatoma cell HepG2, and also recognize ovarian cancer cells and lung adenocarcinoma. The proteinase treatment experiment indicated that all aptamers could recognize target HepG2 cells through surface proteins. This outcome suggested that these aptamers could be used as potential probes for further research in cancer studies, such as developing early detection assays, targeted therapies, and imaging agents, as well as for the investigation of common membrane proteins in these distinguishable cancers. PMID:25938802

  15. QAARM: quasi-anharmonic autoregressive model reveals molecular recognition pathways in ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Savol, Andrej J.; Burger, Virginia M.; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Ramanathan, Arvind; Chennubhotla, Chakra S.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have dramatically improved the atomistic understanding of protein motions, energetics and function. These growing datasets have necessitated a corresponding emphasis on trajectory analysis methods for characterizing simulation data, particularly since functional protein motions and transitions are often rare and/or intricate events. Observing that such events give rise to long-tailed spatial distributions, we recently developed a higher-order statistics based dimensionality reduction method, called quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA), for identifying biophysically-relevant reaction coordinates and substates within MD simulations. Further characterization of conformation space should consider the temporal dynamics specific to each identified substate. Results: Our model uses hierarchical clustering to learn energetically coherent substates and dynamic modes of motion from a 0.5 μs ubiqutin simulation. Autoregressive (AR) modeling within and between states enables a compact and generative description of the conformational landscape as it relates to functional transitions between binding poses. Lacking a predictive component, QAA is extended here within a general AR model appreciative of the trajectory's temporal dependencies and the specific, local dynamics accessible to a protein within identified energy wells. These metastable states and their transition rates are extracted within a QAA-derived subspace using hierarchical Markov clustering to provide parameter sets for the second-order AR model. We show the learned model can be extrapolated to synthesize trajectories of arbitrary length. Contact: ramanathana@ornl.gov; chakracs@pitt.edu PMID:21685101

  16. Recognition of dual targets by a molecular beacon-based sensor: subtyping of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Ching; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lai, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Chang-Chun David; Chuang, Min-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    A molecular beacon (MB)-based sensor to offer a decisive answer in combination with information originated from dual-target inputs is designed. The system harnesses an assistant strand and thermodynamically favored designation of unpaired nucleotides (UNs) to process the binary targets in "AND-gate" format and report fluorescence in "off-on" mechanism via a formation of a DNA four-way junction (4WJ). By manipulating composition of the UNs, the dynamic fluorescence difference between the binary targets-coexisting circumstance and any other scenario was maximized. Characteristic equilibrium constant (K), change of entropy (ΔS), and association rate constant (k) between the association ("on") and dissociation ("off") states of the 4WJ were evaluated to understand unfolding behavior of MB in connection to its sensing capability. Favorable MB and UNs were furthermore designed toward analysis of genuine genetic sequences of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) in an influenza A H5N2 isolate. The MB-based sensor was demonstrated to yield a linear calibration range from 1.2 to 240 nM and detection limit of 120 pM. Furthermore, high-fidelity subtyping of influenza virus was implemented in a sample of unpurified amplicons. The strategy opens an alternative avenue of MB-based sensors for dual targets toward applications in clinical diagnosis.

  17. Characterization of the original Christmas disease mutation (cysteine 206----serine): from clinical recognition to molecular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S A; Duffin, J; Cameron, C; Teitel, J; Garvey, B; Lillicrap, D P

    1992-01-23

    Christmas disease was first reported as a distinct clinical entity in two manuscripts published in 1952. The eponym associated with this disorder, is the surname of the first patient examined in detail and reported by Biggs and colleagues in a paper describing the clinical and laboratory features of seven affected individuals. This patient has severe factor IX coagulant deficiency (less than 0.01 units/ml) and no detectable circulating factor IX antigen (less than 0.01 units/ml). Coding sequence and splice junctions of the factor IX gene from this patient have been amplified in vitro through the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One nucleotide substitution was identified at nucleotide 30,070 where a guanine was replaced by a cytosine. This mutation alters the amino acid encoded at position 206 in the factor IX protein from cysteine to serine. The non conservative nature of this substitution, the absence of this change in more than 200 previously sequenced factor IX genes and the fact that the remainder of the coding region of this gene was normal, all provide strong circumstantial evidence in favour of this change being the causative mutation in this patient. The molecular characterization of this novel mutation in the index case of Christmas disease, contributes to the rapidly expanding body of knowledge pertaining to Christmas disease pathogenesis.

  18. Interfacial molecular interactions based on the conformation recognition between the insoluble antitumor drug AD-1 and DSPC.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tian; Cao, Xiuxiu; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Jian; Shi, Caihong; Su, Jia; Zhang, Yu; Gou, Jingxin; He, Haibing; Guo, Haiyan; Tang, Xing; Zhao, Yuqing

    2016-10-01

    In this study, molecular interactions between the anti-cancer agent 20(R)-25-methoxyl-dammarane-3β, 12β, 20-triol (AD-1) and phospholipid 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) were investigated using the Langmuir film balance technique. The characteristics of binary Langmuir monolayers consisting of DSPC and AD-1 were conducted on the basis of the surface pressure-area per molecule (π-A) isotherms. It was found that the drug was able to become efficiently inserted into preformed DSPC monolayers, indicating a preferential interaction between AD-1 and DSPC. For the examined lateral pressure at 20mN/m, the largest negative values of ΔGex were found for the AD-1/DSPC monolayer, which should be the most stable. Based on the calculated values of ΔGex, we found that the AD-1/DSPC systems exhibited the best mixed characteristics when the molar fraction of the AD-1 was 0.8; at that relative concentration, the AD-1 molecules can mix better and interact with the phospholipid molecules. In addition, the drug-DSPC binary supramolecular structure was also deposited on the mica plates as shown by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Finally, molecular docking calculations explained satisfactorily that, based on the conformations interactions (conformation recognition), even at an AD-1/DSPC molar ratio as high as 8:2, the interfacial stabilization of the AD-1/DSPC system was fairly strong due to hydrophobic interactions. A higher loading capacity of DSPC might be possible, as it is associated with a more flexible geometrical environment, which allows these supramolecular structures to accept larger increases in drug loading upon steric binding. PMID:27469574

  19. Molecular Basis of Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate and ARF1 GTPase Recognition by the FAPP1 Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.; Heroux, A.; Scott, J. L.; Roy, S.; Lenoir, M.; Overduin, M.; Stahelin, R. V.; Kutateladze, T. G.

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded {beta}-barrel capped by an {alpha}-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the {beta}4 and {beta}7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the {beta}-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the {beta}-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1.

  20. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47: minimal structural requirement and spatial molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Koide, Takaki; Asada, Shinichi; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-02-10

    The unique folding of procollagens in the endoplasmic reticulum is achieved with the assistance of procollagen-specific molecular chaperones. Heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone that plays an essential role in normal procollagen folding, although its molecular function has not yet been clarified. Recent advances in studies on the binding specificity of HSP47 have revealed that Arg residues at Yaa positions in collagenous Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats are critical for its interactions (Koide, T., Takahara, Y., Asada, S., and Nagata, K. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 6178-6182; Tasab, M., Jenkinson, L., and Bulleid, N. J. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 35007-35012). In the present study, we further examined the client recognition mechanism of HSP47 by taking advantage of systems employing engineered collagen model peptides. First, in vitro binding studies using conformationally constrained collagen-like peptides revealed that HSP47 only recognized correctly folded triple helices and that the interaction with the corresponding single-chain polypeptides was negligible. Second, a binding study using heterotrimeric model clients for HSP47 demonstrated a minimal requirement for the number of Arg residues in the triple helix. Finally, a cross-linking study using photoreactive collagenous peptides provided information about the spatial orientation of an HSP47 molecule in the chaperone-collagen complex. The obtained results led to the development of a new model of HSP47-collagen complexes that differs completely from the previously proposed "flying capstan model" (Dafforn, T. R., Della, M., and Miller, A. D. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 49310-49319).

  1. dsRNA-protein interactions studied by molecular dynamics techniques. Unravelling dsRNA recognition by DCL1.

    PubMed

    Drusin, Salvador I; Suarez, Irina P; Gauto, Diego F; Rasia, Rodolfo M; Moreno, Diego M

    2016-04-15

    Double stranded RNA (dsRNA) participates in several biological processes, where RNA molecules acquire secondary structure inside the cell through base complementarity. The double stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) is one of the main protein folds that is able to recognize and bind to dsRNA regions. The N-terminal dsRBD of DCL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (DCL1-1), in contrast to other studied dsRBDs, lacks a stable structure, behaving as an intrinsically disordered protein. DCL1-1 does however recognize dsRNA by acquiring a canonical fold in the presence of its substrate. Here we present a detailed modeling and molecular dynamics study of dsRNA recognition by DCL1-1. We found that DCL1-1 forms stable complexes with different RNAs and we characterized the residues involved in binding. Although the domain shows a binding loop substantially shorter than other homologs, it can still interact with the dsRNA and results in bending of the dsRNA A-type helix. Furthermore, we found that R8, a non-conserved residue located in the first dsRNA binding region, recognizes preferentially mismatched base pairs. We discuss our findings in the context of the function of DCL1-1 within the microRNA processing complex.

  2. Molecular modeling studies demonstrate key mutations that could affect the ligand recognition by influenza AH1N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L; García-Machorro, J; Quiliano, Miguel; Zimic, Mirko; Briz, Verónica; Rojas-Hernández, Saul; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this study was to identify neuraminidase (NA) residue mutants from human influenza AH1N1 using sequences from 1918 to 2012. Multiple alignment studies of complete NA sequences (5732) were performed. Subsequently, the crystallographic structure of the 1918 influenza (PDB ID: 3BEQ-A) was used as a wild-type structure and three-dimensional (3-D) template for homology modeling of the mutated selected NA sequences. The 3-D mutated NAs were refined using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (50 ns). The refined 3-D models were used to perform docking studies using oseltamivir. Multiple sequence alignment studies showed seven representative mutations (A232V, K262R, V263I, T264V, S367L, S369N, and S369K). MD simulations applied to 3-D NAs showed that each NA had different active-site shapes according to structural surface visualization and docking results. Moreover, Cartesian principal component analyses (cPCA) show structural differences among these NA structures caused by mutations. These theoretical results suggest that the selected mutations that are located outside of the active site of NA could affect oseltamivir recognition and could be associated with resistance to oseltamivir.

  3. Hydrophilic gallic acid-imprinted polymers over magnetic mesoporous silica microspheres with excellent molecular recognition ability in aqueous fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Xie, Lianwu; Guo, Junfang; Li, Hui; Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yuping; Shi, Shuyun

    2015-07-15

    Hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for gallic acid (GA) were prepared with excellent recognition ability in an aqueous solution. The proposed MIPs were designed by self-polymerization of dopamine (DA) on magnetic mesoporous silica (Fe3O4@SiO2@mSiO2, MMS) using GA as template. Resulting Fe3O4@SiO2@mSiO2@MIPs (MMS-MIPs) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and evaluated by adsorption isotherms/kinetics and competitive adsorption. The adsorption behavior between GA and MMS-MIPs followed Langmuir and Sips adsorption isotherms with a maximum adsorption capacity at 88.7 mg/g and pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics with fast binding (equilibrium time at 100 min). In addition, MMS-MIPs showed rapid magnetic separation (10 s) and stability (retained 95.2% after six cycles). Subsequently, MMS-MIPs were applied for the selective extraction and determination of GA from grape, apple, peach and orange juices (4.02, 3.91, 5.97, and 0.67 μg/g, respectively). Generally, the described method may pave the way towards rationally designing more advanced hydrophilic MIPs.

  4. Molecular modeling studies demonstrate key mutations that could affect the ligand recognition by influenza AH1N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L; García-Machorro, J; Quiliano, Miguel; Zimic, Mirko; Briz, Verónica; Rojas-Hernández, Saul; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this study was to identify neuraminidase (NA) residue mutants from human influenza AH1N1 using sequences from 1918 to 2012. Multiple alignment studies of complete NA sequences (5732) were performed. Subsequently, the crystallographic structure of the 1918 influenza (PDB ID: 3BEQ-A) was used as a wild-type structure and three-dimensional (3-D) template for homology modeling of the mutated selected NA sequences. The 3-D mutated NAs were refined using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (50 ns). The refined 3-D models were used to perform docking studies using oseltamivir. Multiple sequence alignment studies showed seven representative mutations (A232V, K262R, V263I, T264V, S367L, S369N, and S369K). MD simulations applied to 3-D NAs showed that each NA had different active-site shapes according to structural surface visualization and docking results. Moreover, Cartesian principal component analyses (cPCA) show structural differences among these NA structures caused by mutations. These theoretical results suggest that the selected mutations that are located outside of the active site of NA could affect oseltamivir recognition and could be associated with resistance to oseltamivir. PMID:26499499

  5. [Preparation of molecularly imprinted polypyrrole/Fe3O4 composite material and its application in recognition of tryptophan enantiomers].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhidong; Shan, Xueling; Kong, Yong

    2012-04-01

    Ferrosoferric oxide (Fe(3)O(4)) magnetic material was first synthesized, and then the in-situ chemical polymerization of pyrrole was carried out on the surface of Fe(3)O(4) by using pyrole and L-tryptophan (L-Trp) as the functional monomer and templates, respectively. As a result, molecularly imprinted polypyrrole/Fe(3)O(4) composite material was obtained. This composite material was separated from the solution because of its magnetic property. Polypyrrole in the composite was overoxidized in 1 mol/L NaOH solution by applying a potential of 1.0 V, and thus L-Trp templates were de-deoped from the composite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the composite. The solution containing L- or D-Trp was pumped through a porous ceramic tube packed with the composite, separately. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was adopted for the detection of L- or D-Trp in the eluate, and the results indicated that the enrichment ability of the composite for L-Trp was almost 2 times that of D-Trp. Therefore, the electro-magnetic composite material has potential applications as chromatographic stationary phase for chiral recognition.

  6. Molecular recognition of naphthalene diimide ligands by telomeric quadruplex-DNA: the importance of the protonation state and mediated hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Spinello, A; Barone, G; Grunenberg, J

    2016-01-28

    In depth Monte Carlo conformational scans in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electronic structure calculations were applied in order to study the molecular recognition process between tetrasubstituted naphthalene diimide (ND) guests and G-quadruplex (G4) DNA receptors. ND guests are a promising class of telomere stabilizers due to which they are used in novel anticancer therapeutics. Though several ND guests have been studied experimentally in the past, the protonation state under physiological conditions is still unclear. Based on chemical intuition, in the case of N-methyl-piperazine substitution, different protonation states are possible and might play a crucial role in the molecular recognition process by G4-DNA. Depending on the proton concentration, different nitrogen atoms of the N-methyl-piperazine might (or might not) be protonated. This fact was considered in our simulation in terms of a case by case analysis, since the process of molecular recognition is determined by possible donor or acceptor positions. The results of our simulations show that the electrostatic interactions between the ND ligands and the G4 receptor are maximized in the case of the protonation of the terminal nitrogen atoms, forming compact ND G4 complexes inside the grooves. The influence of different protonation states in terms of the ability to form hydrogen bonds with the sugar-phosphate backbone, as well as the importance of mediated vs. direct hydrogen bonding, was analyzed in detail by MD and relaxed force constant (compliance constant) simulations.

  7. A new tripodal receptor for molecular recognition of monosaccharides. A paradigm for assessing glycoside binding affinities and selectivities by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Alberto; Nativi, Cristina; Cacciarini, Martina; Pergoli, Roberto; Roelens, Stefano

    2004-12-22

    A new tripodal receptor for the recognition of monosaccharides is described. The prototypical host 1 features a 1,3,5-substituted 2,4,6-triethylbenzene scaffold bearing three convergent H-bonding units. The binding ability of the t-octyl derivative 1a toward a set of octylglycosides of biologically relevant monosaccharides, including Glc, Gal, Man, and GlcNAc, was investigated by 1H NMR in CDCl3. A protocol for the correct evaluation of binding affinities was established, which can be generally applied for the recognition of monosaccharides by 1H NMR spectroscopy. A three-constant equilibrium model, including 1:1 and 2:1 host-guest association and dimerization of the receptor, was ascertained for the interaction of 1a with all the investigated glycosides. An affinity index, which we defined median binding concentration BC50 in analogy to the IC50 parameter, intended to address the general issue of comparing dimensionally heterogeneous binding data, and a limiting BC0(50)quantity describing intrinsic binding affinities were developed for evaluating the results. BC0(50) values for 1a range from 1 to 6 mM, indicating an intrinsic binding affinity in the millimolar range and a selectivity factor of 5 toward the investigated glycosides. The treatment has been extended to include any generic host-guest system involved in single or multiple binding equilibria.

  8. Molecular Mechanism of Flocculation Self-Recognition in Yeast and Its Role in Mating and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Katty V. Y.; Ielasi, Francesco S.; Nookaew, Intawat; Stals, Ingeborg; Alonso-Sarduy, Livan; Daenen, Luk; Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E.; Stassen, Catherine; van Eijsden, Rudy G. E.; Siewers, Verena; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Kasas, Sandor; Nielsen, Jens; Devreese, Bart

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We studied the flocculation mechanism at the molecular level by determining the atomic structures of N-Flo1p and N-Lg-Flo1p in complex with their ligands. We show that they have similar ligand binding mechanisms but distinct carbohydrate specificities and affinities, which are determined by the compactness of the binding site. We characterized the glycans of Flo1p and their role in this binding process and demonstrate that glycan-glycan interactions significantly contribute to the cell-cell adhesion mechanism. Therefore, the extended flocculation mechanism is based on the self-interaction of Flo proteins and this interaction is established in two stages, involving both glycan-glycan and protein-glycan interactions. The crucial role of calcium in both types of interaction was demonstrated: Ca2+ takes part in the binding of the carbohydrate to the protein, and the glycans aggregate only in the presence of Ca2+. These results unify the generally accepted lectin hypothesis with the historically first-proposed “Ca2+-bridge” hypothesis. Additionally, a new role of cell flocculation is demonstrated; i.e., flocculation is linked to cell conjugation and mating, and survival chances consequently increase significantly by spore formation and by introduction of genetic variability. The role of Flo1p in mating was demonstrated by showing that mating efficiency is increased when cells flocculate and by differential transcriptome analysis of flocculating versus nonflocculating cells in a low-shear environment (microgravity). The results show that a multicellular clump (floc) provides a uniquely organized multicellular ultrastructure that provides a suitable microenvironment to induce and perform cell conjugation and mating. PMID:25873380

  9. Moleculary imprinted polymers with metalloporphyrin-based molecular recognition sites coassembled with methacrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Mukawa, T; Matsui, J; Higashi, M; Shimizu, K D

    2001-08-15

    A diastereoselective molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for (-)-cinchonidine, PPM(CD), was prepared by the combined use of methacrylic acid and vinyl-substituted zinc(II) porphyrin as functional monomers. Compared to MIPs using only methacrylic acid or zinc porphyrin as a functional monomer, PM(CD) and PP(CD), respectively, PPM(CD) showed higher binding ability for (-)-cinchonidine in chromatographic tests using the MIP-packed columns. Scatchard analysis gave a higher association constant of PPM(CD) for (-)-cinchonidine (1.14 x 10(7) M(-1)) than those of PP(CD) (1.45 x 10(6) M(-1)) and PM(CD) (6.78 x 10(6) M(-1)). The affinity distribution of binding sites estimated by affinity spectrum analysis showed a higher percentage of high-affinity sites and a lower percentage of low-affinity sites in PPM(CD). The MIPs containing a zinc(II) porphyrin in the binding sites, PPM(CD) and PP(CD), showed fluorescence quenching according to the binding of (-)-cinchonidine, and the quenching was significant in the low-concentration range, suggesting that the high-affinity binding sites contain the porphyrin residue. The correlation of the relative fluorescence intensity against log of (-)-cinchonidine concentrations showed a linear relationship. These results revealed that the MIP having highly specific binding sites was assembled by the two functional monomers, vinyl-substituted zinc(II) porphyrin and methacrylic acid, and they cooperatively worked to yield the specific binding. In addition, the zinc(II) porphyrin-based MIPs appeared to act as fluorescence sensor selectively responded by binding events of the template molecule.

  10. Recombinant protein scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2012-02-01

    New biological materials for tissue engineering are now being developed using common genetic engineering capabilities to clone and express a variety of genetic elements that allow cost-effective purification and scaffold fabrication from these recombinant proteins, peptides or from chimeric combinations of these. The field is limitless as long as the gene sequences are known. The utility is dependent on the ease, product yield and adaptability of these protein products to the biomedical field. The development of recombinant proteins as scaffolds, while still an emerging technology with respect to commercial products, is scientifically superior to current use of natural materials or synthetic polymer scaffolds, in terms of designing specific structures with desired degrees of biological complexities and motifs. In the field of tissue engineering, next generation scaffolds will be the key to directing appropriate tissue regeneration. The initial period of biodegradable synthetic scaffolds that provided shape and mechanical integrity, but no biological information, is phasing out. The era of protein scaffolds offers distinct advantages, particularly with the combination of powerful tools of molecular biology. These include, for example, the production of human proteins of uniform quality that are free of infectious agents and the ability to make suitable quantities of proteins that are found in low quantity or are hard to isolate from tissue. For the particular needs of tissue engineering scaffolds, fibrous proteins like collagens, elastin, silks and combinations of these offer further advantages of natural well-defined structural scaffolds as well as endless possibilities of controlling functionality by genetic manipulation.

  11. Molecular dynamics analysis of antibody recognition and escape by human H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ieong, Pek; Amaro, Rommie E; Li, Wilfred W

    2015-06-01

    The antibody immunoglobulin (Ig) 2D1 is effective against the 1918 hemagglutinin (HA) and also known to cross-neutralize the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza HA through a similar epitope. However, the detailed mechanism of neutralization remains unclear. We conducted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the interactions between Ig-2D1 and the HAs from the 1918 pandemic flu (A/South Carolina/1/1918, 18HA), the 2009 pandemic flu (A/California/04/2009, 09HA), a 2009 pandemic flu mutant (A/California/04/2009, 09HA_mut), and the 2006 seasonal flu (A/Solomon Islands/3/2006, 06HA). MM-PBSA analyses suggest the approximate free energy of binding (ΔG) between Ig-2D1 and 18HA is -74.4 kcal/mol. In comparison with 18HA, 09HA and 06HA bind Ig-2D1 ∼6 kcal/mol (ΔΔG) weaker, and the 09HA_mut bind Ig-2D1 only half as strong. We also analyzed the contributions of individual epitope residues using the free-energy decomposition method. Two important salt bridges are found between the HAs and Ig-2D1. In 09HA, a serine-to-asparagine mutation coincided with a salt bridge destabilization, hydrogen bond losses, and a water pocket formation between 09HA and Ig-2D1. In 09HA_mut, a lysine-to-glutamic-acid mutation leads to the loss of both salt bridges and destabilizes interactions with Ig-2D1. Even though 06HA has a similar ΔG to 09HA, it is not recognized by Ig-2D1 in vivo. Because 06HA contains two potential glycosylation sites that could mask the epitope, our results suggest that Ig-2D1 may be active against 06HA only in the absence of glycosylation. Overall, our simulation results are in good agreement with observations from biological experiments and offer novel mechanistic insights, to our knowledge, into the immune escape of the influenza virus. PMID:26039171

  12. Contig-Layout-Authenticator (CLA): A Combinatorial Approach to Ordering and Scaffolding of Bacterial Contigs for Comparative Genomics and Molecular Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Sabiha; Kumar, Narender; Lankapalli, Aditya K.; Tiwari, Sumeet K.; Baddam, Ramani; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of genome sequencing platforms have emerged in the recent past. High-throughput platforms like Illumina and 454 are essentially adaptations of the shotgun approach generating millions of fragmented single or paired sequencing reads. To reconstruct whole genomes, the reads have to be assembled into contigs, which often require further downstream processing. The contigs can be directly ordered according to a reference, scaffolded based on paired read information, or assembled using a combination of the two approaches. While the reference-based approach appears to mask strain-specific information, scaffolding based on paired-end information suffers when repetitive elements longer than the size of the sequencing reads are present in the genome. Sequencing technologies that produce long reads can solve the problems associated with repetitive elements but are not necessarily easily available to researchers. The most common high-throughput technology currently used is the Illumina short read platform. To improve upon the shortcomings associated with the construction of draft genomes with Illumina paired-end sequencing, we developed Contig-Layout-Authenticator (CLA). The CLA pipeline can scaffold reference-sorted contigs based on paired reads, resulting in better assembled genomes. Moreover, CLA also hints at probable misassemblies and contaminations, for the users to cross-check before constructing the consensus draft. The CLA pipeline was designed and trained extensively on various bacterial genome datasets for the ordering and scaffolding of large repetitive contigs. The tool has been validated and compared favorably with other widely-used scaffolding and ordering tools using both simulated and real sequence datasets. CLA is a user friendly tool that requires a single command line input to generate ordered scaffolds. PMID:27248146

  13. Structural basis for xyloglucan specificity within GH5 family and the molecular determinants for a-D-Xylp(1¿6)-D-Glcp recognition at the -1 subsite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GH5 is one of the most versatile and largest glycoside hydrolase families, comprising at least 20 distinct activities within a common structural scaffold. However, the molecular basis for the functional differentiation among GH5 members is still not fully understood, principally for xyloglucan speci...

  14. Molecular recognition of 7-(2-octadecyloxycarbonylethyl)guanine to cytidine at the air/water interface and LB film studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Wangen; Luo, Xuzhong; Liang, Yingqiu

    2003-03-15

    Monolayer behavior of a nucleolipid amphiphile, 7-(2-octadecyloxycarbonylethyl)guanine (ODCG), on aqueous cytidine solution was investigated by means of surface-molecular area (pi-A) isotherms. It indicates that molecular recognition by hydrogen bonding is present between ODCG monolayer and the cytidine in subphase. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmission spectroscopic result indicates that the cytidine molecules in the subphase can be transferred onto solid substrates by Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique as a result of the formation of Watson-Crick base-pairing at the air/water interface. Investigation by rotating polarized FTIR transmission also suggests that the headgroup recognition of this amphiphile to the dissolved cytidine influence the orientation of the tailchains.

  15. Evaluation of surface/interface-related physicochemical and microstructural properties of gelatin 3D scaffolds, and their influence on fibroblast growth and morphology.

    PubMed

    Gorgieva, Selestina; Štrancar, Janez; Kokol, Vanja

    2014-11-01

    This article present new insights in complex relation between surface- and interface-related physicochemical properties and microstructuring of three-dimensional (3D) gelatin scaffolds, being fabricated by simultaneous temperature-controlled freeze-thawing cycle and in situ cross-linking using variable conditions (pH) and molarity of carbodiimide reagents, on the seeding and growth of fibroblast cells with subsequent tracking of their spreading and morphology. Rarely populated cells with rounded morphology and small elongations are observed on negative charge-rich scaffold surface with a lower cross-linking degree (CD), and consequently higher molecular mobility and availability of cell-recognition sequences, in comparison with the prominently elongated and densely populated cells on a positively charged scaffold's surface with higher CD and low mobility. Surface microstructure effect was demonstrated by cell vacuolization and their pure intercommunication being present on scaffold's bottom side with smaller pores (25 ± 19 µm) and pore wall thickness (9 ± 5 µm), over the air-exposed side with twice bigger pores (56 ± 38 µm) and pore wall thicknesses (12 ± 6 µm). Strong correlations of CD (r(2) = 0.96) and local molecular mobility (r(2)  = -0.44) with pH and reagents molarity, as well as microstructure features being related to temperature gradient, imply on possibility to modulate scaffold's properties in a direction to guide cell viability and most likely its genotype development.

  16. Molecular bases for the recognition of short peptide substrates and cysteine-directed modifications of human insulin-degrading enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L.; Wadlington, Natasha L.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid β (Aβ). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located ~30Å away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9Å crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite, and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high Km values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all thirteen cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitroso-glutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing towards an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis. PMID:18986166

  17. Molecular bases for the recognition of short peptide substrates and cysteine-directed modifications of human insulin-degrading enzyme.

    PubMed

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L; Wadlington, Natasha L; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2008-12-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid beta (Abeta). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located approximately 30 A away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9 A crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high K(m) values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all 13 cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitrosoglutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing toward an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis.

  18. Molecular Bases for the Recognition of Short Peptide Substrates and Cysteine-Directed Modifications of Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L.; Wadlington, Natasha L.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-12-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid {beta} (A{beta}). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located 30 {angstrom} away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high K{sub m} values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all 13 cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitrosoglutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing toward an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis.

  19. Biomimetic magnetic silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Declercq, Heidi A; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Dubruel, Peter; Cornelissen, Maria; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rivas, Jose; Padeletti, Giuseppina; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L; Dediu, V Alek

    2015-03-25

    Magnetic silk fibroin protein (SFP) scaffolds integrating magnetic materials and featuring magnetic gradients were prepared for potential utility in magnetic-field assisted tissue engineering. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were introduced into SFP scaffolds via dip-coating methods, resulting in magnetic SFP scaffolds with different strengths of magnetization. Magnetic SFP scaffolds showed excellent hyperthermia properties achieving temperature increases up to 8 °C in about 100 s. The scaffolds were not toxic to osteogenic cells and improved cell adhesion and proliferation. These findings suggest that tailored magnetized silk-based biomaterials can be engineered with interesting features for biomaterials and tissue-engineering applications.

  20. Versatile modular scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, J.

    1981-01-01

    Movable and fixed modular scaffolds can be tailored to most scaffolding needs by interconnecting only 4 basic structural elements: platforms, rails, vertical-support angles, and stiffener. Standard nuts and bolts are used to join elements, simplifying construction, and reducing costs. Scaffolds are rigid and can be made any length. They are stable on unlevel ground and can extend to well over 50 feet in height. Scaffolds allow for internal elevators and for wheels and air mounts so that same elements can be used for standing or movable scaffold.

  1. Biomimetic nanoclay scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambre, Avinash Harishchandra

    Tissue engineering offers a significant potential alternative to conventional methods for rectifying tissue defects by evoking natural regeneration process via interactions between cells and 3D porous scaffolds. Imparting adequate mechanical properties to biodegradable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering is an important challenge and extends from molecular to macroscale. This work focuses on the use of sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT) to design polymer composite scaffolds having enhanced mechanical properties along with multiple interdependent properties. Materials design beginning at the molecular level was used in which Na-MMT clay was modified with three different unnatural amino acids and further characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD). Based on improved bicompatibility with human osteoblasts (bone cells) and intermediate increase in d-spacing of MMT clay (shown by XRD), 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay was further used to prepare biopolymer (chitosan-polygalacturonic acid complex) scaffolds. Osteoblast proliferation in biopolymer scaffolds containing 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay was similar to biopolymer scaffolds containing hydroxyapatite (HAP). A novel process based on biomineralization in bone was designed to prepare 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay capable of imparting multiple properties to the scaffolds. Bone-like apatite was mineralized in modified clay and a novel nanoclay-HAP hybrid (in situ HAPclay) was obtained. FTIR spectroscopy indicated a molecular level organic-inorganic association between the intercalated 5-aminovaleric acid and mineralized HAP. Osteoblasts formed clusters on biopolymer composite films prepared with different weight percent compositions of in situ HAPclay. Human MSCs formed mineralized nodules on composite films and mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) in composite scaffolds without the use of osteogenic supplements. Polycaprolactone (PCL), a synthetic polymer, was

  2. Co-assembly of CdTe and Fe3O4 with molecularly imprinted polymer for recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Limin; Chen, Shaona; Chu, Jia; Li, Xin

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we present a general protocol to fabricate imprinting matrix co-loaded with CdTe quantum dots and Fe3O4 nanoparticles for the recognition of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The resultant composites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The materials have been demonstrated to be characterized with spherical shape with a saturation magnetization value of 1.7 emu g-1. Furthermore, the rebinding experiments show that the resultant materials have greater affinity and selectivity towards p-nitrophenol (model EDCs) over structurally related compounds. We believe that the effective method proposed in this work might provide a platform to prepare magnetic and fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of EDCs.

  3. Molecular recognition in a diverse set of protein-ligand interactions studied with molecular dynamics simulations and end-point free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Liwei; Hurley, Thomas D; Meroueh, Samy O

    2013-10-28

    End-point free energy calculations using MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA provide a detailed understanding of molecular recognition in protein-ligand interactions. The binding free energy can be used to rank-order protein-ligand structures in virtual screening for compound or target identification. Here, we carry out free energy calculations for a diverse set of 11 proteins bound to 14 small molecules using extensive explicit-solvent MD simulations. The structure of these complexes was previously solved by crystallography and their binding studied with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data enabling direct comparison to the MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA calculations. Four MM-GBSA and three MM-PBSA calculations reproduced the ITC free energy within 1 kcal·mol(-1) highlighting the challenges in reproducing the absolute free energy from end-point free energy calculations. MM-GBSA exhibited better rank-ordering with a Spearman ρ of 0.68 compared to 0.40 for MM-PBSA with dielectric constant (ε = 1). An increase in ε resulted in significantly better rank-ordering for MM-PBSA (ρ = 0.91 for ε = 10), but larger ε significantly reduced the contributions of electrostatics, suggesting that the improvement is due to the nonpolar and entropy components, rather than a better representation of the electrostatics. The SVRKB scoring function applied to MD snapshots resulted in excellent rank-ordering (ρ = 0.81). Calculations of the configurational entropy using normal-mode analysis led to free energies that correlated significantly better to the ITC free energy than the MD-based quasi-harmonic approach, but the computed entropies showed no correlation with the ITC entropy. When the adaptation energy is taken into consideration by running separate simulations for complex, apo, and ligand (MM-PBSAADAPT), there is less agreement with the ITC data for the individual free energies, but remarkably good rank-ordering is observed (ρ = 0.89). Interestingly, filtering MD snapshots by prescoring

  4. Anticancer drug design using scaffolds of β-lactams, sulfonamides, quinoline, quinoxaline and natural products. Drugs advances in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Balderas-Renteria, I; Gonzalez-Barranco, P; Garcia, A; Banik, B K; Rivera, G

    2012-01-01

    Eleven years after the start of a new millennium characterized by amazing scientific development, the cure for cancer remains a major challenge for humanity. In this regard, scientific efforts have focused on the search for new therapeutic targets that involve specific recognition and stop the spread of cancer cells, as well as the development of new therapeutic options that show greater specificity and better therapeutic efficacy. This review includes recent published literature about new anticancer drug design using scaffolds of β-lactams, sulfonamides, quinoline, quinoxaline and natural products, and focuses on the structure-activity relationships of scaffolds that have been reported to potently inhibit cell growth of human tumor cell lines. It describes not only those synthetic or natural compounds aimed at specific molecular targets of cancer cells in vitro, but also compounds currently in clinical trials.

  5. Electrospun nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Venugopal, J; Ramakrishna, S

    2009-10-01

    The current challenge in bone tissue engineering is to fabricate a bioartificial bone graft mimicking the extracellular matrix (ECM) with effective bone mineralization, resulting in the regeneration of fractured or diseased bones. Biocomposite polymeric nanofibers containing nanohydroxyapatite (HA) fabricated by electrospinning could be promising scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Nanofibrous scaffolds of poly-l-lactide (PLLA, 860+/-110 nm), PLLA/HA (845+/-140 nm) and PLLA/collagen/HA (310+/-125 nm) were fabricated, and the morphology, chemical and mechanical characterization of the nanofibers were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and tensile testing, respectively. The in vitro biocompatibility of different nanofibrous scaffolds was also assessed by growing human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB), and investigating the proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and mineralization of cells on different nanofibrous scaffolds. Osteoblasts were found to adhere and grow actively on PLLA/collagen/HA nanofibers with enhanced mineral deposition of 57% higher than the PLLA/HA nanofibers. The synergistic effect of the presence of an ECM protein, collagen and HA in PLLA/collagen/HA nanofibers provided cell recognition sites together with apatite for cell proliferation and osteoconduction necessary for mineralization and bone formation. The results of our study showed that the biocomposite PLLA/collagen/HA nanofibrous scaffold could be a potential substrate for the proliferation and mineralization of osteoblasts, enhancing bone regeneration. PMID:19447211

  6. A supramolecular hyperbranched polymer based on molecular recognition between benzo-21-crown-7 and secondary ammonium salt.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Fan, Xiaodong; Tian, Wei; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Wanbin; Yang, Zhen

    2014-12-01

    A novel A2-B3-type supramolecular hyperbranched polymer was prepared based on the benzo-21-crown-7/secondary ammonium salt recognition motif. The resulting supramolecular polymer exhibited a reversible disassembled-assembled process by adding or removing potassium ions. PMID:25315034

  7. Homology modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking studies of pattern-recognition transmembrane protein-lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3 glucan-binding protein from Fenneropenaeus indicus.

    PubMed

    Sivakamavalli, Jeyachandran; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3 glucan-binding protein (LGBP) is a family of pattern-recognition transmembrane proteins (PRPs) which plays a vital role in the immune mechanism of crustaceans in adverse conditions. Fenneropenaeus indicus LGBP-deduced amino acid has conserved potential recognition motif for β-1,3 linkages of polysaccharides and putative RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) cell adhesion sites for the activation of innate defense mechanism. In order to understand the stimulating activity of β-1,3 glucan (β-glucan) and its interaction with LGBP, a 3D model of LGBP is generated. Molecular docking is performed with this model, and the results indicate Arg71 with strong hydrogen bond from RGD domain of LGBP. Moreover, from the docking studies, we also suggest that Arg34, Lys68, Val135, and Ala146 in LGBP are important amino acid residues in binding as they have strong bonding interaction in the active site of LGBP. In our in vitro studies, yeast agglutination results suggest that shrimp F. indicus LGBP possesses sugar binding and recognition sites in its structure, which is responsible for agglutination reaction. Our results were synchronized with the already reported evidence both in vivo and in vitro experiments. This investigation may be valuable for further experimental investigation in the synthesis of novel immunomodulator.

  8. New Trends in Inspecting GPCR-ligand Recognition Process: the Contribution of the Molecular Modeling Section (MMS) at the University of Padova.

    PubMed

    Ciancetta, Antonella; Cuzzolin, Alberto; Deganutti, Giuseppe; Sturlese, Mattia; Salmaso, Veronica; Cristiani, Andrea; Sabbadin, Davide; Moro, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    In this review, we present a survey of the recent advances carried out by our research groups in the field of ligand-GPCRs recognition process simulations recently implemented at the Molecular Modeling Section (MMS) of the University of Padova. We briefly describe a platform of tools we have tuned to aid the identification of novel GPCRs binders and the better understanding of their binding mechanisms, based on two extensively used computational techniques such as molecular docking and MD simulations. The developed methodologies encompass: (i) the selection of suitable protocols for docking studies, (ii) the exploration of the dynamical evolution of ligand-protein interaction networks, (iii) the detailed investigation of the role of water molecules upon ligand binding, and (iv) a glance at the way the ligand might go through prior reaching the binding site. PMID:27546048

  9. New Trends in Inspecting GPCR-ligand Recognition Process: the Contribution of the Molecular Modeling Section (MMS) at the University of Padova.

    PubMed

    Ciancetta, Antonella; Cuzzolin, Alberto; Deganutti, Giuseppe; Sturlese, Mattia; Salmaso, Veronica; Cristiani, Andrea; Sabbadin, Davide; Moro, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    In this review, we present a survey of the recent advances carried out by our research groups in the field of ligand-GPCRs recognition process simulations recently implemented at the Molecular Modeling Section (MMS) of the University of Padova. We briefly describe a platform of tools we have tuned to aid the identification of novel GPCRs binders and the better understanding of their binding mechanisms, based on two extensively used computational techniques such as molecular docking and MD simulations. The developed methodologies encompass: (i) the selection of suitable protocols for docking studies, (ii) the exploration of the dynamical evolution of ligand-protein interaction networks, (iii) the detailed investigation of the role of water molecules upon ligand binding, and (iv) a glance at the way the ligand might go through prior reaching the binding site.

  10. Development of a molecular recognition based approach for multi-residue extraction of estrogenic endocrine disruptors from biological fluids coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry measurement.

    PubMed

    Bousoumah, Radia; Antignac, Jean Philippe; Camel, Valérie; Grimaldi, Marina; Balaguer, Patrick; Courant, Frederique; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Morvan, Marie-Line; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Multi-residue methods permitting the high-throughput and affordable simultaneous determination of an extended range of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with reduced time and cost of analysis is of prime interest in order to characterize a whole set of bioactive compounds. Such a method based on UHPLC-MS/MS measurement and dedicated to 13 estrogenic EDCs was developed and applied to biological matrices. Two molecular recognition-based strategies, either molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) with phenolic template or estrogen receptors (ERα) immobilized on a sorbent, were assessed in terms of recovery and purification efficiency. Both approaches demonstrated their suitability to measure ultra-trace levels of estrogenic EDCs in aqueous samples. Applicability of the MIP procedure to urine and serum samples has also been demonstrated. PMID:26391401

  11. Kin Recognition in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wall, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The ability of bacteria to recognize kin provides a means to form social groups. In turn these groups can lead to cooperative behaviors that surpass the ability of the individual. Kin recognition involves specific biochemical interactions between a receptor(s) and an identification molecule(s). Recognition specificity, ensuring that nonkin are excluded and kin are included, is critical and depends on the number of loci and polymorphisms involved. After recognition and biochemical perception, the common ensuing cooperative behaviors include biofilm formation, quorum responses, development, and swarming motility. Although kin recognition is a fundamental mechanism through which cells might interact, microbiologists are only beginning to explore the topic. This review considers both molecular and theoretical aspects of bacterial kin recognition. Consideration is also given to bacterial diversity, genetic relatedness, kin selection theory, and mechanisms of recognition. PMID:27359217

  12. Recognition and binding of β-lactam antibiotics to bovine serum albumin by frontal affinity chromatography in combination with spectroscopy and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Zhang, Tianlong; Bian, Liujiao

    2016-03-01

    Serum albumins are the most abundant carrier proteins in blood plasma and participate in the binding and transportation of various exogenous and endogenous compounds in the body. This work was designed to investigate the recognition and binding of three typical β-lactam antibiotics including penicillin G (Pen G), penicillin V (Pen V) and cefalexin (Cef) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) by frontal affinity chromatography in combination with UV-vis absorption spectra, fluorescence emission spectra, binding site marker competitive experiment and molecular docking under simulated physiological conditions. The results showed that a BSA only bound with one antibiotic molecule in the binding process, and the binding constants for Pen G-BSA, Pen V-BSA and Cef-BSA complexes were 4.22×10(1), 4.86×10(2) and 3.32×10(3) (L/mol), respectively. All the three β-lactam antibiotics were mainly inserted into the subdomain IIA (binding site 1) of BSA by hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals forces. The binding capacity between the antibiotics and BSA was closely related to the functional groups and flexibility of side chains in antibiotics. This study provided an important insight into the molecular recognition and binding interaction of BSA with β-lactam antibiotics, which may be a useful guideline for the innovative clinical medications and new antibiotic designs with effective pharmacological properties. PMID:26882128

  13. Molecular Evolution of the CYP2D Subfamily in Primates: Purifying Selection on Substrate Recognition Sites without the Frequent or Long-Tract Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Yasukochi, Yoshiki; Satta, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 gene is a member of the CYP2D gene subfamily, along with the CYP2D7P and CYP2D8P pseudogenes. Although the CYP2D6 enzyme has been studied extensively because of its clinical importance, the evolution of the CYP2D subfamily has not yet been fully understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to reveal the evolutionary process of the human drug metabolic system. Here, we investigate molecular evolution of the CYP2D subfamily in primates by comparing 14 CYP2D sequences from humans to New World monkey genomes. Window analysis and statistical tests revealed that entire genomic sequences of paralogous genes were extensively homogenized by gene conversion during molecular evolution of CYP2D genes in primates. A neighbor-joining tree based on genomic sequences at the nonsubstrate recognition sites showed that CYP2D6 and CYP2D8 genes were clustered together due to gene conversion. In contrast, a phylogenetic tree using amino acid sequences at substrate recognition sites did not cluster the CYP2D6 and CYP2D8 genes, suggesting that the functional constraint on substrate specificity is one of the causes for purifying selection at the substrate recognition sites. Our results suggest that the CYP2D gene subfamily in primates has evolved to maintain the regioselectivity for a substrate hydroxylation activity between individual enzymes, even though extensive gene conversion has occurred across CYP2D coding sequences. PMID:25808902

  14. Hydrogels and scaffolds for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankur; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2014-10-01

    For over two decades, immunologists and biomaterials scientists have co-existed in parallel world with the rationale of understanding the molecular profile of immune responses to vaccination, implantation, and treating incurable diseases. Much of the field of biomaterial-based immunotherapy has relied on evaluating model antigens such as chicken egg ovalbumin in mouse models but their relevance to humans has been point of much discussion. Nevertheless, such model antigens have provided important insights into the mechanisms of immune regulation and served as a proof-of-concept for plethora of biomaterial-based vaccines. After years of extensive development of numerous biomaterials for immunomodulation, it is only recently that an experimental scaffold vaccine implanted beneath the skin has begun to use the human model to study the immune responses to cancer vaccination by co-delivering patient-derived tumor lysates and immunomodulatory proteins. If successful, this scaffold vaccine will change the way we approached untreatable cancers, but more importantly, will allow a faster and more rational translation of therapeutic regimes to other cancers, chronic infections, and autoimmune diseases. Most materials reviews have focused on immunomodulatory adjuvants and micro-nano-particles. Here we provide an insight into emerging hydrogel and scaffold based immunomodulatory approaches that continue to demonstrate efficacy against immune associated diseases.

  15. Hydrogels and scaffolds for immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For over two decades, immunologists and biomaterials scientists have co-existed in parallel world with the rationale of understanding the molecular profile of immune responses to vaccination, implantation, and treating incurable diseases. Much of the field of biomaterials-based immunotherapy has relied on evaluating model antigens such as chicken egg ovalbumin in mouse models but their relevance to humans has been point of much discussion. Nevertheless, such model antigens have provided important insights about the mechanisms of immune regulation and served as a proof-of-concept for plethora of biomaterials-based vaccines. After years of extensive development of numerous biomaterials for immunomodulation, it is only recently that an experimental scaffold vaccine implanted beneath the skin has begun to use the human model to study the immune responses to cancer vaccination by co-delivering patient-derived tumor lysates and immunomodulatory proteins. If successful, this scaffold vaccine will change the way we approached untreatable cancers, but more importantly, will allow a faster and more rational translation of therapeutic regimes to other cancers, chronic infections, and autoimmune diseases. Most materials reviews have focused on immunomodulatory adjuvants and micro-nano-particles. Here we provide an insight into emerging hydrogel and scaffold based immunomodulatory approaches that continue to demonstrate efficacy against immune associated diseases. PMID:25155610

  16. Fabrication of functional PLGA-based electrospun scaffolds and their applications in biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen; Li, Jiaojiao; Jin, Kaixiang; Liu, Wenlong; Qiu, Xuefeng; Li, Chenrui

    2016-02-01

    Electrospun PLGA-based scaffolds have been applied extensively in biomedical engineering, such as tissue engineering and drug delivery system. Due to lack of the recognition sites on cells, hydropholicity and single-function, the applications of PLGA fibrous scaffolds are limited. In order to tackle these issues, many works have been done to obtain functional PLGA-based scaffolds, including surface modifications, the fabrication of PLGA-based composite scaffolds and drug-loaded scaffolds. The functional PLGA-based scaffolds have significantly improved cell adhesion, attachment and proliferation. Moreover, the current study has summarized the applications of functional PLGA-based scaffolds in wound dressing, vascular and bone tissue engineering area as well as drug delivery system.

  17. Fabrication of functional PLGA-based electrospun scaffolds and their applications in biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen; Li, Jiaojiao; Jin, Kaixiang; Liu, Wenlong; Qiu, Xuefeng; Li, Chenrui

    2016-02-01

    Electrospun PLGA-based scaffolds have been applied extensively in biomedical engineering, such as tissue engineering and drug delivery system. Due to lack of the recognition sites on cells, hydropholicity and single-function, the applications of PLGA fibrous scaffolds are limited. In order to tackle these issues, many works have been done to obtain functional PLGA-based scaffolds, including surface modifications, the fabrication of PLGA-based composite scaffolds and drug-loaded scaffolds. The functional PLGA-based scaffolds have significantly improved cell adhesion, attachment and proliferation. Moreover, the current study has summarized the applications of functional PLGA-based scaffolds in wound dressing, vascular and bone tissue engineering area as well as drug delivery system. PMID:26652474

  18. Liquid chromatography enantioseparations of halogenated compounds on polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phases: role of halogen substituents in molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Paola; Mamane, Victor; Cossu, Sergio

    2015-10-01

    Halogenated chiral molecules have become important in several fields of science, industry, and society as drugs, natural compounds, agrochemicals, environmental pollutants, synthetic products, and chiral supports. Meanwhile, the perception of the halogen moiety in organic compounds and its role in recognition processes changed. Indeed, the recognition of the halogen bond as an intermolecular interaction occurring when the halogen acts as a Lewis acid had a strong impact, particularly in crystal engineering and medicinal chemistry. Due to this renewed interest in the potentialities of chiral organohalogens, here we focus on selected recent applications dealing with enantioseparations of halogenated compounds on polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phases (CSPs), widely used in liquid chromatography (LC). In particular, recently the first case of halogen bonding-driven high-performance LC (HPLC) enantioseparation was reported on a cellulose-based CSP. Along with enantioseparations performed under conventional HPLC, representative applications using supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) are reported.

  19. Recognition of purified beta 1,3/1,6 glucan and molecular signalling in the intestine of Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Kiron, Viswanath; Kulkarni, Amod; Dahle, Dalia; Vasanth, Ghana; Lokesh, Jep; Elvebo, Odd

    2016-03-01

    Atlantic salmon was orally intubated with a highly purified β-glucan product (MacroGard(®)) to study the recognition of the molecule by the receptor genes, the regulation of the downstream signalling genes and global proteins, and the micromorphological changes in the intestine. The β-glucan receptor genes of Atlantic salmon, sclra, sclrb, sclrc and cr3, seem to recognize the molecule, and initiate the downstream ITAM-motif signalling, as evident from the significantly high mRNA levels of ksyk, mapkin2, il1b and mip2a levels. Among the altered proteins, the Apoa4 (involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism); Tagln, Actb (uptake of β-glucan); Psma2 (associated with substrate recognition); and Ckt (energy metabolism-related) were the overexpressed ones. The underexpressed proteins included the Uk114, Rpl9, Ctsb and Lgal that are connected to proliferation, LPS-stimulation, Il1b and lactose recognition, respectively. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of igt and the number of immune cells in the distal intestine were found to increase upon β-glucan uptake by the fish. This study provides some clues on the mechanisms by which the β-glucan evokes response in Atlantic salmon, particularly at the intestinal level.

  20. Molecularly imprinted polymer grafted on polysaccharide microsphere surface by the sol-gel process for protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Li, Jing; Zhang, Shusheng

    2008-02-15

    An interfacial organic-inorganic hybridization concept was applied to the preparation of a new spherical imprinted material for protein recognition. The functional biopolymer chitosan (CS), shaped as microsphere and high-density cross-linked, constituted of the polysaccharide core for surface imprinting. After the model template protein, bovine serum albumin, was covalently immobilized by forming imine bonds with the functional amine groups of CS, two kinds of organic siloxane (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysiloxane: APTMS, and tetraethoxysiloxane: TEOS) assembled and polymerized on the polysaccharide-protein surface via sol-gel process in aqueous solution at room temperature. After template removal, the protein-imprinted sol-gel surface exhibited a prevalent preference for the template protein in adsorption experiments, as compared with four contrastive proteins. Bioinformatics methods were also employed to investigate the imprinting process and the recognition effect. The influence of siloxane type, pH, siloxane/water ratio on template removal and recognition selectivity was assessed. Under optimized imprinting conditions, a large quantity of well-distributed pores was observed on the immobilized-template imprinted surface. The surface-imprinted adsorbent offered a fast kinetics for template re-adsorption and could be reused. Compared with the imprinted material prepared with free-template, material prepared with immobilized-template possessed higher adsorption capacity towards template protein. Easy preparation of the described imprinted material, high affinity and good reusability make this approach attractive and broadly applicable in biotechnology for down-stream processing and biosensor. PMID:18371777

  1. Danger- and pathogen-associated molecular patterns recognition by pattern-recognition receptors and ion channels of the transient receptor potential family triggers the inflammasome activation in immune cells and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Giorgio; Cardinali, Claudio; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Santoni, Matteo; Nabissi, Massimo; Amantini, Consuelo

    2015-02-03

    An increasing number of studies show that the activation of the innate immune system and inflammatory mechanisms play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. The innate immune system is present in almost all multicellular organisms and its activation occurs in response to pathogens or tissue injury via pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Intracellular pathways, linking immune and inflammatory response to ion channel expression and function, have been recently identified. Among ion channels, the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a major family of non-selective cation-permeable channels that function as polymodal cellular sensors involved in many physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of interactions between immune cells and PRRs and ion channels of TRP families with PAMPs and DAMPs to provide new insights into the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. TRP channels have been found to interfere with innate immunity via both nuclear factor-kB and procaspase-1 activation to generate the mature caspase-1 that cleaves pro-interleukin-1β cytokine into the mature interleukin-1β.Sensory neurons are also adapted to recognize dangers by virtue of their sensitivity to intense mechanical, thermal and irritant chemical stimuli. As immune cells, they possess many of the same molecular recognition pathways for danger. Thus, they express PRRs including Toll-like receptors 3, 4, 7, and 9, and stimulation by Toll-like receptor ligands leads to induction of inward currents and sensitization in TRPs. In addition, the expression of inflammasomes in neurons and the involvement of TRPs in central nervous system diseases strongly support a role of TRPs in inflammasome-mediated neurodegenerative pathologies. This field is still at its beginning and further studies may be required.Overall, these

  2. Cytosine derivatized bis(2,2'-bithienyl)methane molecularly imprinted polymer for selective recognition of 6-thioguanine, an antitumor drug.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tan-Phat; Wojnarowicz, Agnieszka; Sosnowska, Marta; Srebnik, Simcha; Benincori, Tiziana; Sannicolò, Francesco; D'Souza, Francis; Kutner, Wlodzimierz

    2015-08-15

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was designed and synthesized to serve as a functional material for selective recognition of 6-thioguanine (6TG), an antitumor drug. For that, the newly synthesized functional monomer, cytosine-bis(2,2'-bithienyl)-(4-carboxyphenyl)methane ester (Cyt-S4), revealed Watson-Crick type nucleobase pairing of 6TG. Formation of the Cyt-S4 and 6TG complex of the 2:1 stoichiometry was postulated based on the DFT calculations at the B3LYP/3-21G((⁎)) level and experimentally confirmed by fluorescence titration. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film was deposited by potentiodynamic electropolymerization on a Pt disk electrode as well as on an Au-coated glass slide and on an Au-quartz crystal resonator. The statistical model of formation of this film was successfully simulated by molecular dynamics. Completeness of the subsequent 6TG template extraction from MIP was confirmed by the UV-visible spectroscopy. An imprinting factor of 2.9 for the MIP film was determined by piezoelectric microgravimetry using ECQM. The double-layer capacity and alternating current measurements under flow-injection analysis (FIA) conditions were selected to transduce the 6TG recognition signal into the change of the double-layer capacity dependence on the 6TG concentration in solution for different supporting electrolyte concentrations. Detectability of the resulting chemosensor was 10 µM 6TG for the 0.5 M KF carrier solution in FIA. Selectivity of the chemosensor with respect to common interferences was high, e.g., it exceeded 130 to 2-amino-6-methylmercaptopurine, a 6TG metabolite.

  3. Cytosine derivatized bis(2,2'-bithienyl)methane molecularly imprinted polymer for selective recognition of 6-thioguanine, an antitumor drug.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tan-Phat; Wojnarowicz, Agnieszka; Sosnowska, Marta; Srebnik, Simcha; Benincori, Tiziana; Sannicolò, Francesco; D'Souza, Francis; Kutner, Wlodzimierz

    2015-08-15

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was designed and synthesized to serve as a functional material for selective recognition of 6-thioguanine (6TG), an antitumor drug. For that, the newly synthesized functional monomer, cytosine-bis(2,2'-bithienyl)-(4-carboxyphenyl)methane ester (Cyt-S4), revealed Watson-Crick type nucleobase pairing of 6TG. Formation of the Cyt-S4 and 6TG complex of the 2:1 stoichiometry was postulated based on the DFT calculations at the B3LYP/3-21G((⁎)) level and experimentally confirmed by fluorescence titration. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film was deposited by potentiodynamic electropolymerization on a Pt disk electrode as well as on an Au-coated glass slide and on an Au-quartz crystal resonator. The statistical model of formation of this film was successfully simulated by molecular dynamics. Completeness of the subsequent 6TG template extraction from MIP was confirmed by the UV-visible spectroscopy. An imprinting factor of 2.9 for the MIP film was determined by piezoelectric microgravimetry using ECQM. The double-layer capacity and alternating current measurements under flow-injection analysis (FIA) conditions were selected to transduce the 6TG recognition signal into the change of the double-layer capacity dependence on the 6TG concentration in solution for different supporting electrolyte concentrations. Detectability of the resulting chemosensor was 10 µM 6TG for the 0.5 M KF carrier solution in FIA. Selectivity of the chemosensor with respect to common interferences was high, e.g., it exceeded 130 to 2-amino-6-methylmercaptopurine, a 6TG metabolite. PMID:25805629

  4. On the influence of crosslinker on template complexation in molecularly imprinted polymers: a computational study of prepolymerization mixture events with correlations to template-polymer recognition behavior and NMR spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Shoravi, Siamak; Olsson, Gustaf D; Karlsson, Björn C G; Nicholls, Ian A

    2014-06-12

    Aspects of the molecular-level basis for the function of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and trimethylolproprane trimethacrylate crosslinked methacrylic acid copolymers molecularly imprinted with (S)-propranolol have been studied using a series of all-component and all-atom molecular dynamics studies of the corresponding prepolymerization systems. The crosslinking agents were observed to contribute to template complexation, and the results were contrasted with previously reported template-recognition behavior of the corresponding polymers. Differences in the extent to which the two crosslinkers interacted with the functional monomer were identified, and correlations were made to polymer-ligand recognition behavior and the results of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies studies. This study demonstrates the importance of considering the functional monomer-crosslinker interaction when designing molecularly imprinted polymers, and highlights the often neglected general contribution of crosslinker to determining the nature of molecularly imprinted polymer-template selectivity.

  5. The Interaction between an Acidic Transcriptional Activator and Its Inhibitor: The Molecular Basis of Ga14p Recognition by Ga180p

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Ryan, Louise A.; Reece, Richard J.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2009-02-16

    The GAL genes, which encode the enzymes required for normal galactose metabolism in yeast, are transcriptionally regulated by three proteins: Gal4p, an activator; Gal80p, an inhibitor; and Gal3p, a galactose sensor. These proteins control the switch between inert and active gene expression. The transcriptional activation function of Gal4p is rendered inactive in the presence of Gal80p. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of a complex between the acidic activation domain of Gal4p and Gal80p. The transactivation domain initiates with an extended region of polypeptide chain followed by two turns of an amphipathic alpha-helix. It fits into and across a deep cleft within the Gal80p dimer with the protein-protein interface defined primarily by hydrophobic interactions. A disordered loop in the apo-Gal80p structure (Asp-309 to Ser-316) becomes well-defined upon binding of the transactivation domain. This investigation provides a new molecular scaffold for understanding previous biochemical and genetic studies.

  6. Molecular Basis for the Recognition of Structurally Distinct Autoinducer Mimics by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR Quorum-Sensing Signaling Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yaozhong; Nair, Satish K.

    2010-01-12

    The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates the expression of virulence factors using quorum sensing, a signaling cascade triggered by the activation of signal receptors by small-molecule autoinducers. These homoserine lactone autoinducers stabilize their cognate receptors and activate their functions as transcription factors. Because quorum sensing regulates the progression of infection and host immune resistance, significant efforts have been devoted toward the identification of small molecules that disrupt this process. Screening efforts have identified a class of triphenyl compounds that are structurally distinct from the homoserine lactone autoinducer, yet interact specifically and potently with LasR receptor to modulate quorum sensing (Muh et al., 2006a). Here we present the high-resolution crystal structures of the ligand binding domain of LasR in complex with the autoinducer N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (1.4 {angstrom} resolution), and with the triphenyl mimics TP-1, TP-3, and TP-4 (to between 1.8 {angstrom} and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution). These crystal structures provide a molecular rationale for understanding how chemically distinct compounds can be accommodated by a highly selective receptor, and provide the framework for the development of novel quorum-sensing regulators, utilizing the triphenyl scaffold.

  7. Molecular recognition with metal containing supramolecular compounds: Soluble tetradentate dithioglyoximes for the detection of organic solvents in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Oeztuerk, Z.Z.

    1996-12-31

    Supramolecular structures have been widely investigated for their specific recognition of ions. Recently, they have been also used to detect neutral molecules and especially organic solvents in the gas phase. In this context, the authors developed a new type of supramolecular structures for the recognition of the organic solvent molecules by their selective incorporation to the bulk of thin films. The authors synthesized a series of the soluble tetradentate dithiogloximes which included mono-, tri-, and pentanuclear metal complexes as well as the heteronuclear polymers. Thin layers of these compounds were prepared from their solutions by evaporating their volatile organic solvents. The subsequent exposure of these films to the same organic solvent molecules in air shows drastic transducer signals, i.e., changes in masses and capacitances due to selective interactions of coordinatively and electronically unsaturated metal complexes with gas molecules. The organic solvents investigated in this work are dichloromethane, trichloromethane, tetrachloromethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, acetone, benzene, toluene, n-hexane, n-octane, methanol, ethanol and n-propanol. Sensor responses were monitored with interdigital capacitor (IDC) and quartz crystal oscillators (QCM).

  8. Use of DNA sequence and mutant analyses and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to examine the molecular basis of nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase autoinhibition, calmodulin recognition, and activity

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The first primary structure for a nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) has been determined by elucidation of the cDNA sequence encoding the protein kinase from chicken embryo fibroblasts, and insight into the molecular mechanism of calmodulin (CaM) recognition and activation has been obtained by the use of site-specific mutagenesis and suppressor mutant analysis. Treatment of chicken and mouse fibroblasts with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides based on the cDNA sequence results in an apparent decrease in MLCK levels, an altered morphology reminiscent of that seen in v-src-transformed cells, and a possible effect on cell proliferation. nmMLCK is distinct from and larger than smooth muscle MLCK (smMLCK), although their extended DNA sequence identity is suggestive of a close genetic relationship not found with skeletal muscle MLCK. The analysis of 20 mutant MLCKs indicates that the autoinhibitory and CaM recognition activities are centered in distinct but functionally coupled amino acid sequences (residues 1,068-1,080 and 1,082-1,101, respectively). Analysis of enzyme chimeras, random mutations, inverted sequences, and point mutations in the 1,082-1,101 region demonstrates its functional importance for CaM recognition but not autoinhibition. In contrast, certain mutations in the 1,068-1,080 region result in a constitutively active MLCK that still binds CaM. These results suggest that CaM/protein kinase complexes use similar structural themes to transduce calcium signals into selective biological responses, demonstrate a direct link between nmMLCK and non-muscle cell function, and provide a firm basis for genetic studies and analyses of how nmMLCK is involved in development and cell proliferation. PMID:2202734

  9. Binding of an RNA aptamer and a partial peptide of a prion protein: crucial importance of water entropy in molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Oshima, Hiraku; Mashima, Tsukasa; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2014-06-01

    It is a central issue to elucidate the new type of molecular recognition accompanied by a global structural change of a molecule upon binding to its targets. Here we investigate the driving force for the binding of R12 (a ribonucleic acid aptamer) and P16 (a partial peptide of a prion protein) during which P16 exhibits the global structural change. We calculate changes in thermodynamic quantities upon the R12-P16 binding using a statistical-mechanical approach combined with molecular models for water which is currently best suited to studies on hydration of biomolecules. The binding is driven by a water-entropy gain originating primarily from an increase in the total volume available to the translational displacement of water molecules in the system. The energy decrease due to the gain of R12-P16 attractive (van der Waals and electrostatic) interactions is almost canceled out by the energy increase related to the loss of R12-water and P16-water attractive interactions. We can explain the general experimental result that stacking of flat moieties, hydrogen bonding and molecular-shape and electrostatic complementarities are frequently observed in the complexes. It is argued that the water-entropy gain is largely influenced by the geometric characteristics (overall shapes, sizes and detailed polyatomic structures) of the biomolecules.

  10. Proton transfer in organic scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Dipankar

    This dissertation focuses on the fundamental understanding of the proton transfer process and translating the knowledge into design/development of new organic materials for efficient non-aqueous proton transport. For example, what controls the shuttling of a proton between two basic sites? a) Distance between two groups? or b) the basicity? c) What is the impact of protonation on molecular conformation when the basic sites are attached to rigid scaffolds? For this purpose, we developed several tunable proton sponges and studied proton transfer in these scaffolds theoretically as well as experimentally. Next we moved our attention to understand long-range proton conduction or proton transport. We introduced liquid crystalline (LC) proton conductor based on triphenylene molecule and established that activation energy barrier for proton transport is lower in the LC phase compared to the crystalline phase. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of several critical factors: the choice of the proton transferring groups, mobility of the charge carriers, intrinsic vs. extrinsic charge carrier concentrations and the molecular architectures on long-range proton transport. The outcome of this research will lead to a deeper understanding of non-aqueous proton transfer process and aid the design of next generation proton exchange membrane (PEM) for fuel cell.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a pattern recognition protein, lipopolysaccharide and beta-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) from Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengsong; Li, Fuhua; Dong, Bo; Wang, Xiaomei; Xiang, Jianhai

    2009-03-01

    A pattern recognition protein (PRP), lipopolysaccharide and beta-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) cDNA was cloned from the haemocyte of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis by the techniques of homology cloning and RACE. Analysis of nucleotide sequence revealed that the full-length cDNA of 1,275 bp has an open reading frame of 1,098 bp encoding a protein of 366 amino acids including a 17 amino acid signal peptide. Sequence comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of F. chinensis LGBP showed a high identity of 94%, 90%, 87%, 72% and 63% with Penaeus monodon BGBP, Litopenaeus stylirostris LGBP, Marsupenaeu japonicus BGBP, Homarus gammarus BGBP and Pacifastacus leniusculus LGBP, respectively. The calculated molecular mass of the mature protein is 39,857 Da with a deduced pI of 4.39. Two putative integrin binding motifs, RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) and a potential recognition motif for beta-1,3-linkage of polysaccharides were observed in LGBP sequence. RT-PCR analysis showed that LGBP gene expresses in haemocyte and hepatopancreas only, but not in other tissues. Capillary electrophoresis RT-PCR method was used to quantify the variation of mRNA transcription level during artificial infection with heat-killed Vibrio anguillarum and Staphylococcus aureusin. A significant enhancement of LGBP transcription was appeared at 6 h post-injection in response to bacterial infection. These results have provided useful information to understand the function of LGBP in shrimp. PMID:18163220

  12. Gradient nanofiber scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Seidi, Azadeh; Sampathkumar, Kaarunya; Srivastava, Alok; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Ramalingam, Murugan

    2013-07-01

    Scaffolds are one of the key factors for the success of tissue engineering, in particular when dealing with anchorage-dependent cells. The concept of using scaffolds in tissue engineering lies in mimicking the physical, chemical and biological features of native extracellular matrix (ECM) in order to support cell function, which in turn regulates cellular microenvironment that directs cell growth and subsequent tissue formation. Nanofibers fabricated from both synthetic and natural polymers are being used as scaffolds in many tissue engineering applications. At the molecular level, native ECM is made up of a gradient of fibrous proteins and polysaccharides that are nanoscale structures. The gradient cues of ECM, directs critical cell behaviors such as alignment, motility and differentiation, particularly in the region between soft and hard tissues called interfacial tissue. Therefore, it is essential to develop gradient nanofiber scaffolds particularly for interfacial tissue engineering applications. Keeping these points in view, in this article, we review the recent developments of gradient nanofiber scaffolds, their design strategies, and their applications in tissue engineering. PMID:23901487

  13. Macroscopic observations of molecular recognition: discrimination of the substituted position on the naphthyl group by polyacrylamide gel modified with β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yongtai; Hashidzume, Akihito; Takashima, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2011-11-15

    Macroscopic molecular recognition observations were realized using polyacrylamide-based gels modified with α-cyclodextrin (α-CD), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), 1-naphthylmethyl (1Np), and 2-naphthylmethyl (2Np) moieties, which are denoted as αCD(x)-gel, βCD(x)-gel, 1Np(y)-gel, and 2Np(y)-gel, where x and y indicate the mol % of CD and Np moieties, respectively. The αCD(5)-gel did not adhere to either the 1Np(5)-gel or 2Np(5)-gel, whereas the βCD(5)-gel interacted with both to form alternating or checkered assemblies. Although the difference in the association constants of β-CD for the model polymers was small, the βCD(x)-gel successfully discriminated between 1Np(y)-gel and 2Np(y)-gel at the appropriate x and y.

  14. NMR solution structure and backbone dynamics of domain III of the E protein of tick-borne Langat flavivirus suggests a potential site for molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Munia; Dutta, Kaushik; White, Mark A; Cowburn, David; Fox, Robert O

    2006-06-01

    Flaviviruses cause many human diseases, including dengue fever, yellow fever, West Nile viral encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fevers, and are transmitted to their vertebrate hosts by infected mosquitoes and ticks. Domain III of the envelope protein (E-D3) is considered to be the primary viral determinant involved in the virus-host-cell receptor interaction, and thus represents an excellent target for antiviral drug development. Langat (LGT) virus is a naturally attenuated BSL-2 TBE virus and is a model for the pathogenic BSL-3 and BSL-4 viruses in the serogroup. We have determined the solution structure of LGT-E-D3 using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The backbone dynamics of LGT-E-D3 have been investigated using 15N relaxation measurements. A detailed analysis of the solution structure and dynamics of LGT-E-D3 suggests potential residues that could form a surface for molecular recognition, and thereby represent a target site for antiviral therapeutics design.

  15. Macroscopic observations of molecular recognition: discrimination of the substituted position on the naphthyl group by polyacrylamide gel modified with β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yongtai; Hashidzume, Akihito; Takashima, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2011-11-15

    Macroscopic molecular recognition observations were realized using polyacrylamide-based gels modified with α-cyclodextrin (α-CD), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), 1-naphthylmethyl (1Np), and 2-naphthylmethyl (2Np) moieties, which are denoted as αCD(x)-gel, βCD(x)-gel, 1Np(y)-gel, and 2Np(y)-gel, where x and y indicate the mol % of CD and Np moieties, respectively. The αCD(5)-gel did not adhere to either the 1Np(5)-gel or 2Np(5)-gel, whereas the βCD(5)-gel interacted with both to form alternating or checkered assemblies. Although the difference in the association constants of β-CD for the model polymers was small, the βCD(x)-gel successfully discriminated between 1Np(y)-gel and 2Np(y)-gel at the appropriate x and y. PMID:21978319

  16. [Strategies to choose scaffold materials for tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qingdong; Zhu, Xulong; Xiang, Junxi; Lü, Yi; Li, Jianhui

    2016-02-01

    Current therapies of organ failure or a wide range of tissue defect are often not ideal. Transplantation is the only effective way for long time survival. But it is hard to meet huge patients demands because of donor shortage, immune rejection and other problems. Tissue engineering could be a potential option. Choosing a suitable scaffold material is an essential part of it. According to different sources, tissue engineering scaffold materials could be divided into three types which are natural and its modified materials, artificial and composite ones. The purpose of tissue engineering scaffold is to repair the tissues or organs damage, so could reach the ideal recovery in its function and structure aspect. Therefore, tissue engineering scaffold should even be as close as much to the original tissue or organs in function and structure. We call it "organic scaffold" and this strategy might be the drastic perfect substitute for the tissues or organs in concern. Optimized organization with each kind scaffold materials could make up for biomimetic structure and function of the tissue or organs. Scaffold material surface modification, optimized preparation procedure and cytosine sustained-release microsphere addition should be considered together. This strategy is expected to open new perspectives for tissue engineering. Multidisciplinary approach including material science, molecular biology, and engineering might find the most ideal tissue engineering scaffold. Using the strategy of drawing on each other strength and optimized organization with each kind scaffold material to prepare a multifunctional biomimetic tissue engineering scaffold might be a good method for choosing tissue engineering scaffold materials. Our research group had differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into bile canaliculi like cells. We prepared poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) biliary stent. The scaffold's internal played a part in the long-term release of cytokines which

  17. [Strategies to choose scaffold materials for tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qingdong; Zhu, Xulong; Xiang, Junxi; Lü, Yi; Li, Jianhui

    2016-02-01

    Current therapies of organ failure or a wide range of tissue defect are often not ideal. Transplantation is the only effective way for long time survival. But it is hard to meet huge patients demands because of donor shortage, immune rejection and other problems. Tissue engineering could be a potential option. Choosing a suitable scaffold material is an essential part of it. According to different sources, tissue engineering scaffold materials could be divided into three types which are natural and its modified materials, artificial and composite ones. The purpose of tissue engineering scaffold is to repair the tissues or organs damage, so could reach the ideal recovery in its function and structure aspect. Therefore, tissue engineering scaffold should even be as close as much to the original tissue or organs in function and structure. We call it "organic scaffold" and this strategy might be the drastic perfect substitute for the tissues or organs in concern. Optimized organization with each kind scaffold materials could make up for biomimetic structure and function of the tissue or organs. Scaffold material surface modification, optimized preparation procedure and cytosine sustained-release microsphere addition should be considered together. This strategy is expected to open new perspectives for tissue engineering. Multidisciplinary approach including material science, molecular biology, and engineering might find the most ideal tissue engineering scaffold. Using the strategy of drawing on each other strength and optimized organization with each kind scaffold material to prepare a multifunctional biomimetic tissue engineering scaffold might be a good method for choosing tissue engineering scaffold materials. Our research group had differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into bile canaliculi like cells. We prepared poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) biliary stent. The scaffold's internal played a part in the long-term release of cytokines which

  18. Molecular basis of the recognition of the ap65-1 gene transcription promoter elements by a Myb protein from the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ingjye; Tsai, Chen-Kun; Chen, Sheng-Chia; Wang, Szu-Huan; Amiraslanov, Imamaddin; Chang, Chi-Fon; Wu, Wen-Jin; Tai, Jung-Hsiang; Liaw, Yen-Chywan; Huang, Tai-Huang

    2011-11-01

    Iron-inducible transcription of the ap65-1 gene in Trichomonas vaginalis involves at least three Myb-like transcriptional factors (tvMyb1, tvMyb2 and tvMyb3) that differentially bind to two closely spaced promoter sites, MRE-1/MRE-2r and MRE-2f. Here, we defined a fragment of tvMyb2 comprising residues 40-156 (tvMyb2₄₀₋₁₅₆) as the minimum structural unit that retains near full binding affinity with the promoter DNAs. Like c-Myb in vertebrates, the DNA-free tvMyb2₄₀₋₁₅₆ has a flexible and open conformation. Upon binding to the promoter DNA elements, tvMyb2₄₀₋₁₅₆ undergoes significant conformational re-arrangement and structure stabilization. Crystal structures of tvMyb2₄₀₋₁₅₆ in complex with promoter element-containing DNA oligomers showed that 5'-a/gACGAT-3' is the specific base sequence recognized by tvMyb2₄₀₋₁₅₆, which does not fully conform to that of the Myb binding site sequence. Furthermore, Lys⁴⁹, which is upstream of the R2 motif (amino acids 52-102) also participates in specific DNA sequence recognition. Intriguingly, tvMyb2₄₀₋₁₅₆ binds to the promoter elements in an orientation opposite to that proposed in the HADDOCK model of the tvMyb1₃₅₋₁₄₁/MRE-1-MRE-2r complex. These results shed new light on understanding the molecular mechanism of Myb-DNA recognition and provide a framework to study the molecular basis of transcriptional regulation of myriad Mybs in T. vaginalis. PMID:21771861

  19. Use of UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy to monitor label-free interaction between molecular recognition elements and erythropoietin on a gold-coated polycarbonate platform.

    PubMed

    Citartan, Marimuthu; Gopinath, Subash C B; Tominaga, Junji; Chen, Yeng; Tang, Thean-Hock

    2014-08-01

    Label-free-based detection is pivotal for real-time monitoring of biomolecular interactions and to eliminate the need for labeling with tags that can occupy important binding sites of biomolecules. One simplest form of label-free-based detection is ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy, which measure changes in reflectivity as a means to monitor immobilization and interaction of biomolecules with their corresponding partners. In biosensor development, the platform used for the biomolecular interaction should be suitable for different molecular recognition elements. In this study, gold (Au)-coated polycarbonate was used as a platform and as a proof-of-concept, erythropoietin (EPO), a doping substance widely abused by the athletes was used as the target. The interaction of EPO with its corresponding molecular recognition elements (anti-EPO monoclonal antibody and anti-EPO DNA aptamer) is monitored by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. Prior to this, to show that UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy is a suitable method for measuring biomolecular interaction, the interaction between biotin and streptavidin was demonstrated via this strategy and reflectivity of this interaction decreased by 25%. Subsequent to this, interaction of the EPO with anti-EPO monoclonal antibody and anti-EPO DNA aptamer resulted in the decrease of reflectivity by 5% and 10%, respectively. The results indicated that Au-coated polycarbonate could be an ideal biosensor platform for monitoring biomolecular interactions using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. A smaller version of the Au-coated polycarbonate substrates can be derived from the recent set-up, to be applied towards detecting EPO abuse among atheletes. PMID:24881539

  20. Use of UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy to monitor label-free interaction between molecular recognition elements and erythropoietin on a gold-coated polycarbonate platform.

    PubMed

    Citartan, Marimuthu; Gopinath, Subash C B; Tominaga, Junji; Chen, Yeng; Tang, Thean-Hock

    2014-08-01

    Label-free-based detection is pivotal for real-time monitoring of biomolecular interactions and to eliminate the need for labeling with tags that can occupy important binding sites of biomolecules. One simplest form of label-free-based detection is ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy, which measure changes in reflectivity as a means to monitor immobilization and interaction of biomolecules with their corresponding partners. In biosensor development, the platform used for the biomolecular interaction should be suitable for different molecular recognition elements. In this study, gold (Au)-coated polycarbonate was used as a platform and as a proof-of-concept, erythropoietin (EPO), a doping substance widely abused by the athletes was used as the target. The interaction of EPO with its corresponding molecular recognition elements (anti-EPO monoclonal antibody and anti-EPO DNA aptamer) is monitored by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. Prior to this, to show that UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy is a suitable method for measuring biomolecular interaction, the interaction between biotin and streptavidin was demonstrated via this strategy and reflectivity of this interaction decreased by 25%. Subsequent to this, interaction of the EPO with anti-EPO monoclonal antibody and anti-EPO DNA aptamer resulted in the decrease of reflectivity by 5% and 10%, respectively. The results indicated that Au-coated polycarbonate could be an ideal biosensor platform for monitoring biomolecular interactions using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. A smaller version of the Au-coated polycarbonate substrates can be derived from the recent set-up, to be applied towards detecting EPO abuse among atheletes.

  1. Exact approaches for scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents new structural and algorithmic results around the scaffolding problem, which occurs prominently in next generation sequencing. The problem can be formalized as an optimization problem on a special graph, the "scaffold graph". We prove that the problem is polynomial if this graph is a tree by providing a dynamic programming algorithm for this case. This algorithm serves as a basis to deduce an exact algorithm for general graphs using a tree decomposition of the input. We explore other structural parameters, proving a linear-size problem kernel with respect to the size of a feedback-edge set on a restricted version of Scaffolding. Finally, we examine some parameters of scaffold graphs, which are based on real-world genomes, revealing that the feedback edge set is significantly smaller than the input size. PMID:26451725

  2. Syntheses, structures, molecular and cationic recognitions and catalytic properties of two lanthanide coordination polymers based on a flexible tricarboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Yan-Mei; Xu, Ji; Liu, Pan; Weththasinha, H.A.B.M.D.; Wu, Yun-Long; Lu, Xiao-Qing; Xie, Ji-Min

    2014-11-15

    Two lanthanide coordination polymers, namely, ([La(TTTA)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (La-TTTA) and [Nd(TTTA)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (Nd-TTTA) have been hydrothermally synthesized through the reaction of lanthanide ions (La{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}) with the flexible tripodal ligand 2,2′,2″-[1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyltris(thio)]tris-acetic acid (H{sub 3}TTTA). La-TTTA and Nd-TTTA are isostructural and both show three dimensional structures. La-TTTA and Nd-TTTA show good recognition of amine molecules via quenching the luminescent intensities in amines emulsions. They can also recognize Fe{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions with the quenching the peak around 361 nm when the compounds immersed in ionic solutions. The two compounds act as efficient Lewis acid catalysts for the cyanosilylation of benzaldehyde and derivatives in high yields shortly due to the strong Lewis acidity and the possible open sites of the lanthanide ions. - Graphical abstract: We have synthesized two isostructural 3D compounds based on H{sub 3}TTTA. They are chemical sensor of amine solvents and cations. They have higher yields and TOFs to catalyze cyanosilylation reactions. - Highlights: • The compounds show recognition of amine molecules via quenching luminescent intensities. • The compounds recognize Fe{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions via quenching the peak around 361 nm. • They act as efficient Lewis acid catalysts for the cyanosilylation reactions in high yields.

  3. Solution structure of GCCAAT recognition motif by 2D NMR, spectral simulation, molecular modeling, and distance geometry calculations.

    PubMed

    Nibedita, R; Kumar, R A; Majumdar, A; Hosur, R V; Govil, G; Majumder, K; Chauhan, V S

    1993-09-01

    Solution conformation of a self-complementary 14-mer DNA duplex (d-GGATTGGCCAATCC) containing the GCCAAT recognition motif of several transcription factors has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Complete resonance assignment of all the protons (except H5',H5'' protons) has been obtained following standard procedures based on two-dimensional NMR techniques. Three-bond coupling constants have been determined by spectral simulation procedures. New strategies have been described and employed for quantifying NOE intensities from the structural point of view. Approximate ranges of gamma torsion angles have been obtained from a selective NOESY experiment, by estimating the J(4'-5'), J(4'-5''), or their sum in the H1'-H4' cross peaks of the spectrum. Likewise, ranges of epsilon torsion angles have been obtained by monitoring the H3' multiplicities in the H8/H6-H3' cross peaks in selective NOESY spectra. With the help of such a total of 73 coupling constraints, 79 NOE intensity constraints, and 108 H-bond constraints, model building has been carried out to obtain a structure which satisfies the constraints. Starting from such a structure, an expanded distance constraint set has been created which has been used for the distance geometry calculations using the program TANDY. In the best structure thus derived, interesting irregularities similar to a BI-BII transition have been observed in the center. The molecule exhibits a bend. The overall base stacking is different from that in either B- or A-DNA models. The base pairs are tilted with respect to the local helix axes. The observed structural features are likely to have important implications for the recognition mechanism of the GCCAAT motif.

  4. Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Recognition of Hepatitis C Virus Transmitted/Founder Variants by RIG-I Is Dependent on U-Core Length

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Alison; Stoddard, Mark; Li, Hui; Marcotrigiano, Joe; Shaw, George M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs against hepatitis C virus (HCV), infection remains a major public health concern because DAA therapeutics do not prevent reinfection and patients can still progress to chronic liver disease. Chronic HCV infection is supported by a variety of viral immune evasion strategies, but, remarkably, 20% to 30% of acute infections spontaneously clear prior to development of adaptive immune responses, thus implicating innate immunity in resolving acute HCV infection. However, the virus-host interactions regulating acute infection are unknown. Transmission of HCV involves one or a few transmitted/founder (T/F) variants. In infected hepatocytes, the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) protein recognizes 5′ triphosphate (5′ppp) of the HCV RNA and a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) motif located within the 3′ untranslated region consisting of poly-U/UC. PAMP binding activates RIG-I to induce innate immune signaling and type 1 interferon antiviral defenses. HCV poly-U/UC sequences can differ in length and complexity, suggesting that PAMP diversity in T/F genomes could regulate innate immune control of acute HCV infection. Using 14 unique poly-U/UC sequences from HCV T/F genomes recovered from acute-infection patients, we tested whether RIG-I recognition and innate immune activation correlate with PAMP sequence characteristics. We show that T/F variants are recognized by RIG-I in a manner dependent on length of the U-core motif of the poly-U/UC PAMP and are recognized by RIG-I to induce innate immune responses that restrict acute infection. PAMP recognition of T/F HCV variants by RIG-I may therefore impart innate immune signaling and HCV restriction to impact acute-phase-to-chronic-phase transition. IMPORTANCE Recognition of nonself molecular patterns such as those seen with viral nucleic acids is an essential step in triggering the immune response to virus infection. Innate immunity is

  5. RECOGNITION OF PYRENE USING MOLECULARLY-IMPRINTED ELECTROCHEMICALLY-DEPOSITED POLY (2-MERCAPTOBENZIMIDAZOLE) OR POLY(RESORCINOL) ON GOLD ELECTRODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using thiol chemistry to form molecularly imprinted polymer-coated gold electrodes to measure pyrene is reported. For the first approach, poly(2-mercaptoimidazole) (2-MBI) was electrochemically deposited on gold electrodes in the presence or absence of the tem...

  6. High-resolution single-molecule recognition imaging of the molecular details of ricin-aptamer interaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular details of DNA aptamer-ricin interactions were investigated. The toxic protein ricin molecules were immobilized on Au(111) surface using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester to specifically react with lysine residues located on the ricin B chains. A single ricin molecule was visualized in ...

  7. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  8. Comparative Study of Degradation Behavior of Bioresorbable Cardiovascular Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiyi; Huang, Chubo; Wang, Shuai; Meng, Juan; Li, Zhonghua; Chang, Zhaohua; Zhu, Yufang; Hua, Zezhao

    2015-03-01

    This comparative study investigated the biodegradation behavior and mechanism of bioresorbable cardiovascular scaffolds using bench testing under physiological conditions and in vivo experiment. The results show that the molecular weight of the scaffold decreased with respect to time after implantation in both in vivo and in vitro tests. It was found that the molecular weights of the implanted scaffolds in the in vivo and in vitro models decreased to 61.8 and 68.5% respectively 6 months after implantation, but the thermodynamic properties of the scaffold material were not significantly affected by the 6-month degradation. Moreover, the study indicated that in spite of the 6-month degradation, the scaffold maintained sufficient radial strength and mechanical integrity. Furthermore, it was noted that the changes in the trends of the mechanical properties and degradation behavior of the scaffolds in the in vitro model were coherent with the results of the in vivo study, which means the in vitro study of the degradation behavior of polylactic acid (PLA) scaffold could offer clinical relevant data and physical insights to predict the in vivo performance.

  9. Molecularly imprinted optosensing material based on hydrophobic CdSe quantum dots via a reverse microemulsion for specific recognition of ractopamine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huilin; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Shuo

    2014-05-15

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based on hydrophobic CdSe quantum dots (QDs) was synthesized using a one-pot room-temperature reverse microemulsion polymerization, and this polymer was applied as a molecular recognition element to construct a ractopamine (RAC) optosensor. Here, hydrophobic CdSe QDs were first introduced to the hydrophilic analyte-imprinted polymer for highly selective and sensitive detection of RAC via the change in fluorescence intensity, because of the high-quality hydrophobic QDs with high quantum yield, sharp photoluminescence spectra and chemical and fluorescent stability. Under optimal conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity of MIP based on hydrophobic QDs decreased linearly with the increasing concentration of RAC in the range of 1.21 × 10(-9) -3.03 × 10(-6)mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 7.57 × 10(-10)mol L(-1), and the precision for five replicate detections of 1.51 × 10(-8)mol L(-1) RAC was 2.09% (relative standard deviation). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace RAC in pork samples, with good recoveries ranging from 82.79% to 97.23%. PMID:24370883

  10. Molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensing interface based on in-situ-polymerization of amino-functionalized ionic liquid for specific recognition of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanying; Han, Miao; Liu, Guishen; Hou, Xiaodong; Huang, Yina; Wu, Kangbing; Li, Chunya

    2015-12-15

    A molecularly imprinted polymer film was in situ polymerized on a carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode surface under room temperature. This technique provides a promising imprinting approach for protein in an aqueous solution using 3-(3-aminopropyl)-1-vinylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid as functional monomer, N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide as crossing linker, ammonium persulfate and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine as initiator, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as template. The molecularly imprinted polymerized ionic liquid film shows enhanced accessibility, high specificity and sensitivity towards BSA. Electrochemical sensing performance of the imprinted sensor was thoroughly investigated using K3Fe[CN]6/K4Fe[CN]6 as electroactive probes. Under optimal conditions, the current difference before and after specific recognition of BSA was found linearly related to its concentration in the range from 1.50×10(-9) to 1.50×10(-6) mol L(-1). The detection limit was calculated to be 3.91×10(-10) mol L(-1) (S/N=3). The practical application of the imprinted sensor was demonstrated by determining BSA in liquid milk samples. PMID:26232004

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Viral and Host Cell Substrate Recognition by Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Keith P.; Laine, Jennifer M.; Deveau, Laura M.; Cao, Hong; Massi, Francesca; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2011-08-16

    Hepatitis C NS3/4A protease is a prime therapeutic target that is responsible for cleaving the viral polyprotein at junctions 3-4A, 4A4B, 4B5A, and 5A5B and two host cell adaptor proteins of the innate immune response, TRIF and MAVS. In this study, NS3/4A crystal structures of both host cell cleavage sites were determined and compared to the crystal structures of viral substrates. Two distinct protease conformations were observed and correlated with substrate specificity: (i) 3-4A, 4A4B, 5A5B, and MAVS, which are processed more efficiently by the protease, form extensive electrostatic networks when in complex with the protease, and (ii) TRIF and 4B5A, which contain polyproline motifs in their full-length sequences, do not form electrostatic networks in their crystal complexes. These findings provide mechanistic insights into NS3/4A substrate recognition, which may assist in a more rational approach to inhibitor design in the face of the rapid acquisition of resistance.

  12. Syntheses, structures, molecular and cationic recognitions and catalytic properties of two lanthanide coordination polymers based on a flexible tricarboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Yan-Mei; Xu, Ji; Liu, Pan; Weththasinha, H. A. B. M. D.; Wu, Yun-Long; Lu, Xiao-Qing; Xie, Ji-Min

    2014-11-01

    Two lanthanide coordination polymers, namely, {[La(TTTA)(H2O)2]·2H2O}n (La-TTTA) and [Nd(TTTA)(H2O)2]·2H2O}n (Nd-TTTA) have been hydrothermally synthesized through the reaction of lanthanide ions (La3+ and Nd3+) with the flexible tripodal ligand 2,2‧,2″-[1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyltris(thio)]tris-acetic acid (H3TTTA). La-TTTA and Nd-TTTA are isostructural and both show three dimensional structures. La-TTTA and Nd-TTTA show good recognition of amine molecules via quenching the luminescent intensities in amines emulsions. They can also recognize Fe3+, Cu2+, Mg2+, Cr3+ and Co2+ ions with the quenching the peak around 361 nm when the compounds immersed in ionic solutions. The two compounds act as efficient Lewis acid catalysts for the cyanosilylation of benzaldehyde and derivatives in high yields shortly due to the strong Lewis acidity and the possible open sites of the lanthanide ions.

  13. Studies on the Conformational Features of Neomycin-B and its Molecular Recognition by RNA and Bacterial Defense Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio, Juan Luis; Bastida, Agatha; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    According to NMR and molecular dynamics simulations, the conformational behavior of natural aminoglycosides is characterized by a remarkable flexibility, with different conformations, even non-exo-anomeric ones, in fast exchange. Very probably, this feature allows the adaptation of these ligands to the spatial and electronic requirements of different receptors. The large diversity of structures adopted by aminoglycosides in the binding pocket of the different RNA receptors and the distinct enzymes involved in bacterial resistance are consistent with this view. This conformational diversity can, in certain favorable cases, be exploited in the design of new antibiotic derivatives not susceptible to enzymatic inactivation, by designing tailor-made conformationally locked aminoglycosides.

  14. Molecularly imprinted macroporous monoliths for solid-phase extraction: Effect of pore size and column length on recognition properties.

    PubMed

    Vlakh, E G; Stepanova, M A; Korneeva, Yu M; Tennikova, T B

    2016-09-01

    The series of macroporous monolithic molecularly imprinted monoliths differed by pore size, column length (volume) and amount of template used for imprinting was synthesized using methacrylic acid and glycerol dimethacrylate as co-monomers and antibiotic ciprofloxacin as a template. The prepared monoliths were characterized regarding to their permeability, pore size, porosity, and resistance to the flow of a mobile phase. The surface morphology was also analyzed. The slight dependence of imprinting factor on flow rate, as well as its independence on pore size of macroporous molecularly imprinted monolithic media was observed. The column obtained at different conditions exhibited different affinity of ciprofloxacin to the imprinted sites that was characterized with Kdiss values in the range of 10(-5)-10(-4)M. The solid-phase extraction of ciprofloxacin from such biological liquids as human blood serum, human urine and cow milk serum was performed using the developed monolithic columns. In all cases, the extraction was found to be 95.0-98.6%. Additionally, the comparison of extraction of three fluoroqinolone analogues, e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, from human blood plasma was carried out. Contrary to ciprofloxacin extracted with more than 95%, this parameter did not exceed 40% for its analogues. PMID:27433985

  15. Molecular recognition of an ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme by RalA GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Holbourn, Kenneth P.; Sutton, J. Mark; Evans, Hazel R.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2005-01-01

    C3 exoenzymes (members of the ADP-ribosyltranferase family) are produced by Clostridium botulinum (C3bot1 and -2), Clostridium limosum (C3lim), Bacillus cereus (C3cer), and Staphylococcus aureus (C3stau1–3). These exoenzymes lack a translocation domain but are known to specifically inactivate Rho GTPases in host target cells. Here, we report the crystal structure of C3bot1 in complex with RalA (a GTPase of the Ras subfamily) and GDP at a resolution of 2.66 Å. RalA is not ADP-ribosylated by C3 exoenzymes but inhibits ADP-ribosylation of RhoA by C3bot1, C3lim, and C3cer to different extents. The structure provides an insight into the molecular interactions between C3bot1 and RalA involving the catalytic ADP-ribosylating turn–turn (ARTT) loop from C3bot1 and helix α4 and strand β6 (which are not part of the GDP-binding pocket) from RalA. The structure also suggests a molecular explanation for the different levels of C3-exoenzyme inhibition by RalA and why RhoA does not bind C3bot1 in this manner. PMID:15809419

  16. Potential protease inhibitors based on a functionalized cyclic sulfamide scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jiaying; Gan, Xiangdong; Alliston, Kevin R; Lai, Zhong; Yu, Hongyi; Groutas, Christopher S; Wong, Tzutshin; Groutas, William C

    2004-01-01

    Exploratory studies related to the design and synthesis of functionalized cyclic sulfamides (I) as potential inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes were carried out. The structural motif and three diversity sites embodied in the scaffold render it amenable to combinatorial parallel synthesis and the facile generation of lead discovery prospecting libraries. The scaffold was readily assembled starting with (DL) serine methyl ester, and a series of compounds was generated and screened against human leukocyte elastase. Modification of the P(1) recognition element, believed to be accommodated at the primary specificity site (S(1) subsite) of the enzyme, yielded compounds that inhibited the enzyme by an apparent hyperbolic partial mixed-type inhibition. PMID:15244417

  17. Synthesis of carbohydrate-scaffolded thymine glycoconjugates to organize multivalency

    PubMed Central

    Ciuk, Anna K

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multivalency effects are essential in carbohydrate recognition processes as occurring on the cell surface. Thus many synthetic multivalent glycoconjugates have been developed as important tools for glycobiological research. We are expanding this collection of molecules by the introduction of carbohydrate-scaffolded divalent glycothymine derivatives that can be intramolecularily dimerized by [2 + 2] photocycloaddition. Thus, thymine functions as a control element that allows to restrict the conformational flexibility of the scaffolded sugar ligands and thus to “organize” multivalency. With this work we add a parameter to multivalency studies additional to valency. PMID:26124869

  18. Biomimetic Scaffolds for Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Nance; Rezzadeh, Kameron S.; Lee, Justine C.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal regenerative medicine emerged as a field of investigation to address large osseous deficiencies secondary to congenital, traumatic, and post-oncologic conditions. Although autologous bone grafts have been the gold standard for reconstruction of skeletal defects, donor site morbidity remains a significant limitation. To address these limitations, contemporary bone tissue engineering research aims to target delivery of osteogenic cells and growth factors in a defined three dimensional space using scaffolding material. Using bone as a template, biomimetic strategies in scaffold engineering unite organic and inorganic components in an optimal configuration to both support osteoinduction as well as osteoconduction. This article reviews the various structural and functional considerations behind the development of effective biomimetic scaffolds for osteogenesis and highlights strategies for enhancing osteogenesis. PMID:26413557

  19. Progress in fold recognition.

    PubMed

    Flöckner, H; Braxenthaler, M; Lackner, P; Jaritz, M; Ortner, M; Sippl, M J

    1995-11-01

    The prediction experiment reveals that fold recognition has become a powerful tool in structural biology. We applied our fold recognition technique to 13 target sequences. In two cases, replication terminating protein and prosequence of subtilisin, the predicted structures are very similar to the experimentally determined folds. For the first time, in a public blind test, the unknown structures of proteins have been predicted ahead of experiment to an accuracy approaching molecular detail. In two other cases the approximate folds have been predicted correctly. According to the assessors there were 12 recognizable folds among the target proteins. In our postprediction analysis we find that in 7 cases our fold recognition technique is successful. In several of the remaining cases the predicted folds have interesting features in common with the experimental results. We present our procedure, discuss the results, and comment on several fundamental and technical problems encountered in fold recognition.

  20. Molecular-shape selectivity by naphthalimido-modified silica stationary phases: Insight into the substituents effect of naphthalene on shape recognition and π-π interactions via electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuko; Ohyama, Kaname; Onodera, Gen; Kuriyama, Masami; Kishikawa, Naoya; Kuroda, Naotaka

    2015-12-18

    This report describes the molecular-shape selectivity of four naphthalimido-modified silica (NIM) stationary phases. To investigate the selectivity, several alkylbenzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were tested using capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with each NIM stationary phase. Results revealed that nitro group-substituted NIM phases had outstanding molecular-shape recognition ability toward PAHs; a strong negative correlation existed between the k' value and L/B ratio that is opposite those observed for C18 phases, in addition, one possessed 10-fold greater molecular-shape recognition ability compared to existing stationary phases. In addition, the position of the nitro group on the naphthalimide moiety modulated the π-stacking interaction due to steric hindrance. Furthermore, structure optimization and electrostatic potential (ESP) surfaces were used to clarify the mechanism of recognition. Based on this high recognition ability, separations of several positional isomers were examined. Results indicated that structure optimization and ESP maps could reveal the effect of functional groups on π-π interactions, which will aid in the design of new NIM stationary phases with shape selectivity, while taking advantage of electrostatic interactions.

  1. HyperCEST detection of a 129Xe-based contrast agent composed of cryptophane-A molecular cages on a bacteriophage scaffold.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd K; Palaniappan, Krishnan K; Ramirez, R Matthew; Francis, Matthew B; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alex

    2013-05-01

    A hyperpolarized 129Xe contrast agent composed of many cryptophane-A molecular cages assembled on an M13 bacteriophage has been demonstrated. Saturation of xenon bound in the large number of cryptophane cages is transferred to the pool of aqueous-solvated xenon via chemical exchange, resulting in efficient generation of hyperCEST contrast. No significant loss of contrast per cryptophane cage was observed for the multivalent phage when compared with unscaffolded cryptophane. Detection of this phage-based hyperCEST agent is reported at concentrations as low as 230 fM, representing the current lower limit for NMR/MRI-based contrast agents.

  2. Macromolecular recognition: Recognition of polymer side chains by cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of cyclodextrins (CD) with water soluble polymers possessing guest residues has been investigated as model systems in biological molecular recognition. The selectivity of interaction of CD with polymer-carrying guest residues is controlled by polymer chains, i.e., the steric effect of polymer main chain, the conformational effect of polymer main chain, and multi-site interaction. Macroscopic assemblies have been also realized based on molecular recognition using polyacrylamide-based gels possessing CD and guest residues.

  3. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Laura E; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered. PMID:27547189

  4. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Laura E.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered. PMID:27547189

  5. L_RNA_scaffolder: scaffolding genomes with transcripts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Generation of large mate-pair libraries is necessary for de novo genome assembly but the procedure is complex and time-consuming. Furthermore, in some complex genomes, it is hard to increase the N50 length even with large mate-pair libraries, which leads to low transcript coverage. Thus, it is necessary to develop other simple scaffolding approaches, to at least solve the elongation of transcribed fragments. Results We describe L_RNA_scaffolder, a novel genome scaffolding method that uses long transcriptome reads to order, orient and combine genomic fragments into larger sequences. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method, the zebrafish genome was scaffolded. With expanded human transcriptome data, the N50 of human genome was doubled and L_RNA_scaffolder out-performed most scaffolding results by existing scaffolders which employ mate-pair libraries. In these two examples, the transcript coverage was almost complete, especially for long transcripts. We applied L_RNA_scaffolder to the highly polymorphic pearl oyster draft genome and the gene model length significantly increased. Conclusions The simplicity and high-throughput of RNA-seq data makes this approach suitable for genome scaffolding. L_RNA_scaffolder is available at http://www.fishbrowser.org/software/L_RNA_scaffolder. PMID:24010822

  6. A Targeted “Capture” and “Removal” Scavenger toward Multiple Pollutants for Water Remediation based on Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Haijing; Hu, Xiaoxia; Li, Yan; Li, Zhihao; Xu, Jinfan; Song, Xiufeng; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    For the water remediation techniques based on adsorption, the long‐standing contradictories between selectivity and multiple adsorbability, as well as between affinity and recyclability, have put it on weak defense amid more and more severe environment crisis. Here, a pollutant‐targeting hydrogel scavenger is reported for water remediation with both high selectivity and multiple adsorbability for several pollutants, and with strong affinity and good recyclability through rationally integrating the advantages of multiple functional materials. In the scavenger, aptamers fold into binding pockets to accommodate the molecular structure of pollutants to afford perfect selectivity, and Janus nanoparticles with antibacterial function as well as anisotropic surfaces to immobilize multiple aptamers allow for simultaneously handling different kinds of pollutants. The scavenger exhibits high efficiencies in removing pollutants from water and it can be easily recycled for many times without significant loss of loading capacities. Moreover, the residual concentrations of each contaminant are well below the drinking water standards. Thermodynamic behavior of the adsorption process is investigated and the rate‐controlling process is determined. Furthermore, a point of use device is constructed and it displays high efficiency in removing pollutants from environmental water. The scavenger exhibits great promise to be applied in the next generation of water purification systems.

  7. In situ copper oxide modified molecularly imprinted polypyrrole film based voltammetric sensor for selective recognition of tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Saumya, Varghese; Prathish, Krishnapillai P; Rao, Talasila P

    2011-08-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrids are promising functional materials as they combine the special characteristics of both organic (polymer) and inorganic phases. Among different existing approaches for the preparation of such polymer-inorganic hybrid coatings, in situ electrochemical methods are very advantageous because of their high sensitivity and simplicity. In the present study, voltammetric sensors for tyrosine are designed and developed via various modifications on glassy carbon electrode such as polypyrrole coated GCE, molecularly imprinted polypyrrole coated GCE (MIPPy) and in situ copper oxide modified MIPPy coated GCE. Of these, in situ copper oxide modified MIPPy coated GCE sensor responds to tyrosine concentrations in the range 1 × 10(-8) to 1 × 10(-6) and 2 × 10(-6) to 8 × 10(-6)M with a very low detection limit of 4.0 × 10(-9)M and by far the most sensitive one. Detailed linear sweep voltammetric and chronoamperometric experiments were undertaken to investigate the electrocatalytic behavior of tyrosine. The electron transfer coefficient, diffusion coefficient and charge transfer rate constants involved in the sensing process using in situ copper oxide modified MIPPy film coated GCE are 0.47, 1.88 × 10(-6)cm(2)s(-1), 4.7 × 10(6) L mol(-1)s(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the designed sensor is highly selective and has been applied successfully for the analysis of synthetic and real samples of human urine.

  8. Molecular and phenotypic data support the recognition of the Wakatobi Flowerpecker (Dicaeum kuehni) from the unique and understudied Sulawesi region.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Seán B A; Kelly, David J; Cooper, Natalie; Bahrun, Andi; Analuddin, Kangkuso; Marples, Nicola M

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimates of species richness are essential to macroecological and macroevolutionary research, as well as to the effective management and conservation of biodiversity. The resolution of taxonomic relationships is therefore of vital importance. While molecular methods have revolutionised taxonomy, contemporary species delimitation requires an integrative, multi-disciplinary approach. Despite boasting a remarkably high level of endemism, the avifauna of the Sulawesi region of Indonesia remains poorly studied. Previous studies of avian diversity in Sulawesi have focussed predominantly on phenotypic characteristics, thus potentially overlooking any genetically distinct lineages. Grey-sided Flowerpecker Dicaeum celebicum populations from the Wakatobi archipelago were originally described as a separate species from those on nearby mainland Sulawesi. However, for reasons that remain unknown, the Wakatobi populations were reclassified as a subspecies of the mainland form. Combining estimates of genetic divergence with phylogenetic and morphological analyses, we reassessed the status of Wakatobi populations. Our results describe the Wakatobi populations as a separate species to those on mainland Sulawesi; reproductively isolated, genetically and morphologically distinct. We therefore recommend the reclassification of these populations to their original status of Dicaeum kuehni and propose the vernacular name 'Wakatobi Flowerpecker'. In consideration of our findings and the lack of integrative ornithological research within the Sulawesi region, we believe species richness and avian endemism within the region are underestimated. PMID:24896822

  9. Multivalent IDP assemblies: Unique properties of LC8-associated, IDP duplex scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah A; Jespersen, Nathan; Woodward, Clare; Barbar, Elisar

    2015-09-14

    A wide variety of subcellular complexes are composed of one or more intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that are multivalent, flexible, and characterized by dynamic binding of diverse partner proteins. These multivalent IDP assemblies, of broad functional diversity, are classified here into five categories distinguished by the number of IDP chains and the arrangement of partner proteins in the functional complex. Examples of each category are summarized in the context of the exceptional molecular and biological properties of IDPs. One type - IDP duplex scaffolds - is considered in detail. Its unique features include parallel alignment of two IDP chains, formation of new self-associated domains, enhanced affinity for additional bivalent ligands, and ubiquitous binding of the hub protein LC8. For two IDP duplex scaffolds, dynein intermediate chain IC and nucleoporin Nup159, these duplex features, together with the inherent flexibility of IDPs, are central to their assembly and function. A new type of IDP-LC8 interaction, distributed binding of LC8 among multiple IDP recognition sites, is described for Nup159 assembly. PMID:26226419

  10. Bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s possessing coordinated metal center(s) and their inclusion complexation behavior with model substrates: enhanced molecular binding ability by multiple recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Li, L; Zhang, H Y; Liu, S X; Guan, X D

    2001-12-14

    To investigate quantitatively the cooperative binding ability of several beta-cyclodextrin oligomers bearing single or multiligated metal center(s), the inclusion complexation behavior of four bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s (2-5) linked by 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxy tethers and their copper(II) complexes (6-9) with representative dye guests, i.e., methyl orange (MO), acridine red (AR), rhodamine B (RhB), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toludino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been examined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C by means of UV-vis, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results obtained indicate that bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-5 can associate with one or three copper(II) ion(s) producing 2:1 or 2:3 bis(beta-cyclodextrin)-copper(II) complexes. These metal-ligated oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s can bind two model substrates to form intramolecular 2:2 host-guest inclusion complexes and thus significantly enhance the original binding abilities of parent beta-cyclodextrin and bis(beta-cyclodextrin) toward model substrates through the cooperative binding of two guest molecules by four tethered cyclodextrin moieties, as well as the additional binding effect supplied by ligated metal center(s). Host 6 showed the highest enhancement of the stability constant, up to 38.3 times for ANS as compared with parent beta-cyclodextrin. The molecular binding mode and stability constant of substrates by bridged bis- and oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-9 are discussed from the viewpoint of the size/shape-fit interaction and molecular multiple recognition between host and guest.

  11. Highly permselective membrane surface modification by cold plasma-induced grafting polymerization of molecularly imprinted polymer for recognition of pyrethroid insecticides in fish.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongrong; Guo, Xiaoqing; Shi, Xizhi; Sun, Aili; Wang, Lin; Xiao, Tingting; Tang, Zigang; Pan, Daodong; Li, Dexiang; Chen, Jiong

    2014-12-01

    Specific molecularly imprinted membranes (MIMs) for pyrethroid insecticides were developed and characterized for the first time in this study by cold plasma-induced grafting polymerization using methacrylic acid as a functional monomer and cypermethrin (CYP) as a template. The nonimprinted membranes (NIMs) were also synthesized using the same procedure without the template. Meanwhile, AFM, XPS, ATR-FTIR, contact angle, and permselectivity experiments were conducted to elucidate the imprinting and recognition properties of MIMs. Results demonstrated that MIMs exhibited excellent imprinting effect and high permselectivity. A molecularly imprinted-membrane-assisted solvent extraction (MI-MASE) method based on the MIMs was established. The operating conditions were optimized for group-selective extraction of the five pyrethroid insecticides. Compared with NIMs, higher extraction recoveries (83.8% to 100.6%) of the five pyrethroid insecticides by gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD) were obtained using MIMs at three spiked levels in fish samples; the RSD values were lower than 8.3%. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) defined as the concentrations at which the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio is 3:1 and 10:1, respectively, were in the range of 0.26 to 0.42 μg/kg and 0.77 to 1.27 μg/kg, respectively. No matrix effect of the developed MI-MASE was observed by gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS). These results demonstrated a highly selective, efficient, and environment-friendly MI-MASE technique for preconcentration and purification of pyrethroid insecticides from seafood, followed by GC-ECD and GC/MS/MS. The excellent applicability and potential of MI-MASE for routine monitoring of pyrethroid pesticides in food samples has also been confirmed.

  12. Modeling material-degradation-induced elastic property of tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bawolin, N K; Li, M G; Chen, X B; Zhang, W J

    2010-11-01

    The mechanical properties of tissue engineering scaffolds play a critical role in the success of repairing damaged tissues/organs. Determining the mechanical properties has proven to be a challenging task as these properties are not constant but depend upon time as the scaffold degrades. In this study, the modeling of the time-dependent mechanical properties of a scaffold is performed based on the concept of finite element model updating. This modeling approach contains three steps: (1) development of a finite element model for the effective mechanical properties of the scaffold, (2) parametrizing the finite element model by selecting parameters associated with the scaffold microstructure and/or material properties, which vary with scaffold degradation, and (3) identifying selected parameters as functions of time based on measurements from the tests on the scaffold mechanical properties as they degrade. To validate the developed model, scaffolds were made from the biocompatible polymer polycaprolactone (PCL) mixed with hydroxylapatite (HA) nanoparticles and their mechanical properties were examined in terms of the Young modulus. Based on the bulk degradation exhibited by the PCL/HA scaffold, the molecular weight was selected for model updating. With the identified molecular weight, the finite element model developed was effective for predicting the time-dependent mechanical properties of PCL/HA scaffolds during degradation.

  13. The molecular recognition of β-cyclodextrin modified CdSe quantum dots with tyrosine enantiomers: Theoretical calculation and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yujuan; Wu, Shuangshuang; Liang, Yaozhen; Yu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, the molecular recognition of mono-(6-mercapto)-β-cyclodextrin modified CdSe quantum dots (β-CD/CdSe QDs) with tyrosine enantiomers were investigated with theoretical calculation and fluorescence spectroscopy. The inclusion processes and the most probable structures of the inclusion complexes were simulated using PM3 energy scanning and optimization method. The trends of stability of the two inclusion complexes deduced from their calculated stabilization energies were studied. Moreover, the fluorescence spectra of β-CD/CdSe QDs in the presence of tyrosine enantiomers as well as the effect of ionic strength on the complexation of β-CD/CdSe QDs-tyrosine were discussed. The experimental results indicated that the β-CD/CdSe QDs have better enantioselectivity to L-tyrosine than that to D-tyrosine, and good linearity between the fluorescence intensity of β-CD/CdSe QDs and L-tyrosine over the concentration range from 0.10 × 10-4 mol/L to 4.00 × 10-4 mol/L with relative coefficient of 0.9909 was obtained. The experimental data agrees well with that obtained from theoretical calculation, indicating that β-cyclodextrin modified CdSe quantum dots contained good inclusion capability and fluorescence property, it has good potential application in the field of biological diagnosis, analysis, etc.

  14. Deciphering the Non-Equivalence of Serine and Threonine O-Glycosylation Points: Implications for Molecular Recognition of the Tn Antigen by an anti-MUC1 Antibody**

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Castro-López, Jorge; Valero-González, Jessika; Madariaga, David; Compañón, Ismael; Somovilla, Víctor J; Salvadó, Míriam; Asensio, Juan L; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Avenoza, Alberto; Busto, Jesús H; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Peregrina, Jesús M; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Corzana, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The structural features of MUC1-like glycopeptides bearing the Tn antigen (α-O-GalNAc-Ser/Thr) in complex with an anti MUC-1 antibody are reported at atomic resolution. For the α-O-GalNAc-Ser derivative, the glycosidic linkage adopts a high-energy conformation, barely populated in the free state. This unusual structure (also observed in an α-S-GalNAc-Cys mimic) is stabilized by hydrogen bonds between the peptidic fragment and the sugar. The selection of a particular peptide structure by the antibody is thus propagated to the carbohydrate through carbohydrate/peptide contacts, which force a change in the orientation of the sugar moiety. This seems to be unfeasible in the α-O-GalNAc-Thr glycopeptide owing to the more limited flexibility of the side chain imposed by the methyl group. Our data demonstrate the non-equivalence of Ser and Thr O-glycosylation points in molecular recognition processes. These features provide insight into the occurrence in nature of the APDTRP epitope for anti-MUC1 antibodies. PMID:26118689

  15. In Vitro Selection of Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Elements against S. aureus Alpha Toxin and Sensitive Detection in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ka L.; Battistella, Luisa; Salva, Alysia D.; Williams, Ryan M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha toxin is one of the major virulence factors secreted by Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that is responsible for a wide variety of infections in both community and hospital settings. Due to the prevalence of S. aureus related infections and the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus, rapid and accurate diagnosis of S. aureus infections is crucial in benefiting patient health outcomes. In this study, a rigorous Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) variant previously developed by our laboratory was utilized to select a single-stranded DNA molecular recognition element (MRE) targeting alpha toxin with high affinity and specificity. At the end of the 12-round selection, the selected MRE had an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 93.7 ± 7.0 nM. Additionally, a modified sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed by using the selected ssDNA MRE as the toxin-capturing element and a sensitive detection of 200 nM alpha toxin in undiluted human serum samples was achieved. PMID:25633102

  16. Molecular Basis of Histone Tail Recognition by Human TIP5 PHD Finger and Bromodomain of the Chromatin Remodeling Complex NoRC

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Cynthia; Valentini, Erica; Fedorov, Oleg; Overvoorde, Lois; Ferguson, Fleur M.; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Knapp, Stefan; Ciulli, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Binding of the chromatin remodeling complex NoRC to RNA complementary to the rDNA promoter mediates transcriptional repression. TIP5, the largest subunit of NoRC, is involved in recruitment to rDNA by interactions with promoter-bound TTF-I, pRNA, and acetylation of H4K16. TIP5 domains that recognize posttranslational modifications on histones are essential for recruitment of NoRC to chromatin, but how these reader modules recognize site-specific histone tails has remained elusive. Here, we report crystal structures of PHD zinc finger and bromodomains from human TIP5 and BAZ2B in free form and bound to H3 and/or H4 histones. PHD finger functions as an independent structural module in recognizing unmodified H3 histone tails, and the bromodomain prefers H3 and H4 acetylation marks followed by a key basic residue, KacXXR. Further low-resolution analyses of PHD-bromodomain modules provide molecular insights into their trans histone tail recognition, required for nucleosome recruitment and transcriptional repression of the NoRC complex. PMID:25533489

  17. Selection of Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Elements against Exotoxin A Using a Novel Decoy-SELEX Method and Sensitive Detection of Exotoxin A in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ka Lok; Yancey, Kailey; Battistella, Luisa; Williams, Ryan M.; Hickey, Katherine M.; Bostick, Chris D.; Gannett, Peter M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Exotoxin A is one of the virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that can cause infections resulting in adverse health outcomes and increased burden to health care systems. Current methods of diagnosing P. aeruginosa infections are time consuming and can require significant preparation of patient samples. This study utilized a novel variation of the Systematic Evolution of Ligand by Exponential Enrichment, Decoy-SELEX, to identify an Exotoxin A specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecular recognition element (MRE). Its emphasis is on increasing stringency in directing binding toward free target of interest and at the same time decreasing binding toward negative targets. A ssDNA MRE with specificity and affinity was identified after fourteen rounds of Decoy-SELEX. Utilizing surface plasmon resonance measurements, the determined equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of the MRE is between 4.2 µM and 4.5 µM, and is highly selective for Exotoxin A over negative targets. A ssDNA MRE modified sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed and achieved sensitive detection of Exotoxin A at nanomolar concentrations in human serum. This study has demonstrated the proof-of-principle of using a ssDNA MRE as a clinical diagnostic tool. PMID:26636098

  18. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element against Clostridium difficile Toxin B and Sensitive Detection in Human Fecal Matter

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Eamonn; Williams, Ryan M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Toxin B is one of the major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that is responsible for a significant number of diarrhea cases in acute care settings. Due to the prevalence of C. difficile induced diarrhea, rapid and correct diagnosis is crucial in the disease management. In this study, we have employed a stringent in vitro selection method to identify single-stranded DNA molecular recognition elements (MRE) specific for toxin B. At the end of the 12-round selection, one MRE with high affinity (Kd = 47.3 nM) for toxin B was identified. The selected MRE demonstrated low cross binding activities on negative targets: bovine serum albumin, Staphylococcus aureus alpha toxin, Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A, and cholera toxin of Vibrio cholera. A modified sandwich ELISA assay was developed utilizing the selected ssDNA MRE as the antigen capturing element and achieved a sensitive detection of 50 nM of toxin B in human fecal preparations. PMID:25734010

  19. Molecular recognition force spectroscopy study of the dynamic interaction between aptamer GBI-10 and extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on human glioblastoma cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjun; Qiao, Haiyan; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Xing, Chunyan; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular recognition force spectroscopy (MR-FS) was applied to investigate the dynamic interaction between aptamer GBI-10 and tenascin-C (TN-C) on human glioblastoma cell surface at single-molecule level. The unbinding force between aptamer GBI-10 and TN-C was 39 pN at the loading rate of 0.3 nN sec⁻¹. A series of kinetic parameters concerning interaction process such as the unbinding force f(u) , the association rate constant k(on) , dissociation rate constant at zero force k(off) , and dissociation constant K(D) for aptamer GBI-10/TN-C complexes were acquired. In addition, the interaction of aptamer GBI-10 with TN-C depended on the presence of Mg²⁺. This work demonstrates that MR-FS can be used as an attractive tool for exploring the interaction forces and dynamic process of aptamer and ligand at the single-molecule level. As a future perspective, MR-FS may be used as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic tool by combining with other techniques.

  20. Molecular rotor-based fluorescent probe for selective recognition of hybrid G-quadruplex and as a K+ sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingling; Shao, Yong; Peng, Jian; Huang, Chaobiao; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Lihua

    2014-02-01

    This work demonstrates the significant fluorescence enhancement of thioflavin T (ThT) when binding to G-quadruplexes possessing hybrid structures by using UV-vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, and Tm experiments to confirm the binding events. ThT binding does not disturb native G-quadruplex structures preformed in Na(+) and K(+) solutions. The fluorescence enhancement is caused by the rotation restriction of benzothiazole (BZT) and dimethylaminobenzene (DMAB) rings in the ThT excited state upon its G-quadruplex binding. This molecular rotor mechanism as a means of fluorescence enhancement is confirmed using a nonrotor analogue of ThT. Hydroxylation and electrolyte experiments demonstrate that ThT stacks on the tetrad of the hybrid G-quadruplexes, whereas electrostatic forces contribute more to ThT binding for other G-quadruplex structures. By stacking on the tetrad, the ThT binding favors selective identification of DNA hybrid G-quadruplex structures with enhanced fluorescence and can serve as a conformation probe to monitor G-quadruplex structure conversion between hybrid and other structures. Using these properties, we developed a selective and label-free fluorescent K(+) sensor with a detection limit of 1 mM for K(+) in the presence of 100 mM Na(+). The coexistence of other metal ions produces a fluorescence response comparable to K(+) alone. We believe that ThT can potentially provide structure identification of hybrid G-quadruplexes and aid in the construction of G-quadruplex-based sensors.

  1. Molecular Mimicry of Human Cytochrome P450 by Hepatitis C Virus at the Level of Cytotoxic T Cell Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kammer, Andreas R.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Grabscheid, Benno; Hunziker, Isabelle P.; Kwappenberg, Kitty M.C.; Reichen, Jürg; Melief, Cornelis J.M.; Cerny, Andreas

    1999-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) type 2, which is defined by the presence of type I antiliver kidney microsome autoantibodies directed mainly against cytochrome P450 (CYP)2D6 and by autoreactive liver infiltrating T cells. Virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that recognize infected cells and contribute to viral clearance and tissue injury during HCV infection could be involved in the induction of AIH. To explore whether the antiviral cellular immunity may turn against self-antigens, we characterized the primary CTL response against an HLA-A*0201–restricted HCV-derived epitope, i.e., HCV core 178–187, which shows sequence homology with human CYP2A6 and CYP2A7 8–17. To determine the relevance of these homologies for the pathogenesis of HCV-associated AIH, we used synthetic peptides to induce primary CTL responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy blood donors and patients with chronic HCV infection. We found that the naive CTL repertoire of both groups contains cross-reactive CTLs inducible by the HCV peptide recognizing both CYP2A6 and CYP2A7 peptides as well as endogenously processed CYP2A6 protein. Importantly, we failed to induce CTLs with the CYP-derived peptides that showed a lower capacity to form stable complexes with the HLA-A2 molecule. These findings demonstrate the potential of HCV to induce autoreactive CD8+ CTLs by molecular mimicry, possibly contributing to virus-associated autoimmunity. PMID:10432280

  2. Mathematical Abstraction through Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmantar, Mehmet Fatih; Roper, Tom

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the role of scaffolding in the process of abstraction. An activity-theoretic approach to abstraction in context is taken. This examination is carried out with reference to verbal protocols of two 17 year-old students working together on a task connected to sketching the graph of |f|x|)|. Examination of the data suggests that…

  3. Molecular basis of IgE-recognition of Lol p 5, a major allergen of rye-grass pollen.

    PubMed

    Suphioglu, C; Blaher, B; Rolland, J M; McCluskey, J; Schäppi, G; Kenrick, J; Singh, M B; Knox, R B

    1998-04-01

    Grass pollen, especially of rye-grass (Lolium perenne). represents an important cause of type I allergy. Identification of IgE-binding (allergenic) epitopes of major grass pollen allergens is essential for understanding the molecular basis of interaction between allergens and human IgE antibodies and therefore facilitates the devising of safer and more effective diagnostic and immunotherapy reagents. The aim of this study was to identify the allergenic epitopes of Lol p 5, a major allergen of rye-grass pollen, immunodissect these epitopes further so that the amino acid residues critical for antibody binding can be determined and investigate the conservation and nature of these epitopes within the context of the natural grass pollen allergens. Peptides, 12-13 amino acid residues long and overlapping each other by 4 amino acid residues, based on the entire deduced amino acid sequence of the coding region of Lol p 5, were synthesised and assayed for IgE-binding. Two strong IgE-binding epitopes (Lol p 5 (49-60) and (265-276), referred to as peptides 7 and 34, respectively) were identified. These epitopes were further resolved by truncated peptides and amino acid replacement studies and the amino acid residues critical for IgE-binding determined (Lol p 5 (49-60) residue Lys57 and (265-276) residue Lys275). Sequences of these epitopes were conserved in related allergens and may form the conserved allergenic domains responsible for the cross-reactivity observed between pollen allergens of taxonomically related grasses. Furthermore, due to its strong IgE-reactivity, synthetic peptide Lol p 5 (265-276) was used to affinity-purify specific IgE antibodies which recognised proteins of other clinically important grass pollens. further indicating presence of allergenic cross-reactivity at the level of allergenic epitope. Moreover, Lol p 5 (265 276) demonstrated a strong capacity to inhibit IgE-binding to natural rye-grass pollen proteins highlighting the antibody accessibility

  4. A molecular-imprint nanosensor for ultrasensitive detection of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dong; Ren, Lu; Zhao, Huaizhou; Xu, Chenjia; Zhang, Lu; Yu, Ying; Wang, Hengzhi; Lan, Yucheng; Roberts, Mary F.; Chuang, Jeffrey H.; Naughton, Michael J.; Ren, Zhifeng; Chiles, Thomas C.

    2010-08-01

    Molecular imprinting is a technique for preparing polymer scaffolds that function as synthetic receptors. Imprinted polymers that can selectively bind organic compounds have proven useful in sensor development. Although creating synthetic molecular-imprinting polymers that recognize proteins remains challenging, nanodevices and nanomaterials show promise in this area. Here, we show that arrays of carbon-nanotube tips with an imprinted non-conducting polymer coating can recognize proteins with subpicogram per litre sensitivity using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have developed molecular-imprinting sensors specific for human ferritin and human papillomavirus derived E7 protein. The molecular-imprinting-based nanosensor can also discriminate between Ca2+-induced conformational changes in calmodulin. This ultrasensitive, label-free electrochemical detection of proteins offers an alternative to biosensors based on biomolecule recognition.

  5. Advances in skin regeneration: application of electrospun scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Mohammad; Boroujeni, Samaneh Moghadasi; Omidvarkordshouli, Noushin; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-06-01

    The paucity of cellular and molecular signals essential for normal wound healing makes severe dermatological ulcers stubborn to heal. The novel strategies of skin regenerative treatments are focused on the development of biologically responsive scaffolds accompanied by cells and multiple biomolecules resembling structural and biochemical cues of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds provide similar architecture to the ECM leading to enhancement of cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and neo tissue formation. This Review surveys the application of biocompatible natural, synthetic and composite polymers to fabricate electrospun scaffolds as skin substitutes and wound dressings. Furthermore, the application of biomolecules and therapeutic agents in the nanofibrous scaffolds viz growth factors, genes, antibiotics, silver nanoparticles, and natural medicines with the aim of ameliorating cellular behavior, wound healing, and skin regeneration are discussed.

  6. Tantalum oxide/carbon nanotubes composite coatings on titanium, and their functionalization with organophosphonic molecular films: a high quality scaffold for hydroxyapatite growth.

    PubMed

    Maho, A; Linden, S; Arnould, C; Detriche, S; Delhalle, J; Mekhalif, Z

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, titanium is a very commonly used biomaterial for the preparation of orthopedic and dental implants. Its excellent mechanical and biochemical bulk properties are nevertheless counterbalanced by its propensity to long term degradation in physiological conditions and its weak osseointegrative capacities. In this context, surface modifications can significantly hinder titanium weaknesses. The approach considered in this work relies on the preparation of thin composite coatings based on tantalum oxide and carbon nanotubes by sol-gel process. Tantalum is particularly interesting for its high biocompatibility and bioactivity, as well as its strong resistance to bio-corrosion. Carbon nanotubes are exploited to reinforce the compactness and homogeneity of the coatings, and can act as a favorable factor to strengthen the interaction with bone components by biomimicry. The composite layers are further modified with specific organophosphonic acid molecular films, able to chemically bind the tantalum oxide surface and improve the hydroxyapatite formation process. The characteristics and the qualities of these hybrid inorganic/organic coatings are evaluated by XPS, SEM, TEM, peeling tests, contact angle measurements, and electrochemical characterizations (free potential, polarization curves).

  7. Facilitated receptor-recognition and enhanced bioactivity of bone morphogenetic protein-2 on magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Baolin; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Tong; Ding, Sai; Zhang, Wenjing; Gu, Yuantong; Liu, Changsheng

    2016-04-01

    Biomaterial surface functionalized with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is a promising approach to fabricating successful orthopedic implants/scaffolds. However, the bioactivity of BMP-2 on material surfaces is still far from satisfactory and the mechanism of related protein-surface interaction remains elusive. Based on the most widely used bone-implants/scaffolds material, hydroxyapatite (HAP), we developed a matrix of magnesium-substituted HAP (Mg-HAP, 2.2 at% substitution) to address these issues. Further, we investigated the adsorption dynamics, BMPRs-recruitment, and bioactivity of recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) on the HAP and Mg-HAP surfaces. To elucidate the mechanism, molecular dynamic simulations were performed to calculate the preferred orientations, conformation changes, and cysteine-knot stabilities of adsorbed BMP-2 molecules. The results showed that rhBMP-2 on the Mg-HAP surface exhibited greater bioactivity, evidenced by more facilitated BMPRs-recognition and higher ALP activity than on the HAP surface. Moreover, molecular simulations indicated that BMP-2 favoured distinct side-on orientations on the HAP and Mg-HAP surfaces. Intriguingly, BMP-2 on the Mg-HAP surface largely preserved the active protein structure evidenced by more stable cysteine-knots than on the HAP surface. These findings explicitly clarify the mechanism of BMP-2-HAP/Mg-HAP interactions and highlight the promising application of Mg-HAP/BMP-2 matrixes in bone regeneration implants/scaffolds.

  8. Facilitated receptor-recognition and enhanced bioactivity of bone morphogenetic protein-2 on magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite surface

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Baolin; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Tong; Ding, Sai; Zhang, Wenjing; Gu, Yuantong; Liu, Changsheng

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial surface functionalized with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is a promising approach to fabricating successful orthopedic implants/scaffolds. However, the bioactivity of BMP-2 on material surfaces is still far from satisfactory and the mechanism of related protein-surface interaction remains elusive. Based on the most widely used bone-implants/scaffolds material, hydroxyapatite (HAP), we developed a matrix of magnesium-substituted HAP (Mg-HAP, 2.2 at% substitution) to address these issues. Further, we investigated the adsorption dynamics, BMPRs-recruitment, and bioactivity of recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) on the HAP and Mg-HAP surfaces. To elucidate the mechanism, molecular dynamic simulations were performed to calculate the preferred orientations, conformation changes, and cysteine-knot stabilities of adsorbed BMP-2 molecules. The results showed that rhBMP-2 on the Mg-HAP surface exhibited greater bioactivity, evidenced by more facilitated BMPRs-recognition and higher ALP activity than on the HAP surface. Moreover, molecular simulations indicated that BMP-2 favoured distinct side-on orientations on the HAP and Mg-HAP surfaces. Intriguingly, BMP-2 on the Mg-HAP surface largely preserved the active protein structure evidenced by more stable cysteine-knots than on the HAP surface. These findings explicitly clarify the mechanism of BMP-2-HAP/Mg-HAP interactions and highlight the promising application of Mg-HAP/BMP-2 matrixes in bone regeneration implants/scaffolds. PMID:27075233

  9. Bilayer porous scaffold based on poly-(ɛ-caprolactone) nanofibrous membrane and gelatin sponge for favoring cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Yiwang; Nie, Huarong; Wang, Yang; Li, Fan; Zheng, Yan

    2011-12-01

    Electrospun poly-(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers has been widely used in the medical prosthesis. However, poor hydrophilicity and the lack of natural recognition sites for covalent cell-recognition signal molecules to promote cell attachment have limited its utility as tissue scaffolds. In this study, Bilayer porous scaffolds based on PCL electrospun membranes and gelatin (GE) sponges were fabricated through soft hydrolysis of PCL electrospun followed by grafting gelatin onto the fiber surface, through crosslinking and freeze drying treatment of additional gelatin coat and grafted gelatin surface. GE sponges were stably anchored on PCL membrane surface with the aid of grafted GE molecules. The morphologies of bilayer porous scaffolds were observed through SEM. The contact angle of the scaffolds was 0°, the mechanical properties of scaffolds were measured by tensile test, Young's moduli of PCL scaffolds before and after hydrolysis are 66-77.3 MPa and 62.3-75.4 MPa, respectively. Thus, the bilayer porous scaffolds showed excellent hydrophilic surface and desirable mechanical strength due to the soft hydrolysis and GE coat. The cell culture results showed that the adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells did more favor to adhere and grow on the bilayer porous scaffolds than on PCL electrospun membranes. The better cell affinity of the final bilayer scaffolds not only attributed to the surface chemistry but also the introduction of bilayer porous structure.

  10. Nitric Oxide Release Part I. Macromolecular Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Daniel A.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The roles of nitric oxide (NO) in physiology and pathophysiology merit the use of NO as a therapeutic for certain biomedical applications. Unfortunately, limited NO payloads, too rapid NO release, and the lack of targeted NO delivery have hindered the clinical utility of NO gas and low molecular weight NO donor compounds. A wide-variety of NO-releasing macromolecular scaffolds has thus been developed to improve NO’s pharmacological potential. In this tutorial review, we provide an overview of the most promising NO release scaffolds including protein, organic, inorganic, and hybrid organic-inorganic systems. The NO release vehicles selected for discussion were chosen based on their enhanced NO storage, tunable NO release characteristics, and potential as therapeutics. PMID:22362355

  11. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, David

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  12. TIP-1 Has PDZ Scaffold Antagonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alewine, Christine; Olsen, Olav; Wade, James B.

    2006-01-01

    PDZ proteins usually contain multiple protein–protein interaction domains and act as molecular scaffolds that are important for the generation and maintenance of cell polarity and cell signaling. Here, we identify and characterize TIP-1 as an atypical PDZ protein that is composed almost entirely of a single PDZ domain and functions as a negative regulator of PDZ-based scaffolding. We found that TIP-1 competes with the basolateral membrane mLin-7/CASK complex for interaction with the potassium channel Kir 2.3 in model renal epithelia. Consequently, polarized plasma membrane expression of Kir 2.3 is disrupted resulting in pronounced endosomal targeting of the channel, similar to the phenotype observed for mutant Kir 2.3 channels lacking the PDZ-binding motif. TIP-1 is ubiquitously expressed, raising the possibility that TIP-1 may play a similar role in regulating the expression of other membrane proteins containing a type I PDZ ligand. PMID:16855024

  13. Evolution stings: the origin and diversification of scorpion toxin peptide scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sunagar, Kartik; Undheim, Eivind A B; Chan, Angelo H C; Koludarov, Ivan; Muñoz-Gómez, Sergio A; Antunes, Agostinho; Fry, Bryan G

    2013-12-13

    The episodic nature of natural selection and the accumulation of extreme sequence divergence in venom-encoding genes over long periods of evolutionary time can obscure the signature of positive Darwinian selection. Recognition of the true biocomplexity is further hampered by the limited taxon selection, with easy to obtain or medically important species typically being the subject of intense venom research, relative to the actual taxonomical diversity in nature. This holds true for scorpions, which are one of the most ancient terrestrial venomous animal lineages. The family Buthidae that includes all the medically significant species has been intensely investigated around the globe, while almost completely ignoring the remaining non-buthid families. Australian scorpion lineages, for instance, have been completely neglected, with only a single scorpion species (Urodacus yaschenkoi) having its venom transcriptome sequenced. Hence, the lack of venom composition and toxin sequence information from an entire continent's worth of scorpions has impeded our understanding of the molecular evolution of scorpion venom. The molecular origin, phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary histories of most scorpion toxin scaffolds remain enigmatic. In this study, we have sequenced venom gland transcriptomes of a wide taxonomical diversity of scorpions from Australia, including buthid and non-buthid representatives. Using state-of-art molecular evolutionary analyses, we show that a majority of CSα/β toxin scaffolds have experienced episodic influence of positive selection, while most non-CSα/β linear toxins evolve under the extreme influence of negative selection. For the first time, we have unraveled the molecular origin of the major scorpion toxin scaffolds, such as scorpion venom single von Willebrand factor C-domain peptides (SV-SVC), inhibitor cystine knot (ICK), disulphide-directed beta-hairpin (DDH), bradykinin potentiating peptides (BPP), linear non-disulphide bridged

  14. Scaffolding Student Participation in Mathematical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moschkovich, Judit N.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of scaffolding can be used to describe various types of adult guidance, in multiple settings, across different time scales. This article clarifies what we mean by scaffolding, considering several questions specifically for scaffolding in mathematics: What theoretical assumptions are framing scaffolding? What is being scaffolded? At…

  15. 49 CFR 214.109 - Scaffolding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... requirements: (1) Each scaffold and scaffold component, except suspension ropes and guardrail systems, but... least four times the maximum intended load applied or transmitted to that scaffold or scaffold component... guardrail system and the walking/working level. (b) Scaffolds shall not be altered or moved while they...

  16. 49 CFR 214.109 - Scaffolding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements: (1) Each scaffold and scaffold component, except suspension ropes and guardrail systems, but... least four times the maximum intended load applied or transmitted to that scaffold or scaffold component... guardrail system and the walking/working level. (b) Scaffolds shall not be altered or moved while they...

  17. 49 CFR 214.109 - Scaffolding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... requirements: (1) Each scaffold and scaffold component, except suspension ropes and guardrail systems, but... least four times the maximum intended load applied or transmitted to that scaffold or scaffold component... guardrail system and the walking/working level. (b) Scaffolds shall not be altered or moved while they...

  18. 49 CFR 214.109 - Scaffolding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requirements: (1) Each scaffold and scaffold component, except suspension ropes and guardrail systems, but... least four times the maximum intended load applied or transmitted to that scaffold or scaffold component... guardrail system and the walking/working level. (b) Scaffolds shall not be altered or moved while they...

  19. 49 CFR 214.109 - Scaffolding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... requirements: (1) Each scaffold and scaffold component, except suspension ropes and guardrail systems, but... least four times the maximum intended load applied or transmitted to that scaffold or scaffold component... guardrail system and the walking/working level. (b) Scaffolds shall not be altered or moved while they...

  20. Adsorption characteristics, recognition properties, and preliminary application of nordihydroguaiaretic acid molecularly imprinted polymers prepared by sol-gel surface imprinting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Sen; Zhang, Wen; Long, Wei; Hou, Dan; Yang, Xuechun; Tan, Ni

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new core-shell composite of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) molecularly imprinted polymers layer-coated silica gel (MIP@SiO2) was prepared through sol-gel technique and applied as a material for extraction of NDGA from Ephedra. It was synthesized using NDGA as the template molecule, γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) and methyltriethoxysilane (MTEOS) as the functional monomers, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as the cross-linker and ethanol as the porogenic solvent in the surface of silica. The non-imprinted polymers layer-coated silica gel (NIP@SiO2) were prepared with the same procedure, but with the absence of template molecule. In addition, the optimum adsorption affinity occurred when the molar ratio of NDGA:APTS:MTEOS:TEOS was 1:6:2:80. The prepared MIP@SiO2 and NIP@SiO2 were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Their affinity properties to NDGA were evaluated through dynamic adsorption, static adsorption, and selective recognition experiments, and the results showed the saturated adsorption capacity of MIP@SiO2 could reach to 5.90 mg g-1, which was two times more than that of NIP@SiO2. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to evaluate the extraction of NDGA from the medicinal plant ephedra by the above prepared materials, and the results indicated that the MIP@SiO2 had potential application in separation of the natural active component NDGA from medicinal plants.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mode of protein recognition by Skp1 and the F-box domain in the SCF complex.

    PubMed

    Chandra Dantu, Sarath; Nathubhai Kachariya, Nitin; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Polyubiquitination of the target protein by a ubiquitin transferring machinery is key to various cellular processes. E3 ligase Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) is one such complex which plays crucial role in substrate recognition and transfer of the ubiquitin molecule. Previous computational studies have focused on S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2), cullin, and RING-finger proteins of this complex, but the roles of the adapter protein Skp1 and F-box domain of Skp2 have not been determined. Using sub-microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of full-length Skp1, unbound Skp2, Skp2-Cks1 (Cks1: Cyclin-dependent kinases regulatory subunit 1), Skp1-Skp2, and Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complexes, we have elucidated the function of Skp1 and the F-box domain of Skp2. We found that the L16 loop of Skp1, which was deleted in previous X-ray crystallography studies, can offer additional stability to the ternary complex via its interactions with the C-terminal tail of Skp2. Moreover, Skp1 helices H6, H7, and H8 display vivid conformational flexibility when not bound to Skp2, suggesting that these helices can recognize and lock the F-box proteins. Furthermore, we observed that the F-box domain could rotate (5°-129°), and that the binding partner determined the degree of conformational flexibility. Finally, Skp1 and Skp2 were found to execute a domain motion in Skp1-Skp2 and Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complexes that could decrease the distance between ubiquitination site of the substrate and the ubiquitin molecule by 3 nm. Thus, we propose that both the F-box domain of Skp2 and Skp1-Skp2 domain motions displaying preferential conformational control can together facilitate polyubiquitination of a wide variety of substrates.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mode of protein recognition by Skp1 and the F-box domain in the SCF complex.

    PubMed

    Chandra Dantu, Sarath; Nathubhai Kachariya, Nitin; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Polyubiquitination of the target protein by a ubiquitin transferring machinery is key to various cellular processes. E3 ligase Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) is one such complex which plays crucial role in substrate recognition and transfer of the ubiquitin molecule. Previous computational studies have focused on S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2), cullin, and RING-finger proteins of this complex, but the roles of the adapter protein Skp1 and F-box domain of Skp2 have not been determined. Using sub-microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of full-length Skp1, unbound Skp2, Skp2-Cks1 (Cks1: Cyclin-dependent kinases regulatory subunit 1), Skp1-Skp2, and Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complexes, we have elucidated the function of Skp1 and the F-box domain of Skp2. We found that the L16 loop of Skp1, which was deleted in previous X-ray crystallography studies, can offer additional stability to the ternary complex via its interactions with the C-terminal tail of Skp2. Moreover, Skp1 helices H6, H7, and H8 display vivid conformational flexibility when not bound to Skp2, suggesting that these helices can recognize and lock the F-box proteins. Furthermore, we observed that the F-box domain could rotate (5°-129°), and that the binding partner determined the degree of conformational flexibility. Finally, Skp1 and Skp2 were found to execute a domain motion in Skp1-Skp2 and Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complexes that could decrease the distance between ubiquitination site of the substrate and the ubiquitin molecule by 3 nm. Thus, we propose that both the F-box domain of Skp2 and Skp1-Skp2 domain motions displaying preferential conformational control can together facilitate polyubiquitination of a wide variety of substrates. PMID:26573739

  3. Bioresorbable Scaffolds for Atheroregression: Understanding of Transient Scaffolding.

    PubMed

    Kharlamov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the clinical and biological features of the bioresorbable scaffolds in interventional cardiology highlighting scientific achievements and challenges of the transient scaffolding with Absorb BVS. Special attention is granted to the vascular biology pathways which, involved in the resorption of scaffold, artery remodeling and mechanisms of Glagovian atheroregression setting the stage for subsequent clinical applications. Twenty five years ago Glagov described the phenomenon of limited external elastic membrane enlargement in response to an increase in plaque burden. We believe this threshold becomes the target for development of strategies that reverse atherosclerosis, and particularly transient scaffolding has a potential to be a tool to ultimately conquer atherosclerosis. PMID:26818488

  4. Molecular dynamics investigations of ozone on an ab initio potential energy surface with the utilization of pattern-recognition neural network for accurate determination of product formation.

    PubMed

    Le, Hung M; Dinh, Thach S; Le, Hieu V

    2011-10-13

    The singlet-triplet transformation and molecular dissociation of ozone (O(3)) gas is investigated by performing quasi-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on an ab initio potential energy surface (PES) with visible and near-infrared excitations. MP4(SDQ) level of theory with the 6-311g(2d,2p) basis set is executed for three different electronic spin states (singlet, triplet, and quintet). In order to simplify the potential energy function, an approximation is adopted by ignoring the spin-orbit coupling and allowing the molecule to switch favorably and instantaneously to the spin state that is more energetically stable (lowest in energy among the three spin states). This assumption has previously been utilized to study the SiO(2) system as reported by Agrawal et al. (J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124 (13), 134306). The use of such assumption in this study probably makes the upper limits of computed rate coefficients the true rate coefficients. The global PES for ozone is constructed by fitting 5906 ab initio data points using a 60-neuron two-layer feed-forward neural network. The mean-absolute error and root-mean-squared error of this fit are 0.0446 eV (1.03 kcal/mol) and 0.0756 eV (1.74 kcal/mol), respectively, which reveal very good fitting accuracy. The parameter coefficients of the global PES are reported in this paper. In order to identify the spin state with high confidence, we propose the use of a pattern-recognition neural network, which is trained to predict the spin state of a given configuration (with a prediction accuracy being 95.6% on a set of testing data points). To enhance the prediction effectiveness, a buffer series of five points are validated to confirm the spin state during the MD process to gain better confidence. Quasi-classical MD simulations from 1.2 to 2.4 eV of total internal energy (including zero-point energy) result in rate coefficients of singlet-triplet transformation in the range of 0.027 ps(-1) to 1.21 ps(-1). Also, we find very

  5. Approaching rational epitope vaccine design for hepatitis C virus with meta-server and multivalent scaffolding.

    PubMed

    He, Linling; Cheng, Yushao; Kong, Leopold; Azadnia, Parisa; Giang, Erick; Kim, Justin; Wood, Malcolm R; Wilson, Ian A; Law, Mansun; Zhu, Jiang

    2015-08-04

    Development of a prophylactic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been hampered by the extraordinary viral diversity and the poor host immune response. Scaffolding, by grafting an epitope onto a heterologous protein scaffold, offers a possible solution to epitope vaccine design. In this study, we designed and characterized epitope vaccine antigens for the antigenic sites of HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 (residues 314-324) and E2 (residues 412-423), for which neutralizing antibody-bound structures are available. We first combined six structural alignment algorithms in a "scaffolding meta-server" to search for diverse scaffolds that can structurally accommodate the HCV epitopes. For each antigenic site, ten scaffolds were selected for computational design, and the resulting epitope scaffolds were analyzed using structure-scoring functions and molecular dynamics simulation. We experimentally confirmed that three E1 and five E2 epitope scaffolds bound to their respective neutralizing antibodies, but with different kinetics. We then investigated a "multivalent scaffolding" approach by displaying 24 copies of an epitope scaffold on a self-assembling nanoparticle, which markedly increased the avidity of antibody binding. Our study thus demonstrates the utility of a multi-scale scaffolding strategy in epitope vaccine design and provides promising HCV immunogens for further assessment in vivo.

  6. Biologically inspired growth of hydroxyapatite crystals on bio-organics-defined scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chunrong; Li, Yuli; Nan, Kaihui

    2013-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Petal-like crystals were observed to form on the surface of the BG/COL/ChS scaffolds. Highlights: ► Porous scaffolds were prepared using bioglass, collagen and chondroitin sulfate. ► Highly oriented HA crystals were grown on scaffolds using simulated body fluids ► The microstructure and orientation of HA were explained by molecular configuration. - Abstract: Several bio-organics-defined composite scaffolds were prepared using 58s-bioglass (BG), collagen (Col) and chondroitin sulfate (ChS). These scaffolds possess highly porous structure. X-ray diffraction of these scaffolds strongly indicated that hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals formed on their surfaces in simulated body fluids within 3 d, and similar formation process of crystals could be obtained on BG/Col and BG/Col/ChS scaffolds. The morphology and structure of the crystals were further examined by scanning electron microscopy. The results obtained indicate that an apatite with petal-like structure similar to that found on BG/Col scaffolds can be produced on BG/Col/ChS scaffolds through biomimetic synthesis, while that on BG/ChS scaffolds took place differently. The differences could be explained by self-assembly processes and the different macromolecular configurations of the Col and ChS fibrils which self-assemble spontaneously into their fibers. On the other hand, the bio-organics-defined composites have good cell biocompability. The results may be applicable to develop tailored biomaterials for peculiar bone substitute.

  7. Functionalization of chitosan/poly(lactic acid-glycolic acid) sintered microsphere scaffolds via surface heparinization for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Khan, Yusuf; Nair, Lakshmi S; Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I; Laurencin, Cato T

    2010-06-01

    Scaffolds exhibiting biological recognition and specificity play an important role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The bioactivity of scaffolds in turn influences, directs, or manipulates cellular responses. In this study, chitosan/poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (chitosan/PLAGA) sintered microsphere scaffolds were functionalized via heparin immobilization. Heparin was successfully immobilized on chitosan/PLAGA scaffolds with controllable loading efficiency. Mechanical testing showed that heparinization of chitosan/PLAGA scaffolds did not significantly alter the mechanical properties and porous structures. In addition, the heparinized chitosan/PLAGA scaffolds possessed a compressive modulus of 403.98 +/- 19.53 MPa and a compressive strength of 9.83 +/- 0.94 MPa, which are in the range of human trabecular bone. Furthermore, the heparinized chitosan/PLAGA scaffolds had an interconnected porous structure with a total pore volume of 30.93 +/- 0.90% and a median pore size of 172.33 +/- 5.89 mum. The effect of immobilized heparin on osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cell growth was investigated. MC3T3-E1 cells proliferated three dimensionally throughout the porous structure of the scaffolds. Heparinized chitosan/PLAGA scaffolds with low heparin loading (1.7 microg/scaffold) were shown to be capable of stimulating MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation by MTS assay and cell differentiation as evidenced by elevated osteocalcin expression when compared with nonheparinized chitosan/PLAGA scaffold and chitosan/PLAGA scaffold with high heparin loading (14.1 microg/scaffold). This study demonstrated the potential of functionalizing chitosan/PLAGA scaffolds via heparinization with improved cell functions for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:19777575

  8. Enzymatic mineralization of silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Declercq, Heidi A; Gheysens, Tom; Dendooven, Jolien; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Cornelissen, Ria; Dubruel, Peter; Kaplan, David L

    2014-07-01

    The present study focuses on the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mediated formation of apatitic minerals on porous silk fibroin protein (SFP) scaffolds. Porous SFP scaffolds impregnated with different concentrations of ALP are homogeneously mineralized under physiological conditions. The mineral structure is apatite while the structures differ as a function of the ALP concentration. Cellular adhesion, proliferation, and colonization of osteogenic MC3T3 cells improve on the mineralized SFP scaffolds. These findings suggest a simple process to generate mineralized scaffolds that can be used to enhanced bone tissue engineering-related utility. PMID:24610728

  9. Norfloxacin-loaded collagen/chitosan scaffolds for skin reconstruction: Preparation, evaluation and in-vivo wound healing assessment.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Azza A; Salama, Alaa H

    2016-02-15

    Biomaterial scaffolds are versatile tools as drug carrier for treatment of wounds. A series of norfloxacin-loaded scaffolds were synthesized for treatment of wounds by combining collagen with two different types of chitosan using freeze-drying technique. Subsequently, scaffolds were screened in terms of morphology, water absorption and retention capacity, biodegradation, ex-vivo bioadhesive strength, in-vitro drug release biological compatibility, X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry as well as in-vivo evaluation. The results indicate that the scaffold mechanical strength is dependent on the type of used chitosan. The prepared scaffolds contained interconnected porous architecture. The scaffolds had high water uptake and retention capacity with extended biodegradation rate. Scaffolds prepared with chitosan HCl showed superior bioadhesive strength compared to those prepared with low molecular weight chitosan. All scaffolds showed almost 100% drug release within 24h. As identified by the terahertz pulsed imaging measurements, there is single scaffold area with the same concentration. After 28 days of wound dressing with selected norfoloxacin-loaded or unloaded collagen/chitosan scaffolds in Albino rats, it was found that the tissue regeneration time was fast compared to non-treated wounds. Furthermore, the drug-loaded scaffolds showed normal structure of an intact epidermal layer as well as the underlying dermis as revealed by histopathological studies. The obtained results suggest that the investigated norfloxacin-loaded collagen/chitosan scaffold is a potential candidate for skin regeneration application.

  10. Instruction, Cognitive Scaffolding, and Motivational Scaffolding in Writing Center Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackiewicz, Jo; Thompson, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we quantitatively analyze the discourse of experienced writing center tutors in 10 highly satisfactory conferences. Specifically, we analyze tutors' instruction, cognitive scaffolding, and motivational scaffolding, all tutoring strategies identified in prior research from other disciplines as educationally effective. We find…

  11. PEP_scaffolder: using (homologous) proteins to scaffold genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bai-Han; Song, Ying-Nan; Xue, Wei; Xu, Gui-Cai; Xiao, Jun; Sun, Ming-Yuan; Sun, Xiao-Wen; Li, Jiong-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Recovering the gene structures is one of the important goals of genome assembly. In low-quality assemblies, and even some high-quality assemblies, certain gene regions are still incomplete; thus, novel scaffolding approaches are required to complete gene regions. Results: We developed an efficient and fast genome scaffolding method called PEP_scaffolder, using proteins to scaffold genomes. The pipeline aims to recover protein-coding gene structures. We tested the method on human contigs; using human UniProt proteins as guides, the improvement on N50 size was 17% increase with an accuracy of ∼97%. PEP_scaffolder improved the proportion of fully covered proteins among all proteins, which was close to the proportion in the finished genome. The method provided a high accuracy of 91% using orthologs of distant species. Tested on simulated fly contigs, PEP_scaffolder outperformed other scaffolders, with the shortest running time and the highest accuracy. Availability and Implementation: The software is freely available at http://www.fishbrowser.org/software/PEP_scaffolder/ Contact: lijt@cafs.ac.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27334475

  12. Novel Antibacterial Nanofibrous PLLA Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kai; Sun, Hongli; Bradley, Mark A.; Dupler, Ellen J.; Giannobile, William V.; Ma, Peter X.

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve high local bioactivity and low systemic side effects of antibiotics in the treatment of dental, periodontal and bone infections, a localized and temporally controlled delivery system is crucial. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) porous tissue engineering scaffold was developed with the ability to release antibiotics in a controlled fashion for long-term inhibition of bacterial growth. The highly soluble antibiotic drug, Doxycycline (DOXY), was successfully incorporated into PLGA nanospheres using a modified water-in-oil-in-oil (w/o/o) emulsion method. The PLGA nanospheres (NS) were then incorporated into prefabricated nanofibrous PLLA scaffolds with a well interconnected macroporous structure. The release kinetics of DOXY from four different PLGA NS formulations on a PLLA scaffold was investigated. DOXY could be released from the NS-scaffolds in a locally and temporally controlled manner. The DOXY release is controlled by DOXY diffusion out of the NS and is strongly dependent upon the physical and chemical properties of the PLGA. While PLGA50-6.5K, PLGA50-64K, and PLGA75-113K NS-scaffolds discharge DOXY rapidly with a high initial burst release, PLGA85-142K NS-scaffold can extend the release of DOXY to longer than 6 weeks with a low initial burst release. Compared to NS alone, the NS incorporated on a 3-D scaffold had significantly reduced the initial burst release. In vitro antibacterial tests of PLGA85 NS-scaffold demonstrated its ability to inhibit common bacterial growth (S.aureus and E.coli) for a prolonged duration. The successful incorporation of DOXY onto 3-D scaffolds and its controlled release from scaffolds extends the usage of nano-fibrous scaffolds from the delivery of large molecules such as growth factors to the delivery of small hydrophilic drugs, allowing for a broader application and a more complex tissue engineering strategy. PMID:20570700

  13. The Scaffold Protein POSH Regulates Axon Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jennifer; Chung, Kwan-Ho; Figueroa, Claudia; Zurawski, Jonathan; Dickson, Heather M.; Brace, E. J.; Avery, Adam W.; Turner, David L.

    2008-01-01

    How scaffold proteins integrate signaling pathways with cytoskeletal components to drive axon outgrowth is not well understood. We report here that the multidomain scaffold protein Plenty of SH3s (POSH) regulates axon outgrowth. Reduction of POSH function by RNA interference (RNAi) enhances axon outgrowth in differentiating mouse primary cortical neurons and in neurons derived from mouse P19 cells, suggesting POSH negatively regulates axon outgrowth. Complementation analysis reveals a requirement for the third Src homology (SH) 3 domain of POSH, and we find that the actomyosin regulatory protein Shroom3 interacts with this domain of POSH. Inhibition of Shroom3 expression by RNAi leads to increased process lengths, as observed for POSH RNAi, suggesting that POSH and Shroom function together to inhibit process outgrowth. Complementation analysis and interference of protein function by dominant-negative approaches suggest that Shroom3 recruits Rho kinase to inhibit process outgrowth. Furthermore, inhibition of myosin II function reverses the POSH or Shroom3 RNAi phenotype, indicating a role for myosin II regulation as a target of the POSH–Shroom complex. Collectively, these results suggest that the molecular scaffold protein POSH assembles an inhibitory complex that links to the actin–myosin network to regulate neuronal process outgrowth. PMID:18829867

  14. The scaffold protein POSH regulates axon outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer; Chung, Kwan-Ho; Figueroa, Claudia; Zurawski, Jonathan; Dickson, Heather M; Brace, E J; Avery, Adam W; Turner, David L; Vojtek, Anne B

    2008-12-01

    How scaffold proteins integrate signaling pathways with cytoskeletal components to drive axon outgrowth is not well understood. We report here that the multidomain scaffold protein Plenty of SH3s (POSH) regulates axon outgrowth. Reduction of POSH function by RNA interference (RNAi) enhances axon outgrowth in differentiating mouse primary cortical neurons and in neurons derived from mouse P19 cells, suggesting POSH negatively regulates axon outgrowth. Complementation analysis reveals a requirement for the third Src homology (SH) 3 domain of POSH, and we find that the actomyosin regulatory protein Shroom3 interacts with this domain of POSH. Inhibition of Shroom3 expression by RNAi leads to increased process lengths, as observed for POSH RNAi, suggesting that POSH and Shroom function together to inhibit process outgrowth. Complementation analysis and interference of protein function by dominant-negative approaches suggest that Shroom3 recruits Rho kinase to inhibit process outgrowth. Furthermore, inhibition of myosin II function reverses the POSH or Shroom3 RNAi phenotype, indicating a role for myosin II regulation as a target of the POSH-Shroom complex. Collectively, these results suggest that the molecular scaffold protein POSH assembles an inhibitory complex that links to the actin-myosin network to regulate neuronal process outgrowth.

  15. Melt electrospinning of biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Karchin, Ari; Simonovsky, Felix I; Ratner, Buddy D; Sanders, Joan E

    2011-09-01

    Electrospinning from a melt, in contrast to from a solution, is an attractive tissue engineering scaffold manufacturing process as it allows for the formation of small diameter fibers while eliminating potentially cytotoxic solvents. Despite this, there is a dearth of literature on scaffold formation via melt electrospinning. This is likely due to the technical challenges related to the need for a well-controlled high-temperature setup and the difficulty in developing an appropriate polymer. In this paper, a biodegradable and thermally stable polyurethane (PU) is described specifically for use in melt electrospinning. Polymer formulations of aliphatic PUs based on (CH(2))(4)-conte