Science.gov

Sample records for molecular sieve control

  1. A controllable molecular sieve for Na+ and K+ ions.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaojing; Li, Jichen; Xu, Ke; Wang, Jianfeng; Yang, Hui

    2010-02-17

    The selective rate of specific ion transport across nanoporous material is critical to biological and nanofluidic systems. Molecular sieves for ions can be achieved by steric and electrical effects. However, the radii of Na(+) and K(+) are quite similar; they both carry a positive charge, making them difficult to separate. Biological ionic channels contain precisely arranged arrays of amino acids that can efficiently recognize and guide the passage of K(+) or Na(+) across the cell membrane. However, the design of inorganic channels with novel recognition mechanisms that control the ionic selectivity remains a challenge. We present here a design for a controllable ion-selective nanopore (molecular sieve) based on a single-walled carbon nanotube with specially arranged carbonyl oxygen atoms modified inside the nanopore, which was inspired by the structure of potassium channels in membrane spanning proteins (e.g., KcsA). Our molecular dynamics simulations show that the remarkable selectivity is attributed to the hydration structure of Na(+) or K(+) confined in the nanochannels, which can be precisely tuned by different patterns of the carbonyl oxygen atoms. The results also suggest that a confined environment plays a dominant role in the selectivity process. These studies provide a better understanding of the mechanism of ionic selectivity in the KcsA channel and possible technical applications in nanotechnology and biotechnology, including serving as a laboratory-in-nanotube for special chemical interactions and as a high-efficiency nanodevice for purification or desalination of sea and brackish water. PMID:20102186

  2. A controllable molecular sieve for Na+ and K+ ions.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaojing; Li, Jichen; Xu, Ke; Wang, Jianfeng; Yang, Hui

    2010-02-17

    The selective rate of specific ion transport across nanoporous material is critical to biological and nanofluidic systems. Molecular sieves for ions can be achieved by steric and electrical effects. However, the radii of Na(+) and K(+) are quite similar; they both carry a positive charge, making them difficult to separate. Biological ionic channels contain precisely arranged arrays of amino acids that can efficiently recognize and guide the passage of K(+) or Na(+) across the cell membrane. However, the design of inorganic channels with novel recognition mechanisms that control the ionic selectivity remains a challenge. We present here a design for a controllable ion-selective nanopore (molecular sieve) based on a single-walled carbon nanotube with specially arranged carbonyl oxygen atoms modified inside the nanopore, which was inspired by the structure of potassium channels in membrane spanning proteins (e.g., KcsA). Our molecular dynamics simulations show that the remarkable selectivity is attributed to the hydration structure of Na(+) or K(+) confined in the nanochannels, which can be precisely tuned by different patterns of the carbonyl oxygen atoms. The results also suggest that a confined environment plays a dominant role in the selectivity process. These studies provide a better understanding of the mechanism of ionic selectivity in the KcsA channel and possible technical applications in nanotechnology and biotechnology, including serving as a laboratory-in-nanotube for special chemical interactions and as a high-efficiency nanodevice for purification or desalination of sea and brackish water.

  3. Investigation of Y/SBA Composite Molecular Sieves Morphology Control and Catalytic Performance for n-Pentane Aromatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chun-Wei; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Li, Shuai; Bian, Xue; Zhao, Shan-Lin; Pei, Ming-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Using Y molecular sieve as the core, Y/SBA-15 composite molecular sieves were prepared by different crystallization methods in the paper. The growth process and morphologies of the composite molecular sieves were controlled by adjusting the synthesis factors. The structures and acidity of two kinds of composite molecular sieves were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and NH3-TPD. The catalysis performances of the composite molecular sieves were investigated in the aromatization reaction of n-pentane. The results indicated that the desired core-shell composite molecular sieves were obtained when the crystallization conditions were 36 hours, 100 °C and secondary crystallization. The aromatization results showed that core-shell composite molecular sieves had better selectivity for producing high application value xylenes compared to mixed-crystal composite molecular sieves.

  4. Investigation of Y/SBA Composite Molecular Sieves Morphology Control and Catalytic Performance for n-Pentane Aromatization

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chun-Wei; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Li, Shuai; Bian, Xue; Zhao, Shan-lin; Pei, Ming-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Using Y molecular sieve as the core, Y/SBA-15 composite molecular sieves were prepared by different crystallization methods in the paper. The growth process and morphologies of the composite molecular sieves were controlled by adjusting the synthesis factors. The structures and acidity of two kinds of composite molecular sieves were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and NH3-TPD. The catalysis performances of the composite molecular sieves were investigated in the aromatization reaction of n-pentane. The results indicated that the desired core-shell composite molecular sieves were obtained when the crystallization conditions were 36 hours, 100 °C and secondary crystallization. The aromatization results showed that core-shell composite molecular sieves had better selectivity for producing high application value xylenes compared to mixed-crystal composite molecular sieves. PMID:27029526

  5. Space station molecular sieve development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C.; Rousseau, J.

    1986-01-01

    An essential function of a space environmental control system is the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere to control the partial pressure of this gas at levels lower than 3 mm Hg. The use of regenerable solid adsorbents for this purpose was demonstrated effectively during the Skylab mission. Earlier sorbent systems used zeolite molecular sieves. The carbon molecular sieve is a hydrophobic adsorbent with excellent potential for space station application. Although carbon molecular sieves were synthesized and investigated, these sieves were designed to simulate the sieving properties of 5A zeolite and for O2/N2 separation. This program was designed to develop hydrophobic carbon molecular sieves for CO2 removal from a space station crew environment. It is a first phase effort involved in sorbent material development and in demonstrating the utility of such a material for CO2 removal on space stations. The sieve must incorporate the following requirements: it must be hydrophobic; it must have high dynamic capacity for carbon dioxide at the low partial pressure of the space station atmosphere; and it must be chemiclly stable and will not generate contaminants.

  6. Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L. ); Naruse, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    A Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS) was added to the existing Tritium Waste Treatment system (TWT) within the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Department of Energy (DOE) no longer allows inventory by difference'' for radioactive wastes that are to be buried. The MSRS was designed and built to comply with this requirement. Within the TWT, water is generated by the catalytic conversion of hydrogen isotopes and removed by molecular sieve trapping prior to release to the environment. Molecular sieve regeneration is required to remove the trapped water and to rejuvenate the beds. The MSRS permits the collection and direct tritium assay of regenerated tritiated water from molecular sieve beds. This paper describes the MSRS in detail and how it is interfaced with the TWT.

  7. Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L.; Naruse, Y.

    1992-03-01

    A Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS) was added to the existing Tritium Waste Treatment system (TWT) within the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Department of Energy (DOE) no longer allows ``inventory by difference`` for radioactive wastes that are to be buried. The MSRS was designed and built to comply with this requirement. Within the TWT, water is generated by the catalytic conversion of hydrogen isotopes and removed by molecular sieve trapping prior to release to the environment. Molecular sieve regeneration is required to remove the trapped water and to rejuvenate the beds. The MSRS permits the collection and direct tritium assay of regenerated tritiated water from molecular sieve beds. This paper describes the MSRS in detail and how it is interfaced with the TWT.

  8. Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Nyman, May D.

    2006-10-17

    Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves having significant activity for multivalent cations and a method for synthesizing such sieves are disclosed. The sieves have a net negatively charged octahedral framework, comprising niobium, oxygen, and octahedrally coordinated lower valence transition metals. The framework can be charge balanced by the occluded alkali cation from the synthesis method. The alkali cation can be exchanged for other contaminant metal ions. The ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be backexchanged in acidic solutions to yield a solution concentrated in the contaminant metal. Alternatively, the ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be thermally converted to a durable perovskite phase waste form.

  9. Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Nyman, May D.

    2003-07-22

    Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves having significant activity for multivalent cations and a method for synthesizing such sieves are disclosed. The sieves have a net negatively charged octahedral framework, comprising niobium, oxygen, and octahedrally coordinated lower valence transition metals. The framework can be charge balanced by the occluded alkali cation from the synthesis method. The alkali cation can be exchanged for other contaminant metal ions. The ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be backexchanged in acidic solutions to yield a solution concentrated in the contaminant metal. Alternatively, the ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be thermally converted to a durable perovskite phase waste form.

  10. Investigations to improve carbon dioxide control with amine and molecular sieve type sorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand, J. F.; Brose, H. F.; Kester, F. L.; Lunde, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The optimization trends and operating parameters of an integral molecular sieve bed heat exchanger were investigated. The optimum combination of substrate and coating for the HS-B porous polymer was determined based on the CO2 dynamic capacity in the presence of water vapor. Full size HS-B canister performance was evaluated. An Amine CO2 Concentrator utilizing IR-45 sorber material and available Manned Orbiting Laboratory hardware was designed, fabricated and tested for use as an experiment in the NASA 90-day space simulator test of 1970. It supported four men in the simulator for 71 days out of the 90-day test duration.

  11. Thermodynamics of formation of molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccione, Patrick Manuel

    2002-09-01

    Thermodynamic investigations are undertaken to better understand the energetic differences amongst molecular sieve frameworks and the mechanisms and interactions important in molecular sieve self-assembly. The enthalpies relative to quartz at 298.15 K are determined by high-temperature solution calorimetry for a collection of calcined pure-silica molecular sieves with diverse structural features. SiO2 molecular sieves are shown to be only modestly (6.8--14.4 kJ/mol) metastable with respect to quartz. The available thermal energy at typical synthesis conditions is RT = 3.5 kJ/mol. A strong correlation between enthalpy and molar volume is observed. The entropies of four pure-silica molecular sieves with a wide range of molar volumes are determined by heat capacity measurements from 5 to 400 K. The entropies of these structures are almost identical (3.2--4.2 J · K-1mol-1 above quartz). The enthalpy and entropy data are combined to calculate the Gibbs free energies of transition from quartz to eight other silica polymorphs. The molecular sieve Gibbs free energies are only 5.5--12.6 kJ/mol less stable than quartz. Therefore, there are no significant thermodynamic barriers to transformations between silica polymorphs. This result suggests that structure-directing agents (SDAs) in molecular sieves syntheses do not serve to stabilize otherwise very unstable phases. Interaction enthalpies between inorganic frameworks and organic SDAs are measured by HF solution calorimetry for six molecular sieve/SDA pairs. The enthalpies are only moderately exothermic (-1.1 to -5.9 kJ/mol SiO2), as expected if the predominant interactions are silica/hydrocarbon van der Waals contacts. Interaction entropies are estimated for three framework/SDA pairs, and together with the interaction enthalpies allow the calculation of the Gibbs free energies of interaction. The latter values range from -2.0 to -5.4 kJ/mol SiO2. This energy range is comparable to that observed for the SiO2 frameworks

  12. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Williams, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The removal of CO{sub 2} is of significance in several energy applications. The combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas, releases large volumes of CO{sub 2} to the environment. Several options exist to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, including substitution of nuclear power for fossil fuels, increasing the efficiency of fossil plants and capturing the CO{sub 2} prior to emission to the environment. All of these techniques have the attractive feature of limiting the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere, but each has economic, technical, or societal limitations. In the production of natural gas, the feed stream from the well frequently contains contaminants and diluents which must be removed before the gas can enter the pipeline distribution system. Notable amongst these diluent gasses is CO{sub 2}, which has no calorific value. Currently, the pipeline specification calls for <2 mol % CO{sub 2} in the gas. Gas separation is thus a relevant technology in the field of energy production. A novel separation system based on a parametric swing process has been developed that utilizes the unique combination of properties exhibited by our carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS).

  13. Enhanced Molecular Sieve CO2 Removal Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Susan; ElSherif, Dina; MacKnight, Allen

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to quantitatively characterize the performance of two major types of molecular sieves for two-bed regenerative carbon dioxide removal at the conditions compatible with both a spacesuit and station application. One sorbent is a zeolite-based molecular sieve that has been substantially improved over the materials used in Skylab. The second sorbent is a recently developed carbon-based molecular sieve. Both molecular sieves offer the potential of high payoff for future manned missions by reducing system complexity, weight (including consumables), and power consumption in comparison with competing concepts. The research reported here provides the technical data required to improve CO2 removal systems for regenerative life support systems for future IVA and EVA missions.

  14. Chlorodifluoromethane equilibrium on 13X molecular sieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlile, Donna L.; Mahle, John J.; Buettner, Leonard C.; Tevault, David E.; Friday, David K.

    1994-08-01

    Adsorption phase equilibrium data are required for evaluating any adsorption-based gas separation process. The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center is currently measuring adsorption phase equilibrium data for a variety of chemical warfare agents and their surrogates on adsorbent materials to correlate physical properties to filtration/separation efficiencies of each vapor on each adsorbent. This report details the adsorption phase equilibrium data measured for chlorodifluoromethane (R-22) on 13X Molecular Sieve. The 13X Molecular Sieve is a candidate adsorbent for future military air purification systems employing the pressure-swing adsorption separation process.

  15. Catalytic cracking catalysts using silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Pellet, R.J.; Coughlin, P.K.; Staniulis, M.T.; Long, G.N.; Rabo, J.A.

    1987-05-19

    A cracking catalyst is described comprising: a silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve of U.S. Pat. No. 4,440,871 characterized in its calcined form by an adsorption of isobutane of at least 2 percent by weight at a pressure of 500 torr and a temperature of 20/sup 0/C and having an effective amount of the cations associated with the silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve selected from the group consisting of H+, ammonium, Group IIA, groups IIIB to VIIB, cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium, and promethium.

  16. Controllable deformation of salt water-filled carbon nanotubes using an electric field with application to molecular sieving.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang; Zhang, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Hongwu; Chen, Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Precisely controlling the deformation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has practical application in the development of nanoscale functional devices, although it is a challenging task. Here, we propose a novel method to guide the deformation of CNTs through filling them with salt water and applying an electric field. With the electric field along the axial direction, the height of CNTs is enlarged by the axial electric force due to the internal ions and polar water molecules. Under an electric field with two mutually orthogonal components, the transverse electric force could further induce the bending deformation of CNTs. Based on the classical rod and beam theories, two mechanical models are constructed to verify and quantitatively describe the relationships between the tension and bending deformations of CNTs and the electric field intensity. Moreover, by means of the electric field-driven tension behavior of CNTs, we design a stretchable molecular sieve to control the flow rate of mixed gas and collect a single high-purity gas. The present work opens up new avenues in the design and fabrication of nanoscale controlling units. PMID:27335235

  17. Controllable deformation of salt water-filled carbon nanotubes using an electric field with application to molecular sieving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang; Zhang, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Hongwu; Chen, Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Precisely controlling the deformation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has practical application in the development of nanoscale functional devices, although it is a challenging task. Here, we propose a novel method to guide the deformation of CNTs through filling them with salt water and applying an electric field. With the electric field along the axial direction, the height of CNTs is enlarged by the axial electric force due to the internal ions and polar water molecules. Under an electric field with two mutually orthogonal components, the transverse electric force could further induce the bending deformation of CNTs. Based on the classical rod and beam theories, two mechanical models are constructed to verify and quantitatively describe the relationships between the tension and bending deformations of CNTs and the electric field intensity. Moreover, by means of the electric field-driven tension behavior of CNTs, we design a stretchable molecular sieve to control the flow rate of mixed gas and collect a single high-purity gas. The present work opens up new avenues in the design and fabrication of nanoscale controlling units.

  18. Molecular sieving silica membrane fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Raman, N.K.; Brinker, C.J.

    1999-08-10

    A process is described for producing a molecular sieve silica membrane comprising depositing a hybrid organic-inorganic polymer comprising at least one organic constituent and at least one inorganic constituent on a porous substrate material and removing at least a portion of the at least one organic constituent of the hybrid organic-inorganic polymer, forming a porous film. 11 figs.

  19. Molecular sieving silica membrane fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Raman, Narayan K.; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    A process for producing a molecular sieve silica membrane comprising depositing a hybrid organic-inorganic polymer comprising at least one organic constituent and at least one inorganic constituent on a porous substrate material and removing at least a portion of the at least one organic constituent of the hybrid organic-inorganic polymer, forming a porous film.

  20. Molecular sieving silica membrane fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Raman, Narayan K.; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    A process for producing a molecular sieve silica membrane comprising depositing a hybrid organic-inorganic polymer comprising at least one organic constituent and at least one inorganic constituent on a porous substrate material and removing at least a portion of the at least one organic constituent of the hybrid organic-inorganic polymer, forming a porous film.

  1. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Molecular sieve resins. 173.40 Section 173.40 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.40 Molecular sieve resins. Molecular sieve resins may be safely used in the processing of food under the following prescribed conditions:...

  2. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Molecular sieve resins. 173.40 Section 173.40 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.40 Molecular sieve resins. Molecular sieve resins may be safely used in the processing of food under the following prescribed conditions:...

  3. Adsorption of gases on carbon molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Ganesh, K.S. )

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption on carbon molecular sieves (CMS) prepared by coke deposition has become an interesting area of adsorption due to its microporous nature and favorable separation factor on size and shape selectivity basis for many gaseous systems. In the present work CMS was synthesized from coconut shell through three major steps, namely, carbonization, activation, and coke deposition by hydrocarbon cracking. The crushed, washed, and sieved granules of coconut shell (particle size 2--3 mm) were pretreated with sodium silicate solution and oven-dried at 150 C to create the inorganic sites necessary for coke deposition. Carbonization and activation of the dried granules were carried out at 800 C, for 30 min each. The activated char thus produced was subjected to hydrocarbon cracking at 600 C for periods varying from 30 to 180 min. The product samples were characterized in terms of adsorption isotherm, kinetic adsorption curve, surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and characteristic energy for adsorption by using O[sub 2], N[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 6], and CH[sub 4].

  4. Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; King, David L

    2010-04-20

    Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts are disclosed, including silver hollandite and cryptomelane. These materials can be used, for example, to catalyze the oxidation of CO.sub.x (e.g., CO), NO.sub.x (e.g., NO), hydrocarbons (e.g., C.sub.3H.sub.6) and/or sulfur-containing compounds. The disclosed materials also may be used to catalyze other reactions, such as the reduction of NO.sub.2. In some cases, the disclosed materials are capable of sorbing certain products from the reactions they catalyze. Silver hollandite, in particular, can be used to remove a substantial portion of certain sulfur-containing compounds from a gas or liquid by catalysis and/or sorption. The gas or liquid can be, for example, natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon.

  5. Silicotitanate molecular sieve and condensed phases

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Nyman, May D.

    2002-01-01

    A new microporous crystalline molecular sieve material having the formula Cs.sub.3 TiSi.sub.3 O.sub.95.cndot.3H.sub.2 O and its hydrothermally condensed phase, Cs.sub.2 TiSi.sub.6 O.sub.15, are disclosed. The microporous material can adsorb divalent ions of radionuclides or other industrial metals such as chromium, nickel, lead, copper, cobalt, zinc, cadmium, barium, and mercury, from aqueous or hydrocarbon solutions. The adsorbed metal ions can be leached out for recovery purposes or the microporous material can be hydrothermally condensed to a radiation resistant, structurally and chemically stable phase which can serve as a storage waste form for radionuclides.

  6. Production of carbon molecular sieves from illinois coals. An assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, Anthony A.; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud

    1991-01-01

    Chars were produced from an Illinois No. 2 bituminous coal under various pyrolysis and activation conditions and tested for their molecular sieve properties. The amount of N2 compared to the amount of CO2 adsorbed by each char was used as a preliminary indicator of its molecular sieve properties. This relatively simple, but apparently useful test was confirmed by successfully characterizing the well-known molecular sieve properties of a commercial zeolite and molecular sieve carbon. In addition, coal chars having relatively high surface areas (800-1800 m2/g) were produced and tested for their molecular sieving capabilities. These carbon materials, which have high adsorption capacities and relatively narrow pore size distributions, should be ideal candidates for the commercial production of CMS.

  7. Copper modified carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfunctional alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  8. Copper crystallite in carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfurfuryl alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  9. Selective molecular sieving through porous graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Steven P.; Wang, Luda; Pellegrino, John; Bunch, J. Scott

    2012-12-01

    Membranes act as selective barriers and play an important role in processes such as cellular compartmentalization and industrial-scale chemical and gas purification. The ideal membrane should be as thin as possible to maximize flux, mechanically robust to prevent fracture, and have well-defined pore sizes to increase selectivity. Graphene is an excellent starting point for developing size-selective membranes because of its atomic thickness, high mechanical strength, relative inertness and impermeability to all standard gases. However, pores that can exclude larger molecules but allow smaller molecules to pass through would have to be introduced into the material. Here, we show that ultraviolet-induced oxidative etching can create pores in micrometre-sized graphene membranes, and the resulting membranes can be used as molecular sieves. A pressurized blister test and mechanical resonance are used to measure the transport of a range of gases (H2, CO2, Ar, N2, CH4 and SF6) through the pores. The experimentally measured leak rate, separation factors and Raman spectrum agree well with models based on effusion through a small number of ångstrom-sized pores.

  10. Antibacterial mesoporous molecular sieves modified with polymeric N-halamine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingfeng; Li, Lin; Liu, Ying; Ren, Xuehong; Liang, Jie

    2016-12-01

    In this research, a new kind of porous N-halamine material with high antibacterial efficacies was prepared. Poly [5,5-dimethyl-3-(3'-triethoxysilylpropyl)-hydantoin] (PSPH), an N-halamine precursor, was synthesized and grafted onto the surface of mesoporous molecular sieves (SBA-15). The mesoporous molecular sieves modified with the N-halamine polymer could be rendered biocidal upon exposure to dilute household bleach. The modified mesoporous molecular sieves were characterized by SEM, TEM, FTIR, XPS, TGA, XRD and BET analysis. It was found that the PSPH has been successfully grafted on the surface of mesoporous molecular sieves, and the morphology and structure of the modified mesoporous molecular sieves were slightly affected. The N-halamine modified mesoporous molecular sieves showed excellent antibacterial property, and inactivated 100% of S. aureus and E. coli O157:H7 with 8.05 and 7.92 log reductions within 1min of contact, respectively. The modified SBA-15 with high-antibacterial efficiency has potential application in water treatment and biomaterials areas. PMID:27612805

  11. A 99 percent purity molecular sieve oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular sieve oxygen generating systems (MSOGS) have become the accepted method for the production of breathable oxygen on military aircraft. These systems separate oxygen for aircraft engine bleed air by application of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology. Oxygen is concentrated by preferential adsorption in nitrogen in a zeolite molecular sieve. However, the inability of current zeolite molecular sieves to discriminate between oxygen and argon results in an oxygen purity limitations of 93-95 percent (both oxygen and argon concentrate). The goal was to develop a new PSA process capable of exceeding the present oxygen purity limitations. A novel molecular sieve oxygen concentrator was developed which is capable of generating oxygen concentrations of up to 99.7 percent directly from air. The process is comprised of four absorbent beds, two containing a zeolite molecular sieve and two containing a carbon molecular sieve. This new process may find use in aircraft and medical breathing systems, and industrial air separation systems. The commercial potential of the process is currently being evaluated.

  12. Molecular Sieve Bench Testing and Computer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; DaLee, Robert C.; Blackmon, James B.

    1995-01-01

    The design of an efficient four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) CO2 removal system for the International Space Station depends on many mission parameters, such as duration, crew size, cost of power, volume, fluid interface properties, etc. A need for space vehicle CO2 removal system models capable of accurately performing extrapolated hardware predictions is inevitable due to the change of the parameters which influences the CO2 removal system capacity. The purpose is to investigate the mathematical techniques required for a model capable of accurate extrapolated performance predictions and to obtain test data required to estimate mass transfer coefficients and verify the computer model. Models have been developed to demonstrate that the finite difference technique can be successfully applied to sorbents and conditions used in spacecraft CO2 removal systems. The nonisothermal, axially dispersed, plug flow model with linear driving force for 5X sorbent and pore diffusion for silica gel are then applied to test data. A more complex model, a non-darcian model (two dimensional), has also been developed for simulation of the test data. This model takes into account the channeling effect on column breakthrough. Four FORTRAN computer programs are presented: a two-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a one-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a model of thermal vacuum desorption; and a model of a tri-sectional packed bed with two different sorbent materials. The programs are capable of simulating up to four gas constituents for each process, which can be increased with a few minor changes.

  13. Mesoporous Molecular Sieves as Supports for Metathesis Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcar, Hynek; Cejka, Jirí

    Mesoporous molecular sieves represent a new family of inorganic oxides with regular nanostructure, large surface areas, large void volumes, and narrow pore size distribution of mesopores. These materials offer new possibilities for designing highly active and selective catalysts for olefin metathesis and metathesis polymerization. Siliceous sieves MCM-41, MCM-48, SBA-15, and organized mesoporous alumina (OMA) were used as supports for preparation of new molybdenum and rhenium oxide catalysts, as well as for heterogenization of well-defined homogeneous catalysts.

  14. Carbon molecular sieves for air separation from Nomex aramid fibers.

    PubMed

    Villar-Rodil, Silvia; Martínez-Alonso, Amelia; Tascón, Juan M D

    2002-10-15

    Activated carbon fibers prepared from aramid fibers have proved to possess outstanding homogeneity in pore size, most of all when Nomex aramid fiber is used as precursor. Taking advantage of this feature, microporous carbon molecular sieves for air separation have been prepared through carbon vapor deposition of benzene on Nomex-derived carbon fibers activated to two different burnoff degrees. Carbon molecular sieves with good selectivity for this separation and showing acceptable adsorption capacities were obtained from ACFs activated to the two burnoff degrees chosen. PMID:12702417

  15. Double rotation NMR studies of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, R. |

    1993-07-01

    Goal is to study the organization and structures of guest atoms and molecules and their reactions on internal surfaces within pores of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na double rotation NMR (DOR) is used since it removes the anisotropic broadening in NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, thus increasing resolution. This work concentrates on probing aluminum framework atoms in aluminophosphate molecular sieves and sodium extra framework cations in porous aluminosilicates. In aluminophosphates, ordering and electronic environments of the framework {sup 27}Al nuclei are modified upon adsorption of water molecules within the channels; a relation is sought between the sieve channel topology and the organization of adsorbed water, as well as the interaction between the Al nuclei and the water molecules. Extra framework Na{sup +} cations are directly involved in adsorption processes and reactions in zeolite cavities.

  16. Update on N2O4 Molecular Sieving with 3A Material at NASA/KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Chuck; Dorn, Claudia

    2000-01-01

    During its operational life, the Shuttle Program has experienced numerous failures in the Nitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4) portion of Reaction Control System (RCS), many of which were attributed to iron-nitrate contamination. Since the mid-1980's, N2O4 has been processed through a molecular sieve at the N2O4 manufacturer's facility which results in an iron content typically less than 0.5 parts-per-million-by-weight (ppmw). In February 1995, a Tiger Team was formed to attempt to resolve the iron nitrate problem. Eighteen specific actions were recommended as possibly reducing system failures. Those recommended actions include additional N2O4 molecular sieving at the Shuttle launch site. Testing at NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) determined an alternative molecular sieve material could also reduce the water-equivalent content (free water and HNO3) and thereby further reduce the natural production of iron nitrate in N2O4 while stored in iron-alloy storage tanks. Since April '96, NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been processing N2O4 through the alternative molecular sieve material prior to delivery to Shuttle launch pad N2O4 storage tanks. A new, much larger capacity molecular sieve unit has also been used. This paper will evaluate the effectiveness of N2O4 molecular sieving on a large-scale basis and attempt to determine if the resultant lower-iron and lower-water content N2O4 maintains this new purity level in pad storage tanks and shuttle flight systems.

  17. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieve electrically regenerable air filter media

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Kirk A.; Burchell, Timothy D.; Judkins, Roddie R.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically regenerable gas filter system includes a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) filter medium. After a separate medium-efficiency pre-filter removes particulate from the supply airstream, the CFCMS filter sorbs gaseous air pollutants before the air is recirculated to the space. When saturated, the CFCMS media is regenerated utilizing a low-voltage current that is caused to pass through the filter medium.

  18. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieve electrically regenerable air filter media

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, K.A.; Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R.

    1998-10-27

    An electrically regenerable gas filter system includes a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) filter medium. After a separate medium-efficiency pre-filter removes particulate from the supply air stream, the CFCMS filter sorbs gaseous air pollutants before the air is recirculated to the space. When saturated, the CFCMS media is regenerated utilizing a low-voltage current that is caused to pass through the filter medium. 3 figs.

  19. Production of carbon molecular sieves from Illinois coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves (CMS) have become an increasingly important class of adsorbents for application in the separation of gas molecules that vary in size and shape. A study is in progress at the Illinois State Geological Survey to determine whether Illinois basin coals are suitable feedstocks for the production of CMS and to evaluate their potential application in gas separation processes of commercial importance. Chars were prepared from Illinois coal in a fixed-bed reactor under a wide range of heat treatment and activation conditions. The effects of various coal/char pretreatments, including coal demineralization, preoxidation, char activation, and carbon deposition, on the molecular sieve properties of the chars were also investigated. Chars with commercially significant BET surface areas of 1500 m2/g were produced by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide as the activant. These high-surface-area (HSA) chars had more than twice the adsorption capacity of commercial carbon and zeolite molecular sieves. The kinetics of adsorption of various gases, e.g., N2, O2, CO2, CH4, CO and H2, on these chars at 25??C was measured. The O2/N2 molecular sieve properties of one char prepared without chemical activation were similar to those of a commercial CMS. On the other hand, the O2/N2 selectivity of the HSA char was comparable to that of a commercial activated carbon, i.e., essentially unity. Carbon deposition, using methane as the cracking gas, increased the O2/N2 selectivity of the HSA char, but significantly decreased its adsorption capacity. Several chars showed good potential for efficient CO2/CH4 separation; both a relatively high CO2 adsorption capacity and CO2/CH4 selectivity were achieved. The micropore size distribution of selected chars was estimated by equilibrium adsorption of carbon dioxide, n-butane and iso-butane at O??C. The extent of adsorption of each gas corresponded to the effective surface area contained in pores with diameters greater than 3

  20. Nanoscale octahedral molecular sieves: Syntheses, characterization, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia

    The major part of this research consists of studies on novel synthesis methods, characterization, and catalytic applications of nanoscale manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves. The second part involves studies of new applications of bulk porous molecular sieve and layered materials (MSLM), zeolites, and inorganic powder materials for diminishing wound bleeding. Manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS) are very important microporous materials. They have been used widely as bulk materials in catalysis, separations, chemical sensors, and batteries, due to their unique tunnel structures and useful properties. Novel methods have been developed to synthesize novel nanoscale octahedral molecular sieve manganese oxides (OMS) and metal-substituted OMS materials in order to modify their physical and chemical properties and to improve their catalytic applications. Different synthetic routes were investigated to find better, faster, and cheaper pathways to produce nanoscale or metal-substituted OMS materials. In the synthetic study of nanosize OMS materials, a combination of sol-gel synthesis and hydrothermal reaction was used to prepare pure crystalline nanofibrous todorokite-type (OMS-1) and cryptomelane-typed (OMS-2) manganese oxides using four alkali cations (Li+, K+, Na +, Rb+) and NH4+ cations. In the synthesis study of nanoscale and metal-substituted OMS materials, a combination of sol-gel synthesis and solid-state reaction was used to prepare transition metal-substituted OMS-2 nanorods, nanoneedles, and nanowires. Preparative parameters of syntheses, such as cation templates, heating temperature and time, were investigated in these syntheses of OMS-1 and OMS-2 materials. The catalytic activities of the novel synthetic nanoscale OMS materials has been evaluated on green oxidation of alcohols and toluene and were found to be much higher than their correspondent bulk materials. New applications of bulk manganese oxide molecular sieve and layered materials

  1. Evaluation of Strontium Selectivity by Sandia Octahedral Molecular Sieves (SOMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Rigali, Mark J.; Stewart, Thomas Austin

    2016-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has collaborated with Pleasanton Ridge Research Company (PRRC) to determine whether Sandia Octahedral Molecular Sieves (SOMS) and modified SOMs materials can be synthesized in large batches and produced in granular form. Sandia National Laboratories tested these SOMS and its variants based in aqueous chemical environments for an application-based evaluation of material performance as a sorbent. Testing focused primarily on determining the distribution coefficients (K d ) and chemical selectivity SOMs for alkali earth (Sr) ions in aqueous and dilute seawater solutions. In general the well-crystallized SOMS materials tested exhibited very high K d values (>10 6 ) in distilled water but K d values dropped substantially (%7E10 2 -10 3 ) in the dilute seawater (3%). However, one set of SOMS samples (1.4.2 and 1.4.6) provided by PRRC yielded relatively high K d (approaching 10 4 ) in dilute seawater. Further examination of these samples by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the presence of at least two phases at least one of which may be accounting for the improved K d values in dilute seawater. Evaluation of Strontium Selectivity by Sandia Octahedral Molecular Sieves (SOMS) January 20, 2016

  2. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, Harvey R.; Fanslow, Glenn E.

    1983-01-01

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed.

  3. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, H.R.; Fanslow, G.E.

    1983-12-20

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed. 8 figs.

  4. Transformation of metal-organic frameworks for molecular sieving membranes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanbin; Zhang, Yufan; Zhang, Congyang; Meng, Qin; Xu, Zehai; Su, Pengcheng; Li, Qingbiao; Shen, Chong; Fan, Zheng; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Guoliang

    2016-04-19

    The development of simple, versatile strategies for the synthesis of metal-organic framework (MOF)-derived membranes are of increasing scientific interest, but challenges exist in understanding suitable fabrication mechanisms. Here we report a route for the complete transformation of a series of MOF membranes and particles, based on multivalent cation substitution. Through our approach, the effective pore size can be reduced through the immobilization of metal salt residues in the cavities, and appropriate MOF crystal facets can be exposed, to achieve competitive molecular sieving capabilities. The method can also be used more generally for the synthesis of a variety of MOF membranes and particles. Importantly, we design and synthesize promising MOF membranes candidates that are hard to achieve through conventional methods. For example, our CuBTC/MIL-100 membrane exhibits 89, 171, 241 and 336 times higher H2 permeance than that of CO2, O2, N2 and CH4, respectively.

  5. Transformation of metal-organic frameworks for molecular sieving membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wanbin; Zhang, Yufan; Zhang, Congyang; Meng, Qin; Xu, Zehai; Su, Pengcheng; Li, Qingbiao; Shen, Chong; Fan, Zheng; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Guoliang

    2016-04-01

    The development of simple, versatile strategies for the synthesis of metal-organic framework (MOF)-derived membranes are of increasing scientific interest, but challenges exist in understanding suitable fabrication mechanisms. Here we report a route for the complete transformation of a series of MOF membranes and particles, based on multivalent cation substitution. Through our approach, the effective pore size can be reduced through the immobilization of metal salt residues in the cavities, and appropriate MOF crystal facets can be exposed, to achieve competitive molecular sieving capabilities. The method can also be used more generally for the synthesis of a variety of MOF membranes and particles. Importantly, we design and synthesize promising MOF membranes candidates that are hard to achieve through conventional methods. For example, our CuBTC/MIL-100 membrane exhibits 89, 171, 241 and 336 times higher H2 permeance than that of CO2, O2, N2 and CH4, respectively.

  6. Transformation of metal-organic frameworks for molecular sieving membranes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanbin; Zhang, Yufan; Zhang, Congyang; Meng, Qin; Xu, Zehai; Su, Pengcheng; Li, Qingbiao; Shen, Chong; Fan, Zheng; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Guoliang

    2016-01-01

    The development of simple, versatile strategies for the synthesis of metal-organic framework (MOF)-derived membranes are of increasing scientific interest, but challenges exist in understanding suitable fabrication mechanisms. Here we report a route for the complete transformation of a series of MOF membranes and particles, based on multivalent cation substitution. Through our approach, the effective pore size can be reduced through the immobilization of metal salt residues in the cavities, and appropriate MOF crystal facets can be exposed, to achieve competitive molecular sieving capabilities. The method can also be used more generally for the synthesis of a variety of MOF membranes and particles. Importantly, we design and synthesize promising MOF membranes candidates that are hard to achieve through conventional methods. For example, our CuBTC/MIL-100 membrane exhibits 89, 171, 241 and 336 times higher H2 permeance than that of CO2, O2, N2 and CH4, respectively. PMID:27090597

  7. MOLECULAR SIEVES AS CATALYSTS FOR METHANOL DEHYDRATION IN THE LPDMEtm PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew W. Wang

    2002-04-01

    Several classes of molecular sieves were investigated as methanol dehydration catalysts for the LPDME{trademark} (liquid-phase dimethyl ether) process. Molecular sieves offer a number of attractive features as potential catalysts for the conversion of methanol to DME. These include (1) a wide range of acid strengths, (2) diverse architectures and channel connectivities that provide latitude for steric control, (3) high active site density, (4) well-investigated syntheses and characterization, and (5) commercial availability in some cases. We directed our work in two areas: (1) a general exploration of the catalytic behavior of various classes of molecular sieves in the LPDME{trademark} system and (2) a focused effort to prepare and test zeolites with predominantly Lewis acidity. In our general exploration, we looked at such diverse materials as chabazites, mordenites, pentasils, SAPOs, and ALPOs. Our work with Lewis acidity sought to exploit the structural advantages of zeolites without the interfering effects of deleterious Broensted sites. We used zeolite Ultrastable Y (USY) as our base material because it possesses a high proportion of Lewis acid sites. This work was extended by modifying the USY through ion exchange to try to neutralize residual Broensted acidity.

  8. Use of Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Burchell, Timothy D

    2005-09-01

    A novel adsorbent material, 'carbon fiber composite molecular sieve' (CFCMS), has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Its features include high surface area, large pore volume, and a rigid, permeable carbon structure that exhibits significant electrical conductivity. The unique combination of high adsorptive capacity, permeability, good mechanical properties, and electrical conductivity represents an enabling technology for the development of novel gas separation and purification systems. In this context, it is proposed that a fast-cycle air separation process that exploits a kinetic separation of oxygen and nitrogen should be possible using a CFCMS material coupled with electrical swing adsorption (ESA). The adsorption of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} on activated carbon fibers was investigated using static and dynamic techniques. Molecular sieving effects in the activated carbon fiber were highlighted by the adsorption of CO{sub 2}, a more sensitive probe molecule for the presence of microporosity in adsorbents. The kinetic studies revealed that O2 was more rapidly adsorbed on the carbon fiber than N{sub 2}, and with higher uptake under equilibrium conditions, providing the fiber contained a high proportion of very narrow micropores. The work indicated that CFCMS is capable of separating O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} from air on the basis of the different diffusion rates of the two molecules in the micropore network of the activated carbon fibers comprising the composite material. In response to recent enquires from several potential users of CFCMS materials, attention has been given to the development of a viable continuous process for the commercial production of CFCMS material. As part of this effort, work was implemented on characterizing the performance of lignin-based activated carbon fiber, a potentially lower cost fiber than the pitch-based fibers used for CFCMS production to date. Similarly, to address engineering issues, measurements were

  9. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that the GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.

  10. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that themore » GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.« less

  11. Zeolite molecular sieves have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Nuno; Partridge, Johann; Halling, Peter J; Barreiros, Susana

    2002-02-01

    Zeolite molecular sieves very commonly are used as in situ drying agents in reaction mixtures of enzymes in nonaqueous media. They often affect enzyme behavior, and this has been interpreted in terms of altered hydration. Here, we show that zeolites can also have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in low water media, resulting from their cation-exchange ability. Initial rates of transesterification catalyzed by cross-linked crystals of subtilisin were compared in supercritical ethane, hexane, and acetonitrile with water activity fixed by pre-equilibration. Addition of zeolite NaA (4 A powder) still caused remarkable rate enhancements (up to 20-fold), despite the separate control of hydration. In the presence of excess of an alternative solid-state acid-base buffer, however, zeolite addition had no effect. The more commonly used Merck molecular sieves (type 3 A beads) had similar but somewhat smaller effects. All zeolites have ion-exchange ability and can exchange H+ for cations such as Na+ and K+. These exchanges will tend to affect the protonation state of acidic groups in the protein and, hence, enzymatic activity. Zeolites pre-equilibrated in aqueous suspensions of varying pH-pNa gave very different enzyme activities. Their differing basicities were demonstrated directly by equilibration with an indicator dissolved in toluene. The potential of zeolites as acid-base buffers for low-water media is discussed, and their ability to overcome pH memory is demonstrated.

  12. Synthesis of mesoporous SAPO-34 molecular sieves and their applications in dehydration of butanols and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jong Won; Jeon, Jaewoo; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2013-04-01

    Microporous SAPO-34 molecular sieves were hydrothermally synthesized with microwave irradiation in the presence of tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAOH) as a template. SAPO-34 molecular sieves with mesoporosity were also prepared in the presence of carbon black as a hard template. By increasing the content of the carbon black template in the synthesis, the mesopore volume increased. Dehydration of alcohols (butanols and ethanol) was carried out with the synthesized SAPO-34 molecular sieves, and the lifetime of the catalysts for the dehydration reaction increased as the mesoporosity increased. Moreover, the performance of the microporous catalyst synthesized with microwave was better than that of the catalyst obtained with conventional electric heating. The relative performance of the catalytic dehydration may be explained by the mesoporosity and the crystal size. Therefore, it may be concluded that small-sized SAPO-34 molecular sieves with high mesoporosity can be produced efficiently with microwave irradiation in the presence of carbon black template, and the molecular sieves are effective in the stable dehydration of alcohols.

  13. Microscopic Observation of Kinetic Molecular Sieving of Hydrogen Isotopes in a Nanoporous Material

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K.; Jobic, H.

    2010-08-20

    We report quasielastic neutron scattering studies of H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} diffusion in a carbon molecular sieve, demonstrating remarkable quantum effects, with the heavier isotope diffusing faster below 100 K, confirming our recent predictions. Our transition state theory and molecular dynamics calculations show that while it is critical for this effect to have narrow windows of size comparable to the de Broglie wavelength, high flux requires that the energy barrier be reduced through small cages. Such materials will enable novel processes for kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes.

  14. In-situ preparation of functionalized molecular sieve material and a methodology to remove template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rekha; Ahmed, Maqsood; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Sakthivel, Ayyamperumal

    2016-03-01

    A series of diaminosilane-functionalized silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve (SAPO-37) was prepared by in-situ synthesis, and a novel method was developed for the selective removal of structure directing agent (SDA)/template from the functionalized SAPO-37.The complete removal of the SDA was evident according to FT-IR, TGA, 13C MAS-NMR and elemental analysis. The developed method was found to be efficient for removal of template from microporous molecular sieve viz., SAPO-37 and can be applied for other microporous molecular sieves such as SAPO-5, SAPO-40, etc. The powder XRD pattern of the template-removed samples showed a highly crystalline SAPO-37 phase. Argentometric titration revealed that more than 90% of diamine functionality exposed on the surface was accessible for catalytic applications. The resultant materials showed promising activity for ring opening of epoxide with aniline to yield β-amino-alcohol.

  15. The modeling of cobalt ions adsorption on molecular sieves and zeolite AW-300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćiçek, Ekrem; Aras, Erdal; Dede, Bülent; Kılıç, Ahmet

    2013-12-01

    High concentration heavy metals in the environment can cause serious problem on human health. Cobalt is a heavy metal that has a large application in different fields. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the adsorption of the cobalt ions from aqueous solutions on molecular sieves and zeolite AW-300. Molecular sieves and zeolites were activated at 873 K for two hours before the adsorption experiment. UV-Visible spectrometer was used to measure concentrations of cobalt ions. All adsorption experiments were performed according to statistical designs for response surface methodological approach. A response surface analysis was guided to advance understand the interactions between adsorbent dose and initial concentration of cobalt ions. The removal efficiencies of cobalt ions on sorbents were characterized. The results indicated that molecular sieves and zeolite AW-300 can be used to remove cobalt ions from aqueous solutions.

  16. A systematic investigation of the preparation and properties of composite carbon molecular sieves containing inorganic oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, Henry C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to define the methodology for the preparation and characterization of new carbon-based molecular sieves with composite structures. Carbon molecular sieves have found increasing application in the field of separation and purification of gases. These materials are relatively easy to prepare and their surfaces can be modified to some extent. It is expected that by combining inorganic oxides with the carbonaceous structure one can begin to design composite materials with a wider range of possible chemical and physical properties. In this way, the IOM-CMS materials may confer distinct advantages over pure carbon molecular sieves, not just for separation, but also for catalysis. The most recent results in the design and characterization of these IOM-CMS materials are reviewed and summarized. Directions for further research are also presented.

  17. In-situ preparation of functionalized molecular sieve material and a methodology to remove template

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rekha; Ahmed, Maqsood; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Sakthivel, Ayyamperumal

    2016-01-01

    A series of diaminosilane-functionalized silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve (SAPO-37) was prepared by in-situ synthesis, and a novel method was developed for the selective removal of structure directing agent (SDA)/template from the functionalized SAPO-37.The complete removal of the SDA was evident according to FT-IR, TGA, 13C MAS-NMR and elemental analysis. The developed method was found to be efficient for removal of template from microporous molecular sieve viz., SAPO-37 and can be applied for other microporous molecular sieves such as SAPO-5, SAPO-40, etc. The powder XRD pattern of the template-removed samples showed a highly crystalline SAPO-37 phase. Argentometric titration revealed that more than 90% of diamine functionality exposed on the surface was accessible for catalytic applications. The resultant materials showed promising activity for ring opening of epoxide with aniline to yield β-amino-alcohol. PMID:26960707

  18. Chlorodifluoromethane equilibrium on 13X molecular sieve. Final report, September 1992-March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Carlile, D.L.; Mahle, J.J.; Buettner, L.C.; Tevault, D.E.; Friday, D.K.

    1994-08-01

    Adsorption phase equilibrium data are required for evaluating any adsorption-based gas separation process. The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center is currently measuring adsorption phase equilibrium data for a variety of chemical warfare agents and their surrogates on adsorbent materials to correlate physical properties to filtration/separation efficiencies of each vapor on each adsorbent. This report details the adsorption phase equilibrium data measured for chlorodifluoromethane (R-22) on 13X Molecular Sieve. The 13X Molecular Sieve is a candidate adsorbent for future military air purification systems employing the pressure-swing adsorption separation process.

  19. Application of 3A molecular sieve layer in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yuan; Wang, Jinzhong E-mail: qingjiang.yu@hit.edu.cn; Yu, Qingjiang E-mail: qingjiang.yu@hit.edu.cn; Huang, Yuewu; Chang, Quanhong; Hao, Chunlei; Jiao, Shujie; Gao, Shiyong; Li, Hongtao; Wang, Dongbo

    2014-08-25

    3A molecular sieve layer was used as dehydration and electronic-insulation layer on the TiO{sub 2} electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells. This layer diminished the effect of water in electrolyte efficiently and enhanced the performance of cells. The conversion efficiency increased from 9.58% to 10.2%. The good moisture resistance of cells was attributed to the three-dimensional interconnecting structure of 3A molecular sieve with strong adsorption of water molecule. While the performance enhancement benefited from the suppression of the charge recombination of electronic-insulation layer and scattering effect of large particles.

  20. Development of design information for molecular-sieve type regenerative CO2-removal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. M.; Ruder, J. M.; Dunn, V. B.; Hwang, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and analytic studies were conducted with molecular sieve sorbents to provide basic design information, and to develop a system design technique for regenerable CO2-removal systems for manned spacecraft. Single sorbate equilibrium data were obtained over a wide range of conditions for CO2, water, nitrogen, and oxygen on several molecular sieve and silica gel sorbents. The coadsorption of CO2 with water preloads, and with oxygen and nitrogen was experimentally evaluated. Mass-transfer, and some limited heat-transfer performance evaluations were accomplished under representative operating conditions, including the coadsorption of CO2 and water. CO2-removal system performance prediction capability was derived.

  1. CTR Fuel recovery system using regeneration of a molecular sieve drying bed

    DOEpatents

    Folkers, Charles L.

    1981-01-01

    A primary molecular sieve drying bed is regenerated by circulating a hot inert gas through the heated primary bed to desorb water held on the bed. The inert gas plus water vapor is then cooled and passed through an auxiliary molecular sieve bed which adsorbs the water originally desorbed from the primary bed. The main advantage of the regeneration technique is that the partial pressure of water can be reduced to the 10.sup.-9 atm. range. This is significant in certain CTR applications where tritiated water (T.sub.2 O, HTO) must be collected and kept at very low partial pressure.

  2. Molecular sieve generation of aviator's oxygen: Performance of a prototype system under simulated flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Ikels, K G; Lamb, M J; Boscola, E J; Ferguson, R H

    1980-07-01

    The molecular sieve method of generating an enriched-oxygen breathing gas is one of several candidate onboard oxygen generation (OBOG) systems under joint Army-Navy-Air Force development for application in tactical aircraft. The performance of a nominal two-man-capacity molecular sieve oxygen generation system was characterized under simulated flight conditions. Data are given on the composition of the molecular sieve-generated breathing gas (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and argon) as a function of inlet air pressure, altitude, breathing gas flow rate, and ambient temperature. The maximum oxygen concentration observed was 95%, with the balance argon. At low demand flow rates and certain conditions of pressure and altitude, the argon enrichment factor exceeded that of oxygen giving a maximum argon concentration of 6.6% with the balance oxygen. The structural integrity of the unit was verified by vibration and centrifuge testing. The performance of the molecular sieve unit is discussed in the context of aircraft operating envelopes using both diluter-demand and 100% delivery subsystems. PMID:6774707

  3. Experiments for the Undergraduate Laboratory that Illustrate the Size-Exclusion Properties of Zeolite Molecular Sieves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments are presented that demonstrate the size-exclusion properties of zeolites and reveal the reason for naming zeolites "molecular sieves". If an IR spectrometer is available, the adsorption or exclusion of alcohols of varying sizes from dichloromethane or chloroform solutions can be readily demonstrated by monitoring changes in the…

  4. Quinidine thiourea-catalyzed enantioselective synthesis of β-nitrophosphonates: Beneficial effects of molecular sieves

    PubMed Central

    Abbaraju, Santhi; Bhanushali, Mayur; Zhao, Cong-Gui

    2011-01-01

    An efficient method for enantioselective synthesis of β-nitrophosphonates via the Michael addition of diphenyl phosphite to nitroalkenes using the readily available quinidine thiourea organocatalyst has been developed. The desired β-nitrophosphonates were obtained in good ee values. Molecular sieves were found to be crucial for achieving high reproducible yields in this reaction. PMID:21921970

  5. Drying R-407C and R-410A refrigerant blends with molecular sieve desiccants

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.P.; Tucker, D.M.

    1998-10-01

    The hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) R-32 (CF{sub 2}H{sub 2}) is a component of refrigerant blends in the 407 and 410 series being tested and commercialized for use as replacements for R-502 and the hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) R-22. The molecular sieve desiccants used with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and HCFC mineral oil systems in the past have achieved high water capacity by excluding the refrigerant and adsorbing only the water. Unfortunately, R-32 is adsorbed on commercial type 3A molecular sieve desiccant products. The result of this adsorption is a loss of water capacity when drying R-32 compared to drying R-22 or R-502 and a reduced level of chemical compatibility of the desiccant with the refrigerant. Some compressor manufacturers are seeking a water concentration as low as 10 mg/kg (ppm[wt]) in the circulating refrigerant of polyolester-lubricated refrigerating equipment using these HFC blends. This paper compares unmodified commercial type 3A molecular sieve desiccants with a recently developed, modified 3A molecular sieve that excludes R-32. The modified 3A has better chemical compatibility with R-32 and high water capacity in liquid R-407C and R-410A. The drying rates of the two desiccants in R-407C and R-410A are similar. Data and test methods are reported on refrigerant adsorption, water capacity, drying rate, and chemical compatibility.

  6. Molecular sieve generation of aviator's oxygen: Performance of a prototype system under simulated flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Ikels, K G; Lamb, M J; Boscola, E J; Ferguson, R H

    1980-07-01

    The molecular sieve method of generating an enriched-oxygen breathing gas is one of several candidate onboard oxygen generation (OBOG) systems under joint Army-Navy-Air Force development for application in tactical aircraft. The performance of a nominal two-man-capacity molecular sieve oxygen generation system was characterized under simulated flight conditions. Data are given on the composition of the molecular sieve-generated breathing gas (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and argon) as a function of inlet air pressure, altitude, breathing gas flow rate, and ambient temperature. The maximum oxygen concentration observed was 95%, with the balance argon. At low demand flow rates and certain conditions of pressure and altitude, the argon enrichment factor exceeded that of oxygen giving a maximum argon concentration of 6.6% with the balance oxygen. The structural integrity of the unit was verified by vibration and centrifuge testing. The performance of the molecular sieve unit is discussed in the context of aircraft operating envelopes using both diluter-demand and 100% delivery subsystems.

  7. Biomass-based palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve as gas separation adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Sumathi; Bashir, Mohammed Jk; Akbar, Zinatizadeh Ali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been widely recognised as a potential low-cost source for the production of high added value materials and proved to be a good precursor for the production of activated carbons. One of such valuable biomasses used for the production of activated carbons is palm shell. Palm shell (endocarp) is an abundant by-product produced from the palm oil industries throughout tropical countries. Palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve has been widely applied in various environmental pollution control technologies, mainly owing to its high adsorption performance, well-developed porosity and low cost, leading to potential applications in gas-phase separation using adsorption processes. This mini-review represents a comprehensive overview of the palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve preparation method, physicochemical properties and feasibility of palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve in gas separation processes. Some of the limitations are outlined and suggestions for future improvements are pointed out.

  8. Growth of oriented molecular sieve crystals on organophosphonate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S.; Bein, T.

    1994-04-01

    THE successful construction of complex organic/inorganic bio-mimetic systems1-3has demonstrated the great power of supra-molecular pre-organization and templating in controlling crystal growth4. For instance, polar organic surfaces or surface-attached polar groups can induce the formation of thin films of iron oxide5. It would be of great interest, for the design of novel devices such as sensors or catalyst membranes6, to be able to control the growth on surfaces of porous crystals with oriented channels: such channels could, for example, control the access of molecules to the surface of a field-effect transistor in a sensor device. Films and membranes with non-oriented channels have been prepared by depositing or growing zeolite7-12 crystals on metal or metal-oxide supports13-21 in one case21, pre-grown crystals of an aluminophosphate zeolite were oriented by application of an electric field. Here we report the oriented growth of crystals of a zinco-phosphate zeolite on gold surfaces modified with metal phosphonate multilayer films. We attribute the high degree of orientation (>90%) to a strong affinity between the phosphonic acid groups of the phosphate multilayer and the (111) faces of the growing crystals.

  9. Effect of soil sieving on respiration induced by low-molecular-weight substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Rahul; Vranová, Valerie; Pavelka, Marian; Rejšek, Klement; Formánek, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    The mesh size of sieves has a significant impact upon soil disturbance, affecting pore structure, fungal hyphae, proportion of fungi to bacteria, and organic matter fractions. The effects are dependent upon soil type and plant coverage. Sieving through a 2 mm mesh increases mineralization of exogenously supplied carbohydrates and phenolics compared to a 5 mm mesh and the effect is significant (p<0.05), especially in organic horizons, due to increased microbial metabolism and alteration of other soil properties. Finer mesh size particularly increases arabinose, mannose, galactose, ferulic and pthalic acid metabolism, whereas maltose mineralization is less affected. Sieving through a 5 mm mesh size is suggested for all type of experiments where enhanced mineralization of low-molecular-weight organic compounds needs to be minimalized.

  10. Reverse osmosis molecular differentiation of organic liquids using carbon molecular sieve membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Dong-Yeun; McCool, Benjamin A.; Deckman, Harry W.; Lively, Ryan P.

    2016-08-01

    Liquid-phase separations of similarly sized organic molecules using membranes is a major challenge for energy-intensive industrial separation processes. We created free-standing carbon molecular sieve membranes that translate the advantages of reverse osmosis for aqueous separations to the separation of organic liquids. Polymer precursors were cross-linked with a one-pot technique that protected the porous morphology of the membranes from thermally induced structural rearrangement during carbonization. Permeation studies using benzene derivatives whose kinetic diameters differ by less than an angstrom show kinetically selective organic liquid reverse osmosis. Ratios of single-component fluxes for para- and ortho-xylene exceeding 25 were observed and para- and ortho- liquid mixtures were efficiently separated, with an equimolar feed enriched to 81 mole % para-xylene, without phase change and at ambient temperature.

  11. Reverse osmosis molecular differentiation of organic liquids using carbon molecular sieve membranes.

    PubMed

    Koh, Dong-Yeun; McCool, Benjamin A; Deckman, Harry W; Lively, Ryan P

    2016-08-19

    Liquid-phase separations of similarly sized organic molecules using membranes is a major challenge for energy-intensive industrial separation processes. We created free-standing carbon molecular sieve membranes that translate the advantages of reverse osmosis for aqueous separations to the separation of organic liquids. Polymer precursors were cross-linked with a one-pot technique that protected the porous morphology of the membranes from thermally induced structural rearrangement during carbonization. Permeation studies using benzene derivatives whose kinetic diameters differ by less than an angstrom show kinetically selective organic liquid reverse osmosis. Ratios of single-component fluxes for para- and ortho-xylene exceeding 25 were observed and para- and ortho- liquid mixtures were efficiently separated, with an equimolar feed enriched to 81 mole % para-xylene, without phase change and at ambient temperature. PMID:27540170

  12. Difunctional polyisobutylene prepared by polymerization of monomer on molecular sieve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Midler, J. A., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Process yields difunctional isobutylene polymers ranging in molecular weight from 1150 to 3600. These polymers have the potential for copolymerization and cross-linking with other monomers to form elastomeric materials.

  13. [Removal Characteristics of Elemental Mercury by Mn-Ce/molecular Sieve].

    PubMed

    Tan, Zeng-qiang; Niu, Guo-ping; Chen, Xiao-wen; An, Zhen

    2015-06-01

    The impregnation method was used to support molecular sieve with active manganese and cerium components to obtain a composite molecular sieve catalyst. The mercury removal performance of the catalyst was studied with a bench-scale setup. XPS analysis was used to characterize the sample before and after the modification in order to study the changes in the active components of the catalyst prepared. The results showed that the catalyst carrying manganese and cerium components had higher oxidation ability of elemental mercury in the temperature range of 300 degrees C - 450 degrees C, especially at 450 degrees C, the oxidation efficiency of elemental mercury was kept above 80%. The catalyst had more functional groups that were conducive to the oxidation of elemental mercury, and the mercury removal mainly depended on the chemical adsorption. The SO2 and NO in flue gas could inhibit the oxidation of elemental mercury to certain extent. PMID:26387298

  14. Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Iton, Lennox E.; Maroni, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

  15. Evaluation of RTV as a Moldable Matrix When Combined With Molecular Sieve and Organic Hydrogen Getter

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    This work was undertaken in an effort to develop a combined RTV 615/3Å molecular sieve/DEB molded component. A molded RTV 615/3Å molecular sieve component is currently in production, and an RTV 615/DEB component was produced in the past. However, all three materials have never before been combined in a single production part, and this is an opportunity to create a new component capable of being molded to shape, performing desiccation, and hydrogen gettering. This analysis looked at weapons system parameters and how they might influence part design. It also looked at material processing and how it related to mixing, activating a dessicant, and hydrogen uptake testing.

  16. A 1-D Model of the 4 Bed Molecular Sieve of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Developments to improve system efficiency and reliability for water and carbon dioxide separation systems on crewed vehicles combine sub-scale systems testing and multi-physics simulations. This paper describes the development of COMSOL simulations in support of the Life Support Systems (LSS) project within NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. Specifically, we model the 4 Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) operating on the International Space Station (ISS).

  17. A Pervaporation Study of Ammonia Solutions Using Molecular Sieve Silica Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xing; Fraser, Thomas; Myat, Darli; Smart, Simon; Zhang, Jianhua; Diniz da Costa, João C.; Liubinas, Audra; Duke, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    An innovative concept is proposed to recover ammonia from industrial wastewater using a molecular sieve silica membrane in pervaporation (PV), benchmarked against vacuum membrane distillation (VMD). Cobalt and iron doped molecular sieve silica-based ceramic membranes were evaluated based on the ammonia concentration factor downstream and long-term performance. A modified low-temperature membrane evaluation system was utilized, featuring the ability to capture and measure ammonia in the permeate. It was found that the silica membrane with confirmed molecular sieving features had higher water selectivity over ammonia. This was due to a size selectivity mechanism that favoured water, but blocked ammonia. However, a cobalt doped silica membrane previously treated with high temperature water solutions demonstrated extraordinary preference towards ammonia by achieving up to a 50,000 mg/L ammonia concentration (a reusable concentration level) measured in the permeate when fed with 800 mg/L of ammonia solution. This exceeded the concentration factor expected by the benchmark VMD process by four-fold, suspected to be due to the competitive adsorption of ammonia over water into the silica structure with pores now large enough to accommodate ammonia. However, this membrane showed a gradual decline in selectivity, suspected to be due to the degradation of the silica material/pore structure after several hours of operation. PMID:24957120

  18. Titanium-containing mesoporous molecular sieves for catalytic oxidation of aromatic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanev, Peter T.; Chibwe, Malama; Pinnavaia, Thomas J.

    1994-03-01

    TITANIUM silicalite is an effective molecular-sieve catalyst for the selective oxidation of alkanes, the hydroxylation of phenol and the epoxidation of alkenes in the presence of H2O2 (refs 1-3). The range of organic compounds that can be oxidized is greatly limited, however, by the relatively small pore size (about 0.6 nm) of the host framework4. Large-pore (mesoporous) silica-based molecular sieves have been prepared recently by Kresge et all5-7 and Kuroda et al 8.; the former used a templating approach in which the formation of an inorganic mesoporous structure is assisted by self-organization of surfactants, and the latter involved topochemical rearrangement of a layered silica precursor. Here we describe the use of the templating approach to synthesize mesoporous silica-based molecular sieves partly substituted with titanium-large-pore analogues of titanium silicalite. We find that these materials show selective catalytic activity towards the oxidation of 2,6-ditert-butyl phenol to the corresponding quinone and the conversion of benzene to phenol.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a new microporous cesium silicotitanate (SNL-B) molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    NYMAN,MAY D.; GU,B.X.; WANG,L.M.; EWING,R.C.; NENOFF,TINA M.

    2000-03-20

    Ongoing hydrothermal Cs-Ti-Si-O-H{sub 2}O phase investigations has produced several new ternary phases including a novel microporous Cs-silicotitanate molecular sieve, SNL-B with the approximate formula of Cs{sub 3}TiSi{sub 3}O{sub 9.5}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O. SNL-B is only the second molecular sieve Cs-silicotitanate phase reported to have been synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Crystallites are very small (0.1 x 2 microns) with a blade-like morphology. SNL-B is confirmed to be a 3-dimensional molecular sieve by a variety of characterization techniques (N{sub 2} adsorption, ion exchange, water adsorption/desorption, solid state CP-MAS NMR). SNL-B is able to desorb and adsorb water from its pores while retaining its crystal structure and exchanges Cs cations readily. Additional techniques were used to describe fundamental properties (powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, {sup 29}Si and {sup 133}/Cs MAS NMR, DTA, SEM/EDS, ion selectivity, and radiation stability). The phase relationships of metastable SNL-B to other hydrothermally synthesized Cs-Ti-Si-O-H{sub 2}O phases are discussed, particularly its relationship to a Cs-silicotitanate analogue of pharmacosiderite, and a novel condensed phase, a polymorph of Cs{sub 2}TiSi{sub 6}O{sub 15}(SNL-A).

  20. Praseodymium incorporated AIPO-5 molecular sieves for aerobic oxidation of ethylbenzene.

    PubMed

    Sundaravel, B; Babu, C M; Palanisamy, B; Palanichamy, M; Shanthi, K; Murugesan, V

    2013-04-01

    PrAlPO-5 with (Al + P)/Pr ratios of 25, 50, 75 and 100 molecular sieves were successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method. These molecular sieves were characterised using XPS, TPD-NH3, ex-situ pyridine adsorbed IR, TPR, TGA, 27Al and 31P MAS-NMR and ESR studies. The incorporation of praseodymium in the framework of AlPO-5 was confirmed by XRD, DRS UV-vis and 27Al and 31P MAS-NMR analysis. ESR spectrum showed the presence of adsorbed oxygen. The nature and strength of acid sites were identified by ex-situ pyridine adsorbed IR and TPD-NH3. The BET surface area was found to be in the range of 238-272 m2 g(-1). The catalytic activity of the molecular sieves was tested for the liquid phase aerobic oxidation of ethylbenzene. Acetophenone was found to be the major product with more than 90% ethylbenzene conversion. ICP-OES analysis revealed the presence of praseodymium intact in the framework of AlPO-5 up to five cycles.

  1. A pervaporation study of ammonia solutions using molecular sieve silica membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Fraser, Thomas; Myat, Darli; Smart, Simon; Zhang, Jianhua; Diniz da Costa, João C; Liubinas, Audra; Duke, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    An innovative concept is proposed to recover ammonia from industrial wastewater using a molecular sieve silica membrane in pervaporation (PV), benchmarked against vacuum membrane distillation (VMD). Cobalt and iron doped molecular sieve silica-based ceramic membranes were evaluated based on the ammonia concentration factor downstream and long-term performance. A modified low-temperature membrane evaluation system was utilized, featuring the ability to capture and measure ammonia in the permeate. It was found that the silica membrane with confirmed molecular sieving features had higher water selectivity over ammonia. This was due to a size selectivity mechanism that favoured water, but blocked ammonia. However, a cobalt doped silica membrane previously treated with high temperature water solutions demonstrated extraordinary preference towards ammonia by achieving up to a 50,000 mg/L ammonia concentration (a reusable concentration level) measured in the permeate when fed with 800 mg/L of ammonia solution. This exceeded the concentration factor expected by the benchmark VMD process by four-fold, suspected to be due to the competitive adsorption of ammonia over water into the silica structure with pores now large enough to accommodate ammonia. However, this membrane showed a gradual decline in selectivity, suspected to be due to the degradation of the silica material/pore structure after several hours of operation. PMID:24957120

  2. Synthetic Zeolites and Other Microporous Oxide Molecular Sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, John D.

    1999-03-01

    Use of synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxides since 1950 has improved insulated windows, automobile air-conditioning, refrigerators, air brakes on trucks, laundry detergents, etc. Their large internal pore volumes, molecular-size pores, regularity of crystal structures, and the diverse framework chemical compositions allow "tailoring" of structure and properties. Thus, highly active and selective catalysts as well as adsorbents and ion exchangers with high capacities and selectivities were developed. In the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries, zeolites have made possible cheaper and lead-free gasoline, higher performance and lower-cost synthetic fibers and plastics, and many improvements in process efficiency and quality and in performance. Zeolites also help protect the environment by improving energy efficiency, reducing automobile exhaust and other emissions, cleaning up hazardous wastes (including the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and other radioactive wastes), and, as specially tailored desiccants, facilitating the substitution of new refrigerants for the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons banned by the Montreal Protocol.

  3. Synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxide molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J D

    1999-03-30

    Use of synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxides since 1950 has improved insulated windows, automobile air-conditioning, refrigerators, air brakes on trucks, laundry detergents, etc. Their large internal pore volumes, molecular-size pores, regularity of crystal structures, and the diverse framework chemical compositions allow "tailoring" of structure and properties. Thus, highly active and selective catalysts as well as adsorbents and ion exchangers with high capacities and selectivities were developed. In the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries, zeolites have made possible cheaper and lead-free gasoline, higher performance and lower-cost synthetic fibers and plastics, and many improvements in process efficiency and quality and in performance. Zeolites also help protect the environment by improving energy efficiency, reducing automobile exhaust and other emissions, cleaning up hazardous wastes (including the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and other radioactive wastes), and, as specially tailored desiccants, facilitating the substitution of new refrigerants for the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons banned by the Montreal Protocol.

  4. Inclusion of polyaniline filaments in zeolite molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Enzel, P.; Bein, T. )

    1989-08-24

    Polyaniline has been synthesized in the channels of mordenite (one-dimensional) and zeolite Y (three-dimensional). Aniline was diffused from hexane solution into dehydrated zeolite pores containing different concentrations of framework hydroxyl groups. Addition of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} to an aqueous suspension of the loaded zeolites afforded intrazeolite polyaniline chains, as demonstrated by FTIR, electronic absorption data, and recovery of the included polymer. Stoichiometric, kinetic, XPS, and microscopic data and the absence of bulk conductivity of the polymer/zeolite powders lead to the conclusion that the polymer is formed inside the host channel system. While the polyaniline chains in mordenite channels appear to be more highly oxidized than in Y zeolite, both systems show spectroscopic features typical of emeraldine base and emeraldine salt polymers. The polyaniline/zeolite hybrids represent a new class of materials containing synthetic conductors encapsulated in crystalline inorganic hosts with channel systems of molecular dimensions.

  5. Synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxide molecular sieves

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, John D.

    1999-01-01

    Use of synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxides since 1950 has improved insulated windows, automobile air-conditioning, refrigerators, air brakes on trucks, laundry detergents, etc. Their large internal pore volumes, molecular-size pores, regularity of crystal structures, and the diverse framework chemical compositions allow “tailoring” of structure and properties. Thus, highly active and selective catalysts as well as adsorbents and ion exchangers with high capacities and selectivities were developed. In the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries, zeolites have made possible cheaper and lead-free gasoline, higher performance and lower-cost synthetic fibers and plastics, and many improvements in process efficiency and quality and in performance. Zeolites also help protect the environment by improving energy efficiency, reducing automobile exhaust and other emissions, cleaning up hazardous wastes (including the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and other radioactive wastes), and, as specially tailored desiccants, facilitating the substitution of new refrigerants for the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons banned by the Montreal Protocol. PMID:10097059

  6. Synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxide molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J D

    1999-03-30

    Use of synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxides since 1950 has improved insulated windows, automobile air-conditioning, refrigerators, air brakes on trucks, laundry detergents, etc. Their large internal pore volumes, molecular-size pores, regularity of crystal structures, and the diverse framework chemical compositions allow "tailoring" of structure and properties. Thus, highly active and selective catalysts as well as adsorbents and ion exchangers with high capacities and selectivities were developed. In the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries, zeolites have made possible cheaper and lead-free gasoline, higher performance and lower-cost synthetic fibers and plastics, and many improvements in process efficiency and quality and in performance. Zeolites also help protect the environment by improving energy efficiency, reducing automobile exhaust and other emissions, cleaning up hazardous wastes (including the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and other radioactive wastes), and, as specially tailored desiccants, facilitating the substitution of new refrigerants for the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons banned by the Montreal Protocol. PMID:10097059

  7. Carbon molecular sieve membranes on porous composite tubular supports for high performance gas separations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Pyung -Soo; Bhave, Ramesh R.; Nam, Seung -Eun; Kim, Daejin

    2016-01-11

    Thin carbon molecular sieve membranes (<500 nm) were fabricated inside of long geometry (9 inch) of stainless steel tubes with all welded construction. Alumina intermediate layer on porous stainless steel tube support was used to reduce effective support pore size and to provide a more uniform surface roughness. Novolac phenolic resin solution was then coated on the inside of porous stainless steel tube by slip casting while their viscosities were controlled from 5 centipoises to 30 centipoises. Carbonization was carried out at 700 °C in which thermal stress was minimized and high quality carbon films were prepared. The highest separationmore » performance characteristics were obtained using 20 cP phenolic resin solutions. The fabricated CMSM showed good separation factor for He/N2 462, CO2/N2 97, and O2/N2 15.4. As the viscosity of polymer precursor solution was reduced from 20 cP to 15 cP, gas permeance values almost doubled with somewhat lower separation factor He/N2 156, CO2/N2 88, and O2/N2 7.7.« less

  8. Tunable ionic-conductivity of collapsed Sandia octahedral molecular sieves (SOMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Pless, Jason; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Garino, Terry J.; Axness, Marlene

    2006-11-01

    This proposal focuses on the synthesis and characterization of ''tunable'' perovskite ceramics with resulting controlled strength and temperature of dielectric constants and/or with ionic conductivity. Traditional methods of synthesis involve high temperature oxide mixing and baking. We developed a new methodology of synthesis involving the (1) low temperature hydrothermal synthesis of metastable porous phases with ''tuned'' stoichiometry, and element types, and then (2) low temperature heat treatment to build exact stoichiometry perovskites, with the desired vacancy concentrations. This flexible pathway can lead to compositions and structures not attainable by conventional methods. During the course of this program, a series of Na-Nb perovskites were synthesized by calcining and collapsing microporous Sandia Octahedral Molecular Sieve (SOMS) phases. These materials were studied by various characterization techniques and conductivity measurements to better delineate stability and stoichiometry/bulk conductivity relationships. The conductivity can be altered by changing the concentration and type of the substituting framework cation(s) or by ion exchange of sodium. To date, the Na{sub 0.9}Mg{sub 0.1}Nb{sub 0.8}Ti{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} shows the best conductivity.

  9. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q.

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  10. Molecular sieve oxygen generating system: the argon question--a brief review.

    PubMed

    Ikels, K G; Adams, J D

    1979-09-01

    The molecular sieve oxygen generating system (MSOG) is currently being considered as a replacement for liquid and gaseous stores on aircraft for the supply of aviator's breathing oxygen. Incorporation of onboard oxygen generation in aircraft not only increases system safety but also minimizes logistic requirements. However, a unique characteristic of the MSOG is that it concentrates not only oxygen but also argon in the process of removing nitrogen from engine bleed air. Maximum concentrations produced by present systems are in the order of 95% oxygen and 5% argon. These results have precipitated numerous questions relating to the physiological effects of argon in the product breathing gas. This report reviews the current literature concerning argon as a minor constituent (less than 10%) in gas breathing systems and recommends studies prior to human compatibility testing of the molecule sieve oxygen generating systems.

  11. Titania nanoparticles synthesis in mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41.

    PubMed

    Lihitkar, N B; Abyaneh, Majid Kazemian; Samuel, V; Pasricha, R; Gosavi, S W; Kulkarni, S K

    2007-10-01

    Nanocrystalline titanium oxide (TiO(2)) is one of the most useful oxide material, because of its widespread applications in photocatalysis, solar energy conversion, sensors and optoelectronics. The control of particle size and monodispersity of TiO(2) nanoparticles is a challenging task. The use of MCM-41, an inorganic template of uniform pore size (2-10 nm), can overcome this difficulty and produce stable nanoparticles of uniform size and shape. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of titania nanoparticles inside the pores of silica based MCM-41 forming a TiO(2)/Si-MCM composite. Composites are formed in the alcoholic medium by incipient wetness impregnation method. Titania particles of average 3 nm size are obtained. Effect of silica and titania precursors on the quality of nanoparticles has been investigated. The characterization of titania-MCM-41 composites has been carried out using a variety of techniques like UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. It has been found that the titania particles are co-ordinated with Si-MCM by SiOTi covalent bond. PMID:17586518

  12. Advanced Nanostructured Molecular Sieves for Energy Efficient Industrial Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Kunhao Li, Michael Beaver

    2012-01-18

    Due to the very small relative volatility difference between propane and propylene, current propane/propylene separation by distillation requires very tall distillation towers (150-250 theoretical plates) and large reflux ratios (up to 15), which is considered to be the most energy consuming large-scale separation process. Adsorptive separation processes are widely considered to be more energy-efficient alternatives to distillation. However, slow diffusion kinetics/mass transport rate through the adsorbent bed often limits the performance of such processes, so further improvements are possible if intra-particle mass transfer rates can be improved. Rive Technology, Inc. is developing and commercializing its proprietary mesoporous zeolite technology for catalysis and separation. With well-controlled intracrystalline mesoporosity, diffusion kinetics through such mesoporous zeolite based catalysts is much improved relative to conventional zeolites, leading to significantly better product selectivity. This 'proof-of-principle' project (DE-EE0003470) is intended to demonstrate that Rive mesoporous zeolite technology can be extended and applied in adsorptive propane/propylene separation and lead to significant energy saving compared to the current distillation process. In this project, the mesoporous zeolite Y synthesis technology was successfully extended to X and A zeolites that are more relevant to adsorbent applications. Mesoporosity was introduced to zeolite X and A for the first time while maintaining adequate adsorption capacity. Zeolite adsorbents were tested for liquid phase separation performance using a pulse flow test unit and the test results show that the separation selectivity of the mesoporous zeolite adsorbent is much closer to optimal for a Simulated Moving Bed (SMB) separation process and the enhanced mesoporosity lead to >100% increase of overall mass transport rate for propane and propylene. These improvements will significantly improve the

  13. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes continuing work on the activation and characterization of formed carbon fiber composites. The composites are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and activated at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) using steam, CO{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} at different conditions of temperature and time, and with different furnace configurations. The general aims of the project are to produce uniformly activated samples with controlled pore structures for specialist applications such as gas separation and water treatment. In previous work the authors reported that composites produced from isotropic pitch fibers weighing up to 25g can be uniformly activated through the appropriate choice of reaction conditions and furnace configurations. They have now succeeded in uniformly activating composites of dimensions up to 12 x 7 x 6 cm, or up to about 166 gram - a scale-up factor of about six. Part of the work has involved the installation of a new furnace that can accommodate larger composites. Efforts were made to achieve uniform activation in both steam and CO{sub 2}. The authors have also succeeded in producing materials with very uniform and narrow pore size distributions by using a novel method involving low temperature oxygen chemisorption in combination with heat treatment in N{sub 2} at high temperatures. Work has also started on the activation of PAN based carbon fibers and fiber composites with the aim of producing composites with wide pore structures for use as catalyst supports. So far activation of the PAN fiber composites supplied by ORNL has been difficult which is attributed to the low reactivity of the PAN fibers. As a result, studies are now being made of the activation of the PAN fibers to investigate the optimum carbonization and activation conditions for PAN based fibers.

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and pulsed laser ablation of molecular sieves for thin film applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Trinidad, Jr.

    1998-12-01

    Molecular sieves are one class of crystalline low density metal oxides which are made up of one-, two-, and three dimensional pores and/or cages. We have investigated the synthesis and characterization of metal substituted aluminophosphates and all silica molecular sieves for thin film applications. A new copper substituted aluminophosphate, CuAPO-5 has been synthesized and characterized using x-ray powder diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Electron spin resonance and electron spin echo modulation provided supporting evidence of framework incorporation of Cu(II) ions. Thus, an exciting addition has been added to the family of metal substituted aluminophosphates where substitution of the metal has been demonstrated as framework species. Also presented here is the synthesis and characterization of an iron substituted aluminophosphate, FeAPO-5, and an all silica zeolite, UTD-1 for thin film applications. Pulsed laser ablation has been employed as the technique to generate thin films. Here an excimer laser (KrFsp*, 248 nm) was used to deposit the molecular sieves on a variety of substrates including polished silicon, titanium nitride, and porous stainless steel disks. The crystallinity of the deposited films was enhanced by a post hydrothermal treatment. A vapor phase treatment of the laser deposited FeAPO-5 films has been shown to increase the crystallinity of the film without increasing film thickness. Thin films of the FeAPO-5 molecular sieves were subsequently used as the dielectric phase in capacitive type chemical sensors. The capacitance change of the FeAPO-5 devices to the relative moisture makes them potential humidity sensors. The all silica zeolite UTD-1 thin films were deposited on polished silicon and porous supports. A brief post hydrothermal treatment of the laser deposited films deposited on polished silicon and porous metal supports resulted in oriented film growth lending these films to applications in gas separations

  15. Ultrahigh CO2 adsorption capacity on carbon molecular sieves at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Wahby, Anass; Sepúlveda-Escribano, Antonio; Martínez-Escandell, Manuel; Kaneko, Katsumi; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco

    2011-06-28

    Although metal-organic framework (MOF) materials have been postulated as superior to any other sorbent for CO(2) adsorption at room temperature, here we prove that the appropriate selection of the raw material and the synthesis conditions allows the preparation of carbon molecular sieves (CMSs) with adsorption capacity, on a volumetric basis, highly exceeding those reported in the literature for MOFs. Furthermore, the excellent sorption properties of CMSs over the whole pressure range (up to 50 bar) are fully reversible after different adsorption/desorption cycles.

  16. Catalytic Reforming of Lignin-Derived Bio-Oil Over a Nanoporous Molecular Sieve Silicoaluminophosphate-11.

    PubMed

    Park, Y K; Kang, Hyeon Koo; Jang, Hansaem; Suh, Dong Jin; Park, Sung Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of lignin, a major constituent of biomass, was performed. A nanoporous molecular sieve silicoaluminophosphate-11 (SAPO-11) was selected as catalyst. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that 500 degrees C was the optimal pyrolysis temperature. Pyrolyzer-gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy was used to investigate the pyrolysis product distribution. Production of phenolics, the dominant product from the pyrolysis of lignin, was promoted by the increase in the catalyst dose. In particular, low-molecular-mass phenolics were produced more over SAPO-11, while high-molecular-mass phenolics and double-bond-containing phenolics were produced less. The fraction of aromatic compounds, including benzene, toluene, xylene, and ethylbenzene, was also increased by catalytic reforming. The catalytic effects were more pronounced when the catalyst/biomass ratio was increased. The enhanced production of aromatic compounds by an acidic catalyst obtained in this study is in good agreement with the results of previous studies.

  17. Catalytic Reforming of Lignin-Derived Bio-Oil Over a Nanoporous Molecular Sieve Silicoaluminophosphate-11.

    PubMed

    Park, Y K; Kang, Hyeon Koo; Jang, Hansaem; Suh, Dong Jin; Park, Sung Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of lignin, a major constituent of biomass, was performed. A nanoporous molecular sieve silicoaluminophosphate-11 (SAPO-11) was selected as catalyst. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that 500 degrees C was the optimal pyrolysis temperature. Pyrolyzer-gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy was used to investigate the pyrolysis product distribution. Production of phenolics, the dominant product from the pyrolysis of lignin, was promoted by the increase in the catalyst dose. In particular, low-molecular-mass phenolics were produced more over SAPO-11, while high-molecular-mass phenolics and double-bond-containing phenolics were produced less. The fraction of aromatic compounds, including benzene, toluene, xylene, and ethylbenzene, was also increased by catalytic reforming. The catalytic effects were more pronounced when the catalyst/biomass ratio was increased. The enhanced production of aromatic compounds by an acidic catalyst obtained in this study is in good agreement with the results of previous studies. PMID:27483769

  18. Hydroxylation of phenol over MeAPO molecular sieves synthesized by vapor phase transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hui; Chen, Jingjing; Chen, Xia; Leng, Yixin; Zhong, Jing

    2016-07-01

    In this study, MeAPO-25 (Me = Fe, Cu, Mn) molecular sieves were first synthesized by a vapor phase transport method using tetramethyl guanidine as the template and applied to hydroxylation of phenol. The zeolites were characterized by XRD, SEM, FT-IR, and DR UV-Vis. As a result, MeAPO-21 and MeAPO-15 were synthesized by changing the Me/Al ratio. UV-Visible diffuse reflectance study suggested incorporation of heteroatoms into the framework and FT-IR study also supported these data. Effects of heteroatoms, contents of Me in MeAPO-25, reaction temperature, phenol/H2O2 mole ratios, reaction time and concentration of catalyst on the conversion of phenol, as well as on the selectivity were studied. FeAPO-25 exhibited a high catalytic activity at the mole ratio of FeO and Al2O3 equal to 0.1 in the synthesis gel, giving the phenol conversion of 88.75% and diphenols selectivity of 66.23% at 60°C within 3 h [ n(phenol)/ n(H2O2) = 0.75, m(FeAPO-25)/ m(phenol) = 7.5%]. Experimental results indicated that the FeAPO-25 molecular sieve was a fairly promising candidate for the application in hydroxylation of phenol.

  19. Redox chemistry of gaseous reactants inside photoexcited FeAlPO{sub 4} molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Ulagappan, N.; Frei, H.

    2000-01-27

    The reactivity of ligand-to-metal charge transfer excited Fe centers of FeAlPO{sub 4}-5 molecular sieve at the gas-micropore interface has been probed by in situ FT-IR spectroscopy. Laser light in the region 350--430 nm was used to excite the metal centers, and reaction was induced between methanol or 2-propanol and O{sub 2}. Acetone and H{sub 2}O are the observed products of the 2-propanol + O{sub 2} system, while the reaction of methanol with O{sub 2} yields formic acid, methyl formate, and H{sub 2}O as final products. These originate from secondary thermal reaction of initially produced formaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide. The primary step of the proposed mechanism involves one-electron reduction of O{sub 2} by transient Fe{sup +II} under concurrent donation of an electron to be hole of framework oxygen by the alcohol molecule. The efficient reaction suggests that the photoreduced Fe center of the molecular sieve has a substantially stronger reducing power than the conduction band electrons of dense-phase Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} semiconductor particles.

  20. Molecular sieve/sulfonated poly(ether ketone ether sulfone) composite membrane as proton exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changkhamchom, Sairung; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2012-02-01

    A proton exchange membrane (PEM) is an electrolyte membrane used in both polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Currently, PEMs typically used for PEMFCs are mainly the commercially available Nafion^ membranes, which is high cost and loss of proton conductivity at elevated temperature. In this work, the Sulfonated poly(ether ketone ether sulfone), (S-PEKES), was synthesized by the nucleophilic aromatic substitution polycondensation between bisphenol S and 4,4'-dichlorobenzophenone, and followed by the sulfonation reaction with concentrated sulfuric acid. The molecular sieve was added in the S-PEKES matrix at various ratios to form composite membranes to be the candidate for PEM. Properties of both pure sulfonated polymer and composite membranes were compared with the commercial Nafion^ 117 membrane from Dupont. S-PEKES membranes cast from these materials were evaluated as a polymer electrolyte membrane for direct methanol fuel cells. The main properties investigated were the proton conductivity, methanol permeability, thermal, chemical, oxidative, and mechanical stabilities by using a LCR meter, Gas Chromatography, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Fenton's reagent, and Universal Testing Machine. The addition of the molecular sieve helped to increase both the proton conductivity and the methanol stability. These composite membranes are shown as to be potential candidates for use as a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM).

  1. A portable molecular-sieve-based CO2 sampling system for radiocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palonen, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a field-capable sampling system for the collection of CO2 samples for radiocarbon-concentration measurements. Most target systems in environmental research are limited in volume and CO2 concentration, making conventional flask sampling hard or impossible for radiocarbon studies. The present system captures the CO2 selectively to cartridges containing 13X molecular sieve material. The sampling does not introduce significant under-pressures or significant losses of moisture to the target system, making it suitable for most environmental targets. The system also incorporates a significantly larger sieve container for the removal of CO2 from chambers prior to the CO2 build-up phase and sampling. In addition, both the CO2 and H2O content of the sample gas are measured continuously. This enables in situ estimation of the amount of collected CO2 and the determination of CO2 flux to a chamber. The portable sampling system is described in detail and tests for the reliability of the method are presented.

  2. A portable molecular-sieve-based CO{sub 2} sampling system for radiocarbon measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Palonen, V.

    2015-12-15

    We have developed a field-capable sampling system for the collection of CO{sub 2} samples for radiocarbon-concentration measurements. Most target systems in environmental research are limited in volume and CO{sub 2} concentration, making conventional flask sampling hard or impossible for radiocarbon studies. The present system captures the CO{sub 2} selectively to cartridges containing 13X molecular sieve material. The sampling does not introduce significant under-pressures or significant losses of moisture to the target system, making it suitable for most environmental targets. The system also incorporates a significantly larger sieve container for the removal of CO{sub 2} from chambers prior to the CO{sub 2} build-up phase and sampling. In addition, both the CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O content of the sample gas are measured continuously. This enables in situ estimation of the amount of collected CO{sub 2} and the determination of CO{sub 2} flux to a chamber. The portable sampling system is described in detail and tests for the reliability of the method are presented.

  3. A portable molecular-sieve-based CO2 sampling system for radiocarbon measurements.

    PubMed

    Palonen, V

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a field-capable sampling system for the collection of CO2 samples for radiocarbon-concentration measurements. Most target systems in environmental research are limited in volume and CO2 concentration, making conventional flask sampling hard or impossible for radiocarbon studies. The present system captures the CO2 selectively to cartridges containing 13X molecular sieve material. The sampling does not introduce significant under-pressures or significant losses of moisture to the target system, making it suitable for most environmental targets. The system also incorporates a significantly larger sieve container for the removal of CO2 from chambers prior to the CO2 build-up phase and sampling. In addition, both the CO2 and H2O content of the sample gas are measured continuously. This enables in situ estimation of the amount of collected CO2 and the determination of CO2 flux to a chamber. The portable sampling system is described in detail and tests for the reliability of the method are presented.

  4. Synthesis of MCM-41 molecular sieves in the presence of dialkyl dimethyl ammonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Karra, V.R.; Sayari, A.

    1995-12-01

    In the synthesis of MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves the chain length of the surfactant template plays a major role in determining the pore dimensions of the resulting material. The effect of the bulkiness of quaternary ammonium template on the pore size of mesoporous silicates has been studied using various dialkyl dimethyl ammonium bromide salts. These templates were prepared by refluxing long chain N,N-dimethyl alkyl amines and bromo alkanes for 24 h. The obtained silicates were characterized by various techniques including XRD, nitrogen and benzene adsorption, FTIR, {sup 29}Si MAS NMR and electron microscopy. The relationship between the length of both alkyl groups and the pore size of the material will be presented.

  5. Mesoporous Molecular Sieves Based Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis and Metathesis Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcar, Hynek; Čejka, Jiří

    Heterogeneous catalysts for olefin metathesis using different types of (i) siliceous mesoporous molecular sieves, and (ii) organized mesoporous alumina as supports are reported. The catalysts were prepared either by spreading of transition metal oxidic phase on the support surface or by immobilizing transition metal compounds (mostly organometallic) on the support. The activity of these catalysts in various types of metathesis reactions (i.e. alkene and diene metathesis, metathesis of unsaturated esters and ethers, RCM, ROMP and metathesis polymerization of alkynes) was described. The main advantages of these catalysts consist generally in their high activity and selectivity, easy separation of catalysts from reaction products and the preparation of products free of catalyst residue. The examples of pore size influence on the selectivity in metathesis reactions are also given.

  6. Inorganic fluoride uptake as a measure of relative compatibility of molecular sieve desiccants with fluorocarbon refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.P.; Blackwell, C.S.

    1995-12-31

    The fluoride content of molecular sieve desiccants after exposure to R-32 in compatibility tests indicates the extent of the reaction of refrigerant with desiccant. The objective is to determine this fluoride content in a way that reports fluorine that has reacted with the desiccant, not fluorine that is present as adsorbed refrigerant. A conditioning procedure is described to remove adsorbed refrigerant by displacement with water vapor. The efficacy of this procedure is substantiated by {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy. The conditioned desiccant undergoes pyrohydrolysis at a high temperature (975 C, 1787 F) to remove reacted fluorine as HF. Fluoride is determined in the resulting condensate using an ion-selective electrode. The ability of this technique to report accurate fluoride values is confirmed with standard reference materials.

  7. Ionothermal synthesis process for aluminophosphate molecular sieves in the mixed water/ionic liquid system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenchao; Zhang, Weiping; Xu, Renshun; Han, Xiuwen; Tian, Zhijian; Bao, Xinhe

    2012-01-21

    The synthesis process of aluminophosphate AlPO(4)-11 molecular sieve in the mixed water/1-butyl- 3-methylimidazolium bromide ([bmim]Br) ionic liquid was investigated by XRD, multinuclear solid-state NMR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It was observed that a tablet phase, named SIZ-2, was formed at the early stage of crystallization. During crystallization metastable SIZ-2 with an incompletely condensed framework phosphorus disappeared gradually, and the phosphorous species became fully condensed through hydroxyl reaction with tetrahedral aluminum to form thermodynamically stable AlPO(4)-11 in the final product. It was found that [bmim]Br, acting as the structure-directing agent, was occluded into the AlPO(4)-11 channel.

  8. Production of carbon molecular sieves from Illinois coal. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzio, A.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Feizoulof, C.A.; Vyas, S.N.

    1994-09-01

    Carbon molecular sieves (CMS) have become an increasingly important class of adsorbents for use in gas separation and recovery processes. The overall objective of this project is to determine whether Illinois coal is a suitable feedstock for the production of CMS and to evaluate the potential application of the products in commercial gas separation processes. The full potential of these materials in commercial gas separations has yet to be realized. In Phase II, the optimal char preparation conditions determined in Phase I are being applied to production of larger quantities of CMS in a 2 in. ID batch fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) and a 4 in. ID continuous rotary tube kiln (RTK). In the previous reporting period, an invention disclosure describing a novel CMS preparation technique (oxygen deposition) was prepared and submitted to Research Corporation Technologies for evaluation. During this reporting period, work continued on the development of the oxygen deposition process. Carbon deposition as a means to narrow pore size was also investigated. Pound quantities of CMS were prepared from IBC-102 coal in the TRK. A meeting was arranged between the ISGS and Carbo Tech Industieservice GmbH, one of two companies in the world that produce CMS from coal, to discuss possible shipment of Illinois coal to Germany for CMS production. A secrecy agreement between the ISGS and Carbo Tech is in preparation. Several large scale char production runs using Industry Mine coal were conducted in an 18 in. ID batch and 8 in. ID continuous RTK at Allis Mineral Systems, Milwaukee, WI. The molecular sieve properties of the chars have yet to be determined.

  9. Practical-scale tests of cryogenic molecular sieve for separating low-concentration hydrogen isotopes from helium

    SciTech Connect

    Willms, R.S.; Taylor, D.J.; Enoeda, Mikio; Okuno, Kenji

    1994-06-01

    Earlier bench-scale work at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory examined a number of adsorbents for their suitability for separating low-concentration hydrogen (no tritium) from helium. One of the effective adsorbents was Linde 5A molecular sieve. Recently, experiments including tritium were conducted using practical-scale adsorbers. These tests used existing cryogenic molecular sieve beds (CMSB`s) which each contain about 1.6 kg of Linde 5A molecular sieve. They are part of the TSTA integrated tritium processing system. Gas was fed to each CMSB at about 13 SLPM with a nominal composition of 99% He, 0.98% H{sub 2} and 0.02% HT. In all cases, for an extended period of time, the beds allowed no detectable (via Raman spectroscopy) hydrogen isotopes to escape in the bed effluent. Thereafter, the hydrogen isotopes appeared in the bed exit with a relatively sharp breakthrough curve. This work concludes that cryogenic molecular sieve adsorption is an practical and effective means of separating low-concentration hydrogen isotopes from a helium carrier.

  10. Self-Assembly and Dynamics of Organic 2D Molecular Sieves: Ab Initio and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. John, Alexander; Wexler, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous molecular self-assembly is a promising route for bottom-up manufacturing of two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with specific topologies on atomically flat surfaces. Of particular interest is the possibility of selective lock-and-key interaction of guest molecules inside cavities formed by complex self-assembled host structures. Our host structure is a monolayer consisting of interdigitated 1,3,5-tristyrylbenzene substituted by alkoxy peripheral chains containing n = 6, 8, 10, 12, or 14 carbon atoms (TSB3,5-C n) deposited on a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. Using ab initio methods from quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations, we construct and analyze the structure and functionality of the TSB3,5-C n monolayer as a molecular sieve. Supported by ACS-PRF 52696-ND5.

  11. Spontaneous liquid-gas imbibition for characterization of carbon molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Su, Yanmin; Xu, Shaoping; Wang, Jifeng; Xiao, Ronglin

    2012-07-01

    Spontaneous liquid-gas imbibition at 293.2K and 0.1 MPa was conducted to assess the micropore size and size-exclusion property of carbon molecular sieves (CMS). The CMS were firstly saturated with N(2) and then immersed into water. The volume of gas recovered by the water imbibition was measured and applied to evaluate the density of the N(2) adsorbed in the CMS. The micropore size of the CMS was determined by comparing the N(2) density from the water-N(2) imbibition with that calculated by grand canonical simulation. The micropore size evaluated by the liquid-gas imbibition coincides with that obtained by N(2) adsorption at ambient temperature. The size-exclusion property of the CMS was estimated through comparing the N(2) recovery by imbibition of liquids with increasing molecular dimensions, that is, water, benzene, and cyclohexane. The amount of N(2) recovered from benzene imbibition is dramatically less than that from the water imbibition, showing that the dominated micropore size of the CMS is smaller than 0.37 nm. Furthermore, the effect of chemical vapor deposition treatment on the porous texture of the CMS was revealed by the liquid-gas imbibition.

  12. The effects of zeolite molecular sieve based surface treatments on the properties of wool fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carran, Richard S.; Ghosh, Arun; Dyer, Jolon M.

    2013-12-01

    Wool is a natural composite fiber, with keratin and keratin-associated proteins as the key molecular components. The outermost surface of wool fibers comprises a hydrophobic lipid layer that can lead to unsatisfactory processing and properties of fabric products. In this study, molecular sieve 5A, a Na+ and Ca2+ exchanged type A zeolite with a 1:1 Si:Al ratio was integrated onto the surface of wool using 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxy silane. The resultant surface morphology, hydrophilicity and mechanical performance of the treated wool fabrics were then evaluated. Notably, the surface hydrophilicity of wool was observed to increase dramatically. When wool was treated with a dispersion of 2 wt% acetic acid, 2.5 wt% zeolite and 0.3 wt% or more silane, the water contact angle was observed to decrease from an average value of 148° to 0° over a period of approximately 30 s. Scanning electron microscopic imaging indicated good coverage of the wool surface with zeolite particles, with infrared spectroscopic evaluation indicating strong bonding of the dealuminated zeolite to wool keratins. This application of zeolite showed no adverse effects on the tensile and other mechanical properties of the fabric. This study indicates that zeolite-based treatment is a potentially efficient approach to increasing the surface hydrophilicity and modifying other key surface properties of wool and wool fabrics.

  13. Continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” on 5A zeolite for distinguishing small organic molecules by size

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-09-11

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences weremore » effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. Lastly, this novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation.« less

  14. Continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” on 5A zeolite for distinguishing small organic molecules by size

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-09-11

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. Lastly, this novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation.

  15. Continuously Adjustable, Molecular-Sieving “Gate” on 5A Zeolite for Distinguishing Small Organic Molecules by Size

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. This novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation. PMID:26358480

  16. Degradation of antibiotic amoxicillin using 1 x 1 molecular sieve-structured manganese oxide.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Wen-Hui; Hu, Ching-Yao; Liu, Bin-Sheng; Tzou, Yu-Min

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism ofamoxicillin (AMO) degradation using a 1 x 1 molecular sieve-structured manganese oxide (MnO2) was studied. The presence of the buffer solution (i.e., NaHCO3, NaH2PO4 and KH2PO4) diminished AMO binding to MnO2, thus reducing AMO degradation in the pretest; therefore, all other experiments in this study were conducted without the addition of a buffer. Third-order rate constants, second-order on AMO and first-order on MnO2 increased with elevating pH level (2.81-7.23) from 0.54 to 9.17 M(-2) s(-1), and it decreased to 4.27 M(-2) s(-1) at pH 8.53 beyond the pk(a2) of AMO (7.3). The dissolution of the MnO2 suspension with and without AMO exhibited a similar trend; that is, Mn2+ concentration increased with decreasing pH. However, the dissolution of MnO2 with AMO was greater than that without AMO, except for the reaction occurring at pH 8.53, partially indicating that MnO2 acts as an oxidant in AMO degradation. The preliminary chromatogram data display different products with varying pH reaction s, implying that AMO elimination using this 1 x 1 molecular sieve-structured MnO2 is by adsorption as well as oxidative degradation. A complementary experiment indicates that the amount of oxidatively degraded AMO increases substantially from 65.5% at 4 h to 95% at 48 h, whereas the AMO adsorbed onto MnO2 decreases slightly from 4.5% at4 h to 2.4% at 48 h. The oxidative degradation accounted for more AMO removal than adsorption over the whole reaction course, indicating that the oxidative reaction of AMO on MnO2 dominated the AMO removal. PMID:24350501

  17. Textural mesoporosity and the catalytic activity of mesoporous molecular sieves with wormhole framework structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, T.R.; Liu, Y.; Pinnavaia, T.J.; Billinge, S.J.L.; Rieker, T.P.

    1999-09-29

    Three different water-alcohol cosolvent systems were used to assemble mesoporous molecular sieve silicas with wormhole framework structures (previously denoted HMS silicas) from an electrically neutral amine surfactant (S{degree}) and a silicon alkoxide precursor (I{degree}). The fundamental particle size and associated textural (interparticle) porosity of the disordered structures were correlated with the solubility of the surfactant in the water-alcohol cosolvents used for the S{degree}I{degree} assembly process. Polar cosolvents containing relatively low volume fractions of C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}OH alcohols (n = 1--3) gave heterogeneous surfactant emulsions that assembled intergrown aggregates of small primary particles with high textural pore volumes (designated HMS-HTx). Conversely, three-dimensional, monolithic particles with little or no textural porosity (designated HMS-LTx) were formed from homogeneous surfactant solutions in lower polarity cosolvents. Aluminum substituted AL-HMS-HTx analogues with high textural porosity and improved framework accessibility also were shown to be much more efficient catalysts than AL-HMS-LTx or monolithic forms of hexagonal AL-MCM-41 for the sterically demanding condensed phase alkylation of 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol with cinnamyl alcohol. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies verified the textural differences between wormhole HMS and electrostatically assembled hexagonal MCM-41 and SBA-3 molecular sieves. Power law fits to the scattering data indicated a surface fractal (D{sub s} = 2.76) for HMS-HTx, consistent with rough surfaces. A second power law at lower-q indicated the formation of a mass fractal (D{sub m} = 1.83) consistent with branching of small fundamental particles. Hexagonal MCM-41 and SBA-3 silicas, on the other hand, exhibited scattering properties consistent with moderately rough surfaces (D{sub s} = 2.35 and 2.22, respectively) and large particle diameters ({much

  18. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Carbon-Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.

    1995-01-01

    levels of burnoff above about 40%, the extent of contraction is sufficient to produce stresses that result in fracture. Activated composites have been evaluated for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus has been constructed specifically for this purpose. Samples activated to low burn-off (5-7% wt loss) with low surface areas (from 300-500m{sup 2}/g) give much better separation of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, than samples produced at higher burnoff, and there appears to be no benefit in producing composites at burnoffs higher than 10%. The greater separation efficiency obtained at low burnoff means that the most effective CFCMS can be produced at relatively low cost. Continuing work will attempt to define the parameters that influence this gas separation, and whether these are applicable to other gas mixtures. Five samples of CFCMS have been recently prepared for shipment to British Oxygen Corporation (BOC) for testing as molecular sieves. The samples were machined to specific dimensions at ORNL (approx. 2.5 cm diameter x 1.25 cm thick) and activated at CAER. The samples were produced to different burn-off, but all have relatively narrow pore size distributions with average pore diameters around 6A.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization and Application of N-Ti/13X/MCM-41 Mesoporous Molecular Sieves.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hong; Nguyen, Nhat-Thien; Hei, Xiao-Hui; Nguyen, Cong Nguyen; Tsai, Hsiao-Hsin; Chang, I-Cheng; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2016-06-01

    Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) is a type of phthalate ester. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have examined the removal of DBP. In this study we use a composite material of N-Ti/13X/MCM-41, synthesized by nitrogen, molecular sieve 13X, tetrabutyl orthotitanate and tetraethyl orthosilicate as raw materials, CTAB as a structural template and tetrabutyl titanate and urea under hydrothermal conditions. The optimized experimental conditions, such as the amount of material, reaction time, pH value and initial concentration were tested. The surface areas of N-Ti/13X/MCM-41 were found to be 664 m2g(-1). TEM micrographs revealed N-Ti/13X/MCM-41 is consisting of aggregates of spherical particles, similar with standard synthesized MCM-41 (Mobil Composition of Matter No. 41). Through photocatalytic degradation experiments, the optimum degradation efficiency of DBP was more than 90% at a pH 6.0 with catalyst dosing of 0.15 g L(-1). PMID:27427754

  20. Mixed Matrix Carbon Molecular Sieve and Alumina (CMS-Al2O3) Membranes.

    PubMed

    Song, Yingjun; Wang, David K; Birkett, Greg; Martens, Wayde; Duke, Mikel C; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C

    2016-01-01

    This work shows mixed matrix inorganic membranes prepared by the vacuum-assisted impregnation method, where phenolic resin precursors filled the pore of α-alumina substrates. Upon carbonisation, the phenolic resin decomposed into several fragments derived from the backbone of the resin matrix. The final stages of decomposition (>650 °C) led to a formation of carbon molecular sieve (CMS) structures, reaching the lowest average pore sizes of ~5 Å at carbonisation temperatures of 700 °C. The combination of vacuum-assisted impregnation and carbonisation led to the formation of mixed matrix of CMS and α-alumina particles (CMS-Al2O3) in a single membrane. These membranes were tested for pervaporative desalination and gave very high water fluxes of up to 25 kg m(-2) h(-1) for seawater (NaCl 3.5 wt%) at 75 °C. Salt rejection was also very high varying between 93-99% depending on temperature and feed salt concentration. Interestingly, the water fluxes remained almost constant and were not affected as feed salt concentration increased from 0.3, 1 and 3.5 wt%.

  1. Mixed Matrix Carbon Molecular Sieve and Alumina (CMS-Al2O3) Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yingjun; Wang, David K.; Birkett, Greg; Martens, Wayde; Duke, Mikel C.; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C.

    2016-07-01

    This work shows mixed matrix inorganic membranes prepared by the vacuum-assisted impregnation method, where phenolic resin precursors filled the pore of α-alumina substrates. Upon carbonisation, the phenolic resin decomposed into several fragments derived from the backbone of the resin matrix. The final stages of decomposition (>650 °C) led to a formation of carbon molecular sieve (CMS) structures, reaching the lowest average pore sizes of ~5 Å at carbonisation temperatures of 700 °C. The combination of vacuum-assisted impregnation and carbonisation led to the formation of mixed matrix of CMS and α-alumina particles (CMS-Al2O3) in a single membrane. These membranes were tested for pervaporative desalination and gave very high water fluxes of up to 25 kg m‑2 h‑1 for seawater (NaCl 3.5 wt%) at 75 °C. Salt rejection was also very high varying between 93–99% depending on temperature and feed salt concentration. Interestingly, the water fluxes remained almost constant and were not affected as feed salt concentration increased from 0.3, 1 and 3.5 wt%.

  2. Adsorbate shape selectivity: Separation of the HF/134a azeotrope over carbogenic molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, A.; Mariwala, R.K.; Kane, M.S.; Foley, H.C.

    1995-03-01

    Experimental evidence is provided for adsorptive shape selectivity in the separation of the azeotrope between HF and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (134a) over pyrolyzed poly(furfuryl alcohol)-derived carbogenic molecular sieve (PPFA-CMS). The separation can be accomplished over coconut charcoal or Carbosieve G on the basis of the differences in the extent of equilibrium adsorption of HF and 134a. On these adsorbents 134a is more strongly bound than HF, thus it elutes much more slowly from the bed. The heat of adsorption for 134a in the vicinity of 200 C on Carbosieve G is {approximately}8.8 kcal/mol. In contrast, when the same azeotropic mixture is separated over PPFA-CMS prepared at 500 C, 134a is not adsorbed. As a result 134a elutes from the bed first, followed by HF. The reversal is brought about by the narrower pore size and pore size distribution of the PPFA-CMS versus that for Carbosieve G. Thus the separation over PPFA-CMS is an example of adsorbate shape selectivity and represents a limiting case of kinetic separation.

  3. [Adsorption characteristics of acetone and butanone onto honeycomb ZSM-5 molecular sieve].

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Luan, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Qiang; Ye, Ping-Wei; Li, Kai; Wang, Xi-Qin

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption capacity of acetone and acetone-butanone mixture onto honeycomb ZSM-5 molecular sieve was measured in this paper, and the influences of relative humidity, initial adsorbate concentration and airflow velocity on the adsorption process were investigated. Besides, adsorption performance parameters were calculated by Wheeler's equation. The results showed that relative humidity had no obvious influence on the acetone adsorption performance, which suggests that this material has good hydrophobic ability; in the low concentration range, the dynamic saturated adsorption capacity of acetone increased with the increase of initial concentration, but in the occasion of high concentration of acetone gas (more than 9 mg x L(-1)), the dynamic saturated adsorption capacity maintained at a certain level and did not vary with the increase of initial concentration; the increase of air flow velocity resulted in significant increase of acetone adsorption rate constant, at the same time the critical layer thickness of the adsorbent bed also increased significantly. In the cases of acetone-butanone mixture, the adsorption capacity of butanone onto ZSM-5 was clearly higher than that of acetone.

  4. Mixed Matrix Carbon Molecular Sieve and Alumina (CMS-Al2O3) Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yingjun; Wang, David K.; Birkett, Greg; Martens, Wayde; Duke, Mikel C.; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C.

    2016-01-01

    This work shows mixed matrix inorganic membranes prepared by the vacuum-assisted impregnation method, where phenolic resin precursors filled the pore of α-alumina substrates. Upon carbonisation, the phenolic resin decomposed into several fragments derived from the backbone of the resin matrix. The final stages of decomposition (>650 °C) led to a formation of carbon molecular sieve (CMS) structures, reaching the lowest average pore sizes of ~5 Å at carbonisation temperatures of 700 °C. The combination of vacuum-assisted impregnation and carbonisation led to the formation of mixed matrix of CMS and α-alumina particles (CMS-Al2O3) in a single membrane. These membranes were tested for pervaporative desalination and gave very high water fluxes of up to 25 kg m−2 h−1 for seawater (NaCl 3.5 wt%) at 75 °C. Salt rejection was also very high varying between 93–99% depending on temperature and feed salt concentration. Interestingly, the water fluxes remained almost constant and were not affected as feed salt concentration increased from 0.3, 1 and 3.5 wt%. PMID:27469389

  5. CIT-7, a crystalline, molecular sieve with pores bounded by 8 and 10-membered rings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Xie, Dan; Rea, Thomas; Davis, Mark E.

    2015-01-23

    A new crystalline molecular sieve, denoted CIT-7, is synthesized using an imidazolium-based diquaternary organic structure directing agent (OSDA). The framework structure is determined from a combination of rotation electron diffraction and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. The structure has 10 crystallographically unique tetrahedral atoms (T-atoms) in the unit cell, and can be described as an ordered arrangement of the [425462] mtw building unit and a previously unreported [4452] building unit. The framework contains a 2-dimensional pore system that is bounded by 10 T-atom rings (10-ring, 5.1 Å × 6.2 Å opening) that are connected with oval 8-rings (2.9 Å ×more » 5.5 Å opening) through medium-sized cavities (~7.9 Å) at the channel intersections. CIT-7 can be synthesized over a broad range of compositions including pure-silica and heteroatom, e.g., aluminosilicate and titanosilicate, containing variants.« less

  6. CIT-7, a crystalline, molecular sieve with pores bounded by 8 and 10-membered rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Xie, Dan; Rea, Thomas; Davis, Mark E.

    2015-01-23

    A new crystalline molecular sieve, denoted CIT-7, is synthesized using an imidazolium-based diquaternary organic structure directing agent (OSDA). The framework structure is determined from a combination of rotation electron diffraction and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. The structure has 10 crystallographically unique tetrahedral atoms (T-atoms) in the unit cell, and can be described as an ordered arrangement of the [425462] mtw building unit and a previously unreported [4452] building unit. The framework contains a 2-dimensional pore system that is bounded by 10 T-atom rings (10-ring, 5.1 Å × 6.2 Å opening) that are connected with oval 8-rings (2.9 Å × 5.5 Å opening) through medium-sized cavities (~7.9 Å) at the channel intersections. CIT-7 can be synthesized over a broad range of compositions including pure-silica and heteroatom, e.g., aluminosilicate and titanosilicate, containing variants.

  7. Passive CO{sub 2} removal using a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R.

    1995-12-01

    Manufacture and characterization of a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), and its efficacy as a CO{sub 2} gas adsorbent are reported. The CFCMS consists of an isotropic pitch derived carbon fiber and a phenolic resin derived carbon binder. Activation (selective gasification) of the CFCMS creates microporosity in the carbon fibers, yielding high micropore volumes (>0.5 cm{sup 3}/g) and BET surface areas (>1000 m{sup 2}/g). Moreover, the CFCMS material is a rigid, strong, monolith with an open structure that allows the free-flow of fluids through the material. This combination of properties provides an adsorbent material that has several distinct advantages over granular adsorbents in gas separation systems such as pressure swing adsorption (PSA) units. The results of our initial evaluations of the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and kinetics of CFCMS are reported. The room temperature CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of CFCMS is >120 mg of CO{sub 2} per g of CFCMS. A proposed project is described that targets the development, over a three-year period, of a demonstration separation system based on CFCMS for the removal of CO{sub 2} from a flue gas slip stream at a coal-fired power plant. The proposed program would be conducted jointly with industrial and utility partners.

  8. Mixed Matrix Carbon Molecular Sieve and Alumina (CMS-Al2O3) Membranes.

    PubMed

    Song, Yingjun; Wang, David K; Birkett, Greg; Martens, Wayde; Duke, Mikel C; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C

    2016-01-01

    This work shows mixed matrix inorganic membranes prepared by the vacuum-assisted impregnation method, where phenolic resin precursors filled the pore of α-alumina substrates. Upon carbonisation, the phenolic resin decomposed into several fragments derived from the backbone of the resin matrix. The final stages of decomposition (>650 °C) led to a formation of carbon molecular sieve (CMS) structures, reaching the lowest average pore sizes of ~5 Å at carbonisation temperatures of 700 °C. The combination of vacuum-assisted impregnation and carbonisation led to the formation of mixed matrix of CMS and α-alumina particles (CMS-Al2O3) in a single membrane. These membranes were tested for pervaporative desalination and gave very high water fluxes of up to 25 kg m(-2) h(-1) for seawater (NaCl 3.5 wt%) at 75 °C. Salt rejection was also very high varying between 93-99% depending on temperature and feed salt concentration. Interestingly, the water fluxes remained almost constant and were not affected as feed salt concentration increased from 0.3, 1 and 3.5 wt%. PMID:27469389

  9. [Synergetic effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loaded catalyst on microwave assisted catalytic oxidation of toluene].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Bo, Long-Li; Liu, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jian-Yu; Yang, Li; Cai, Li-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Molecular sieve loaded catalyst was prepared by impregnation method, microwave-absorbing material silicon carbide and the catalyst were investigated for catalytic oxidation of toluene by microwave irradiation. Research work examined effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loading Cu-V catalyst's mixture ratio as well as mixed approach changes on degradation of toluene, and characteristics of catalyst were measured through scanning electron microscope, specific surface area test and X-ray diffraction analysis. The result showed that the fixed bed reactor had advantages of both thermal storage property and low-temperature catalytic oxidation when 20% silicon carbide was filled at the bottom of the reactor, and this could effectively improve the utilization of microwave energy as well as catalytic oxidation efficiency of toluene. Under microwave power of 75 W and 47 W, complete-combustion temperatures of molecular sieve loaded Cu-V catalyst and Cu-V-Ce catalyst to toluene were 325 degrees C and 160 degrees C, respectively. Characteristics of the catalysts showed that mixture of rare-earth element Ce increased the dispersion of active components in the surface of catalyst, micropore structure of catalyst effectively guaranteed high adsorption capacity for toluene, while amorphous phase of Cu and V oxides increased the activity of catalyst greatly.

  10. Activation and micropore structure determination of carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves. Topical report, 30 March 1994--14 April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, You Qing

    1995-05-19

    Progress in developing novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are activated using steam or CO{sub 2}, in order to produce uniform activation through the material and to control the pore structure and adsorptive properties. There is an overall shrinkage during activation, which is directly correlated with burnoff; burnoff above 40% results in fracture. Burnoffs higher than 10% does not produce any benefit for separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures. Five samples of CFCMS have been prepared for testing as molecular sieves; all have relatively narrow pore size distributions with average pore diameters around 6A.

  11. Titanium(IV) in the organic-structure-directing-agent-free synthesis of hydrophobic and large-pore molecular sieves as redox catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingui; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Junko N; Tatsumi, Takashi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-08-10

    Titanium(IV) incorporated into the framework of molecular sieves can be used as a highly active and sustainable catalyst for the oxidation of industrially important organic molecules. Unfortunately, the current process for the incorporation of titanium(IV) requires a large amount of expensive organic molecules used as organic-structure-directing agents (OSDAs), and this significantly increases the production costs and causes environmental problems owing to the removal of OSDAs by pyrolysis. Herein, an OSDA-free process was developed to incorporate titanium(IV) into BEA-type molecular sieves for the first time. More importantly, the hydrophobic environment and the robust, 3 D, and large pore structure of the titanium(IV)-incorporated molecular sieves fabricated from the OSDA-free process created a catalyst that was extremely active and selective for the epoxidation of bulky cyclooctene in comparison to Ti-incorporated BEA-type molecular sieves synthesized with OSDAs and commercial titanosilicate TS-1.

  12. Effects of octahedral molecular sieve on treatment performance, microbial metabolism, and microbial community in expanded granular sludge bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fei; Xu, Aihua; Xia, Dongsheng; Yu, Yang; Chen, Guo; Meyer, Melissa; Zhao, Dongye; Huang, Ching-Hua; Wu, Qihang; Fu, Jie

    2015-12-15

    This study evaluated the effects of synthesized octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) nanoparticles on the anaerobic microbial community in a model digester, expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor. The addition of OMS-2 (0.025 g/L) in the EGSB reactors resulted in an enhanced operational performance, i.e., COD removal and biogas production increased by 4% and 11% respectively, and effluent volatile fatty acid (VFA) decreased by 11% relative to the control group. The Biolog EcoPlate™ test was employed to investigate microbial metabolism in the EGSB reactors. Results showed that OMS-2 not only increased the microbial metabolic level but also significantly changed the community level physiological profiling of the microorganisms. The Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated OMS-2 enhanced the microbial diversity and altered the community structure. The largest bacterial genus Lactococcus, a lactic acid bacterium, reduced from 29.3% to 20.4% by abundance in the presence of 0.25 g/L OMS-2, which may be conducive to decreasing the VFA production and increasing the microbial diversity. OMS-2 also increased the quantities of acetogenic bacteria and Archaea, and promoted the acetogenesis and methanogenesis. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy illustrated that Mn(IV)/Mn(III) with high redox potential in OMS-2 were reduced to Mn(II) in the EGSB reactors; this in turn affected the microbial community. PMID:26397455

  13. Catalyzing the oxidation of sulfamethoxazole by permanganate using molecular sieves supported ruthenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Sun, Bo; Huang, Yuying; Guan, Xiaohong

    2015-12-01

    This study developed a heterogeneous catalytic permanganate oxidation system with three molecular sieves, i.e., nanosized ZSM-5 (ZSM-5A), microsized ZSM-5 (ZSM-5B) and MCM-41, supported ruthenium nanoparticles as catalyst, denoted as Ru/ZSM-5A, Ru/ZSM-5B and Ru/MCM-41, respectively. The presence of 0.5gL(-1) Ru/ZSM-5A, Ru/ZSM-5B and Ru/MCM-41 increased the oxidation rate of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) by permanganate at pH 7.0 by 27-1144 times. The catalytic performance of Ru catalysts toward SMX oxidation by permanganate was strongly dependent on Ru loading on the catalysts. The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses confirmed that Ru catalyst acted as an electron shuttle in catalytic permanganate oxidation process. Ru(III) deposited on the surface of catalysts was oxidized by permanganate to its higher oxidation state Ru(VII), which could work as a co-oxidant with permanganate to decompose SMX and was then reduced to its initial tri-valence. During the successive runs, Ru/ZSM-5A could not maintain its catalytic activity due to the deposition of MnO2, which was the reductive product of permanganate, onto the surface of Ru/ZSM-5A. Thus, the regeneration of partially deactivated Ru catalysts by reductant NH2OH⋅HCl or ascorbic acid was proposed. Ru/ZSM-5A regenerated by NH2OH⋅HCl displayed comparable catalytic ability to its virgin counterpart, while ascorbic acid could not completely remove the deposited MnO2. A trace amount of leaching of Ru into the reaction solution was also observed, which would be ameliorated by improving the preparation conditions in the future study. PMID:26196405

  14. In situ microscopy reveals reversible cell wall swelling in kelp sieve tubes: one mechanism for turgor generation and flow control?

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Jan; Tepler Drobnitch, Sarah; Peters, Winfried S; Knoblauch, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Kelps, brown algae (Phaeophyceae) of the order Laminariales, possess sieve tubes for the symplasmic long-distance transport of photoassimilates that are evolutionarily unrelated but structurally similar to the tubes in the phloem of vascular plants. We visualized sieve tube structure and wound responses in fully functional, intact Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana [K. Mertens] Postels & Ruprecht 1840). In injured tubes, apparent slime plugs formed but were unlikely to cause sieve tube occlusion as they assembled at the downstream side of sieve plates. Cell walls expanded massively in the radial direction, reducing the volume of the wounded sieve elements by up to 90%. Ultrastructural examination showed that a layer of the immediate cell wall characterized by circumferential cellulose fibrils was responsible for swelling and suggested that alginates, abundant gelatinous polymers of the cell wall matrix, were involved. Wall swelling was rapid, reversible and depended on intracellular pressure, as demonstrated by pressure-injection of silicon oil. Our results revive the concept of turgor generation and buffering by swelling cell walls, which had fallen into oblivion over the last century. Because sieve tube transport is pressure-driven and controlled physically by tube diameter, a regulatory role of wall swelling in photoassimilate distribution is implied in kelps.

  15. In situ microscopy reveals reversible cell wall swelling in kelp sieve tubes: one mechanism for turgor generation and flow control?

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Jan; Tepler Drobnitch, Sarah; Peters, Winfried S; Knoblauch, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Kelps, brown algae (Phaeophyceae) of the order Laminariales, possess sieve tubes for the symplasmic long-distance transport of photoassimilates that are evolutionarily unrelated but structurally similar to the tubes in the phloem of vascular plants. We visualized sieve tube structure and wound responses in fully functional, intact Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana [K. Mertens] Postels & Ruprecht 1840). In injured tubes, apparent slime plugs formed but were unlikely to cause sieve tube occlusion as they assembled at the downstream side of sieve plates. Cell walls expanded massively in the radial direction, reducing the volume of the wounded sieve elements by up to 90%. Ultrastructural examination showed that a layer of the immediate cell wall characterized by circumferential cellulose fibrils was responsible for swelling and suggested that alginates, abundant gelatinous polymers of the cell wall matrix, were involved. Wall swelling was rapid, reversible and depended on intracellular pressure, as demonstrated by pressure-injection of silicon oil. Our results revive the concept of turgor generation and buffering by swelling cell walls, which had fallen into oblivion over the last century. Because sieve tube transport is pressure-driven and controlled physically by tube diameter, a regulatory role of wall swelling in photoassimilate distribution is implied in kelps. PMID:26991892

  16. Quality Control of Trichinella Testing at the Slaughterhouse Laboratory: Evaluation of the Use of a 400-Micrometer-Mesh-Size Sieve in the Magnetic Stirrer Method.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Frits; van Andel, Esther; Swart, Arno; van der Giessen, Joke

    2016-02-01

    The performance of a 400-μm-mesh-size sieve (sieve400) has not previously been compared with that of a 180-μm-mesh-size sieve (sieve180). Using pork samples spiked with 0 to 10 Trichinella muscle larvae and an artificial digestion method, sieve performance was evaluated for control of Trichinella in meat-producing animals. The use of a sieve400 resulted in 12% lower larval counts, 147% more debris, and 28% longer counting times compared with the use of a sieve180. Although no false-negative results were obtained, prolonged counting times with the sieve400 may have an impact on performance in a high-throughput environment such as a slaughterhouse laboratory. Based on our results, the sieve180 remains the sieve of choice for Trichinella control in meat in slaughterhouse laboratories, according to the European Union reference method (European Commission regulation 2075/2005). Furthermore, the results of the present study contribute to the discussion of harmonization of meat inspection requirements among countries. PMID:26818995

  17. Quality Control of Trichinella Testing at the Slaughterhouse Laboratory: Evaluation of the Use of a 400-Micrometer-Mesh-Size Sieve in the Magnetic Stirrer Method.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Frits; van Andel, Esther; Swart, Arno; van der Giessen, Joke

    2016-02-01

    The performance of a 400-μm-mesh-size sieve (sieve400) has not previously been compared with that of a 180-μm-mesh-size sieve (sieve180). Using pork samples spiked with 0 to 10 Trichinella muscle larvae and an artificial digestion method, sieve performance was evaluated for control of Trichinella in meat-producing animals. The use of a sieve400 resulted in 12% lower larval counts, 147% more debris, and 28% longer counting times compared with the use of a sieve180. Although no false-negative results were obtained, prolonged counting times with the sieve400 may have an impact on performance in a high-throughput environment such as a slaughterhouse laboratory. Based on our results, the sieve180 remains the sieve of choice for Trichinella control in meat in slaughterhouse laboratories, according to the European Union reference method (European Commission regulation 2075/2005). Furthermore, the results of the present study contribute to the discussion of harmonization of meat inspection requirements among countries.

  18. Synthesis of multi-wall carbon nanotubes by the pyrolysis of ethanol on Fe/MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qian; Li, Yanhui; Zhou, Xuping; Jiang, Tingshun; Li, Changsheng; Yin, Hengbo

    2010-03-01

    Ordered hexagonal arrangement MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves were synthesized by the traditional hydrothermal method, and Fe-loaded MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves (Fe/MCM-41) were prepared by the wet impregnation method. Their mesoporous structures were testified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the N 2 physical adsorption technique. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method via the pyrolysis of ethanol at atmospheric pressure using Fe/MCM-41 as a catalytic template. The effect of different reaction temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 ∘C on the formation of CNTs was investigated. The resulting carbon materials were characterized by various physicochemical techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with an internal diameter of ca. 7.7 nm and an external diameter of ca. 16.9 nm were successfully obtained by the pyrolysis of ethanol at 800 ∘C utilizing Fe/MCM-41 as a catalytic template.

  19. N-methyldiethanolamine: a multifunctional structure-directing agent for the synthesis of SAPO and AlPO molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dehua; Tian, Peng; Fan, Dong; Yang, Miao; Gao, Beibei; Qiao, Yuyan; Wang, Chan; Liu, Zhongmin

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) is demonstrated to be a multifunctional structure-directing agent for the synthesis of aluminophosphate-based molecular sieves. Four types of molecular sieves, including SAPO-34, -35, AlPO-9 and -22, are for the first time acquired with MDEA as a novel template. The phase selectivity of the present synthesis is found to be condition-dependent. SAPO-34 (CHA) crystallizes from a conventional hydrothermal system with a higher MDEA concentration. When using MDEA as both the template and solvent, pure SAPO-35 (LEV) is obtained from the synthetic gel with a high P2O5/Al2O3 ratio of (2-3), in which the concentration of MDEA could be varied in a wide range. AlPO-9 and AlPO-22 (AWW) are synthesized under the similar conditions to SAPO-35, except without the addition of Si source. The physicochemical properties of the obtained samples are investigated by XRD, XRF, SEM, N2 physisorption, TG-DSC, and various NMR spectra ((13)C, (29)Si, (27)Al and (31)P). Both SAPO-34 and SAPO-35 show good thermal stability, large surface area, and high pore volume. The catalytic performance of SAPO-34 is evaluated by the methanol-to-olefins (MTO) reaction and a good (C2H4+C3H6) selectivity of 82.7% has been achieved. PMID:25616250

  20. Time-Dependent CO[subscript 2] Sorption Hysteresis in a One-Dimensional Microporous Octahedral Molecular Sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Espinal, Laura; Wong-Ng, Winnie; Kaduk, James A.; Allen, Andrew J.; Snyder, Chad R.; Chiu, Chun; Siderius, Daniel W.; Li, Lan; Cockayne, Eric; Espinal, Anais E.; Suib, Steven L.

    2014-09-24

    The development of sorbents for next-generation CO{sub 2} mitigation technologies will require better understanding of CO{sub 2}/sorbent interactions. Among the sorbents under consideration are shape-selective microporous molecular sieves with hierarchical pore morphologies of reduced dimensionality. We have characterized the non-equilibrium CO{sub 2} sorption of OMS-2, a well-known one-dimensional microporous octahedral molecular sieve with manganese oxide framework. Remarkably, we find that the degree of CO{sub 2} sorption hysteresis increases when the gas/sorbent system is allowed to equilibrate for longer times at each pressure step. Density functional theory calculations indicate a 'gate-keeping' role of the cation in the tunnel, only allowing CO{sub 2} molecules to enter fully into the tunnel via a highly unstable transient state when CO{sub 2} loadings exceed 0.75 mmol/g. The energy barrier associated with the gate-keeping effect suggests an adsorption mechanism in which kinetic trapping of CO{sub 2} is responsible for the observed hysteretic behavior.

  1. Spray-dried powders enhance vaginal siRNA delivery by potentially modulating the mucus molecular sieve structure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Na; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Feifei; Zhang, Tao; Gan, Yong; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery provides a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of vaginal diseases. However, the densely cross-linked mucus layer on the vaginal wall severely restricts nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery to the vaginal epithelium. In order to overcome this barrier and enhance vaginal mucus penetration, we prepared spray-dried powders containing siRNA-loaded nanoparticles. Powders with Pluronic F127 (F127), hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), and mannitol as carriers were obtained using an ultrasound-assisted spray-drying technique. Highly dispersed dry powders with diameters of 5-15 μm were produced. These powders showed effective siRNA protection and sustained release. The mucus-penetrating properties of the powders differed depending on their compositions. They exhibited different potential of opening mesh size of molecular sieve in simulated vaginal mucus system. A powder formulation with 0.6% F127 and 0.1% HPMC produced the maximum increase in the pore size of the model gel used to simulate vaginal mucus by rapidly extracting water from the gel and interacting with the gel; the resulting modulation of the molecular sieve effect achieved a 17.8-fold improvement of siRNA delivery in vaginal tract and effective siRNA delivery to the epithelium. This study suggests that powder formulations with optimized compositions have the potential to alter the steric barrier posed by mucus and hold promise for effective vaginal siRNA delivery.

  2. Spray-dried powders enhance vaginal siRNA delivery by potentially modulating the mucus molecular sieve structure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Na; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Feifei; Zhang, Tao; Gan, Yong; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery provides a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of vaginal diseases. However, the densely cross-linked mucus layer on the vaginal wall severely restricts nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery to the vaginal epithelium. In order to overcome this barrier and enhance vaginal mucus penetration, we prepared spray-dried powders containing siRNA-loaded nanoparticles. Powders with Pluronic F127 (F127), hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), and mannitol as carriers were obtained using an ultrasound-assisted spray-drying technique. Highly dispersed dry powders with diameters of 5–15 μm were produced. These powders showed effective siRNA protection and sustained release. The mucus-penetrating properties of the powders differed depending on their compositions. They exhibited different potential of opening mesh size of molecular sieve in simulated vaginal mucus system. A powder formulation with 0.6% F127 and 0.1% HPMC produced the maximum increase in the pore size of the model gel used to simulate vaginal mucus by rapidly extracting water from the gel and interacting with the gel; the resulting modulation of the molecular sieve effect achieved a 17.8-fold improvement of siRNA delivery in vaginal tract and effective siRNA delivery to the epithelium. This study suggests that powder formulations with optimized compositions have the potential to alter the steric barrier posed by mucus and hold promise for effective vaginal siRNA delivery. PMID:26347257

  3. Formation of hydroxyl-functionalized stilbenoid molecular sieves at the liquid/solid interface on top of a 1-decanol monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellec, Amandine; Arrigoni, Claire; Douillard, Ludovic; Fiorini-Debuisschert, Céline; Mathevet, Fabrice; Kreher, David; Attias, André-Jean; Charra, Fabrice

    2014-10-01

    Specific molecular tectons can be designed to form molecular sieves through self-assembly at the solid-liquid interface. After demonstrating a model tecton bearing apolar alkyl chains, we then focus on a modified structure involving asymmetric functionalization of some alkyl chains with polar hydroxyl groups in order to get chemical selectivity in the sieving. As the formation of supramolecular self-assembled networks strongly depends on molecule-molecule, molecule-substrate and molecule-solvent interactions, we compared the tectons’ self-assembly on graphite for two types of solvent. We demonstrate the possibility to create hydroxylated stilbenoid molecular sieves by using 1-decanol as a solvent. Interestingly, with this solvent, the porous network is developed on top of a 1-decanol monolayer.

  4. Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane as a True One Box Unit for Large Scale Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Paul

    2012-05-01

    IGCC coal-fired power plants show promise for environmentally-benign power generation. In these plants coal is gasified to syngas then processed in a water gas-shift (WGS) reactor to maximize the hydrogen/CO{sub 2} content. The gas stream can then be separated into a hydrogen rich stream for power generation and/or further purified for sale as a chemical and a CO{sub 2} rich stream for the purpose of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Today, the separation is accomplished using conventional absorption/desorption processes with post CO{sub 2} compression. However, significant process complexity and energy penalties accrue with this approach, accounting for ~20% of the capital cost and ~27% parasitic energy consumption. Ideally, a one-box process is preferred in which the syngas is fed directly to the WGS reactor without gas pre-treatment, converting the CO to hydrogen in the presence of H{sub 2}S and other impurities and delivering a clean hydrogen product for power generation or other uses. The development of such a process is the primary goal of this project. Our proposed "one-box" process includes a catalytic membrane reactor (MR) that makes use of a hydrogen-selective, carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane, and a sulfur-tolerant Co/Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The membrane reactor's behavior has been investigated with a bench top unit for different experimental conditions and compared with the modeling results. The model is used to further investigate the design features of the proposed process. CO conversion >99% and hydrogen recovery >90% are feasible under the operating pressures available from IGCC. More importantly, the CMS membrane has demonstrated excellent selectivity for hydrogen over H{sub 2}S (>100), and shown no flux loss in the presence of a synthetic "tar"-like material, i.e., naphthalene. In summary, the proposed "one-box" process has been successfully demonstrated with the bench-top reactor. In parallel we have successfully designed and

  5. Mathematical model and calculation algorithm of micro and meso levels of separation process of gaseous mixtures in molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Umarova, Zhanat; Botayeva, Saule; Yegenova, Aliya; Usenova, Aisaule

    2015-05-15

    In the given article, the main thermodynamic aspects of the issue of modeling diffusion transfer in molecular sieves have been formulated. Dissipation function is used as a basic notion. The differential equation, connecting volume flow with the change of the concentration of catchable component has been derived. As a result, the expression for changing the concentration of the catchable component and the coefficient of membrane detecting has been received. As well, the system approach to describing the process of gases separation in ultra porous membranes has been realized and micro and meso-levels of mathematical modeling have been distinguished. The non-ideality of the shared system is primarily taken into consideration at the micro-level and the departure from the diffusion law of Fick has been taken into account. The calculation method of selectivity considering fractal structure of membranes has been developed at the meso level. The calculation algorithm and its software implementation have been suggested.

  6. Integrated Testing of a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve, Air-Cooled Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor, and Sabatier Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Miller, Lee; Campbell, Melissa; Mulloth, Lila; Varghese, Mini

    2006-01-01

    Accumulation and subsequent compression of carbon dioxide that is removed from the space cabin are two important processes involved in a closed-loop air revitalization scheme of the International Space Station (ISS). The 4-Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of ISS currently operates in an open loop mode without a compressor. The Sabatier Engineering Development Unit (EDU) processes waste CO2 to provide water to the crew. This paper reports the integrated 4BMS, air-cooled Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor (TSAC), and Sabatier EDU testing. The TSAC prototype was developed at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). The 4BMS was modified to a functionally flight-like condition at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Testing was conducted at MSFC. The paper provides details of the TSAC operation at various CO2 loadings and corresponding performance of the 4BMS and Sabatier.

  7. Synthesis of an extra-large molecular sieve using proton sponges as organic structure-directing agents

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Franco, Raquel; Moliner, Manuel; Yun, Yifeng; Sun, Junliang; Wan, Wei; Zou, Xiaodong; Corma, Avelino

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of crystalline microporous materials containing large pores is in high demand by industry, especially for the use of these materials as catalysts in chemical processes involving bulky molecules. An extra-large–pore silicoaluminophosphate with 16-ring openings, ITQ-51, has been synthesized by the use of bulky aromatic proton sponges as organic structure-directing agents. Proton sponges show exceptional properties for directing extra-large zeolites because of their unusually high basicity combined with their large size and rigidity. This extra-large–pore material is stable after calcination, being one of the very few examples of hydrothermally stable molecular sieves containing extra-large pores. The structure of ITQ-51 was solved from submicrometer-sized crystals using the rotation electron diffraction method. Finally, several hypothetical zeolites related to ITQ-51 have been proposed. PMID:23431186

  8. Production of carbon molecular sieves from Illinois coal. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzio, A.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1993-12-31

    Carbon molecular sieves (CMS) have become an increasingly important class of adsorbents for use in gas separation and recovery processes. The overall objective of this project is to determine whether Illinois Basin coals are a suitable feedstock for the production of CMS and to evaluate the potential application of these products in commercial gas separation processes. In Phase 1 of this project, gram quantities of char were prepared from Illinois coal in a fixed-bed reactor under a wide range of pyrolysis and activation conditions. Chars having surface areas of 1,500--2,100 m{sup 2}/g were produced by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide (KOH) as the chemical activant. These high surface area (HSA) chars had more than twice the adsorption capacity of commercial molecular sieves. The kinetics of adsorption of various gases, e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}, on these chars at 25 C was determined. Several chars showed good potential for efficient O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} separation. In Phase 2 of this project, larger quantities of char are being prepared from Illinois coal in a batch fluidized-bed reactor and in a continuous rotary tube kiln. The ability of these chars to separate binary gas mixtures is tested in an adsorption column/gas chromatography system. Oxygen and nitrogen breakthrough curves obtained for selected chars were compared to those of a commercial zeolite. Selected chars were subjected to a nitric acid oxidation treatment. The air separation capability of nitric acid treated char was strongly dependent on the outgassing conditions used prior to an O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} adsorption experiment. An outgassing temperature of 130--160 C produced chars with the most favorable air separation properties. 61 refs.

  9. A novel molecular sieve supporting material for enhancing activity and stability of Ag3PO4 photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Wang, Peifu; Niu, Futao; Huang, Cunping; Li, Yang; Yao, Weifeng

    2016-08-01

    A small-pore silicon-substituted silicon aluminum phosphate (SAPO-34) molecular sieve, for the first time, is reported to significantly increase both the activity and life span of Ag3PO4 photocatalyst for visible-light degradation of methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (RhB). Results show that 60 wt.% Ag3PO4/SAPO-34 exhibits the highest photocatalytic degradation efficiencies for both MB (91.0% degradation within 2.0 min) and RhB (91.0% degradation within 7.0 min). In comparison, pure Ag3PO4 powder photocatalyst requires 8.0 min and 12.0 min for decomposing 91.0% of MB and RhB, respectively. During MB degradation the rate constant for 60 wt.% Ag3PO4/SAPO-34 increases 317.2% in comparison with the rate constant of pure Ag3PO4. This activity is also much higher than literature reported composite or supported Ag3PO4 photocatalysts. In three photocatalytic runs for the degradation of RhB, the rate constant for 60 wt.% Ag3PO4/SAPO-34 reduces from 0.33 to 0.18 min-1 (45.5% efficiency loss). In contrast, the rate constant of pure Ag3PO4 catalyst decreases from 0.2 to 0.07 min-1 (80.0% efficiency loss). All experimental results have shown that small pores and zero light absorption loss of SAPO-34 molecular sieves minimize Ag3PO4 loading, enhance photocatalytic activity and prolong the lifespan of Ag3PO4 photocatalyst.

  10. Titanium(IV) in the organic-structure-directing-agent-free synthesis of hydrophobic and large-pore molecular sieves as redox catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingui; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Junko N; Tatsumi, Takashi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-08-10

    Titanium(IV) incorporated into the framework of molecular sieves can be used as a highly active and sustainable catalyst for the oxidation of industrially important organic molecules. Unfortunately, the current process for the incorporation of titanium(IV) requires a large amount of expensive organic molecules used as organic-structure-directing agents (OSDAs), and this significantly increases the production costs and causes environmental problems owing to the removal of OSDAs by pyrolysis. Herein, an OSDA-free process was developed to incorporate titanium(IV) into BEA-type molecular sieves for the first time. More importantly, the hydrophobic environment and the robust, 3 D, and large pore structure of the titanium(IV)-incorporated molecular sieves fabricated from the OSDA-free process created a catalyst that was extremely active and selective for the epoxidation of bulky cyclooctene in comparison to Ti-incorporated BEA-type molecular sieves synthesized with OSDAs and commercial titanosilicate TS-1. PMID:26073555

  11. Platinum-nickel frame within metal-organic framework fabricated in situ for hydrogen enrichment and molecular sieving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Yu, Rong; Huang, Jinglu; Shi, Yusheng; Zhang, Diyang; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dingsheng; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2015-09-01

    Developing catalysts that provide the effective activation of hydrogen and selective absorption of substrate on metal surface is crucial to simultaneously improve activity and selectivity of hydrogenation reaction. Here we present an unique in situ etching and coordination synthetic strategy for exploiting a functionalized metal-organic framework to incorporate the bimetallic platinum-nickel frames, thereby forming a frame within frame nanostructure. The as-grown metal-organic framework serves as a `breath shell' to enhance hydrogen enrichment and activation on platinum-nickel surface. More importantly, this framework structure with defined pores can provide the selective accessibility of molecules through its one-dimensional channels. In a mixture containing four olefins, the composite can selectively transport the substrates smaller than its pores to the platinum-nickel surface and catalyse their hydrogenation. This molecular sieve effect can be also applied to selectively produce imines, which are important intermediates in the reductive imination of nitroarene, by restraining further hydrogenation via cascade processes.

  12. Preparation and application of zirconium sulfate supported on SAPO-34 molecular sieve as solid acid catalyst for esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Dongyan Ma, Hong; Cheng, Fei

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SAPO-34 supported zirconium sulfate solid acid catalyst was prepared. • Esterification of acetic acid with ethanol can be catalyzed by ZS/SAPO-34. • The hydration of ZS is vital to the acidic property and catalytic performance. • The ZS/SAPO-34 catalyst treated at 200 °C shows good reusability. - Abstract: Zirconium sulfate (ZS) was supported on SAPO-34 molecular sieve by using an incipient wetness impregnation method with zirconium sulfate as the precursor. The as-prepared catalysts were used as solid acid catalyst for esterification reaction of acetic acid with ethanol. The influence of calcination temperature on the acidic property, catalytic activity, and reusability of ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts were mainly investigated. FT-IR, SEM, EDS and TG analysis have been carried out to demonstrate the characteristics of ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts. It was found that the 30 wt%ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts display the property of superacid irrespective of calcination temperature. The ZS/SAPO-34 catalyst treated at 200 °C can enhance the interaction between the supported ZS and SAPO-34 and keep the catalyst remaining substantially active after several reaction cycles. However, further increasing calcination temperature will cause the transfer of ZS from hydrate to anhydrous phase, and thus the decrease of activity.

  13. Interlinked Test Results for Fusion Fuel Processing and Blanket Tritium Recovery Systems Using Cryogenic Molecular Sieve Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Takumi; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Iwai, Yasunori; Isobe, Kanetsugu; Uzawa, Masayuki; Nishi, Masataka

    2005-07-15

    A simulated fuel processing (cryogenic distillation columns and a palladium diffuser) and CMSB (cryogenic molecular sieve bed) systems were linked together, and were operated. The validity of the CMSB was discussed through this experiment as an integrated system for the recovery of blanket tritium. A gas stream of hydrogen isotopes and He was supplied to the CMSB as the He sweep gas in blanket of a fusion reactor. After the breakthrough of tritium was observed, regeneration of the CMSB was carried out by evacuating and heating. The hydrogen isotopes were finally recovered by the diffuser. At first, only He gas was sent by the evacuating. The hydrogen isotopes gas was then rapidly released by the heating. The system worked well against the above drastic change of conditions. The amount of hydrogen isotopes gas finally recovered by the diffuser was in good agreement with that adsorbed by the CMSB. The dynamic behaviors (breakthrough and regeneration) of the system were explained well by a set of basic codes.

  14. Semi-Technical Cryogenic Molecular Sieve Bed for the Tritium Extraction System of the Test Blanket Module for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Beloglazov, S.; Bekris, N.; Glugla, M.; Wagner, R.

    2005-07-15

    The tritium extraction from the ITER Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Module purge gas is proposed to be performed in a two steps process: trapping water in a cryogenic Cold Trap, and adsorption of hydrogen isotopes (H{sub 2}, HT, T{sub 2}) as well as impurities (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}) in a Cryogenic Molecular Sieve Bed (CMSB) at 77K. A CMSB in a semi-technical scale (one-sixth of the flow rate of the ITER-HCPB) was design and constructed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The full capacity of CMSB filled with 20 kg of MS-5A was calculated based on adsorption isotherm data to be 9.4 mol of H{sub 2} at partial pressure 120 Pa. The breakthrough tests at flow rates up to 2 Nm{sup 3}h{sup -1} of He with 110 Pa of H{sub 2} conformed with good agreement the adsorption capacity of the CMSB. The mass-transfer zone was found to be relatively narrow (12.5 % of the MS Bed height) allowing to scale up the CMSB to ITER flow rates.

  15. An efficient synthesis of graphenated carbon nanotubes over the tailored mesoporous molecular sieves by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Atchudan, R.; Joo, Jin.; Pandurangan, A.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Tailored 3D cubic Ni/KIT-6 with large pores was synthesized successfully. ► The new hybrid g-CNTs in large scale were synthesized using Ni/KIT-6 by CVD method. ► The use of mesoporous material by CVD method would be an ideal choice to prepare g-CNTs at reasonable cost. ► This type of g-CNTs might be a new avenue for nano-electronic applications. - Abstract: The new hybrid of graphenated carbon nanotubes (g-CNTs) was superior to either CNTs or graphene. Mesoporous 3D cubic Ni/KIT-6 were synthesized hydrothermally through organic template route and then were used as catalytic template for the production of g-CNTs using acetylene as a carbon precursor by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The deposited new hybrid carbon materials were purified and analyzed by various physico-chemical techniques such as XRD, TGA, SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The graphitization of CNTs was confirmed by TGA and HRTEM studies. Thermal stability, surface morphology, and structural morphology of these materials were revealed by TGA, SEM and TEM analysis, respectively. Moreover, the tailored mesoporous Ni/KIT-6 molecular sieves were found to possess better quality and massive quantity of g-CNTs produced compared to other catalytic template route.

  16. Platinum–nickel frame within metal-organic framework fabricated in situ for hydrogen enrichment and molecular sieving

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Yu, Rong; Huang, Jinglu; Shi, Yusheng; Zhang, Diyang; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dingsheng; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Developing catalysts that provide the effective activation of hydrogen and selective absorption of substrate on metal surface is crucial to simultaneously improve activity and selectivity of hydrogenation reaction. Here we present an unique in situ etching and coordination synthetic strategy for exploiting a functionalized metal-organic framework to incorporate the bimetallic platinum–nickel frames, thereby forming a frame within frame nanostructure. The as-grown metal-organic framework serves as a ‘breath shell' to enhance hydrogen enrichment and activation on platinum–nickel surface. More importantly, this framework structure with defined pores can provide the selective accessibility of molecules through its one-dimensional channels. In a mixture containing four olefins, the composite can selectively transport the substrates smaller than its pores to the platinum–nickel surface and catalyse their hydrogenation. This molecular sieve effect can be also applied to selectively produce imines, which are important intermediates in the reductive imination of nitroarene, by restraining further hydrogenation via cascade processes. PMID:26391605

  17. Ionothermal Synthesis of MnAPO-SOD Molecular Sieve without the Aid of Organic Structure-Directing Agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Tian, Zhijian; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yasong; Li, Dawei; Ma, Huaijun; Xu, Renshun

    2016-02-15

    An SOD-type metalloaluminophosphate molecular sieve (denoted as SOD-Mn) was ionothermally synthesized by introducing manganese(II) cations into the reaction mixture via MnO-acid or MnO2-reductant reactions. Composition and structure analyses results show that two kinds of manganese(II) cations exist in the SOD-Mn structure. Part of the manganese(II) cations isomorphously substitute the framework aluminum(III) with a substitution degree of ∼30%. The rest of the manganese(II) cations occupy a fraction of the sod cages in their hydrated forms. A comprehensive investigation of the synthesis parameters, crystal sizes, and crystallization kinetics indicates that the in situ released hydrated manganese(II) cations direct the formation of SOD-Mn. Such structure-directing effect may be inhibited by both the fluorination of manganese(II) cations and the water accumulation during crystallization. In the fluoride anion-containing reaction mixture with a low ionic liquid content, the crystallization process is strongly suppressed, and large SOD-Mn single crystals of over 200 μm in size are yielded. SOD-Mn is free from organics and shows improved thermal stability compared with metalloaluminophosphates synthesized by using organic structure-directing agents.

  18. Protein sterilization method of firefly luciferase using reduced pressure and molecular sieves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Rich, E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The sterilization of the protein fruitfly luciferase under conditions that prevent denaturation is examined. Denaturation is prevented by heating the protein in contact with molecular seives and under a reduced pressure of the order of 0.00005 millimeters of mercury.

  19. Glycidol-modified gels for molecular-sieve chromatography. Surface hydrophilization and pore size reduction.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, K O

    1987-11-01

    Divinyl sulfone-crosslinked agarose gels were made hydrophilic by coupling glycidol to the agarose chains. The concentration of glycidol in the reaction mixture determines the pore size of the gels (the glycidol molecules probably form polymers, the degree of polymerization increasing with the glycidol concentration). Gels prepared with moderate glycidol concentrations are still porous enough to be used for separation of proteins and peptides. Gels with a high degree of glycidol polymerization are suited for desalting of low-molecular-weight compounds, for instance peptides.

  20. SSZ-26 and SSZ-33: Two molecular sieves with intersecting 10- and 12-ring pores

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, R.F.; Li, H.X.; Davis, M.E. ); Pan, M.; Crozier, P.A. )

    1993-12-03

    The framework structures of two closely related molecular seives, SSZ-26 and SSZ-33, are described. These materials possess a previously missing but desired structural feature in a group of industrially significant zeolites. They contain a three-dimensional pore system that provides access to the crystal interior through both 10- and 12-rings. This property is a consequence of the organic structure-directing agents used in the synthesis of these materials. These materials are examples of the purposeful design of a micropore architecture. Both SSZ-26 and SSZ-33 contain the 4=4-1 building unit that had been previously found only in natural zeolites.

  1. Atmospheric weathering and silica-coated feldspar: analogy with zeolite molecular sieves, granite weathering, soil formation, ornamental slabs, and ceramics.

    PubMed

    Smith, J V

    1998-03-31

    Feldspar surfaces respond to chemical, biological, and mechanical weathering. The simplest termination is hydroxyl (OH), which interacts with any adsorption layer. Acid leaching of alkalis and aluminum generated a silica-rich, nanometers-thick skin on certain feldspars. Natural K, Na-feldspars develop fragile surfaces as etch pits expand into micrometer honeycombs, possibly colonized by lichens. Most crystals have various irregular coats. Based on surface-catalytic processes in molecular sieve zeolites, I proposed that some natural feldspars lose weakly bonded Al-OH (aluminol) to yield surfaces terminated by strongly bonded Si-OH (silanol). This might explain why some old feldspar-bearing rocks weather slower than predicted from brief laboratory dissolution. Lack of an Al-OH infrared frequency from a feldspar surface is consistent with such a silanol-dominated surface. Raman spectra of altered patches on acid-leached albite correspond with amorphous silica rather than hydroxylated silica-feldspar, but natural feldspar may respond differently. The crystal structure of H-exchanged feldspar provides atomic positions for computer modeling of complex ideas for silica-terminated feldspar surfaces. Natural weathering also depends on swings of temperature and hydration, plus transport of particles, molecules, and ionic complexes by rain and wind. Soil formation might be enhanced by crushing granitic outcrops to generate new Al-rich surfaces favorable for chemical and biological weathering. Ornamental slabs used by architects and monumental masons might last longer by minimizing mechanical abrasion during sawing and polishing and by silicifying the surface. Silica-terminated feldspar might be a promising ceramic surface.

  2. Current Understanding of Cu-Exchanged Chabazite Molecular Sieves for Use as Commercial Diesel Engine DeNOx Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-11-03

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia using metal-exchanged molecular sieves with a chabazite (CHA) structure has recently been commercialized on diesel vehicles. One of the commercialized catalysts, i.e., Cu-SSZ-13, has received much attention for both practical and fundamental studies. For the latter, the particularly well-defined structure of this zeolite is allowing long-standing issues of the catalytically active site for SCR in metal-exchanged zeolites to be addressed. In this review, recent progress is summarized with a focus on two areas. First, the technical significance of Cu-SSZ-13 as compared to other Cu-ion exchanged zeolites (e.g., Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta) is highlighted. Specifically, the much enhanced hydrothermal stability for Cu-SSZ-13 compared to other zeolite catalysts is addressed via performance measurements and catalyst characterization using several techniques. The enhanced stability of Cu-SSZ-13 is rationalized in terms of the unique small pore structure of this zeolite catalyst. Second, the fundamentals of the catalytically active center; i.e., the chemical nature and locations within the SSZ-13 framework are presented with an emphasis on understanding structure-function relationships. For the SCR reaction, traditional kinetic studies are complicated by intra-particle diffusion limitations. However, a major side reaction, nonselective ammonia oxidation by oxygen, does not suffer from mass-transfer limitations at relatively low temperatures due to significantly lower reaction rates. This allows structure-function relationships that are rather well understood in terms of Cu ion locations and redox properties. Finally, some aspects of the SCR reaction mechanism are addressed on the basis of in-situ spectroscopic studies.

  3. Radiation-induced silver agglomeration in molecular sieves: A comparison between A and X zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadło, Jarosław; Waşowicz, Tomasz; Michalik, Jacek

    1995-06-01

    The stabilization conditions of silver atoms and clusters in hydrated and dehydrated AgNa-A and AgNa-X zeolites γ-irradiated at 77 K have been studied by ESR. It was found that silver agglomeration mechanisms in hydrated A and X zeolites are very similar and are controlled by the migration of silver atoms into the α-cages. In dehydrated zeolites agglomeration leads to completely different silver clusters in A and X zeolites. Small cationic clusters are stabilized in A zeolites and metallic clusters in X zeolites. Various factors affecting the agglomeration process in A and X zeolites are discussed.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of highly ordered Ni-MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanhui; Lim, Sangyun; Du, Guoan; Chen, Yuan; Ciuparu, Dragos; Haller, Gary L

    2005-07-14

    Highly ordered Ni-MCM-41 samples with nearly atomically dispersed nickel ions were prepared reproducibly and characterized. Similar to the Co-MCM-41 samples, the pore diameter and porosity can be precisely controlled by changing the synthesis surfactant chain length. Nickel was incorporated by isomorphous substitution of silicon in the MCM-41 silica framework, which makes the Ni-MCM-41 a physically stable catalyst in harsh reaction conditions such as CO disproportionation to single wall carbon nanotubes or CO2 methanation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that the overall local environment of nickel in Ni-MCM-41 was a tetrahedral or distorted tetrahedral coordination with surrounding oxygen anions. Hydrogen TPR revealed that our Ni-MCM-41 samples have high stability against reduction; however, compared to Co-MCM-41, the Ni-MCM-41 has a lower reduction temperature, and both the H2-TPR and in situ XANES TPR reveal that the reducibility of nickel is not clearly correlated with the pore radius of curvature, as in the case of Co-MCM-41. This is probably a result of nickel being thermodynamically more easily reduced than cobalt. The stability of the structural order of Ni-MCM-41 has been investigated under SWNT synthesis and CO2 methanation reaction conditions as both require catalyst exposure to reducing environments leading to formation of metallic Ni clusters. Nitrogen physisorption and XRD results show that structural order was maintained under both SWNT synthesis and CO2 methanation reaction conditions. EXAFS results demonstrate that the nickel particle size can be controlled by different prereduction temperatures but not by the pore radius of curvature as in the case of Co-MCM-41. PMID:16852651

  5. Synthesis and modification of mesoporous silica and the preparation of molecular sieve thin films via pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, Decio Heringer

    2001-07-01

    describes the evaluation of the HISIV(TM) 1000 molecular sieve for TBC adsorption. The TBC equilibrium capacity was determined from a cyclohexane/TBC liquid mixture and was comparable to alumina adsorbents. Practicum One. A fluorescent diagnostic system was developed to image the inhomogeneous mixture formed as two miscible fluids mix. This diagnostic for the mixing fraction uses a commercially available CCD color camera, a polarity sensitive fluorescent probe (DCM), and the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging technique to track the mixing of two miscible fluids of different polarity (ethanol and decane). The DCM fluorescence spectrum shifts to the red with increasing polarity, and the CCD camera's red, green, and blue color channels serve as spectral filters for the probe's fluorescence.

  6. Dark- and photoreactions of ethanol and acetaldehyde over TiO{sub 2}/carbon molecular sieve fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Reztsova, T.; Chang, C.H.; Idriss, H.; Koresh, J.

    1999-07-01

    TiO{sub 2} has been synthesized within the pores of carbon molecular sieve fibers (CMSF) in order to grow particles of quantum size. TiO{sub 2}/CMSF characteristics were followed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-vis diffuse reflectance. XPS showed that all Ti cations are in a +4 oxidation state. The reduction profile of Ti cations (made by preferential O anion removal due to Ar{sup +} sputtering), as evidenced by Ti{sup +x}/Ti{sup +4} cations, is very similar to that already observed for well-defined TiO{sub 2} surfaces. The absence of XRD pattern indicated that TiO{sub 2} particles are in an amorphous form. UV-vis diffuse reflectance showed a considerably blue shift ({Delta}E = 0.6--0.7 eV) of the band gap of TiO{sub 2}/CMSF when compared to TiO{sub 2} (anatase). This shift translates an average particle radius of 15 {+-} 2 {angstrom}. Larger TiO{sub 2} particles, outside the CMSF nanopores, are, however, observed by TEM. Dark- and photoreactions of ethanol and acetaldehyde have been investigated over TiO{sub 2}/CMSF by steady state kinetics and temperature programmed desorption in UHV conditions, as well as in batch conditions at atmospheric pressure. UHV-steady state ethanol reactions have shown eightfold increase in the reaction rate at 573 K in the presence of UV when compared to dark reactions at the same temperatures. The rate constants ratio k{sub 2}K{sub 2}/k{sub 1}K{sub 1}, for the photoreactions of ethanol, is ca. 40 times higher for TiO{sub 2}/CMSF than for TiO{sub 2} (powder) indicating the high selectivity of the former toward total conversion of ethanol to CO{sub 2} with minor accumulation of acetaldehyde (k{sub 1}K{sub 1} and k{sub 2}K{sub 2} are the rate constants for ethanol to acetaldehyde and acetaldehyde to CO{sub 2}, respectively). Evidence of C-C bond dissociation is given by formaldehyde desorption during UV-acetaldehyde-TPD over TiO{sub 2}/CMSF under UHV conditions. Moreover, UV

  7. Evaluation of INL Supplied MOOSE/OSPREY Model: Modeling Water Adsorption on Type 3A Molecular Sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Pompilio, L. M.; DePaoli, D. W.; Spencer, B. B.

    2014-08-29

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Idaho National Lab’s Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) software in modeling the adsorption of water onto type 3A molecular sieve (3AMS). MOOSE can be thought-of as a computing framework within which applications modeling specific coupled-phenomena can be developed and run. The application titled Off-gas SeParation and REcoverY (OSPREY) has been developed to model gas sorption in packed columns. The sorbate breakthrough curve calculated by MOOSE/OSPREY was compared to results previously obtained in the deep bed hydration tests conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coding framework permits selection of various options, when they exist, for modeling a process. For example, the OSPREY module includes options to model the adsorption equilibrium with a Langmuir model or a generalized statistical thermodynamic adsorption (GSTA) model. The vapor solid equilibria and the operating conditions of the process (e.g., gas phase concentration) are required to calculate the concentration gradient driving the mass transfer between phases. Both the Langmuir and GSTA models were tested in this evaluation. Input variables were either known from experimental conditions, or were available (e.g., density) or were estimated (e.g., thermal conductivity of sorbent) from the literature. Variables were considered independent of time, i.e., rather than having a mass transfer coefficient that varied with time or position in the bed, the parameter was set to remain constant. The calculated results did not coincide with data from laboratory tests. The model accurately estimated the number of bed volumes processed for the given operating parameters, but breakthrough times were not accurately predicted, varying 50% or more from the data. The shape of the breakthrough curves also differed from the experimental data, indicating a much wider sorption band. Model modifications are needed to improve its utility and

  8. Low temperature VOC combustion over manganese, Cobalt and Zinc ALPO(4) Molecular sieves. Semi-annual, March 1, 1996 - Aug. 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Das, K.; Sheehan, D.G.; Szostak, R.

    1996-12-31

    A functional fixed bed continuous flow catalytic reactor was constructed for conducting experiments on the catalytic destruction of VOCs using cobalt and manganese containing aluminophosphate catalysts (MeAPOs). The reactor was also interfaced to a Gas Chromatograph in order to facilitate on line product analysis. As preliminary catalytic experiments, a cobalt exchanged form of large pore zeolite Y was used as a reference catalyst for the oxidation of methylene chloride (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). At 350{degrees}C, the catalyst was effective in partial conversion of this feed stream of VOC to CO{sub 2}. Optimization of reaction conditions are currently underway in order to obtain higher conversion levels. The effect of variations in reaction conditions such as reactant flow rate, reaction temperature and catalyst compositions are currently been investigated. In the next phase of this project, the Co-exchanged Y zeolite will be substituted by the MeAPOs catalysts and the reactivities of the latter will be assessed. The potential of the MeAPOs to function as oxidation catalysts was evaluated in the liquid phase conversion of phenol to hydroquinone and catechol. The percentage conversion and product yield were significant and varied depending on the metal type and content of the molecular sieve framework. Conversion levels were also dependent on molecular sieve pore dimensions as the medium pore MeAPO-11 was more active than the larger pore MeAPO-5 or MeAPO-36.

  9. Integrated Testing of a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve and a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, David L.

    2004-01-01

    Accumulation and subsequent compression of carbon dioxide that is removed from space cabin are two important processes involved in a closed-loop air revitalization scheme of the International Space Station (ISS). The 4-Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of ISS currently operates in an open loop mode without a compressor. This paper reports the integrated 4BMS and liquid-cooled TSAC testing conducted during the period of March 3 to April 18, 2003. The TSAC prototype was developed at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). The 4BMS was modified to a functionally flight-like condition at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Testing was conducted at MSFC. The paper provides details of the TSAC operation at various CO2 loadings and corresponding performance of CDRA.

  10. Nanoscopic imaging of meso-tetraalkylporphyrins prepared in high yields enabled by Montmorrilonite K10 and 3A molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Plamont, Rémi; Kikkawa, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Mayuko; Kanesato, Masatoshi; Giorgi, Michel; Chan Kam Shun, Anita; Roussel, Christian; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2013-08-19

    We have developed a high-yielding synthesis of meso-tetraalkylporphyrins, which previously have been obtained only in lower yields. By employing Montmorrilonite K10 as the acid catalyst and 3 Å molecular sieves as the dehydrating agent, yields that reached 70 % could be achieved with some aliphatic aldehydes. The free-base porphyrins with decyl (C10) or longer chains were imaged at the single-molecule level at the solvent/surface interface. Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was used as a π-stacking surface, whereas 1-phenyloctane and 1-phenylnonane were used as solvents. An odd-even effect was observed from C13 to C16. For C13 a single-crystal X-ray structure allowed an unprecedented insight into how packing from two dimensions is expanded into a three-dimensional crystal lattice. PMID:23839774

  11. Natural gas cleanup: Evaluation of a molecular sieve carbon as a pressure swing adsorbent for the separation of methane/nitrogen mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, R.W.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the results of a preliminary evaluation to determine the technical feasibility of using a molecular sieve carbon manufactured by the Takeda Chemical Company of Japan in a pressure owing adsorption cycle for upgrading natural gas (methane) contaminated with nitrogen. Adsorption tests were conducted using this adsorbent in two, four, and five-step adsorption cycles. Separation performance was evaluated in terms of product purity, product recovery, and sorbent productivity for all tests. The tests were conducted in a small, single-column adsorption apparatus that held 120 grams of the adsorbent. Test variables included adsorption pressure, pressurization rate, purge rate and volume, feed rate, and flow direction in the steps from which the product was collected. Sorbent regeneration was accomplished by purging the column with the feed gas mixture for all but one test series where a pure methane purge was used. The ratio between the volumes of the pressurization gas and the purge gas streams was found to be an important factor in determining separation performance. Flow rates in the various cycle steps had no significant effect. Countercurrent flow in the blow-down and purge steps improved separation performance. Separation performance appears to improve with increasing adsorption pressure, but because there are a number of interrelated variables that are also effected by pressure, further testing will be needed to verify this. The work demonstrates that a molecular sieve carbon can be used to separate a mixture of methane and nitrogen when used in a pressure swing cycle with regeneration by purge. Further work is needed to increase product purity and product recovery.

  12. OZONE REACTION WITH N-ALDEHYDES (N=4-10), BENZALDEHYDE, ETHANOL, ISOPROPANOL, AND N-PROPANOL ADSORBED ON A DUAL-BED GRAPHITIZED CARBON/CARBON MOLECULAR SIEVE ADSORBENT CARTRIDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone reacts with n-aldehydes (n = 4 - 10), benzaldehyde, ethanol, isopropanol, and n-propanol adsorbed on a dual-bed graphitized carbon/carbon molecular sieve adsorbent cartridge. Destruction of n-aldehydes increases with n number and with ozone concentration. In some samp...

  13. Massively parallel mathematical sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Montry, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a well-known algorithm for finding all prime numbers in a given subset of integers. A parallel version of the Sieve is described that produces computational speedups over 800 on a hypercube with 1,024 processing elements for problems of fixed size. Computational speedups as high as 980 are achieved when the problem size per processor is fixed. The method of parallelization generalizes to other sieves and will be efficient on any ensemble architecture. We investigate two highly parallel sieves using scattered decomposition and compare their performance on a hypercube multiprocessor. A comparison of different parallelization techniques for the sieve illustrates the trade-offs necessary in the design and implementation of massively parallel algorithms for large ensemble computers.

  14. Effect of surfactant/silica molar ratios on the formation of mesoporous molecular sieves: Inorganic mimicry of surfactant liquid-crystal phases and mechanistic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Vartuli, J.C.; Schmitt, K.D.; McCullen, S.B.; Hellring, S.D.; Beck, J.S.; Schlenker, J.L.; Olson, D.H.; Sheppard, E.W.; Kresge, C.T.; Roth, W.J.

    1994-12-01

    The influence of surfactant/silica molar ratio (Sur/Si) in the synthesis of mesoporous molecular sieve materials (M41S) was studied in a simple ternary synthesis system containing tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), water, and the cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) cation at 100{degrees}C. The resulting silicate materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, {sup 29}Si NMR, and FTIR. As the Sur/Si molar ratio increased from 0.5 to 2, the siliceous products obtained could be classified into four separate groups: MCM-41 (hexagonal), MCM-48 (cubic), thermally unstable M41S, and a molecular species, the cubic octamer [(CTMA)SiO{sub 2.5}]{sub 8}. One of the thermally unstable structures has been identified as a lamellar phase. These results are consistent with known micellar phase transformations that occur at various surfactant concentrations and reinforce the concept that liquid-crystal structures serve as templating agents for the formation of M41S type materials. 48 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Controlling molecular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dameron, Arrelaine A.

    , a molecular ink is patterned by contact with a patterned stamp directly atop an existing adamantanethiolate self-assembled monolayer, displacing the self-assembled monolayer everywhere the self-assembled monolayer is contacted. In this way, artificial diffusion barriers are created that block lateral mobility of the stamped molecules during patterning, allowing the patterning of molecules that are otherwise not patternable by conventional techniques. We also studied the influence of deposition time and the substrate species presence on molecular transport during dip-pen nanolithography. The transport rate was dependent on the size of the patterned features, and slowed down as a function of total deposition time. Additionally, the transported molecules interacted with preexisiting substrate molecules, and the transport rate was influenced by the functionality of substrate species. These studies demonstrate how complex assembles can be controlled by manipulating the properties of the individual components of the molecular device.

  16. Synthesis and application of mesoporous molecular sieve for miniaturized matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction of bioactive flavonoids from toothpaste, plant, and saliva.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wan; Cao, Jun; Ye, Li-Hong; Xu, Jing-Jing; Hu, Shuai-Shuai; Peng, Li-Qing

    2015-12-01

    This article describes the use of the mesoporous molecular sieve KIT-6 as a sorbent in miniaturized matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) in combination with ultra-performance LC for the determination of bioactive flavonoids in toothpaste, Scutellariae Radix, and saliva. In this study, for the first time, KIT-6 was used as a sorbent material for this mode of extraction. Compared with common silica-based sorbents (C18 and activated silica gel), the proposed KIT-6 dispersant with a three-dimensional cubic Ia3d structure and highly ordered arrays of mesoporous channels exhibits excellent adsorption capability of the tested compounds. In addition, several experimental variables, such as the mass ratio of sample to dispersant, grinding time, and elution solvent, were optimized to maximize the extraction efficiency. The proposed analytical method is simple, fast, and entails low consumption of samples, dispersants and elution solvents, thereby meeting "green chemistry" requirements. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries of three bioactive flavonoids obtained by analyzing the spiked samples were from 89.22 to 101.17%. Also, the LODs and LOQs for determining the analytes were in the range of 0.02-0.04 μg/mL and 0.07-0.13 μg/mL, respectively. Finally, the miniaturized matrix solid-phase dispersion method was successfully applied to the analysis of target solutes in real samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:26332895

  17. Application of computational fluid dynamics for the simulation of cryogenic molecular sieve bed absorber of hydrogen isotopes recovery system for Indian LLCB-TBM

    SciTech Connect

    Gayathri Devi, V.; Sircar, A.; Sarkar, B.

    2015-03-15

    One of the most challenging tasks in the design of the fuel cycle system lies in the effective design of Tritium Extraction System (TES) which involves proper extraction and purification of tritium in the fuel cycle of the fusion reactor. Indian Lead Lithium cooled Ceramic Breeder Test Blanket Module (LLCB-TBM) would extract hydrogen isotopes through Cryogenic Molecular Sieve Bed (CMSB) adsorber system. A prototype Hydrogen Isotopes Recovery System (HIRS) is being developed to validate the concepts for tritium extraction by adsorption mass transfer mechanism. In this study, a design model has been developed and analyzed to simulate the adsorption mass transfer kinetics in a fixed bed adsorption column. The simulation leads primarily to effective design of HIRS, which is a state-of-the-art technology. The paper describes the process simulation approach and the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. The effects of different operating conditions are studied to investigate their influence on the hydrogen isotopes adsorption capacity. The results of the present simulation study would be used to understand the best optimized transport phenomenon before realizing the TES as a system for LLCB-TBM. (authors)

  18. Does aphid salivation affect phloem sieve element occlusion in vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Ortega, Karla J.

    2013-01-01

    To protect against loss of photo-assimilate-rich phloem sap, plants have evolved several mechanisms to plug phloem sieve tubes in response to damage. In many Fabaceae, each sieve element contains a discrete proteinaceous body called a forisome, which, in response to damage, rapidly transforms from a condensed configuration that does not impede the flow of sap to a dispersed configuration that plugs the sieve element. Aphids and other specialized phloem sap feeders can ingest phloem sap from a single sieve element for hours or days, and to do this, they must be able to suppress or reverse phloem plugging. A recent study provided in vitro evidence that aphid saliva can reverse forisome plugs. The present study tested this hypothesis in vivo by inducing forisome plugs which triggered aphids to switch behaviour from phloem sap ingestion to salivation into the sieve element. After salivating into the sieve element for various periods of time, the aphids were instantaneously cryofixed (freeze fixed) in situ on their leaf. The state of the forisome was then determined in the penetrated sieve element and in nearby non-penetrated sieve elements which served as controls for sieve elements not subjected to direct aphid salivation. Forisomes were almost always in close contact with the stylet tips and thus came into direct contact with the saliva. Nonetheless, forisome plugs in the penetrated sieve element did not revert back to a non-plugging state any faster than those in neighbouring sieve elements that were not subjected to direct aphid salivation. PMID:24127515

  19. Itegrated Test and Evaluation of a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) Carbon Dioxide Removtal System (CDRA), Mechanical Compressor Engineering Development Unit (EDU), and Sabitier Engineering Development Unit (EDU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Campbell, Melissa; Murdoch, Karen; Miller, Lee A.; Jeng, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Currently on the International Space Station s (ISS) U.S. Segment, carbon dioxide (CO2) scrubbed from the cabin by a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) is vented overboard as a waste product. Likewise, the product hydrogen (H2) that will be generated by the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) planned for installation will also be vented. A flight experiment has been proposed that will take the waste CO2 removed from the cabin, and via the catalytic Sabatier process, reduce it with waste H2 to generate water and methane. The water produced may provide cost and logistics savings for ISS by reducing the amount of water periodically re-supplied to orbit. To make this concept viable, a mechanical piston compressor and accumulator were developed for collecting and storing the CO2 from the CDRA. The compressor, accumulator and Sabatier system would be packaged together as one unit and referred to as the Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA). Testing was required to evaluate the performance of a 4BMS CDRA, compressor, accumulator, and Sabatier performance along with their operating rules when integrated together. This had been numerically modeled and simulated; however, testing was necessary to verify the results from the engineering analyses. Testing also allowed a better understanding of the practical inefficiencies and control issues involved in a fully integrated system versus the theoretical ideals in the model. This paper presents and discusses the results of an integrated engineering development unit test.

  20. Microfluidic sieve valves

    DOEpatents

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  1. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.

    1997-12-01

    Monolithic adsorbents based on isotropic pitch fibers have been developed jointly by ORNL and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research. The monoliths are attractive for gas separation and storage applications because of their unique combination of physical properties and microporous structure. Currently at ORNL the monoliths are produced in billets that are 10 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length. The monolithic adsorbent material is being considered for guard bed applications on a natural gas (NG) powered device. In order for the material to be successful in this application, one must attain a uniform activation to modest micropore volumes throughout the large monoliths currently being produced. Here the authors report the results of a study directed toward attaining uniform activation in these billets.

  2. Research on Molecular Sieve Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Dhananjai B.; Hayhurst, David T.

    1985-01-01

    The zeolite synthesis and modification research program at Cleveland State University (Ohio) is described, including program philosophy and objectives, and research facilities. Also considers zeolite synthesis, adsorption on zeolites, kinetics of adsorption, and zeolite catalysis research. (JN)

  3. Optically controllable molecular logic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Takahiro Fujii, Ryo; Ogura, Yusuke; Tanida, Jun

    2015-07-06

    Molecular logic circuits represent a promising technology for observation and manipulation of biological systems at the molecular level. However, the implementation of molecular logic circuits for temporal and programmable operation remains challenging. In this paper, we demonstrate an optically controllable logic circuit that uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for signaling. The FRET-based signaling process is modulated by both molecular and optical inputs. Based on the distance dependence of FRET, the FRET pathways required to execute molecular logic operations are formed on a DNA nanostructure as a circuit based on its molecular inputs. In addition, the FRET pathways on the DNA nanostructure are controlled optically, using photoswitching fluorescent molecules to instruct the execution of the desired operation and the related timings. The behavior of the circuit can thus be controlled using external optical signals. As an example, a molecular logic circuit capable of executing two different logic operations was studied. The circuit contains functional DNAs and a DNA scaffold to construct two FRET routes for executing Input 1 AND Input 2 and Input 1 AND NOT Input 3 operations on molecular inputs. The circuit produced the correct outputs with all possible combinations of the inputs by following the light signals. Moreover, the operation execution timings were controlled based on light irradiation and the circuit responded to time-dependent inputs. The experimental results demonstrate that the circuit changes the output for the required operations following the input of temporal light signals.

  4. Ultrasound- and Molecular Sieves-Assisted Synthesis, Molecular Docking and Antifungal Evaluation of 5-(4-(Benzyloxy)-substituted phenyl)-3-((phenylamino)methyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2(3H)-thiones.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Urja D; Tupe, Santosh G; Seijas Vazquez, Julio A; Khan, Firoz A Kalam; Sangshetti, Jaiprakash N; Nikalje, Anna Pratima G

    2016-01-01

    A novel series of 5-(4-(benzyloxy)substituted phenyl)-3-((phenyl amino)methyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2(3H)-thione Mannich bases 6a-o were synthesized in good yield from the key compound 5-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2(3H)-thione by aminomethylation with paraformaldehyde and substituted amines using molecular sieves and sonication as green chemistry tools. The antifungal activity of the new products was evaluated against seven human pathogenic fungal strains, namely, Candida albicans ATCC 24433, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Candida glabrata NCYC 388, Cryptococcus neoformans ATCC 34664, Cryptococcus neoformans PRL 518, Aspergillus fumigatus NCIM 902 and Aspergillus niger ATCC 10578. The synthesized compounds 6d, 6f, 6g, 6h and 6j exhibited promising antifungal activity against the tested fungal pathogens. In molecular docking studies, derivatives 6c, 6f and 6i showed good binding at the active site of C. albicans cytochrome P450 enzyme lanosterol 14 α-demethylase. The in vitro antifungal activity results and docking studies indicated that the synthesized compounds have potential antifungal activity and can be further optimized as privileged scaffolds to design and develop potent antifungal drugs. PMID:27171073

  5. Generalized Fibonacci photon sieves.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong

    2015-08-20

    We successfully extend the standard Fibonacci zone plates with two on-axis foci to the generalized Fibonacci photon sieves (GFiPS) with multiple on-axis foci. We also propose the direct and inverse design methods based on the characteristic roots of the recursion relation of the generalized Fibonacci sequences. By switching the transparent and opaque zones, according to the generalized Fibonacci sequences, we not only realize adjustable multifocal distances but also fulfill the adjustable compression ratio of focal spots in different directions. PMID:26368763

  6. [Quality control in molecular microbiology].

    PubMed

    Orta Mira, Nieves; Guna Serrano, María Remedio; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción; Pérez, José L

    2008-07-01

    The term quality assurance (QA) refers to the quality control activities related to analytical procedures performed in the clinical microbiology laboratory. QA should include both external and internal quality assessment. Application of quality control tools in molecular microbiology assays is crucial to ensure the accuracy of results and appropriate patient management. External quality control is used for laboratory intercomparisons, detection of random and systematic errors, evaluation of the suitability of some reagents or commercial diagnostic kits, and continuing education. The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology includes quality control procedures for molecular microbiology, as well as specific programs for quantitative determination of the viral load of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), two highly important molecular markers in clinical settings due to their prognostic value and utility as a treatment guide. Internal quality control allows random and systematic errors to be detected through the inclusion of quality control samples in the assays performed in the laboratory, equipment monitoring, and audit. Evaluation of all molecular microbiology assays before their inclusion in the daily routine work of the laboratory is of utmost importance.

  7. Coherent control of molecular torsion.

    PubMed

    Parker, Shane M; Ratner, Mark A; Seideman, Tamar

    2011-12-14

    We propose a coherent, strong-field approach to control the torsional modes of biphenyl derivatives, and develop a numerical scheme to simulate the torsional dynamics. By choice of the field parameters, the method can be applied either to drive the torsion angle to an arbitrary configuration or to induce free internal rotation. Transient absorption spectroscopy is suggested as a probe of torsional control and the usefulness of this approach is numerically explored. Several consequences of our ability to manipulate molecular torsional motions are considered. These include a method for the inversion of molecular chirality and an ultrafast chiral switch.

  8. Molecular Pathways Controlling Pancreas induction

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kyle W.; Wells, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in generating pancreatic cell types from human pluripotent stem cells has depended on our knowledge of the developmental processes that regulate pancreas development in vivo. The developmental events between gastrulation and formation of the embryonic pancreatic primordia are both rapid and dynamic and studies in frog, fish, chick, and mouse have identified the molecular basis of how the pancreas develops from multipotent endoderm progenitors. Here, we review the current status of our understanding of molecular mechanisms that control endoderm formation, endoderm patterning, and pancreas specification and highlight how these discoveries have allowed for the development of robust methods to generate pancreatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22743233

  9. Molecular Control of Macromolecular Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcombe, Thomas Wesley, III

    Molecular level control over macromolecules has been at the heart of human advancement, long before Hermann Staudinger coined the term Makromolekule. From the development of primitive pharmaceuticals to the advanced materials that sent Man into outer-space, We have been tinkering with God's paint since our inception. The work described herein primarily involves advances concerning poly-aromatic macromolecules for use in future electronic applications, particularly that of organic photovoltaics. There is a final chapter, however, that gives the reader a taste of how some molecular level changes can be directly visualized with modern microscopy techniques. Chapter 1 provides a very brief introduction to conjugated polymers and molecular level control over macromolecular properties. Chapters 2--4 introduces the concept of polymer substitution as a means by which to control and improve charge generation in organic photovoltaic devices. Chapters 5 and 6 show how these polymers can take on larger, defined structures, yet are still beholden to intrinsic molecular properties---such as regioregularity, a fancy word for the regularity of the position in which two aromatic rings are joined together. Chapter 7 re-examines the role of polymer substitution on photovoltaic performance, this time with an emphasis on homo-polymer packing rather than electron transfer at the donor/acceptor interface. Finally, Chapter 8 visualizes how controlling the environment about a single metal atom can lead directly to a cyclic polyolefin. Individually, these advances do not yield any breakthroughs noticeable to a general audience; collectively, they sit atop a mountain of human knowledge, waiting to provide a stepping stone for the next generation.

  10. Quantum Control of Molecular Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, I. R.; Gonzalez-Vazquez, J.; Santamaria, J.; Malinovsky, V. S.; Chang, B. Y.

    2007-12-26

    A general scheme is presented for controlling different molecular properties under strong pulse sequences working in the adiabatic regime. The strong laser pulses create laser induced potentials (LIP). The design of adiabatic schemes allows to move the wave function to the desired LIP. Manipulation of the structure of these LIPs and the starting energy of the wave function in the LIP, allows to control such different properties as bond lengths, vibrational motions, and intramolecular couplings. This work reviews some recent results under a unified frame and explores future applications.

  11. Multiprocessing the Sieve of Eratosthenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhari, S.H.

    1987-04-01

    More than two thousand years ago, Eratosthenes of Cyrene described a procedure for finding all prime numbers in a given range. This straightforward algorithm, known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, is to this day the only procedure for finding prime numbers. In recent years it has been of interest to computer scientists and engineers because it serves as a convenient benchmark against which to measure some aspects of a computer's performance. Specifically, the Sieve tests the power of a machine (or of a compiler) to access a very large array in memory rapidly and repeatedly. This power is clearly influenced by memory access time, the speed at which indexing is done, and the overhead of looping. The parallel version of the Sieve is very useful as a test of some of the capabilities of a parallel machine. The parallel algorithm is straightforward, and so is the process for checking the final results. However, the efficient implementation of the algorithm on a real parallel machine, especially in the dynamic load-balancing case, requires thoughtful design.

  12. Molecular control of facial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B.; Rooker, S.M.; Helms, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a developmental perspective on the concept of phylotypic and phenotypic stages of craniofacial development. Within Orders of avians and mammals, a phylotypic period exists when the morphology of the facial prominences is minimally divergent. We postulate that species-specific facial variations arise as a result of subtle shifts in the timing and the duration of molecular pathway activity (e.g., heterochrony), and present evidence demonstrating a critical role for Wnt and FGF signaling in this process. The same molecular pathways that shape the vertebrate face are also implicated in craniofacial deformities, indicating that comparisons between and among animal species may represent a novel method for the identification of human craniofacial disease genes. PMID:19747977

  13. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  14. A patterned anisotropic nanofluidic sieving structure for continuous-flow separation of DNA and proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianping; Schoch, Reto B; Stevens, Anna L; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Han, Jongyoon

    2007-02-01

    Microfabricated regular sieving structures hold great promise as an alternative to gels to improve the speed and resolution of biomolecule separation. In contrast to disordered porous gel networks, these regular structures also provide well defined environments ideal for the study of molecular dynamics in confining spaces. However, the use of regular sieving structures has, to date, been limited to the separation of long DNA molecules, however separation of smaller, physiologically relevant macromolecules, such as proteins, still remains a challenge. Here we report a microfabricated anisotropic sieving structure consisting of a two-dimensional periodic nanofluidic filter array. The designed structural anisotropy causes different-sized or -charged biomolecules to follow distinct trajectories, leading to efficient separation. Continuous-flow size-based separation of DNA and proteins, as well as electrostatic separation of proteins, was achieved, demonstrating the potential use of this device as a generic molecular sieving structure for an integrated biomolecule sample preparation and analysis system. PMID:18654231

  15. A patterned anisotropic nanofluidic sieving structure for continuous-flow separation of DNA and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianping; Schoch, Reto B.; Stevens, Anna L.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Han, Jongyoon

    2007-02-01

    Microfabricated regular sieving structures hold great promise as an alternative to gels to improve the speed and resolution of biomolecule separation. In contrast to disordered porous gel networks, these regular structures also provide well defined environments ideal for the study of molecular dynamics in confining spaces. However, the use of regular sieving structures has, to date, been limited to the separation of long DNA molecules, however separation of smaller, physiologically relevant macromolecules, such as proteins, still remains a challenge. Here we report a microfabricated anisotropic sieving structure consisting of a two-dimensional periodic nanofluidic filter array. The designed structural anisotropy causes different-sized or -charged biomolecules to follow distinct trajectories, leading to efficient separation. Continuous-flow size-based separation of DNA and proteins, as well as electrostatic separation of proteins, was achieved, demonstrating the potential use of this device as a generic molecular sieving structure for an integrated biomolecule sample preparation and analysis system.

  16. Multiprocessing the Sieve of Eratosthenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S.

    1986-01-01

    The Sieve of Eratosthenes for finding prime numbers in recent years has seen much use as a benchmark algorithm for serial computers while its intrinsically parallel nature has gone largely unnoticed. The implementation of a parallel version of this algorithm for a real parallel computer, the Flex/32, is described and its performance discussed. It is shown that the algorithm is sensitive to several fundamental performance parameters of parallel machines, such as spawning time, signaling time, memory access, and overhead of process switching. Because of the nature of the algorithm, it is impossible to get any speedup beyond 4 or 5 processors unless some form of dynamic load balancing is employed. We describe the performance of our algorithm with and without load balancing and compare it with theoretical lower bounds and simulated results. It is straightforward to understand this algorithm and to check the final results. However, its efficient implementation on a real parallel machine requires thoughtful design, especially if dynamic load balancing is desired. The fundamental operations required by the algorithm are very simple: this means that the slightest overhead appears prominently in performance data. The Sieve thus serves not only as a very severe test of the capabilities of a parallel processor but is also an interesting challenge for the programmer.

  17. Molecular controls of arterial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Michael; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Formation of arterial vasculature, here termed arteriogenesis, is a central process in embryonic vascular development as well as in adult tissues. While the process of capillary formation, angiogenesis, is relatively well understood, much remains to be learned about arteriogenesis. Recent discoveries point to the key role played by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) in control of this process and to newly identified control circuits that dramatically influence its activity. The latter can present particularly attractive targets for a new class of therapeutic agents capable of activation of this signaling cascade in a ligand-independent manner, thereby promoting arteriogenesis in diseased tissues. PMID:25953926

  18. Semiclassical guided optimal control of molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, A.; Mil'nikov, G.; Nakamura, H.

    2005-10-15

    An efficient semiclassical optimal control theory applicable to multidimensional systems is formulated for controlling wave packet dynamics on a single adiabatic potential energy surface. The approach combines advantages of different formulations of optimal control theory: quantum and classical on one hand and global and local on the other. Numerical applications to the control of HCN-CNH isomerization demonstrate that this theory can provide an efficient tool to manipulate molecular dynamics of many degrees of freedom by laser pulses.

  19. Effect of H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} impregnation on Sn-MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves and their physico-chemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Nedumaran, D.; Pandurangan, A.

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The wide angle XRD shows the well dispersion of HPWA in Sn-MCM-41. It enhances the total acidity of the material. The acidity of the material is correlated with sulfone selectivity. The FT-IR of dibenzothiophene and product shows the formation of sulfone (DBTO{sub 2}). - Highlights: • To enhance the total acidity of Sn-MCM-41 TPA is impregnated. • FT-IR and {sup 31}P MAS NMR confirms the HPWA intact on Sn-MCM-41. • EDAX shows the presence of W and P on Sn-MCM-41. • In ODS formation of sulfone was confirmed by FT-IR and {sup 1}H NMR. • The order of the catalytic activity of the catalysts are 18HSnM > 28HSnM > 8HSnM. - Abstract: Si-Sn-MCM-41 (Si/Sn = 110) mesoporous molecular sieve was synthesized by hydrothermal sol–gel method using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant and SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O as a metal source. To generate surface acidity of Si-Sn-MCM-41, 12-tungstophosphoric acid (HPWA) is impregnated on it. The acidity of HPWA loading on Sn-MCM-41 was investigated by temperature programmed desorption of NH{sub 3}. The diffused reflectance spectra of ultraviolet radiation, Raman spectra, FT-IR, {sup 29}Si-MAS NMR and {sup 31}P-MAS NMR techniques revealed the intact of α-Keggin anions on Sn-MCM-41. The wide angle XRD results showed that the HPWA is well dispersed on the support. The total acidity was enhanced with increase in loading of H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}. The catalytic activity was examined in desulfurization of dibenzothiophene in vapor phase system. Among the catalysts 18% HPWA loaded Sn-MCM-41 showed good catalytic activity in desulfurization at 325 °C. The HPWA/Sn-MCM-41 are a suitable solid acid catalyst for converting organic sulfur into insoluble sulfone.

  20. Cavity-Controlled Chemistry in Molecular Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Felipe; Spano, Frank C.

    2016-06-01

    The demonstration of strong and ultrastrong coupling regimes of cavity QED with polyatomic molecules has opened new routes to control chemical dynamics at the nanoscale. We show that strong resonant coupling of a cavity field with an electronic transition can effectively decouple collective electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a disordered molecular ensemble, even for molecules with high-frequency quantum vibrational modes having strong electron-vibration interactions. This type of polaron decoupling can be used to control chemical reactions. We show that the rate of electron transfer reactions in a cavity can be orders of magnitude larger than in free space for a wide class of organic molecular species.

  1. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions. PMID:25282046

  2. Molecular entomology and prospects for malaria control.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F. H.; Kamau, L.; Ranson, H. A.; Vulule, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    During the past decade, the techniques of molecular and cell biology have been embraced by many scientists doing research on anopheline vectors of malaria parasites. Some of the most important research advances in molecular entomology have concerned the development of sophisticated molecular tools for procedures such as genetic and physical mapping and germ line transformation. Major advances have also been made in the study of specific biological processes such as insect defence against pathogens and the manner in which malaria parasites and their anopheline hosts interact during sporogony. One of the most important highlights of this research trend has been the emergence during the past year of a formal international Anopheles gambiae genome project, which at present includes investigators in several laboratories in Europe and the USA. Although much of this molecular research is directed towards the development of malaria control strategies that are probably many years from implementation, there are some important areas of molecular entomology that may have a more near-term impact on malaria control. We highlight developments over the past decade in three such areas that we believe can make important contributions to the development of near-term malaria control strategies. These areas are anopheline species identification, the detection and monitoring of insecticide susceptibility/resistance in wild anopheline populations and the determination of the genetic structure of anopheline populations. PMID:11196488

  3. Biofuel Manufacturing from Woody Biomass: Effects of Sieve Size Used in Biomass Size Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Song, Xiaoxu; Deines, T. W.; Pei, Z. J.; Wang, Donghai

    2012-01-01

    Size reduction is the first step for manufacturing biofuels from woody biomass. It is usually performed using milling machines and the particle size is controlled by the size of the sieve installed on a milling machine. There are reported studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in milling of woody biomass. These studies show that energy consumption increased dramatically as sieve size became smaller. However, in these studies, the sugar yield (proportional to biofuel yield) in hydrolysis of the milled woody biomass was not measured. The lack of comprehensive studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in biomass milling and sugar yield in hydrolysis process makes it difficult to decide which sieve size should be selected in order to minimize the energy consumption in size reduction and maximize the sugar yield in hydrolysis. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap in the literature. In this paper, knife milling of poplar wood was conducted using sieves of three sizes (1, 2, and 4 mm). Results show that, as sieve size increased, energy consumption in knife milling decreased and sugar yield in hydrolysis increased in the tested range of particle sizes. PMID:22665985

  4. Biofuel manufacturing from woody biomass: effects of sieve size used in biomass size reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Song, Xiaoxu; Deines, T W; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2012-01-01

    Size reduction is the first step for manufacturing biofuels from woody biomass. It is usually performed using milling machines and the particle size is controlled by the size of the sieve installed on a milling machine. There are reported studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in milling of woody biomass. These studies show that energy consumption increased dramatically as sieve size became smaller. However, in these studies, the sugar yield (proportional to biofuel yield) in hydrolysis of the milled woody biomass was not measured. The lack of comprehensive studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in biomass milling and sugar yield in hydrolysis process makes it difficult to decide which sieve size should be selected in order to minimize the energy consumption in size reduction and maximize the sugar yield in hydrolysis. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap in the literature. In this paper, knife milling of poplar wood was conducted using sieves of three sizes (1, 2, and 4 mm). Results show that, as sieve size increased, energy consumption in knife milling decreased and sugar yield in hydrolysis increased in the tested range of particle sizes.

  5. Control-volume representation of molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Smith, E R; Heyes, D M; Dini, D; Zaki, T A

    2012-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) parallel to the control volume (CV) formulation of fluid mechanics is developed by integrating the formulas of Irving and Kirkwood [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 817 (1950)] over a finite cubic volume of molecular dimensions. The Lagrangian molecular system is expressed in terms of an Eulerian CV, which yields an equivalent to Reynolds' transport theorem for the discrete system. This approach casts the dynamics of the molecular system into a form that can be readily compared to the continuum equations. The MD equations of motion are reinterpreted in terms of a Lagrangian-to-control-volume (LCV) conversion function ϑ(i) for each molecule i. The LCV function and its spatial derivatives are used to express fluxes and relevant forces across the control surfaces. The relationship between the local pressures computed using the volume average [Lutsko, J. Appl. Phys. 64, 1152 (1988)] techniques and the method of planes [Todd et al., Phys. Rev. E 52, 1627 (1995)] emerges naturally from the treatment. Numerical experiments using the MD CV method are reported for equilibrium and nonequilibrium (start-up Couette flow) model liquids, which demonstrate the advantages of the formulation. The CV formulation of the MD is shown to be exactly conservative and is, therefore, ideally suited to obtain macroscopic properties from a discrete system.

  6. Control-volume representation of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. R.; Heyes, D. M.; Dini, D.; Zaki, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) parallel to the control volume (CV) formulation of fluid mechanics is developed by integrating the formulas of Irving and Kirkwood [J. Chem. Phys.JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.1747782 18, 817 (1950)] over a finite cubic volume of molecular dimensions. The Lagrangian molecular system is expressed in terms of an Eulerian CV, which yields an equivalent to Reynolds’ transport theorem for the discrete system. This approach casts the dynamics of the molecular system into a form that can be readily compared to the continuum equations. The MD equations of motion are reinterpreted in terms of a Lagrangian-to-control-volume (LCV) conversion function ϑi for each molecule i. The LCV function and its spatial derivatives are used to express fluxes and relevant forces across the control surfaces. The relationship between the local pressures computed using the volume average [Lutsko, J. Appl. Phys.JAPIAU0021-897910.1063/1.341877 64, 1152 (1988)] techniques and the method of planes [Todd , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.52.1627 52, 1627 (1995)] emerges naturally from the treatment. Numerical experiments using the MD CV method are reported for equilibrium and nonequilibrium (start-up Couette flow) model liquids, which demonstrate the advantages of the formulation. The CV formulation of the MD is shown to be exactly conservative and is, therefore, ideally suited to obtain macroscopic properties from a discrete system.

  7. Molecular, metabolic, and genetic control: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, John J.; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    The living cell is a miniature, self-reproducing, biochemical machine. Like all machines, it has a power supply, a set of working components that carry out its necessary tasks, and control systems that ensure the proper coordination of these tasks. In this Special Issue, we focus on the molecular regulatory systems that control cell metabolism, gene expression, environmental responses, development, and reproduction. As for the control systems in human-engineered machines, these regulatory networks can be described by nonlinear dynamical equations, for example, ordinary differential equations, reaction-diffusion equations, stochastic differential equations, or cellular automata. The articles collected here illustrate (i) a range of theoretical problems presented by modern concepts of cellular regulation, (ii) some strategies for converting molecular mechanisms into dynamical systems, (iii) some useful mathematical tools for analyzing and simulating these systems, and (iv) the sort of results that derive from serious interplay between theory and experiment.

  8. Mechanical sieve for screening mineral samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, W. P.

    1970-01-01

    Mechanical sieve consists of three horizontal screens mounted in a vertical stack. A combination of rotation and tapping produces an even flow across the screens, dislodges trapped particles, an ensures rapid segregation of the sample.

  9. Modeling the hydrodynamics of Phloem sieve plates.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Mullendore, Daniel Leroy; Holbrook, Noel Michele; Bohr, Tomas; Knoblauch, Michael; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Sieve plates have an enormous impact on the efficiency of the phloem vascular system of plants, responsible for the distribution of photosynthetic products. These thin plates, which separate neighboring phloem cells, are perforated by a large number of tiny sieve pores and are believed to play a crucial role in protecting the phloem sap from intruding animals by blocking flow when the phloem cell is damaged. The resistance to the flow of viscous sap in the phloem vascular system is strongly affected by the presence of the sieve plates, but the hydrodynamics of the flow through them remains poorly understood. We propose a theoretical model for quantifying the effect of sieve plates on the phloem in the plant, thus unifying and improving previous work in the field. Numerical simulations of the flow in real and idealized phloem channels verify our model, and anatomical data from 19 plant species are investigated. We find that the sieve plate resistance is correlated to the cell lumen resistance, and that the sieve plate and the lumen contribute almost equally to the total hydraulic resistance of the phloem translocation pathway.

  10. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of ‘minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions. PMID:26797564

  11. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of `minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions.

  12. Improved internal control for molecular diagnosis assays.

    PubMed

    Vinayagamoorthy, T; Maryanski, Danielle; Vinayagamoorthy, Dilanthi; Hay, Katie S L; Yo, Jacob; Carter, Mark; Wiegel, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The two principal determining steps in molecular diagnosis are the amplification and the identification steps. Accuracy of DNA amplification is primarily determined by the annealing sequence of the PCR primer to the analyte DNA. Accuracy for identification is determined either by the annealing region of a labelled probe for the real time PCR analysis, or the annealing of a sequencing primer for DNA sequencing analysis, that binds to the respective analyte (amplicon). Presently, housekeeping genes (Beta globin, GAPDH) are used in molecular diagnosis to verify that the PCR conditions are optimum, and are thus known as amplification controls [1-4]. Although these genes have been useful as amplification controls, they lack the true definition of an internal control because the primers and annealing conditions are not identical to the analyte being assayed. This may result in a false negative report [5]. The IC-Code platform technology described here provides a true internal control where the internal control and analyte share identical PCR primers annealing sequences for the amplification step and identical sequencing primer annealing sequence for the identification step. •The analyte and internal control have the same PCR and sequencing annealing sequences.•This method assures for little or no false negatives and false positives due to the method's design of using identical annealing conditions for the internal control and analyte, and by using DNA sequencing analysis for the identification step of the analyte, respectively.•This method also allows for a set lower limit of detection to be used by varying the amount of internal control used in the assay.

  13. Generation of optical vortices by apodized photon sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hai-bin; Wang, Xing-hai; Chen, Jun; Sun, Ping

    2016-05-01

    As a novel diffractive optical element, photon sieve has good focusing properties. We propose a method to verify the focusing properties by using apodized photon sieves. The apodized photon sieve is obtained by using a Gaussian window function to modulate the general photon sieve. Focusing properties of apodized photon sieve are studied by numerical simulations and experiments. It shows that photon sieves have good focusing ability, and the focusing ability of the photon sieve on the focal plane is stronger than that on other image planes. The experimental results also demonstrate that photon sieves can be used to generate optical vortices. The existence of optical vortices is confirmed by the formation of fork fringes. This apodized photon sieve is expected to have some practical applications in focusing analysis, optical imaging, and optical communication.

  14. Molecular control of fission yeast cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sergio A; Paoletti, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Cytokinesis gives rise to two independent daughter cells at the end of the cell division cycle. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has emerged as one of the most powerful systems to understand how cytokinesis is controlled molecularly. Like in most eukaryotes, fission yeast cytokinesis depends on an acto-myosin based contractile ring that assembles at the division site under the control of spatial cues that integrate information on cell geometry and the position of the mitotic apparatus. Cytokinetic events are also tightly coordinated with nuclear division by the cell cycle machinery. These spatial and temporal regulations ensure an equal cleavage of the cytoplasm and an accurate segregation of the genetic material in daughter cells. Although this model system has specificities, the basic mechanisms of contractile ring assembly and function deciphered in fission yeast are highly valuable to understand how cytokinesis is controlled in other organisms that rely on a contractile ring for cell division.

  15. Silk: molecular organization and control of assembly.

    PubMed

    Valluzzi, Regina; Winkler, Stefan; Wilson, Donna; Kaplan, David L

    2002-02-28

    The interface between the science and engineering of biology and materials is an area of growing interest. One of the goals of this field is to utilize biological synthesis and processing of polymers as a route to gain insight into topics such as molecular recognition, self-assembly and the formation of materials with well-defined architectures. The biological processes involved in polymer synthesis and assembly can offer important information on fundamental interactions involved in the formation of complex material architectures, as well as practical knowledge into new and important materials related to biomaterial uses and tissue engineering needs. Classic approaches in biology, including genetic engineering, controlled microbial physiology and enzymatic synthesis, are prototypical methods used to control polymer structure and chemistry, including stereoselectivity and regioselectivity, to degrees unattainable using traditional synthetic chemistry. This type of control can lead to detailed and systematic studies of the formation of the structural hierarchy in materials and the subsequent biological responses to these materials.

  16. All-optical control of molecular fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2010-01-15

    We present a quantum electrodynamical procedure to demonstrate the all-optical control of molecular fluorescence. The effect is achieved on passage of an off-resonant laser beam through an optically activated system; the presence of a surface is not required. Following the derivation and analysis of the all-optical control mechanism, calculations are given to quantify the significant modification of spontaneous fluorescent emission with input laser irradiance. Specific results are given for molecules whose electronic spectra are dominated by transitions between three electronic levels, and suitable laser experimental methods are proposed. It is also shown that the phenomenon is sensitive to the handedness of circularly polarized throughput, producing a conferred form of optical activity.

  17. Molecular control of wood formation in trees.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zheng-Hua; Zhong, Ruiqin

    2015-07-01

    Wood (also termed secondary xylem) is the most abundant biomass produced by plants, and is one of the most important sinks for atmospheric carbon dioxide. The development of wood begins with the differentiation of the lateral meristem, vascular cambium, into secondary xylem mother cells followed by cell expansion, secondary wall deposition, programmed cell death, and finally heartwood formation. Significant progress has been made in the past decade in uncovering the molecular players involved in various developmental stages of wood formation in tree species. Hormonal signalling has been shown to play critical roles in vascular cambium cell proliferation and a peptide-receptor-transcription factor regulatory mechanism similar to that controlling the activity of apical meristems is proposed to be involved in the maintenance of vascular cambium activity. It has been demonstrated that the differentiation of vascular cambium into xylem mother cells is regulated by plant hormones and HD-ZIP III transcription factors, and the coordinated activation of secondary wall biosynthesis genes during wood formation is mediated by a transcription network encompassing secondary wall NAC and MYB master switches and their downstream transcription factors. Most genes encoding the biosynthesis enzymes for wood components (cellulose, xylan, glucomannan, and lignin) have been identified in poplar and a number of them have been functionally characterized. With the availability of genome sequences of tree species from both gymnosperms and angiosperms, and the identification of a suite of wood-associated genes, it is expected that our understanding of the molecular control of wood formation in trees will be greatly accelerated.

  18. Molecular mechanisms that control endothelial cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Vestweber, D

    2000-02-01

    Endothelial cell contacts control the permeability of the blood vessel wall. This allows the endothelium to form a barrier for solutes, macromolecules, and leukocytes between the vessel lumen and the interstitial space. Loss of this barrier function in pathophysiological situations can lead to extracellular oedema. The ability of leukocytes to enter tissue at sites of inflammation is dependent on molecular mechanisms that allow leukocytes to adhere to the endothelium and to migrate through the endothelial cell layer and the underlying basal lamina. It is a commonly accepted working hypothesis that inter-endothelial cell contacts are actively opened and closed during this process. Angiogenesis is another important process that requires well-controlled regulation of inter-endothelial cell contacts. The formation of new blood vessels by sprouting from pre-existing vessels depends on the loosening of established endothelial cell contacts and the migration of endothelial cells that form the outgrowing sprouts. This review focuses on the molecular composition of endothelial cell surface proteins and proteins of the cytoskeletal undercoat of the plasma membrane at sites of inter-endothelial cell contacts and discusses the current knowledge about the potential role of such molecules in the regulation of endothelial cell contacts. PMID:10685062

  19. SEORious business: structural proteins in sieve tubes and their involvement in sieve element occlusion.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Michael; Froelich, Daniel R; Pickard, William F; Peters, Winfried S

    2014-04-01

    The phloem provides a network of sieve tubes for long-distance translocation of photosynthates. For over a century, structural proteins in sieve tubes have presented a conundrum since they presumably increase the hydraulic resistance of the tubes while no potential function other than sieve tube or wound sealing in the case of injury has been suggested. Here we summarize and critically evaluate current speculations regarding the roles of these proteins. Our understanding suffers from the suggestive power of images; what looks like a sieve tube plug on micrographs may not actually impede translocation very much. Recent reports of an involvement of SEOR (sieve element occlusion-related) proteins, a class of P-proteins, in the sealing of injured sieve tubes are inconclusive; various lines of evidence suggest that, in neither intact nor injured plants, are SEORs determinative of translocation stoppage. Similarly, the popular notion that P-proteins serve in the defence against phloem sap-feeding insects is unsupported by empirical facts; it is conceivable that in functional sieve tubes, aphids actually could benefit from inducing a plug. The idea that rising cytosolic Ca(2+) generally triggers sieve tube blockage by P-proteins appears widely accepted, despite lacking experimental support. Even in forisomes, P-protein assemblages restricted to one single plant family and the only Ca(2+)-responsive P-proteins known, the available evidence does not unequivocally suggest that plug formation is the cause rather than a consequence of translocation stoppage. We conclude that the physiological roles of structural P-proteins remain elusive, and that in vivo studies of their dynamics in continuous sieve tube networks combined with flow velocity measurements will be required to (hopefully) resolve this scientific roadblock. PMID:24591057

  20. SEORious business: structural proteins in sieve tubes and their involvement in sieve element occlusion.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Michael; Froelich, Daniel R; Pickard, William F; Peters, Winfried S

    2014-04-01

    The phloem provides a network of sieve tubes for long-distance translocation of photosynthates. For over a century, structural proteins in sieve tubes have presented a conundrum since they presumably increase the hydraulic resistance of the tubes while no potential function other than sieve tube or wound sealing in the case of injury has been suggested. Here we summarize and critically evaluate current speculations regarding the roles of these proteins. Our understanding suffers from the suggestive power of images; what looks like a sieve tube plug on micrographs may not actually impede translocation very much. Recent reports of an involvement of SEOR (sieve element occlusion-related) proteins, a class of P-proteins, in the sealing of injured sieve tubes are inconclusive; various lines of evidence suggest that, in neither intact nor injured plants, are SEORs determinative of translocation stoppage. Similarly, the popular notion that P-proteins serve in the defence against phloem sap-feeding insects is unsupported by empirical facts; it is conceivable that in functional sieve tubes, aphids actually could benefit from inducing a plug. The idea that rising cytosolic Ca(2+) generally triggers sieve tube blockage by P-proteins appears widely accepted, despite lacking experimental support. Even in forisomes, P-protein assemblages restricted to one single plant family and the only Ca(2+)-responsive P-proteins known, the available evidence does not unequivocally suggest that plug formation is the cause rather than a consequence of translocation stoppage. We conclude that the physiological roles of structural P-proteins remain elusive, and that in vivo studies of their dynamics in continuous sieve tube networks combined with flow velocity measurements will be required to (hopefully) resolve this scientific roadblock.

  1. Recent Improvements To the Sieve of Eratosthenes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quesada, Antonio R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents recently developed generalizations to the sieve of Eratosthenes, showing the principles underlying these improvements, which increase its efficiency without changing too much of its simplicity. Offers several possibilities to propose good investigations for students to explore, find patterns, and make generalizations. (JRH)

  2. Molecular control of grass inflorescence development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dabing; Yuan, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    The grass family is one of the largest families in angiosperms and has evolved a characteristic inflorescence morphology, with complex branches and specialized spikelets. The origin and development of the highly divergent inflorescence architecture in grasses have recently received much attention. Increasing evidence has revealed that numerous factors, such as transcription factors and plant hormones, play key roles in determining reproductive meristem fate and inflorescence patterning in grasses. Moreover, some molecular switches that have been implicated in specifying inflorescence shapes contribute significantly to grain yields in cereals. Here, we review key genetic and molecular switches recently identified from two model grass species, rice (Oryza sativa) and maize (Zea mays), that regulate inflorescence morphology specification, including meristem identity, meristem size and maintenance, initiation and outgrowth of axillary meristems, and organogenesis. Furthermore, we summarize emerging networks of genes and pathways in grass inflorescence morphogenesis and emphasize their evolutionary divergence in comparison with the model eudicot Arabidopsis thaliana. We also discuss the agricultural application of genes controlling grass inflorescence development.

  3. Chronic recording of regenerating VIIIth nerve axons with a sieve electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mensinger, A. F.; Anderson, D. J.; Buchko, C. J.; Johnson, M. A.; Martin, D. C.; Tresco, P. A.; Silver, R. B.; Highstein, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    A micromachined silicon substrate sieve electrode was implanted within transected toadfish (Opsanus tau) otolith nerves. High fidelity, single unit neural activity was recorded from seven alert and unrestrained fish 30 to 60 days after implantation. Fibrous coatings of genetically engineered bioactive protein polymers and nerve guide tubes increased the number of axons regenerating through the electrode pores when compared with controls. Sieve electrodes have potential as permanent interfaces to the nervous system and to bridge missing connections between severed or damaged nerves and muscles. Recorded impulses might also be amplified and used to control prosthetic devices.

  4. The Molecular Control of Blood Cell Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Leo

    1987-12-01

    The establishment of a cell culture system for the clonal development of blood cells has made it possible to identify the proteins that regulate the growth and differentiation of different blood cell lineages and to discover the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cell development in blood forming tissues. A model system with myeloid blood cells has shown that (i) normal blood cells require different proteins to induce cell multiplication (growth inducers) and cell differentiation (differentiation inducers), (ii) there is a hierarchy of growth inducers as cells become more restricted in their developmental program, and (iii) a cascade of interactions between proteins determines the correct balance between immature and mature cells in normal blood cell development. Gene cloning has shown that there is a family of different genes for these proteins. Normal protein regulators of blood cell development can control the abnormal growth of certain types of leukemic cells and suppress malignancy by incuding differentiation to mature nondividing cells. Chromosome abnormalities that give rise to malignancy in these leukemic cells can be bypassed and their effects nullified by inducing differentiation, which stops cells from multiplying. These blood cell regulatory proteins are active in culture and in the body, and they can be used clinically to correct defects in blood cell development.

  5. Molecular and genetic control of plant thermomorphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Quint, Marcel; Delker, Carolin; Franklin, Keara A; Wigge, Philip A; Halliday, Karen J; van Zanten, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is a major factor governing the distribution and seasonal behaviour of plants. Being sessile, plants are highly responsive to small differences in temperature and adjust their growth and development accordingly. The suite of morphological and architectural changes induced by high ambient temperatures, below the heat-stress range, is collectively called thermomorphogenesis. Understanding the molecular genetic circuitries underlying thermomorphogenesis is particularly relevant in the context of climate change, as this knowledge will be key to rational breeding for thermo-tolerant crop varieties. Until recently, the fundamental mechanisms of temperature perception and signalling remained unknown. Our understanding of temperature signalling is now progressing, mainly by exploiting the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) has emerged as a critical player in regulating phytohormone levels and their activity. To control thermomorphogenesis, multiple regulatory circuits are in place to modulate PIF4 levels, activity and downstream mechanisms. Thermomorphogenesis is integrally governed by various light signalling pathways, the circadian clock, epigenetic mechanisms and chromatin-level regulation. In this Review, we summarize recent progress in the field and discuss how the emerging knowledge in Arabidopsis may be transferred to relevant crop systems. PMID:27250752

  6. Factorization using the quadratic sieve algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.A.; Holdridge, D.B.

    1983-12-01

    Since the cryptosecurity of the RSA two key cryptoalgorithm is no greater than the difficulty of factoring the modulus (product of two secret primes), a code that implements the Quadratic Sieve factorization algorithm on the CRAY I computer has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories to determine as sharply as possible the current state-of-the-art in factoring. Because all viable attacks on RSA thus far proposed are equivalent to factorization of the modulus, sharper bounds on the computational difficulty of factoring permit improved estimates for the size of RSA parameters needed for given levels of cryptosecurity. Analysis of the Quadratic Sieve indicates that it may be faster than any previously published general purpose algorithm for factoring large integers. The high speed of the CRAY I coupled with the capability of the CRAY to pipeline certain vectorized operations make this algorithm (and code) the front runner in current factoring techniques.

  7. Factorization using the quadratic sieve algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.A.; Holdridge, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    Since the cryptosecurity of the RSA two key cryptoalgorithm is no greater than the difficulty of factoring the modulus (product of two secret primes), a code that implements the Quadratic Sieve factorization algorithm on the CRAY I computer has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories to determine as sharply as possible the current state-of-the-art in factoring. Because all viable attacks on RSA thus far proposed are equivalent to factorization of the modulus, sharper bounds on the computational difficulty of factoring permit improved estimates for the size of RSA parameters needed for given levels of cryptosecurity. Analysis of the Quadratic Sieve indicates that it may be faster than any previously published general purpose algorithm for factoring large integers. The high speed of the CRAY I coupled with the capability of the CRAY to pipeline certain vectorized operations make this algorithm (and code) the front runner in current factoring techniques.

  8. Use of thermal sieve to allow optical testing of cryogenic optical systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Wook; Cai, Wenrui; Burge, James H

    2012-05-21

    Full aperture testing of large cryogenic optical systems has been impractical due to the difficulty of operating a large collimator at cryogenic temperatures. The Thermal Sieve solves this problem by acting as a thermal barrier between an ambient temperature collimator and the cryogenic system under test. The Thermal Sieve uses a set of thermally controlled baffles with array of holes that are lined up to pass the light from the collimator without degrading the wavefront, while attenuating the thermal background by nearly 4 orders of magnitude. This paper provides the theory behind the Thermal Sieve system, evaluates the optimization for its optical and thermal performance, and presents the design and analysis for a specific system.

  9. Sieve Tube Geometry in Relation to Phloem Flow

    PubMed Central

    Mullendore, Daniel L.; Windt, Carel W.; Van As, Henk; Knoblauch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Sieve elements are one of the least understood cell types in plants. Translocation velocities and volume flow to supply sinks with photoassimilates greatly depend on the geometry of the microfluidic sieve tube system and especially on the anatomy of sieve plates and sieve plate pores. Several models for phloem translocation have been developed, but appropriate data on the geometry of pores, plates, sieve elements, and flow parameters are lacking. We developed a method to clear cells from cytoplasmic constituents to image cell walls by scanning electron microscopy. This method allows high-resolution measurements of sieve element and sieve plate geometries. Sieve tube–specific conductivity and its reduction by callose deposition after injury was calculated for green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), bamboo (Phyllostachys nuda), squash (Cucurbita maxima), castor bean (Ricinus communis), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Phloem sap velocity measurements by magnetic resonance imaging velocimetry indicate that higher conductivity is not accompanied by a higher velocity. Studies on the temporal development of callose show that small sieve plate pores might be occluded by callose within minutes, but plants containing sieve tubes with large pores need additional mechanisms. PMID:20354199

  10. Force-controlled lifting of molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, N.; Wagner, C.; Weiss, C.; Temirov, R.; Tautz, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Lifting a single molecular wire off the surface with a combined frequency-modulated atomic force and tunneling microscope it is possible to monitor the evolution of both the wire configuration and the contacts simultaneously with the transport conductance experiment. In particular, critical points where individual bonds to the surface are broken and instabilities where the wire is prone to change its contact configuration can be identified in the force gradient and dissipation responses of the junction. This additional mechanical information can be used to unambiguously determine the conductance of a true molecular wire, that is, of a molecule that is contacted via a pointlike “crocodile clip” to each of the electrodes but is otherwise free.

  11. Controlling local currents in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadalam, Hari Kumar; Harbola, Upendra

    2016-09-01

    The effects of nonequilibrium constraints and dephasing on the circulating currents in molecular junctions are analyzed. Circulating currents are manifestations of quantum effects and can be induced either by externally applied bias or an external magnetic field through the molecular system. In a symmetric Aharonov-Bohm ring, bond currents have two contributions, bias driven and magnetic field driven. We analyze the competition between these two contributions and show that, as a consequence, current through one of the branches can be completely suppressed. We then study the effect of asymmetry (as a result of chemical substitution) on the current pathways inside the molecule and study asymmetry-induced circulating currents (without magnetic field) by tuning the coupling strength of the substituent (at finite bias).

  12. Controlled release of molecular components of dendrimer/bioactive complexes

    DOEpatents

    Segalman, D.J.; Wallace, J.S.

    1998-08-18

    A method for releasing molecules (guest molecules) from the matrix formed by the structure of another molecule (host molecule) in a controllable manner has been invented. This method has many applications in science and industry. In addition, applications based on such molecular systems may revolutionize significant areas of medicine, in particular the treatment of cancer and of viral infection. Similar effects can also be obtained by controlled fragmentation of a source molecule, where the molecular fragments form the active principle. 13 figs.

  13. Controlled release of molecular components of dendrimer/bioactive complexes

    DOEpatents

    Segalman, Daniel J.; Wallace, J. Shield

    1998-01-01

    A method for releasing molecules (guest molecules) from the matrix formed by the structure of another molecule (host molecule) in a controllable manner has been invented. This method has many applications in science and industry. In addition, applications based on such molecular systems may revolutionize significant areas of medicine, in particular the treatment of cancer and of viral infection. Similar effects can also be obtained by controlled fragmentation of a source molecule, where the molecular fragments form the active principle.

  14. Resolution enhancement of photon sieve based on apodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanxiao; Xing, Tingwen; Liao, Zhijie; Yang, Yong; Ma, Jianling

    2008-03-01

    Photon sieve is a novel diffractive optical element modulating either amplitude or phase which consists of a great number of pinholes distributed appropriately over the Fresnel zones for the focusing and imaging of light. Photon sieve has the advantages of the diameter of pinholes beyond the limitation of the corresponding Fresnel zone width and the minimum background in the focal plane. Furthermore, photon sieve can be fabricated on a single surface without any supporting struts required unlike the Fresnel zone plate. Photon sieve can be used as EUV telescope for solar orbiter, space-based surveillance telescope operating at visible light, or other imaging components. Photon sieve can also be used as one of the promising lithographic tools for nanoscale science and engineering to obtain the lower cost, higher flexibility and better resolution. The approaches to enhancing imaging resolution of photon sieve are presented in detail. According to Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory, the diffractive field of photon sieve is described by means of the discrete fast Fourier transform algorithm. The related contents include the calculation of point spread function, the suppression of side lobes, the imaging bandwidth, the physical limit of resolution, and the diffraction efficiency. Imaging properties of photon sieve are analyzed on the basis of precise test.

  15. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Long, Ruixing; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2013-03-01

    Optimal control of molecular dynamics is commonly expressed from a quantum mechanical perspective. However, in most contexts the preponderance of molecular dynamics studies utilize classical mechanical models. This paper treats laser-driven optimal control of molecular dynamics in a classical framework. We consider the objective of steering a molecular system from an initial point in phase space to a target point, subject to the dynamic constraint of Hamilton's equations. The classical control landscape corresponding to this objective is a functional of the control field, and the topology of the landscape is analyzed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under specific assumptions on the regularity of the control fields, the classical control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating the presence of an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical principles on (a) a model diatomic molecule, (b) two coupled Morse oscillators, and (c) a chaotic system with a coupled quartic oscillator, confirming the absence of traps in the classical control landscape. We compare the classical formulation with the mathematically analogous quantum state-to-state transition probability control landscape.

  16. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes in phase space.

    PubMed

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Long, Ruixing; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2013-03-28

    Optimal control of molecular dynamics is commonly expressed from a quantum mechanical perspective. However, in most contexts the preponderance of molecular dynamics studies utilize classical mechanical models. This paper treats laser-driven optimal control of molecular dynamics in a classical framework. We consider the objective of steering a molecular system from an initial point in phase space to a target point, subject to the dynamic constraint of Hamilton's equations. The classical control landscape corresponding to this objective is a functional of the control field, and the topology of the landscape is analyzed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under specific assumptions on the regularity of the control fields, the classical control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating the presence of an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical principles on (a) a model diatomic molecule, (b) two coupled Morse oscillators, and (c) a chaotic system with a coupled quartic oscillator, confirming the absence of traps in the classical control landscape. We compare the classical formulation with the mathematically analogous quantum state-to-state transition probability control landscape.

  17. Controlling Motion at the Nanoscale: Rise of the Molecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Abendroth, John M; Bushuyev, Oleksandr S; Weiss, Paul S; Barrett, Christopher J

    2015-08-25

    As our understanding and control of intra- and intermolecular interactions evolve, ever more complex molecular systems are synthesized and assembled that are capable of performing work or completing sophisticated tasks at the molecular scale. Commonly referred to as molecular machines, these dynamic systems comprise an astonishingly diverse class of motifs and are designed to respond to a plethora of actuation stimuli. In this Review, we outline the conditions that distinguish simple switches and rotors from machines and draw from a variety of fields to highlight some of the most exciting recent examples of opportunities for driven molecular mechanics. Emphasis is placed on the need for controllable and hierarchical assembly of these molecular components to display measurable effects at the micro-, meso-, and macroscales. As in Nature, this strategy will lead to dramatic amplification of the work performed via the collective action of many machines organized in linear chains, on functionalized surfaces, or in three-dimensional assemblies. PMID:26172380

  18. Controlling Motion at the Nanoscale: Rise of the Molecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Abendroth, John M; Bushuyev, Oleksandr S; Weiss, Paul S; Barrett, Christopher J

    2015-08-25

    As our understanding and control of intra- and intermolecular interactions evolve, ever more complex molecular systems are synthesized and assembled that are capable of performing work or completing sophisticated tasks at the molecular scale. Commonly referred to as molecular machines, these dynamic systems comprise an astonishingly diverse class of motifs and are designed to respond to a plethora of actuation stimuli. In this Review, we outline the conditions that distinguish simple switches and rotors from machines and draw from a variety of fields to highlight some of the most exciting recent examples of opportunities for driven molecular mechanics. Emphasis is placed on the need for controllable and hierarchical assembly of these molecular components to display measurable effects at the micro-, meso-, and macroscales. As in Nature, this strategy will lead to dramatic amplification of the work performed via the collective action of many machines organized in linear chains, on functionalized surfaces, or in three-dimensional assemblies.

  19. Molecular dynamics computer simulation of permeation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, P.I.; Heffelfinger, G.S.; Fisler, D.K.; Ford, D.M.

    1997-12-31

    In this work the authors simulate permeation of gases and cations in solid models using molecular mechanics and a dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics technique. The molecular sieving nature of microporous zeolites are discussed and compared with that for amorphous silica made by sol-gel methods. One mesoporous and one microporous membrane model are tested with Lennard-Jones gases corresponding to He, H{sub 2}, Ar and CH{sub 4}. The mesoporous membrane model clearly follows a Knudsen diffusion mechanism, while the microporous model having a hard-sphere cutoff pore diameter of {approximately}3.4 {angstrom} demonstrates molecular sieving of the methane ({sigma} = 3.8 {angstrom}) but anomalous behavior for Ar ({sigma} = 3.4 {angstrom}). Preliminary results of Ca{sup +} diffusion in calcite and He/H{sub 2} diffusion in polyisobutylene are also presented.

  20. Controlling Molecular Ordering in Solution-State Conjugated Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jiahua; Han, Youngkyu; Kumar, Rajeev; Hong, Kunlun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Smith, Gregory Scott; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Do, Changwoo

    2015-07-17

    Rationally encoding molecular interactions that can control the assembly structure and functional expression in solution of conjugated polymers holds great potential for enabling optimal organic optoelectronic and sensory materials. In this work, we show that thermally-controlled and surfactant-guided assembly of water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solution is a simple and effective strategy to generate optoelectronic materials with desired molecular ordering. We have studied a conjugated polymer consisting of a hydrophobic thiophene backbone and hydrophilic, thermo-responsive ethylene oxide side groups, which shows a step-wise, multi-dimensional assembly in water. By incorporating the polymer into phase-segregated domains of an amphiphilic surfactant in solution, we demonstrate that both chain conformation and degree of molecular ordering of the conjugated polymer can be tuned in hexagonal, micellar and lamellar phases of the surfactant solution. The controlled molecular ordering in conjugated polymer assembly is demonstrated as a key factor determining the electronic interaction and optical function.

  1. Molecular and circadian controls of ameloblasts

    PubMed Central

    Athanassiou-Papaefthymiou, Maria; Kim, Doohak; Harbon, Lindsay; Papagerakis, Silvana; Schnell, Santiago; Harada, Hidemitsu; Papagerakis, Petros

    2012-01-01

    Stage-specific expression of ameloblast-specific genes is controlled by differential expression of transcription factors. In addition, ameloblasts follow daily rhythms in their main activities i.e. enamel protein secretion and enamel mineralization. This time related control is orchestrated by oscillations of clock proteins involved in circadian rhythms regulation. Our aim was to identify the potential links between daily rhythms and developmental controls of ameloblast differentiation. The effects of selected transcriptional factors Distal-less homeobox 3 (Dlx3) and Runt related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and clock gene Nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (Nr1d1) on secretory and maturation ameloblasts [using stage-specific markers amelogenin (Amel), enamelin (Enam) and kallikrein related-peptidase 4 (Klk4)] were evaluated in HAT-7 ameloblast cell line. Amel and Enam steady-state RNA expression levels were down-regulated in Runx2 over-expressing cells and up-regulated in Dlx3 over-expressing cells. In contrast, Klk4 was up-regulated by both Dlx3 and Runx2. Furthermore, a temporal and spatial relationship between clock genes and ameloblast differentiation markers was detected. Of interest, clock genes not only affected rhythmic expression of ameloblast specific genes but also influenced the expression of Runx2. Multi-scale mathematical modeling is being explored to further understand the temporal and developmental controls of ameloblast differentiation. Our study provides novel insights into the regulatory mechanisms sustaining ameloblast differentiation. PMID:22243224

  2. Subnanometer Two-Dimensional Graphene Oxide Channels for Ultrafast Gas Sieving.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Liu, Gongping; Huang, Kang; Chu, Zhenyu; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping

    2016-03-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials with atomic thickness and extraordinary physicochemical properties exhibit unique mass transport behaviors, enabling them as emerging nanobuilding blocks for separation membranes. Engineering 2D materials into membrane with subnanometer apertures for precise molecular sieving remains a great challenge. Here, we report rational-designing external forces to precisely manipulate nanoarchitecture of graphene oxide (GO)-assembled 2D channels with interlayer height of ∼0.4 nm for fast transporting and selective sieving gases. The external forces are synergistic to direct the GO nanosheets stacking so as to realize delicate size-tailoring of in-plane slit-like pores and plane-to-plane interlayer-galleries. The 2D channels endow GO membrane with excellent molecular-sieving characteristics that offer 2-3 orders of magnitude higher H2 permeability and 3-fold enhancement in H2/CO2 selectivity compared with commercial membranes. Formation mechanism of 2D channels is proposed on the basis of the driving forces, nanostructures, and transport behaviors.

  3. Molecular-Weight-Controlled, End-Capped Polybenzimidazoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Novel molecular-weight-controlled end-capped poly(arylene ether benzimidazole)s (PAEBI's) prepared by nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides. Polymers prepared at various molecular weights by upsetting stoichiometry of monomers and end-capped with monohydroxybenzimidazole. Exhibit favorable physical and mechanical properties, improved solubility in polar aprotic solvents and better compression moldability. Potential applications as adhesives, coatings, films, fibers, membranes, moldings, and composite matrix resins.

  4. Beyond Dispersity: Deterministic Control of Polymer Molecular Weight Distribution.

    PubMed

    Gentekos, Dillon T; Dupuis, Lauren N; Fors, Brett P

    2016-02-17

    The breadth of the molecular weight distributions (MWD) of polymers influences their physical properties; however, no synthetic methods allow precise control of the exact shape and composition of a distribution. We report a modular strategy that enables deterministic control over polymer MWD through temporal regulation of initiation in nitroxide-mediated polymerization reactions. This approach is applicable to any controlled polymerization that uses a discrete initiator, and it allows the use of MWD composition as a parameter to tune material properties.

  5. Spectral tuning of organic nanocolloids by controlled molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Naciri, Jawad; Anderson, George P; Chen, Mu-San; Ratna, Banahalli R

    2009-10-27

    The controlled self-assembly of molecules and interactions between them remain a challenge in creating tunable and functional organic nanostructures. One class of molecular systems that has proven useful for incorporating tunable functionality at different length scales is liquid crystals (LCs) due to its ability to inherently self-organize. Here we present a novel approach to utilize the self-assembly of polymerizable liquid crystals to control the molecular aggregation of stable fluorescent chromophores and create a unique class of organic fluorescent nanocolloids. By adjusting the ratio between the dye and LC molecules inside the nanocolloids, we demonstrate the ability to control the molecular interactions and tune the fluorescent emission spectra of nanocolloid populations under single wavelength excitation. The single absorption spectrum and multiple emission spectra are highly desirable and reminiscent of the spectroscopic signature of quantum dots. These novel fluorescent nanocolloids have broad potential applications in fluorescent imaging and biological labeling.

  6. Control of DNA hybridization by photoswitchable molecular glue.

    PubMed

    Dohno, Chikara; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2011-12-01

    Hybridization of DNA is one of the most intriguing events in molecular recognition and is essential for living matter to inherit life beyond generations. In addition to the function of DNA as genetic material, DNA hybridization is a key to control the function of DNA-based materials in nanoscience. Since the hybridization of two single stranded DNAs is a thermodynamically favorable process, dissociation of the once formed DNA duplex is normally unattainable under isothermal conditions. As the progress of DNA-based nanoscience, methodology to control the DNA hybridization process has become increasingly important. Besides many reports using the chemically modified DNA for the regulation of hybridization, we focused our attention on the use of a small ligand as the molecular glue for the DNA. In 2001, we reported the first designed molecule that strongly and specifically bound to the mismatched base pairs in double stranded DNA. Further studies on the mismatch binding molecules provided us a key discovery of a novel mode of the binding of a mismatch binding ligand that induced the base flipping. With these findings we proposed the concept of molecular glue for DNA for the unidirectional control of DNA hybridization and, eventually photoswitchable molecular glue for DNA, which enabled the bidirectional control of hybridization under photoirradiation. In this tutorial review, we describe in detail how we integrated the mismatch binding ligand into photoswitchable molecular glue for DNA, and the application and perspective in DNA-based nanoscience.

  7. Quantum control of molecular tunneling ionization in the spatiotemporal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Hideki; Saito, Naoaki; Morishita, Toru

    2011-06-15

    We report on a method that can control molecular photoionization in both space and time domains. The directionally asymmetric molecular tunneling ionization induced by intense (5.0 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}) phase-controlled two-color laser pulses consisting of fundamental and second-harmonic light achieves the selective ionization of asymmetric molecules in the space domain, and manipulates the birth time and direction of photoelectron emission on an attosecond time scale. This method provides a powerful tool for tracking the quantum dynamics of photoelectrons by using phase-dependent oriented molecules as a phase reference in simultaneous ion-electron detection.

  8. Continuous-Flow Bioseparation Using Microfabricated Anisotropic Nanofluidic Sieving Structures

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jianping; Mao, Pan; Han, Jongyoon

    2010-01-01

    The anisotropic nanofluidic filter (nanofilter) array (ANA) is a unique molecular sieving structure for separating biomolecules. Here we describe fabrication of planar and vertical ANA chips and how to perform continuous-flow bioseparation using them. This protocol is most useful for bioengineers that are interested in developing automated multistep chip-based bioanalysis systems and assumes prior cleanroom microfabrication knowledge. The ANA consists of a two-dimensional periodic nanofilter array, and the designed structural anisotropy of the ANA causes different sized- or charged-biomolecules to follow distinct trajectories under applied electric fields, leading to efficient continuous-flow separation. Using microfluidic channels surrounding the ANA, the fractionated biomolecule streams are collected and routed to different fluid channels or reservoirs for convenient sample recovery and downstream bioanalysis. The ANA is physically robust and can be reused repeatedly. Compared to conventional gel-based separation techniques, the ANA offers the potential for faster separation, higher throughput, and more convenient sample recovery. PMID:19876028

  9. Threshold microsclerotial inoculum for cotton verticillium wilt determined through wet-sieving and real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Fan, Rong; Dong, Haitao; Shang, Wenjing; Xu, Xiangming; Zhu, Heqin; Yang, Jiarong; Hu, Xiaoping

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of Verticillium dahliae microsclerotia is an important component of wilt management on a range of crops. Estimation of microsclerotia by dry or wet sieving and plating of soil samples on semiselective medium is a commonly used technique but this method is resource-intensive. We developed a new molecular quantification method based on Synergy Brands (SYBR) Green real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction of wet-sieving samples (wet-sieving qPCR). This method can detect V. dahliae microsclerotia as low as 0.5 CFU g(-1) of soil. There was a high correlation (r=0.98) between the estimates of conventional plating analysis and the new wet-sieving qPCR method for 40 soil samples. To estimate the inoculum threshold for cotton wilt, >400 soil samples were taken from the rhizosphere of individual plants with or without visual wilt symptoms in experimental and commercial cotton fields at the boll-forming stage. Wilt inoculum was estimated using the wet-sieving qPCR method and related to wilt development. The estimated inoculum threshold varied with cultivar, ranging from 4.0 and 7.0 CFU g(-1) of soil for susceptible and resistant cultivars, respectively. In addition, there was an overall relationship of wilt incidence with inoculum density across 31 commercial fields where a single composite soil sample was taken at each field, with an estimated inoculum threshold of 11 CFU g(-1) of soil. These results suggest that wilt risk can be predicted from the estimated soil inoculum density using the new wet-sieving qPCR method. We recommend the use of 4.0 and 7.0 CFU g(-1) as an inoculum threshold on susceptible and resistant cultivars, respectively, in practical risk prediction schemes.

  10. 7 CFR 801.8 - Tolerances for sieves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.8 Tolerances for sieves. The maintenance tolerances for...

  11. 7 CFR 801.8 - Tolerances for sieves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.8 Tolerances for sieves. The maintenance tolerances for...

  12. 7 CFR 801.8 - Tolerances for sieves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.8 Tolerances for sieves. The maintenance tolerances for...

  13. 7 CFR 801.8 - Tolerances for sieves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.8 Tolerances for sieves. The maintenance tolerances for...

  14. 7 CFR 801.8 - Tolerances for sieves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.8 Tolerances for sieves. The maintenance tolerances for...

  15. Post-sieve element transport of photoassimilates in sink regions.

    PubMed

    Patrick, J W; Offler, C E

    1996-08-01

    Photoassimilate transport from the sieve elements to the recipient sink cells, principally in the form of sucrose, provides a link between sink metabolism and compartmentation with phloem import. Phloem unloading has focused attention on photoassimilate transport across the sieve element boundary. However, post-sieve element transport can be of equal or greater significance. Three cellular pathways of sieve element unloading and post-sieve element transport are identified. These are apoplastic, symplastic and symplastic interrupted by an apoplastic step. The symplastic path is considered to be the common path, while the remaining pathways serve specialized functions. In particular, the apoplastic step isolates the sieve element transport function from the effects of solute concentration or osmotic changes in the sink cells. Switching between apo- and symplastic routes within a given sink has been found to be linked with such changes. Plasmodesmatal transport undoubtedly involves a diffusive component, but whether bulk flow contributes to the symplastic flux of photoassimilate from the sieve elements to the recipient sink cells is yet to be established unequivocally. Efflux across the plasma membranes of the sieve element-companion cell (se-cc) complexes and other vascular cells occurs by passive diffusion. Along the axial route, retrieval from the phloem apoplast is mediated by sucrose/proton symport. However, this mechanism is absent in terminal sinks. Non-vascular efflux from the maternal tissues of developing seed is passive in cereals and energy-coupled in certain grain legumes. Accumulation of sugars from the apoplast of all sinks with an apoplastic step universally occurs by a plasma membrane-bound sugar/proton symport mechanism. Regulation of symplastic transport could be mediated by a combination of sink metabolism and compartmentation coupled with changes in the transport properties of the interconnecting plasmodesmata. PMID:21245245

  16. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Xianwen; Geng, Zhirong; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Zhilin; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  17. Controlling molecular ordering in solution-state conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Han, Y.; Kumar, R.; He, Y.; Hong, K.; Bonnesen, P. V.; Sumpter, B. G.; Smith, S. C.; Smith, G. S.; Ivanov, I. N.; Do, C.

    2015-09-01

    Rationally encoding molecular interactions that can control the assembly structure and functional expression in a solution of conjugated polymers hold great potential for enabling optimal organic optoelectronic and sensory materials. In this work, we show that thermally-controlled and surfactant-guided assembly of water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solution is a simple and effective strategy to generate optoelectronic materials with the desired molecular ordering. We have studied a conjugated polymer consisting of a hydrophobic thiophene backbone and hydrophilic, thermo-responsive ethylene oxide side groups, which shows a step-wise, multi-dimensional assembly in water. By incorporating the polymer into phase-segregated domains of an amphiphilic surfactant in solution, we demonstrate that both chain conformation and degree of molecular ordering of the conjugated polymer can be tuned in hexagonal, micellar and lamellar phases of the surfactant solution. The controlled molecular ordering in conjugated polymer assembly is demonstrated as a key factor determining the electronic interaction and optical function.Rationally encoding molecular interactions that can control the assembly structure and functional expression in a solution of conjugated polymers hold great potential for enabling optimal organic optoelectronic and sensory materials. In this work, we show that thermally-controlled and surfactant-guided assembly of water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solution is a simple and effective strategy to generate optoelectronic materials with the desired molecular ordering. We have studied a conjugated polymer consisting of a hydrophobic thiophene backbone and hydrophilic, thermo-responsive ethylene oxide side groups, which shows a step-wise, multi-dimensional assembly in water. By incorporating the polymer into phase-segregated domains of an amphiphilic surfactant in solution, we demonstrate that both chain conformation and degree of molecular ordering

  18. Optimal control of molecular motion expressed through quantum fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Bijoy K.; Rabitz, Herschel; Askar, Attila

    2000-04-01

    A quantum fluid-dynamic (QFD) control formulation is presented for optimally manipulating atomic and molecular systems. In QFD the control quantum system is expressed in terms of the probability density ρ and the quantum current j. This choice of variables is motivated by the generally expected slowly varying spatial-temporal dependence of the fluid-dynamical variables. The QFD approach is illustrated for manipulation of the ground electronic state dynamics of HCl induced by an external electric field.

  19. A two-color, self-controlled molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Biner, Sarah M; Häner, Robert

    2011-12-16

    Control yourself! A two-color molecular beacon with non-nucleosidic chromophores in a triplex stem is presented. Pyrene and PDI fluorophores act as mutual quenchers by formation of a donor-acceptor complex in the closed form. Hybridization with the target results in two independent fluorescence signals. The two-color read-out provides a "self-control" feature, which helps to eliminate false positive signals in imaging and screening applications.

  20. Molecular control and variation in the floral transition.

    PubMed

    Battey, Nicholas H; Tooke, Fiona

    2002-02-01

    The common controls that are involved in both vegetative and floral development are becoming apparent at the molecular level. Intriguing links are also emerging between developmental events during the juvenile/adult and floral transitions. This progress has made it possible to test the annual model of floral transition in a wide range of plant species, including those that flower perennially. PMID:11788310

  1. Temperature-controlled molecular depolarization gates in nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, Leif; Schroder, Leif; Chavez, Lana; Meldrum, Tyler; Smith, Monica; Lowery, Thomas J.; E. Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2008-02-27

    Down the drain: Cryptophane cages in combination with selective radiofrequency spin labeling can be used as molecular 'transpletor' units for transferring depletion of spin polarization from a hyperpolarized 'source' spin ensemble to a 'drain' ensemble. The flow of nuclei through the gate is adjustable by the ambient temperature, thereby enabling controlled consumption of hyperpolarization.

  2. Control of molecular handedness using pump-dump laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoki, Kunihito; González, Leticia; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2002-02-01

    A theoretical method for controlling handedness of preoriented enantiomers starting from an equal mixture of right(R)-handed and left(L)-handed molecules using linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulses is presented. The essence of the method lies in the fact that the molecular handedness of oriented enantiomers is reflected in the direction of the electronic transition moment vector. A pump-dump control scheme via an electronic excited state is considered for controlling molecular handedness in a femtosecond time scale. The direction of the polarization vector of the pump pulse and that of the dump pulse are determined in such a way that there is the largest interaction between the laser and the L-(R-) handed molecules, while the interaction with R-(L-) handed ones vanishes. In the case in which both the pump and dump pulses are independent of each other with no overlap between them, an analytical expression for the yield of molecular handedness is derived by solving the equation of motion of the density matrix. This expression shows that both the pump and dump lasers with π-pulse area produce the maximum transfer yield of molecular handedness. The effectiveness of the laser control method is demonstrated by numerical simulation of dynamic chirality of pre-oriented H2POSH in a racemic mixture via the first electronic singlet excited state.

  3. Preparation of Fe/Mo/molecular sieves by CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jin S.; Donohu, J.A.; Choi-Feng, C.

    1995-12-01

    A series of mixed metal oxide catalysts was prepared via the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique by using the silanol moiety existing on various zeolite matrices as an anchoring site for metals. The novel CVD Fe/Mo/DBH catalyst was made by depositing FeCl{sub 3} and then MoO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} on the partially deboronated borosilicate (DBH). The catalyst precursor was activated by calcining it at 650-690{degrees}C for prolonged period. Among the zeolite matrices such as borosilicate, silicalite, ZSM-5, {beta}-zeolite and {Upsilon}-zeolite, the DBH exhibited a unique papra-selective oxidation property for the gas-phase O{sub 2} oxidation of polymethylated benzenes. Terephthaldehyde was produced in the oxidation of p-xylene. The impregnated catalyst was also prepared by the incipient wetness method. The catalyst performance and the stability of the impregnated catalyst were compared with those of the CVD counterpart. The CVD catalyst was more active and showed better stability than the impregnated catalyst. These catalysts were characterized by ammonia TPD, Raman spectroscopy, and electron microscopy with an objective of explaining these findings.

  4. Molecular sieve sensors for selective detection at the nanogram level

    DOEpatents

    Bein, Thomas; Brown, Kelly D.; Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, Charles J.

    1992-01-01

    The invention relates to a selective chemical sensor for selective detection of chemical entities even at the nanogram level. The invention further relates to methods of using the sensor. The sensor comprises: (a) a piezoelectric substrate capable of detecting mass changes resulting from adsorption of material thereon; and (b) a coating applied to the substrate, which selectively sorbs chemical entities of a size smaller than a preselected magnitude.

  5. Controlling molecular ordering in solution-state conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Han, Y; Kumar, R; He, Y; Hong, K; Bonnesen, P V; Sumpter, B G; Smith, S C; Smith, G S; Ivanov, I N; Do, C

    2015-10-01

    Rationally encoding molecular interactions that can control the assembly structure and functional expression in a solution of conjugated polymers hold great potential for enabling optimal organic optoelectronic and sensory materials. In this work, we show that thermally-controlled and surfactant-guided assembly of water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solution is a simple and effective strategy to generate optoelectronic materials with the desired molecular ordering. We have studied a conjugated polymer consisting of a hydrophobic thiophene backbone and hydrophilic, thermo-responsive ethylene oxide side groups, which shows a step-wise, multi-dimensional assembly in water. By incorporating the polymer into phase-segregated domains of an amphiphilic surfactant in solution, we demonstrate that both chain conformation and degree of molecular ordering of the conjugated polymer can be tuned in hexagonal, micellar and lamellar phases of the surfactant solution. The controlled molecular ordering in conjugated polymer assembly is demonstrated as a key factor determining the electronic interaction and optical function.

  6. Controlling Molecular Ordering in Solution-State Conjugated Polymers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Jiahua; Han, Youngkyu; Kumar, Rajeev; Hong, Kunlun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Smith, Gregory Scott; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Do, Changwoo

    2015-07-17

    Rationally encoding molecular interactions that can control the assembly structure and functional expression in solution of conjugated polymers holds great potential for enabling optimal organic optoelectronic and sensory materials. In this work, we show that thermally-controlled and surfactant-guided assembly of water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solution is a simple and effective strategy to generate optoelectronic materials with desired molecular ordering. We have studied a conjugated polymer consisting of a hydrophobic thiophene backbone and hydrophilic, thermo-responsive ethylene oxide side groups, which shows a step-wise, multi-dimensional assembly in water. By incorporating the polymer into phase-segregated domains of an amphiphilic surfactant in solution,more » we demonstrate that both chain conformation and degree of molecular ordering of the conjugated polymer can be tuned in hexagonal, micellar and lamellar phases of the surfactant solution. The controlled molecular ordering in conjugated polymer assembly is demonstrated as a key factor determining the electronic interaction and optical function.« less

  7. The angiosperm phloem sieve tube system: a role in mediating traits important to modern agriculture.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Lucas, William J

    2014-04-01

    The plant vascular system serves a vital function by distributing water, nutrients and hormones essential for growth and development to the various organs of the plant. In this review, attention is focused on the role played by the phloem as the conduit for delivery of both photosynthate and information macromolecules, especially from the context of its mediation in traits that are important to modern agriculture. Resource allocation of sugars and amino acids, by the phloem, to specific sink tissues is of importance to crop yield and global food security. Current findings are discussed in the context of a hierarchical control network that operates to integrate resource allocation to competing sinks. The role of plasmodesmata that connect companion cells to neighbouring sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells is evaluated in terms of their function as valves, connecting the sieve tube pressure manifold system to the various plant tissues. Recent studies have also revealed that plasmodesmata and the phloem sieve tube system function cooperatively to mediate the long-distance delivery of proteins and a diverse array of RNA species. Delivery of these information macromolecules is discussed in terms of their roles in control over the vegetative-to-floral transition, tuberization in potato, stress-related signalling involving miRNAs, and genetic reprogramming through the delivery of 24-nucleotide small RNAs that function in transcriptional gene silencing in recipient sink organs. Finally, we discuss important future research areas that could contribute to developing agricultural crops with engineered performance characteristics for enhance yield potential.

  8. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  9. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-07-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment.

  10. Controlling a spillover pathway with the molecular cork effect.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowski, Matthew D; Jewell, April D; Stamatakis, Michail; Boucher, Matthew B; Lewis, Emily A; Murphy, Colin J; Kyriakou, Georgios; Sykes, E Charles H

    2013-06-01

    Spillover of reactants from one active site to another is important in heterogeneous catalysis and has recently been shown to enhance hydrogen storage in a variety of materials. The spillover of hydrogen is notoriously hard to detect or control. We report herein that the hydrogen spillover pathway on a Pd/Cu alloy can be controlled by reversible adsorption of a spectator molecule. Pd atoms in the Cu surface serve as hydrogen dissociation sites from which H atoms can spillover onto surrounding Cu regions. Selective adsorption of CO at these atomic Pd sites is shown to either prevent the uptake of hydrogen on, or inhibit its desorption from, the surface. In this way, the hydrogen coverage on the whole surface can be controlled by molecular adsorption at a minority site, which we term a 'molecular cork' effect. We show that the molecular cork effect is present during a surface catalysed hydrogenation reaction and illustrate how it can be used as a method for controlling uptake and release of hydrogen in a model storage system.

  11. Controlling a spillover pathway with the molecular cork effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Jewell, April D.; Stamatakis, Michail; Boucher, Matthew B.; Lewis, Emily A.; Murphy, Colin J.; Kyriakou, Georgios; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2013-06-01

    Spillover of reactants from one active site to another is important in heterogeneous catalysis and has recently been shown to enhance hydrogen storage in a variety of materials. The spillover of hydrogen is notoriously hard to detect or control. We report herein that the hydrogen spillover pathway on a Pd/Cu alloy can be controlled by reversible adsorption of a spectator molecule. Pd atoms in the Cu surface serve as hydrogen dissociation sites from which H atoms can spillover onto surrounding Cu regions. Selective adsorption of CO at these atomic Pd sites is shown to either prevent the uptake of hydrogen on, or inhibit its desorption from, the surface. In this way, the hydrogen coverage on the whole surface can be controlled by molecular adsorption at a minority site, which we term a ‘molecular cork’ effect. We show that the molecular cork effect is present during a surface catalysed hydrogenation reaction and illustrate how it can be used as a method for controlling uptake and release of hydrogen in a model storage system.

  12. Sieve of Eratosthenes benchmarks for the Z8 FORTH microcontroller

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.

    1989-02-01

    This report presents benchmarks for the Z8 FORTH microcontroller system that ORNL uses extensively in proving concepts and developing prototype test equipment for the Smart House Project. The results are based on the sieve of Eratosthenes algorithm, a calculation used extensively to rate computer systems and programming languages. Three benchmark refinements are presented,each showing how the execution speed of a FORTH program can be improved by use of a particular optimization technique. The last version of the FORTH benchmark shows that optimization is worth the effort: It executes 20 times faster than the Gilbreaths' widely-published FORTH benchmark program. The National Association of Home Builders Smart House Project is a cooperative research and development effort being undertaken by American home builders and a number of major corporations serving the home building industry. The major goal of the project is to help the participating organizations incorporate advanced technology in communications,energy distribution, and appliance control products for American homes. This information is provided to help project participants use the Z8 FORTH prototyping microcontroller in developing Smart House concepts and equipment. The discussion is technical in nature and assumes some experience with microcontroller devices and the techniques used to develop software for them. 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  13. Controlled Rotation and Manipulation of Individual Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersell, Heath; Perera, U. G. E.; Ample, F.; Zhang, Y.; Vives, G.; Echeverria, J.; Grisolia, M.; Rapenne, G.; Joachim, C.; Hla, S.-W.

    2015-03-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines, but the parallels between the two are frequently only superficial because many molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, chemically and light driven rotary molecular motors have been developed. For electrically driven motors, tunneling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) have been used to drive rotation in a simple rotor into a single direction and to move a wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a single standalone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction [1] by selective inelastic electron tunneling through different sub-units of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotator for controlled rotations, and a Ru atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation originates from saw-tooth-like rotational potentials, which are determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site. This project is supported by the US DOE, BES grant: DE-FG02-02ER46012.

  14. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D.; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-04-01

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. Engineering molecular motors with controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells and provide optimized device components for tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions and other signals. Here, we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies and guided by a structural model for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we have constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should make it possible to achieve spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size and branchpoint turning.

  15. Molecular mechanism of size control in development and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolong; Xu, Tian

    2011-01-01

    How multicellular organisms control their size is a fundamental question that fascinated generations of biologists. In the past 10 years, tremendous progress has been made toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying size control. Original studies from Drosophila showed that in addition to extrinsic nutritional and hormonal cues, intrinsic mechanisms also play important roles in the control of organ size during development. Several novel signaling pathways such as insulin and Hippo-LATS signaling pathways have been identified that control organ size by regulating cell size and/or cell number through modulation of cell growth, cell division, and cell death. Later studies using mammalian cell and mouse models also demonstrated that the signaling pathways identified in flies are also conserved in mammals. Significantly, recent studies showed that dysregulation of size control plays important roles in the development of many human diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and hypertrophy. PMID:21483452

  16. Effects of Mesh Size on Sieved Samples of Corophium volutator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crewe, Tara L.; Hamilton, Diana J.; Diamond, Antony W.

    2001-08-01

    Corophium volutator (Pallas), gammaridean amphipods found on intertidal mudflats, are frequently collected in mud samples sieved on mesh screens. However, mesh sizes used vary greatly among studies, raising the possibility that sampling methods bias results. The effect of using different mesh sizes on the resulting size-frequency distributions of Corophium was tested by collecting Corophium from mud samples with 0·5 and 0·25 mm sieves. More than 90% of Corophium less than 2 mm long passed through the larger sieve. A significantly smaller, but still substantial, proportion of 2-2·9 mm Corophium (30%) was also lost. Larger size classes were unaffected by mesh size. Mesh size significantly changed the observed size-frequency distribution of Corophium, and effects varied with sampling date. It is concluded that a 0·5 mm sieve is suitable for studies concentrating on adults, but to accurately estimate Corophium density and size-frequency distributions, a 0·25 mm sieve must be used.

  17. Mesh Algorithms for PDE with Sieve I: Mesh Distribution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knepley, Matthew G.; Karpeev, Dmitry A.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a new programming framework, called Sieve, to support parallel numerical partial differential equation(s) (PDE) algorithms operating over distributed meshes. We have also developed a reference implementation of Sieve in C++ as a library of generic algorithms operating on distributed containers conforming to the Sieve interface. Sieve makes instances of the incidence relation, or arrows, the conceptual first-class objects represented in the containers. Further, generic algorithms acting on this arrow container are systematically used to provide natural geometric operations on the topology and also, through duality, on the data. Finally, coverings and duality are used to encode notmore » only individual meshes, but all types of hierarchies underlying PDE data structures, including multigrid and mesh partitions. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of the framework, we show how the mesh partition data can be represented and manipulated using the same fundamental mechanisms used to represent meshes. We present the complete description of an algorithm to encode a mesh partition and then distribute a mesh, which is independent of the mesh dimension, element shape, or embedding. Moreover, data associated with the mesh can be similarly distributed with exactly the same algorithm. The use of a high level of abstraction within the Sieve leads to several benefits in terms of code reuse, simplicity, and extensibility. We discuss these benefits and compare our approach to other existing mesh libraries.« less

  18. Control of rotor motion in a light-driven molecular motor: towards a molecular gearbox.

    PubMed

    Ter Wiel, Matthijs K J; van Delden, Richard A; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2005-11-21

    Controlled intramolecular movement and coupling of motor and rotor functions is exerted by this new molecular device. The rate of rotation of the rotor part of the molecule can be adjusted by alteration of the conformation of the motor part of the molecule. For all states of the motor part, different rates of rotation were measured for the rotor part. Conversion between the four propeller orientations was achieved by irradiation and heating.

  19. Principles of the Quantum Control of Molecular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Moshe; Brumer, Paul

    2003-02-01

    Principles and Applications of Quantum Control Over the past fifteen years, significant developments have been made in utilizing quantum attributes of light and matter to assume unprecedented control over the dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. This growth reflects a confluence of factors including the maturation of quantum mechanics as a tool for chemistry and physics, the development of new laser devices increasing our ability to manipulate light, and the recognition that coherent laser light can be used to imprint information on atoms and molecules for practical purposes. Written by two of the world's leading researchers in the field, Principles of the Quantum Control of Molecular Processes offers a systematic introduction to the fundamental principles of coherent control, and to the physics and chemistry necessary to master it. Designed as both a resource for self-study and as a graduate textbook, this survey of the subject provides a step-by-step discussion of light-matter interactions along with coverage of such essential topics as: Molecular dynamics and control The dynamics of photodissociation Bimolecular collision processes The control of chirality and asymmetric synthesis Application of control using moderate and strong fields Tuning the system and laser parameters to achieve optimal control Decoherence and methods for countering it Both authoritative and comprehensive, this first in-depth treatment of coherent control is destined to become the standard reference in an increasingly influential field. PAUL W. BRUMER, PhD, is University Professor-Theoretical Chemical Physics and holds the Roel Buck Chair in Chemical Physics at the University of Toronto. He received his BSc. from Brooklyn College and his PhD from Harvard University. MOSHE SHAPIRO, PhD, is the Jacques Mimran Professor of Chemical Physics at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel, and a Professor of Chemistry and Physics at the University of British Columbia. He received his

  20. Controlling Molecular Growth between Fractals and Crystals on Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Li, Na; Gu, Gao-Chen; Wang, Hao; Nieckarz, Damian; Szabelski, Paweł; He, Yang; Wang, Yu; Xie, Chao; Shen, Zi-Yong; Lü, Jing-Tao; Tang, Hao; Peng, Lian-Mao; Hou, Shi-Min; Wu, Kai; Wang, Yong-Feng

    2015-12-22

    Recent studies demonstrate that simple functional molecules, which usually form two-dimensional (2D) crystal structures when adsorbed on solid substrates, are also able to self-assemble into ordered openwork fractal aggregates. To direct and control the growth of such fractal supramolecules, it is necessary to explore the conditions under which both fractal and crystalline patterns develop and coexist. In this contribution, we study the coexistence of Sierpiński triangle (ST) fractals and 2D molecular crystals that were formed by 4,4″-dihydroxy-1,1':3',1″-terphenyl molecules on Au(111) in ultrahigh vacuum. Growth competition between the STs and 2D crystals was realized by tuning substrate and molecular surface coverage and changing the functional groups of the molecular building block. Density functional theory calculations and Monte Carlo simulations are used to characterize the process. Both experimental and theoretical results demonstrate the possibility of steering the surface self-assembly to generate fractal and nonfractal structures made up of the same molecular building block.

  1. Controlling Molecular Growth between Fractals and Crystals on Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Li, Na; Gu, Gao-Chen; Wang, Hao; Nieckarz, Damian; Szabelski, Paweł; He, Yang; Wang, Yu; Xie, Chao; Shen, Zi-Yong; Lü, Jing-Tao; Tang, Hao; Peng, Lian-Mao; Hou, Shi-Min; Wu, Kai; Wang, Yong-Feng

    2015-12-22

    Recent studies demonstrate that simple functional molecules, which usually form two-dimensional (2D) crystal structures when adsorbed on solid substrates, are also able to self-assemble into ordered openwork fractal aggregates. To direct and control the growth of such fractal supramolecules, it is necessary to explore the conditions under which both fractal and crystalline patterns develop and coexist. In this contribution, we study the coexistence of Sierpiński triangle (ST) fractals and 2D molecular crystals that were formed by 4,4″-dihydroxy-1,1':3',1″-terphenyl molecules on Au(111) in ultrahigh vacuum. Growth competition between the STs and 2D crystals was realized by tuning substrate and molecular surface coverage and changing the functional groups of the molecular building block. Density functional theory calculations and Monte Carlo simulations are used to characterize the process. Both experimental and theoretical results demonstrate the possibility of steering the surface self-assembly to generate fractal and nonfractal structures made up of the same molecular building block. PMID:26502984

  2. MYC cofactors: molecular switches controlling diverse biological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hann, Stephen R

    2014-06-17

    The transcription factor MYC has fundamental roles in proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and stem cell pluripotency. Over the last 30 years extensive information has been gathered on the numerous cofactors that interact with MYC and the target genes that are regulated by MYC as a means of understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling its diverse roles. Despite significant advances and perhaps because the amount of information learned about MYC is overwhelming, there has been little consensus on the molecular functions of MYC that mediate its critical biological roles. In this perspective, the major MYC cofactors that regulate the various transcriptional activities of MYC, including canonical and noncanonical transactivation and transcriptional repression, will be reviewed and a model of how these transcriptional mechanisms control MYC-mediated proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis will be presented. The basis of the model is that a variety of cofactors form dynamic MYC transcriptional complexes that can switch the molecular and biological functions of MYC to yield a diverse range of outcomes in a cell-type- and context-dependent fashion.

  3. An autonomous molecular computer for logical control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenson, Yaakov; Gil, Binyamin; Ben-Dor, Uri; Adar, Rivka; Shapiro, Ehud

    2004-05-01

    Early biomolecular computer research focused on laboratory-scale, human-operated computers for complex computational problems. Recently, simple molecular-scale autonomous programmable computers were demonstrated allowing both input and output information to be in molecular form. Such computers, using biological molecules as input data and biologically active molecules as outputs, could produce a system for `logical' control of biological processes. Here we describe an autonomous biomolecular computer that, at least in vitro, logically analyses the levels of messenger RNA species, and in response produces a molecule capable of affecting levels of gene expression. The computer operates at a concentration of close to a trillion computers per microlitre and consists of three programmable modules: a computation module, that is, a stochastic molecular automaton; an input module, by which specific mRNA levels or point mutations regulate software molecule concentrations, and hence automaton transition probabilities; and an output module, capable of controlled release of a short single-stranded DNA molecule. This approach might be applied in vivo to biochemical sensing, genetic engineering and even medical diagnosis and treatment. As a proof of principle we programmed the computer to identify and analyse mRNA of disease-related genes associated with models of small-cell lung cancer and prostate cancer, and to produce a single-stranded DNA molecule modelled after an anticancer drug.

  4. Remote control of molecular motors using light-activated gearshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Zev

    2013-03-01

    Engineering molecular motors with dynamically controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in vivo and provide sophisticated components for directed nanoscale transport in vitro. We previously constructed myosin motors that respond to a change in [Ca++] by reversing their direction of motion along the polarized actin filament. To expand the potential applications of controllable molecular motors, we have now developed myosins that shift gears in response to blue light illumination. Light is a versatile control signal that can be readily modulated in time and space, and is generally orthogonal to cellular signaling. Using structure-guided protein engineering, we have incorporated LOV photoreceptor domains into the lever arms of chimeric myosins, resulting in motors that robustly speed up, slow down, or switch directions upon illumination. These genetically encoded motors should be directly deployable inside living cells. Our successful designs include constructs based on two different myosin classes, and we show that optical velocity control can be implemented in motors that move at microns/sec speeds, enabling practical biological and bioengineering applications.

  5. Attosecond vacuum UV coherent control of molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ranitovic, Predrag; Hogle, Craig W.; Rivière, Paula; Palacios, Alicia; Tong, Xiao-Ming; Toshima, Nobuyuki; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Martin, Leigh; Martín, Fernando; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic light sources make it possible to access attosecond timescales, thus opening up the prospect of manipulating electronic wave packets for steering molecular dynamics. However, two decades after the birth of attosecond physics, the concept of attosecond chemistry has not yet been realized; this is because excitation and manipulation of molecular orbitals requires precisely controlled attosecond waveforms in the deep UV, which have not yet been synthesized. Here, we present a unique approach using attosecond vacuum UV pulse-trains to coherently excite and control the outcome of a simple chemical reaction in a deuterium molecule in a non-Born–Oppenheimer regime. By controlling the interfering pathways of electron wave packets in the excited neutral and singly ionized molecule, we unambiguously show that we can switch the excited electronic state on attosecond timescales, coherently guide the nuclear wave packets to dictate the way a neutral molecule vibrates, and steer and manipulate the ionization and dissociation channels. Furthermore, through advanced theory, we succeed in rigorously modeling multiscale electron and nuclear quantum control in a molecule. The observed richness and complexity of the dynamics, even in this very simplest of molecules, is both remarkable and daunting, and presents intriguing new possibilities for bridging the gap between attosecond physics and attochemistry. PMID:24395768

  6. Microfabricated Sieve for the Continuous Sorting of Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, T. A. J.; Austin, R. H.

    1998-02-01

    In a two-dimensional periodic but asymmetric environment, a Brownian particle that is driven in one direction by a potential gradient will also drift in the orthogonal direction at a rate that depends on its diffusion coefficient. On this basis, we propose a new method for separating biological macromolecules according to size. A fine stream of molecules is electrophoresed through a microfabricated sieve, etched from a silicon chip by lithography. The sieve consists of a periodic array of oblong obstacles, which deflect the molecules so that each species follows a different trajectory, oblique to the flow. Advantages promised by the technique include improved efficiency, continuous sorting and ready automation.

  7. Optical control of molecular dynamics: Molecular cannons, reflectrons, and wave-packet focusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Jeffrey L.; Whitnell, Robert M.; Wilson, Kent R.; Yan, YiJing; Mukamel, Shaul

    1993-11-01

    We consider the control of molecular dynamics using tailored light fields, based on a phase space theory of control [Y. J. Yan et al., J. Phys. Chem. 97, 2320 (1993)]. This theory enables us to calculate, in the weak field (one-photon) limit, the globally optimal light field that produces the best overlap for a given phase space target. We present as an illustrative example the use of quantum control to overcome the natural tendency of quantum wave packets to delocalize on excited state potential energy curves. Three cases are studied: (i) a ``molecular cannon'' in which we focus an outgoing continuum wave packet of I2 in both position and momentum, (ii) a ``reflectron'' in which we focus an incoming bound wave packet of I2, and (iii) the focusing of a bound wave packet of Na2 at a turning point on the excited state potential using multiple light pulses to create a localized wave packet with zero momentum. For each case, we compute the globally optimal light field and also how well the wave packet produced by this light field achieves the desired target. These globally optimal fields are quite simple and robust. While our theory provides the globally optimal light field in the linear, weak field regime, experiment can in reality only provide a restricted universe of possible light fields. We therefore also consider the control of molecular quantum dynamics using light fields restricted to a parametrized functional form which spans a set of fields that can be experimentally realized. We fit the globally optimal electric field with a functional form consisting of a superposition of subpulses with variable parameters of amplitude, center time, center frequency, temporal width, relative phase, and linear and quadratic chirp. The best fit light fields produce excellent quantum control and are within the range of experimental possibility. We discuss relevant experiments such as ultrafast spectroscopy and ultrafast electron and x-ray diffraction which can in principle

  8. Nanoscale Bio-Molecular Control Using EC-OWLS

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J P; Voros, J; Hubbell, J A; Textor, M

    2002-11-20

    A recently developed technique termed ''Electrochemical Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy'' (EC-OWLS) [1] combines evanescent-field optical sensing with electrochemical control of surface adsorption processes. Initial EC-OWLS investigations efficiently monitored molecular surface adsorption and layer thickness changes of an adsorbed polymer layer examined in situ as a function of potential applied to a waveguide1. A layer of indium tin oxide (ITO) served as both a high refractive index waveguide for optical sensing, and a conductive electrode; an electrochemical flow-through fluid cell incorporated working, reference and counter electrodes. Poly(L-lysine)-grafted-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) served as a model, polycation adsorbate. Results indicate that adsorption and desorption of PLL-g-PEG from aqueous buffer are a function of applied potential, and that binding events subsequent to PLL-g-PEG functionalization are dependent on reorganization in the molecular adlayer.

  9. Molecular diagnostic and surveillance tools for global malaria control.

    PubMed

    Erdman, Laura K; Kain, Kevin C

    2008-01-01

    Malaria is the most devastating parasitic infection in the world, annually causing over 1 million deaths and extensive morbidity. The global burden of malaria has increased over the last several decades, as have rates of imported malaria into non-endemic regions. Rapid and accurate diagnostics are a crucial component of malaria control strategies, and epidemiological surveillance is required to monitor trends in malaria prevalence and antimalarial drug resistance. Conventional malaria diagnostic and surveillance tools can be cumbersome and slow with limitations in both sensitivity and specificity. New molecular techniques have been developed in an attempt to overcome these restrictions. These molecular techniques are discussed with regard to their technical advantages and disadvantages, with an emphasis on the practicality of implementation in malaria-endemic and non-endemic regions.

  10. Application of statistical process control to qualitative molecular diagnostic assays.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Cathal P; Finn, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Modern pathology laboratories and in particular high throughput laboratories such as clinical chemistry have developed a reliable system for statistical process control (SPC). Such a system is absent from the majority of molecular laboratories and where present is confined to quantitative assays. As the inability to apply SPC to an assay is an obvious disadvantage this study aimed to solve this problem by using a frequency estimate coupled with a confidence interval calculation to detect deviations from an expected mutation frequency. The results of this study demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of this approach and highlight minimum sample number requirements. Notably, assays with low mutation frequencies and detection of small deviations from an expected value require greater sample numbers to mitigate a protracted time to detection. Modeled laboratory data was also used to highlight how this approach might be applied in a routine molecular laboratory. This article is the first to describe the application of SPC to qualitative laboratory data. PMID:25988159

  11. Molecular separation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    1996-04-09

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for separating a gaseous mixture of chemically identical but physically different molecules based on their polarities. The gaseous mixture of molecules is introduced in discrete quantities into the proximal end of a porous glass molecular sieve. The molecular sieve is exposed to microwaves to excite the molecules to a higher energy state from a lower energy state, those having a higher dipole moment being excited more than those with a lower energy state. The temperature of the sieve kept cold by a flow of liquid nitrogen through a cooling jacket so that the heat generated by the molecules colliding with the material is transferred away from the material. The molecules thus alternate between a higher energy state and a lower one, with the portion of molecules having the higher dipole moment favored over the others. The former portion can then be extracted separately from the distal end of the molecular sieve. 2 figs.

  12. Molecular networks involved in the immune control of BK polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Girmanova, Eva; Brabcova, Irena; Klema, Jiri; Hribova, Petra; Wohlfartova, Mariana; Skibova, Jelena; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    BK polyomavirus infection is the important cause of virus-related nephropathy following kidney transplantation. BK virus reactivates in 30%-80% of kidney transplant recipients resulting in BK virus-related nephropathy in 1%-10% of cases. Currently, the molecular processes associated with asymptomatic infections in transplant patients infected with BK virus remain unclear. In this study we evaluate intrarenal molecular processes during different stages of BKV infection. The gene expression profiles of 90 target genes known to be associated with immune response were evaluated in kidney graft biopsy material using TaqMan low density array. Three patient groups were examined: control patients with no evidence of BK virus reactivation (n = 11), infected asymptomatic patients (n = 9), and patients with BK virus nephropathy (n = 10). Analysis of biopsies from asymptomatic viruria patients resulted in the identification of 5 differentially expressed genes (CD3E, CD68, CCR2, ICAM-1, and SKI) (P < 0.05), and functional analysis showed a significantly heightened presence of costimulatory signals (e.g., CD40/CD40L; P < 0.05). Gene ontology analysis revealed several biological networks associated with BKV immune control in comparison to the control group. This study demonstrated that asymptomatic BK viruria is associated with a different intrarenal regulation of several genes implicating in antiviral immune response.

  13. Ultra-broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaonan; Hu, Jingpei; Lin, Yu; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Xiaojun; Pu, Donglin; Chen, Linsen; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements suffer from large chromatic aberration due to the strong wavelength-dependent nature in diffraction phenomena, and therefore, diffractive elements can work only at a single designed wavelength, which significantly limits the applications of diffractive elements in imaging. Here, we report on a demonstration of a wavefront coded broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves. The broadband diffraction imaging is implemented with a wavefront coded pinhole pattern that generates equal focusing power for a wide range of operating wavelength in a single thin-film element without complicated auxiliary optical system. Experimental validation was performed using an UV-lithography fabricated wavefront coded photon sieves. Results show that the working bandwidth of the wavefront coded photon sieves reaches 28 nm compared with 0.32 nm of the conventional one. Further demonstration of the achromatic imaging with a bandwidth of 300 nm is also performed with a wavefront coded photon sieves integrated with a refractive element. PMID:27328713

  14. Ultra-broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaonan; Hu, Jingpei; Lin, Yu; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Xiaojun; Pu, Donglin; Chen, Linsen; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-06-01

    Diffractive optical elements suffer from large chromatic aberration due to the strong wavelength-dependent nature in diffraction phenomena, and therefore, diffractive elements can work only at a single designed wavelength, which significantly limits the applications of diffractive elements in imaging. Here, we report on a demonstration of a wavefront coded broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves. The broadband diffraction imaging is implemented with a wavefront coded pinhole pattern that generates equal focusing power for a wide range of operating wavelength in a single thin-film element without complicated auxiliary optical system. Experimental validation was performed using an UV-lithography fabricated wavefront coded photon sieves. Results show that the working bandwidth of the wavefront coded photon sieves reaches 28 nm compared with 0.32 nm of the conventional one. Further demonstration of the achromatic imaging with a bandwidth of 300 nm is also performed with a wavefront coded photon sieves integrated with a refractive element.

  15. Flow Characteristics of Human Erythrocytes through Polycarbonate Sieves.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, M I; Bryant, C A; Hammerle, W E; Usami, S; Chien, S

    1967-08-18

    We used polycarbonate sieves with uniform cylindrical pores (2.4 to 6.8 microns in diameter) to filter suspensions of human erythrocytes (mean major diameter is 7.2 microns) in Eagle-albumin solution. With 6.8-micron sieves the pressure-flow curves are convexed to the pressure-axis at low pressures and become linear with high pressures. With 4.5-micron sieves, however, the pressure-flow relationship is linear throughout the range of study. In both types of sieves, flow rate is reduced progressively with increasing concentration of red blood cells (RBC) over a range of 0.5 to 95 percent. The resistance to flow of RBC suspensions is higher in 4.5-micron than in 6.8-micron pores. With filter pore diameters of 3.0 microns or more, the RBC concentration in the filtrate was 100 percent of that in the solution being filtered, but only 70 percent with 2.4-micron pores. The observed critical pore diameter for 100 percent cell transmission agrees with theoretical calculation based on the assumption that the RBC membrane is deformable but nonextensible. The importance of cell deformation in the passage of RBC's through small pores is shown by the inability of RBC hardened in acetaldehyde to pass pores with 6.8-micron diameter.

  16. Ligand Control of Manganese Telluride Molecular Cluster Core Nuclearity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bonnie; Paley, Daniel W; Siegrist, Theo; Steigerwald, Michael L; Roy, Xavier

    2015-09-01

    We report the synthesis, structural diversity, and chemical behavior of a family of manganese telluride molecular clusters whose charge-neutral cores are passivated by two-electron donor ligands. We describe three different core structures: a cubane-type Mn4Te4, a prismane Mn6Te6, and a dicubane Mn8Te8. We use various trialkylphosphines and N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) as surface ligands and demonstrate that the formation of the different cluster core structures is controlled by the choice of ligand: bulky ligands such as P(i)Pr3, PCy3, or (i)Pr2NHC ((i)Pr2NHC = 1,3-diisopropyl-4,5-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene) form the cubane-type core, while the smaller PMe3 produces the prismane core. The intermediate-sized PEt3 produces both cubane and prismane species. These manganese telluride molecular clusters are labile, and the capping phosphines can be replaced by stronger ligands, while the internal core structure of the cluster remains intact. The interplay of structural diversity and ligand versatility and lability makes these clusters potentially useful building blocks for the assembly of larger aggregates and extended structures. We demonstrate the simplest prototype of these solid-forming reactions: the direct coupling of two Mn4Te4((i)Pr2NHC)4 units to form the dicubane Mn8Te8((i)Pr2NHC)6. We also postulate the prismatic Mn6Te6 as the common ancestor of both Chevrel-type M6E8 and octanuclear rhombododecahedral M8E6 molecular clusters (M = transition metal and E = chalcogen), and we discuss the core structure of our molecular clusters as recognizable building units for the zinc blende and the hypothetical wurtzite lattices of MnTe.

  17. Molecular technology: improving strategies for controlling hydatid disease and cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    McManus, D P

    1990-06-01

    Recombinant DNA and related technologies are providing valuable, novel reagents for application in control strategies against the major parasitic diseases, including hydatid disease and cysticercosis. The impact of these powerful techniques for improving diagnosis and identification of various life cycle stages of Echinococcus spp. and Taenia solium, essential pre-requisites for epidemiological studies and for evaluating control programs, is beyond question. Furthermore, the use of molecular technology for characterizing sub-specific variants of strains of both Echinococcus and T. solium has led to important revisions of our understanding of the diseases they cause. In light of the recent remarkable development of a recombinant vaccine against T. ovis, the first practical parasite vaccine to be produced, the prospects for rapid development of similar vaccines against the medically important taeniids appear to be very encouraging.

  18. Numerical optimization of laser fields to control molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Haj-Yedder, A.; Auger, A.; Dion, C.M.; Cances, E.; Le Bris, C.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2002-12-01

    A thorough numerical illustration of an optimal control scenario dealing with the laser-induced orientation of a diatomic molecule (LiF) is presented. Special emphasis is laid on the definition of the various targets dealing with different orientation characteristics, identified in terms of maximum efficiency (i.e., molecular axis direction closest to the direction of the laser polarization vector), maximum duration (i.e., the time interval during which this orientation is maintained), or of a compromise between efficiency and duration. Excellent postpulse orientation is achieved by sudden, intense pulses. Thermal effects are also studied with an extension of the control scenarios to Boltzmann averaged orientation dynamics at T=5 K.

  19. Redox Control of Leukemia: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Mary E.; Rivera-Del Valle, Nilsa

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play both positive and negative roles in the proliferation and survival of a cell. This dual nature has been exploited by leukemia cells to promote growth, survival, and genomic instability—some of the hallmarks of the cancer phenotype. In addition to altered ROS levels, many antioxidants are dysregulated in leukemia cells. Together, the production of ROS and the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes make up the primary redox control of leukemia cells. By manipulating this system, leukemia cells gain proliferative and survival advantages, even in the face of therapeutic insults. Standard treatment options have improved leukemia patient survival rates in recent years, although relapse and the development of resistance are persistent challenges. Therapies targeting the redox environment show promise for these cases. This review highlights the molecular mechanisms that control the redox milieu of leukemia cells. In particular, ROS production by the mitochondrial electron transport chain, NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidoreductase, and cytochrome P450 will be addressed. Expression and activation of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, heme oxygenase, glutathione, thioredoxin, and peroxiredoxin are perturbed in leukemia cells, and the functional consequences of these molecular alterations will be described. Lastly, we delve into how these pathways can be potentially exploited therapeutically to improve treatment regimens and promote better outcomes for leukemia patients. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1349–1383. PMID:22900756

  20. Coherent 2D Spectroscopy and Control of Molecular Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brixner, Tobias

    2007-03-01

    Coherent two-dimensional femtosecond spectroscopy is used to investigate electronic couplings within molecular complexes. Third-order optical response functions are measured in a non-collinear three-pulse photon echo geometry with heterodyne signal detection. In combination with suitable simulations this allows recovering the delocalization of excited-state wavefunctions, their coupling, and the corresponding energy transport pathways, with nanometer spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution. Examples of multichromophoric systems are the FMO and the LH3 light-harvesting complexes from green sulfur bacteria and purple bacteria, respectively, for which energy transfer processes have been determined. Additional challenges arise if one is interested in the spectroscopy of photochemical rather than photophysical processes in molecular complexes: The product yields attained by a single femtosecond laser pulse are often very small, and hence time-dependent signals are hard to measure with good signal-to-noise ratio. In the context of coherent control, this implies that bond-breaking photochemistry in liquids is still difficult despite the many successes of optimal control in gas-phase photodissociation. In a novel accumulative scheme, macroscopic amounts of stable photoproducts are generated in an optimal fashion and with high product detection sensitivity. In connection with time-resolved spectroscopy, the accumulative scheme furthermore provides kinetic information on the pathways of low-efficiency chemical reaction channels. This was applied to investigate the photoconversion of green fluorescent protein.

  1. Molecular Aspects of Transport in Thin Films of Controlled Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Paul W. Bohn

    2009-04-16

    Our laboratory focuses on developing spatially localized chemistries which can produce structures of controlled architecture on the supermolecular length scale -- structures which allow us to control the motion of molecular species with high spatial resolution, ultimately on nanometer length scales. Specifically, nanocapillary array membranes (NCAMs) contain an array of nanometer diameter pores connecting vertically separated microfluidic channels. NCAMs can manipulate samples with sub-femtoliter characteristic volumes and attomole sample amounts and are opening the field of chemical analysis of mass-limited samples, because they are capable of digital control of fluid switching down to sub-attoliter volumes; extension of analytical “unit operations” down to sub-femtomole sample sizes; and exerting spatiotemporal control over fluid mixing to enable studies of reaction dynamics. Digital flow switching mediated by nanocapillary array membranes can be controlled by bias, ionic strength, or pore diameter and is being studied by observing the temporal characteristics of transport across a single nanopore in thin PMMA membranes. The control of flow via nanopore surface characteristics, charge density and functional group presentation, is being studied by coupled conductivity and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. Reactive mixing experiments previously established low millisecond mixing times for NCAM-mediated fluid transfer, and this has been exploited to demonstrate capture of mass-limited target species by Au colloids. Voltage and thermally-activated polymer switches have been developed for active control of transport in NCAMs. Thermally-switchable and size-selective transport was achieved by grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes onto the exterior surface of a Au-coated polycarbonate track-etched membrane, while the voltage-gated properties of poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) were characterized dynamically. Electrophoretic separations have been

  2. Molecular substrates of action control in cortico-striatal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Shiflett, Michael W.; Balleine, Bernard W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the molecular mechanisms in the striatum that mediate reward-based learning and action control during instrumental conditioning. Experiments assessing the neural bases of instrumental conditioning have uncovered functional circuits in the striatum, including dorsal and ventral striatal sub-regions, involved in action-outcome learning, stimulus-response learning, and the motivational control of action by reward-associated cues. Integration of dopamine (DA) and glutamate neurotransmission within these striatal sub-regions is hypothesized to enable learning and action control through its role in shaping synaptic plasticity and cellular excitability. The extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) appears to be particularly important for reward-based learning and action control due to its sensitivity to combined DA and glutamate receptor activation and its involvement in a range of cellular functions. ERK activation in striatal neurons is proposed to have a dual role in both the learning and performance factors that contribute to instrumental conditioning through its regulation of plasticity-related transcription factors and its modulation of intrinsic cellular excitability. Furthermore, perturbation of ERK activation by drugs of abuse may give rise to behavioral disorders such as addiction. PMID:21704115

  3. LARC-TPI 1500 series controlled molecular weight polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald; St. Clair, Terry; Burks, Harold; Gautreaux, Carol; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    1990-01-01

    LARC-TPI, a linear high temperature thermoplastic polyimide, was developed several years ago at NASA Langley Research Center. This material has been commercialized by Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc., Tokyo, Japan, as a varnish and powder. More recently, a melt-extruded film of a controlled molecular weight of this same polymer has been supplied to NASA Langley Research Center for evaluation. This new form, called LARC-TPI 1500 series, has been prepared in three molecular weights - high, medium and low flow polymers. The subject of this investigation deals with the rheological properties of the high and medium flow powders and the adhesive properties of the medium flow melt-extruded film. Rheological studies indicate that the high and medium flow forms of the polymer fall in the flow range of injection moldable materials. Adhesive data generated on the medium flow extruded film shows this form to be well suited for structural adhesive bonding. The data are as good or better than that for LARC-TPI data of previous studies.

  4. Experimental demonstration of a controllable electrostatic molecular beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lianzhong; Liang, Yan; Gu, Zhenxing; Hou, Shunyong; Li, Shengqiang; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2011-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a controllable electrostatic beam splitter for guided ND3 molecules with a single Y-shaped charged wire and a homogeneous bias field generated by a charged metallic parallel-plate capacitor. We study the dependences of the splitting ratio R of the guided ND3 beam and its relative guiding efficiency η on the voltage difference between two output arms of the splitter. The influences of the molecular velocity v and the cutting position L on the splitting ratio R are investigated as well, and the guiding and splitting dynamic processes of cold molecules are simulated. Our study shows that the splitting ratio R of our splitter can be conveniently adjusted from 10% to 90% by changing ΔU from -6  kV to +6  kV, and the simulated results are consistent with our experimental ones.

  5. Dihydroazulene: from controlling photochromism to molecular electronics devices.

    PubMed

    Broman, Søren Lindbæk; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2014-10-21

    Recent synthetic advances allowing large-scale preparation and systematic functionalization of the dihydroazulene (DHA)-vinylheptafulvene (VHF) photo-/thermoswitch have enabled detailed studies on how to tune optical and switching properties and have paved the way for using this system as a functional unit in molecular electronics and materials chemistry. Since discovery of its photochromism in the 1980'ies, numerous examples of DHA-VHF systems have been developed, allowing multimode switching, fluorescence-control and fine tuning of absorbance and VHF half-lives, giving insights into the mechanism of the switching event. Here, we present an overview of the properties of the DHA-VHF system, together with some selected synthetic procedures which have paved the way for its development.

  6. Focusing properties of phase-only generalized Fibonacci photon sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new algorithm to extend the standard Fibonacci photon sieve to the phase-only generalized Fibonacci photon sieve (GFiPS) and find that the focusing properties of the phase-only GFiPS are only relevant to the characteristic roots of the recursion relation of the generalized Fibonacci sequences. By switching the transparent and opaque zones on the basis of the generalized Fibonacci sequences, we not only realize adjustable bifocal lengths, but also give their corresponding analytic expressions. Besides, we investigate a special phase-only GFiPS, a spiral-phase GFiPS, which can present twin vortices along the axial coordinate. Compared with the single focusing system, bifocal system can be exploited to enhance the processing speed, and offer a broad range of applications, such as direct laser writing, optical tweezers or atom trapping and paralleled fluorescence microscope.

  7. Size-reduction and sorting behavior in sieve hammer mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schallnus, Harald

    Experiments were performed in a continuously operating sieve hammer mill to determine the duration of presence of the material to be ground in the size reduction machine. The test stand, analysis techniques, evaluation methods, and selection and production of samples are described. It is shown that the duration of presence of the material in the grinding space of the mill is approximately comparable to that in an ideal mixer. The type of sieve casing has an essential effect on the duration of presence. A combined model for the description of the size reduction and sorting behavior which allows the determination of the process coefficients (size reduction speed, sorting speed, mass transition coefficient) and their dependence on the different parameters, was developed.

  8. A differential delay equation arising from the sieve of Eratosthenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheer, A. Y.; Goldston, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the differential delay equation introduced by Buchstab (1937) in connection with an asymptotic formula for the uncanceled terms in the sieve of Eratosthenes. Maier (1985) used this result to show there is unexpected irreqularity in the distribution of primes in short intervals. The function omega(u) is studied in this paper using numerical and analytical techniques. The results are applied to give some numerical constants in Maier's theorem.

  9. Understanding and controlling regime switching in molecular diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallerberg, S.; de Wijn, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion can be strongly affected by ballistic flights (long jumps) as well as long-lived sticking trajectories (long sticks). Using statistical inference techniques in the spirit of Granger causality, we investigate the appearance of long jumps and sticks in molecular-dynamics simulations of diffusion in a prototype system, a benzene molecule on a graphite substrate. We find that specific fluctuations in certain, but not all, internal degrees of freedom of the molecule can be linked to either long jumps or sticks. Furthermore, by changing the prevalence of these predictors with an outside influence, the diffusion of the molecule can be controlled. The approach presented in this proof of concept study is very generic and can be applied to larger and more complex molecules. Additionally, the predictor variables can be chosen in a general way so as to be accessible in experiments, making the method feasible for control of diffusion in applications. Our results also demonstrate that data-mining techniques can be used to investigate the phase-space structure of high-dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems.

  10. Molecular spintronics: destructive quantum interference controlled by a gate.

    PubMed

    Saraiva-Souza, Aldilene; Smeu, Manuel; Zhang, Lei; Souza Filho, Antonio Gomes; Guo, Hong; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-10-22

    The ability to control the spin-transport properties of a molecule bridging conducting electrodes is of paramount importance to molecular spintronics. Quantum interference can play an important role in allowing or forbidding electrons from passing through a system. In this work, the spin-transport properties of a polyacetylene chain bridging zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) are studied with nonequilibrium Green's function calculations performed within the density functional theory framework (NEGF-DFT). ZGNR electrodes have inherent spin polarization along their edges, which causes a splitting between the properties of spin-up and spin-down electrons in these systems. Upon adding an imidazole donor group and a pyridine acceptor group to the polyacetylene chain, this causes destructive interference features in the electron transmission spectrum. Particularly, the donor group causes a large antiresonance dip in transmission at the Fermi energy EF of the electrodes. The application of a gate is investigated and found to provide control over the energy position of this feature making it possible to turn this phenomenon on and off. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of this system are also calculated, showing near ohmic scaling for spin-up but negative differential resistance (NDR) for spin-down.

  11. 3D Oxidized Graphene Frameworks for Efficient Nano Sieving.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Pranav Bhagwan; Saxena, Sumit; Badhe, Dhanashree Kamlesh; Chaudhary, Raghvendra Pratap; Shukla, Shobha

    2016-02-19

    The small size of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions provides a bottleneck in desalination and is a challenge in providing alternatives for continuously depleting fresh water resources. Graphene by virtue of its structural properties has the potential to address this issue. Studies have indicated that use of monolayer graphene can be used to filter micro volumes of saline solution. Unfortunately it is extremely difficult, resource intensive and almost impractical with current technology to fabricate operational devices using mono-layered graphene. Nevertheless, graphene based devices still hold the key to solve this problem due to its nano-sieving ability. Here we report synthesis of oxidized graphene frameworks and demonstrate a functional device to desalinate and purify seawater from contaminants including Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, dyes and other microbial pollutants. Micro-channels in these frameworks help in immobilizing larger suspended solids including bacteria, while nano-sieving through graphene enables the removal of dissolved ions (e.g. Cl(-)). Nano-sieving incorporated with larger frameworks has been used in filtering Na(+) and Cl(-) ions in functional devices.

  12. Predictability sieve, pointer states, and the classicality of quantum trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, D. A. R.; Zurek, W. H.; Dziarmaga, J.

    2005-12-15

    We study various measures of classicality of the states of open quantum systems subject to decoherence. Classical states are expected to be stable in spite of decoherence, and are thought to leave conspicuous imprints on the environment. Here these expected features of environment-induced superselection are quantified using four different criteria: predictability sieve (which selects states that produce least entropy), purification time (which looks for states that are the easiest to find out from the imprint they leave on the environment), efficiency threshold (which finds states that can be deduced from measurements on a smallest fraction of the environment), and purity loss time (that looks for states for which it takes the longest to lose a set fraction of their initial purity). We show that when pointer states--the most predictable states of an open quantum system selected by the predictability sieve--are well defined, all four criteria agree that they are indeed the most classical states. We illustrate this with two examples: an underdamped harmonic oscillator, for which coherent states are unanimously chosen by all criteria, and a free particle undergoing quantum Brownian motion, for which most criteria select almost identical Gaussian states (although, in this case, the predictability sieve does not select well defined pointer states)

  13. 3D Oxidized Graphene Frameworks for Efficient Nano Sieving.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Pranav Bhagwan; Saxena, Sumit; Badhe, Dhanashree Kamlesh; Chaudhary, Raghvendra Pratap; Shukla, Shobha

    2016-01-01

    The small size of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions provides a bottleneck in desalination and is a challenge in providing alternatives for continuously depleting fresh water resources. Graphene by virtue of its structural properties has the potential to address this issue. Studies have indicated that use of monolayer graphene can be used to filter micro volumes of saline solution. Unfortunately it is extremely difficult, resource intensive and almost impractical with current technology to fabricate operational devices using mono-layered graphene. Nevertheless, graphene based devices still hold the key to solve this problem due to its nano-sieving ability. Here we report synthesis of oxidized graphene frameworks and demonstrate a functional device to desalinate and purify seawater from contaminants including Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, dyes and other microbial pollutants. Micro-channels in these frameworks help in immobilizing larger suspended solids including bacteria, while nano-sieving through graphene enables the removal of dissolved ions (e.g. Cl(-)). Nano-sieving incorporated with larger frameworks has been used in filtering Na(+) and Cl(-) ions in functional devices. PMID:26892277

  14. 3D Oxidized Graphene Frameworks for Efficient Nano Sieving

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Pranav Bhagwan; Saxena, Sumit; Badhe, Dhanashree Kamlesh; Chaudhary, Raghvendra Pratap; Shukla, Shobha

    2016-01-01

    The small size of Na+ and Cl− ions provides a bottleneck in desalination and is a challenge in providing alternatives for continuously depleting fresh water resources. Graphene by virtue of its structural properties has the potential to address this issue. Studies have indicated that use of monolayer graphene can be used to filter micro volumes of saline solution. Unfortunately it is extremely difficult, resource intensive and almost impractical with current technology to fabricate operational devices using mono-layered graphene. Nevertheless, graphene based devices still hold the key to solve this problem due to its nano-sieving ability. Here we report synthesis of oxidized graphene frameworks and demonstrate a functional device to desalinate and purify seawater from contaminants including Na+ and Cl− ions, dyes and other microbial pollutants. Micro-channels in these frameworks help in immobilizing larger suspended solids including bacteria, while nano-sieving through graphene enables the removal of dissolved ions (e.g. Cl−). Nano-sieving incorporated with larger frameworks has been used in filtering Na+ and Cl− ions in functional devices. PMID:26892277

  15. Involvement of the sieve element cytoskeleton in electrical responses to cold shocks.

    PubMed

    Hafke, Jens B; Ehlers, Katrin; Föller, Jens; Höll, Sabina-Roxana; Becker, Stefanie; van Bel, Aart J E

    2013-06-01

    This study dealt with the visualization of the sieve element (SE) cytoskeleton and its involvement in electrical responses to local cold shocks, exemplifying the role of the cytoskeleton in Ca(2+)-triggered signal cascades in SEs. High-affinity fluorescent phalloidin as well as immunocytochemistry using anti-actin antibodies demonstrated a fully developed parietal actin meshwork in SEs. The involvement of the cytoskeleton in electrical responses and forisome conformation changes as indicators of Ca(2+) influx was investigated by the application of cold shocks in the presence of diverse actin disruptors (latrunculin A and cytochalasin D). Under control conditions, cold shocks elicited a graded initial voltage transient, ΔV1, reduced by external La(3+) in keeping with the involvement of Ca(2+) channels, and a second voltage transient, ΔV2. Cytochalasin D had no effect on ΔV1, while ΔV1 was significantly reduced with 500 nm latrunculin A. Forisome dispersion was triggered by cold shocks of 4°C or greater, which was indicative of an all-or-none behavior. Forisome dispersion was suppressed by incubation with latrunculin A. In conclusion, the cytoskeleton controls cold shock-induced Ca(2+) influx into SEs, leading to forisome dispersion and sieve plate occlusion in fava bean (Vicia faba).

  16. Involvement of the sieve element cytoskeleton in electrical responses to cold shocks.

    PubMed

    Hafke, Jens B; Ehlers, Katrin; Föller, Jens; Höll, Sabina-Roxana; Becker, Stefanie; van Bel, Aart J E

    2013-06-01

    This study dealt with the visualization of the sieve element (SE) cytoskeleton and its involvement in electrical responses to local cold shocks, exemplifying the role of the cytoskeleton in Ca(2+)-triggered signal cascades in SEs. High-affinity fluorescent phalloidin as well as immunocytochemistry using anti-actin antibodies demonstrated a fully developed parietal actin meshwork in SEs. The involvement of the cytoskeleton in electrical responses and forisome conformation changes as indicators of Ca(2+) influx was investigated by the application of cold shocks in the presence of diverse actin disruptors (latrunculin A and cytochalasin D). Under control conditions, cold shocks elicited a graded initial voltage transient, ΔV1, reduced by external La(3+) in keeping with the involvement of Ca(2+) channels, and a second voltage transient, ΔV2. Cytochalasin D had no effect on ΔV1, while ΔV1 was significantly reduced with 500 nm latrunculin A. Forisome dispersion was triggered by cold shocks of 4°C or greater, which was indicative of an all-or-none behavior. Forisome dispersion was suppressed by incubation with latrunculin A. In conclusion, the cytoskeleton controls cold shock-induced Ca(2+) influx into SEs, leading to forisome dispersion and sieve plate occlusion in fava bean (Vicia faba). PMID:23624858

  17. Involvement of the Sieve Element Cytoskeleton in Electrical Responses to Cold Shocks1[W

    PubMed Central

    Hafke, Jens B.; Ehlers, Katrin; Föller, Jens; Höll, Sabina-Roxana; Becker, Stefanie; van Bel, Aart J.E.

    2013-01-01

    This study dealt with the visualization of the sieve element (SE) cytoskeleton and its involvement in electrical responses to local cold shocks, exemplifying the role of the cytoskeleton in Ca2+-triggered signal cascades in SEs. High-affinity fluorescent phalloidin as well as immunocytochemistry using anti-actin antibodies demonstrated a fully developed parietal actin meshwork in SEs. The involvement of the cytoskeleton in electrical responses and forisome conformation changes as indicators of Ca2+ influx was investigated by the application of cold shocks in the presence of diverse actin disruptors (latrunculin A and cytochalasin D). Under control conditions, cold shocks elicited a graded initial voltage transient, ΔV1, reduced by external La3+ in keeping with the involvement of Ca2+ channels, and a second voltage transient, ΔV2. Cytochalasin D had no effect on ΔV1, while ΔV1 was significantly reduced with 500 nm latrunculin A. Forisome dispersion was triggered by cold shocks of 4°C or greater, which was indicative of an all-or-none behavior. Forisome dispersion was suppressed by incubation with latrunculin A. In conclusion, the cytoskeleton controls cold shock-induced Ca2+ influx into SEs, leading to forisome dispersion and sieve plate occlusion in fava bean (Vicia faba). PMID:23624858

  18. (Questions)n on phloem biology. 2. Mass flow, molecular hopping, distribution patterns and macromolecular signalling.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Aart J E; Furch, Alexandra C U; Hafke, Jens B; Knoblauch, Michael; Patrick, John W

    2011-10-01

    This review speculates on correlations between mass flow in sieve tubes and the distribution of photoassimilates and macromolecular signals. Since micro- (low-molecular compounds) and macromolecules are withdrawn from, and released into, the sieve-tube sap at various rates, distribution patterns of these compounds do not strictly obey mass-flow predictions. Due to serial release and retrieval transport steps executed by sieve tube plasma membranes, micromolecules are proposed to "hop" between sieve element/companion cell complexes and phloem parenchyma cells under source-limiting conditions (apoplasmic hopping). Under sink-limiting conditions, micromolecules escape from sieve tubes via pore-plasmodesma units and are temporarily stored. It is speculated that macromolecules "hop" between sieve elements and companion cells using plasmodesmal trafficking mechanisms (symplasmic hopping). We explore how differential tagging may influence distribution patterns of macromolecules and how their bidirectional movement could arise. Effects of exudation techniques on the macromolecular composition of sieve-tube sap are discussed. PMID:21889037

  19. Mathematical inference and control of molecular networks from perturbation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed-Rasheed, Mohammed

    in order to affect the time evolution of molecular activity in a desirable manner. In this proposal, we address both the inference and control problems of GRNs. In the first part of the thesis, we consider the control problem. We assume that we are given a general topology network structure, whose dynamics follow a discrete-time Markov chain model. We subsequently develop a comprehensive framework for optimal perturbation control of the network. The aim of the perturbation is to drive the network away from undesirable steady-states and to force it to converge to a unique desirable steady-state. The proposed framework does not make any assumptions about the topology of the initial network (e.g., ergodicity, weak and strong connectivity), and is thus applicable to general topology networks. We define the optimal perturbation as the minimum-energy perturbation measured in terms of the Frobenius norm between the initial and perturbed networks. We subsequently demonstrate that there exists at most one optimal perturbation that forces the network into the desirable steady-state. In the event where the optimal perturbation does not exist, we construct a family of sub-optimal perturbations that approximate the optimal solution arbitrarily closely. In the second part of the thesis, we address the inference problem of GRNs from time series data. We model the dynamics of the molecules using a system of ordinary differential equations corrupted by additive white noise. For large-scale networks, we formulate the inference problem as a constrained maximum likelihood estimation problem. We derive the molecular interactions that maximize the likelihood function while constraining the network to be sparse. We further propose a procedure to recover weak interactions based on the Bayesian information criterion. For small-size networks, we investigated the inference of a globally stable 7-gene melanoma genetic regulatory network from genetic perturbation experiments. We considered five

  20. Water transport control in carbon nanotube arrays

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Based on a recent scaling law of the water mobility under nanoconfined conditions, we envision novel strategies for precise modulation of water diffusion within membranes made of carbon nanotube arrays (CNAs). In a first approach, the water diffusion coefficient D may be tuned by finely controlling the size distribution of the pore size. In the second approach, D can be varied at will by means of externally induced electrostatic fields. Starting from the latter strategy, switchable molecular sieves are proposed, where membranes are properly designed with sieving and permeation features that can be dynamically activated/deactivated. Areas where a precise control of water transport properties is beneficial range from energy and environmental engineering up to nanomedicine. PMID:25313305

  1. Excited state dynamics & optical control of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Ted; Sension, Roseanne

    2014-03-01

    Chiral overcrowded alkenes are likely candidates for light driven rotary molecular motors. At their core, these molecular motors are based on the chromophore stilbene, undergoing ultrafast cis/trans photoisomerization about their central double bond. Unlike stilbene, the photochemistry of molecular motors proceeds in one direction only. This unidirectional rotation is a result of helicity in the molecule induced by steric hindrance. However, the steric hindrance which ensures unidirectional excited state rotation, has the unfortunate consequence of producing large ground state barriers which dramatically decrease the overall rate of rotation. These molecular scale ultrafast motors have only recently been studied by ultrafast spectroscopy. Our lab has studied the photochemistry and photophysics of a ``first generation'' molecular motor with UV-visible transient absorption spectroscopy. We hope to use optical pulse shaping to enhance the efficiency and turnover rate of these molecular motors.

  2. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Masataka

    2015-12-31

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method.

  3. Autonomous grain combine control system

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Lucas, James R.; Prickel, Marvin A.

    2013-06-25

    A system for controlling a grain combine having a rotor/cylinder, a sieve, a fan, a concave, a feeder, a header, an engine, and a control system. The feeder of the grain combine is engaged and the header is lowered. A separator loss target, engine load target, and a sieve loss target are selected. Grain is harvested with the lowered header passing the grain through the engaged feeder. Separator loss, sieve loss, engine load and ground speed of the grain combine are continuously monitored during the harvesting. If the monitored separator loss exceeds the selected separator loss target, the speed of the rotor/cylinder, the concave setting, the engine load target, or a combination thereof is adjusted. If the monitored sieve loss exceeds the selected sieve loss target, the speed of the fan, the size of the sieve openings, or the engine load target is adjusted.

  4. Visualization of three-dimensional liquid flow on sieve trays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoling

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents the simulated result of three-dimensional liquid velocity profile on sieve trays by using a computational flow dynamics (CFD) model with considerations of volume fraction of gas and liquid and the interfacial forces. The Κ-ɛ equation is used for the closure of basic equations. For the first time the three-dimensional liquid flow on a distillation column with ten trays under total reflux is visualized. The simulation was carried out with an Origin 200 Server Workstation of SGI Company using Star-CD V3.1 program. Simulation provides the detailed information of the distribution of 3D liquid velocity on the distillation column.

  5. Centrifugal Size-Separation Sieve for Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Dreyer, Christopher (Inventor); Riedel, Edward (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A centrifugal sieve and method utilizes centrifugal force in rapidly-rotated cylindrical or conical screens as the primary body force contributing to size segregation. Within the centrifugal acceleration field, vibration and/or shearing flows are induced to facilitate size segregation and eventual separation of the fines from the coarse material. Inside a rotating cylindrical or conical screen, a separately-rotated screw auger blade can be used to transport material along the rotating cylinder or conical wall and to induce shearing in the material.

  6. Nios II hardware acceleration of the epsilon quadratic sieve algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Bäse, Uwe; Botella, Guillermo; Castillo, Encarnacion; García, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    The quadratic sieve (QS) algorithm is one of the most powerful algorithms to factor large composite primes used to break RSA cryptographic systems. The hardware structure of the QS algorithm seems to be a good fit for FPGA acceleration. Our new ɛ-QS algorithm further simplifies the hardware architecture making it an even better candidate for C2H acceleration. This paper shows our design results in FPGA resource and performance when implementing very long arithmetic on the Nios microprocessor platform with C2H acceleration for different libraries (GMP, LIP, FLINT, NRMP) and QS architecture choices for factoring 32-2048 bit RSA numbers.

  7. Medical sieve: a cognitive assistant for radiologists and cardiologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syeda-Mahmood, T.; Walach, E.; Beymer, D.; Gilboa-Solomon, F.; Moradi, M.; Kisilev, P.; Kakrania, D.; Compas, C.; Wang, H.; Negahdar, R.; Cao, Y.; Baldwin, T.; Guo, Y.; Gur, Y.; Rajan, D.; Zlotnick, A.; Rabinovici-Cohen, S.; Ben-Ari, R.; Guy, Amit; Prasanna, P.; Morey, J.; Boyko, O.; Hashoul, S.

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists and cardiologists today have to view large amounts of imaging data relatively quickly leading to eye fatigue. Further, they have only limited access to clinical information relying mostly on their visual interpretation of imaging studies for their diagnostic decisions. In this paper, we present Medical Sieve, an automated cognitive assistant for radiologists and cardiologists designed to help in their clinical decision-making. The sieve is a clinical informatics system that collects clinical, textual and imaging data of patients from electronic health records systems. It then analyzes multimodal content to detect anomalies if any, and summarizes the patient record collecting all relevant information pertinent to a chief complaint. The results of anomaly detection are then fed into a reasoning engine which uses evidence from both patient-independent clinical knowledge and large-scale patient-driven similar patient statistics to arrive at potential differential diagnosis to help in clinical decision making. In compactly summarizing all relevant information to the clinician per chief complaint, the system still retains links to the raw data for detailed review providing holistic summaries of patient conditions. Results of clinical studies in the domains of cardiology and breast radiology have already shown the promise of the system in differential diagnosis and imaging studies summarization.

  8. Designing π-stacked molecular structures to control heat transport through molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiršanskas, Gediminas; Li, Qian; Solomon, Gemma C.; Flensberg, Karsten; Leijnse, Martin

    2014-12-08

    We propose and analyze a way of using π stacking to design molecular junctions that either enhance or suppress a phononic heat current, but at the same time remain conductors for an electric current. Such functionality is highly desirable in thermoelectric energy converters, as well as in other electronic components where heat dissipation should be minimized or maximized. We suggest a molecular design consisting of two masses coupled to each other with one mass coupled to each lead. By having a small coupling (spring constant) between the masses, it is possible to either reduce or perhaps more surprisingly enhance the phonon conductance. We investigate a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use first principle calculations to extract model parameters for a number of specific molecular realizations, confirming that our proposal can indeed be realized using standard molecular building blocks.

  9. Molecular Factors Controlling Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting by Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Polívka, Tomáš; Frank, Harry A.

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids are naturally-occurring pigments that absorb light in the spectral region in which the sun irradiates maximally. These molecules transfer this energy to chlorophylls, initiating the primary photochemical events of photosynthesis. Carotenoids also regulate the flow of energy within the photosynthetic apparatus and protect it from photo-induced damage caused by excess light absorption. To carry out these functions in nature, carotenoids are bound in discrete pigment-protein complexes in close proximity to chlorophylls. A few 3D structures of these carotenoid complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Thus, the stage is set for attempting to correlate the structural information with the spectroscopic properties of carotenoids to understand the molecular mechanism(s) of their function in photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we summarize current spectroscopic data describing the excited state energies and ultrafast dynamics of purified carotenoids in solution and bound in light-harvesting complexes from purple bacteria, marine algae, and green plants. Many of these complexes can be modified using mutagenesis or pigment exchange which facilitates making the correlations between structure and function. We describe the structural and electronic factors controlling the function of carotenoids as energy donors. We also discuss unresolved issues related to the nature of spectroscopically dark excited states, which could play a role in light-harvesting. To illustrate the interplay between structural determinations and spectroscopic investigations that exemplifies work in the field, we describe the spectroscopic properties of four light-harvesting complexes whose structures have been determined to atomic resolution. The first, the LH2 complex from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, contains the carotenoid, rhodopin glucoside. The second is the LHCII trimeric complex from higher plants which uses the carotenoids, lutein, neoxanthin

  10. Ultrastructure as a Control for Protistan Molecular Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Taylor

    1999-10-01

    A variety of molecular sequences and treeing methods have been used in attempts to unravel early protistan evolution and the origins of "higher" eukaryotic taxa. How does one know which approach is closest to the real phylogenetic tree? Obviously it is the robustness of its resulting trees, the coherence with other data sets, both structural and molecular, that is the test. Simply put: it should make biological sense. It seems evident, comparing morphology, especially ultrastructure, with ribosomal DNA trees, that the major lineages have now been confirmed. In particular, the remarkably conservative mitochondrial crista type in protists is coherent with mitochondrial DNA sequences. Several amitochondrial groups, presumed to be primitive on the basis of SSU ribosomal DNA, show alarming positional volatility when other genes are used. In addition, the presence of mitochondrial genes in the nucleus of several amitochondrial flagellates raises doubts about them being primordially amitochondrial. Consequently, the root of the eukaryote tree is still in question. A disturbing question arises: can loss of features in parasitism mimic primitiveness not only in a morphological but also in a molecular way, evolving more rapidly and creating long branches that methodologically place them basal in the trees? Conflicting molecular phylogenies cannot be resolved by molecular data alone. Morpholological, especially ultrastructural, data are an essential component of phylogenetic reconstruction.

  11. Molecular separation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for separating a gaseous mixture of chemically identical but physically different molecules based on their polarities. The gaseous mixture of molecules is introduced in discrete quantities into the proximal end of a porous glass molecular. The molecular sieve is exposed to microwaves to excite the molecules to a higher energy state from a lower energy state, those having a higher dipole moment being excited more than those with a lower energy state. The temperature of the sieve kept cold by a flow of liquid nitrogen through a cooling jacket so that the heat generated by the molecules colliding with the material is transferred away from the material. The molecules thus alternate between a higher energy state and a lower one, with the portion of molecules having the higher dipole moment favored over the others. The former portion can then be extracted separately from the distal end of the molecular sieve.

  12. Controlling the sense of molecular rotation: Classical versus quantum analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.; Kitano, Kenta; Hasegawa, Hirokazu; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2011-02-15

    Recently, it was predicted theoretically and verified experimentally that a pair of delayed and cross-polarized short laser pulses can create molecular ensembles with a well-defined sense of rotation (clockwise or counterclockwise). Here we provide a comparative study of the classical and quantum aspects of the underlying mechanism for linear molecules and for symmetric tops, like benzene molecules, that were used for the first experimental demonstration of the effect. Very good quantitative agreement is found between the classical description of the process and the rigorous quantum-mechanical analysis at the relevant experimental conditions. Both approaches predict the same optimal values for the delay between pulses and the angle between them, and deliver the same magnitude of the induced oriented angular momentum of the molecular ensemble. As expected, quantum and classical analyses substantially deviate when the delay between pulses is comparable with the period of quantum rotational revivals. However, time-averaged characteristics of the excited molecular ensemble are equally well described by these two approaches. This is illustrated by calculating the anisotropic time-averaged angular distribution of the double-pulse excited molecules, which reflects persistent confinement of the molecular axes to the rotation plane defined by two polarization vectors of the pulses.

  13. Controlling the sense of molecular rotation: Classical versus quantum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Kitano, Kenta; Hasegawa, Hirokazu; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2011-02-01

    Recently, it was predicted theoretically and verified experimentally that a pair of delayed and cross-polarized short laser pulses can create molecular ensembles with a well-defined sense of rotation (clockwise or counterclockwise). Here we provide a comparative study of the classical and quantum aspects of the underlying mechanism for linear molecules and for symmetric tops, like benzene molecules, that were used for the first experimental demonstration of the effect. Very good quantitative agreement is found between the classical description of the process and the rigorous quantum-mechanical analysis at the relevant experimental conditions. Both approaches predict the same optimal values for the delay between pulses and the angle between them, and deliver the same magnitude of the induced oriented angular momentum of the molecular ensemble. As expected, quantum and classical analyses substantially deviate when the delay between pulses is comparable with the period of quantum rotational revivals. However, time-averaged characteristics of the excited molecular ensemble are equally well described by these two approaches. This is illustrated by calculating the anisotropic time-averaged angular distribution of the double-pulse excited molecules, which reflects persistent confinement of the molecular axes to the rotation plane defined by two polarization vectors of the pulses.

  14. A method to engineer phase-encoded photon sieve for intensity pattern generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Ma, Li; Gao, Yaru; Liu, Chunxiang; Xu, Shicai; Zhang, Meina; Cheng, Chuanfu

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel type of photon sieve where phases of its sieved waves are encoded as radial positions of the pinholes and use such phase-encoded sieves for generating designed intensity patterns in Fresnel domain. The sieve pinholes are arranged around Fresnel-rings to eliminate the quadratic Fresnel phase factor of diffraction of the sieved waves, leading the wave propagation to be equivalent to Fraunhofer diffraction. The pinholes take constant size in this paper and realize equal amplitude in the multiple sieved waves. Their positions are adjusted radially from corresponding rings to encode wave phases, taking effect by resulting in different optical paths from them to the observation plane origin. Then along with wave propagation, the encoded phases are decoded and the required phase differences are obtained in the discrete waves. We first conduct numerical simulations to show satisfactory performance of such phase-encoded photon sieves in generating arbitrarily designed intensity patterns and describe the quality of the reconstructed patterns. Then for qualitatively verifying the phase-encoding method, we experimentally fabricate three such sieves with relatively small pinhole number and obtain the designed patterns.

  15. Molecular gels-based controlled release devices for pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2-Heptanone is a volatile solvent that is effective in controlling parasitic mites (Varroa) in honeybee. Controlled-release of 2-heptanone is needed to avoid overdosing, minimize chemical usage, and provide a sustained release over a several week period. Control-release devices comprised of a reserv...

  16. Frontier orbital control of molecular conductance and its switching.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald

    2014-04-14

    For transmission of electrons through a π system, when the Landauer theory of molecular conductance is viewed from a molecular orbital (MO) perspective, there obtains a simple perturbation theoretic dependence, due to Yoshizawa and Tada, on a) the product of the orbital coefficients at the sites of electrode attachment, and b) the MO energies. The frontier orbitals consistently and simply indicate high or low transmission, even if other orbitals may contribute. This formalism, with its consequent reinforcement and/or interference of conductance, accounts for the (previously explained) difference in direct vs. cross conjugated transmission across an ethylene, as well as the comparative ON/OFF ratios in the experimentally investigated dimethyldihydropyrene and dithienylethene-type single-molecule switches. A strong dependence of the conductance on the site of attachment of the electrodes in a π system is an immediate extrapolation; the theory then predicts that for some specified sites the switching behavior will be inverted; i.e. the "open" molecular form of the switch will be more conductive.

  17. Mechanisms of recirculating liquid flow on distillation sieve plates

    SciTech Connect

    Biddulph, M.W. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Burton, A.C. )

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the phenomenon of flow recirculation on distillation sieve trays. A novel dye injection technique has been applied to a 1.81 m air-water simulation column and has yielded new information concerning the nature of the boundary layer of gas-liquid biphase as it detaches from the column wall. The study has shown that recirculation is strongly influenced by inlet conditions. A critical factor is the underflow clearance between the inlet downcomer apron and the tray floor. As this clearance is increased, the size of the recirculating zones passes through a minimum, indicating the existence of two different mechanisms responsible for the nonuniform flow patterns. A significant implication of this work is that tray designers may minimize the impact of recirculating on mass transfer efficiency by appropriate choice of underflow clearance.

  18. A rhenium complex doped in a silica molecular sieve for molecular oxygen sensing: Construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhou; Li, Yanxiao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported a diamine ligand and its Re(I) complex for potential application in oxygen sensing. The novelty of this diamine ligand localized at its increased conjugation chain which had a typical electron-withdrawing group of 1,3,4-oxadiazole. Electronic distribution of excited electrons and their lifetime were supposed to be increased, favoring oxygen sensing collision. This hypothesis was confirmed by single crystal analysis, theoretical calculation and photophysical measurement. It was found that this Re(I) complex had a long-lived emission peaking at 545 nm, favoring sensing application. By doping this complex into a silica matrix MCM-41, oxygen sensing performance and mechanism of the resulting composites were discussed in detail. Non-linear Stern-Volmer working curves were observed with maximum sensitivity of 5.54 and short response time of ~ 6 s.

  19. Remote conformational control of a molecular switch via methylation and deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Knipe, Peter C; Jones, Ian M; Thompson, Sam; Hamilton, Andrew D

    2014-12-14

    Exacting control over conformation in response to an external stimulus is the central focus of molecular switching. Here we describe the synthesis of a series of diphenylacetylene-based molecular switches, and examine their response to covalent modification and deprotonation at remote phenolic positions. A complex interplay between multiple intramolecular hydrogen bond donors and acceptors determines the global conformation.

  20. Comparing position and force control for interactive molecular simulators with haptic feedback.

    PubMed

    Bolopion, Aude; Cagneau, Barthélemy; Redon, Stephane; Régnier, Stéphane

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a novel tool for the analysis of new molecular structures which enables a wide variety of manipulations. It is composed of a molecular simulator and a haptic device. The simulation software deals with systems of hundreds or thousands of degrees of freedom and computes the reconfiguration of the molecules in a few tenths of a second. For the ease of manipulation and to help the operator understand nanoscale phenomena, a haptic device is connected to the simulator. To handle a wide variety of applications, both position and force control are implemented. To our knowledge, this is the first time the applications of force control are detailed for molecular simulation. These two control modes are compared in terms of adequacy with molecular dynamics, transparency and stability sensitivity with respect to environmental conditions. Based on their specificity the operations they can realize are detailed. Experiments highlight the usability of our tool for the different steps of the analysis of molecular structures. It includes the global reconfiguration of a molecular system, the measurement of molecular properties and the comprehension of nanoscale interactions. Compared to most existing systems, the one developed in this paper offers a wide range of possible experiments. The detailed analysis of the properties of the control modes can be easily used to implement haptic feedback on other molecular simulators. PMID:20727801

  1. Molecular simulations of supercritical fluid permeation through disordered microporous carbons.

    PubMed

    Boţan, Alexandru; Vermorel, Romain; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M

    2013-08-13

    Fluid transport through microporous carbon-based materials is inherent in numerous applications, ranging from gas separation by carbon molecular sieves to natural gas production from coal seams and gas shales. The present study investigates the steady-state permeation of supercritical methane in response to a constant cross-membrane pressure drop. We performed dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulations to mimic the conditions of actual permeation experiments. To overcome arbitrary assumptions regarding the investigated porous structures, the membranes were modeled after the CS1000a and CS1000 molecular models, which are representative of real microporous carbon materials. When adsorption-induced molecular trapping (AIMT) mechanisms are negligible, we show that the permeability of the microporous material, although not significantly sensitive to the pressure gradient, monotonically decreases with temperature and reservoir pressures, consistent with diffusion theory. However, when AIMT occurs, the permeability increases with temperature in agreement with experimental data found in the literature. PMID:23886335

  2. Mechanisms of Molecular Response in the Optimal Control of Photoisomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Dietzek, Benjamin; Brueggemann, Ben; Pascher, Torbjoern; Yartsev, Arkady

    2006-12-22

    We report on adaptive feedback control of photoinduced barrierless isomerization of 1,1'-diethyl-2,2'-cyanine in solution. We compare the effect of different fitness parameters and show that optimal control of the absolute yield of isomerization (photoisomer concentration versus excitation photons) can be achieved, while the relative isomerization yield (photoisomer concentration versus number of relaxed excited-state molecules) is unaffected by adaptive feedback control. The temporal structure of the optimized excitation pulses allows one to draw clear mechanistic conclusions showing the critical importance of coherent nuclear motion for the control of isomerization.

  3. Molecular control of vertebrate iron homeostasis by iron regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wallander, Michelle L.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Both deficiencies and excesses of iron represent major public health problems throughout the world. Understanding the cellular and organismal processes controlling iron homeostasis is critical for identifying iron-related diseases and in advancing the clinical treatments for such disorders of iron metabolism. Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 are key regulators of vertebrate iron metabolism. These RNA binding proteins post-transcriptionally control the stability or translation of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in iron homeostasis thereby controlling the uptake, utilization, storage or export of iron. Recent evidence provides insight into how IRPs selectively control the translation or stability of target mRNAs, how IRP RNA binding activity is controlled by iron-dependent and iron-independent effectors, and the pathological consequences of dysregulation of the IRP system. PMID:16872694

  4. Control over molecular motion using the cis–trans photoisomerization of the azo group

    PubMed Central

    Ribagorda, María

    2012-01-01

    Summary Control over molecular motion represents an important objective in modern chemistry. Aromatic azobenzenes are excellent candidates as molecular switches since they can exist in two forms, namely the cis (Z) and trans (E) isomers, which can interconvert both photochemically and thermally. This transformation induces a molecular movement and a significant geometric change, therefore the azobenzene unit is an excellent candidate to build dynamic molecular devices. We describe selected examples of systems containing an azobenzene moiety and their motions and geometrical changes caused by external stimuli. PMID:23019434

  5. Applying CLIPS to control of molecular beam epitaxy processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabeau, Arthur A.; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Jamison, Keith D.; Horton, Charles; Ignatiev, Alex; Glover, John R.

    1990-01-01

    A key element of U.S. industrial competitiveness in the 1990's will be the exploitation of advanced technologies which involve low-volume, high-profit manufacturing. The demands of such manufacture limit participation to a few major entities in the U.S. and elsewhere, and offset the lower manufacturing costs of other countries which have, for example, captured much of the consumer electronics market. One such technology is thin-film epitaxy, a technology which encompasses several techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE), and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy (VPE). Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a technology for creating a variety of electronic and electro-optical materials. Compared to standard microelectronic production techniques (including gaseous diffusion, ion implantation, and chemical vapor deposition), MBE is much more exact, though much slower. Although newer than the standard technologies, MBE is the technology of choice for fabrication of ultraprecise materials for cutting-edge microelectronic devices and for research into the properties of new materials.

  6. Controlling silk fibroin microspheres via molecular weight distribution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dong-Mei; Pan, Jue-Jing; Wang, Qun; Liu, Xin-Fang; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-05-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) microspheres were produced by salting out SF solution via the addition of potassium phosphate buffer solution (K2HPO4-KH2PO4). The morphology, size and polydispersity of SF microspheres were adjusted by changing the molecular weight (MW) distribution and concentration of SF, as well as the ionic strength and pH of the buffer solution. Changing the conditions under which the SF fiber dissolved in the Lithium Boride (LiBr) solution resulted in altering the MW distribution of SF solution. Under optimal salting-out conditions (ionic strength>0.7 M and pH>7) and using a smaller and narrower SF MW distribution, SF microspheres with smoother shapes and more uniform sizes were produced. Meanwhile, the size and polydispersity of the microspheres increased when the SF concentration was increased from 0.25 mg/mL to 20 mg/mL. The improved SF microspheres, obtained by altering the distribution of molecular weight, have potential in drug and gene delivery applications.

  7. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, B. Eugene; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    1992-01-01

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

  8. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1992-12-15

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth. 3 figs.

  9. Clast-contact conglomerates in submarine canyons: possible subaqueous sieve deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    Thick, coarse, clast-contact conglomerates in submarine canyon fill have previously been attributed to rock-fall, grain-flow, or winnowing processes. However, these processes do not adequately explain some thick conglomeratic sequences. The proposed process of subaqueous sieve deposition could account for these clast-contact conglomerates. Subaerial sieve deposition has been documented on small-scale fan models and on alluvial fans. A subaerial sieve deposit begins as a debris flow which at some point freezes up. The matrix is then lost by subsequent filtration or outflow, and the emplacement of a clast-contact gravel ensues. A subaqueous sieve deposit would be slightly modified in that the matrix would not be lost by filtration into the submarine canyon floor, but rather by outflow at the terminus of the lobe immediately after deposition, or possibly from the top and/or sides of the freezing flow mass during transport. Besides forming in submarine canyons, subaqueous sieve deposits might also occur in paralic, submarine fan channel, and base-of-the-slope settings. In substantiating the existence of subaqueous sieve deposits, the sedimentary structures and grain-size data from recent sieve deposits on alluvial fans are compared to those of ancient submarine canyon deposits. Numerous similarities are found supporting this new method of deposition. Some discrepancies are encountered, but these are expected due to modifications caused by an aqueous medium.

  10. Nanopore formation by controlled electrical breakdown: Efficient molecular-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F. M.; Abdel-Daiem, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    A controlled electrical breakdown is used to produce efficient nanopore (NP) sensors. This phenomenon can be used to precisely fabricate these nanopore (NP) sensors through the membranes of the polydimethylsiloxane microarrays. This can be carried out, when localizing the electrical potential through a suitable microfluidic channel. Organic molecules, and other different protein-molecules, can be easily and precisely detected using this procedure referred to as controlled electrical breakdown technique.

  11. Fluctuating-bias controlled electron transport in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Michael; MacKinnon, Angus; Kantorovich, Lev

    2016-05-01

    We consider the problem of transport through a multiterminal molecular junction in the presence of a stochastic bias, which can also be used to describe transport through fluctuating molecular energy levels. To describe these effects, we first make a simple extension of our previous work [Phys. Rev. B 91, 125433 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.125433] to show that the problem of tunneling through noisy energy levels can be mapped onto the problem of a noisy driving bias, which appears in the Kadanoff-Baym equations for this system in an analogous manner to the driving term in the Langevin equation for a classical circuit. This formalism uses the nonequilibrium Green's function method to obtain analytically closed formulas for transport quantities within the wide-band limit approximation for an arbitrary time-dependent bias and it is automatically partition free. We obtain exact closed formulas for both the colored and white noise-averaged current at all times. In the long-time limit, these formulas possess a Landauer-Büttiker-type structure which enables the extraction of an effective transmission coefficient for the transport. Expanding the Fermi function into a series of simple poles, we find an exact formal relation between the parameters which characterize the bias fluctuations and the poles of the Fermi function. This enables us to describe the effect of the temperature and the strength of the fluctuations on the averaged current which we interpret as a quantum analog to the classical fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We use these results to convincingly refute some recent results on the multistability of the current through a fluctuating level, simultaneously verifying that our formalism satisfies some well-known theorems on the asymptotic current. Finally, we present numerical results for the current through a molecular chain which demonstrate a transition from nonlinear to linear I -V characteristics as the strength of fluctuations is increased, as well as a

  12. Femtosecond quantum control of molecular dynamics in the condensed phase.

    PubMed

    Nuernberger, Patrick; Vogt, Gerhard; Brixner, Tobias; Gerber, Gustav

    2007-05-28

    We review the progress in controlling quantum dynamical processes in the condensed phase with femtosecond laser pulses. Due to its high particle density the condensed phase has both high relevance and appeal for chemical synthesis. Thus, in recent years different methods have been developed to manipulate the dynamics of condensed-phase systems by changing one or multiple laser pulse parameters. Single-parameter control is often achieved by variation of the excitation pulse's wavelength, its linear chirp or its temporal subpulse separation in case of pulse sequences. Multiparameter control schemes are more flexible and provide a much larger parameter space for an optimal solution. This is realized in adaptive femtosecond quantum control, in which the optimal solution is iteratively obtained through the combination of an experimental feedback signal and an automated learning algorithm. Several experiments are presented that illustrate the different control concepts and highlight their broad applicability. These fascinating achievements show the continuous progress on the way towards the control of complex quantum reactions in the condensed phase.

  13. Elastomeric Conducting Polyaniline Formed Through Topological Control of Molecular Templates.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hangjun; Zhong, Mingjiang; Wu, Haosheng; Park, Sangwoo; Mohin, Jacob W; Klosterman, Luke; Yang, Zhou; Yang, Huai; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Bettinger, Christopher John

    2016-06-28

    A strategy for creating elastomeric conducting polyaniline networks is described. Simultaneous elastomeric mechanical properties (E < 10 MPa) and electronic conductivities (σ > 10 S cm(-1)) are achieved via molecular templating of conjugated polymer networks. Diblock copolymers with star topologies processed into self-assembled elastomeric thin films reduce the percolation threshold of polyaniline synthesized via in situ polymerization. Block copolymer templates with star topologies produce elastomeric conjugated polymer composites with Young's moduli ranging from 4 to 12 MPa, maximum elongations up to 90 ± 10%, and electrical conductivities of 30 ± 10 S cm(-1). Templated polyaniline films exhibit Young's moduli up to 3 orders of magnitude smaller compared to bulk polyaniline films while preserving comparable bulk electronic conductivity. Flexible conducting polymers have prospective applications in devices for energy storage and conversion, consumer electronics, and bioelectronics. PMID:27175931

  14. Confinement-induced Molecular Templating and Controlled Ligation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berard, Daniel; Shayegan, Marjan; Michaud, François; Henkin, Gil; Scott, Shane; Leith, Jason; Leslie, Sabrina; Leslie Lab Team

    Loading and manipulating long DNA molecules within sub-50 nm cross-section nanostructures for genomic and biochemical analyses, while retaining their structural integrity, present key technological challenges to the biotechnology sector, such as device clogging and molecular breakage. We overcome these challenges by using Convex Lens-induced Confinement (CLiC) technology to gently load DNA into nanogrooves from above. Here, we demonstrate single-fluorophore visualization of custom DNA barcodes as well as efficient top-loading of DNA into sub-50 nm nanogrooves of variable topographies. We study confinement-enhanced self-ligation of polymers loaded in circular nanogrooves. Further, we use concentric, circular nanogrooves to eliminate confinement gradient-induced drift of stretched DNA.

  15. Elastomeric Conducting Polyaniline Formed Through Topological Control of Molecular Templates.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hangjun; Zhong, Mingjiang; Wu, Haosheng; Park, Sangwoo; Mohin, Jacob W; Klosterman, Luke; Yang, Zhou; Yang, Huai; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Bettinger, Christopher John

    2016-06-28

    A strategy for creating elastomeric conducting polyaniline networks is described. Simultaneous elastomeric mechanical properties (E < 10 MPa) and electronic conductivities (σ > 10 S cm(-1)) are achieved via molecular templating of conjugated polymer networks. Diblock copolymers with star topologies processed into self-assembled elastomeric thin films reduce the percolation threshold of polyaniline synthesized via in situ polymerization. Block copolymer templates with star topologies produce elastomeric conjugated polymer composites with Young's moduli ranging from 4 to 12 MPa, maximum elongations up to 90 ± 10%, and electrical conductivities of 30 ± 10 S cm(-1). Templated polyaniline films exhibit Young's moduli up to 3 orders of magnitude smaller compared to bulk polyaniline films while preserving comparable bulk electronic conductivity. Flexible conducting polymers have prospective applications in devices for energy storage and conversion, consumer electronics, and bioelectronics.

  16. Molecular control of transgene escape from genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Kuvshinov, V; Koivu, K; Kanerva, A; Pehu, E

    2001-02-01

    Potential risks of gene escape from transgenic crops through pollen and seed dispersal are being actively discussed and have slowed down full utilization of gene technology in crop improvement. To ban the transgene flow, barren zones and 'terminator' technology were developed as GMO risk management technologies in transgenic crops. Unfortunately, the technologies have not protected reliably the transgene migration to wild relatives. The present study offers a novel molecular technique to eliminate gene flow from transgenic plants to wild relatives by recoverable block of function (RBF). The RBF consists of a blocking sequence linked to the gene of interest and a recovering sequence, all in one transformable construct. The blocking sequence blocks a certain molecular or physiological function of the host plant. Action of the blocking sequence leads to the death of the host plant or to an alteration in its phenotype resulting in inability for sexual reproduction in nature. The recovering construct recovers the blocked function of the host plant. The recovering construct is regulated externally by a specific chemical or physical treatment of the plants and does not act under natural conditions. In nature, hybrids of the transgenic plants with its wild relatives carrying the RBF will die or be unable to reproduce because of the blocking construct action. A working model of RBF is described in this report as one example of the RBF concept. This RBF example is based on barnase (the blocking construct) and barstar (the recovering construct) gene expression in tobacco under sulfhydryl endopeptidase (SH-EP) and a heat shock (HS) promoter, respectively.

  17. Molecular control of endothelial cell behaviour during blood vessel morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Shane P.; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate vasculature forms an extensive branched network of blood vessels that supplies tissues with nutrients and oxygen. During vascular development, coordinated control of endothelial cell behaviour at the levels of cell migration, proliferation, polarity, differentiation and cell–cell communication is critical for functional blood vessel morphogenesis. Recent data uncover elaborate transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms that fine-tune key signalling pathways (such as the vascular endothelial growth factor and Notch pathways) to control endothelial cell behaviour during blood vessel sprouting (angiogenesis). These emerging frameworks controlling angiogenesis provide unique insights into fundamental biological processes common to other systems, such as tissue branching morphogenesis, mechanotransduction and tubulogenesis. PMID:21860391

  18. A molecular logical switching beacon controlled by thiolated DNA signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Liuqing; Yang, Jing; Liu, Shi; Xu, Jin

    2013-12-14

    A logical switching MB is established, with an "ON/OFF" switching function. In this study, thiolated DNA can participate as a switching controller to regulate the fluorescent increments of other DNA input signals. Assisted by gold nanoparticles and DNA branch migration, one and two-switch systems have been achieved.

  19. Lost in Transcription: Molecular Mechanisms that Control HIV Latency

    PubMed Central

    Taube, Ran; Peterlin, Boris Matija

    2013-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has limited the replication and spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, despite treatment, HIV infection persists in latently infected reservoirs, and once therapy is interrupted, viral replication rebounds quickly. Extensive efforts are being directed at eliminating these cell reservoirs. This feat can be achieved by reactivating latent HIV while administering drugs that prevent new rounds of infection and allow the immune system to clear the virus. However, current approaches to HIV eradication have not been effective. Moreover, as HIV latency is multifactorial, the significance of each of its molecular mechanisms is still under debate. Among these, transcriptional repression as a result of reduced levels and activity of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb: CDK9/cyclin T) plays a significant role. Therefore, increasing levels of P-TEFb expression and activity is an excellent strategy to stimulate viral gene expression. This review summarizes the multiple steps that cause HIV to enter into latency. It positions the interplay between transcriptionally active and inactive host transcriptional activators and their viral partner Tat as valid targets for the development of new strategies to reactivate latent viral gene expression and eradicate HIV. PMID:23518577

  20. A molecular epidemiology case control study on pleural malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Claudia; Martini, Fernanda; Tognon, Mauro; Filiberti, Rosa; Neri, Monica; Perrone, Emanuela; Landini, Eleonora; Canessa, Paolo A; Ivaldi, Gian Paolo; Betta, Pietro; Mutti, Luciano; Puntoni, Riccardo

    2005-07-01

    Pleural malignant mesothelioma is an uncommon neoplasm usually associated with asbestos exposure. The increasing incidence of malignant mesothelioma cases involving individuals with low levels of asbestos exposure suggests a complex carcinogenetic process with the involvement of other cofactors. Cytogenetic studies revealed the complexity of the genetic changes involved in this neoplasm reflecting the accumulation of genomic damage. One of the most used methodologies for assessing genomic damage is the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus test applied in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). This approach allows the detection of chromosomal alterations expressed in binucleated cells after nuclear division in vitro. This marker could provide a tool for assessing genetically determined constitutional differences in chromosomal instability. A biomonitoring study was carried out to evaluate the micronuclei frequency in PBLs of patients with pleural malignant mesothelioma with respect to lung cancer, healthy, and risk controls as a marker of cancer susceptibility in correlation with the presence of SV40. A significant increased micronuclei frequency was observed in patients with malignant mesothelioma in comparison with all the other groups, the mean micronuclei frequency was double in patients with malignant mesothelioma compared with healthy controls, risk controls, and patients with lung adenocarcinoma (median 11.4 binucleated cells with micronuclei/1,000 binucleated cells versus 6.2, 6.1, and 5.1, respectively). Our data indicate that human T lymphocyte samples carry DNA sequences coding for SV40 large T antigen at low prevalence, both in cancer cases and controls. Evidence of cytogenetic damage revealed as micronuclei frequency in mesothelioma cancer patients could be related to exogenous and endogenous cofactors besides asbestos exposure.

  1. Discovery of the cellular and molecular basis of cholesterol control.

    PubMed

    Schekman, Randy

    2013-09-10

    The cellular control of cholesterol metabolism mediated by lipoproteins was first appreciated in pioneering work published in a 1974 PNAS Classic by Michael Brown and Joseph Goldstein. We know from this paper that the LDL binds to a cell surface receptor and dampens the activity of a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis and that a receptor deficiency is responsible for a major genetic cause of hypercholesterolemia and premature atherosclerosis.

  2. Molecular designs for controlling the local environments around metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah A; Borovik, A S

    2015-08-18

    The functions of metal complexes are directly linked to the local environment in which they are housed; modifications to the local environment (or secondary coordination sphere) are known to produce changes in key properties of the metal centers that can affect reactivity. Noncovalent interactions are the most common and influential forces that regulate the properties of secondary coordination spheres, which leads to complexities in structure that are often difficult to achieve in synthetic systems. Using key architectural features from the active sites of metalloproteins as inspiration, we have developed molecular systems that enforce intramolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) around a metal center via incorporation of H-bond donors and acceptors into rigid ligand scaffolds. We have utilized these molecular species to probe mechanistic aspects of biological dioxygen activation and water oxidation. This Account describes the stabilization and characterization of unusual M-oxo and heterobimetallic complexes. These types of species have been implicated in a range of oxidative processes in biology but are often difficult to study because of their inherent reactivity. Our H-bonding ligand systems allowed us to prepare an Fe(III)-oxo species directly from the activation of O2 that was subsequently oxidized to form a monomeric Fe(IV)-oxo species with an S = 2 spin state, similar to those species proposed as key intermediates in non-heme monooxygenases. We also demonstrated that a single Mn(III)-oxo center that was prepared from water could be converted to a high-spin Mn(V)-oxo species via stepwise oxidation, a process that mimics the oxidative charging of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II. Current mechanisms for photosynthetic O-O bond formation invoke a Mn(IV)-oxyl species rather than the isoelectronic Mn(V)-oxo system as the key oxidant based on computational studies. However, there is no experimental information to support the existence of a Mn

  3. Molecular mechanisms controlling proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    2000-02-10

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is the simplest biological system for the transduction of light energy. Light energy is directly converted to transmembrane proton gradient by a single, small membrane protein. The extraordinary stability of bR makes it an outstanding subject for bioenergetic studies. This project has focused on the role of interactions between key residues of the pigment involved in light-induced proton transfer. Methods to estimate the strength of these interactions and their correlation with the rate and efficiency of proton transfer have been developed. The concept of the coupling of the protonation states of key groups has been applied to individual steps of the proton transfer with the ultimate goal of understanding on the molecular level the driving forces for proton transport and the pathway of the transported proton in bT. The mechanism of light-induced proton release, uptake and the mechanism of recovery of initial state of bT has been examined. The experiments were performed with genetically engineered, site-specific mutants of bR. This has enabled us to characterize the role of individual amino acid residues in bR. Time resolved and low temperature absorption spectroscopy and light-induced photocurrent measurements were used in order to study the photochemical cycle and proton transfer in mutant pigments. Chemical modification and crosslinking of both the specific amino acids to the chromophore or to other amino acids were used to elucidate the role of light-induced conformational changes in the photocycle and the structure of the protein in the ground state. The results of this project provided new knowledge on the architecture of the proton transfer pathways inside the protein, on the mechanism of proton release in bR, and on the role of specific amino acid residues in the structure and function of bR.

  4. Molecular wave-packet dynamics on laser-controlled transition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Andreas; Gärttner, Martin; Cörlin, Philipp; Sperl, Alexander; Schönwald, Michael; Mizuno, Tomoya; Sansone, Giuseppe; Senftleben, Arne; Ullrich, Joachim; Feuerstein, Bernold; Pfeifer, Thomas; Moshammer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We present a kinematically complete and time-resolved study of the dissociation dynamics of H2+ using ultrashort extreme-ultraviolet and near-infrared laser pulses. The reaction kinematics can be controlled by varying the time delay between the two pulses. We demonstrate that a time-dependent laser-dressed potential-energy curve enables the control of the nuclear motion. The dynamics is well reproduced by intuitive semiclassical trajectories on a time-dependent potential curve. From this most fundamental scenario we gain insight in the underlying mechanisms which may be applied as design principles for molecular quantum control, particularly for ultrafast molecular reactions involving the motion of protons.

  5. Cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling the migration of neocortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Marín, Oscar

    2013-07-01

    The discovery, approximately 15 years ago, that cortical GABAergic interneurons originate outside the pallium has revolutionized our understanding of the development of the cerebral cortex. It is now clear that glutamatergic pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons follow largely distinct development programs, a notion that has challenged our views on how these neurons assemble to form precise neural circuits. In this review, I summarize our current knowledge of the mechanisms that control the migration of neocortical interneurons, a process that can be subdivided into three consecutive phases: migration to the cortex, intracortical dispersion, and layering.

  6. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface.

    PubMed

    Canlas, Christian P; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W; Winans, Randall E; Van Duyne, Richard P; Stair, Peter C; Notestein, Justin M

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al(2)O(3) (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with 'nanocavities' (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO(2) photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations. PMID:23174984

  7. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canlas, Christian P.; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A.; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A.; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.; van Duyne, Richard P.; Stair, Peter C.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al2O3 (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with ‘nanocavities’ (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO2 photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations.

  8. Experimental testing of focusing properties of subwavelength photon sieves using exposure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenbo; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    An exposure method is proposed to test the focusing properties of subwavelength photon sieves. To solve the problems caused by the subwavelength photon sieves (such as short focal length and small focal spot size), a grating moiré fringe phase detection technique and a microcontact sensor with lead zirconium titanate (PZT) stepping hybrid technique are used in the experimental setup. The focusing properties of the subwavelength photon sieves are tested by this setup. The results show that the focal length and the focal spot size are close to the designed value. Finally, the intensity distribution of the focal spot is proposed. This research result will be beneficial for understanding the focusing properties of subwavelength photon sieves, will help us to improve the imaging quality, and will provide a good experimental basis for practical applications in the nanolithography field.

  9. Centrifugal Sieve for Gravity-Level-Independent Size Segregation of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.; Dreyer, Christopher; Riedel, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Conventional size segregation or screening in batch mode, using stacked vibrated screens, is often a time-consuming process. Utilization of centrifugal force instead of gravity as the primary body force can significantly shorten the time to segregate feedstock into a set of different-sized fractions. Likewise, under reduced gravity or microgravity, a centrifugal sieve system would function as well as it does terrestrially. When vibratory and mechanical blade sieving screens designed for terrestrial conditions were tested under lunar gravity conditions, they did not function well. The centrifugal sieving design of this technology overcomes the issues that prevented sieves designed for terrestrial conditions from functioning under reduced gravity. These sieves feature a rotating outer (cylindrical or conical) screen wall, rotating fast enough for the centrifugal forces near the wall to hold granular material against the rotating screen. Conventional centrifugal sieves have a stationary screen and rapidly rotating blades that shear the granular solid near the stationary screen, and effect the sieving process assisted by the airflow inside the unit. The centrifugal sieves of this new design may (or may not) have an inner blade or blades, moving relative to the rotating wall screen. Some continuous flow embodiments would have no inner auger or blades, but achieve axial motion through vibration. In all cases, the shearing action is gentler than conventional centrifugal sieves, which have very high velocity differences between the stationary outer screen and the rapidly rotating blades. The new design does not depend on airflow in the sieving unit, so it will function just as well in vacuum as in air. One advantage of the innovation for batch sieving is that a batch-mode centrifugal sieve may accomplish the same sieving operation in much less time than a conventional stacked set of vibrated screens (which utilize gravity as the primary driving force for size separation

  10. Dr. Grant Heikan examines lunar material in sieve from sample container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Dr. Grant Heikan, Manned Spacecraft Center and a Lunar Sample preliminary Examination Team member, examines lunar material in a sieve from the bulk sample container which was opened in the Biopreparation Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory.

  11. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Y. Murakawa, T. Shimamura, K. Oishi, M. Ohyama, T. Kurita, N.

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  12. Molecular/cell engineering approach to autocrine ligand control of cell function.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, D A; Forsten, K E; Will, B; Wiley, H S

    1995-01-01

    Tissue engineering, along with other modern cell- and tissue-based health care technologies, depends on successful regulation of cell function by molecular means, including pharmacological agents, materials, and genetics. This regulation is generally mediated by cell receptor/ligand interactions providing primary targets for molecular intervention. While regulatory ligands may often be exogenous in nature, in the categories of endocrine and paracrine hormone systems, they are being increasingly appreciated as crucial in local control of cell and tissue function. Improvements in design of health care technologies involving autocrine ligand interactions with cell receptors should benefit from increased qualitative and quantitative understanding of the kinetic and transport processes governing these interactions. In this symposium paper we offer a concise overview of our recent efforts combining molecular cell biology and engineering approaches to increase the understanding of how molecular and cellular parameters may be manipulated for improved control of cell and tissue function regulated by autocrine ligands.

  13. Characterization and control of molecular ordering on adsorbate-induced reconstructed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Woei Wu; Hsu, C. L.; Lin, K. C.; Sin, L. Y.; Tang, Tong B.

    2005-02-01

    Understanding molecular ordering is a critical step in achieving molecular self-assembly for the fabrication of nanomaterials, and molecular ordering in the adsorption of large molecules on atomically flat surfaces can be characterized with precision by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Complications arise therein from the expanded possibility of various adsorption structures, conformations and surface reconstructions. Here we present two cases of C 60 adsorbed on Ag(1 0 0) and Cu(1 1 1) that illustrate the importance of competitive interactions in the presence of adsorbate-induced reconstruction. In both studies, strong STM contrasts derive from topographic features arising from reconstructed substrates. C 60/Ag(1 0 0) presents a unique uniaxially incommensurate molecular packing. We have also found that one can control molecular ordering with a stepped surface to produce a single-domain film. In C 60/Cu(1 1 1), we are able to obtain metastable, yet well-defined, molecular ordering with precise annealing procedures. These metastable states exhibit a clear correlation between molecular contrast patterns and the adlayer rotation angle, as a consequence of competitive interactions between optimizing C 60 bonding at preferred reconstructive sites and C 60-C 60 repulsion. Finer control of selective preparation of these metastable structures offers a plausible way of fabricating nanostructures by design.

  14. Redox Control of Microglial Function: Molecular Mechanisms and Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    McBean, Gethin; Cindric, Marina; Egea, Javier; López, Manuela G.; Rada, Patricia; Zarkovic, Neven

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by chronic microglial over-activation and oxidative stress. It is now beginning to be recognized that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by either microglia or the surrounding environment not only impact neurons but also modulate microglial activity. In this review, we first analyze the hallmarks of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory phenotypes of microglia and their regulation by ROS. Then, we consider the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by NADPH oxidases and nitric oxide synthases and the new findings that also indicate an essential role of glutathione (γ-glutamyl-l-cysteinylglycine) in redox homeostasis of microglia. The effect of oxidant modification of macromolecules on signaling is analyzed at the level of oxidized lipid by-products and sulfhydryl modification of microglial proteins. Redox signaling has a profound impact on two transcription factors that modulate microglial fate, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, master regulators of the pro-inflammatory and antioxidant responses of microglia, respectively. The relevance of these proteins in the modulation of microglial activity and the interplay between them will be evaluated. Finally, the relevance of ROS in altering blood brain barrier permeability is discussed. Recent examples of the importance of these findings in the onset or progression of neurodegenerative diseases are also discussed. This review should provide a profound insight into the role of redox homeostasis in microglial activity and help in the identification of new promising targets to control neuroinflammation through redox control of the brain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1766–1801. PMID:24597893

  15. Redox control of microglial function: molecular mechanisms and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Ana I; McBean, Gethin; Cindric, Marina; Egea, Javier; López, Manuela G; Rada, Patricia; Zarkovic, Neven; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2014-10-20

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by chronic microglial over-activation and oxidative stress. It is now beginning to be recognized that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by either microglia or the surrounding environment not only impact neurons but also modulate microglial activity. In this review, we first analyze the hallmarks of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory phenotypes of microglia and their regulation by ROS. Then, we consider the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by NADPH oxidases and nitric oxide synthases and the new findings that also indicate an essential role of glutathione (γ-glutamyl-l-cysteinylglycine) in redox homeostasis of microglia. The effect of oxidant modification of macromolecules on signaling is analyzed at the level of oxidized lipid by-products and sulfhydryl modification of microglial proteins. Redox signaling has a profound impact on two transcription factors that modulate microglial fate, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, master regulators of the pro-inflammatory and antioxidant responses of microglia, respectively. The relevance of these proteins in the modulation of microglial activity and the interplay between them will be evaluated. Finally, the relevance of ROS in altering blood brain barrier permeability is discussed. Recent examples of the importance of these findings in the onset or progression of neurodegenerative diseases are also discussed. This review should provide a profound insight into the role of redox homeostasis in microglial activity and help in the identification of new promising targets to control neuroinflammation through redox control of the brain.

  16. Molecular Comb Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, T.L.; Thundat, G.T.; Witkowski, C.E., III

    2007-07-17

    This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist Protein Discovery, Inc. to develop a novel biomolecular separation system based on an ORNL patent application 'Photoelectrochemical Molecular Comb' by Thundat, Ferrell, and Brown. The Molecular Comb concept is based on creating light-induced charge carriers at a semiconductor-liquid interface, which is kept at a potential control such that a depletion layer is formed in the semiconductor. Focusing light from a low-power illumination source creates electron-hole pairs, which get separated in the depletion layer. The light-induced charge carriers reaching the surface attract oppositely charged biomolecules present in the solution. The solution is a buffer solution with very small concentrations of biomolecules. As the focused light is moved across the surface of the semiconductor-liquid interface, the accumulated biomolecules follow the light beam. A thin layer of gel or other similar material on the surface of the semiconductor can act as a sieving medium for separating the biomolecules according to their sizes.

  17. Molecular control of ovulation and luteinization in the primate follicle.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Richard L; Xu, Fuhua; Duffy, Diane M

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, significant progress was made, particularly through the use of the macaque monkey, in identifying three types of local factors that are induced by the midcycle LH surge and play a critical role in ovulation and/or luteinization of the primate follicle. The ovulatory gonadotropin surge increases prostaglandin (PTG, typically abbreviated PG) levels in follicles prior to rupture; although considerable attention has focused on LH stimulation of the "inducible" form of PG G/H synthase (PTGS2), other aspects of PG synthesis (notably a phospholipase A2, cPLA2, and a PGE synthase, PTGES) and metabolism (15-hydroxy PG dehydrogenase, HPGD) also appear LH-regulated and may control the timing of the PG rise in the ovulatory follicle. Local (intrafollicular) ablation and replacement of PGs suggests that PGE2 is essential for release of the oocyte; but not necessarily for follicle rupture, and not for luteinization. Novel PGE-regulated genes are being identified in macaque granulosa cells, including adipose differentiation-related protein (ADFP). Similar types of studies indicate that the rise in progesterone (P) synthesis, as well as the induction of the genomic P receptor in granulosa cells, is essential for both ovulation and luteinization of the primate follicle. Limited data suggest that P action controls cell cycle activity (via cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27), cholesterol uptake and utilization (e.g., low density lipoprotein or LDL receptor), proteases and their inhibitors (matrix metalloproteinase or MMP1; tissue inhibitor of MMP or TIMP1) and cell health in the granulosa cell layer. Finally, members of two classes of angiogenic factors, originally proposed as important for embryonic and pathologic (tumorigenic) vasculogenesis, appear induced in the granulosa layer of the preovulatory follicle, i.e., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin (ANGPT). Local injection of antagonists to VEGF (soluble VEGF receptor) and

  18. Molecular mechanism for the operation of nitrogen control in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Luque, I; Flores, E; Herrero, A

    1994-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, ammonium exerts a negative regulation of the expression of proteins involved in the assimilation of nitrogen sources alternative to ammonium. In Synechococcus, mRNA levels of genes encoding proteins for nitrate and ammonium assimilation were observed to be negatively regulated by ammonium, and ammonium-regulated transcription start points were identified for those genes. The NtcA protein is a positive regulator of genes subjected to nitrogen control by ammonium. Mutants lacking NtcA exhibited only basal mRNA levels of the regulated genes, even in the absence of ammonium, indicating that NtcA exerts its regulatory action by positively influencing mRNA levels of the nitrogen-regulated genes. NtcA was observed to bind directly to the promoters of nitrogen-regulated genes, and the palindromic DNA sequence GTAN8TAC was identified as a sequence signature for NtcA-target sites. The structure of the nitrogen-, NtcA-regulated promoters of Synechococcus was determined to be constituted by a -10, Pribnow-like box in the form TAN3T, and an NtcA-binding site that substituted for the canonical -35 box. Images PMID:8026471

  19. Molecular control of irreversible bistability during trypanosome developmental commitment

    PubMed Central

    Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Szöőr, Balazs; Ferguson, Michael A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei involves developmental transitions that allow survival, proliferation, and transmission of these parasites. One of these, the differentiation of growth-arrested stumpy forms in the mammalian blood into insect-stage procyclic forms, can be induced synchronously in vitro with cis-aconitate. Here, we show that this transition is an irreversible bistable switch, and we map the point of commitment to differentiation after exposure to cis-aconitate. This irreversibility implies that positive feedback mechanisms operate to allow commitment (i.e., the establishment of “memory” of exposure to the differentiation signal). Using the reversible translational inhibitor cycloheximide, we show that this signal memory requires new protein synthesis. We further performed stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to analyze synchronized parasite populations, establishing the protein and phosphorylation profile of parasites pre- and postcommitment, thereby defining the “commitment proteome.” Functional interrogation of this data set identified Nek-related kinase as the first-discovered protein kinase controlling the initiation of differentiation to procyclic forms. PMID:26483558

  20. Reaction -Diffusion Systems in Intracellular Molecular Transport and Control

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Siowling; Byrska, Marta; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions make cells work only if the participating chemicals are delivered to desired locations in a timely and precise fashion. While most research to date has focused on the so-called active-transport mechanisms, “passive” diffusion is often equally rapid and is always energetically less costly. Capitalizing on these advantages, cells have developed sophisticated reaction-diffusion (RD) systems that control a wide range of cellular functions – from chemotaxis and cell division, through signaling cascades and oscillations, to cell motility. Despite their apparent diversity, these systems share many common features and are “wired” according to “generic” motifs involving non-linear kinetics, autocatalysis, and feedback loops. Understanding the operation of these complex (bio)chemical systems requires the analysis of pertinent transport-kinetic equations or, at least on a qualitative level, of the characteristic times describing constituent sub-processes. Therefore, in reviewing the manifestations of cellular RD, we also attempt to familiarize the reader with the basic theory of these processes. PMID:20518023

  1. Tuning Pore Size in Square-Lattice Coordination Networks for Size-Selective Sieving of CO2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Jie; Madden, David G; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Kumar, Amrit; Yang, Qing-Yuan; Xue, Wei; Space, Brian; Perry, John J; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2016-08-22

    Porous materials capable of selectively capturing CO2 from flue-gases or natural gas are of interest in terms of rising atmospheric CO2 levels and methane purification. Size-exclusive sieving of CO2 over CH4 and N2 has rarely been achieved. Herein we show that a crystal engineering approach to tuning of pore-size in a coordination network, [Cu(quinoline-5-carboxyate)2 ]n (Qc-5-Cu) ena+bles ultra-high selectivity for CO2 over N2 (SCN ≈40 000) and CH4 (SCM ≈3300). Qc-5-Cu-sql-β, a narrow pore polymorph of the square lattice (sql) coordination network Qc-5-Cu-sql-α, adsorbs CO2 while excluding both CH4 and N2 . Experimental measurements and molecular modeling validate and explain the performance. Qc-5-Cu-sql-β is stable to moisture and its separation performance is unaffected by humidity.

  2. Tuning Pore Size in Square-Lattice Coordination Networks for Size-Selective Sieving of CO2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Jie; Madden, David G; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Kumar, Amrit; Yang, Qing-Yuan; Xue, Wei; Space, Brian; Perry, John J; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2016-08-22

    Porous materials capable of selectively capturing CO2 from flue-gases or natural gas are of interest in terms of rising atmospheric CO2 levels and methane purification. Size-exclusive sieving of CO2 over CH4 and N2 has rarely been achieved. Herein we show that a crystal engineering approach to tuning of pore-size in a coordination network, [Cu(quinoline-5-carboxyate)2 ]n (Qc-5-Cu) ena+bles ultra-high selectivity for CO2 over N2 (SCN ≈40 000) and CH4 (SCM ≈3300). Qc-5-Cu-sql-β, a narrow pore polymorph of the square lattice (sql) coordination network Qc-5-Cu-sql-α, adsorbs CO2 while excluding both CH4 and N2 . Experimental measurements and molecular modeling validate and explain the performance. Qc-5-Cu-sql-β is stable to moisture and its separation performance is unaffected by humidity. PMID:27439315

  3. Conservation Biological Control of Pests in the Molecular Era: New Opportunities to Address Old Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Gurr, Geoff M.; You, Minsheng

    2016-01-01

    Biological control has long been considered a potential alternative to pesticidal strategies for pest management but its impact and level of use globally remain modest and inconsistent. A rapidly expanding range of molecular – particularly DNA-related – techniques is currently revolutionizing many life sciences. This review identifies a series of constraints on the development and uptake of conservation biological control and considers the contemporary and likely future influence of molecular methods on these constraints. Molecular approaches are now often used to complement morphological taxonomic methods for the identification and study of biological control agents including microbes. A succession of molecular techniques has been applied to ‘who eats whom’ questions in food-web ecology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approaches have largely superseded immunological approaches such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and now – in turn – are being overtaken by next generation sequencing (NGS)-based approaches that offer unparalleled power at a rapidly diminishing cost. There is scope also to use molecular techniques to manipulate biological control agents, which will be accelerated with the advent of gene editing tools, the CRISPR/Cas9 system in particular. Gene editing tools also offer unparalleled power to both elucidate and manipulate plant defense mechanisms including those that involve natural enemy attraction to attacked plants. Rapid advances in technology will allow the development of still more novel pest management options for which uptake is likely to be limited chiefly by regulatory hurdles. PMID:26793225

  4. Conservation Biological Control of Pests in the Molecular Era: New Opportunities to Address Old Constraints.

    PubMed

    Gurr, Geoff M; You, Minsheng

    2015-01-01

    Biological control has long been considered a potential alternative to pesticidal strategies for pest management but its impact and level of use globally remain modest and inconsistent. A rapidly expanding range of molecular - particularly DNA-related - techniques is currently revolutionizing many life sciences. This review identifies a series of constraints on the development and uptake of conservation biological control and considers the contemporary and likely future influence of molecular methods on these constraints. Molecular approaches are now often used to complement morphological taxonomic methods for the identification and study of biological control agents including microbes. A succession of molecular techniques has been applied to 'who eats whom' questions in food-web ecology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approaches have largely superseded immunological approaches such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and now - in turn - are being overtaken by next generation sequencing (NGS)-based approaches that offer unparalleled power at a rapidly diminishing cost. There is scope also to use molecular techniques to manipulate biological control agents, which will be accelerated with the advent of gene editing tools, the CRISPR/Cas9 system in particular. Gene editing tools also offer unparalleled power to both elucidate and manipulate plant defense mechanisms including those that involve natural enemy attraction to attacked plants. Rapid advances in technology will allow the development of still more novel pest management options for which uptake is likely to be limited chiefly by regulatory hurdles.

  5. The contribution of molecular epidemiology to the understanding and control of viral diseases of salmonid aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Snow, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a science which utilizes molecular biology to define the distribution of disease in a population (descriptive epidemiology) and relies heavily on integration of traditional (or analytical) epidemiological approaches to identify the etiological determinants of this distribution. The study of viral pathogens of aquaculture has provided many exciting opportunities to apply such tools. This review considers the extent to which molecular epidemiological studies have contributed to better understanding and control of disease in aquaculture, drawing on examples of viral diseases of salmonid fish of commercial significance including viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). Significant outcomes of molecular epidemiological studies include:Improved taxonomic classification of viruses. A better understanding of the natural distribution of viruses. An improved understanding of the origins of viral pathogens in aquaculture. An improved understanding of the risks of translocation of pathogens outwith their natural host range. An increased ability to trace the source of new disease outbreaks. Development of a basis for ensuring development of appropriate diagnostic tools. An ability to classify isolates and thus target future research aimed at better understanding biological function. While molecular epidemiological studies have no doubt already made a significant contribution in these areas, the advent of new technologies such as pyrosequencing heralds a quantum leap in the ability to generate descriptive molecular sequence data. The ability of molecular epidemiology to fulfil its potential to translate complex disease pathways into relevant fish health policy is thus unlikely to be limited by the generation of descriptive molecular markers. More likely, full realisation of the potential to better explain viral transmission pathways will be dependent on the ability to assimilate

  6. Phosphorescent Molecular Butterflies with Controlled Potential-Energy Surfaces and Their Application as Luminescent Viscosity Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenkun; Yuan, Lin; Yuan, Zhao; Doyle, Nicholas Kelly; Dilbeck, Tristan; Bahadur, Divya; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Dearden, Albert; Huang, Chen; Ma, Biwu

    2016-09-01

    We report precise manipulation of the potential-energy surfaces (PESs) of a series of butterfly-like pyrazolate-bridged platinum binuclear complexes, by synthetic control of the electronic structure of the cyclometallating ligand and the steric bulkiness of the pyrazolate bridging ligand. Color tuning of dual emission from blue/red, to green/red and red/deep red were achieved for these phosphorescent molecular butterflies, which have two well-controlled energy minima on the PESs. The environmentally dependent photoluminescence of these molecular butterflies enabled their application as self-referenced luminescent viscosity sensor. PMID:27500886

  7. Phosphorescent Molecular Butterflies with Controlled Potential-Energy Surfaces and Their Application as Luminescent Viscosity Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenkun; Yuan, Lin; Yuan, Zhao; Doyle, Nicholas Kelly; Dilbeck, Tristan; Bahadur, Divya; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Dearden, Albert; Huang, Chen; Ma, Biwu

    2016-09-01

    We report precise manipulation of the potential-energy surfaces (PESs) of a series of butterfly-like pyrazolate-bridged platinum binuclear complexes, by synthetic control of the electronic structure of the cyclometallating ligand and the steric bulkiness of the pyrazolate bridging ligand. Color tuning of dual emission from blue/red, to green/red and red/deep red were achieved for these phosphorescent molecular butterflies, which have two well-controlled energy minima on the PESs. The environmentally dependent photoluminescence of these molecular butterflies enabled their application as self-referenced luminescent viscosity sensor.

  8. Controlled Folding, Motional, and Constitutional Dynamic Processes of Polyheterocyclic Molecular Strands.

    PubMed

    Barboiu, Mihail; Stadler, Adrian-Mihail; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-18

    General design principles have been developed for the control of the structural features of polyheterocyclic strands and their effector-modulated shape changes. Induced defined molecular motions permit designed enforcement of helical as well as linear molecular shapes. The ability of such molecular strands to bind metal cations allows the generation of coiling/uncoiling processes between helically folded and extended linear states. Large molecular motions are produced on coordination of metal ions, which may be made reversible by competition with an ancillary complexing agent and fueled by sequential acid/base neutralization energy. The introduction of hydrazone units into the strands confers upon them constitutional dynamics, whereby interconversion between different strand compositions is achieved through component exchange. These features have relevance for nanomechanical devices. We present a morphological and functional analysis of such systems developed in our laboratories.

  9. Estrogen-related receptor α, the molecular clock, and transcriptional control of metabolic outputs.

    PubMed

    Giguère, V; Dufour, C R; Eichner, L J; Deblois, G; Cermakian, N

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism and circadian rhythms must be closely integrated to support the energetic needs of the organism linked to the daily timing of physiological and behavioral processes. Although components of the molecular clock can directly target some metabolic genes, the control of metabolic clock output is believed to be mediated mostly through the action of transcription factors whose patterns of expression are rhythmic in metabolic tissues. Our recent work has identified the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), a potent effector of metabolic gene networks, as a direct regulator of the molecular clock. Thus, by acting both upstream of and downstream from the molecular clock, ERRα serves as a key transcription factor linking the clock with metabolic control.

  10. Methanol-induced chain termination in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) biopolymers: molecular weight control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A systematic study was performed to demonstrate the impact of methanol (MeOH) on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthesis and molecular weight (MW) control. Glycerine (init. conc. = 1.0%; w/v), was used as the primary carbon source in batch-culture fermentations with varying concentrations (0 to 0.85...

  11. Optimising molecular diagnostic capacity for effective control of tuberculosis in high-burden settings.

    PubMed

    Sabiiti, W; Mtafya, B; Kuchaka, D; Azam, K; Viegas, S; Mdolo, A; Farmer, E C W; Khonga, M; Evangelopoulos, D; Honeyborne, I; Rachow, A; Heinrich, N; Ntinginya, N E; Bhatt, N; Davies, G R; Jani, I V; McHugh, T D; Kibiki, G; Hoelscher, M; Gillespie, S H

    2016-08-01

    The World Health Organization's 2035 vision is to reduce tuberculosis (TB) associated mortality by 95%. While low-burden, well-equipped industrialised economies can expect to see this goal achieved, it is challenging in the low- and middle-income countries that bear the highest burden of TB. Inadequate diagnosis leads to inappropriate treatment and poor clinical outcomes. The roll-out of the Xpert(®) MTB/RIF assay has demonstrated that molecular diagnostics can produce rapid diagnosis and treatment initiation. Strong molecular services are still limited to regional or national centres. The delay in implementation is due partly to resources, and partly to the suggestion that such techniques are too challenging for widespread implementation. We have successfully implemented a molecular tool for rapid monitoring of patient treatment response to anti-tuberculosis treatment in three high TB burden countries in Africa. We discuss here the challenges facing TB diagnosis and treatment monitoring, and draw from our experience in establishing molecular treatment monitoring platforms to provide practical insights into successful optimisation of molecular diagnostic capacity in resource-constrained, high TB burden settings. We recommend a holistic health system-wide approach for molecular diagnostic capacity development, addressing human resource training, institutional capacity development, streamlined procurement systems, and engagement with the public, policy makers and implementers of TB control programmes. PMID:27393531

  12. Molecular control of electron and hole transfer processes: Theory and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.D.; Cave, R.J.

    1996-02-01

    Recent decades have seen remarkable advances in microscopic understanding of electron transfer (ET) processes in widely ranging contexts, including solid-state, liquid solution, and complex biological assemblies. The primary goal of this chapter is to report recent advances in the modeling, calculation, and analysis of electronic coupling in complex molecular aggregates, thereby allowing an assessment of current progress toward the goal of molecular-level control and design. The control of electron transfer kinetics (i.e., enhancing desired processes, while inhibiting others) involves, of course, system energetics (especially activation and reorganization energies) as well as electronic coupling, which is most directly relevant only after the system has reached the appropriate point (or region) along the reaction coordinate. Nevertheless, to focus the discussion in this chapter, the authors will consider such energetics, and the associated molecular and solvent coordinates which control then, only to the extent that they bear on the analysis of the electronic coupling. In the following sections they first discuss the formulation of basic ET models, including the definition of initial and final states, the role of orbitals and 1-particle models in a many-electron context, the utility of various effective Hamiltonians, and the role of vibronic as well as purely electronic effects. With these theoretical tools in hand, they then examine very recent applications to complex molecular systems using the techniques of computational quantum chemistry, followed by detailed analysis of the numerical results. They then conclude with some comments regarding the current ``state of the art`` and remaining challenges.

  13. Broadening the polyethylene molecular weight distribution by controlling the hydrogen concentration and catalyst feed rates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Emad M; Ali, Mohammad Al-haj

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the control of an industrial gas-phase polyethylene reactor to produce a desired molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the polymer. The controller objective is to regulate online the entire molecular weight distribution by either manipulating the hydrogen content inside the reactor or coordinating the feed rates of two different types of catalysts. In this work, the molecular weight distribution is modeled as a function of the reaction kinetics and hydrogen to monomer ratio. Nonlinear model predictive controller (NLMPC) algorithm is used to maintain the desired molecular weight distribution online. The closed-loop simulations indicated the effectiveness of NLMPC to achieve its goal even in the presence of modeling errors. Moreover, the results showed that, altering the hydrogen concentration solely can produce the required polymer quality provided that an efficient mechanism is available to readily alter the hydrogen composition. Alternatively, the desired MWD can also be guaranteed with proper manipulation of the catalyst feed rates while the other process inputs are kept constant.

  14. Control of field-free molecular alignment by phase-shaped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, M.; Hertz, E.; Guerin, S.; Jauslin, H.R.; Lavorel, B.; Faucher, O.

    2005-08-15

    We report an experimental study of the control of molecular alignment of N{sub 2} by use of spectrally modulated pulses at an intensity regime below the intrinsic saturation of the alignment. By manipulating the relative timing of the alignment revival pattern arising from the even subset of the thermal ensemble as compared to the odd subset, we demonstrate that the angular distribution of the aligned molecule can be converted into planar delocalization at specific times. We also show that the angular focusing of the molecular axis can be switched off by applying a specific bipulse.

  15. Brownian Motion Rectifier: Continuous Sorting of Macromolecules in a Microfabricated Sieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. F.; Duke, T. A. J.; Chan, S. S.; Bakajin, O. B.; Austin, R. H.; Cox, E. C.

    1998-03-01

    A new method for separating biological macromolecules according to size has been proposed by Duke and Austin (T.A.J. Duke and R.H. Austin, preprint (1997).). A fine stream of molecules is transported through a microfabricated sieve, etched from a silicon chip by photolithography. The sieve consists of a periodic array of oblong obstacles, oriented at an angle to the direction of flow. The spatial asymmetry and the broken time-reversal symmetry (imposed by the flow) cause the Brownian motion of the molecules to be rectified. Since the effect depends on the thermal motion, molecules with different diffusion coefficients are deflected by different amounts, and consequently a mixture of molecules is sorted according to size. Our preliminary results in sorting a mixture of DNA in such a sieve will be presented.

  16. Laser Diffraction Techniques Replace Sieving for Lunar Soil Particle Size Distribution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.; Gonzalez, C. P.; McKay, D. S.; Fruland, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Sieving was used extensively until 1999 to determine the particle size distribution of lunar samples. This method is time-consuming, and requires more than a gram of material in order to obtain a result in which one may have confidence. This is demonstrated by the difference in geometric mean and median for samples measured by [1], in which a 14-gram sample produced a geometric mean of approx.52 micrometers, whereas two other samples of 1.5 grams resulted in gave means of approx.63 and approx.69 micrometers. Sample allocations for sieving are typically much smaller than a gram, and many of the sample allocations received by our lab are 0.5 to 0.25 grams in mass. Basu [2] has described how the finest fraction of the soil is easily lost in the sieving process, and this effect is compounded when sample sizes are small.

  17. Direct Measurement of Sieve Tube Turgor Pressure Using Severed Aphid Stylets 1

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John P.; Fisher, Donald B.

    1980-01-01

    Turgor pressure in individual sieve tubes was measured directly by gluing capillary micromanometers over exuding aphid stylets with cyanoac-rylate adhesive. Pressures of up to 10 bars were measured in sieve tubes of Salix babylonica, with an estimated accuracy of ± 0.3 bars or better. For comparison with the direct measurements of sieve tube turgor, calculated values of turgor pressure were also obtained from the difference between leaf water potential and phloem exudate solute potential, estimated from its refractive index and sucrose content. In most cases the measured turgor pressure was greater than the calculated value. The discrepancy between the two values was most likely due to the presence of appreciable concentrations of potassium and amino acids in the phloem exudate. PMID:16661346

  18. Reversible molecular switching of molecular beacon: controlling DNA hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics using mercury(ii) ions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ronghua; Jin, Jianyu; Long, Liping; Wang, Yongxiang; Wang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2009-01-21

    We report that the hydrogen-bonding pattern in a molecular beacon can be replaced by metal-dependent pairs of Hg(2+) and DNA thymine (T) bases. A molecular beacon based on T-Hg(2+)-T exhibits a lower background signal and higher thermostability than regular molecular beacons.

  19. Live Imaging of Companion Cells and Sieve Elements in Arabidopsis Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Cayla, Thibaud; Batailler, Brigitte; Le Hir, Rozenn; Revers, Frédéric; Anstead, James A.; Thompson, Gary A.; Grandjean, Olivier; Dinant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The phloem is a complex tissue composed of highly specialized cells with unique subcellular structures and a compact organization that is challenging to study in vivo at cellular resolution. We used confocal scanning laser microscopy and subcellular fluorescent markers in companion cells and sieve elements, for live imaging of the phloem in Arabidopsis leaves. This approach provided a simple framework for identifying phloem cell types unambiguously. It highlighted the compactness of the meshed network of organelles within companion cells. By contrast, within the sieve elements, unknown bodies were observed in association with the PP2-A1:GFP, GFP:RTM1 and RTM2:GFP markers at the cell periphery. The phloem lectin PP2-A1:GFP marker was found in the parietal ground matrix. Its location differed from that of the P-protein filaments, which were visualized with SEOR1:GFP and SEOR2:GFP. PP2-A1:GFP surrounded two types of bodies, one of which was identified as mitochondria. This location suggested that it was embedded within the sieve element clamps, specific structures that may fix the organelles to each another or to the plasma membrane in the sieve tubes. GFP:RTM1 was associated with a class of larger bodies, potentially corresponding to plastids. PP2-A1:GFP was soluble in the cytosol of immature sieve elements. The changes in its subcellular localization during differentiation provide an in vivo blueprint for monitoring this process. The subcellular features obtained with these companion cell and sieve element markers can be used as landmarks for exploring the organization and dynamics of phloem cells in vivo. PMID:25714357

  20. Computational image formation with photon sieves for milli-arcsecond solar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktem, Figen S.; Kamalabadi, Farzad; Davila, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    A photon sieve is a modification of a Fresnel zone plate in which open zones are replaced by a large number of circular holes. This diffractive imaging element is specially suited to observations at UV and x-ray wavelengths where refractive lenses are not available due to strong absorption of materials, and reflective mirrors are difficult to manufacture with sufficient surface figure accuracy to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. On the other hand, photon sieves enable diffraction-limited imaging with much more relaxed tolerances than conventional imaging technology. In this presentation, we present the capabilities of an instrument concept that is based on computational image formation with photon sieves. The instrument enables high-resolution spectral imaging by distributing the imaging task between a photon sieve system and a computational method. A photon sieve coupled with a moving detector provides measurements from multiple planes. Then computational image formation, which involves deconvolution, is performed in a Bayesian estimation framework to reconstruct the multi-spectral images from these measurements. In addition to diffraction-limited high spatial resolution enabled by photon sieves, this instrument can also achieve higher spectral resolution than the conventional spectral imagers, since the technique offers the possibility of separating nearby spectral components that would not otherwise be possible using wavelength filters. Here, the promising capabilities and the imaging performance are shown for imaging the solar corona at EUV wavelengths. The effectiveness of various potential observing scenarios, the effects of interfering emission lines, and the appropriate form of the cost function for image deconvolution are examined.

  1. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Strains: A Fundamental Tool for Tuberculosis Control and Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Cannas, Angela; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Di Caro, Antonino; Delogu, Giovanni; Girardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. An improvement of the strategies for disease control is necessary in both low- and high-incidence TB countries. Clinicians, epidemiologists, laboratory specialists, and public health players should work together in order to achieve a significant reduction in TB transmission and spread of drug-resistant strains. Effective TB surveillance relies on early diagnosis of new cases, appropriate therapy, and accurate detection of outbreaks in the community, in order to implement proper TB control strategies. To achieve this goal, information from classical and molecular epidemiology, together with patient clinical data need to be combined. In this review, we summarize the methodologies currently used in molecular epidemiology, namely molecular typing. We will discuss their efficiency to phylogenetically characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates, and their ability to provide information that can be useful for disease control. We will also introduce next generation sequencing as the methodology that potentially could provide in a short time both, detection of new outbreaks and identification of resistance patterns. This could envision a potential of next generation sequencing as an important tool for accurate patient management and disease control. PMID:27403266

  2. Effect of liquid channeling on a 1.8-m distillation sieve tray

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, S.J.; Biddulph, M.W.; Krishnamurthy, K.R.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation designed to establish the extent of the effects of liquid channeling and stagnant zones on the efficiency of a 1.8-m diameter sieve tray. The method used is to compare performance, in the same column and using the same system, with a novel tray which is known, from hydraulic studies, to remove stagnant zones. It is found that there is an observable loss in efficiency in the sieve tray, particularly at heavy loadings, and this will have implications for designers specifying high-capacity trays for new or upgraded columns.

  3. Microfluidic sieve using intertwined, free-standing carbon nanotube mesh as active medium

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr

    2007-11-06

    A microfluidic sieve having a substrate with a microfluidic channel, and a carbon nanotube mesh. The carbon nanotube mesh is formed from a plurality of intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes which are fixedly attached within the channel for separating, concentrating, and/or filtering molecules flowed through the channel. In one embodiment, the microfluidic sieve is fabricated by providing a substrate having a microfluidic channel, and growing the intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes from within the channel to produce the carbon nanotube mesh attached within the channel.

  4. Selective transport control on molecular velcro made from intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Kai D; Dettmer, Simon L; Kapinos, Larisa E; Pagliara, Stefano; Keyser, Ulrich F; Jeney, Sylvia; Lim, Roderick Y H

    2014-07-01

    The selectivity and speed of many biological transport processes transpire from a 'reduction of dimensionality' that confines diffusion to one or two dimensions instead of three. This behaviour remains highly sought after on polymeric surfaces as a means to expedite diffusional search processes in molecular engineered systems. Here, we have reconstituted the two-dimensional diffusion of colloidal particles on a molecular brush surface. The surface is composed of phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups)--intrinsically disordered proteins that facilitate selective transport through nuclear pore complexes in eukaryotic cells. Local and ensemble-level experiments involving optical trapping using a photonic force microscope and particle tracking by video microscopy, respectively, reveal that 1-µm-sized colloidal particles bearing nuclear transport receptors called karyopherins can exhibit behaviour that varies from highly localized to unhindered two-dimensional diffusion. Particle diffusivity is controlled by varying the amount of free karyopherins in solution, which modulates the multivalency of Kap-binding sites within the molecular brush. We conclude that the FG Nups resemble stimuli-responsive molecular 'velcro', which can impart 'reduction of dimensionality' as a means of biomimetic transport control in artificial environments.

  5. Control of ultrafast molecular photodissociation by laser-field-induced potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, M. E.; González-Vázquez, J.; Balerdi, G.; Solá, I. R.; de Nalda, R.; Bañares, L.

    2014-09-01

    Experiments aimed at understanding ultrafast molecular processes are now routine, and the notion that external laser fields can constitute an additional reagent is also well established. The possibility of externally controlling a reaction with radiation increases immensely when its intensity is sufficiently high to distort the potential energy surfaces at which chemists conceptualize reactions take place. Here we explore the transition from the weak- to the strong-field regimes of laser control for the dissociation of a polyatomic molecule, methyl iodide. The control over the yield of the photodissociation reaction proceeds through the creation of a light-induced conical intersection. The control of the velocity of the product fragments requires external fields with both high intensities and short durations. This is because the mechanism by which control is exerted involves modulating the potentials around the light-induced conical intersection, that is, creating light-induced potentials.

  6. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes for multi-target objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2015-04-01

    This paper considers laser-driven optimal control of an ensemble of non-interacting molecules whose dynamics lie in classical phase space. The molecules evolve independently under control to distinct final states. We consider a control landscape defined in terms of multi-target (MT) molecular states and analyze the landscape as a functional of the control field. The topology of the MT control landscape is assessed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under particular assumptions, the MT control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Both the absence of traps and rank of the Hessian are shown to be analogous to the situation of specifying multiple targets for an ensemble of quantum states. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the classical landscape principles and further characterize the system behavior as the control field is optimized.

  7. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes for multi-target objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2015-04-21

    This paper considers laser-driven optimal control of an ensemble of non-interacting molecules whose dynamics lie in classical phase space. The molecules evolve independently under control to distinct final states. We consider a control landscape defined in terms of multi-target (MT) molecular states and analyze the landscape as a functional of the control field. The topology of the MT control landscape is assessed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under particular assumptions, the MT control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Both the absence of traps and rank of the Hessian are shown to be analogous to the situation of specifying multiple targets for an ensemble of quantum states. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the classical landscape principles and further characterize the system behavior as the control field is optimized.

  8. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes for multi-target objectives.

    PubMed

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2015-04-21

    This paper considers laser-driven optimal control of an ensemble of non-interacting molecules whose dynamics lie in classical phase space. The molecules evolve independently under control to distinct final states. We consider a control landscape defined in terms of multi-target (MT) molecular states and analyze the landscape as a functional of the control field. The topology of the MT control landscape is assessed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under particular assumptions, the MT control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Both the absence of traps and rank of the Hessian are shown to be analogous to the situation of specifying multiple targets for an ensemble of quantum states. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the classical landscape principles and further characterize the system behavior as the control field is optimized.

  9. The movement protein of cucumber mosaic virus traffics into sieve elements in minor veins of nicotiana clevelandii

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, LM; Boevink, P; Cruz, SS; Palukaitis, P; Oparka, KJ

    1998-01-01

    The location of the 3a movement protein (MP) of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was studied by quantitative immunogold labeling of the wild-type 3a MP in leaves of Nicotiana clevelandii infected by CMV as well as by using a 3a-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion expressed from a potato virus X (PVX) vector. Whether expressed from CMV or PVX, the 3a MP targeted plasmodesmata and accumulated in the central cavity of the pore. Within minor veins, the most extensively labeled plasmodesmata were those connecting sieve elements and companion cells. In addition to targeting plasmodesmata, the 3a MP accumulated in the parietal layer of mature sieve elements. Confocal imaging of cells expressing the 3a-GFP fusion protein showed that the 3a MP assembled into elaborate fibrillar formations in the sieve element parietal layer. The ability of 3a-GFP, expressed from PVX rather than CMV, to enter sieve elements demonstrates that neither the CMV RNA nor the CMV coat protein is required for trafficking of the 3a MP into sieve elements. CMV virions were not detected in plasmodesmata from CMV-infected tissue, although large CMV aggregates were often found in the parietal layer of sieve elements and were usually surrounded by 3a MP. These data suggest that CMV traffics into minor vein sieve elements as a ribonucleoprotein complex that contains the viral RNA, coat protein, and 3a MP, with subsequent viral assembly occurring in the sieve element parietal layer. PMID:9548980

  10. Site-controlled Ag nanocrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy-Towards plasmonic integration technology

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanczyk, Adam; Noetzel, Richard

    2012-12-15

    We demonstrate site-controlled growth of epitaxial Ag nanocrystals on patterned GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with high degree of long-range uniformity. The alignment is based on lithographically defined holes in which position controlled InAs quantum dots are grown. The Ag nanocrystals self-align preferentially on top of the InAs quantum dots. No such ordering is observed in the absence of InAs quantum dots, proving that the ordering is strain-driven. The presented technique facilitates the placement of active plasmonic nanostructures at arbitrarily defined positions enabling their integration into complex devices and plasmonic circuits.

  11. Nonlinear Raman Techniques in Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy for the Analysis and Control of Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Materny, Arnulf; Konradi, Jakow; Namboodiri, Vinu; Namboodiri, Mahesh; Scaria, Abraham

    2008-11-14

    The use of four-wave mixing techniques in femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy has considerable advantages. Due to the many degrees of freedom offered e.g. by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the dynamics even of complex systems can be analyzed in detail. Using pulse shaping techniques in combination with a self-learning loop approach, molecular mode excitation can be controlled very efficiently in a multi-photon excitation process. Results obtained from the optimal control of CARS on {beta}-carotene are discussed.

  12. Azobenzene Modified Imidacloprid Derivatives as Photoswitchable Insecticides: Steering Molecular Activity in a Controllable Manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiping; Shi, Lina; Jiang, Danping; Cheng, Jiagao; Shao, Xusheng; Li, Zhong

    2015-10-01

    Incorporating the photoisomerizable azobenzene into imidacloprid produced a photoswitchable insecticidal molecule as the first neonicotinoid example of remote control insecticide performance with spatiotemporal resolution. The designed photoswitchable insecticides showed distinguishable activity against Musca both in vivo and in vitro upon irradiation. Molecular docking study further suggested the binding difference of the two photoisomers. The generation of these photomediated insecticides provides novel insight into the insecticidal activity facilitating further investigation on the functions of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and opens a novel way to control and study insect behavior on insecticide poisoning using light.

  13. From molecular control to quantum technology with the dynamic Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Wu, Guorong; Lausten, Rune; Townsend, Dave; Walmsley, Lan A; Stolow, Albert; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2011-01-01

    The non-resonant dynamic Stark effect is a powerful and general way of manipulating ultrafast processes in atoms, molecules, and solids with exquisite precision. We discuss the physics behind this effect, and demonstrate its efficacy as a method of control in a variety of systems. These applications range from the control of molecular rotational dynamics to the manipulation of chemical reaction dynamics, and from the suppression of vacuum fluctuation effects in coherent preparation of matter, to the dynamic generation of bandwidth for storage of broadband quantum states of light. PMID:22452088

  14. From molecular control to quantum technology with the dynamic Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Wu, Guorong; Lausten, Rune; Townsend, Dave; Walmsley, Lan A; Stolow, Albert; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2011-01-01

    The non-resonant dynamic Stark effect is a powerful and general way of manipulating ultrafast processes in atoms, molecules, and solids with exquisite precision. We discuss the physics behind this effect, and demonstrate its efficacy as a method of control in a variety of systems. These applications range from the control of molecular rotational dynamics to the manipulation of chemical reaction dynamics, and from the suppression of vacuum fluctuation effects in coherent preparation of matter, to the dynamic generation of bandwidth for storage of broadband quantum states of light.

  15. Thermodynamic Control of Two-Dimensional Molecular Ionic Nanostructures on Metal Surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jeon, Seokmin; Doak, Peter W.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-07-26

    Bulk molecular ionic solids exhibit fascinating electronic properties, including electron correlations, phase transitions and superconducting ground states. In contrast, few of these phenomena have so far been observed in low-dimensional molecular structures, including thin films, nanoparticles and molecular blends, not in the least because most of such structures have so far been composed of nearly closed-shell molecules. It is therefore desirable to develop low-dimensional molecular structures of ionic molecules toward fundamental studies and potential applications. Here we present detailed analysis of monolayer-thick structures of the canonical TTF-TCNQ (tetrathiafulvalene 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) system grown on low-index gold and silver surfaces. The most distinctivemore » property of the epitaxial growth is the wide abundance of stable TTF/TCNQ ratios, in sharp contrast to the predominance of 1:1 ratio in the bulk. We propose the existence of the surface phase-diagram that controls the structures of TTF-TCNQ on the surfaces, and demonstrate phase-transitions that occur upon progressively increasing the density of TCNQ while keeping the surface coverage of TTF fixed. Based on direct observations, we propose the binding motif behind the stable phases and infer the dominant interactions that enable the existence of the rich spectrum of surface structures. Finally, we also show that the surface phase diagram will control the epitaxy beyond monolayer coverage. Multiplicity of stable surface structures, the corollary rich phase diagram and the corresponding phase-transitions present an interesting opportunity for low-dimensional molecular systems, particularly if some of the electronic properties of the bulk can be preserved or modified in the surface phases.« less

  16. Thermodynamic Control of Two-Dimensional Molecular Ionic Nanostructures on Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seokmin; Doak, Peter W; Sumpter, Bobby G; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-08-23

    Bulk molecular ionic solids exhibit fascinating electronic properties, including electron correlations, phase transitions, and superconducting ground states. In contrast, few of these phenomena have been observed in low-dimensional molecular structures, including thin films, nanoparticles, and molecular blends, not in the least because most of such structures have been composed of nearly closed-shell molecules. It is therefore desirable to develop low-dimensional ionic molecular structures that can capture potential applications. Here, we present detailed analysis of monolayer-thick structures of the canonical TTF-TCNQ (tetrathiafulvalene 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) system grown on low-index gold and silver surfaces. The most distinctive property of the epitaxial growth is the wide abundance of stable TTF/TCNQ ratios, in sharp contrast to the predominance of a 1:1 ratio in the bulk. We propose the existence of the surface phase diagram that controls the structures of TTF-TCNQ on the surfaces and demonstrate phase transitions that occur upon progressively increasing the density of TCNQ while keeping the surface coverage of TTF fixed. Based on direct observations, we propose the binding motif behind the stable phases and infer the dominant interactions that enable the existence of the rich spectrum of surface structures. Finally, we also show that the surface phase diagram will control the epitaxy beyond monolayer coverage. Multiplicity of stable surface structures, the corollary rich phase diagram, and the corresponding phase transitions present an interesting opportunity for low-dimensional molecular systems, particularly if some of the electronic properties of the bulk can be preserved or modified in the surface phases. PMID:27458890

  17. Control of molecular weight of polystyrene using the reverse iodine transfer polymerization (RITP)-emulsion technique.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyeong Geun; Shin, Hongcheol; Jung, Hyejun; Lee, Byung Hyung; Choe, Soonja

    2011-01-15

    The RITP-emulsion polymerization of styrene in the presence of molecular iodine has been successfully performed using potassium persulfate (KPS) as an initiator and 1-hexadecanesulfonate as an emulsifier under argon atmosphere at 80°C for 7 hrs in the absence of light. The effects of the iodine concentration, molar ratio between KPS and iodine, and solid contents on the molecular weight of polystyrene (PS) were studied. As the iodine concentration increased from 0.05 to 0.504 mmol under the fixed [KPS]/[I(2)] ratio at 4.5, the weight-average molecular weight of PS substantially decreased from 126,120 to 35,690 g/mol, the conversion increased from 85.0% to 95.2%, and the weight-average particle diameter decreased from 159 to 103 nm. In addition, as the ratio of [KPS]/[I(2)] increased from 0.5 to 6.0 at the fixed [I(2)] of 0.504 mmol, the weight-average molecular weight of PS decreased from 72,170 to 30,640 g/mol with high conversion between 81.7% and 96.5%. Moreover, when the styrene solid content increased from 10 to 40 wt.% at the fixed [KPS]/[I(2)] ratio of 4.5, the weight-average molecular weight of PS varied between 33,500 and 37,200 g/mol, the conversion varied between 94.9% and 89.7% and the weight-average diameter varied from 122 to 205 nm. Thus, the control of molecular weight of PS less than 100,000g/mol with high conversion (95%) and particle stability of up to 40 wt.% solid content were easily achieved through the usage of iodine with suitable ratio of [KPS]/[I(2)] in the RITP-emulsion polymerization technique, which is of great industrial importance.

  18. Impact of the carbon pore size and topology on the equilibrium quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes at zero coverage and finite pressures.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Gauden, Piotr A; Terzyk, Artur P; Furmaniak, Sylwester

    2009-04-01

    Carbonaceous slit-shaped and square-shaped pores efficiently differentiate adsorbed hydrogen isotopes at 77 and 33 K. Extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the square-shaped carbon pores enhanced the selectivity of deuterium over hydrogen in comparison to equivalent slit-shaped carbon pores at zero coverage as well as at finite pressures (i.e. quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes is pore-topology-dependent). We show that this enhancement of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity results from larger localization of hydrogen isotopes in square-shaped pores. The operating pressures for efficient quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes are strongly dependent on the topology as well as on the size of the carbon pores. However, for both considered carbon pore topologies the highest D(2)/H(2) separation factor is observed at zero-coverage limit. Depending on carbon pore size and topology we predicted monotonic decreasing and non-monotonic shape of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity at finite pressures. For both kinds of carbonaceous pores of molecular sizes we predict high compression of hydrogen isotopes at 77 and 33 K (for example, the pore density of compressed hydrogen isotopes at 77 K and 0.25 MPa in a square-shaped carbon pore of size 2.6 Å exceeds 60 mmol cm(-3); for comparison, the liquid density of para-H(2) at 30 K and 30 MPa is 42 mmol cm(-3)). Finally, by direct comparison of simulation results with experimental data it is explained why 'ordinary' carbonaceous materials are not efficient quantum sieves.

  19. Alternative sieving method for extraction of light filth from cheeses: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, M J

    1994-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted on an alternative sieving method for the extraction of light filth from cheeses. The alternative method was developed that is applicable to broad variety of cheeses. A 225 g test portion is dispersed in a solution of 5.7% HCl, Igepal CO-730, and Igepal DM-710. Digested cheese is wet-sieved on a No. 230 sieve. The residue is treated with Tergitol Anionic 4, transferred to 1% sodium lauryl sulfate solution, heated, and maintained at 65 degrees-75 degrees C for 10 min. The residue is washed with these 2 surfactants a maximum of 4 times until it is reduced to an amount that is filterable. The residue is filtered and the filter papers are examined microscopically at a magnification of ca 30x. Average recoveries by 9 collaborators for 3 spike levels of rat hairs (5, 10, and 15) were 80, 68, and 81%, respectively; for insect fragments (5, 15, and 30) recoveries were 97, 90, and 92%, respectively. The alternative sieving method for extraction of light filth from cheeses has been adopted first action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL. PMID:7950417

  20. A parabolic model to control quantum interference in T-shaped molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-09-01

    Quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular devices have drawn increasing attention over the past years due to their unique features observed in the conductance spectrum. For the further development of single molecular devices exploiting QI effects, it is of great theoretical and practical interest to develop simple methods controlling the emergence and the positions of QI effects like anti-resonances or Fano line shapes in conductance spectra. In this work, starting from a well-known generic molecular junction with a side group (T-shaped molecule), we propose a simple graphical method to visualize the conditions for the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti-resonances, in the conductance spectrum. By introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic diagram), we can easily visualize the relation between the electronic parameters and the positions of normal resonant peaks and anti-resonant peaks induced by quantum interference in the conductance spectrum. This parabolic model not only can predict the emergence and energetic position of quantum interference from a few electronic parameters but also can enable one to know the coupling between the side group and the main conduction channel from measurements in the case of orthogonal basis. The results obtained within the parabolic model are validated using density-functional based quantum transport calculations in realistic T-shaped molecular junctions.

  1. Novel Genetic and Molecular Tools for the Investigation and Control of Dengue Virus Transmission by Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Franz, Alexander W E; Clem, Rollie J; Passarelli, A Lorena

    2014-03-01

    Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue virus (DENV) throughout the tropical world. This anthropophilic mosquito species needs to be persistently infected with DENV before it can transmit the virus through its saliva to a new vertebrate host. In the mosquito, DENV is confronted with several innate immune pathways, among which RNA interference is considered the most important. The Ae. aegypti genome project opened the doors for advanced molecular studies on pathogen-vector interactions including genetic manipulation of the vector for basic research and vector control purposes. Thus, Ae. aegypti has become the primary model for studying vector competence for arboviruses at the molecular level. Here, we present recent findings regarding DENV-mosquito interactions, emphasizing how innate immune responses modulate DENV infections in Ae. aegypti. We also describe the latest advancements in genetic manipulation of Ae. aegypti and discuss how this technology can be used to investigate vector transmission of DENV at the molecular level and to control transmission of the virus in the field.

  2. Coherent molecular transistor: Control through variation of the gate wave function

    SciTech Connect

    Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2014-03-21

    In quantum interference transistors (QUITs), the current through the device is controlled by variation of the gate component of the wave function that interferes with the wave function component joining the source and the sink. Initially, mesoscopic QUITs have been studied and more recently, QUITs at the molecular scale have been proposed and implemented. Typically, in these devices the gate lead is subjected to externally adjustable physical parameters that permit interference control through modifications of the gate wave function. Here, we present an alternative model of a molecular QUIT in which the gate wave function is directly considered as a variable and the transistor operation is discussed in terms of this variable. This implies that we specify the gate current as well as the phase of the gate wave function component and calculate the resulting current through the source-sink channel. Thus, we extend on prior works that focus on the phase of the gate wave function component as a control parameter while having zero or certain discrete values of the current. We address a large class of systems, including finite graphene flakes, and obtain analytic solutions for how the gate wave function controls the transistor.

  3. Coherent molecular transistor: control through variation of the gate wave function.

    PubMed

    Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2014-03-21

    In quantum interference transistors (QUITs), the current through the device is controlled by variation of the gate component of the wave function that interferes with the wave function component joining the source and the sink. Initially, mesoscopic QUITs have been studied and more recently, QUITs at the molecular scale have been proposed and implemented. Typically, in these devices the gate lead is subjected to externally adjustable physical parameters that permit interference control through modifications of the gate wave function. Here, we present an alternative model of a molecular QUIT in which the gate wave function is directly considered as a variable and the transistor operation is discussed in terms of this variable. This implies that we specify the gate current as well as the phase of the gate wave function component and calculate the resulting current through the source-sink channel. Thus, we extend on prior works that focus on the phase of the gate wave function component as a control parameter while having zero or certain discrete values of the current. We address a large class of systems, including finite graphene flakes, and obtain analytic solutions for how the gate wave function controls the transistor.

  4. Catalytic cracking of HDPE wastes to liquid fuel in the presence of siliceous mesoporous molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Anita; Majid, Noor Diana Abdul; Yusup, Suzana

    2014-10-01

    A siliceous gel was synthesized at 80°C and aged for 5 days at 120°C before it was dried at 120°C for 16 hours and calcined at 500 and 700°C. The calcined Na-Si-MMS samples were then undergone ion exchange with ammonia solution to form NH4- Si - MMS . All samples were characterized for their physicochemical properties using nitrogen (N2) adsorption-desorption isotherm for surface area and porosity; and temperature programme desorption of ammonia (TPD-NH3) for determination of acidity. The catalytic activity of all samples was tested in pyrolysis of high density polyethylene (HDPE) waste at catalyst to HDPE ratio of 0.2. The organic liquid product (OLP) collected was analysed using gas chromatography (GC). Results show that presence of Na-Si-MMS calcined at 500°C promotes the formation of gasoline-like product while presence of Na-Si-MMS calcined at 700°C promotes the formation of both diesel-like and kerosene-like products. On the other hand, presence of all NH4-Si-MMS catalysts promotes the formation of gasoline-like product. These show that the activation process of Si-MMS has a significant effect on the production of fuel-like product from pyrolysis of HDPE.

  5. Molecular sieve adsorbents and membranes for applications in the production of renewable fuels and chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Rajiv

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF), a new class of porous materials, have emerged as promising candidate for gas storage, separation membrane and chemical sensors. We used secondary growth method to grow microporous metal organic framework (MMOF) films on porous alumina supports. Examination of the film using SEM and XRD showed that the crystals were well inter-grown and preferentially oriented. Gas permeation study showed that membranes were defect free and moderate selectivity was achieved for H2/N2 gas pairs. The next project had to do with ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass as an alternate energy source. However, toxic inhibitors produced from the hydrolysis of biomass decrease ethanol yield during the fermentation process. We demonstrated the use of zeolites for the pretreatment of hydrolyzate in order to remove inhibitors like 5-Hydroxymethylfurfuraldehyde (HMF) and furfural from aqueous solution. Zeolites exhibit preferential adsorption of the inhibitors and in effect improve the ethanol yield during fermentation. Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST) was also used to predict adsorption isotherms for HMF-furfural mixtures using single component adsorption data. We also studied production of HMF, a potential substitute as a building block for plastic and chemical production, from renewable biomass resources. Catalytic dehydration of fructose for HMF production faces problems like low conversion and yield. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) can be used as the solvent as well as the catalyst resulting in high HMF yield. We studied a reaction-separation system for this dehydration reaction where the product (HMF) could be recovered by selective adsorption on solid adsorbents from the reaction mixture.

  6. Reduction of nitrogen oxides with catalytic acid resistant aluminosilicate molecular sieves and ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Pence, Dallas T.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1980-01-01

    Noxious nitrogen oxides in a waste gas stream such as the stack gas from a fossil-fuel-fired power generation plant or other industrial plant off-gas stream is catalytically reduced to elemental nitrogen and/or innocuous nitrogen oxides employing ammonia as reductant in the presence of a zeolite catalyst in the hydrogen or sodium form having pore openings of about 3 to 10 A.

  7. Optimization of Manganese Reduction in Biotreated POME onto 3A Molecular Sieve and Clinoptilolite Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Jami, Mohammed S; Rosli, Nurul-Shafiqah; Amosa, Mutiu K

    2016-06-01

    Availability of quality-certified water is pertinent to the production of food and pharmaceutical products. Adverse effects of manganese content of water on the corrosion of vessels and reactors necessitate that process water is scrutinized for allowable concentration levels before being applied in the production processes. In this research, optimization of the adsorption process conditions germane to the removal of manganese from biotreated palm oil mill effluent (BPOME) using zeolite 3A subsequent to a comparative adsorption with clinoptilolite was studied. A face-centered central composite design (FCCCD) of the response surface methodology (RSM) was adopted for the study. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for response surface quadratic model revealed that the model was significant with dosage and agitation speed connoting the main significant process factors for the optimization. R(2) of 0.9478 yielded by the model was in agreement with predicted R(2). Langmuir and pseudo-second-order suggest the adsorption mechanism involved monolayer adsorption and cation exchanging.

  8. Probing silicon substitution in molecular sieves by plasma desorption mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Stipdonk, M. J.; von Heimburg, S. L.; Schweikert, E. A.

    1998-10-01

    Plasma desorption was used to produce secondary ion mass spectra from samples of unsubstituted and substituted aluminum phosphate materials. The yield of fingerprint ions representative of silicon oxide solids indicates that the incorporation of silicon into the material during synthesis and following calcination occurs via the formation of silicon-rich islands. Complementary X-ray photoelectron data provide supporting evidence that the surface of the substituted aluminum phosphate material becomes silicon rich and phosphorus depleted. No changes in the unsubstituted and substituted material with respect to composition and phase were detected using powder X-ray diffraction.

  9. LOW TEMPERATURE VOC COMBUSTION OVER MANGANESE, COBALT AND ZINC ALPO4 MOLECULAR SIEVES

    SciTech Connect

    Rosemarie Szostak

    2003-03-06

    The objective of this project was to prepare microporous aluminophosphates containing magnesium, manganese, cobalt and zinc (MeAPOs) and to evaluate their performance as oxidation catalysts for the removal of low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from gas streams. The tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) To develop reliable synthesis methods for metal aluminophosphates containing manganese, cobalt and zinc in their framework; (2) To characterize these materials for crystallinity, phase purity, the location and nature of the incorporated metal in the framework; and (3) To evaluate the materials for their catalytic activities in the oxidation of volatile organic environmental pollutants.

  10. Synthesis and application of different phthalocyanine molecular sieve catalyst for oxidative desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Na; Li, Siwen; Wang, Jinyi; Zhang, Ronglan; Gao, Ruimin; Zhao, Jianshe; Wang, Junlong

    2015-05-15

    M{sub 2}(PcAN){sub 2} (M=Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mn) anchored onto W-HZSM-5 (M{sub 2}(PcAN){sub 2}–W-HZSM-5) or the M{sub 2}(PcTN){sub 2} doping W-HZSM-5 (M{sub 2}(PcTN){sub 2}/W-HZSM-5) were prepared and their catalytic performances were tested for oxidative desulfurization in the presence of oxygen. Thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT), and dibenzothiophene (DBT) were considered as sulfur compounds. Among zeolite-based catalysts, the Cu{sub 2}(PcAN){sub 2}–W-HZSM-5 and Cu{sub 2}(PcTN){sub 2}/W-HZSM-5 showed superior desulfurization performance and the activity of selectivity followed the order: T>BT>DBT. The effects of phthalocyanine concentration were studied by UV–Vis and calcination temperature was obtained by TG-DSC for Cu{sub 2}(PcTN){sub 2}/W-HZSM-5. Catalysts were characterized by EA, IR, XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP, and N{sub 2} adsorption. Reaction time, temperature and the amount of catalyst were investigated as the important parameters for optimization of the reaction. Furthermore, a possible process of oxidative desulfurization and the reaction products were proposed. - Graphical abstract: The ODS reaction schematic shows the reaction mechanism of ultra-deep desulfurization. The sulfur compounds are oxidized to their corresponding sulfoxides or sulfones through the use of oxygen and catalysts. The reaction process of ultra-deep desulfurization. - Highlights: • A kind of novel catalyst for deep desulfurization was synthesized. • Cu{sub 2}(PcAN){sub 2}–W-HZSM-5 exhibits excellent catalytic performance for desulfurization. • The reaction conditions that affect desulfurization efficiency are investigated. • The reaction process of model sulfur compounds is proposed.

  11. Selective oxidation of hydrocarbons with O{sub 2} over chromium aluminophosphate-5 molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.D.; Sheldon, R.A.

    1995-04-15

    Chromium-substituted aluminophosphate-5 (CrAPO-5) is a heterogeneous, recyclable catalyst for the liquid phase autooxidation of hydrocarbons. CrAPO-5 catalyzed the autooxidation of cyclohexane at 115-130{degrees}C and 5 bar O{sub 2}, 20 bar air in the presence of a small amount of an alkyl hydroperoxide initiator, to afford cyclohexanone as the major product. Similarly, tetralin and indane were selectively oxidized to a 1-tetralone and 1-indanone, respectively, at 100{degrees}C and 1 bar O{sub 2}. Ethylbenzene was selectively converted to acetophenone, in the presence of sodium-exchanged CrAPO-5, at 130{degrees}C and 1 bar O{sub 2}. The CrAPO-5 catalyst was recycled four times without loss of activity or selectivity in the decomposition of cyclohexyl hydroperoxide. Evidence is presented to support a mechanism involving initial free radical autoxidation of the hydrocarbons followed by selective CrAPO-5-catalyzed intramolecular, heterolytic decomposition of the secondary alkyl hydroperoxide intermediate to the corresponding ketone and water. 26 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Coal precursors for carbon molecular sieves. Quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, O.C.; Sparks, C.R.; Fuller, E.L. Jr.

    1995-12-29

    We have completed the remainder of our experimental work during this work period and have extracted much of the data from the many analyses performed. The temperatures at which selected thermal reactions occur and the temperatures at which monitored gases are released are in the process of being read from the computerized data. The data gleaned from the literature and the data we have gathered will be combined and examined using multiple regression analysis. During the course of our study we performed 55 BET analyses (including 12 fresh coal analyses, 10 coal samples that had been pyrolyzed in helium gas, 24 coal samples that had been activated using He-O2, 5 coal samples activated using He-H2O, and 4 coals samples activated using CO2). The number of BET analyses performed far exceeds the number we had planned when this project was first proposed. These analyses provide information that reveals the effects that factors such as the gas (or gas mixture) used for activation, the maximum temperature reached during activation, grain size, etc., have on the degree to which a coal is activated. These relationships are described, briefly, below. They will be discussed in detail in the Final Report. During this work period the FTIR equipment became available and we completed the FTIR analyses of all twelve (12) coal samples.

  13. Synthesis and application of different phthalocyanine molecular sieve catalyst for oxidative desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Na; Li, Siwen; Wang, Jinyi; Zhang, Ronglan; Gao, Ruimin; Zhao, Jianshe; Wang, Junlong

    2015-05-01

    M2(PcAN)2 (M=Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mn) anchored onto W-HZSM-5 (M2(PcAN)2-W-HZSM-5) or the M2(PcTN)2 doping W-HZSM-5 (M2(PcTN)2/W-HZSM-5) were prepared and their catalytic performances were tested for oxidative desulfurization in the presence of oxygen. Thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT), and dibenzothiophene (DBT) were considered as sulfur compounds. Among zeolite-based catalysts, the Cu2(PcAN)2-W-HZSM-5 and Cu2(PcTN)2/W-HZSM-5 showed superior desulfurization performance and the activity of selectivity followed the order: T>BT>DBT. The effects of phthalocyanine concentration were studied by UV-Vis and calcination temperature was obtained by TG-DSC for Cu2(PcTN)2/W-HZSM-5. Catalysts were characterized by EA, IR, XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP, and N2 adsorption. Reaction time, temperature and the amount of catalyst were investigated as the important parameters for optimization of the reaction. Furthermore, a possible process of oxidative desulfurization and the reaction products were proposed.

  14. Microwave-assisted fast vapor-phase transport synthesis of MnAPO-5 molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Hui; Yao Jianfeng; Ke Xuebin; Zhang Lixiong Xu Nanping

    2009-04-02

    MnAPO-5 was prepared by a microwave-assisted vapor-phase transport method at 180 deg. C in short times. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV-vis spectroscopic measurement, NH{sub 3}-temperature-programmed desorption and esterification reaction. It was found that dry gels prepared with aluminum isopropoxide, phosphoric acid and manganese acetate could be transferred to MnAPO-5 in the vapors of triethylamine and water by the microwave-assisted vapor-phase transport method at 180 deg. C for less than 30 min. The crystallization time was greatly reduced by the microwave heating compared with the conventional heating. The resulting MnAPO-5 exhibited much smaller particle sizes, higher surface areas and slightly higher catalytic activity in the esterification of acetic acid and butyl alcohol than those prepared by the conventional vapor-phase transport method and hydrothermal synthesis.

  15. Textural and structural properties and surface acidity characterization of mesoporous silica-zirconia molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Castellón, E.; Jiménez-López, A.; Maireles-Torres, P.; Jones, D. J.; Rozière, J.; Trombetta, M.; Busca, G.; Lenarda, M.; Storaro, L.

    2003-11-01

    Homogeneous mesoporous zirconium-containing MCM-41 type silica were prepared by supramolecular templating and their textural and structural properties were studied using powder X-ray diffraction, N 2 porosimetry, atomic force microscopy, EXAFS, XPS, and UV-VIS-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Their acid properties were also studied by using IR spectroscopy and by the use of catalytic tests such as the decomposition of isopropanol and the isomerization of 1-butene. The materials prepared show a good degree of crystallinity with a regular ordering of the pores into a hexagonal arrangement and high thermal stability. The specific surface area of the prepared materials decreases as the zirconium content rises. Zirconium atoms are in coordination 7 to 8 and located at the surface of the pores such that a high proportion of the oxygen atoms bonded to zirconium corresponds to surface non-condensed oxygen atoms. Both facts are responsible for the acid properties of the solids that show weak Brønsted and medium strong Lewis acidity.

  16. Preparation, characterization, and catalytic performance of Ta-HMS mesoporous molecular sieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuefeng; Zhang, Like; Gao, Huanxin; Chen, Qingling

    2016-08-01

    Various Ta-HMS (hexagonal mesoporous silica) samples with different Ta content were hydrothermally prepared and characterized by XRD, N2-adsorption, ICP-AES, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The catalytic performance of the samples was also evaluated in the epoxidation of cyclohexene with cumene hydroperoxide as oxidant. The regularity of mesoporous structure decreases while more extraframe Ta ions are formed with increasing the Ta content. Ta-HMS with Ta/Si ratio of 0.015 shows the highest conversion and selectivity in the studied epoxidation reaction. The catalyst can be used for three times without significant activity loss.

  17. Optimization of Manganese Reduction in Biotreated POME onto 3A Molecular Sieve and Clinoptilolite Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Jami, Mohammed S; Rosli, Nurul-Shafiqah; Amosa, Mutiu K

    2016-06-01

    Availability of quality-certified water is pertinent to the production of food and pharmaceutical products. Adverse effects of manganese content of water on the corrosion of vessels and reactors necessitate that process water is scrutinized for allowable concentration levels before being applied in the production processes. In this research, optimization of the adsorption process conditions germane to the removal of manganese from biotreated palm oil mill effluent (BPOME) using zeolite 3A subsequent to a comparative adsorption with clinoptilolite was studied. A face-centered central composite design (FCCCD) of the response surface methodology (RSM) was adopted for the study. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for response surface quadratic model revealed that the model was significant with dosage and agitation speed connoting the main significant process factors for the optimization. R(2) of 0.9478 yielded by the model was in agreement with predicted R(2). Langmuir and pseudo-second-order suggest the adsorption mechanism involved monolayer adsorption and cation exchanging. PMID:26556067

  18. Coherent Control of Molecular Torsion and the Active-space Decomposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Shane Matthew

    This dissertation discusses schemes and applications for the strong-field control of molecular torsions as well as introduces the active-space decomposition method. In the first part, a route to realize general control over the torsional motions of a class of biaryl compounds is proposed. Torsion in biaryl compounds--molecules with two aromatic moieties connected by a bond about which the barrier to rotation is small--mediates the electronic coupling between the two rings in the molecule. Thus, by controlling the torsion angle, one also controls the electron transfer and transport rates, the absorption and emission spectra, and the molecule's chirality. In our scheme, a non-resonant half-cycle pulse interacts with the permanent dipole of only one moiety of the pre-oriented biaryl compound. In the non-adiabatic regime, coherent motion is initiated by the half-cycle pulse. In the adiabatic regime, the torsion angle is tuned by the pulse. By properly choosing the parameters and polarization of the half-cycle pulse, we show that free internal rotation can be started or that the molecular chirality can be inverted. Then, with the aid of optimal control theory, we design "deracemizing" control pulses, i.e., control pulses that convert a racemic mixture into an enantiopure mixture. Finally, we explore the potential for this type of control in a single-molecule pulling experiment. In the second part, we describe the active space decomposition method for computing excited states of molecular dimers. In this method, the dimer's wavefunction is expressed as a linear combination of direct products of orthogonal localized monomer states. The adiabatic dimer states are found by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian in this direct product space. Matrix elements between direct product states are computed directly, without ever explicitly forming the dimer wavefunction, thus enabling calculations of dimers with active space sizes that would be otherwise impossible. The decomposed

  19. Photochromic Spatiotemporal Control of Bubble-Propelled Micromotors by a Spiropyran Molecular Switch.

    PubMed

    Moo, James Guo Sheng; Presolski, Stanislav; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-22

    Controlling the environment in which bubble-propelled micromotors operate represents an attractive strategy to influence their motion, especially when the trigger is as simple as light. We demonstrate that spiropyrans, which isomerize to amphiphilic merocyanines under UV irradiation, can act as molecular switches that drastically affect the locomotion of the micrometer-sized engines. The phototrigger could be either a point or a field source, thus allowing different modes of control to be executed. A whole ensemble of micromotors was repeatedly activated and deactivated by just altering the spiropyran-merocyanine ratio with light. Moreover, the velocity of individual micromotors was altered using a point irradiation source that caused only localized changes in the environment. Such selective manipulation, achieved here with an optical microscope and a photochromic additive in the medium, reveals the ease of the methodology, which can allow micro- and nanomotors to reach their full potential of not just stochastic, but directional controlled motion.

  20. Molecular Control of Atypical Protein Kinase C: Tipping the Balance between Self-Renewal and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Michael L; Prehoda, Kenneth E

    2016-04-10

    Complex organisms are faced with the challenge of generating and maintaining diverse cell types, ranging from simple epithelia to neurons and motile immune cells [1-3]. To meet this challenge, a complex set of regulatory pathways controls nearly every aspect of cell growth and function, including genetic and epigenetic programming, cytoskeleton dynamics, and protein trafficking. The far reach of cell fate specification pathways makes it particularly catastrophic when they malfunction, both during development and for tissue homeostasis in adult organisms. Furthermore, the therapeutic promise of stem cells derives from their ability to deftly navigate the multitude of pathways that control cell fate [4]. How the molecular components making up these pathways function to specify cell fate is beginning to become clear. Work from diverse systems suggests that the atypical Protein Kinase C (aPKC) is a key regulator of cell fate decisions in metazoans [5-7]. Here, we examine some of the diverse physiological outcomes of aPKC's function in differentiation, along with the molecular pathways that control aPKC and those that are responsive to changes in its catalytic activity. PMID:26992354

  1. Orientation Control of Molecular Chains in Polymers Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Horiuchi, Toshihisa; Ishida, Kenji; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2004-07-01

    We successfully controlled the molecular orientation of flat-on lamellar crystals of the ferroelectric copolymer, vinylidenefluoride and trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)), on Pt and Au surfaces utilizing atomic force microscopy (AFM). The orientation was controlled by scanning a cantilever tip in contact with the film surface whose temperature was kept at just below its melting point (Tm). The molecules were stretched in the scan direction and new edge-on crystals were subsequently formed, whose lamellar planes were perpendicular to the scan direction. We also attempted to modify an isotactic poly-1-butene (IPB) thin film and a polyaniline emeraldine base (PANI-EB) thin film utilizing AFM. In the case of IPB film, structures similar to edge-on crystals of P(VDF-TrFE) were obtained when modified with the film temperature kept at just below its Tm. The result strongly suggests that this orientation control technique is also applicable to IPB. On the other hand, in the case of PANI-EB film, we could obtain many ellipsoidal grains in the scanned area. One possible mechanism is that PANI-EB molecular chains were stretched parallel to the modification scan to form fibrils or bundles.

  2. Quantum control of a molecular ionization process by using Fourier-synthesized laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Hideki; Saito, Naoaki

    2015-11-01

    In photoexcitation processes, if the motion of excited electrons can be precisely steered by the instantaneous electric field of an arbitrary waveform of a Fourier-synthesized laser field, the resultant matter response can be achieved within one optical cycle, usually within the attosecond (1 as =10-18s) regime. Fourier synthesis of laser fields has been achieved in various ways. However, the general use of Fourier-synthesized laser fields for the control of matter is extremely limited. Here, we report the quantum control of a nonlinear response of a molecular ionization process by using Fourier-synthesized laser fields. The directionally asymmetric molecular tunneling ionization induced by intense (5.0 ×1012W /c m2) Fourier-synthesized laser fields consisting of fundamental, second-, third-, and fourth-harmonic light achieves the orientation-selective ionization; we utilized the orientation-selective ionization for measurement of the relative phase differences between the fundamental and each harmonic light. Our findings impact not only light-wave engineering but also the control of matter, possibly triggering the creation and establishment of a new methodology that uses Fourier-synthesized laser fields.

  3. Recent advances in molecular medicine techniques for the diagnosis, prevention, and control of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    França, R F O; da Silva, C C; De Paula, S O

    2013-06-01

    In recent years we have observed great advances in our ability to combat infectious diseases. Through the development of novel genetic methodologies, including a better understanding of pathogen biology, pathogenic mechanisms, advances in vaccine development, designing new therapeutic drugs, and optimization of diagnostic tools, significant infectious diseases are now better controlled. Here, we briefly describe recent reports in the literature concentrating on infectious disease control. The focus of this review is to describe the molecular methods widely used in the diagnosis, prevention, and control of infectious diseases with regard to the innovation of molecular techniques. Since the list of pathogenic microorganisms is extensive, we emphasize some of the major human infectious diseases (AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, rotavirus, herpes virus, viral hepatitis, and dengue fever). As a consequence of these developments, infectious diseases will be more accurately and effectively treated; safe and effective vaccines are being developed and rapid detection of infectious agents now permits countermeasures to avoid potential outbreaks and epidemics. But, despite considerable progress, infectious diseases remain a strong challenge to human survival. PMID:23339016

  4. Recent advances in molecular medicine techniques for the diagnosis, prevention, and control of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    França, R F O; da Silva, C C; De Paula, S O

    2013-06-01

    In recent years we have observed great advances in our ability to combat infectious diseases. Through the development of novel genetic methodologies, including a better understanding of pathogen biology, pathogenic mechanisms, advances in vaccine development, designing new therapeutic drugs, and optimization of diagnostic tools, significant infectious diseases are now better controlled. Here, we briefly describe recent reports in the literature concentrating on infectious disease control. The focus of this review is to describe the molecular methods widely used in the diagnosis, prevention, and control of infectious diseases with regard to the innovation of molecular techniques. Since the list of pathogenic microorganisms is extensive, we emphasize some of the major human infectious diseases (AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, rotavirus, herpes virus, viral hepatitis, and dengue fever). As a consequence of these developments, infectious diseases will be more accurately and effectively treated; safe and effective vaccines are being developed and rapid detection of infectious agents now permits countermeasures to avoid potential outbreaks and epidemics. But, despite considerable progress, infectious diseases remain a strong challenge to human survival.

  5. Controlling Internal Organization of Multilayer Poly(methacrylic acid) Hydrogels with Polymer Molecular Weight

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Zavgorodnya, Oleksandra; Ankner, John F.; Kharlampieva, Eugenia

    2015-11-16

    Here, we report on tailoring the internal architecture of multilayer-derived poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) hydrogels by controlling the molecular weight of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVPON) in hydrogen-bonded (PMAA/PVPON) layer-by-layer precursor films. The hydrogels are produced by cross-linking PMAA in the spin-assisted multilayers followed by PVPON release. We found that the thickness, morphology, and architecture of hydrogen-bonded films and the corresponding hydrogels are significantly affected by PVPON chain length. For all systems, an increase in PVPON molecular weight from Mw = 2.5 to 1300 kDa resulted in increased total film thickness. We also show that increasing polymer Mw smooths the hydrogen-bonded film surfaces butmore » roughens those of the hydrogels. Using deuterated dPMAA marker layers in neutron reflectometry measurements, we found that hydrogen-bonded films reveal a high degree of stratification which is preserved in the cross-linked films. We observed dPMAA to be distributed more widely in the hydrogen-bonded films prepared with small Mw PVPON due to the greater mobility of short-chain PVPON. Furthermore, these variations in the distribution of PMAA are erased after cross-linking, resulting in a distribution of dPMAA over about two bilayers for all Mw but being somewhat more widely distributed in the films templated with higher Mw PVPON. Finally, our results yield new insights into controlling the organization of nanostructured polymer networks using polymer molecular weight and open opportunities for fabrication of thin films with well-organized architecture and controllable function.« less

  6. Controlling Internal Organization of Multilayer Poly(methacrylic acid) Hydrogels with Polymer Molecular Weight

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Zavgorodnya, Oleksandra; Ankner, John F.; Kharlampieva, Eugenia

    2015-11-16

    Here, we report on tailoring the internal architecture of multilayer-derived poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) hydrogels by controlling the molecular weight of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVPON) in hydrogen-bonded (PMAA/PVPON) layer-by-layer precursor films. The hydrogels are produced by cross-linking PMAA in the spin-assisted multilayers followed by PVPON release. We found that the thickness, morphology, and architecture of hydrogen-bonded films and the corresponding hydrogels are significantly affected by PVPON chain length. For all systems, an increase in PVPON molecular weight from Mw = 2.5 to 1300 kDa resulted in increased total film thickness. We also show that increasing polymer Mw smooths the hydrogen-bonded film surfaces but roughens those of the hydrogels. Using deuterated dPMAA marker layers in neutron reflectometry measurements, we found that hydrogen-bonded films reveal a high degree of stratification which is preserved in the cross-linked films. We observed dPMAA to be distributed more widely in the hydrogen-bonded films prepared with small Mw PVPON due to the greater mobility of short-chain PVPON. Furthermore, these variations in the distribution of PMAA are erased after cross-linking, resulting in a distribution of dPMAA over about two bilayers for all Mw but being somewhat more widely distributed in the films templated with higher Mw PVPON. Finally, our results yield new insights into controlling the organization of nanostructured polymer networks using polymer molecular weight and open opportunities for fabrication of thin films with well-organized architecture and controllable function.

  7. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhi; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-12

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  8. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  9. Characterization of five subgroups of the sieve element occlusion gene family in Glycine max reveals genes encoding non-forisome P-proteins, forisomes and forisome tails.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Sascia; Ernst, Antonia M; Hawat, Susan; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Noll, Gundula A

    2014-09-01

    P-proteins are structural phloem proteins discussed to be involved in the rapid sealing of injured sieve elements. P-proteins are found in all dicotyledonous and some monocotyledonous plants, but additional crystalloid P-proteins, known as forisomes, have evolved solely in the Fabaceae. Both types are encoded by members of the sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family, which comprises seven phylogenetic subgroups. The Fabaceae-specific subgroup 1 contains genes encoding forisome subunits in e.g. Medicago truncatula, Vicia faba, Dipteryx panamensis and Canavalia gladiata whereas basal subgroup 5 encodes P-proteins in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The function of remaining subgroups is still unknown. We chose Glycine max (soybean) as a model to investigate SEO proteins representing different subgroups in one species. We isolated native P-proteins to determine the SEO protein composition and analyzed the expression pattern, localization and structure of the G. max SEO proteins representing five of the subgroups. We found that subgroup 1 GmSEO genes encode forisome subunits, a member of subgroup 5 encodes a non-forisome P-protein and subgroup 2 GmSEO genes encode the components of forisome tails, which are present in a restricted selection of Fabaceaen species. We therefore present the first molecular characterization of a Fabaceae non-forisome P-protein and the first evidence that forisome tails are encoded by a phylogenetically-distinct branch of the SEO gene family.

  10. Case-control comparison of bacterial and protozoan microorganisms associated with gastroenteritis: application of molecular detection.

    PubMed

    Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, L E S; Dullaert-de Boer, M; Ruijs, G J H M; van der Reijden, W A; van der Zanden, A G M; Weel, J F L; Schuurs, T A

    2015-06-01

    The introduction of molecular detection of infectious organisms has led to increased numbers of positive findings, as observed for pathogens causing gastroenteritis (GE). However, because little is known about the prevalence of these pathogens in the healthy asymptomatic population, the clinical value of these additional findings is unclear. A case-control study was carried out in a population of patients served by general practitioners in the Netherlands. A total of 2710 fecal samples from case and matched control subjects were subjected to multiplex real-time PCR for the 11 most common bacterial and four protozoal causes of GE. Of 1515 case samples, 818 (54%) were positive for one or more target organisms. A total of 49% of the controls were positive. Higher positivity rates in cases compared to controls were observed for Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Clostridium difficile, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli/Shigella spp., enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteroaggregative E. coli, atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, and Giardia lamblia. However, Dientamoeba fragilis and Shiga-like toxigenic E. coli were detected significantly less frequent in cases than in controls, while no difference in prevalence was found for typical EPEC and enterohemorrhagic E. coli. The association between the presence of microorganisms and GE was the weakest in children aged 0 to 5 years. Higher relative loads in cases further support causality. This was seen for Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., enterotoxigenic E. coli, and C. parvum/hominis, and for certain age categories of those infected with C. difficile, enteroaggregative E. coli, and atypical EPEC. For D. fragilis and Shiga-like toxigenic E. coli/enterohemorrhagic E. coli, pathogen loads were lower in cases. Application of molecular diagnostics in GE is rapid, sensitive and specific, but results should be interpreted with care, using clinical and additional background information.

  11. Molecular and cellular control of cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) provides a good experimental system for studying the molecular and functional genomics underlying the ability of plants to defend themselves against microbial pathogens. Cell death is a genetically programmed response that requires specific host cellular factors. Hypersensitive response (HR) is defined as rapid cell death in response to a pathogen attack. Pepper plants respond to pathogen attacks by activating genetically controlled HR- or disease-associated cell death. HR cell death, specifically in incompatible interactions between pepper and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, is mediated by the molecular genetics and biochemical machinery that underlie pathogen-induced cell death in plants. Gene expression profiles during the HR-like cell death response, virus-induced gene silencing and transient and transgenic overexpression approaches are used to isolate and identify HR- or disease-associated cell death genes in pepper plants. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, cytosolic calcium ion and defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid are involved in the execution of pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we summarize recent molecular and cellular studies of the pepper cell death-mediated defense response, highlighting the signaling events of cell death in disease-resistant pepper plants. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cellular functions of pepper cell death response genes will aid the development of novel practical approaches to enhance disease resistance in pepper, thereby helping to secure the future supply of safe and nutritious pepper plants worldwide.

  12. OHMS**: Phytoplasmas dictate changes in sieve-element ultrastructure to accommodate their requirements for nutrition, multiplication and translocation

    PubMed Central

    Musetti, Rita; Pagliari, Laura; Buxa, Stefanie V.; Degola, Francesca; De Marco, Federica; Loschi, Alberto; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; van Bel, Aart J. E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phytoplasmas are among the most recently discovered plant pathogenic microorganisms so, many traits of the interactions with host plants and insect vectors are still unclear and need to be investigated. At now, it is impossible to determine the precise sequences leading to the onset of the relationship with the plant host cell. It is still unclear how phytoplasmas, located in the phloem sieve elements, exploit host cell to draw nutrition for their metabolism, growth and multiplication. In this work, basing on microscopical observations, we give insight about the structural interactions established by phytoplasmas and the sieve element plasma membrane, cytoskeleton, sieve endoplasmic reticulum, speculating about a possible functional role. PMID:26795235

  13. Sieve-based relation extraction of gene regulatory networks from biological literature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Relation extraction is an essential procedure in literature mining. It focuses on extracting semantic relations between parts of text, called mentions. Biomedical literature includes an enormous amount of textual descriptions of biological entities, their interactions and results of related experiments. To extract them in an explicit, computer readable format, these relations were at first extracted manually from databases. Manual curation was later replaced with automatic or semi-automatic tools with natural language processing capabilities. The current challenge is the development of information extraction procedures that can directly infer more complex relational structures, such as gene regulatory networks. Results We develop a computational approach for extraction of gene regulatory networks from textual data. Our method is designed as a sieve-based system and uses linear-chain conditional random fields and rules for relation extraction. With this method we successfully extracted the sporulation gene regulation network in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis for the information extraction challenge at the BioNLP 2013 conference. To enable extraction of distant relations using first-order models, we transform the data into skip-mention sequences. We infer multiple models, each of which is able to extract different relationship types. Following the shared task, we conducted additional analysis using different system settings that resulted in reducing the reconstruction error of bacterial sporulation network from 0.73 to 0.68, measured as the slot error rate between the predicted and the reference network. We observe that all relation extraction sieves contribute to the predictive performance of the proposed approach. Also, features constructed by considering mention words and their prefixes and suffixes are the most important features for higher accuracy of extraction. Analysis of distances between different mention types in the text shows that our choice

  14. Plasmon excitation of supported gold nanoparticles can control molecular release from supramolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Daniela T; Carrillo, Adela I; Scaiano, Juan C

    2013-08-20

    Hybrid mesoporous silica materials containing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been investigated as potential molecular delivery systems. The photophysical properties of AuNPs, particularly their plasmon band transitions, have been used to control the rate of the release of naproxen from the pores of mesoporous silica matrices. Two different approaches were employed to incorporate AuNPs into the silica network: that is, grafting (using 3-aminopropyltriethoxisilane) and direct absorption. In this research, the anti-inflamatory drug naproxen serves as a test molecule, showing how localized plasmon heating could be used to modify diffusion kinetics within mesoporous materials. Beyond naproxen release, the methodology developed could be employed to release other drugs, sensors, or active molecules, not just in medicine, but in many other fields where nanotechnology is leading to many innovative applications. The hybrid materials developed show a new simple system to efficiently control the release of active cargo from mesoporous silica matrices.

  15. Strong-field control over the product branching ratios in molecular dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigsbee, Brandon; Zohrabi, Mohammad; Ablikim, Utuq; Guevara, Nicolais; Carnes, Kevin; Ben-Itzhak, Itzik; Esry, Brett

    2012-06-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of strong-field control over the fragmentation channel in molecular dissociation by intense, single-color laser fields with emphasis on the effect of chirped pulses. In particular, the branching ratio between H+D^+ and H^++D from an HD^+ target is examined as a function of kinetic energy release for 790 nm pulses with intensities on the order of 10^14 W/cm^2 and pulse lengths ranging from 25 to 65 fs. Theoretical calculations based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation are compared to measurements using a coincidence 3-D momentum imaging technique. Both demonstrate that control is indeed possible and depends, as expected, on details of the laser pulse such as its chirp.

  16. Controlled release of the herbicide simazine from computationally designed molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Piletska, Elena V; Turner, Nicholas W; Turner, Anthony P F; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2005-11-01

    The present study describes the development of materials suitable for environmental control of algae. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were used as simazine carriers able to provide the controlled release of simazine into water. Three polymers were designed using computational modelling. The selection of methacrylic acid (MA) and hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEM) as functional monomers was based on results obtained using the Leapfrog algorithm. A cross-linked polymer made without functional monomers was also prepared and tested as a control. The release of simazine from all three polymers was studied. It was shown that the presence of functional monomers is important for polymer affinity and for controlled release of herbicide. The speed of release of herbicide correlated with the calculated binding characteristics. The high-affinity MA-based polymer released approximately 2% and the low-affinity HEM-based polymer released approximately 27% of the template over 25 days. The kinetics of simazine release from HEM-based polymer show that total saturation of an aqueous environment could be achieved over a period of 3 weeks and this corresponds to the maximal simazine solubility in water. The possible use of these types of polymers in the field of controlled release is discussed.

  17. Quantum control of molecular orientation by two-color laser fields.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Hideki; Nakanaga, Taisuke

    2004-03-15

    We demonstrate molecular orientation by using phase-controlled two-color omega+2omega laser pulses with an intensity of 1.0x10(12) W/cm(2) and a pulse duration of 130 fs. The orientation of three iodine-containing molecules (IBr, CH(3)I, and C(3)H(5)I) was monitored by the directional asymmetries of the photofragment angular distribution in dissociative ionization. In all three molecules, the directional asymmetry showed an oscillating behavior dependent on the relative phase difference between omega and 2omega pulses. The phase dependence of the directional asymmetry observed in iodine ions and counterpart ions were out of phase with each other. This result shows that a phase-controlled omega+2omega optical field discriminates between parallel and antiparallel configurations of aligned molecules that have a permanent dipole. This method performed well because (1) molecular orientation can be achieved by all-optical fields; (2) the direction of orientation is easily switched by changing the sign of the quantum interference; and (3) this method is free from any resonance constraint and thus can be applied to any molecule.

  18. [Cloning alphavirus and flavivirus sequences for use as positive controls in molecular diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Camacho, Daría; Reyes, Jesús; Franco, Leticia; Comach, Guillermo; Ferrer, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to obtain a positive control to validate molecular techniques (reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) used in the diagnosis and research of viral infections. From strains of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), Zika virus, and Dengue virus (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV- 3, and DENV-4) viral RNAs were extracted to obtain complementary DNA using RT-PCR from the nsP4 (CHIKV), NS5 (Zika virus), C/prM-M, and 5'UTR-C (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, DENV-4) sequences, which were cloned into pGEM®-T Easy. Cloning was confirmed through colony PCR, from which plasmid DNA was extracted for fragment cloning verification. Cloning of cDNA corresponding to nsP4, NS5, C/prM-M, and 5'UTR-C of the different viral agents was achieved. In conclusion, recombinant plasmids were obtained with each of the sequences specified for further assessment as positive controls in molecular techniques in an effort to avoid the use of cell cultures, which can be costly, time-consuming, and potentially dangerous. PMID:27656926

  19. [Cloning alphavirus and flavivirus sequences for use as positive controls in molecular diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Camacho, Daría; Reyes, Jesús; Franco, Leticia; Comach, Guillermo; Ferrer, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to obtain a positive control to validate molecular techniques (reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) used in the diagnosis and research of viral infections. From strains of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), Zika virus, and Dengue virus (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV- 3, and DENV-4) viral RNAs were extracted to obtain complementary DNA using RT-PCR from the nsP4 (CHIKV), NS5 (Zika virus), C/prM-M, and 5'UTR-C (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, DENV-4) sequences, which were cloned into pGEM®-T Easy. Cloning was confirmed through colony PCR, from which plasmid DNA was extracted for fragment cloning verification. Cloning of cDNA corresponding to nsP4, NS5, C/prM-M, and 5'UTR-C of the different viral agents was achieved. In conclusion, recombinant plasmids were obtained with each of the sequences specified for further assessment as positive controls in molecular techniques in an effort to avoid the use of cell cultures, which can be costly, time-consuming, and potentially dangerous.

  20. Molecular methods for microbiological quality control of meat and meat products: a review.

    PubMed

    Gokulakrishnan, P; Vergis, Jess

    2015-01-01

    Achieving food safety is a global health goal and the food-borne diseases take a major check on global health. Therefore, detection of microbial pathogens in food is the solution to the prevention and recognition of problems related to health and safety. Conventional and standard bacterial detection methods such as culture and colony counting methods and immunology-based methods may take up to several hours or even a few days to yield a result. Obviously, this is inadequate, and recently many researchers are focusing towards the progress of rapid diagnostic methods. The advent of molecular techniques has led to the development of a diverse array of assay for quality control of meat and meat products. Rapid analysis using DNA hybridization and amplification techniques offer more sensitivity and specificity to get results than culture based methods as well as dramatic reduction in the time to get results. Many methods have also achieved the high level automation, facilitating their application as routine sample screening assays. This review is intended to provide an overview of the molecular methods for microbiological quality control of meat and meat products.

  1. Porous aromatic frameworks with anion-templated pore apertures serving as polymeric sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye; Sun, Fuxing; Li, Lina; Cui, Peng; Zhu, Guangshan

    2014-06-01

    Owing to environmental pollution and energy depletion, efficient separation of energy gases has attracted widespread attention. Low-cost and efficient adsorbents for gas separation are greatly needed. Here we report a family of quaternary pyridinium-type porous aromatic frameworks with tunable channels. After carefully choosing and adjusting the sterically hindered counter ions via a facile ion exchange approach, the pore diameters are tuned at an angstrom scale in the range of 3.4-7 Å. The designed pore sizes may bring benefits to capturing or sieving gas molecules with varied diameters to separate them efficiently by size-exclusive effects. By combining their specific separation properties, a five-component (hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide and methane) gas mixture can be separated completely. The porous aromatic frameworks may hold promise for practical and commercial applications as polymeric sieves.

  2. Chip-based optical microscopy for imaging membrane sieve plates of liver scavenger cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, Øystein I.; Øie, Cristina I.; McCourt, Peter; Ahluwalia, Balpreet S.

    2015-08-01

    The evanescent field on top of optical waveguides is used to image membrane network and sieve-plates of liver endothelial cells. In waveguide excitation, the evanescent field is dominant only near the surface (~100-150 nm) providing a default optical sectioning by illuminating fluorophores in close proximity to the surface and thus benefiting higher signal-to-noise ratio. The sieve plates of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are present on the cell membrane, thus near-field waveguide chip-based microscopy configuration is preferred over epi-fluorescence. The waveguide chip is compatible with optical fiber components allowing easy multiplexing to different wavelengths. In this paper, we will discuss the challenges and opportunities provided by integrated optical microscopy for imaging cell membranes.

  3. Reproducibility of a silicone-based test food to masticatory performance evaluation by different sieve methods.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ayala, Alfonso; Vilanova, Larissa Soares Reis; Costa, Marina Abrantes; Farias-Neto, Arcelino

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of the condensation silicone Optosil Comfort® as an artificial test food for masticatory performance evaluation. Twenty dentate subjects with mean age of 23.3±0.7 years were selected. Masticatory performance was evaluated using the simple (MPI), the double (IME) and the multiple sieve methods. Trials were carried out five times by three examiners: three times by the first, and once by the second and third examiners. Friedman's test was used to find the differences among time trials. Reproducibility was determined by the intra-class correlation (ICC) test (α=0.05). No differences among time trials were found, except for MPI-4 mm (p=0.022) from the first examiner results. The intra-examiner reproducibility (ICC) of almost all data was high (ICC≥0.92, p<0.001), being moderate only for MPI-0.50 mm (ICC=0.89, p<0.001). The inter-examiner reproducibility was high (ICC>0.93, p<0.001) for all results. For the multiple sieve method, the average mean of absolute difference from repeated measurements were lower than 1 mm. This trend was observed only from MPI-0.50 to MPI-1.4 for the single sieve method, and from IME-0.71/0.50 to IME-1.40/1.00 for the double sieve method. The results suggest that regardless of the method used, the reproducibility of Optosil Comfort® is high. PMID:24918363

  4. [Sieve-tube plastids of monocotyledons : Comparative investigations of the fine structure and distribution of specific plastids].

    PubMed

    Behnke, H D

    1968-06-01

    Fine-structural investigations of 24 monocotyledons from 21 families and all but one order succeeded in revealing a plastid with cuneate proteinaceous inclusion bodies as being typical of monocot sieve-tubes. Inclusion bodies originate in large numbers during plastid differentiation; they concentrate in the matrix and aggregate around an invisible centre, that mostly lies at one end of the elongated ameboid proplastid. The inclusion-free part of the young plastid contains countless vesicles and short membranes, presumably invaginations of the inner plastid envelope. Proteinaceous inclusion bodies show a crystal-like structure composed of 50-60 Å subunits in straight and parallel order. Besides these crystal-like inclusion bodies sieve-tube plastids of many monocotyledons also contain starch. - Sieve-tube plastids of Nuphar luteum and Nymphaea alba look like plastids in dicotyledon sieve-tubes, starch being their only inclusion.

  5. Molecular and genetic aspects of controlling the soilborne necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia and Pythium.

    PubMed

    Okubara, Patricia A; Dickman, Martin B; Blechl, Ann E

    2014-11-01

    The soilborne necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia and Pythium infect a wide range of crops in the US and worldwide. These pathogens pose challenges to growers because the diseases they cause are not adequately controlled by fungicides, rotation or, for many hosts, natural genetic resistance. Although a combination of management practices are likely to be required for control of Rhizoctonia and Pythium, genetic resistance remains a key missing component. This review discusses the recent deployment of introduced genes and genome-based information for control of Rhizoctonia, with emphasis on three pathosystems: Rhizoctonia solani AG8 and wheat, R. solani AG1-IA and rice, and R. solani AG3 or AG4 and potato. Molecular mechanisms underlying disease suppression will be addressed, if appropriate. Although less is known about genes and factors suppressive to Pythium, pathogen genomics and biological control studies are providing useful leads to effectors and antifungal factors. Prospects for resistance to Rhizoctonia and Pythium spp. will continue to improve with growing knowledge of pathogenicity strategies, host defense gene action relative to the pathogen infection process, and the role of environmental factors on pathogen-host interactions.

  6. Molecular and genetic aspects of controlling the soilborne necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia and Pythium.

    PubMed

    Okubara, Patricia A; Dickman, Martin B; Blechl, Ann E

    2014-11-01

    The soilborne necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia and Pythium infect a wide range of crops in the US and worldwide. These pathogens pose challenges to growers because the diseases they cause are not adequately controlled by fungicides, rotation or, for many hosts, natural genetic resistance. Although a combination of management practices are likely to be required for control of Rhizoctonia and Pythium, genetic resistance remains a key missing component. This review discusses the recent deployment of introduced genes and genome-based information for control of Rhizoctonia, with emphasis on three pathosystems: Rhizoctonia solani AG8 and wheat, R. solani AG1-IA and rice, and R. solani AG3 or AG4 and potato. Molecular mechanisms underlying disease suppression will be addressed, if appropriate. Although less is known about genes and factors suppressive to Pythium, pathogen genomics and biological control studies are providing useful leads to effectors and antifungal factors. Prospects for resistance to Rhizoctonia and Pythium spp. will continue to improve with growing knowledge of pathogenicity strategies, host defense gene action relative to the pathogen infection process, and the role of environmental factors on pathogen-host interactions. PMID:25438786

  7. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Bertrand; Hermanson, Ola

    2010-05-01

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  8. Chemical Reactivity of Formaldehyde in FeAlP0{sub 4} Sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Yeom, Young-Hoon; Ulagappan, Nagappan; Frei, Heinz

    2001-03-12

    Formaldehyde gas loaded into framework Fe aluminophosphate sieve (FeAlP O4-5) at 250 K was found to react with adsorbed H2O, CH3OH, H2O2, or lattice OH groups to yield the corresponding addition product, namely CH2(OH)2, CH3OCH2OH, HO 2CH2OH, or POCH2OH, respectively. Reactions were monitored in situ by static FT-IR spectroscopy, and assignments are based on experiments with CD2=0 and CD3OD. Most efficient was the reaction with H2O2 as indicated by the fact that HO2CH2OH was formed at the exclusion of CH2(OH)2 and POCH2OH when adsorbing formaldehyde onto a sieve loaded with H2O2 and H2O. Methoxymethanol, methanediol, and POCH2OH were stable at 250 K, but dissociated above 0 degrees C under release of formaldehyde. Hydromethyl hydroperoxide disproportionates to formic acid and water. Under 355 nm irradiation in FeAlPO4 sieve, HO2CH2OH was found to undergo efficient photofragmentation.

  9. Impact of fine mesh sieve primary treatment on nitrogen removal in moving bed biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Rusten, B; Razafimanantsoa, V A; Andriamiarinjaka, M A; Otis, C L; Sahu, A K; Bilstad, T

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the effect of selective particle removal during primary treatment on nitrogen removal in moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs). Two small MBBR pilot plants were operated in parallel, where one train treated 2 mm screened municipal wastewater and the other train treated wastewater that had passed through a Salsnes Filter SF1000 rotating belt sieve (RBS) with a 33 µs sieve cloth. The SF1000 was operated without a filter mat on the belt. The tests confirmed that, for the wastewater characteristics at the test plant, Salsnes Filter primary treatment with a 33 µs RBS and no filter mat produced a primary effluent that was close to optimum. Removal of organic matter with the 33 µs sieve had no negative effect on the denitrification process. Nitrification rates improved by 10-15% in the train with 33 µs RBS primary treatment. Mass balance calculations showed that without RBS primary treatment, the oxygen demand in the biological system was 36% higher. Other studies have shown that the sludge produced by RBS primary treatment is beneficial for biogas production and will also significantly improve sludge dewatering of the combined primary and biological sludge. PMID:26819389

  10. Highly Efficient Quantum Sieving in Porous Graphene-like Carbon Nitride for Light Isotopes Separation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Light isotopes separation, such as (3)He/(4)He, H2/D2, H2/T2, etc., is crucial for various advanced technologies including isotope labeling, nuclear weapons, cryogenics and power generation. However, their nearly identical chemical properties made the separation challenging. The low productivity of the present isotopes separation approaches hinders the relevant applications. An efficient membrane with high performance for isotopes separation is quite appealing. Based on first-principles calculations, we theoretically demonstrated that highly efficient light isotopes separation, such as (3)He/(4)He, can be reached in a porous graphene-like carbon nitride material via quantum sieving effect. Under moderate tensile strain, the quantum sieving of the carbon nitride membrane can be effectively tuned in a continuous way, leading to a temperature window with high (3)He/(4)He selectivity and permeance acceptable for efficient isotopes harvest in industrial application. This mechanism also holds for separation of other light isotopes, such as H2/D2, H2/T2. Such tunable quantum sieving opens a promising avenue for light isotopes separation for industrial application. PMID:26813491

  11. Highly Efficient Quantum Sieving in Porous Graphene-like Carbon Nitride for Light Isotopes Separation

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, H2/D2, H2/T2, etc., is crucial for various advanced technologies including isotope labeling, nuclear weapons, cryogenics and power generation. However, their nearly identical chemical properties made the separation challenging. The low productivity of the present isotopes separation approaches hinders the relevant applications. An efficient membrane with high performance for isotopes separation is quite appealing. Based on first-principles calculations, we theoretically demonstrated that highly efficient light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, can be reached in a porous graphene-like carbon nitride material via quantum sieving effect. Under moderate tensile strain, the quantum sieving of the carbon nitride membrane can be effectively tuned in a continuous way, leading to a temperature window with high 3He/4He selectivity and permeance acceptable for efficient isotopes harvest in industrial application. This mechanism also holds for separation of other light isotopes, such as H2/D2, H2/T2. Such tunable quantum sieving opens a promising avenue for light isotopes separation for industrial application. PMID:26813491

  12. Highly Efficient Quantum Sieving in Porous Graphene-like Carbon Nitride for Light Isotopes Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, H2/D2, H2/T2, etc., is crucial for various advanced technologies including isotope labeling, nuclear weapons, cryogenics and power generation. However, their nearly identical chemical properties made the separation challenging. The low productivity of the present isotopes separation approaches hinders the relevant applications. An efficient membrane with high performance for isotopes separation is quite appealing. Based on first-principles calculations, we theoretically demonstrated that highly efficient light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, can be reached in a porous graphene-like carbon nitride material via quantum sieving effect. Under moderate tensile strain, the quantum sieving of the carbon nitride membrane can be effectively tuned in a continuous way, leading to a temperature window with high 3He/4He selectivity and permeance acceptable for efficient isotopes harvest in industrial application. This mechanism also holds for separation of other light isotopes, such as H2/D2, H2/T2. Such tunable quantum sieving opens a promising avenue for light isotopes separation for industrial application.

  13. Impact of fine mesh sieve primary treatment on nitrogen removal in moving bed biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Rusten, B; Razafimanantsoa, V A; Andriamiarinjaka, M A; Otis, C L; Sahu, A K; Bilstad, T

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the effect of selective particle removal during primary treatment on nitrogen removal in moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs). Two small MBBR pilot plants were operated in parallel, where one train treated 2 mm screened municipal wastewater and the other train treated wastewater that had passed through a Salsnes Filter SF1000 rotating belt sieve (RBS) with a 33 µs sieve cloth. The SF1000 was operated without a filter mat on the belt. The tests confirmed that, for the wastewater characteristics at the test plant, Salsnes Filter primary treatment with a 33 µs RBS and no filter mat produced a primary effluent that was close to optimum. Removal of organic matter with the 33 µs sieve had no negative effect on the denitrification process. Nitrification rates improved by 10-15% in the train with 33 µs RBS primary treatment. Mass balance calculations showed that without RBS primary treatment, the oxygen demand in the biological system was 36% higher. Other studies have shown that the sludge produced by RBS primary treatment is beneficial for biogas production and will also significantly improve sludge dewatering of the combined primary and biological sludge.

  14. Molecular-Scale Structural Controls on Nanoscale Growth Processes: Step-Specific Regulation of Biomineral Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; Davis, K. J.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Orme, C. A.

    2001-12-01

    Deciphering the complex strategies by which organisms produce nanocrystalline materials with exquisite morphologies is central to understanding biomineralizing systems. One control on the morphology of biogenic nanoparticles is the specific interactions of their surfaces with the organic functional groups provided by the organism and the various inorganic species present in the ambient environment. It is now possible to directly probe the microscopic structural controls on crystal morphology by making quantitative measurements of the dynamic processes occurring at the mineral-water interface. These observations can provide crucial information concerning the actual mechanisms of growth that is otherwise unobtainable through macroscopic techniques. Here we use in situ molecular-scale observations of step dynamics and growth hillock morphology to directly resolve roles of principal impurities in regulating calcite surface morphologies. We show that the interactions of certain inorganic as well as organic impurities with the calcite surface are dependent upon the molecular-scale structures of step-edges. These interactions can assume a primary role in directing crystal morphology. In calcite growth experiments containing magnesium, we show that growth hillock structures become modified owing to the preferential inhibition of step motion along directions approximately parallel to the [010]. Compositional analyses have shown that Mg incorporates at different levels into the two types of nonequivalent steps, which meet at the hillock corner parallel to [010]. A simple calculation of the strain caused by this difference indicates that we should expect a significant retardation at this corner, in agreement with the observed development of [010] steps. If the low-energy step-risers produced by these [010] steps is perpendicular to the c-axis as seems likely from crystallographic considerations, this effect provides a plausible mechanism for the elongated calcite crystal

  15. Molecular basis of photoprotection and control of photosynthetic light-harvesting.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Andrew A; Liu, Zhenfeng; Broess, Koen; van Oort, Bart; van Amerongen, Herbert; Wang, Chao; Horton, Peter; Robert, Bruno; Chang, Wenrui; Ruban, Alexander

    2005-07-01

    In order to maximize their use of light energy in photosynthesis, plants have molecules that act as light-harvesting antennae, which collect light quanta and deliver them to the reaction centres, where energy conversion into a chemical form takes place. The functioning of the antenna responds to the extreme changes in the intensity of sunlight encountered in nature. In shade, light is efficiently harvested in photosynthesis. However, in full sunlight, much of the energy absorbed is not needed and there are vitally important switches to specific antenna states, which safely dissipate the excess energy as heat. This is essential for plant survival, because it provides protection against the potential photo-damage of the photosynthetic membrane. But whereas the features that establish high photosynthetic efficiency have been highlighted, almost nothing is known about the molecular nature of the dissipative states. Recently, the atomic structure of the major plant light-harvesting antenna protein, LHCII, has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Here we demonstrate that this is the structure of a dissipative state of LHCII. We present a spectroscopic analysis of this crystal form, and identify the specific changes in configuration of its pigment population that give LHCII the intrinsic capability to regulate energy flow. This provides a molecular basis for understanding the control of photosynthetic light-harvesting.

  16. Control of colloidal placement by modulated molecular orientation in nematic cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chenhui; Turiv, Taras; Guo, Yubing; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Wei, Qi-Huo; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2016-01-01

    Colloids self-assemble into various organized superstructures determined by particle interactions. There is tremendous progress in both the scientific understanding and the applications of self-assemblies of single-type identical particles. Forming superstructures in which the colloidal particles occupy predesigned sites and remain in these sites despite thermal fluctuations represents a major challenge of the current state of the art. We propose a versatile approach to directing placement of colloids using nematic liquid crystals with spatially varying molecular orientation preimposed by substrate photoalignment. Colloidal particles in a nematic environment are subject to the long-range elastic forces originating in the orientational order of the nematic. Gradients of the orientational order create an elastic energy landscape that drives the colloids into locations with preferred type of deformations. As an example, we demonstrate that colloidal spheres with perpendicular surface anchoring are driven into the regions of maximum splay, whereas spheres with tangential surface anchoring settle into the regions of bend. Elastic forces responsible for preferential placement are measured by exploring overdamped dynamics of the colloids. Control of colloidal self-assembly through patterned molecular orientation opens new opportunities for designing materials and devices in which particles should be placed in predesigned locations.

  17. Control of colloidal placement by modulated molecular orientation in nematic cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chenhui; Turiv, Taras; Guo, Yubing; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Wei, Qi-Huo; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2016-01-01

    Colloids self-assemble into various organized superstructures determined by particle interactions. There is tremendous progress in both the scientific understanding and the applications of self-assemblies of single-type identical particles. Forming superstructures in which the colloidal particles occupy predesigned sites and remain in these sites despite thermal fluctuations represents a major challenge of the current state of the art. We propose a versatile approach to directing placement of colloids using nematic liquid crystals with spatially varying molecular orientation preimposed by substrate photoalignment. Colloidal particles in a nematic environment are subject to the long-range elastic forces originating in the orientational order of the nematic. Gradients of the orientational order create an elastic energy landscape that drives the colloids into locations with preferred type of deformations. As an example, we demonstrate that colloidal spheres with perpendicular surface anchoring are driven into the regions of maximum splay, whereas spheres with tangential surface anchoring settle into the regions of bend. Elastic forces responsible for preferential placement are measured by exploring overdamped dynamics of the colloids. Control of colloidal self-assembly through patterned molecular orientation opens new opportunities for designing materials and devices in which particles should be placed in predesigned locations. PMID:27652343

  18. Molecular Effects of Irradiation (Cobalt-60) on the Control of Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Luo, Lingyan; Chen, Xieting; Hu, Meiying; Hu, Qiongbo; Gong, Liang; Weng, Qunfang

    2015-01-01

    The effective dose of irradiation to control pest mites in quarantine has been studied extensively, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of the irradiation on mites are largely unknown. In this study, exposure to 400 Gy of γ rays had significant (p < 0.05) effects on the adult survival, fecundity and egg viability of Panonychus citri. The irradiation caused the degradation of the DNA of P. citri adults and damaged the plasma membrane system of the egg, which led to condensed nucleoli and gathered yolk. Additionally, the transcriptomes and gene expression profiles between irradiated and non-irradiated mites were compared, and three digital gene expression libraries were assembled and analyzed. The differentially expressed genes were putatively involved in apoptosis, cell death and the cell cycle. Finally, the expression profiles of some related genes were studied using quantitative real-time PCR. Our study provides valuable information on the changes in the transcriptome of irradiated P. citri, which will facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that cause the sterility induced by irradiation. PMID:26569230

  19. Control of colloidal placement by modulated molecular orientation in nematic cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chenhui; Turiv, Taras; Guo, Yubing; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Wei, Qi-Huo; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2016-09-01

    Colloids self-assemble into various organized superstructures determined by particle interactions. There is tremendous progress in both the scientific understanding and the applications of self-assemblies of single-type identical particles. Forming superstructures in which the colloidal particles occupy predesigned sites and remain in these sites despite thermal fluctuations represents a major challenge of the current state of the art. We propose a versatile approach to directing placement of colloids using nematic liquid crystals with spatially varying molecular orientation preimposed by substrate photoalignment. Colloidal particles in a nematic environment are subject to the long-range elastic forces originating in the orientational order of the nematic. Gradients of the orientational order create an elastic energy landscape that drives the colloids into locations with preferred type of deformations. As an example, we demonstrate that colloidal spheres with perpendicular surface anchoring are driven into the regions of maximum splay, whereas spheres with tangential surface anchoring settle into the regions of bend. Elastic forces responsible for preferential placement are measured by exploring overdamped dynamics of the colloids. Control of colloidal self-assembly through patterned molecular orientation opens new opportunities for designing materials and devices in which particles should be placed in predesigned locations. PMID:27652343

  20. Polyvinylpyrrolidone molecular weight controls silica shell thickness on Au nanoparticles with diglycerylsilane as precursor.

    PubMed

    Vanderkooy, Alan; Brook, Michael A

    2012-08-01

    Several strategies have been described for the preparation of silica-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (SiO(2)-AuNP), which typically suffer from an initial interface between gold and silica that is difficult to control, and layer thicknesses that are very sensitive to minor changes in silane concentration and incubation time. The silica shell thicknesses are normally equal to or larger than the gold particles themselves, which is disadvantageous when the particles are to be used for biodiagnostic applications. We present a facile and reproducible method to produce very thin silica shells (3-5 nm) on gold nanoparticles: the process is highly tolerant to changes in reaction conditions. The method utilized polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) of specific molecular weights to form the interface between gold and silica. The method further requires a nontraditional silica precursor, diglycerylsilane, which efficiently undergoes sol-gel processing at neutrality. Under these conditions, higher molecular weight PVP leads to thicker silica shells: PVP acts as the locus for silica growth into an interpenetrating organic-inorganic hybrid structure.

  1. Oligogermanes as molecular precursors for germanium(0) nanoparticles: Size control and size-dependent fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Schrick, Aaron C.; Weinert, Charles S.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Catenated germanium compounds are employed as molecular precursors for germanium(0) nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles, and their fluorescence spectra, depend on the number of catenated germanium atoms present in the precursor. - Highlights: • We have used oligogermanes for the size-specific synthesis of germanium(0) nanoparticles. • The size of the nanomaterials obtained depends directly on the degree of catenation present in the oligogermane precursor. • The nanoparticles are shown to exhibit size-dependent fluorescence. • Oligogermanes will function as useful precursors for the synthesis of a variety of nanomaterials. - Abstract: Germanium nanoparticles were synthesized in solution from novel oligogermane molecular precursors. The size of the nanoparticles obtained is directly related to the number of catenated germanium atoms present in the oligogermane precursor and the nanoparticles exhibit size-dependent fluorescence. The germanium nanoparticles were also characterized by TEM, powder XRD, FTIR, EDS and XPS methods. This method appears to be a promising new route for the synthesis of germanium nanoparticles since the size of the materials obtained can be controlled by the choice of the oligogermane used as the precursor.

  2. Thermally controlled optical shutter in an inter-molecular hydrogen bonded liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, V. N.; Madhu Mohan, M. L. N.

    2011-11-01

    Novel homologs series of supra-molecular liquid crystals have been isolated. Hydrogen bond is formed between mandelic acid (MD) and various homologs of p- n-alkyloxy benzoic acids (nOBA) and has been confirmed by FTIR studies. Optical polarizing microscopic observations show that all these materials exhibit rich liquid crystallinity with various mesophases. Phase transition temperatures and enthalpy values are experimentally evaluated by DSC studies and the phase diagram of homologous series has been constructed. An interesting feature is the observation of thermally controlled reversible optical shuttering action in one of the homolog, wherein with the increment of temperature the homeotropic texture changes to homogenous texture of smectic F. Thus, this optical shuttering phenomenon is reversible. Optical tilt angle data of two homologs have been fitted to power law equation and it is found that the mean field theory prediction is valid. The light intensity profile in homeotropic region of smectic F in one complex has been experimentally analyzed and a steep sudden decrement of the intensity of light manifesting the distortion of the molecular alignment is experimentally found.

  3. Nosocomial outbreak of Legionnaires' disease: molecular epidemiology and disease control measures.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J M; Latham, R H; Meier, F A; Green, J A; Boshard, R; Mooney, B R; Edelstein, P H

    1987-02-01

    Molecular laboratory techniques were used to study the epidemiology of an outbreak of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. All patient isolates were Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and showed identical plasmid profiles and reactions with serogroup-specific monoclonal antibodies. L pneumophila was also cultured from four of five cooling tower water samples; however, the isolate from only one tower was serogroup 1 of the same subtype as patient isolates. Since the cases were temporally clustered and epidemiologically associated with exposure to cooling tower aerosols, the single cooling tower implicated by molecular analysis was the most likely source of the outbreak. Chlorination of cooling tower ponds has eradicated the epidemic strain. Since potable water also harbored the infecting organism and was the probable source for cooling tower contamination, decontamination of the hospital water system was also undertaken. Superchlorination of hot water holding tanks to 17 ppm on a weekly basis has effectively eradicated L pneumophila from the potable water system and appears to be a reasonable, simple, and relatively inexpensive alternative to previously described methods of control.

  4. Molecular Modeling of Interaction between Diabetic Drug and Antioxidant in Controlling Sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakesh, Leela; Lee, Choon

    2009-09-01

    This article examined the possible protective effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) taurine, quercetin and Syringaldehyde dendritic antioxidants against the oxidative stress induced by diabetic or pre-diabetic patient case due to high sucrose intake by computer simulation. We also compared these results with the well-known diabetic drugs glizipid and Avandia. Towards this understanding we undertook a molecular level computer model in order to study the molecular interaction between high sugar content with antioxidant by varying ratios of sucrose molecules with and without the presence of diabetic drugs. From our study it shows that with the presence of various antioxidant combinations diabetics drugs could be much more beneficial to the patients in terms of its side effects such a heart attack. Many interesting results have been obtained by this study. The application of this driving force may be used to predict the feasibility and benefit in order to understand the high-sucrose diet-induced obesity, which certainly would bring new insights on obesity-related adverse control and may possibly suggest the impact of N-acetylcysteine and syringaldehyde in such cases. Hyperglycemia is an important predictor of cardiovascular mortality in patients with diabetes. We also investigated the hypothesis that diabetes or acute hyperglycemia attenuates the reduction of myocardial infarct size produced by activation of mitochondrial ATP-regulated potassium (KATP) channels. The results indicate that diabetes/hyperglycemia impairs activation of mitochondrial KATP channels.

  5. Molecular bioelectricity: how endogenous voltage potentials control cell behavior and instruct pattern regulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael

    2014-12-01

    In addition to biochemical gradients and transcriptional networks, cell behavior is regulated by endogenous bioelectrical cues originating in the activity of ion channels and pumps, operating in a wide variety of cell types. Instructive signals mediated by changes in resting potential control proliferation, differentiation, cell shape, and apoptosis of stem, progenitor, and somatic cells. Of importance, however, cells are regulated not only by their own Vmem but also by the Vmem of their neighbors, forming networks via electrical synapses known as gap junctions. Spatiotemporal changes in Vmem distribution among nonneural somatic tissues regulate pattern formation and serve as signals that trigger limb regeneration, induce eye formation, set polarity of whole-body anatomical axes, and orchestrate craniofacial patterning. New tools for tracking and functionally altering Vmem gradients in vivo have identified novel roles for bioelectrical signaling and revealed the molecular pathways by which Vmem changes are transduced into cascades of downstream gene expression. Because channels and gap junctions are gated posttranslationally, bioelectrical networks have their own characteristic dynamics that do not reduce to molecular profiling of channel expression (although they couple functionally to transcriptional networks). The recent data provide an exciting opportunity to crack the bioelectric code, and learn to program cellular activity at the level of organs, not only cell types. The understanding of how patterning information is encoded in bioelectrical networks, which may require concepts from computational neuroscience, will have transformative implications for embryogenesis, regeneration, cancer, and synthetic bioengineering. PMID:25425556

  6. Molecular bioelectricity: how endogenous voltage potentials control cell behavior and instruct pattern regulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In addition to biochemical gradients and transcriptional networks, cell behavior is regulated by endogenous bioelectrical cues originating in the activity of ion channels and pumps, operating in a wide variety of cell types. Instructive signals mediated by changes in resting potential control proliferation, differentiation, cell shape, and apoptosis of stem, progenitor, and somatic cells. Of importance, however, cells are regulated not only by their own Vmem but also by the Vmem of their neighbors, forming networks via electrical synapses known as gap junctions. Spatiotemporal changes in Vmem distribution among nonneural somatic tissues regulate pattern formation and serve as signals that trigger limb regeneration, induce eye formation, set polarity of whole-body anatomical axes, and orchestrate craniofacial patterning. New tools for tracking and functionally altering Vmem gradients in vivo have identified novel roles for bioelectrical signaling and revealed the molecular pathways by which Vmem changes are transduced into cascades of downstream gene expression. Because channels and gap junctions are gated posttranslationally, bioelectrical networks have their own characteristic dynamics that do not reduce to molecular profiling of channel expression (although they couple functionally to transcriptional networks). The recent data provide an exciting opportunity to crack the bioelectric code, and learn to program cellular activity at the level of organs, not only cell types. The understanding of how patterning information is encoded in bioelectrical networks, which may require concepts from computational neuroscience, will have transformative implications for embryogenesis, regeneration, cancer, and synthetic bioengineering. PMID:25425556

  7. Polymeric Colloidal Nanostructures Fabricated via Highly Controlled Convective Assembly and Their Use for Molecular Imprinting.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin Chul; Park, Jin Young

    2016-03-23

    In this work, the formation of various polystyrene (PS) colloidal structures on striped PS patterns is demonstrated based on a simple and novel convective assembly method that controls the electrostatic interactions between the PS colloidal particles and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Under the optimal conditions (different withdrawal speeds, channel dimensions, suspension concentrations, etc.), highly ordered structures such as highly close-packed, zigzag, and linear colloidal aggregates are observed. In addition, these colloidal arrangements are used for development of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) sensors with highly improved sensing properties. Using PDMS replicas, three hemispherical poly(methacrylic acid-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (poly(MAA-EGDMA)) MIP films, including planar MIP and non-imprinted polymer (NIP) films, are photopolymerized for detection of trace atrazine in an aqueous solution. From gravimetric quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, a non-close-packed MIP film exhibits highest sensing response (Δf = 932 Hz) to atrazine detection among hemispherical MIP films and shows 6.5-fold higher sensing response than the planar MIP film. In addition, the sensitivity of the MIP sensor is equivalent to -119 Hz/(mol L(-1)). From the ratio of slopes of the calibration curves for the hemispherical MIP and NIP films, the imprinting factor (If) is as high as 11.0. The hemispherical MIP film also shows excellent selectivity in comparison with the sensing responses of other analogous herbicides. As a result, this molecular surface imprinting using PS colloidal arrays is highly efficient for herbicide detection. PMID:26938141

  8. H2A.Z: a molecular rheostat for transcriptional control

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian*, Vidya; Fields*, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The replacement of nucleosomal H2A with the histone variant H2A.Z is critical for regulating DNA-mediated processes across eukaryotes and for early development of multicellular organisms. How this variant performs these seemingly diverse roles has remained largely enigmatic. Here, we discuss recent mechanistic insights that have begun to reveal how H2A.Z functions as a molecular rheostat for gene control. We focus on specific examples in metazoans as a model for understanding how H2A.Z integrates information from histone post-translational modifications, other histone variants, and transcription factors (TFs) to regulate proper induction of gene expression programs in response to cellular cues. Finally, we propose a general model of how H2A.Z incorporation regulates chromatin states in diverse processes. PMID:25705384

  9. Strong molecular traffic control effect in TNU-9 zeolite channel topology.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sakuntala; Harish, Ramanna; Schütz, Gunter M

    2011-12-29

    Reactivity enhancement in a catalytic zeolite grain through molecular traffic control (MTC) rests on the basic notion that the reactant and product molecules prefer to diffuse along different channels inside the grain and therefore do not mutually hinder their transport in and out of the grain. We investigate the conditions of reactivity enhancement in the presence of MTC for a realistic channel topology that describes the pore structure of a TNU-9 zeolite. We compare the output current of an MTC system with a reference system, which does not show any channel selectivity. For a wide range of reaction rates and for different grain sizes, we find that there is a very significant enhancement of reactivity for the MTC system. This effect remains strong as the grain size increases. The mechanism behind reactivity enhancement is argued to be generic rather than being confined to the particular structure of TNU-9.

  10. Controllable growth of layered selenide and telluride heterostructures and superlattices using molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vishwanath, Suresh; Liu, Xinyu; Rouvimov, Sergei; Basile, Leonardo; Lu, Ning; Azcatl, Angelica; Magno, Katrina; Wallace, Robert M.; Kim, Moon; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; et al

    2016-01-06

    Layered materials are an actively pursued area of research for realizing highly scaled technologies involving both traditional device structures as well as new physics. Lately, non-equilibrium growth of 2D materials using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is gathering traction in the scientific community and here we aim to highlight one of its strengths, growth of abrupt heterostructures, and superlattices (SLs). In this work we present several of the firsts: first growth of MoTe2 by MBE, MoSe2 on Bi2Se3 SLs, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) SLs, and lateral junction between a quintuple atomic layer of Bi2Te3 and a triple atomic layer of MoTe2.more » In conclusion, reflected high electron energy diffraction oscillations presented during the growth of TMD SLs strengthen our claim that ultrathin heterostructures with monolayer layer control is within reach.« less

  11. Controlled route to the fabrication of carbon and boron nitride nanoscrolls: A molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perim, Eric; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon nanoscrolls (graphene layers rolled up into papyrus-like tubular structures) are nanostructures with unique and interesting characteristics that could be exploited to build several new nanodevices. However, an efficient and controlled synthesis of these structures was not achieved yet, making its large scale production a challenge to materials scientists. Also, the formation process and detailed mechanisms that occur during its synthesis are not completely known. In this work, using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we discuss a possible route to nanoscrolls made from graphene layers deposited over silicon oxide substrates containing chambers/pits. The scrolling mechanism is triggered by carbon nanotubes deposited on the layers. The process is completely general and can be used to produce scrolls from other lamellar materials, like boron nitride, for instance.

  12. Precision spectroscopy of the molecular ion HD{sup +}: Control of Zeeman shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Bakalov, Dimitar; Korobov, Vladimir; Schiller, Stephan

    2010-11-15

    Precision spectroscopy on cold molecules can potentially enable novel tests of fundamental laws of physics and alternative determination of some fundamental constants. Realizing this potential requires a thorough understanding of the systematic effects that shift the energy levels of molecules. We have performed a complete ab initio calculation of the magnetic field effects for a particular system, the molecular hydrogen ion HD{sup +}. Different spectroscopic schemes have been considered, and several transitions, all accessible by modern radiation sources and exhibiting well controllable or negligible Zeeman shift, have been identified. Thus, HD{sup +} is a candidate for the determination of the ratio of electron-to-nuclear reduced mass, and for tests of its time independence.

  13. Signal control by self-assembly of fluorophores in a molecular beacon--a model study.

    PubMed

    Biner, Sarah M; Kummer, Dominic; Malinovskii, Vladimir L; Häner, Robert

    2011-04-21

    Pyrene excimer fluorescence is efficiently regulated through formation of π-stacked aggregates between dialkynylpyrene (Y) and perylenediimide (E) residues located in the stem region of a molecular beacon (MB). The building blocks form organized, multichromophoric complexes in the native form. Hybridization to the target results in a conformational reorganization of the chromophores. The nature of the aggregates was investigated by changing the number of chromophores and natural base pairs in the beacon stem. The formation of different types of complexes (EYEY→YEY→EY) is revealed by characteristic spectroscopic changes. The data show that signal control is an intrinsic property of the interacting chromophores. The directed assembly of non-nucleosidic chromophores can be used for the generation of an on/off switch of a fluorescence signal. The concept may find applications in various types of light-based input/output systems.

  14. Molecular Interaction Control in Diblock Copolymer Blends and Multiblock Copolymers with Opposite Phase Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Junhan

    2014-03-01

    Here we show how to control molecular interactions via mixing AB and AC diblock copolymers, where one copolymer exhibits upper order-disorder transition and the other does lower disorder-order transition. Linear ABC triblock copolymers possessing both barotropic and baroplastic pairs are also taken into account. A recently developed random-phase approximation (RPA) theory and the self-consistent field theory (SCFT) for general compressible mixtures are used to analyze stability criteria and morphologies for the given systems. It is demonstrated that the copolymer systems can yield a variety of phase behaviors in their temperature and pressure dependence upon proper mixing conditions and compositions, which is caused by the delicate force fields generated in the systems. We acknowledge the financial support from National Research Foundation of Korea and Center for Photofunctional Energy Materials.

  15. Towards precise defect control in layered oxide structures by using oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Baiutti, Federico; Christiani, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this paper we present the atomic-layer-by-layer oxide molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-oxide MBE) which has been recently installed in the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research and we report on its present status, providing some examples that demonstrate its successful application in the synthesis of different layered oxides, with particular reference to superconducting La2CuO4 and insulator-to-metal La2− xSrxNiO4. We briefly review the ALL-oxide MBE technique and its unique capabilities in the deposition of atomically smooth single-crystal thin films of various complex oxides, artificial compounds and heterostructures, introducing our goal of pursuing a deep investigation of such systems with particular emphasis on structural defects, with the aim of tailoring their functional properties by precise defects control. PMID:24995148

  16. Pulse-fluence-specified optimal control simulation with applications to molecular orientation and spin-isomer-selective molecular alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Masataka; Nakashima, Kaoru; Ohtsuki, Yukiyoshi

    2015-12-31

    We propose an optimal control simulation with specified pulse fluence and amplitude. The simulation is applied to the orientation control of CO molecules to examine the optimal combination of THz and laser pulses, and to discriminate nuclear-spin isomers of {sup 14}N{sub 2} as spatially anisotropic distributions.

  17. New insights into the molecular-level control of silica mineralization by diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; Dove, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    microscopy with elements of modern materials chemistry, to directly measure the rate of amorphous silica nucleation on COOH, NH3+, and COOH / NH3+-terminated surfaces under controlled solution conditions. Our results provide new insights into the molecular-level control of silica mineralization in diatoms. We show that differences between substrate-specific nucleation rates are controlled largely by kinetic factors rather than thermodynamic drivers, and that amine-terminated surfaces are not capable of triggering the onset of silica deposition without the synergistic activity of neighboring negatively charged species on the surface or in solution (e.g. carboxyl or phosphoryl groups). In light of this result we conclude that sites on the organic matrix that have phosphate and amine moieties in close proximity serve not only as contact points between the constituent macromolecules in the matrix, but also as initial sites of silica deposition.

  18. Sub-10-fs control of dissociation pathways in the hydrogen molecular ion with a few-pulse attosecond pulse train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabekawa, Yasuo; Furukawa, Yusuke; Okino, Tomoya; Amani Eilanlou, A.; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2016-09-01

    The control of the electronic states of a hydrogen molecular ion by photoexcitation is considerably difficult because it requires multiple sub-10 fs light pulses in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) wavelength region with a sufficiently high intensity. Here, we demonstrate the control of the dissociation pathway originating from the 2pσu electronic state against that originating from the 2pπu electronic state in a hydrogen molecular ion by using a pair of attosecond pulse trains in the XUV wavelength region with a train-envelope duration of ~4 fs. The switching time from the peak to the valley in the oscillation caused by the vibrational wavepacket motion in the 1sσg ground electronic state is only 8 fs. This result can be classified as the fastest control, to the best of our knowledge, of a molecular reaction in the simplest molecule on the basis of the XUV-pump and XUV-probe scheme.

  19. Control of the molecular degradation of hyaluronic acid hydrogels for tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun Ju; Kang, Sun-Woong; Kim, Byung-Soo; Jiang, Ge; Cho, Il Hwan; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2008-09-01

    A novel protocol to control the molecular degradation of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels was successfully developed for tissue augmentation applications. HA has a different conformational structure in water and organic solvent, and the carboxyl group of HA is known to be the recognition site of hyaluronidase and HA receptors. Based on these findings, HA was chemically modified by grafting adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) to the carboxyl group of HA in the water to prepare HA-ADH(WATER) and in the mixed solvent of water and ethanol to prepare degradation-controlled HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL). Three kinds of HA hydrogels were prepared by the crosslinking of HA-ADH(WATER) or HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL) with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate, and by the crosslinking of HA-OH with divinyl sulfone (DVS). In vitro and in vivo degradation tests showed that HA-DVS hydrogels were degraded most rapidly, followed by HA-ADH(WATER) hydrogels and HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL) hydrogels. There was no adverse effect during and after in vivo degradation tests. All of the HA hydrogel samples appeared to be biocompatible, according to the histological analysis with hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue. PMID:18022803

  20. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.