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Sample records for molecular signature multiplicity

  1. Systems Analysis of Immunity to Influenza Vaccination across Multiple Years and in Diverse Populations Reveals Shared Molecular Signatures.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Helder I; Hagan, Thomas; Duraisingham, Sai S; Lee, Eva K; Kwissa, Marcin; Rouphael, Nadine; Frasca, Daniela; Gersten, Merril; Mehta, Aneesh K; Gaujoux, Renaud; Li, Gui-Mei; Gupta, Shakti; Ahmed, Rafi; Mulligan, Mark J; Shen-Orr, Shai; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Subramaniam, Shankar; Pulendran, Bali

    2015-12-15

    Systems approaches have been used to describe molecular signatures driving immunity to influenza vaccination in humans. Whether such signatures are similar across multiple seasons and in diverse populations is unknown. We applied systems approaches to study immune responses in young, elderly, and diabetic subjects vaccinated with the seasonal influenza vaccine across five consecutive seasons. Signatures of innate immunity and plasmablasts correlated with and predicted influenza antibody titers at 1 month after vaccination with >80% accuracy across multiple seasons but were not associated with the longevity of the response. Baseline signatures of lymphocyte and monocyte inflammation were positively and negatively correlated, respectively, with antibody responses at 1 month. Finally, integrative analysis of microRNAs and transcriptomic profiling revealed potential regulators of vaccine immunity. These results identify shared vaccine-induced signatures across multiple seasons and in diverse populations and might help guide the development of next-generation vaccines that provide persistent immunity against influenza.

  2. Comparison of molecular signatures from multiple skin diseases identifies mechanisms of immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inkeles, Megan S; Scumpia, Philip O; Swindell, William R; Lopez, David; Teles, Rosane M B; Graeber, Thomas G; Meller, Stephan; Homey, Bernhard; Elder, James T; Gilliet, Michel; Modlin, Robert L; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    The ability to obtain gene expression profiles from human disease specimens provides an opportunity to identify relevant gene pathways, but is limited by the absence of data sets spanning a broad range of conditions. Here, we analyzed publicly available microarray data from 16 diverse skin conditions in order to gain insight into disease pathogenesis. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering separated samples by disease as well as common cellular and molecular pathways. Disease-specific signatures were leveraged to build a multi-disease classifier, which predicted the diagnosis of publicly and prospectively collected expression profiles with 93% accuracy. In one sample, the molecular classifier differed from the initial clinical diagnosis and correctly predicted the eventual diagnosis as the clinical presentation evolved. Finally, integration of IFN-regulated gene programs with the skin database revealed a significant inverse correlation between IFN-β and IFN-γ programs across all conditions. Our study provides an integrative approach to the study of gene signatures from multiple skin conditions, elucidating mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. In addition, these studies provide a framework for developing tools for personalized medicine toward the precise prediction, prevention, and treatment of disease on an individual level.

  3. Are there molecular signatures?

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes molecular signatures and mutational spectrum analysis. The mutation spectrum is defined as the type and location of DNA base change. There are currently about five well documented cases. Mutations and radon-associated tumors are discussed.

  4. Integrating multiple molecular sources into a clinical risk prediction signature by extracting complementary information.

    PubMed

    Hieke, Stefanie; Benner, Axel; Schlenl, Richard F; Schumacher, Martin; Bullinger, Lars; Binder, Harald

    2016-08-30

    High-throughput technology allows for genome-wide measurements at different molecular levels for the same patient, e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and gene expression. Correspondingly, it might be beneficial to also integrate complementary information from different molecular levels when building multivariable risk prediction models for a clinical endpoint, such as treatment response or survival. Unfortunately, such a high-dimensional modeling task will often be complicated by a limited overlap of molecular measurements at different levels between patients, i.e. measurements from all molecular levels are available only for a smaller proportion of patients. We propose a sequential strategy for building clinical risk prediction models that integrate genome-wide measurements from two molecular levels in a complementary way. To deal with partial overlap, we develop an imputation approach that allows us to use all available data. This approach is investigated in two acute myeloid leukemia applications combining gene expression with either SNP or DNA methylation data. After obtaining a sparse risk prediction signature e.g. from SNP data, an automatically selected set of prognostic SNPs, by componentwise likelihood-based boosting, imputation is performed for the corresponding linear predictor by a linking model that incorporates e.g. gene expression measurements. The imputed linear predictor is then used for adjustment when building a prognostic signature from the gene expression data. For evaluation, we consider stability, as quantified by inclusion frequencies across resampling data sets. Despite an extremely small overlap in the application example with gene expression and SNPs, several genes are seen to be more stably identified when taking the (imputed) linear predictor from the SNP data into account. In the application with gene expression and DNA methylation, prediction performance with respect to survival also indicates that the proposed approach might

  5. Raman spectroscopy explores molecular structural signatures of hidden materials in depth: Universal Multiple Angle Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sil, Sanchita; Umapathy, Siva

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive 3D imaging in materials and medical research involves methodologies such as X-ray imaging, MRI, fluorescence and optical coherence tomography, NIR absorption imaging, etc., providing global morphological/density/absorption changes of the hidden components. However, molecular information of such buried materials has been elusive. In this article we demonstrate observation of molecular structural information of materials hidden/buried in depth using Raman scattering. Typically, Raman spectroscopic observations are made at fixed collection angles, such as, 90°, 135°, and 180°, except in spatially offset Raman scattering (SORS) (only back scattering based collection of photons) and transmission techniques. Such specific collection angles restrict the observations of Raman signals either from or near the surface of the materials. Universal Multiple Angle Raman Spectroscopy (UMARS) presented here employs the principle of (a) penetration depth of photons and then diffuse propagation through non-absorbing media by multiple scattering and (b) detection of signals from all the observable angles. PMID:24930768

  6. Signature molecular descriptor : advanced applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the development of the Signature Molecular Descriptor (or Signature) for use in the solution of inverse design problems as well as in highthroughput screening applications. The ultimate goal of using Signature is to identify novel and non-intuitive chemical structures with optimal predicted properties for a given application. We demonstrate this in three studies: green solvent design, glucocorticoid receptor ligand design and the design of inhibitors for Factor XIa. In many areas of engineering, compounds are designed and/or modified in incremental ways which rely upon heuristics or institutional knowledge. Often multiple experiments are performed and the optimal compound is identified in this brute-force fashion. Perhaps a traditional chemical scaffold is identified and movement of a substituent group around a ring constitutes the whole of the design process. Also notably, a chemical being evaluated in one area might demonstrate properties very attractive in another area and serendipity was the mechanism for solution. In contrast to such approaches, computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) looks to encompass both experimental and heuristic-based knowledge into a strategy that will design a molecule on a computer to meet a given target. Depending on the algorithm employed, the molecule which is designed might be quite novel (re: no CAS registration number) and/or non-intuitive relative to what is known about the problem at hand. While CAMD is a fairly recent strategy (dating to the early 1980s), it contains a variety of bottlenecks and limitations which have prevented the technique from garnering more attention in the academic, governmental and industrial institutions. A main reason for this is how the molecules are described in the computer. This step can control how models are developed for the properties of interest on a given problem as well as how to go from an output of the algorithm to an actual chemical structure. This report

  7. Schizophrenia-associated methylomic variation: molecular signatures of disease and polygenic risk burden across multiple brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Joana; Hannon, Eilis; Dempster, Emma; Pidsley, Ruth; Macdonald, Ruby; Knox, Olivia; Spiers, Helen; Troakes, Claire; Al-Saraj, Safa; Turecki, Gustavo; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Genetic association studies provide evidence for a substantial polygenic component to schizophrenia, although the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the disorder remain largely undefined. Building on recent studies supporting a role for developmentally regulated epigenetic variation in the molecular aetiology of schizophrenia, this study aimed to identify epigenetic variation associated with both a diagnosis of schizophrenia and elevated polygenic risk burden for the disease across multiple brain regions. Genome-wide DNA methylation was quantified in 262 post-mortem brain samples, representing tissue from four brain regions (prefrontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum) from 41 schizophrenia patients and 47 controls. We identified multiple disease-associated and polygenic risk score-associated differentially methylated positions and regions, which are not enriched in genomic regions identified in genetic studies of schizophrenia and do not reflect direct genetic effects on DNA methylation. Our study represents the first analysis of epigenetic variation associated with schizophrenia across multiple brain regions and highlights the utility of polygenic risk scores for identifying molecular pathways associated with aetiological variation in complex disease. PMID:28011714

  8. Molecular signatures of major depression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Na; Chang, Simon; Li, Yihan; Li, Qibin; Hu, Jingchu; Liang, Jieqin; Song, Li; Kretzschmar, Warren; Gan, Xiangchao; Nicod, Jerome; Rivera, Margarita; Deng, Hong; Du, Bo; Li, Keqing; Sang, Wenhu; Gao, Jingfang; Gao, Shugui; Ha, Baowei; Ho, Hung-Yao; Hu, Chunmei; Hu, Jian; Hu, Zhenfei; Huang, Guoping; Jiang, Guoqing; Jiang, Tao; Jin, Wei; Li, Gongying; Li, Kan; Li, Yi; Li, Yingrui; Li, Youhui; Lin, Yu-Ting; Liu, Lanfen; Liu, Tiebang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yuan; Lu, Yao; Lv, Luxian; Meng, Huaqing; Qian, Puyi; Sang, Hong; Shen, Jianhua; Shi, Jianguo; Sun, Jing; Tao, Ming; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Jian; Wang, Linmao; Wang, Xueyi; Wang, Xumei; Yang, Huanming; Yang, Lijun; Yin, Ye; Zhang, Jinbei; Zhang, Kerang; Sun, Ning; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhong, Hui; Breen, Gerome; Wang, Jun; Marchini, Jonathan; Chen, Yiping; Xu, Qi; Xu, Xun; Mott, Richard; Huang, Guo-Jen; Kendler, Kenneth; Flint, Jonathan

    2015-05-04

    Adversity, particularly in early life, can cause illness. Clues to the responsible mechanisms may lie with the discovery of molecular signatures of stress, some of which include alterations to an individual's somatic genome. Here, using genome sequences from 11,670 women, we observed a highly significant association between a stress-related disease, major depression, and the amount of mtDNA (p = 9.00 × 10(-42), odds ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29-1.37]) and telomere length (p = 2.84 × 10(-14), odds ratio 0.85 [95% CI = 0.81-0.89]). While both telomere length and mtDNA amount were associated with adverse life events, conditional regression analyses showed the molecular changes were contingent on the depressed state. We tested this hypothesis with experiments in mice, demonstrating that stress causes both molecular changes, which are partly reversible and can be elicited by the administration of corticosterone. Together, these results demonstrate that changes in the amount of mtDNA and telomere length are consequences of stress and entering a depressed state. These findings identify increased amounts of mtDNA as a molecular marker of MD and have important implications for understanding how stress causes the disease.

  9. Molecular Signatures of Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Na; Chang, Simon; Li, Yihan; Li, Qibin; Hu, Jingchu; Liang, Jieqin; Song, Li; Kretzschmar, Warren; Gan, Xiangchao; Nicod, Jerome; Rivera, Margarita; Deng, Hong; Du, Bo; Li, Keqing; Sang, Wenhu; Gao, Jingfang; Gao, Shugui; Ha, Baowei; Ho, Hung-Yao; Hu, Chunmei; Hu, Jian; Hu, Zhenfei; Huang, Guoping; Jiang, Guoqing; Jiang, Tao; Jin, Wei; Li, Gongying; Li, Kan; Li, Yi; Li, Yingrui; Li, Youhui; Lin, Yu-Ting; Liu, Lanfen; Liu, Tiebang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yuan; Lu, Yao; Lv, Luxian; Meng, Huaqing; Qian, Puyi; Sang, Hong; Shen, Jianhua; Shi, Jianguo; Sun, Jing; Tao, Ming; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Jian; Wang, Linmao; Wang, Xueyi; Wang, Xumei; Yang, Huanming; Yang, Lijun; Yin, Ye; Zhang, Jinbei; Zhang, Kerang; Sun, Ning; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhong, Hui; Breen, Gerome; Wang, Jun; Marchini, Jonathan; Chen, Yiping; Xu, Qi; Xu, Xun; Mott, Richard; Huang, Guo-Jen; Kendler, Kenneth; Flint, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adversity, particularly in early life, can cause illness. Clues to the responsible mechanisms may lie with the discovery of molecular signatures of stress, some of which include alterations to an individual’s somatic genome. Here, using genome sequences from 11,670 women, we observed a highly significant association between a stress-related disease, major depression, and the amount of mtDNA (p = 9.00 × 10−42, odds ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29–1.37]) and telomere length (p = 2.84 × 10−14, odds ratio 0.85 [95% CI = 0.81–0.89]). While both telomere length and mtDNA amount were associated with adverse life events, conditional regression analyses showed the molecular changes were contingent on the depressed state. We tested this hypothesis with experiments in mice, demonstrating that stress causes both molecular changes, which are partly reversible and can be elicited by the administration of corticosterone. Together, these results demonstrate that changes in the amount of mtDNA and telomere length are consequences of stress and entering a depressed state. These findings identify increased amounts of mtDNA as a molecular marker of MD and have important implications for understanding how stress causes the disease. PMID:25913401

  10. Molecular signatures of vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn; Lindqvist, Madelene; Harandi, Ali M

    2015-09-29

    Mass vaccination has saved millions of human lives and improved the quality of life in both developing and developed countries. The emergence of new pathogens and inadequate protection conferred by some of the existing vaccines such as vaccines for tuberculosis, influenza and pertussis especially in certain age groups have resulted in a move from empirically developed vaccines toward more pathogen tailored and rationally engineered vaccines. A deeper understanding of the interaction of innate and adaptive immunity at molecular level enables the development of vaccines that selectively target certain type of immune responses without excessive reactogenicity. Adjuvants constitute an imperative element of modern vaccines. Although a variety of candidate adjuvants have been evaluated in the past few decades, only a limited number of vaccine adjuvants are currently available for human use. A better understanding of the mode of action of adjuvants is pivotal to harness the potential of existing and new adjuvants in shaping a desired immune response. Recent advancement in systems biology powered by the emerging cutting edge omics technology has led to the identification of molecular signatures rapidly induced after vaccination in the blood that correlate and predict a later protective immune response or vaccine safety. This can pave ways to prospectively determine the potency and safety of vaccines and adjuvants. This review is intended to highlight the importance of big data analysis in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms of actions of adjuvants to inform rational development of future human vaccines.

  11. Molecular signatures of ribosomal evolution.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Elijah; Sethi, Anurag; Montoya, Jonathan; Woese, Carl R; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2008-09-16

    Ribosomal signatures, idiosyncrasies in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and/or proteins, are characteristic of the individual domains of life. As such, insight into the early evolution of the domains can be gained from a comparative analysis of their respective signatures in the translational apparatus. In this work, we identify signatures in both the sequence and structure of the rRNA and analyze their contributions to the universal phylogenetic tree using both sequence- and structure-based methods. Domain-specific ribosomal proteins can be considered signatures in their own right. Although it is commonly assumed that they developed after the universal ribosomal proteins, we present evidence that at least one may have been present before the divergence of the organismal lineages. We find correlations between the rRNA signatures and signatures in the ribosomal proteins showing that the rRNA signatures coevolved with both domain-specific and universal ribosomal proteins. Finally, we show that the genomic organization of the universal ribosomal components contains these signatures as well. From these studies, we propose the ribosomal signatures are remnants of an evolutionary-phase transition that occurred as the cell lineages began to coalesce and so should be reflected in corresponding signatures throughout the fabric of the cell and its genome.

  12. Molecular signatures of ribosomal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Elijah; Sethi, Anurag; Montoya, Jonathan; Woese, Carl R.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2008-01-01

    Ribosomal signatures, idiosyncrasies in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and/or proteins, are characteristic of the individual domains of life. As such, insight into the early evolution of the domains can be gained from a comparative analysis of their respective signatures in the translational apparatus. In this work, we identify signatures in both the sequence and structure of the rRNA and analyze their contributions to the universal phylogenetic tree using both sequence- and structure-based methods. Domain-specific ribosomal proteins can be considered signatures in their own right. Although it is commonly assumed that they developed after the universal ribosomal proteins, we present evidence that at least one may have been present before the divergence of the organismal lineages. We find correlations between the rRNA signatures and signatures in the ribosomal proteins showing that the rRNA signatures coevolved with both domain-specific and universal ribosomal proteins. Finally, we show that the genomic organization of the universal ribosomal components contains these signatures as well. From these studies, we propose the ribosomal signatures are remnants of an evolutionary-phase transition that occurred as the cell lineages began to coalesce and so should be reflected in corresponding signatures throughout the fabric of the cell and its genome. PMID:18768810

  13. Quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature with constant size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Li, Zhenli

    2016-09-01

    Using quantum homomorphic signature in quantum network, we propose a quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme. Different from classical signature and current quantum signature schemes, the multi-signature proposed in our scheme is not generated by simply putting the individual signatures together, but by aggregating the individual signatures based on homomorphic property. Therefore, the size of the multi-signature is constant. Furthermore, based on a wide range of investigation for the security of existing quantum signature protocols, our protocol is designed to resist possible forgery attacks against signature and message from the various attack sources and disavowal attacks from participants.

  14. Molecular signature in HCV-positive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    De Re, Valli; Caggiari, Laura; Garziera, Marica; De Zorzi, Mariangela; Repetto, Ombretta

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive, single-stranded RNA virus, which has been associated to different subtypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Cumulative evidence suggests an HCV-related antigen driven process in the B-NHL development. The underlying molecular signature associated to HCV-related B-NHL has to date remained obscure. In this review, we discuss the recent developments in this field with a special mention to different sets of genes whose expression is associated with BCR coupled to Blys signaling which in turn was found to be linked to B-cell maturation stages and NF-κb transcription factor. Even if recent progress on HCV-B-NHL signature has been made, the precise relationship between HCV and lymphoma development and phenotype signature remain to be clarified.

  15. Does radiation cause molecular signatures?

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.P.

    1997-03-01

    Several classes of genes are mutated during the progression to cancer. The oncogenes include ras, myc and c-erbB-2; suppressor genes include p53, Rb, p16, and APC; and cancer susceptibility genes include hMSH2. Germline mutations in many of these genes produce cancer syndromes such as retinoblastoma, Li-Fraumeni Sydrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or HNPCC (hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer). Sporadic tumors frequently contain somatic mutations in the same genes. Analysis of the mutational spectrum of sporadic and inherited tumors can provide clues to etiology and insight into molecular pathogenesis. The character and distribution of mutations comprise a mutational spectrum. Mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene occur commonly in human cancer, and nearly 5000 have been reported to date. The p53 mutational spectrum is dominated by missense point mutations (84%) and complemented by insertions/deletions (10%) and non-sense mutations (7%). Most mutations occur within evolutionarily conserved residues within the DNA-binding domain, and the pattern of mutational hotspots provided the first clue to p53 function: it is a transcription factor that binds to a DNA consensus sequence. Elucidation of the crystal structure of the central DNA-binding domain has uncovered the significance of the mutational hotspots. These insights suggest strategies for rational drug design, for example, constructing `restoring` compounds that complete the wild type hydrogen bonds missing in the mutant p53 protein. Mutational spectrum analysis is a new tool for probing cancer etiology and pathogensis. Using current technology, the p53 tumor suppressor gene is the most informative target sequence, but the next generation of rapid sequencing technologies will expand the range of testable cancer genes and fill new mutational databases.

  16. [Molecular signatures of breast cancer: What clinical utility?].

    PubMed

    Delaloge, Suzette; Saghatchian, Mahasti; Ghouadni, Amal; Fekih, Mahmoud; André, Fabrice

    2015-06-01

    The role of molecular signatures in the adjuvant management of breast cancer remains a debated topic. Discussions should take into account the level of scientific validation, the impact on practice, the expected benefits and financing issues. This article presents the key points for a rational use of commercial molecular signatures.

  17. Reactive oxygen species-associated molecular signature predicts survival in patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bime, Christian; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Ting; Slepian, Marvin J; Garcia, Joe G N; Hecker, Louise

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis-related multiple organ dysfunction syndrome is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. There is overwhelming evidence that oxidative stress plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated multiple organ failure; however, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-associated biomarkers and/or diagnostics that define mortality or predict survival in sepsis are lacking. Lung or peripheral blood gene expression analysis has gained increasing recognition as a potential prognostic and/or diagnostic tool. The objective of this study was to identify ROS-associated biomarkers predictive of survival in patients with sepsis. In-silico analyses of expression profiles allowed the identification of a 21-gene ROS-associated molecular signature that predicts survival in sepsis patients. Importantly, this signature performed well in a validation cohort consisting of sepsis patients aggregated from distinct patient populations recruited from different sites. Our signature outperforms randomly generated signatures of the same signature gene size. Our findings further validate the critical role of ROSs in the pathogenesis of sepsis and provide a novel gene signature that predicts survival in sepsis patients. These results also highlight the utility of peripheral blood molecular signatures as biomarkers for predicting mortality risk in patients with sepsis, which could facilitate the development of personalized therapies.

  18. Reactive oxygen species–associated molecular signature predicts survival in patients with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tong; Wang, Ting; Slepian, Marvin J.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Hecker, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sepsis-related multiple organ dysfunction syndrome is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. There is overwhelming evidence that oxidative stress plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated multiple organ failure; however, reactive oxygen species (ROS)–associated biomarkers and/or diagnostics that define mortality or predict survival in sepsis are lacking. Lung or peripheral blood gene expression analysis has gained increasing recognition as a potential prognostic and/or diagnostic tool. The objective of this study was to identify ROS-associated biomarkers predictive of survival in patients with sepsis. In-silico analyses of expression profiles allowed the identification of a 21-gene ROS-associated molecular signature that predicts survival in sepsis patients. Importantly, this signature performed well in a validation cohort consisting of sepsis patients aggregated from distinct patient populations recruited from different sites. Our signature outperforms randomly generated signatures of the same signature gene size. Our findings further validate the critical role of ROSs in the pathogenesis of sepsis and provide a novel gene signature that predicts survival in sepsis patients. These results also highlight the utility of peripheral blood molecular signatures as biomarkers for predicting mortality risk in patients with sepsis, which could facilitate the development of personalized therapies. PMID:27252846

  19. A Systems Biological Approach Reveals Multiple Crosstalk Mechanism between Gram-Positive and Negative Bacterial Infections: An Insight into Core Mechanism and Unique Molecular Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Thangam, Berla; Ahmed, Shiek S. S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections remain a major threat and a leading cause of death worldwide. Most of the bacterial infections are caused by gram-positive and negative bacteria, which are recognized by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4, respectively. Activation of these TLRs initiates multiple pathways that subsequently lead to effective immune response. Although, both the TLRs share common signaling mechanism yet they may exhibit specificity as well, resulting in the release of diverse range of inflammatory mediators which could be used as candidate biomolecules for bacterial infections. Results We adopted systems biological approach to identify signaling pathways mediated by TLRs to determine candidate molecules associated with bacterial infections. We used bioinformatics concepts, including literature mining to construct protein-protein interaction network, prioritization of TLRs specific nodes using microarray data and pathway analysis. Our constructed PPI network for TLR 2 (nodes: 4091 and edges: 66068) and TLR 4 (node: 4076 and edges: 67898) showed 3207 common nodes, indicating that both the TLRs might share similar signaling events that are attributed to cell migration, MAPK pathway and several inflammatory cascades. Our results propose the potential collaboration between the shared signaling pathways of both the receptors may enhance the immune response against invading pathogens. Further, to identify candidate molecules, the TLRs specific nodes were prioritized using microarray differential expressed genes. Of the top prioritized TLR 2 molecules, 70% were co-expressed. A similar trend was also observed within TLR 4 nodes. Further, most of these molecules were preferentially found in blood plasma for feasible diagnosis. Conclusions The analysis reveals the common and unique mechanism regulated by both the TLRs that provide a broad perspective of signaling events in bacterial infections. Further, the identified candidate biomolecules could potentially aid

  20. Bayesian profiling of molecular signatures to predict event times

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dabao; Zhang, Min

    2007-01-01

    Background It is of particular interest to identify cancer-specific molecular signatures for early diagnosis, monitoring effects of treatment and predicting patient survival time. Molecular information about patients is usually generated from high throughput technologies such as microarray and mass spectrometry. Statistically, we are challenged by the large number of candidates but only a small number of patients in the study, and the right-censored clinical data further complicate the analysis. Results We present a two-stage procedure to profile molecular signatures for survival outcomes. Firstly, we group closely-related molecular features into linkage clusters, each portraying either similar or opposite functions and playing similar roles in prognosis; secondly, a Bayesian approach is developed to rank the centroids of these linkage clusters and provide a list of the main molecular features closely related to the outcome of interest. A simulation study showed the superior performance of our approach. When it was applied to data on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we were able to identify some new candidate signatures for disease prognosis. Conclusion This multivariate approach provides researchers with a more reliable list of molecular features profiled in terms of their prognostic relationship to the event times, and generates dependable information for subsequent identification of prognostic molecular signatures through either biological procedures or further data analysis. PMID:17239251

  1. A broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme based on quantum GHZ entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan; Chen, Hong; Gao, Yan; Zhuang, Honglin; Lian, Haigang; Han, Zhengping; Yu, Peng; Kong, Xiangze; Wen, Xiaojun

    2014-09-01

    Using the correlation of the GHZ triplet states, a broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme is proposed. Different from classical multiple signature and current quantum signature schemes, which could only deliver either multiple signature or unconditional security, our scheme guarantees both by adopting quantum key preparation, quantum encryption algorithm and quantum entanglement. Our proposed scheme has the properties of multiple signature, blindness, non-disavowal, non-forgery and traceability. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to propose the broadcasting multiple blind signature of quantum cryptography.

  2. Novel risk stratification of patients with neuroblastoma by genomic signature, which is independent of molecular signature.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, N; Oba, S; Ohira, M; Misra, A; Fridlyand, J; Ishii, S; Nakamura, Y; Isogai, E; Hirata, T; Yoshida, Y; Todo, S; Kaneko, Y; Albertson, D G; Pinkel, D; Feuerstein, B G; Nakagawara, A

    2008-01-17

    Human neuroblastoma remains enigmatic because it often shows spontaneous regression and aggressive growth. The prognosis of advanced stage of sporadic neuroblastomas is still poor. Here, we investigated whether genomic and molecular signatures could categorize new therapeutic risk groups in primary neuroblastomas. We conducted microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) with a DNA chip carrying 2464 BAC clones to examine genomic aberrations of 236 neuroblastomas and used in-house cDNA microarrays for gene-expression profiling. Array-CGH demonstrated three major genomic groups of chromosomal aberrations: silent (GGS), partial gains and/or losses (GGP) and whole gains and/or losses (GGW), which well corresponded with the patterns of chromosome 17 abnormalities. They were further classified into subgroups with different outcomes. In 112 sporadic neuroblastomas, MYCN amplification was frequent in GGS (22%) and GGP (53%) and caused serious outcomes in patients. Sporadic tumors with a single copy of MYCN showed the 5-year cumulative survival rates of 89% in GGS, 53% in GGP and 85% in GGW. Molecular signatures also segregated patients into the favorable and unfavorable prognosis groups (P=0.001). Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that genomic and molecular signatures were mutually independent, powerful prognostic indicators. Thus, combined genomic and molecular signatures may categorize novel risk groups and confer new clues for allowing tailored or even individualized medicine to patients with neuroblastoma.

  3. Molecular signatures in the transport properties of molecular wire junctions: what makes a junction "molecular"?

    PubMed

    Troisi, Alessandro; Ratner, Mark A

    2006-02-01

    The simplest component of molecular electronics consists of a single-molecule transport junction: a molecule sandwiched between source and drain electrodes, with or without a third gate electrode. In this Concept article, we focus on how molecules control transport in metal-electrode molecular junctions, and where the molecular signatures are to be found. In the situation where the molecule is relatively short and the gap between injection energy and molecular eigenstates is large, transport occurs largely by elastic tunneling, stochastic switching is common, and the vibronic signature can be found using inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). As the energy gaps for injection become smaller, one begins to see stronger molecular signatures - these include Franck-Condon-like structures in the current/voltage characteristic and strong vibronic interactions, which can lead to hopping behavior at the polaron limit. Conformational changes induced by the strong electric field lead to another strong manifestation of the molecular nature of the junction. We overview some of this mechanistic landscape, focusing on significant effects of switching (both stochastic and controlled by the electric field) and of molecular vibronic coupling.

  4. Molecular signatures for the Crenarchaeota and the Thaumarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S; Shami, Ali

    2011-02-01

    Crenarchaeotes found in mesophilic marine environments were recently placed into a new phylum of Archaea called the Thaumarchaeota. However, very few molecular characteristics of this new phylum are currently known which can be used to distinguish them from the Crenarchaeota. In addition, their relationships to deep-branching archaeal lineages are unclear. We report here detailed analyses of protein sequences from Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota that have identified many conserved signature indels (CSIs) and signature proteins (SPs) (i.e., proteins for which all significant blast hits are from these groups) that are specific for these archaeal groups. Of the identified signatures 6 CSIs and 13 SPs are specific for the Crenarchaeota phylum; 6 CSIs and >250 SPs are uniquely found in various Thaumarchaeota (viz. Cenarchaeum symbiosum, Nitrosopumilus maritimus and a number of uncultured marine crenarchaeotes) and 3 CSIs and ~10 SPs are found in both Thaumarchaeota and Crenarchaeota species. Some of the molecular signatures are also present in Korarchaeum cryptofilum, which forms the independent phylum Korarchaeota. Although some of these molecular signatures suggest a distant shared ancestry between Thaumarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, our identification of large numbers of Thaumarchaeota-specific proteins and their deep branching between the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota phyla in phylogenetic trees shows that they are distinct from both Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota in both genetic and phylogenetic terms. These observations support the placement of marine mesophilic archaea into the separate phylum Thaumarchaeota. Additionally, many CSIs and SPs have been found that are specific for different orders within Crenarchaeota (viz. Sulfolobales-3 CSIs and 169 SPs, Thermoproteales-5 CSIs and 25 SPs, Desulfurococcales-4 SPs, and Sulfolobales and Desulfurococcales-2 CSIs and 18 SPs). The signatures described here provide novel means for distinguishing the Crenarchaeota and

  5. A Molecular Signature of Proteinuria in Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Heather N.; Tritchler, David; Cattran, Daniel C.; Eichinger, Felix; Boucherot, Anissa; Henger, Anna; Berthier, Celine C.; Nair, Viji; Cohen, Clemens D.

    2010-01-01

    Proteinuria is the most important predictor of outcome in glomerulonephritis and experimental data suggest that the tubular cell response to proteinuria is an important determinant of progressive fibrosis in the kidney. However, it is unclear whether proteinuria is a marker of disease severity or has a direct effect on tubular cells in the kidneys of patients with glomerulonephritis. Accordingly we studied an in vitro model of proteinuria, and identified 231 “albumin-regulated genes” differentially expressed by primary human kidney tubular epithelial cells exposed to albumin. We translated these findings to human disease by studying mRNA levels of these genes in the tubulo-interstitial compartment of kidney biopsies from patients with IgA nephropathy using microarrays. Biopsies from patients with IgAN (n = 25) could be distinguished from those of control subjects (n = 6) based solely upon the expression of these 231 “albumin-regulated genes.” The expression of an 11-transcript subset related to the degree of proteinuria, and this 11-mRNA subset was also sufficient to distinguish biopsies of subjects with IgAN from control biopsies. We tested if these findings could be extrapolated to other proteinuric diseases beyond IgAN and found that all forms of primary glomerulonephritis (n = 33) can be distinguished from controls (n = 21) based solely on the expression levels of these 11 genes derived from our in vitro proteinuria model. Pathway analysis suggests common regulatory elements shared by these 11 transcripts. In conclusion, we have identified an albumin-regulated 11-gene signature shared between all forms of primary glomerulonephritis. Our findings support the hypothesis that albuminuria may directly promote injury in the tubulo-interstitial compartment of the kidney in patients with glomerulonephritis. PMID:20976140

  6. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C E; Self, J L; Copley, J R D; Faraone, A

    2016-07-07

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  7. Molecular signatures for sex in the Placozoa

    PubMed Central

    Signorovitch, Ana Y.; Dellaporta, Stephen L.; Buss, Leo W.

    2005-01-01

    Placozoans, the simplest free-living animals, have never been observed to reproduce sexually. Here, we describe molecular evidence for sexual reproduction within one clade of the Placozoa. In a population sample of 10 individuals, within-individual and overall nucleotide diversity were similar to each other and consistent with levels observed in sexually reproducing species. Intergenic recombination as well as the sharing of alleles between heterozygous and homozygous individuals was also observed. These hallmarks of sexual reproduction establish that sex is indeed present in this phylum. PMID:16230622

  8. Molecular signatures database (MSigDB) 3.0.

    PubMed

    Liberzon, Arthur; Subramanian, Aravind; Pinchback, Reid; Thorvaldsdóttir, Helga; Tamayo, Pablo; Mesirov, Jill P

    2011-06-15

    Well-annotated gene sets representing the universe of the biological processes are critical for meaningful and insightful interpretation of large-scale genomic data. The Molecular Signatures Database (MSigDB) is one of the most widely used repositories of such sets. We report the availability of a new version of the database, MSigDB 3.0, with over 6700 gene sets, a complete revision of the collection of canonical pathways and experimental signatures from publications, enhanced annotations and upgrades to the web site. MSigDB is freely available for non-commercial use at http://www.broadinstitute.org/msigdb.

  9. Transcriptional Networks Inferred from Molecular Signatures of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tongbai, Ron; Idelman, Gila; Nordgard, Silje H.; Cui, Wenwu; Jacobs, Jonathan L.; Haggerty, Cynthia M.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Livingston, Gary; Shaunessy, Patrick; Chiang, Chih-Hung; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Bilke, Sven; Gardner, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Global genomic approaches in cancer research have provided new and innovative strategies for the identification of signatures that differentiate various types of human cancers. Computational analysis of the promoter composition of the genes within these signatures may provide a powerful method for deducing the regulatory transcriptional networks that mediate their collective function. In this study we have systematically analyzed the promoter composition of gene classes derived from previously established genetic signatures that recently have been shown to reliably and reproducibly distinguish five molecular subtypes of breast cancer associated with distinct clinical outcomes. Inferences made from the trends of transcription factor binding site enrichment in the promoters of these gene groups led to the identification of regulatory pathways that implicate discrete transcriptional networks associated with specific molecular subtypes of breast cancer. One of these inferred pathways predicted a role for nuclear factor-κB in a novel feed-forward, self-amplifying, autoregulatory module regulated by the ERBB family of growth factor receptors. The existence of this pathway was verified in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation and shown to be deregulated in breast cancer cells overexpressing ERBB2. This analysis indicates that approaches of this type can provide unique insights into the differential regulatory molecular programs associated with breast cancer and will aid in identifying specific transcriptional networks and pathways as potential targets for tumor subtype-specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:18187569

  10. Transcriptional networks inferred from molecular signatures of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tongbai, Ron; Idelman, Gila; Nordgard, Silje H; Cui, Wenwu; Jacobs, Jonathan L; Haggerty, Cynthia M; Chanock, Stephen J; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Livingston, Gary; Shaunessy, Patrick; Chiang, Chih-Hung; Kristensen, Vessela N; Bilke, Sven; Gardner, Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Global genomic approaches in cancer research have provided new and innovative strategies for the identification of signatures that differentiate various types of human cancers. Computational analysis of the promoter composition of the genes within these signatures may provide a powerful method for deducing the regulatory transcriptional networks that mediate their collective function. In this study we have systematically analyzed the promoter composition of gene classes derived from previously established genetic signatures that recently have been shown to reliably and reproducibly distinguish five molecular subtypes of breast cancer associated with distinct clinical outcomes. Inferences made from the trends of transcription factor binding site enrichment in the promoters of these gene groups led to the identification of regulatory pathways that implicate discrete transcriptional networks associated with specific molecular subtypes of breast cancer. One of these inferred pathways predicted a role for nuclear factor-kappaB in a novel feed-forward, self-amplifying, autoregulatory module regulated by the ERBB family of growth factor receptors. The existence of this pathway was verified in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation and shown to be deregulated in breast cancer cells overexpressing ERBB2. This analysis indicates that approaches of this type can provide unique insights into the differential regulatory molecular programs associated with breast cancer and will aid in identifying specific transcriptional networks and pathways as potential targets for tumor subtype-specific therapeutic intervention.

  11. Metabolomic signatures associated with disease severity in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Cristina; Agirrezabal, Ion; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Zubizarreta, Irati; Pulido-Valdeolivas, Irene; Saiz, Albert; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Villar, Luisa; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Fernández, Oscar; Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Arroyo, Rafael; Castro, Azucena

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify differences in the metabolomic profile in the serum of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared to controls and to identify biomarkers of disease severity. Methods: We studied 2 cohorts of patients with MS: a retrospective longitudinal cohort of 238 patients and 74 controls and a prospective cohort of 61 patients and 41 controls with serial serum samples. Patients were stratified into active or stable disease based on 2 years of prospective assessment accounting for presence of clinical relapses or changes in disability measured with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Metabolomic profiling (lipids and amino acids) was performed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in serum samples. Data analysis was performed using parametric methods, principal component analysis, and partial least square discriminant analysis for assessing the differences between cases and controls and for subgroups based on disease severity. Results: We identified metabolomics signatures with high accuracy for classifying patients vs controls as well as for classifying patients with medium to high disability (EDSS >3.0). Among them, sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylethanolamine were the metabolites that showed a more robust pattern in the time series analysis for discriminating between patients and controls. Moreover, levels of hydrocortisone, glutamic acid, tryptophan, eicosapentaenoic acid, 13S-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, lysophosphatidylcholines, and lysophosphatidylethanolamines were associated with more severe disease (non-relapse-free or increase in EDSS). Conclusions: We identified metabolomic signatures composed of hormones, lipids, and amino acids associated with MS and with a more severe course. PMID:28180139

  12. AuNPs for identification of molecular signatures of resistance

    PubMed Central

    Veigas, Bruno; Fernandes, Alexandra R.; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing levels of drug resistance are one of biggest threats to overcome microbial infection. The ability to rapidly and accurately detect a given pathogen and its drug resistance profile is essential for the appropriate treatment of patients and for preventing further spread of drug-resistant strains. The predictive and informative value of these molecular markers needs to be translated into robust surveillance tools that correlate to the target and extent of resistance, monitor multiresistance and provide real time assessment at point-of-need. Rapid molecular assays for the detection of drug-resistance signatures in clinical specimens are based on the detection of specific nucleotide sequences and/or mutations within pre-selected biomarkers in the genome, indicative of the presence of the pathogen and/or associated with drug resistance. DNA and/or RNA based assays offer advantages over phenotypic assays, such as specificity and time from collection to result. Nanotechnology has provided new and robust tools for the detection of pathogens and more crucially to the fast and sensitive characterisation of molecular signatures of drug resistance. Amongst the plethora of nanotechnology based approaches, gold nanoparticles have prompt for the development of new strategies and platforms capable to provide valuable data at point-of-need with increased versatility but reduced costs. Gold nanoparticles, due to their unique spectral, optical and electrochemical properties, are one of the most widely used nanotechnology systems for molecular diagnostics. This review will focus on the use of gold nanoparticles for screening molecular signatures of drug resistance that have been reported thus far, and provide a critical evaluation of current and future developments of these technologies assisting pathogen identification and characterisation. PMID:25221547

  13. Molecular classification of prostate cancer using curated expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Markert, Elke K; Mizuno, Hideaki; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J

    2011-12-27

    High Gleason score is currently the best prognostic indicator for poor prognosis in prostate cancer. However, a significant number of patients with low Gleason scores develop aggressive disease as well. In an effort to understand molecular signatures associated with poor outcome in prostate cancer, we analyzed a microarray dataset characterizing 281 prostate cancers from a Swedish watchful-waiting cohort. Patients were classified on the basis of their mRNA microarray signature profiles indicating embryonic stem cell expression patterns (stemness), inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and PTEN, activation of several oncogenic pathways, and the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. Unsupervised clustering identified a subset of tumors manifesting stem-like signatures together with p53 and PTEN inactivation, which had very poor survival outcome, a second group with intermediate survival outcome, characterized by the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, and three groups with benign outcome. The stratification was validated on a second independent dataset of 150 tumor and metastatic samples from a clinical cohort at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. This classification is independent of Gleason score and therefore provides useful unique molecular profiles for prostate cancer prognosis, helping to predict poor outcome in patients with low or average Gleason scores.

  14. Dynamical signatures of molecular symmetries in nonequilibrium quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingna, Juzar; Manzano, Daniel; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-06-01

    Symmetries play a crucial role in ubiquitous systems found in Nature. In this work, we propose an elegant approach to detect symmetries by measuring quantum currents. Our detection scheme relies on initiating the system in an anti-symmetric initial condition, with respect to the symmetric sites, and using a probe that acts like a local noise. Depending on the position of the probe the currents exhibit unique signatures such as a quasi-stationary plateau indicating the presence of metastability and multi-exponential decays in case of multiple symmetries. The signatures are sensitive to the characteristics of the probe and vanish completely when the timescale of the coherent system dynamics is much longer than the timescale of the probe. These results are demonstrated using a 4-site model and an archetypal example of the para-benzene ring and are shown to be robust under a weak disorder.

  15. Dynamical signatures of molecular symmetries in nonequilibrium quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Thingna, Juzar; Manzano, Daniel; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-06-17

    Symmetries play a crucial role in ubiquitous systems found in Nature. In this work, we propose an elegant approach to detect symmetries by measuring quantum currents. Our detection scheme relies on initiating the system in an anti-symmetric initial condition, with respect to the symmetric sites, and using a probe that acts like a local noise. Depending on the position of the probe the currents exhibit unique signatures such as a quasi-stationary plateau indicating the presence of metastability and multi-exponential decays in case of multiple symmetries. The signatures are sensitive to the characteristics of the probe and vanish completely when the timescale of the coherent system dynamics is much longer than the timescale of the probe. These results are demonstrated using a 4-site model and an archetypal example of the para-benzene ring and are shown to be robust under a weak disorder.

  16. Dynamical signatures of molecular symmetries in nonequilibrium quantum transport

    PubMed Central

    Thingna, Juzar; Manzano, Daniel; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-01-01

    Symmetries play a crucial role in ubiquitous systems found in Nature. In this work, we propose an elegant approach to detect symmetries by measuring quantum currents. Our detection scheme relies on initiating the system in an anti-symmetric initial condition, with respect to the symmetric sites, and using a probe that acts like a local noise. Depending on the position of the probe the currents exhibit unique signatures such as a quasi-stationary plateau indicating the presence of metastability and multi-exponential decays in case of multiple symmetries. The signatures are sensitive to the characteristics of the probe and vanish completely when the timescale of the coherent system dynamics is much longer than the timescale of the probe. These results are demonstrated using a 4-site model and an archetypal example of the para-benzene ring and are shown to be robust under a weak disorder. PMID:27311717

  17. Molecular signatures of mammalian hibernation: comparisons with alternative phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yichi; Shao, Chunxuan; Fedorov, Vadim B; Goropashnaya, Anna V; Barnes, Brian M; Yan, Jun

    2013-08-20

    Mammalian hibernators display phenotypes similar to physiological responses to calorie restriction and fasting, sleep, cold exposure, and ischemia-reperfusion in non-hibernating species. Whether biochemical changes evident during hibernation have parallels in non-hibernating systems on molecular and genetic levels is unclear. We identified the molecular signatures of torpor and arousal episodes during hibernation using a custom-designed microarray for the Arctic ground squirrel (Urocitellus parryii) and compared them with molecular signatures of selected mouse phenotypes. Our results indicate that differential gene expression related to metabolism during hibernation is associated with that during calorie restriction and that the nuclear receptor protein PPARα is potentially crucial for metabolic remodeling in torpor. Sleep-wake cycle-related and temperature response genes follow the same expression changes as during the torpor-arousal cycle. Increased fatty acid metabolism occurs during hibernation but not during ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice and, thus, might contribute to protection against ischemia-reperfusion during hibernation. In this study, we systematically compared hibernation with alternative phenotypes to reveal novel mechanisms that might be used therapeutically in human pathological conditions.

  18. Molecular signatures of mammalian hibernation: comparisons with alternative phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammalian hibernators display phenotypes similar to physiological responses to calorie restriction and fasting, sleep, cold exposure, and ischemia-reperfusion in non-hibernating species. Whether biochemical changes evident during hibernation have parallels in non-hibernating systems on molecular and genetic levels is unclear. Results We identified the molecular signatures of torpor and arousal episodes during hibernation using a custom-designed microarray for the Arctic ground squirrel (Urocitellus parryii) and compared them with molecular signatures of selected mouse phenotypes. Our results indicate that differential gene expression related to metabolism during hibernation is associated with that during calorie restriction and that the nuclear receptor protein PPARα is potentially crucial for metabolic remodeling in torpor. Sleep-wake cycle-related and temperature response genes follow the same expression changes as during the torpor-arousal cycle. Increased fatty acid metabolism occurs during hibernation but not during ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice and, thus, might contribute to protection against ischemia-reperfusion during hibernation. Conclusions In this study, we systematically compared hibernation with alternative phenotypes to reveal novel mechanisms that might be used therapeutically in human pathological conditions. PMID:23957789

  19. Intermittency of interstellar turbulence: observational signatures in diffuse molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgarone, E.; Hily-Blant, P.; Pety, J.; Pineau Des Forêts, G.

    2005-09-01

    Several properties of the cold interstellar molecular gas may be interpreted as the signatures of the intermittency of turbulence. These are non-Gaussian statistics of the velocity field, plus ubiquitous traces of warm gas within the cold medium. The existence of the warm gas is attested to by observations of highly excited molecular hydrogen and by manifestations of a specific chemistry. Small-scale coherent magnetized vortices and low velocity magneto-hydrodynamical shocks are able to reproduce most of these properties. In both kinds of structure, and for different reasons, the neutrals decouple from the ions and magnetic fields. Interferometric observations seem to favor small scale vortices rather than shocks, involving timescales of only a few thousands years.

  20. Molecular signatures of neural connectivity in the olfactory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Diodato, Assunta; Ruinart de Brimont, Marion; Yim, Yeong Shin; Derian, Nicolas; Perrin, Sandrine; Pouch, Juliette; Klatzmann, David; Garel, Sonia; Choi, Gloria B; Fleischmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The ability to target subclasses of neurons with defined connectivity is crucial for uncovering neural circuit functions. The olfactory (piriform) cortex is thought to generate odour percepts and memories, and odour information encoded in piriform is routed to target brain areas involved in multimodal sensory integration, cognition and motor control. However, it remains unknown if piriform outputs are spatially organized, and if distinct output channels are delineated by different gene expression patterns. Here we identify genes selectively expressed in different layers of the piriform cortex. Neural tracing experiments reveal that these layer-specific piriform genes mark different subclasses of neurons, which project to distinct target areas. Interestingly, these molecular signatures of connectivity are maintained in reeler mutant mice, in which neural positioning is scrambled. These results reveal that a predictive link between a neuron's molecular identity and connectivity in this cortical circuit is determined independent of its spatial position. PMID:27426965

  1. A Urinary Metabolic Signature for Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica.

    PubMed

    Gebregiworgis, Teklab; Nielsen, Helle H; Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Reddy, Jay; Illes, Zsolt; Powers, Robert

    2016-02-05

    Urine is a metabolite-rich biofluid that reflects the body's effort to maintain chemical and osmotic homeostasis. Clinical diagnosis routinely relies on urine samples because the collection process is easy and noninvasive. Despite these advantages, urine is an under-investigated source of biomarkers for multiple sclerosis (MS). Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has become a common approach for analyzing urinary metabolites for disease diagnosis and biomarker discovery. For illustration of the potential of urinary metabolites for diagnosing and treating MS patients, and for differentiating between MS and other illnesses, 38 urine samples were collected from healthy controls, MS patients, and neuromyelitis optica-spectrum disorder (NMO-SD) patients and analyzed with NMR, multivariate statistics, one-way ANOVA, and univariate statistics. Urine from MS patients exhibited a statistically distinct metabolic signature from healthy and NMO-SD controls. A total of 27 metabolites were differentially altered in the urine from MS and NMO-SD patients and were associated with synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, amino acids, propionate and pyruvate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and glycolysis. Metabolites altered in urine from MS patients were shown to be related to known pathogenic processes relevant to MS, including alterations in energy and fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial activity, and the gut microbiota.

  2. Molecular signatures of differential responses to exercise trainings during rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Gregory, Chris; Ye, Fan; Harafuji, Naoe; Lott, Donovan; Lai, San-Huei; Mathur, Sunita; Scarborough, Mark; Gibbs, Parker; Baligand, Celine; Vandenborne, Krista

    2017-01-01

    The loss and recovery of muscle mass and function following injury and during rehabilitation varies among individuals. While recent expression profiling studies have illustrated transcriptomic responses to muscle disuse and remodeling, how these changes contribute to the physiological responses are not clear. In this study, we quantified the effects of immobilization and subsequent rehabilitation training on muscle size and identified molecular pathways associated with muscle responsiveness in an orthopaedic patient cohort study. The injured leg of 16 individuals with ankle injury was immobilized for a minimum of 4 weeks, followed by a 6-week rehabilitation program. The maximal cross-sectional area (CSA) of the medial gastrocnemius muscle of the immobilized and control legs were determined by T1-weighted axial MRI images. Genome-wide mRNA profiling data were used to identify molecular signatures that distinguish the patients who responded to immobilization and rehabilitation and those who were considered minimal responders. RESULTS: Using 6% change as the threshold to define responsiveness, a greater degree of changes in muscle size was noted in high responders (−14.9 ± 3.6%) compared to low responders (0.1 ± 0.0%) during immobilization. In addition, a greater degree of changes in muscle size was observed in high responders (20.5 ± 3.2%) compared to low responders (2.5 ± 0.9%) at 6-week rehabilitation. Microarray analysis showed a higher number of genes differentially expressed in the responders compared to low responders in general; with more expression changes observed at the acute stage of rehabilitation in both groups. Pathways analysis revealed top molecular pathways differentially affected in the groups, including genes involved in mitochondrial function, protein turn over, integrin signaling and inflammation. This study confirmed the extent of muscle atrophy due to immobilization and recovery by exercise training is associated with distinct remodeling

  3. Detection of chemical explosives using multiple photon signatures.

    PubMed

    Loschke, K W; Dunn, W L

    2010-01-01

    A template-matching procedure is being investigated for rapid detection of improvised explosive devices at standoff distances. Photon-scattered and photon-induced positron annihilation radiation responses are being studied as a part of a signature-based radiation scanning approach. Back-streaming radiation responses, called signatures, are compared to templates, which are collections of the same signatures if the interrogated volume contained a significant amount of explosive. Experiments have been conducted that show that explosive surrogates (fertilizers) can be distinguished from several inert materials. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Extracellular matrix proteomics identifies molecular signature of symptomatic carotid plaques

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Sarah R.; Willeit, Karin; Didangelos, Athanasios; Matic, Ljubica Perisic; Skroblin, Philipp; Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Lengquist, Mariette; Rungger, Gregor; Kapustin, Alexander; Kedenko, Ludmilla; Molenaar, Chris; Lu, Ruifang; Barwari, Temo; Suna, Gonca; Iglseder, Bernhard; Paulweber, Bernhard; Willeit, Peter; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Davies, Alun H.; Monaco, Claudia; Hedin, Ulf; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The identification of patients with high-risk atherosclerotic plaques prior to the manifestation of clinical events remains challenging. Recent findings question histology- and imaging-based definitions of the “vulnerable plaque,” necessitating an improved approach for predicting onset of symptoms. METHODS. We performed a proteomics comparison of the vascular extracellular matrix and associated molecules in human carotid endarterectomy specimens from 6 symptomatic versus 6 asymptomatic patients to identify a protein signature for high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Proteomics data were integrated with gene expression profiling of 121 carotid endarterectomies and an analysis of protein secretion by lipid-loaded human vascular smooth muscle cells. Finally, epidemiological validation of candidate biomarkers was performed in two community-based studies. RESULTS. Proteomics and at least one of the other two approaches identified a molecular signature of plaques from symptomatic patients that comprised matrix metalloproteinase 9, chitinase 3-like-1, S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100A8), S100A9, cathepsin B, fibronectin, and galectin-3-binding protein. Biomarker candidates measured in 685 subjects in the Bruneck study were associated with progression to advanced atherosclerosis and incidence of cardiovascular disease over a 10-year follow-up period. A 4-biomarker signature (matrix metalloproteinase 9, S100A8/S100A9, cathepsin D, and galectin-3-binding protein) improved risk prediction and was successfully replicated in an independent cohort, the SAPHIR study. CONCLUSION. The identified 4-biomarker signature may improve risk prediction and diagnostics for the management of cardiovascular disease. Further, our study highlights the strength of tissue-based proteomics for biomarker discovery. FUNDING. UK: British Heart Foundation (BHF); King’s BHF Center; and the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Center based at Guy’s and St

  5. Signature properties of water: Their molecular electronic origins

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrew P.; Cipcigan, Flaviu S.; Crain, Jason; Martyna, Glenn J.

    2015-01-01

    Water challenges our fundamental understanding of emergent materials properties from a molecular perspective. It exhibits a uniquely rich phenomenology including dramatic variations in behavior over the wide temperature range of the liquid into water’s crystalline phases and amorphous states. We show that many-body responses arising from water’s electronic structure are essential mechanisms harnessed by the molecule to encode for the distinguishing features of its condensed states. We treat the complete set of these many-body responses nonperturbatively within a coarse-grained electronic structure derived exclusively from single-molecule properties. Such a “strong coupling” approach generates interaction terms of all symmetries to all orders, thereby enabling unique transferability to diverse local environments such as those encountered along the coexistence curve. The symmetries of local motifs that can potentially emerge are not known a priori. Consequently, electronic responses unfiltered by artificial truncation are then required to embody the terms that tip the balance to the correct set of structures. Therefore, our fully responsive molecular model produces, a simple, accurate, and intuitive picture of water’s complexity and its molecular origin, predicting water’s signature physical properties from ice, through liquid–vapor coexistence, to the critical point. PMID:25941394

  6. Blind separation of multiple vehicle signatures in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi-Sadjadi, M. R.; Srinivasan, S.

    2005-05-01

    This paper considers the problem of classifying ground vehicles using their acoustic signatures recorded by unattended passive acoustic sensors. Using these sensors, acoustic signatures of a wide variety of sources such as trucks, tanks, personnel, and airborne targets can be recorded. Additionally, interference sources such as wind noise and ambient noise are typically present. The proposed approach in this paper relies on the blind source separation of the recorded signatures of various sources. Two different frequency domain source separation methods have been employed to separate the vehicle signatures that overlap both spectrally and temporally. These methods rely on the frequency domain extension of the independent component analysis (ICA) method and a joint diagonalization of the time varying spectra. Spectral and temporal-dependent features are then extracted from the separated sources using a new feature extraction method and subsequently used for target classification using a three-layer neural network. The performance of the developed algorithms are demonstrated on a subset of a real acoustic signature database acquired from the US Army TACOM-ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  7. Molecular subsets in the gene expression signatures of scleroderma skin.

    PubMed

    Milano, Ausra; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Sargent, Jennifer L; George, Lacy K; McCalmont, Timothy H; Connolly, M Kari; Whitfield, Michael L

    2008-07-16

    Scleroderma is a clinically heterogeneous disease with a complex phenotype. The disease is characterized by vascular dysfunction, tissue fibrosis, internal organ dysfunction, and immune dysfunction resulting in autoantibody production. We analyzed the genome-wide patterns of gene expression with DNA microarrays in skin biopsies from distinct scleroderma subsets including 17 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc), 7 patients with SSc with limited scleroderma (lSSc), 3 patients with morphea, and 6 healthy controls. 61 skin biopsies were analyzed in a total of 75 microarray hybridizations. Analysis by hierarchical clustering demonstrates nearly identical patterns of gene expression in 17 out of 22 of the forearm and back skin pairs of SSc patients. Using this property of the gene expression, we selected a set of 'intrinsic' genes and analyzed the inherent data-driven groupings. Distinct patterns of gene expression separate patients with dSSc from those with lSSc and both are easily distinguished from normal controls. Our data show three distinct patient groups among the patients with dSSc and two groups among patients with lSSc. Each group can be distinguished by unique gene expression signatures indicative of proliferating cells, immune infiltrates and a fibrotic program. The intrinsic groups are statistically significant (p<0.001) and each has been mapped to clinical covariates of modified Rodnan skin score, interstitial lung disease, gastrointestinal involvement, digital ulcers, Raynaud's phenomenon and disease duration. We report a 177-gene signature that is associated with severity of skin disease in dSSc. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of skin biopsies demonstrates that the heterogeneity in scleroderma can be measured quantitatively with DNA microarrays. The diversity in gene expression demonstrates multiple distinct gene expression programs in the skin of patients with scleroderma.

  8. Molecular Subsets in the Gene Expression Signatures of Scleroderma Skin

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Ausra; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Sargent, Jennifer L.; George, Lacy K.; McCalmont, Timothy H.; Connolly, M. Kari; Whitfield, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Scleroderma is a clinically heterogeneous disease with a complex phenotype. The disease is characterized by vascular dysfunction, tissue fibrosis, internal organ dysfunction, and immune dysfunction resulting in autoantibody production. Methodology and Findings We analyzed the genome-wide patterns of gene expression with DNA microarrays in skin biopsies from distinct scleroderma subsets including 17 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc), 7 patients with SSc with limited scleroderma (lSSc), 3 patients with morphea, and 6 healthy controls. 61 skin biopsies were analyzed in a total of 75 microarray hybridizations. Analysis by hierarchical clustering demonstrates nearly identical patterns of gene expression in 17 out of 22 of the forearm and back skin pairs of SSc patients. Using this property of the gene expression, we selected a set of ‘intrinsic’ genes and analyzed the inherent data-driven groupings. Distinct patterns of gene expression separate patients with dSSc from those with lSSc and both are easily distinguished from normal controls. Our data show three distinct patient groups among the patients with dSSc and two groups among patients with lSSc. Each group can be distinguished by unique gene expression signatures indicative of proliferating cells, immune infiltrates and a fibrotic program. The intrinsic groups are statistically significant (p<0.001) and each has been mapped to clinical covariates of modified Rodnan skin score, interstitial lung disease, gastrointestinal involvement, digital ulcers, Raynaud's phenomenon and disease duration. We report a 177-gene signature that is associated with severity of skin disease in dSSc. Conclusions and Significance Genome-wide gene expression profiling of skin biopsies demonstrates that the heterogeneity in scleroderma can be measured quantitatively with DNA microarrays. The diversity in gene expression demonstrates multiple distinct gene expression programs in the skin of

  9. Molecular signatures of longevity: Insights from cross-species comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Siming; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2017-10-01

    Much of the current research on longevity focuses on the aging process within a single species. Several molecular players (e.g. IGF1 and MTOR), pharmacological compounds (e.g. rapamycin and metformin), and dietary approaches (e.g. calorie restriction and methionine restriction) have been shown to be important in regulating and modestly extending lifespan in model organisms. On the other hand, natural lifespan varies much more significantly across species. Within mammals alone, maximum lifespan differs more than 100 fold, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent comparative studies are beginning to shed light on the molecular signatures associated with exceptional longevity. These include genome sequencing of microbats, naked mole rat, blind mole rat, bowhead whale and African turquoise killifish, and comparative analyses of gene expression, metabolites, lipids and ions across multiple mammalian species. Together, they point towards several putative strategies for lifespan regulation and cancer resistance, as well as the pathways and metabolites associated with longevity variation. In particular, longevity may be achieved by both lineage-specific adaptations and common mechanisms that apply across the species. Comparing the resulting cross-species molecular signatures with the within-species lifespan extension strategies will improve our understanding of mechanisms of longevity control and provide a starting point for novel and effective interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Deconvolving molecular signatures of interactions between microbial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Harn, Y.-C.; Powers, M. J.; Shank, E. A.; Jojic, V.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The interactions between microbial colonies through chemical signaling are not well understood. A microbial colony can use different molecules to inhibit or accelerate the growth of other colonies. A better understanding of the molecules involved in these interactions could lead to advancements in health and medicine. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) applied to co-cultured microbial communities aims to capture the spatial characteristics of the colonies’ molecular fingerprints. These data are high-dimensional and require computational analysis methods to interpret. Results: Here, we present a dictionary learning method that deconvolves spectra of different molecules from IMS data. We call this method MOLecular Dictionary Learning (MOLDL). Unlike standard dictionary learning methods which assume Gaussian-distributed data, our method uses the Poisson distribution to capture the count nature of the mass spectrometry data. Also, our method incorporates universally applicable information on common ion types of molecules in MALDI mass spectrometry. This greatly reduces model parameterization and increases deconvolution accuracy by eliminating spurious solutions. Moreover, our method leverages the spatial nature of IMS data by assuming that nearby locations share similar abundances, thus avoiding overfitting to noise. Tests on simulated datasets show that this method has good performance in recovering molecule dictionaries. We also tested our method on real data measured on a microbial community composed of two species. We confirmed through follow-up validation experiments that our method recovered true and complete signatures of molecules. These results indicate that our method can discover molecules in IMS data reliably, and hence can help advance the study of interaction of microbial colonies. Availability and implementation: The code used in this paper is available at: https://github.com/frizfealer/IMS_project. Contact: vjojic@cs.unc.edu Supplementary

  11. Molecular signatures associated with cognitive deficits in schizophrenia: a study of biopsied olfactory neural epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Y; Kondo, M A; Okada, K; Takayanagi, Y; Tanaka, T; Ho, T; Varvaris, M; Tajinda, K; Hiyama, H; Ni, K; Colantuoni, C; Schretlen, D; Cascella, N G; Pevsner, J; Ishizuka, K; Sawa, A

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a key feature of schizophrenia (SZ) and determines functional outcome. Nonetheless, molecular signatures in neuronal tissues that associate with deficits are not well understood. We conducted nasal biopsy to obtain olfactory epithelium from patients with SZ and control subjects. The neural layers from the biopsied epithelium were enriched by laser-captured microdissection. We then performed an unbiased microarray expression study and implemented a systematic neuropsychological assessment on the same participants. The differentially regulated genes in SZ were further filtered based on correlation with neuropsychological traits. This strategy identified the SMAD 5 gene, and real-time quantitative PCR analysis also supports downregulation of the SMAD pathway in SZ. The SMAD pathway has been important in multiple tissues, including the role for neurodevelopment and bone formation. Here the involvement of the pathway in adult brain function is suggested. This exploratory study establishes a strategy to better identify neuronal molecular signatures that are potentially associated with mental illness and cognitive deficits. We propose that the SMAD pathway may be a novel target in addressing cognitive deficit of SZ in future studies. PMID:27727244

  12. Molecular signatures in response to Isoliquiritigenin in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Eun; Hong, Eun-Jung; Nam, Hye-Young; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jeon, Jae-Pil

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified the inhibitory effect of ISL on cell proliferation of LCLs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ISL-induced genes and miRNAs through microarray approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs associated with ISL effect. -- Abstract: Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) has been known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of various cancer cells. However, genetic factors regulating ISL effects remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular signatures involved in ISL-induced cell death of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) using microarray analyses. For gene expression and microRNA (miRNA) microarray experiments, each of 12 LCL strains was independently treated with ISL or DMSO as a vehicle control for a day prior to total RNA extraction. ISL treatment inhibited cell proliferation of LCLs in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray analysis showed that ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway, having a potential as regulators in LCL survival and sensitivity to ISL-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, 36 miRNAs including five miRNAs with unknown functions were differentially expressed in ISL-treated LCLs. The integrative analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs. Among them, miR-1207-5p and miR-575 were negatively correlated with p53 pathway- and cell cycle-associated genes, respectively. In conclusion, our study suggests that miRNAs play an important role in ISL-induced cytotoxicity in LCLs by targeting signaling pathways including p53 pathway and cell cycle.

  13. Revealing the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technology and genome-wide association studies are now revealing the complex interactions between hosts and pathogen through genomic variation signatures, which arise from evolutionary co-existence. PMID:22011345

  14. Transcriptome analysis and molecular signature of human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Strunnikova, N.V.; Maminishkis, A.; Barb, J.J.; Wang, F.; Zhi, C.; Sergeev, Y.; Chen, W.; Edwards, A.O.; Stambolian, D.; Abecasis, G.; Swaroop, A.; Munson, P.J.; Miller, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a polarized cell layer critical for photoreceptor function and survival. The unique physiology and relationship to the photoreceptors make the RPE a critical determinant of human vision. Therefore, we performed a global expression profiling of native and cultured human fetal and adult RPE and determined a set of highly expressed ‘signature’ genes by comparing the observed RPE gene profiles to the Novartis expression database (SymAtlas: http://wombat.gnf.org/index.html) of 78 tissues. Using stringent selection criteria of at least 10-fold higher expression in three distinct preparations, we identified 154 RPE signature genes, which were validated by qRT-PCR analysis in RPE and in an independent set of 11 tissues. Several of the highly expressed signature genes encode proteins involved in visual cycle, melanogenesis and cell adhesion and Gene ontology analysis enabled the assignment of RPE signature genes to epithelial channels and transporters (ClCN4, BEST1, SLCA20) or matrix remodeling (TIMP3, COL8A2). Fifteen RPE signature genes were associated with known ophthalmic diseases, and 25 others were mapped to regions of disease loci. An evaluation of the RPE signature genes in a recently completed AMD genomewide association (GWA) data set revealed that TIMP3, GRAMD3, PITPNA and CHRNA3 signature genes may have potential roles in AMD pathogenesis and deserve further examination. We propose that RPE signature genes are excellent candidates for retinal diseases and for physiological investigations (e.g. dopachrome tautomerase in melanogenesis). The RPE signature gene set should allow the validation of RPE-like cells derived from human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells for cell-based therapies of degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:20360305

  15. Gene-expression signature of benign monoclonal gammopathy evident in multiple myeloma is linked to good prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Fenghuang; Barlogie, Bart; Arzoumanian, Varant; Huang, Yongsheng; Williams, David R.; Hollmig, Klaus; Pineda-Roman, Mauricio; Tricot, Guido; van Rhee, Frits; Zangari, Maurizio; Dhodapkar, Madhav; Shaughnessy, John D.

    2007-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) can progress to multiple myeloma (MM). Although these diseases share many of the same genetic features, it is still unclear whether global gene-expression profiling might identify prior genomic signatures that distinguish them. Through significance analysis of microarrays, 52 genes involved in important pathways related to cancer were differentially expressed in the plasma cells of healthy subjects (normal plasma-cell [NPC]; n = 22) and patients with stringently defined MGUS/smoldering MM (n = 24) and symptomatic MM (n = 351) (P < .001). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of 351 patients with MM, 44 with MGUS (24 + 20), and 16 with MM from MGUS created 2 major cluster branches, one containing 82% of the MGUS patients and the other containing 28% of the MM patients, termed MGUS-like MM (MGUS-L MM). Using the same clustering approach on an independent cohort of 214 patients with MM, 27% were found to be MGUS-L. This molecular signature, despite its association with a lower incidence of complete remission (P = .006), was associated with low-risk clinical and molecular features and superior survival (P < .01). The MGUS-L signature was also seen in plasma cells from 15 of 20 patients surviving more than 10 years after autotransplantation. These data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of plasma-cell dyscrasias. PMID:17023574

  16. Identification of characteristic molecular signature for volatile organic compounds in peripheral blood of rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeong Kyu; Jung, Kwang Hwa; Noh, Ji Heon; Eun, Jung Woo; Bae, Hyun Jin; Xie, Hong Jian; Jang, Ja-June; Ryu, Jae Chun; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2011-01-15

    In a previous report we demonstrated that the transcriptomic response of liver tissue was specific to toxicants, and a characteristic molecular signature could be used as an early prognostic biomarker in rats. It is necessary to determine the transcriptomic response to toxicants in peripheral blood for application to the human system. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) comprise a major group of pollutants which significantly affect the chemistry of the atmosphere and human health. In this study we identified and validated the specific molecular signatures of toxicants in rat whole blood as early predictors of environmental toxicants. VOCs (dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, and trichloroethylene) were administered to 11-week-old SD male rats after 48 h of exposure, peripheral whole blood was subjected to expression profiling analysis. Unsupervised gene expression analysis resulted in a characteristic molecular signature for each toxicant, and supervised analysis identified 1,217 outlier genes as distinct molecular signatures discerning VOC exposure from healthy controls. Further analysis of multi-classification suggested 337 genes as early detective molecular markers for three VOCs with 100% accuracy. A large-scale gene expression analysis of a different VOC exposure animal model suggested that characteristic expression profiles exist in blood cells and multi-classification of this VOC-specific molecular signature can discriminate each toxicant at an early exposure time. This blood expression signature can thus be used as discernable surrogate marker for detection of biological responses to VOC exposure in an environment.

  17. Signatures of multiple stellar populations in unresolved extragalactic globular/young massive star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Finzell, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    We present an investigation of potential signatures of the formation of multiple stellar populations in recently formed extragalactic star clusters. All of the Galactic globular clusters for which good samples of individual stellar abundances are available show evidence for multiple populations. This appears to require that multiple episodes of star formation and light element enrichment are the norm in the history of a globular cluster. We show that there are detectable observational signatures of multiple formation events in the unresolved spectra of massive, young extragalactic star clusters. We present the results of a pilot program to search for one of the cleanest signatures that we identify—the combined presence of emission lines from a very recently formed population and absorption lines from a somewhat older population. A possible example of such a system is identified in the Antennae galaxies. This source's spectrum shows evidence of two stellar populations with ages of 8 Myr and 80 Myr. Further investigation shows that these populations are in fact physically separated, but only by a projected distance of 59 pc. We show that the clusters are consistent with being bound and discuss the possibility that their coalescence could result in a single globular cluster hosting multiple stellar populations. While not the prototypical system proposed by most theories of the formation of multiple populations in clusters, the detection of this system in a small sample is both encouraging and interesting. Our investigation suggests that expanded surveys of massive young star clusters should detect more clusters with such signatures.

  18. Improvement of a quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme based on quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Daowen; Zou, Xiangfu

    2016-06-01

    Recently, a broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme based on quantum teleportation has been proposed for the first time. It is claimed to have unconditional security and properties of quantum multiple signature and quantum blind signature. In this paper, we analyze the security of the protocol and show that each signatory can learn the signed message by a single-particle measurement and the signed message can be modified at random by any attacker according to the scheme. Furthermore, there are some participant attacks and external attacks existing in the scheme. Finally, we present an improved scheme and show that it can resist all of the mentioned attacks. Additionally, the secret keys can be used again and again, making it more efficient and practical.

  19. Molecular signature of erythroblast enucleation in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rouzbeh, Shaghayegh; Kobari, Ladan; Cambot, Marie; Mazurier, Christelle; Hebert, Nicolas; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Durand, Charles; Douay, Luc; Lapillonne, Hélène

    2015-08-01

    While enucleation is a critical step in the terminal differentiation of human red blood cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying this unique process remain unclear. To investigate erythroblast enucleation, we studied the erythroid differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which provide a unique model for deeper understanding of the development and differentiation of multiple cell types. First, using a two-step protocol, we demonstrated that terminal erythroid differentiation from hESCs is directly dependent on the age of the embryoid bodies. Second, by choosing hESCs in two extreme conditions of erythroid culture, we obtained an original differentiation model which allows one to study the mechanisms underlying the enucleation of erythroid cells by analyzing the gene and miRNA (miR) expression profiles of cells from these two culture conditions. Third, using an integrated analysis of mRNA and miR expression profiles, we identified five miRs potentially involved in erythroblast enucleation. Finally, by selective knockdown of these five miRs we found miR-30a to be a regulator of erythroblast enucleation in hESCs.

  20. Molecular signature of anastasis for reversal of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ho Man; Talbot, C Conover; Fung, Ming Chiu; Tang, Ho Lam

    2017-01-01

    Anastasis (Greek for "rising to life") is a cell recovery phenomenon that rescues dying cells from the brink of cell death. We recently discovered anastasis to occur after the execution-stage of apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Promoting anastasis could in principle preserve injured cells that are difficult to replace, such as cardiomyocytes and neurons. Conversely, arresting anastasis in dying cancer cells after cancer therapies could improve treatment efficacy. To develop new therapies that promote or inhibit anastasis, it is essential to identify the key regulators and mediators of anastasis - the therapeutic targets. Therefore, we performed time-course microarray analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of anastasis during reversal of ethanol-induced apoptosis in mouse primary liver cells. We found striking changes in transcription of genes involved in multiple pathways, including early activation of pro-cell survival, anti-oxidation, cell cycle arrest, histone modification, DNA-damage and stress-inducible responses, and at delayed times, angiogenesis and cell migration. Validation with RT-PCR confirmed similar changes in the human liver cancer cell line, HepG2, during anastasis. Here, we present the time-course whole-genome gene expression dataset revealing gene expression profiles during the reversal of apoptosis. This dataset provides important insights into the physiological, pathological, and therapeutic implications of anastasis.

  1. Molecular signature of anastasis for reversal of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ho Man; Talbot Jr, C. Conover; Fung, Ming Chiu; Tang, Ho Lam

    2017-01-01

    Anastasis (Greek for "rising to life") is a cell recovery phenomenon that rescues dying cells from the brink of cell death. We recently discovered anastasis to occur after the execution-stage of apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Promoting anastasis could in principle preserve injured cells that are difficult to replace, such as cardiomyocytes and neurons. Conversely, arresting anastasis in dying cancer cells after cancer therapies could improve treatment efficacy. To develop new therapies that promote or inhibit anastasis, it is essential to identify the key regulators and mediators of anastasis – the therapeutic targets. Therefore, we performed time-course microarray analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of anastasis during reversal of ethanol-induced apoptosis in mouse primary liver cells. We found striking changes in transcription of genes involved in multiple pathways, including early activation of pro-cell survival, anti-oxidation, cell cycle arrest, histone modification, DNA-damage and stress-inducible responses, and at delayed times, angiogenesis and cell migration. Validation with RT-PCR confirmed similar changes in the human liver cancer cell line, HepG2, during anastasis. Here, we present the time-course whole-genome gene expression dataset revealing gene expression profiles during the reversal of apoptosis. This dataset provides important insights into the physiological, pathological, and therapeutic implications of anastasis. PMID:28299189

  2. Ocular motor signatures of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Joanne; Clough, Meaghan; Beh, Shin; Millist, Lynette; Sears, Derek; Frohman, Ashley N; Lizak, Nathaniel; Lim, Jayne; Kolbe, Scott; Rennaker, Robert L; Frohman, Teresa C; White, Owen B; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-11-01

    The anatomical and functional overlap between ocular motor command circuitry and the higher-order networks that form the scaffolding for cognition makes for a compelling hypothesis that measures of ocular motility could provide a means to sensitively interrogate cognitive dysfunction in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Such an approach may ultimately provide objective and reproducible measures of cognitive dysfunction that offer an innovative capability to refine diagnosis, improve prognostication, and more accurately codify disease burden. A further dividend may be the validation and application of biomarkers that can be used in studies aimed at identifying and monitoring preventative, protective and even restorative properties of novel neurotherapeutics in MS. This Review discusses the utility of ocular motor measures in patients with MS to characterize disruption to wide-ranging networks that support cognitive function.

  3. A DYNAMICAL SIGNATURE OF MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    Richer, Harvey B.; Heyl, Jeremy; Anderson, Jay; Kalirai, Jason S.; Shara, Michael M.; Dotter, Aaron; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Rich, R. Michael E-mail: heyl@phas.ubc.ca E-mail: jkalarai@stsci.edu E-mail: aaron.dotter@gmail.com E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu

    2013-07-01

    Based on the width of its main sequence, and an actual observed split when viewed through particular filters, it is widely accepted that 47 Tucanae contains multiple stellar populations. In this contribution, we divide the main sequence of 47 Tuc into four color groups, which presumably represent stars of various chemical compositions. The kinematic properties of each of these groups are explored via proper motions, and a strong signal emerges of differing proper-motion anisotropies with differing main-sequence color; the bluest main-sequence stars exhibit the largest proper-motion anisotropy which becomes undetectable for the reddest stars. In addition, the bluest stars are also the most centrally concentrated. A similar analysis for Small Magellanic Cloud stars, which are located in the background of 47 Tuc on our frames, yields none of the anisotropy exhibited by the 47 Tuc stars. We discuss implications of these results for possible formation scenarios of the various populations.

  4. Uncovering the Hidden Molecular Signatures of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    aromatase   inhibitor ...is  more   natural  for  samples  to  display  a  range  of  activation  levels  for  a  given  signature.  This...more   natural   for   human   breast   tumors   to   display   a   range   in   signal  activation  levels  or

  5. The molecular signature of selection underlying human adaptations.

    PubMed

    Harris, Eugene E; Meyer, Diogo

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade, advances in human population genetics and comparative genomics have resulted in important contributions to our understanding of human genetic diversity and genetic adaptation. For the first time, we are able to reliably detect the signature of natural selection from patterns of DNA polymorphism. Identifying the effects of natural selection in this way provides a crucial piece of evidence needed to support hypotheses of human adaptation. This review provides a detailed description of the theory and analytical approaches used to detect signatures of natural selection in the human genome. We discuss these methods in relation to four classic human traits--skin color, the Duffy blood group, bitter-taste sensation, and lactase persistence. By highlighting these four traits we are able to discuss the ways in which analyses of DNA polymorphism can lead to inferences regarding past histories of selection. Specifically, we can infer the importance of specific regimes of selection (i.e. directional selection, balancing selection, and purifying selection) in the evolution of a trait because these different types of selection leave different patterns of DNA polymorphism. In addition, we demonstrate how these types of data can be used to estimate the time frame in which selection operated on a trait. As the field has advanced, a general issue that has come to the forefront is how specific demographic events in human history, such as population expansions, bottlenecks, and subdivision of populations, have also left a signature across the genome that can interfere with our detection of the footprint of selection at particular genes. Therefore, we discuss this general problem with respect to the four traits reviewed here, and describe the ways in which the signature of selection can be teased from a background signature of demographic history. Finally, we move from a discussion of analyses of selection motivated by a "candidate-gene" approach, in which a priori

  6. Molecular Signatures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: A Review and Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Erna S.; Mackiewicz, Miroslaw; Gislason, Thorarinn; Teff, Karen L.; Pack, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are largely mediated by chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. The primary molecular domains affected are sympathetic activity, oxidative stress and inflammation. Other affected domains include adipokines, adhesion molecules and molecules that respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress. Changes in molecular domains affected by OSA, assessed in blood and/or urine, can provide a molecular signature for OSA that could potentially be used diagnostically and to predict who is likely to develop different OSA-related comorbidities. High-throughput discovery strategies such as microarrays, assessing changes in gene expression in circulating blood cells, have the potential to find new candidates and pathways thereby expanding the molecular signatures for OSA. More research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiological significance of these molecular signatures and their relationship with OSA comorbidities. Many OSA subjects are obese, and obesity is an independent risk factor for many comorbidities associated with OSA. Moreover, obesity affects the same molecular pathways as OSA. Thus, a challenge to establishing a molecular signature for OSA is to separate the effects of OSA from obesity. We propose that the optimal strategy is to evaluate the temporal changes in relevant molecular pathways during sleep and, in particular, the alterations from before to after sleep when assessed in blood and/or urine. Such changes will be at least partly a consequence of chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation that occurs during sleep. Citation: Arnardottir ES; Mackiewicz M; Gislason T; Teff KL; Pack AI. Molecular signatures of obstructive sleep apnea in adults: A review and perspective. SLEEP 2009;32(4):447–470. PMID:19413140

  7. Multi-Tissue Microarray Analysis Identifies a Molecular Signature of Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Sarah E.; Cheng, Chia-Ho; Atkinson, Donald L.; Krcmery, Jennifer; Guzman, Claudia E.; Kent, David T.; Zukor, Katherine; Marx, Kenneth A.; Odelberg, Shannon J.; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    The inability to functionally repair tissues that are lost as a consequence of disease or injury remains a significant challenge for regenerative medicine. The molecular and cellular processes involved in complete restoration of tissue architecture and function are expected to be complex and remain largely unknown. Unlike humans, certain salamanders can completely regenerate injured tissues and lost appendages without scar formation. A parsimonious hypothesis would predict that all of these regenerative activities are regulated, at least in part, by a common set of genes. To test this hypothesis and identify genes that might control conserved regenerative processes, we performed a comprehensive microarray analysis of the early regenerative response in five regeneration-competent tissues from the newt Notophthalmus viridescens. Consistent with this hypothesis, we established a molecular signature for regeneration that consists of common genes or gene family members that exhibit dynamic differential regulation during regeneration in multiple tissue types. These genes include members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and its regulators, extracellular matrix components, genes involved in controlling cytoskeleton dynamics, and a variety of immune response factors. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis validated and supported their functional activities in conserved regenerative processes. Surprisingly, dendrogram clustering and RadViz classification also revealed that each regenerative tissue had its own unique temporal expression profile, pointing to an inherent tissue-specific regenerative gene program. These new findings demand a reconsideration of how we conceptualize regenerative processes and how we devise new strategies for regenerative medicine. PMID:23300656

  8. Molecular signatures of lung cancer: defining new diagnostic and therapeutic paradigms.

    PubMed

    Balko, Justin M; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2012-02-01

    Molecular profiling holds great promise for improving our ability to diagnose, prognosticate, and select individualized treatments for lung cancer patients. However, using multidimensional data and novel technologies to derive these profiles is limited by our ability to employ the assay in a clinical scenario where it can impact the course of disease. Although many molecular signatures have been reported in lung cancer, as of yet, few have been sufficiently validated for widespread clinical use. Recently, several novel signatures have been reported, which address critical aspects of patient care and/or demonstrate improved efforts for appropriate clinical validation. Here, we present our opinion on the current state of the field of molecular signatures in lung cancer.

  9. Instance influence estimation for hyperspectral target signature characterization using extended functions of multiple instances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Sheng; Zare, Alina

    2016-05-01

    The Extended Functions of Multiple Instances (eFUMI) algorithm1 is a generalization of Multiple Instance Learning (MIL). In eFUMI, only bag level (i.e. set level) labels are needed to estimate target signatures from mixed data. The training bags in eFUMI are labeled positive if any data point in a bag contains or represents any proportion of the target signature and are labeled as a negative bag if all data points in the bag do not represent any target. From these imprecise labels, eFUMI has been shown to be effective at estimating target signatures in hyperspectral subpixel target detection problems. One motivating scenario for the use of eFUMI is where an analyst circles objects/regions of interest in a hyperspectral scene such that the target signatures of these objects can be estimated and be used to determine whether other instances of the object appear elsewhere in the image collection. The regions highlighted by the analyst serve as the imprecise labels for eFUMI. Often, an analyst may want to iteratively refine their imprecise labels. In this paper, we present an approach for estimating the influence on the estimated target signature if the label for a particular input data point is modified. This instance influence estimation guides an analyst to focus on (re-)labeling the data points that provide the largest change in the resulting estimated target signature and, thus, reduce the amount of time an analyst needs to spend refining the labels for a hyperspectral scene. Results are shown on real hyperspectral sub-pixel target detection data sets.

  10. Molecular-signature analyses support the establishment of the actinobacterial genus Sphaerimonospora (Mingma et al. 2016).

    PubMed

    Meyers, Paul R

    2017-08-18

    The genera Microbispora and Sphaerimonospora were examined for GyrB and RecA amino-acid signatures to determine whether molecular-signature analyses support the recent establishment of the genus Sphaerimonospora. The creation of Sphaerimonospora was based mainly upon morphological differences between Microbispora and Sphaerimonospora and the clustering of the type strains of the two genera in phylogenetic trees based on a multilocus sequence analysis. The molecular-signature analyses showed that all members of Sphaerimonospora can be distinguished from all members of Microbispora at 14 amino acid positions in the GyrB protein and at four positions in the shorter RecA protein. These amino acid differences can be used as signatures to differentiate the members of these genera from each other and thus provide support for the establishment of the genus Sphaerimonospora. This is the first demonstration of the use of molecular signatures to support the establishment of a new genus in the family Streptosporangiaceae. Following the transfer of Microbispora mesophila and Microbispora thailandensis from Microbispora to Sphaerimonospora, all species in the genus Microbispora are characterised by the insertion of a small, hydrophobic amino acid after position 208 in the GyrB protein. This insertion is absent from the GyrB protein of members of the genus Sphaerimonospora. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimation of the Performance of Multiple Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures for Detecting Shielded HEU

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson; Scott M. Watson; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive modeling study has been carried out to evaluate the utility of multiple active neutron interrogation signatures for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). The modeling effort focused on varying HEU masses from 1 kg to 20 kg; varying types of shields including wood, steel, cement, polyethylene, and borated polyethylene; varying depths of the HEU in the shields, and varying engineered shields immediately surrounding the HEU including steel, tungsten, and cadmium. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures were the focus of the study and false negative detection probabilities versus measurement time were used as a performance metric. To facilitate comparisons among different approaches an automated method was developed to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for different sets of model variables for multiple background count rate conditions. This paper summarizes results or the analysis, including laboratory benchmark comparisons between simulations and experiments. The important impact engineered shields can play towards degrading detectability and methods for mitigating this will be discussed.

  12. Molecular signatures of mouse TRPV1-lineage neurons revealed by RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Samridhi C; Mishra, Santosh K; Maric, Dragan; Kaszas, Krisztian; Gonnella, Gian Luigi; Clokie, Samuel J; Kominsky, Hal D; Gross, Jacklyn R; Keller, Jason M; Mannes, Andrew J; Hoon, Mark A; Iadarola, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Disorders of pain neural systems are frequently chronic and, when recalcitrant to treatment, can severely degrade the quality of life. The pain pathway begins with sensory neurons in dorsal root or trigeminal ganglia, and the neuronal subpopulations that express the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) ion channel transduce sensations of painful heat and inflammation and play a fundamental role in clinical pain arising from cancer and arthritis. In the present study, we elucidate the complete transcriptomes of neurons from the TRPV1 lineage and a non-TRPV1 neuroglial population in sensory ganglia through the combined application of next-gen deep RNA-Seq, genetic neuronal labeling with fluorescence-activated cell sorting, or neuron-selective chemoablation. RNA-Seq accurately quantitates gene expression, a difficult parameter to determine with most other methods, especially for very low and very high expressed genes. Differentially expressed genes are present at every level of cellular function from the nucleus to the plasma membrane. We identified many ligand receptor pairs in the TRPV1 population, suggesting that autonomous presynaptic regulation may be a major regulatory mechanism in nociceptive neurons. The data define, in a quantitative, cell population-specific fashion, the molecular signature of a distinct and clinically important group of pain-sensing neurons and provide an overall framework for understanding the transcriptome of TRPV1 nociceptive neurons. Next-gen RNA-Seq, combined with molecular genetics, provides a comprehensive and quantitative measurement of transcripts in TRPV1 lineage neurons and a contrasting transcriptome from non-TRPV1 neurons and cells. The transcriptome highlights previously unrecognized protein families, identifies multiple molecular circuits for excitatory or inhibitory autocrine and paracrine signaling, and suggests new combinatorial approaches to pain control. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Phylogeny and molecular signatures for the phylum Fusobacteria and its distinct subclades.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S; Sethi, Mohit

    2014-08-01

    The members of the phylum Fusobacteria and its two families, Fusobacteriaceae and Leptotrichiaceae, are distinguished at present mainly on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA gene trees and analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequences in the 16S-23S rDNA. However, no biochemical or molecular characteristics are known that are uniquely shared by all of most members of these groups of bacteria. We report here detailed phylogenetic and comparative analyses on 45 sequenced Fusobacteria genomes to examine their evolutionary relationships and to identify molecular markers that are specific for the members of this phylum. In phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences or concatenated sequences for 17 conserved proteins, members of the families Fusobacteriaceae and Leptotrichiaceae formed strongly supported clades and were clearly distinguished. In these trees, the species from the genus Fusobacterium also formed a number of well-supported clades. In parallel, comparative analyses on Fusobacteria genomes have identified 44 conserved signature indels (CSIs) in proteins involved in a broad range of functions that are either specific for the phylum Fusobacteria or a number of distinct subclades within this phylum. Seven of these CSIs in important proteins are uniquely present in the protein homologs of all sequenced Fusobacteria and they provide potential molecular markers for this phylum. Six and three other CSIs in other protein sequences are specific for members of the families Fusobacteriaceae and Leptotrichiaceae, respectively, and they provide novel molecular means for distinguishing members of these two families. Fourteen additional CSIs in different proteins, which are specific for either members of the genera Fusobacterium or Leptotrichia, or a number of other well-supported clades of Fusobacteria at multiple phylogenetic levels, provide molecular markers for these groups and information regarding the evolutionary relationships among the

  14. Uncovering the Hidden Molecular Signatures of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Naujokasa, Naila Chughtaia, Jason I. Herschkowitze, Aleix Pratf,g, Anna Marie Mulliganh,i, William J. Mullera,b, Robert D. Cardiffd, Jeff P. Greggd...murine mammary carcinoma models and human breast tumors. Genome Biol 8(5):R76. 4. Brenton JD, Carey LA, Ahmed AA, Caldas C (2005) Molecular classification

  15. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Pospisil, Tyler C.; Jones, Kayla S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  16. A Molecular Signature of Depression in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Sibille, Etienne; Wang, Yingjie; Joeyen-Waldorf, Jennifer; Gaiteri, Chris; Surget, Alexandre; Oh, Sunghee; Belzung, Catherine; Tseng, George C.; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Major depressive disorder is a heterogeneous illness with a mostly un-characterized pathology. Recent gene array attempts to identify the molecular underpinnings of the illness in human postmortem subjects have not yielded a consensus. The authors hypothesized that controlling several sources of clinical and technical variability and supporting their analysis with array results from a parallel study in the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) rodent model of depression would facilitate identification of the molecular pathology of major depression. Method Large-scale gene expression was monitored in postmortem tissue from the anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala in paired male subjects with familial major depression and matched control subjects without major depression (N=14–16 pairs). Area dissections and analytical approaches were optimized. Results from the major depression group were compared with those from the UCMS study and confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Gene coexpression network analysis was performed on transcripts with conserved major depression-UCMS effects. Results Significant and bidirectional predictions of altered gene expression were identified in amygdala between major depression and the UCMS model of depression. These effects were detected at the group level and also identified a subgroup of depressed subjects with a more homogeneous molecular pathology. This phylogenetically conserved “molecular signature” of major depression was reversed by antidepressants in mice, identified two distinct oligodendrocyte and neuronal phenotypes, and participated in highly cohesive and interactive gene co-expression networks. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that the biological liability to major depression is reflected in a persistent molecular pathology that affects the amygdala, and support the hypothesis of maladaptive changes in this brain region as a putative primary pathology in major

  17. Micro-Doppler analysis of multiple frequency continuous wave radar signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Michael G.; Rogers, Robert L.

    2007-04-01

    Micro-Doppler refers to Doppler scattering returns produced by non rigid-body motion. Micro-Doppler gives rise to many detailed radar image features in addition to those associated with bulk target motion. Targets of different classes (for example, humans, animals, and vehicles) produce micro-Doppler images that are often distinguishable even by nonexpert observers. Micro-Doppler features have great potential for use in automatic target classification algorithms. Although the potential benefit of using micro-Doppler in classification algorithms is high, relatively little experimental (non-synthetic) micro-Doppler data exists. Much of the existing experimental data comes from highly cooperative targets (human or vehicle targets directly approaching the radar). This research involved field data collection and analysis of micro-Doppler radar signatures from non-cooperative targets. The data was collected using a low cost Xband multiple frequency continuous wave (MFCW) radar with three transmit frequencies. The collected MFCW radar signatures contain data from humans, vehicles, and animals. The presented data includes micro-Doppler signatures previously unavailable in the literature such as crawling humans and various animal species. The animal micro-Doppler signatures include deer, dog, and goat datasets. This research focuses on the analysis of micro-Doppler from noncooperative targets approaching the radar at various angles, maneuvers, and postures.

  18. Analyses and improvement of a broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme based on quantum GHZ entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Daowen; Zou, Xiangfu; Mateus, Paulo

    2017-06-01

    A broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme based on quantum GHZ entanglement has been presented recently. It is said that the scheme's unconditional security is guaranteed by adopting quantum key preparation, quantum encryption algorithm and quantum entanglement. In this paper, we prove that each signatory can get the signed message just by an intercept-resend attack. Then, we show there still exist some participant attacks and external attacks. Specifically, we verify the message sender Alice can impersonate each signatory to sign the message at will, and so is the signature collector Charlie. Also, we demonstrate that the receiver Bob can forge the signature successfully, and with respect to the external attacks, the eavesdropper Eve can modify the signature at random. Besides, we discover Eve can change the signed message at random, and Eve can impersonate Alice as the message sender without being discovered. In particular, we propose an improved scheme based on the original one and show that it is secure against not only the attacks mentioned above but also some collusion attacks.

  19. Quantum signatures of a molecular nanomagnet in direct magnetocaloric measurements.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Joseph W; Collison, David; McInnes, Eric J L; Schnack, Jürgen; Palacios, Elias; Evangelisti, Marco

    2014-10-22

    Geometric spin frustration in low-dimensional materials, such as the two-dimensional kagome or triangular antiferromagnetic nets, can significantly enhance the change of the magnetic entropy and adiabatic temperature following a change in the applied magnetic field, that is, the magnetocaloric effect. In principle, an equivalent outcome should also be observable in certain high-symmetry zero-dimensional, that is, molecular, structures with frustrated topologies. Here we report experimental realization of this in a heptametallic gadolinium molecule. Adiabatic demagnetization experiments reach ~200 mK, the first sub-Kelvin cooling with any molecular nanomagnet, and reveal isentropes (the constant entropy paths followed in the temperature-field plane) with a rich structure. The latter is shown to be a direct manifestation of the trigonal antiferromagnetic net structure, allowing study of frustration-enhanced magnetocaloric effects in a finite system.

  20. Identification of a Unique TGF-β Dependent Molecular and Functional Signature in Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Butovsky, Oleg; Jedrychowski, Mark P.; Moore, Craig S.; Cialic, Ron; Lanser, Amanda J.; Gabriely, Galina; Koeglsperger, Thomas; Dake, Ben; Wu, Pauline M.; Doykan, Camille E.; Fanek, Zain; Liu, LiPing; Chen, Zhuoxun; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Gygi, Steven P.; Antel, Jack P.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS) that participate both in normal CNS function and disease. We investigated the molecular signature of microglia and identified 239 genes and 8 microRNAs that were uniquely or highly expressed in microglia vs. myeloid and other immune cells. Out of 239 genes, 106 were enriched in microglia as compared to astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons. This microglia signature was not observed in microglial lines or in monocytes recruited to the CNS and was also observed in human microglia. Based on this signature, we found a crucial role for TGF-β in microglial biology that included: 1) the requirement of TGF-β for the in vitro development of microglia that express the microglial molecular signature characteristic of adult microglia; and 2) the absence of microglia in CNS TGF-β1 deficient mice. Our results identify a unique microglial signature that is dependent on TGF-β signaling which provides insights into microglial biology and the possibility of targeting microglia for the treatment of CNS disease. PMID:24316888

  1. A new molecular signature method for prediction of driver cancer pathways from transcriptional data.

    PubMed

    Rykunov, Dmitry; Beckmann, Noam D; Li, Hui; Uzilov, Andrew; Schadt, Eric E; Reva, Boris

    2016-06-20

    Assigning cancer patients to the most effective treatments requires an understanding of the molecular basis of their disease. While DNA-based molecular profiling approaches have flourished over the past several years to transform our understanding of driver pathways across a broad range of tumors, a systematic characterization of key driver pathways based on RNA data has not been undertaken. Here we introduce a new approach for predicting the status of driver cancer pathways based on signature functions derived from RNA sequencing data. To identify the driver cancer pathways of interest, we mined DNA variant data from TCGA and nominated driver alterations in seven major cancer pathways in breast, ovarian and colon cancer tumors. The activation status of these driver pathways were then characterized using RNA sequencing data by constructing classification signature functions in training datasets and then testing the accuracy of the signatures in test datasets. The signature functions differentiate well tumors with nominated pathway activation from tumors with no signs of activation: average AUC equals to 0.83. Our results confirm that driver genomic alterations are distinctively displayed at the transcriptional level and that the transcriptional signatures can generally provide an alternative to DNA sequencing methods in detecting specific driver pathways.

  2. A new molecular signature method for prediction of driver cancer pathways from transcriptional data

    PubMed Central

    Rykunov, Dmitry; Beckmann, Noam D.; Li, Hui; Uzilov, Andrew; Schadt, Eric E.; Reva, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Assigning cancer patients to the most effective treatments requires an understanding of the molecular basis of their disease. While DNA-based molecular profiling approaches have flourished over the past several years to transform our understanding of driver pathways across a broad range of tumors, a systematic characterization of key driver pathways based on RNA data has not been undertaken. Here we introduce a new approach for predicting the status of driver cancer pathways based on signature functions derived from RNA sequencing data. To identify the driver cancer pathways of interest, we mined DNA variant data from TCGA and nominated driver alterations in seven major cancer pathways in breast, ovarian and colon cancer tumors. The activation status of these driver pathways were then characterized using RNA sequencing data by constructing classification signature functions in training datasets and then testing the accuracy of the signatures in test datasets. The signature functions differentiate well tumors with nominated pathway activation from tumors with no signs of activation: average AUC equals to 0.83. Our results confirm that driver genomic alterations are distinctively displayed at the transcriptional level and that the transcriptional signatures can generally provide an alternative to DNA sequencing methods in detecting specific driver pathways. PMID:27098033

  3. A Molecular Signature of Myalgia in Myotonic Dystrophy 2.

    PubMed

    Moshourab, Rabih; Palada, Vinko; Grunwald, Stefanie; Grieben, Ulrike; Lewin, Gary R; Spuler, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Chronic muscle pain affects close to 20% of the population and is a major health burden. The underlying mechanisms of muscle pain are difficult to investigate as pain presents in patients with very diverse histories. Treatment options are therefore limited and not tailored to underlying mechanisms. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of myalgia we investigated a homogeneous group of patients suffering from myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), a monogenic disorder presenting with myalgia in at least 50% of affected patients. After IRB approval we performed an observational cross-sectional cohort study and recruited 42 patients with genetically confirmed DM2 plus 20 healthy age and gender matched control subjects. All participants were subjected to an extensive sensory-testing protocol. In addition, RNA sequencing was performed from 12 muscle biopsy specimens obtained from DM2 patients. Clinical sensory testing as well as RNA sequencing clearly separated DM2 myalgic from non-myalgia patients and also from healthy controls. In particular pressure pain thresholds were significantly lowered for all muscles tested in myalgic DM2 patients but were not significantly different between non-myalgic patients and healthy controls. The expression of fourteen muscle expressed genes in myalgic patients was significantly up or down-regulated in myalgic compared to non-myalgic DM2 patients. Our data support the idea that molecular changes in the muscles of DM2 patients are associated with muscle pain. Further studies should address whether muscle-specific molecular pathways play a significant role in myalgia in order to facilitate the development of mechanism-based therapeutic strategies to treat musculoskeletal pain. This study was funded by the German Research Society (DFG, GK1631), KAP programme of Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin and Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene signatures in wound tissue as evidenced by molecular profiling in the chick embryo model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modern functional genomic approaches may help to better understand the molecular events involved in tissue morphogenesis and to identify molecular signatures and pathways. We have recently applied transcriptomic profiling to evidence molecular signatures in the development of the normal chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and in tumor engrafted on the CAM. We have now extended our studies by performing a transcriptome analysis in the "wound model" of the chicken CAM, which is another relevant model of tissue morphogenesis. Results To induce granulation tissue (GT) formation, we performed wounding of the chicken CAM and compared gene expression to normal CAM at the same stage of development. Matched control samples from the same individual were used. We observed a total of 282 genes up-regulated and 44 genes down-regulated assuming a false-discovery rate at 5% and a fold change > 2. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis lead to the identification of several categories that are associated to organismal injury, tissue morphology, cellular movement, inflammatory disease, development and immune system. Endothelial cell data filtering leads to the identification of several new genes with an endothelial cell signature. Conclusions The chick chorioallantoic wound model allows the identification of gene signatures and pathways involved in GT formation and neoangiogenesis. This may constitute a fertile ground for further studies. PMID:20840761

  5. Reading the molecular signature of ecosystems in dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Carsten; Roth, Vanessa-Nina; Dittmar, Thorsten; Gleixner, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    To make forecasts about the behavior, origin and fate of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the environment, we need further insights into the molecular composition of this complex mixture. The development of soft ionization procedures and mass spectrometers capable of ultrahigh resolution (Fourier-Transform Mass Spectrometry, FTMS) have opened important new horizons in this regard. However, the application of such systems is restricted due to high purchase and maintenance costs. The introduction of the improved version of the Orbitrap FTMS analyzer ("Elite") in 2011 could open new perspectives for the molecular-level investigation of DOM, as it combines high performance with lower overall costs. We compared the Orbitrap with an established FT-ICR-MS (ion cyclotron resonance, 15 Tesla) to assess the potential of this analyzer on a broad set of 17 terrestrial and aquatic DOM samples prepared by solid phase extraction (SPE-DOM, Dittmar et al. 2008). The dataset included groundwater, soil water from different depths and vegetation covers (forests, grassland), as well as bog, river, lake and marine waters. We here show that the Orbitrap analyzer is able to detect hard-to-resolve nitrogen and sulfur containing compounds (triplet signal [CHO]N2O2, [CHO]C5, [CHO]C2H4S) up to a mass-to-charge ratio of 430 and well retrieves the intensity information of the FT-ICR-MS. Both points have been recently reported as major obstacles in the detailed molecular-level analyses of DOM by Orbitrap systems (Hawkes et al. 2016). In our data, slight deviations in intensity representation were only found in samples characterized by stronger aromaticity, and especially in the lower mass range (below m/z 250). A subset of > 6000 formulae detected in both sets was used to further characterize the sample set on a molecular level. The derived ecological information, as assessed by ordination and post-ordination gradient fitting, was highly consistent among both datasets. A dominating first

  6. Identification of a common Wnt-associated genetic signature across multiple cell types in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    West, James D.; Austin, Eric D.; Gaskill, Christa; Marriott, Shennea; Baskir, Rubin; Bilousova, Ganna; Jean, Jyh-Chang; Hemnes, Anna R.; Menon, Swapna; Bloodworth, Nathaniel C.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Kropski, Johnathan A.; Irwin, David; Ware, Lorraine B.; Wheeler, Lisa; Hong, Charles C.; Meyrick, Barbara; Loyd, James E.; Bowman, Aaron B.; Ess, Kevin C.; Klemm, Dwight J.; Young, Pampee P.; Merryman, W. David; Kotton, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Understanding differences in gene expression that increase risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is essential to understanding the molecular basis for disease. Previous studies on patient samples were limited by end-stage disease effects or by use of nonadherent cells, which are not ideal to model vascular cells in vivo. These studies addressed the hypothesis that pathological processes associated with PAH may be identified via a genetic signature common across multiple cell types. Expression array experiments were initially conducted to analyze cell types at different stages of vascular differentiation (mesenchymal stromal and endothelial) derived from PAH patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Molecular pathways that were altered in the PAH cell lines were then compared with those in fibroblasts from 21 patients, including those with idiopathic and heritable PAH. Wnt was identified as a target pathway and was validated in vitro using primary patient mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggest that the molecular lesions that cause PAH are present in all cell types evaluated, regardless of origin, and that stimulation of the Wnt signaling pathway was a common molecular defect in both heritable and idiopathic PAH. PMID:24871858

  7. Identification of a common Wnt-associated genetic signature across multiple cell types in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    West, James D; Austin, Eric D; Gaskill, Christa; Marriott, Shennea; Baskir, Rubin; Bilousova, Ganna; Jean, Jyh-Chang; Hemnes, Anna R; Menon, Swapna; Bloodworth, Nathaniel C; Fessel, Joshua P; Kropski, Johnathan A; Irwin, David; Ware, Lorraine B; Wheeler, Lisa; Hong, Charles C; Meyrick, Barbara; Loyd, James E; Bowman, Aaron B; Ess, Kevin C; Klemm, Dwight J; Young, Pampee P; Merryman, W David; Kotton, Darrell; Majka, Susan M

    2014-09-01

    Understanding differences in gene expression that increase risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is essential to understanding the molecular basis for disease. Previous studies on patient samples were limited by end-stage disease effects or by use of nonadherent cells, which are not ideal to model vascular cells in vivo. These studies addressed the hypothesis that pathological processes associated with PAH may be identified via a genetic signature common across multiple cell types. Expression array experiments were initially conducted to analyze cell types at different stages of vascular differentiation (mesenchymal stromal and endothelial) derived from PAH patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Molecular pathways that were altered in the PAH cell lines were then compared with those in fibroblasts from 21 patients, including those with idiopathic and heritable PAH. Wnt was identified as a target pathway and was validated in vitro using primary patient mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggest that the molecular lesions that cause PAH are present in all cell types evaluated, regardless of origin, and that stimulation of the Wnt signaling pathway was a common molecular defect in both heritable and idiopathic PAH.

  8. Characteristic molecular and proteomic signatures of drug-induced liver injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jung Woo; Bae, Hyun Jin; Shen, Qingyu; Park, Se Jin; Kim, Hyung Seok; Shin, Woo Chan; Yang, Hee Doo; Jin, Chan Young; You, Jueng Soo; Kang, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hoguen; Ahn, Young Min; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2015-02-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern during drug development and remains one of the main reasons for withdrawal of drugs from the market. Although it is crucial to develop methods that will detect potential hepatotoxicity of drug candidates as early and as quickly as possible, there is still a lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers for DILI that consequently leads to a scarcity of reliable hepatotoxic data. Hence, in this study, we assessed characteristic molecular signatures in rat liver treated with drugs (pyrazinamide, ranitidine, enalapril, carbamazepine and chlorpromazine) that are known to cause DILI in humans. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of transcriptome changes induced by DILI-causing drugs resulted in three different subclusters on dendrogram, i.e., hepatocellular, cholestatic and mixed type of DILI at early time points (2 days), and multiclassification analysis suggested 31 genes as discernible markers for each DILI pattern. Further analysis for characteristic molecular signature of each DILI pattern provided a molecular basis for different modes of DILI action. A proteomics study of the same rat livers was used to confirm the results, and the two sets of data showed 60 matching classifiers. In conclusion, the data of different DILI-causing drug treatments from genomic analysis in a rat model suggest that DILI-specific molecular signatures can discriminate different patterns of DILI at an early exposure time point, and that they provide useful information for mechanistic studies that may lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of DILI.

  9. Circulating miRNAs revealed as surrogate molecular signatures for the early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sanjay; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Suman, Shankar; Kumar, Vijay; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2015-12-01

    The miRNAs have well studied roles in cancer. Here, we identified altered miRNA expression by global miRNA profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of breast cancer (n = 15) and healthy subjects (n = 15), and further validated the selected miRNAs in PBMCs (n = 45), blood plasma (n = 45) and breast tissue samples (n = 09). The expression of altered miRNAs was also evaluated in PBMCs among early stage (n = 32), advanced stage (n = 13), triple positive (n = 5) and triple negative (n = 5) breast cancer patients. Results showed differential pattern of expressions of these miRNAs in multiple cohorts, however in early stage breast cancer, miR-106a-5p and miR-454-3p were upregulated (p < 0.05), miR-195-5p and miR-495 were downregulated (p < 0.05) in PBMCs. In addition, these miRNAs were also significantly associated with cancer and ErbB signaling pathways. Multiple regression analysis and receiver-operative curve (ROC) analysis of miR-195-5p and miR-495 with area under curve (AUC) of 0.901 showed best discriminating combination for early stage breast cancer detection. In summary, the present study delineated the importance of miR-195-5p and miR-495 miRNAs as prospective circulating surrogate molecular signatures for early detection of breast cancer.

  10. The molecular and gene regulatory signature of a neuron

    PubMed Central

    Hobert, Oliver; Carrera, Inés; Stefanakis, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    Neuron-type specific gene batteries define the morphological and functional diversity of cell types in the nervous system. Here, we discuss the composition of neuron-type specific gene batteries and illustrate gene regulatory strategies employed by distinct organisms from C.elegans to higher vertebrates, which are instrumental in determining the unique gene expression profile and molecular composition of individual neuronal cell types. Based on principles learned from prokaryotic gene regulation, we argue that neuronal, terminal gene batteries are functionally grouped into parallel acting “regulons”. The theoretical concepts discussed here provide testable hypotheses for future experimental analysis into the exact gene regulatory mechanisms that are employed in the generation of neuronal diversity and identity. PMID:20663572

  11. Contraction Signatures toward Dense Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Friesen, R. K.; Martin, P. G.; Caselli, P.; Kauffmann, J.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of an HCO+ (3-2) and N2D+ (3-2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO+ asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter δv, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO+ profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the δv and collapse model results, we find that δv is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km s-1) to supersonic (0.4 km s-1), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cores have contraction speeds significantly less than their free-fall speeds. Only 7 of 28 starless cores have spectra well-fit by the collapse model, which more than doubles (15 of 28) for protostellar cores. Starless cores with masses greater than the Jeans mass (M/MJ > 1) are somewhat more likely to show contraction motions. We find no trend of optically thin non-thermal line width with M/MJ, suggesting that any undetected contraction motions are small and subsonic. Most starless cores in Perseus are either not in a state of collapse or expansion, or are in a very early stage of collapse.

  12. CONTRACTION SIGNATURES TOWARD DENSE CORES IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J. L.; Friesen, R. K.; Martin, P. G.; Caselli, P.; Pineda, J. E.; Kauffmann, J.

    2016-03-10

    We report the results of an HCO{sup +} (3–2) and N{sub 2}D{sup +} (3–2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO{sup +} asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter δ{sub v}, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO{sup +} profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the δ{sub v} and collapse model results, we find that δ{sub v} is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km s{sup −1}) to supersonic (0.4 km s{sup −1}), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cores have contraction speeds significantly less than their free-fall speeds. Only 7 of 28 starless cores have spectra well-fit by the collapse model, which more than doubles (15 of 28) for protostellar cores. Starless cores with masses greater than the Jeans mass (M/M{sub J} > 1) are somewhat more likely to show contraction motions. We find no trend of optically thin non-thermal line width with M/M{sub J}, suggesting that any undetected contraction motions are small and subsonic. Most starless cores in Perseus are either not in a state of collapse or expansion, or are in a very early stage of collapse.

  13. Expression profiling elucidates a molecular gene signature for pulmonary hypertension in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Sunit; Zhou, Tong; Javaid, Kamran; Abbasi, Taimur; Casanova, Nancy; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Wade, Michael S.; Noth, Imre; Sweiss, Nadera J.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH), when it complicates sarcoidosis, carries a poor prognosis, in part because it is difficult to detect early in patients with worsening respiratory symptoms. Pathogenesis of sarcoidosis occurs via incompletely characterized mechanisms that are distinct from the mechanisms of pulmonary vascular remodeling well known to occur in conjunction with other chronic lung diseases. To address the need for a biomarker to aid in early detection as well as the gap in knowledge regarding the mechanisms of PH in sarcoidosis, we used genome-wide peripheral blood gene expression analysis and identified an 18-gene signature capable of distinguishing sarcoidosis patients with PH (n = 8), sarcoidosis patients without PH (n = 17), and healthy controls (n = 45). The discriminative accuracy of this 18-gene signature was 100% in separating sarcoidosis patients with PH from those without it. If validated in a large replicate cohort, this signature could potentially be used as a diagnostic molecular biomarker for sarcoidosis-associated PH. PMID:28090288

  14. Specific molecular signatures predict decitabine response in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Meldi, Kristen; Qin, Tingting; Buchi, Francesca; Droin, Nathalie; Sotzen, Jason; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Selimoglu-Buet, Dorothée; Masala, Erico; Allione, Bernardino; Gioia, Daniela; Poloni, Antonella; Lunghi, Monia; Solary, Eric; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Santini, Valeria; Figueroa, Maria E

    2015-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) are characterized by mutations in genes encoding epigenetic modifiers and aberrant DNA methylation. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DMTis) are used to treat these disorders, but response is highly variable, with few means to predict which patients will benefit. Here, we examined baseline differences in mutations, DNA methylation, and gene expression in 40 CMML patients who were responsive or resistant to decitabine (DAC) in order to develop a molecular means of predicting response at diagnosis. While somatic mutations did not differentiate responders from nonresponders, we identified 167 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of DNA at baseline that distinguished responders from nonresponders using next-generation sequencing. These DMRs were primarily localized to nonpromoter regions and overlapped with distal regulatory enhancers. Using the methylation profiles, we developed an epigenetic classifier that accurately predicted DAC response at the time of diagnosis. Transcriptional analysis revealed differences in gene expression at diagnosis between responders and nonresponders. In responders, the upregulated genes included those that are associated with the cell cycle, potentially contributing to effective DAC incorporation. Treatment with CXCL4 and CXCL7, which were overexpressed in nonresponders, blocked DAC effects in isolated normal CD34+ and primary CMML cells, suggesting that their upregulation contributes to primary DAC resistance.

  15. Molecular signature of organic nitrogen in septic-impacted groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, William A.; Longnecker, Krista; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved inorganic and organic nitrogen levels are elevated in aquatic systems due to anthropogenic activities. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) arises from various sources, and its impact could be more clearly constrained if specific sources were identified and if the molecular-level composition of DON were better understood. In this work, the pharmaceutical carbamazepine was used to identify septic-impacted groundwater in a coastal watershed. Using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry data, the nitrogen-containing features of the dissolved organic matter in septic-impacted and non-impacted samples were compared. The septic-impacted groundwater samples have a larger abundance of nitrogen-containing formulas. Impacted samples have additional DON features in the regions ascribed as ‘protein-like’ and ‘lipid-like’ in van Krevelen space and have more intense nitrogen-containing features in a specific region of a carbon versus mass plot. These features are potential indicators of dissolved organic nitrogen arising from septic effluents, and this work suggests that ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry is a valuable tool to identify and characterize sources of DON.

  16. Translating a gene expression signature for multiple myeloma prognosis into a robust high-throughput assay for clinical use

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Widespread adoption of genomic technologies in the management of heterogeneous indications, including Multiple Myeloma, has been hindered by concern over variation between published gene expression signatures, difficulty in physician interpretation and the challenge of obtaining sufficient genetic material from limited patient specimens. Methods Since 2006, the 70-gene prognostic signature, developed by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) has been applied to over 4,700 patients in studies performed in 4 countries and described in 17 peer-reviewed publications. Analysis of control sample and quality control data compiled over a 12-month period was performed. Results Over a 12 month period, the 70-gene prognosis score (range 0–100) of our multiple myeloma cell-line control sample had a standard deviation of 2.72 and a coefficient of variance of 0.03. The whole-genome microarray profile used to calculate a patient’s GEP70 score can be generated with as little as 15 ng of total RNA; approximately 30,000 CD-138+ plasma cells. Results from each GEP70 analysis are presented as either low (70-gene score <45.2) or high (≥45.2) risk for relapse (newly diagnosed setting) or shorter overall survival (relapse setting). A personalized and outcome-annotated gene expression heat map is provided to assist in the clinical interpretation of the result. Conclusions The 70-gene assay, commercialized under the name ‘MyPRS®’ (Myeloma Prognostic Risk Score) and performed in Signal Genetics’ CLIA-certified high throughput flow-cytometry and molecular profiling laboratory is a reproducible and standardized method of multiple myeloma prognostication. PMID:24885236

  17. Predictive gene signatures: molecular markers distinguishing colon adenomatous polyp and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E; Farquharson, Andrew J; Mayer, Claus Dieter; Vase, Hollie F; Coates, Philip J; Steele, Robert J; Carey, Francis A

    2014-01-01

    Cancers exhibit abnormal molecular signatures associated with disease initiation and progression. Molecular signatures could improve cancer screening, detection, drug development and selection of appropriate drug therapies for individual patients. Typically only very small amounts of tissue are available from patients for analysis and biopsy samples exhibit broad heterogeneity that cannot be captured using a single marker. This report details application of an in-house custom designed GenomeLab System multiplex gene expression assay, the hCellMarkerPlex, to assess predictive gene signatures of normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma colon tissue using archived tissue bank material. The hCellMarkerPlex incorporates twenty-one gene markers: epithelial (EZR, KRT18, NOX1, SLC9A2), proliferation (PCNA, CCND1, MS4A12), differentiation (B4GANLT2, CDX1, CDX2), apoptotic (CASP3, NOX1, NTN1), fibroblast (FSP1, COL1A1), structural (ACTG2, CNN1, DES), gene transcription (HDAC1), stem cell (LGR5), endothelial (VWF) and mucin production (MUC2). Gene signatures distinguished normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma. Individual gene targets significantly contributing to molecular tissue types, classifier genes, were further characterised using real-time PCR, in-situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry revealing aberrant epithelial expression of MS4A12, LGR5 CDX2, NOX1 and SLC9A2 prior to development of carcinoma. Identified gene signatures identify aberrant epithelial expression of genes prior to cancer development using in-house custom designed gene expression multiplex assays. This approach may be used to assist in objective classification of disease initiation, staging, progression and therapeutic responses using biopsy material.

  18. Clonogenic Multiple Myeloma Cells have Shared stemness Signature Associated with Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Reghunathan, Renji; Bi, Chonglei; Liu, Shaw Cheng; Loong, Koh Tze; Chung, Tae-Hoon; Huang, Gaofeng; Chng, Wee Joo

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is the abnormal clonal expansion of post germinal B cells in the bone marrow. It was previously reported that clonogenic myeloma cells are CD138−. Human MM cell lines RPMI8226 and NCI H929 contained 2-5% of CD138− population. In this study, we showed that CD138− cells have increased ALDH1 activity, a hallmark of normal and neoplastic stem cells. CD138−ALDH+ cells were more clonogenic than CD138+ALDH− cells and only CD138− cells differentiated into CD138+ population. In vivo tumor initiation and clonogenic potentials of the CD138− population was confirmed using NOG mice. We derived a gene expression signature from functionally validated and enriched CD138− clonogenic population from MM cell lines and validated these in patient samples. This data showed that CD138− cells had an enriched expression of genes that are expressed in normal and malignant stem cells. Differentially expressed genes included components of the polycomb repressor complex (PRC) and their targets. Inhibition of PRC by DZNep showed differential effect on CD138− and CD138+ populations. The ‘stemness’ signature derived from clonogenic CD138− cells overlap significantly with signatures of common progenitor cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and Leukemic stem cells and is associated with poorer survival in different clinical datasets. PMID:23985559

  19. Spectroscopic signatures of molecular orbitals in transition metal oxides with a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pchelkina, Z. V.; Streltsov, S. V.; Mazin, I. I.

    2016-11-01

    A tendency to form benzenelike molecular orbitals has recently been shown to be a common feature of the 4 d and 5 d transition metal oxides with a honeycomb lattice. This tendency competes with other interactions such as the spin-orbit coupling and Hubbard correlations and can be partially or completely suppressed. In the calculations, SrRu2O6 presents the cleanest case of well-formed molecular orbitals so far; however, direct experimental evidence for or against this proposition has been missing. In this paper, we show that combined photoemission and optical studies can be used to identify molecular orbitals in SrRu2O6 . Symmetry-driven election selection rules suppress optical transitions between certain molecular orbitals, while photoemission and inverse photoemission measurements are insensitive to them. Comparing the photoemission and optical conductivity spectra, one should be able to observe clear signatures of molecular orbitals.

  20. Linking the Molecular Signature of Heteroatomic Dissolved Organic Matter to Watershed Characteristics in World Rivers.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sasha; Riedel, Thomas; Niggemann, Jutta; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Dittmar, Thorsten; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    Large world rivers are significant sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the oceans. Watershed geomorphology and land use can drive the quality and reactivity of DOM. Determining the molecular composition of riverine DOM is essential for understanding its source, mobility and fate across landscapes. In this study, DOM from the main stem of 10 global rivers covering a wide climatic range and land use features was molecularly characterized via ultrahigh-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). FT-ICR mass spectral data revealed an overall similarity in molecular components among the rivers. However, when focusing specifically on the contribution of nonoxygen heteroatomic molecular formulas (CHON, CHOS, CHOP, etc.) to the bulk molecular signature, patterns relating DOM composition and watershed land use became apparent. Greater abundances of N- and S-containing molecular formulas were identified as unique to rivers influenced by anthropogenic inputs, whereas rivers with primarily forested watersheds had DOM signatures relatively depleted in heteroatomic content. A strong correlation between cropland cover and dissolved black nitrogen was established when focusing specifically on the pyrogenic class of compounds. This study demonstrated how changes in land use directly affect downstream DOM quality and could impact C and nutrient cycling on a global scale.

  1. Molecular signature of MT1-MMP: transactivation of the downstream universal gene network in cancer.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Dmitri V; Savinov, Alexei Y; Williams, Roy; Liu, Kang; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Krajewski, Stan; Strongin, Alex Y

    2008-06-01

    Invasion-promoting MT1-MMP is directly linked to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Our studies led us to identify those genes, the expression of which is universally linked to MT1-MMP in multiple tumor types. Genome-wide expression profiling of MT1-MMP-overexpressing versus MT1-MMP-silenced cancer cells and a further data mining analysis of the preexisting expression database of 190 human tumors of 14 cancer types led us to identify 11 genes, the expression of which correlated firmly and universally with that of MT1-MMP (P < 0.00001). These genes included regulators of energy metabolism (NNT), trafficking and membrane fusion (SLCO2A1 and ANXA7), signaling and transcription (NR3C1, JAG1, PI3K delta, and CK2 alpha), chromatin rearrangement (SMARCA1), cell division (STK38/NDR1), apoptosis (DAPK1), and mRNA splicing (SNRPB2). Our subsequent extensive analysis of cultured cells, tumor xenografts, and cancer patient biopsies supported our data mining. Our results suggest that transcriptional reprogramming of the specific downstream genes, which themselves are associated with tumorigenesis, represents a distinctive "molecular signature" of the proteolytically active MT1-MMP. We suggest that the transactivation activity of MT1-MMP contributes to the promigratory cell phenotype, which is induced by this tumorigenic proteinase. The activated downstream gene network then begins functioning in unison with MT1-MMP to rework the signaling, transport, cell division, energy metabolism, and other critical cell functions and to commit the cell to migration, invasion, and, consequently, tumorigenesis.

  2. Conserved signature indels and signature proteins as novel tools for understanding microbial phylogeny and systematics: identification of molecular signatures that are specific for the phytopathogenic genera Dickeya, Pectobacterium and Brenneria.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Hafiz Sohail; Lee, Brian; Gupta, Radhey S

    2014-02-01

    Genome sequences are enabling applications of different approaches to more clearly understand microbial phylogeny and systematics. Two of these approaches involve identification of conserved signature indels (CSIs) and conserved signature proteins (CSPs) that are specific for different lineages. These molecular markers provide novel and more definitive means for demarcation of prokaryotic taxa and for identification of species from these groups. Genome sequences are also enabling determination of phylogenetic relationships among species based upon sequences for multiple proteins. In this work, we have used all of these approaches for studying the phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genera Dickeya, Pectobacterium and Brenneria. Members of these genera, which cause numerous diseases in important food crops and ornamental plants, are presently distinguished mainly on the basis of their branching in phylogenetic trees. No biochemical or molecular characteristic is known that is uniquely shared by species from these genera. Hence, detailed studies using the above approaches were carried out on proteins from the genomes of these bacteria to identify molecular markers that are specific for them. In phylogenetic trees based upon concatenated sequences for 23 conserved proteins, members of the genera Dickeya, Pectobacterium and Brenneria formed a strongly supported clade within the other Enterobacteriales. Comparative analysis of protein sequences from the Dickeya, Pectobacterium and Brenneria genomes has identified 10 CSIs and five CSPs that are either uniquely or largely found in all genome-sequenced species from these genera, but not present in any other bacteria in the database. In addition, our analyses have identified 10 CSIs and 17 CSPs that are specifically present in either all or most sequenced Dickeya species/strains, and six CSIs and 19 CSPs that are uniquely found in the sequenced Pectobacterium genomes. Finally, our analysis also identified three CSIs

  3. Computing molecular signatures as optima of a bi-objective function: method and application to prediction in oncogenomics.

    PubMed

    Gardeux, Vincent; Chelouah, Rachid; Wanderley, Maria F Barbosa; Siarry, Patrick; Braga, Antônio P; Reyal, Fabien; Rouzier, Roman; Pusztai, Lajos; Natowicz, René

    2015-01-01

    Filter feature selection methods compute molecular signatures by selecting subsets of genes in the ranking of a valuation function. The motivations of the valuation functions choice are almost always clearly stated, but those for selecting the genes according to their ranking are hardly ever explicit. We addressed the computation of molecular signatures by searching the optima of a bi-objective function whose solution space was the set of all possible molecular signatures, ie, the set of subsets of genes. The two objectives were the size of the signature-to be minimized-and the interclass distance induced by the signature-to be maximized-. We showed that: 1) the convex combination of the two objectives had exactly n optimal non empty signatures where n was the number of genes, 2) the n optimal signatures were nested, and 3) the optimal signature of size k was the subset of k top ranked genes that contributed the most to the interclass distance. We applied our feature selection method on five public datasets in oncology, and assessed the prediction performances of the optimal signatures as input to the diagonal linear discriminant analysis (DLDA) classifier. They were at the same level or better than the best-reported ones. The predictions were robust, and the signatures were almost always significantly smaller. We studied in more details the performances of our predictive modeling on two breast cancer datasets to predict the response to a preoperative chemotherapy: the performances were higher than the previously reported ones, the signatures were three times smaller (11 versus 30 gene signatures), and the genes member of the signature were known to be involved in the response to chemotherapy. Defining molecular signatures as the optima of a bi-objective function that combined the signature size and the interclass distance was well founded and efficient for prediction in oncogenomics. The complexity of the computation was very low because the optimal signatures

  4. Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Feda

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients will eventually relapse or become refractory to the treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is the resistance to therapy. Novel agents are currently in development for the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM, including immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, cell signaling targeted therapies, and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment. We have previously reviewed in detail the contemporary immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies therapies for MM. Therefore, in this review, we focused on the role of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, including cell signaling targeted therapies (HDAC, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Hsp90, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and cell cycle) and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment (hypoxia, angiogenesis, integrins, CD44, CXCR4, and selectins). Although these novel agents have improved the therapeutic outcomes for MM patients, further development of new therapeutic agents is warranted. PMID:24829804

  5. Molecularly targeted therapies in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Feda; Luderer, Micah; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients will eventually relapse or become refractory to the treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is the resistance to therapy. Novel agents are currently in development for the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM, including immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, cell signaling targeted therapies, and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment. We have previously reviewed in detail the contemporary immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies therapies for MM. Therefore, in this review, we focused on the role of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, including cell signaling targeted therapies (HDAC, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Hsp90, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and cell cycle) and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment (hypoxia, angiogenesis, integrins, CD44, CXCR4, and selectins). Although these novel agents have improved the therapeutic outcomes for MM patients, further development of new therapeutic agents is warranted.

  6. Intraindividual genome expression analysis reveals a specific molecular signature of psoriasis and eczema.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Maria; Knapp, Bettina; Garzorz, Natalie; Mattii, Martina; Pullabhatla, Venu; Pennino, Davide; Andres, Christian; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Cavani, Andrea; Theis, Fabian J; Ring, Johannes; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian

    2014-07-09

    Previous attempts to gain insight into the pathogenesis of psoriasis and eczema by comparing their molecular signatures were hampered by the high interindividual variability of those complex diseases. In patients affected by both psoriasis and nonatopic or atopic eczema simultaneously (n = 24), an intraindividual comparison of the molecular signatures of psoriasis and eczema identified genes and signaling pathways regulated in common and exclusive for each disease across all patients. Psoriasis-specific genes were important regulators of glucose and lipid metabolism, epidermal differentiation, as well as immune mediators of T helper 17 (TH17) responses, interleukin-10 (IL-10) family cytokines, and IL-36. Genes in eczema related to epidermal barrier, reduced innate immunity, increased IL-6, and a TH2 signature. Within eczema subtypes, a mutually exclusive regulation of epidermal differentiation genes was observed. Furthermore, only contact eczema was driven by inflammasome activation, apoptosis, and cellular adhesion. On the basis of this comprehensive picture of the pathogenesis of psoriasis and eczema, a disease classifier consisting of NOS2 and CCL27 was created. In an independent cohort of eczema (n = 28) and psoriasis patients (n = 25), respectively, this classifier diagnosed all patients correctly and also identified initially misdiagnosed or clinically undifferentiated patients.

  7. Closely spaced multiple mutations as potential signatures of transient hypermutability in human genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Min; Férec, Claude; Cooper, David N

    2009-10-01

    Data from diverse organisms suggests that transient hypermutability is a general mutational mechanism with the potential to generate multiple synchronous mutations, a phenomenon probably best exemplified by closely spaced multiple mutations (CSMMs). Here we have attempted to extend the concept of transient hypermutability from somatic cells to the germline, using human inherited disease-causing multiple mutations as a model system. Employing stringent criteria for data inclusion, we have retrospectively identified numerous potential examples of pathogenic CSMMs that exhibit marked similarities to the CSMMs reported in other systems. These examples include (1) eight multiple mutations, each comprising three or more components within a sequence tract of <100 bp; (2) three possible instances of "mutation showers"; and (3) numerous highly informative "homocoordinate" mutations. Using the proportion of CpG substitution as a crude indicator of the relative likelihood of transient hypermutability, we present evidence to suggest that CSMMs comprising at least one pair of mutations separated by < or =100 bp may constitute signatures of transient hypermutability in human genes. Although this analysis extends the generality of the concept of transient hypermutability and provides new insights into what may be considered a novel mechanism of mutagenesis underlying human inherited disease, it has raised serious concerns regarding current practices in mutation screening.

  8. Optical signatures of molecular dissymmetry: combining theory with experiments to address stereochemical puzzles.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Parag; Wipf, Peter; Beratan, David N

    2009-06-16

    Modern chemistry emerged from the quest to describe the three-dimensional structure of molecules: van't Hoff's tetravalent carbon placed symmetry and dissymmetry at the heart of chemistry. In this Account, we explore how modern theory, synthesis, and spectroscopy can be used in concert to elucidate the symmetry and dissymmetry of molecules and their assemblies. Chiroptical spectroscopy, including optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), electronic circular dichroism (ECD), vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), and Raman optical activity (ROA), measures the response of dissymmetric structures to electromagnetic radiation. This response can in turn reveal the arrangement of atoms in space, but deciphering the molecular information encoded in chiroptical spectra requires an effective theoretical approach. Although important correlations between ECD and molecular stereochemistry have existed for some time, a battery of accurate new theoretical methods that link a much wider range of chiroptical spectroscopies to structure have emerged over the past decade. The promise of this field is considerable: theory and spectroscopy can assist in assigning the relative and absolute configurations of complex products, revealing the structure of noncovalent aggregates, defining metrics for molecular diversity based on polarization response, and designing chirally imprinted nanomaterials. The physical organic chemistry of chirality is fascinating in its own right: defining atomic and group contributions to optical rotation (OR) is now possible. Although the common expectation is that chiroptical response is determined solely by a chiral solute's electronic structure in a given environment, chiral imprinting effects on the surrounding medium and molecular assembly can, in fact, dominate the chiroptical signatures. The theoretical interpretation of chiroptical markers is challenging because the optical properties are subtle, resulting from the strong electric dipole and the weaker electric

  9. Optical signatures of molecular dissymmetry: Combining theory with experiments to address stereochemical puzzles

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Parag; Wipf, Peter; Beratan, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus Modern chemistry emerged from the quest to describe the three-dimensional structure of molecules: van’t Hoff’s tetravalent carbon placed symmetry and dissymmetry at the heart of chemistry. In this Account, we explore how modern theory, synthesis, and spectroscopy can be used in concert to elucidate the symmetry and dissymmetry of molecules and their assemblies. Chiroptical spectroscopy—including optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), electronic circular dichroism (ECD), vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), and Raman optical activity (ROA)—measures the response of dissymmetric structures to electromagnetic radiation. This response can in turn reveal the arrangement of atoms in space, but deciphering the molecular information encoded in chiroptical spectra requires an effective theoretical approach. Although important correlations between ECD and molecular stereochemistry have existed for some time, a battery of accurate new theoretical methods that link a much wider range of chiroptical spectroscopies to structure have emerged over the last decade. The promise of this field is considerable: theory and spectroscopy can assist in assigning the relative and absolute configurations of complex products, in revealing the structure of non-covalent aggregates, in defining metrics for molecular diversity based upon polarization response, and in designing chirally imprinted nanomaterials. The physical organic chemistry of chirality is fascinating in its own right: defining atomic and group contributions to optical rotation (OR) is now possible. Although the common expectation is that chiroptical response is determined solely by a chiral solute’s electronic structure in a given environment, chiral imprinting effects on the surrounding medium and molecular assembly can, in fact, dominate the chiroptical signatures. The theoretical interpretation of chiroptical markers is challenging because the optical properties are subtle, which results from the strong

  10. Molecular signatures of transgenerational response to ocean acidification in a species of reef fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunter, Celia; Welch, Megan J.; Ryu, Taewoo; Zhang, Huoming; Berumen, Michael L.; Nilsson, Göran E.; Munday, Philip L.; Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    The impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems will depend on species capacity to adapt. Recent studies show that the behaviour of reef fishes is impaired at projected CO 2 levels; however, individual variation exists that might promote adaptation. Here, we show a clear signature of parental sensitivity to high CO 2 in the brain molecular phenotype of juvenile spiny damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus, primarily driven by circadian rhythm genes. Offspring of CO 2-tolerant and CO 2-sensitive parents were reared at near-future CO 2 (754 μatm) or present-day control levels (414 μatm). By integrating 33 brain transcriptomes and proteomes with a de novo assembled genome we investigate the molecular responses of the fish brain to increased CO 2 and the expression of parental tolerance to high CO 2 in the offspring molecular phenotype. Exposure to high CO 2 resulted in differential regulation of 173 and 62 genes and 109 and 68 proteins in the tolerant and sensitive groups, respectively. Importantly, the majority of differences between offspring of tolerant and sensitive parents occurred in high CO 2 conditions. This transgenerational molecular signature suggests that individual variation in CO 2 sensitivity could facilitate adaptation of fish populations to ocean acidification.

  11. Metabolic Signatures Uncover Distinct Targets in Molecular Subsets of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Pilar; Kishan, Amar U.; Norberg, Erik; Stanley, Illana; Chapuy, Bjoern; Ficarro, Scott B.; Polak, Klaudia; Tondera, Daniel; Gounarides, John; Yin, Hong; Zhou, Feng; Green, Michael R.; Chen, Linfeng; Monti, Stefano; Marto, Jarrod A.; Shipp, Margaret A.; Danial, Nika N.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular signatures have identified several subsets of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) and rational targets within the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling axis. The OxPhos-DLBCL subset, which harbors the signature of genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism, is insensitive to inhibition of BCR survival signaling, but is functionally undefined. We show that compared with BCR-DLBCLs, OxPhos-DLBCLs display enhanced mitochondrial energy transduction, greater incorporation of nutrient-derived carbons into the TCA cycle and increased glutathione levels. Importantly, perturbation of the fatty acid oxidation program and glutathione synthesis proved selectively toxic to this tumor subset. Our analysis provides evidence for distinct metabolic fingerprints and associated survival mechanisms in DLBCL and may have therapeutic implications. PMID:23079663

  12. Molecular Signature for Lymphatic Invasion Associated with Survival of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Paik, E Sun; Choi, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo; Choi, Chel Hun

    2017-05-22

    We aimed to develop molecular classifier that can predict lymphatic invasion and their clinical significance in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. We analyzed gene expression (mRNA, methylated DNA) in data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. To identify molecular signatures for lymphatic invasion, we found differentially expressed genes. The performance of classifier was validated by receiver operating characteristics analysis, logistic regression, linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and support vector machine (SVM). We assessed prognostic role of classifier using random survival forest (RSF) model and pathway deregulation score (PDS). For external validation, we analyzed microarray data from 26 EOC samples of Samsung Medical Center and curatedOvarianData database. We identified 21 mRNAs, and 7 methylated DNAs from primary EOC tissues that predicted lymphatic invasion, and created prognostic models. The classifier predicted lymphatic invasion well, which was validated by logistic regression, LDA, and SVM algorithm (C-index of 0.90, 0.71, and 0.74 for mRNA and C-index of 0.64, 0.68, and 0.69 for DNA methylation). Using RSF model, incorporating molecular data with clinical variables improved prediction of progression-free survival compared with using only clinical variables (P < 0.001 and P = 0.008). Similarly, PDS enabled us to classify patients into high-risk and low-risk group, which resulted in survival difference in mRNA profiles (Log rank P value = 0.011). In external validation, gene signature was well correlated with prediction of lymphatic invasion and patients' survival. Molecular signature model predicting lymphatic invasion was well performed, and also associated with survival of EOC patients.

  13. Molecular signatures that are distinctive characteristics of the vertebrates and chordates and supporting a grouping of vertebrates with the tunicates.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S

    2016-01-01

    Members of the phylum Chordata and the subphylum Vertebrata are presently distinguished solely on the basis of morphological characteristics. The relationship of the vertebrates to the two non-vertebrate chordate subphyla is also a subject of debate. Analyses of protein sequences have identified multiple conserved signature indels (CSIs) that are specific for Chordata or for Vertebrata. Five CSIs in 4 important proteins are specific for the Vertebrata, whereas two other CSIs are uniquely found in all sequenced chordate species including Ciona intestinalis and Oikapleura dioica (Tunicates) as well as Branchiostoma floridae (Cephalochordates). The shared presence of these molecular signatures by all vertebrates/chordate species, but in no other animal taxa, strongly indicates that the genetic changes represented by the identified CSIs diagnose monophyletic groups. Two other discovered CSIs are uniquely shared by different vertebrate species and by either one (Ciona intestinalis) or both tunicate (Ciona and Oikapleura) species, but they are not found in Branchiostoma or other animal species. Specific presence of these CSIs in different vertebrates and either one or both tunicate species provides strong independent evidence that the vertebrate species are more closely related to the urochordates (tunicates) than to the cephalochordates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hormone-induced protection against mammary tumorigenesis is conserved in multiple rat strains and identifies a core gene expression signature induced by pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Collin M; Stoddard, Alexander J; Belka, George K; Dugan, Katherine D; Notarfrancesco, Kathleen L; Moody, Susan E; D'Cruz, Celina M; Chodosh, Lewis A

    2006-06-15

    Women who have their first child early in life have a substantially lower lifetime risk of breast cancer. The mechanism for this is unknown. Similar to humans, rats exhibit parity-induced protection against mammary tumorigenesis. To explore the basis for this phenomenon, we identified persistent pregnancy-induced changes in mammary gene expression that are tightly associated with protection against tumorigenesis in multiple inbred rat strains. Four inbred rat strains that exhibit marked differences in their intrinsic susceptibilities to carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis were each shown to display significant protection against methylnitrosourea-induced mammary tumorigenesis following treatment with pregnancy levels of estradiol and progesterone. Microarray expression profiling of parous and nulliparous mammary tissue from these four strains yielded a common 70-gene signature. Examination of the genes constituting this signature implicated alterations in transforming growth factor-beta signaling, the extracellular matrix, amphiregulin expression, and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I axis in pregnancy-induced alterations in breast cancer risk. Notably, related molecular changes have been associated with decreased mammographic density, which itself is strongly associated with decreased breast cancer risk. Our findings show that hormone-induced protection against mammary tumorigenesis is widely conserved among divergent rat strains and define a gene expression signature that is tightly correlated with reduced mammary tumor susceptibility as a consequence of a normal developmental event. Given the conservation of this signature, these pathways may contribute to pregnancy-induced protection against breast cancer.

  15. Computing Molecular Signatures as Optima of a Bi-Objective Function: Method and Application to Prediction in Oncogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Gardeux, Vincent; Chelouah, Rachid; Wanderley, Maria F Barbosa; Siarry, Patrick; Braga, Antônio P; Reyal, Fabien; Rouzier, Roman; Pusztai, Lajos; Natowicz, René

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Filter feature selection methods compute molecular signatures by selecting subsets of genes in the ranking of a valuation function. The motivations of the valuation functions choice are almost always clearly stated, but those for selecting the genes according to their ranking are hardly ever explicit. METHOD We addressed the computation of molecular signatures by searching the optima of a bi-objective function whose solution space was the set of all possible molecular signatures, ie, the set of subsets of genes. The two objectives were the size of the signature–to be minimized–and the interclass distance induced by the signature–to be maximized–. RESULTS We showed that: 1) the convex combination of the two objectives had exactly n optimal non empty signatures where n was the number of genes, 2) the n optimal signatures were nested, and 3) the optimal signature of size k was the subset of k top ranked genes that contributed the most to the interclass distance. We applied our feature selection method on five public datasets in oncology, and assessed the prediction performances of the optimal signatures as input to the diagonal linear discriminant analysis (DLDA) classifier. They were at the same level or better than the best-reported ones. The predictions were robust, and the signatures were almost always significantly smaller. We studied in more details the performances of our predictive modeling on two breast cancer datasets to predict the response to a preoperative chemotherapy: the performances were higher than the previously reported ones, the signatures were three times smaller (11 versus 30 gene signatures), and the genes member of the signature were known to be involved in the response to chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS Defining molecular signatures as the optima of a bi-objective function that combined the signature size and the interclass distance was well founded and efficient for prediction in oncogenomics. The complexity of the computation

  16. A common molecular signature in ASD gene expression: following Root 66 to autism.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Beltran, L; Esteban, F J; Wall, D P

    2016-01-05

    Several gene expression experiments on autism spectrum disorders have been conducted using both blood and brain tissue. Individually, these studies have advanced our understanding of the molecular systems involved in the molecular pathology of autism and have formed the bases of ongoing work to build autism biomarkers. In this study, we conducted an integrated systems biology analysis of 9 independent gene expression experiments covering 657 autism, 9 mental retardation and developmental delay and 566 control samples to determine if a common signature exists and to test whether regulatory patterns in the brain relevant to autism can also be detected in blood. We constructed a matrix of differentially expressed genes from these experiments and used a Jaccard coefficient to create a gene-based phylogeny, validated by bootstrap. As expected, experiments and tissue types clustered together with high statistical confidence. However, we discovered a statistically significant subgrouping of 3 blood and 2 brain data sets from 3 different experiments rooted by a highly correlated regulatory pattern of 66 genes. This Root 66 appeared to be non-random and of potential etiologic relevance to autism, given their enriched roles in neurological processes key for normal brain growth and function, learning and memory, neurodegeneration, social behavior and cognition. Our results suggest that there is a detectable autism signature in the blood that may be a molecular echo of autism-related dysregulation in the brain.

  17. Molecular trajectories provide signatures of protein clustering and crowding at the oil/water interface.

    PubMed

    McUmber, Aaron C; Larson, Nicholas R; Randolph, Theodore W; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2015-06-02

    Using high throughput single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), we have acquired molecular trajectories of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg white lysozyme during protein layer formation at the silicone oil-water interface. These trajectories were analyzed to determine the distribution of molecular diffusion coefficients, and for signatures of molecular crowding/caging, including subdiffusive motion and temporal anticorrelation of the instantaneous velocity vector. The evolution of these properties with aging time of the interface was compared with dynamic interfacial tension measurements. For both lysozyme and BSA, we observed an overall slowing of protein objects, the onset of both subdiffusive and anticorrelated motion (associated with crowding), and a decrease in the interfacial tension with aging time. For lysozyme, all of these phenomena occurred virtually simultaneously, consistent with a homogeneous model of layer formation that involves gradual crowding of weakly interacting proteins. For BSA, however, the slowing occurred first, followed by the signatures of crowding/caging, followed by a decrease in interfacial tension, consistent with a heterogeneous model of layer formation involving the formation of protein clusters. The application of microrheological methods to single molecule trajectories described here provides an unprecedented level of mechanistic interpretation of interfacial events that occurred over a wide range of interfacial protein coverage.

  18. A candidate molecular signature associated with tamoxifen failure in primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, Julie A; Robertson, Katherine E; Ravel, Patrice; Bray, Susan E; Bajard, Agathe; Purdie, Colin A; Nguyen, Catherine; Hadad, Sirwan M; Bieche, Ivan; Chabaud, Sylvie; Bachelot, Thomas; Thompson, Alastair M; Cohen, Pascale A

    2008-01-01

    Few markers are available that can predict response to tamoxifen treatment in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers. Identification of such markers would be clinically useful. We attempted to identify molecular markers associated with tamoxifen failure in breast cancer. Eighteen initially ER-positive patients treated with tamoxifen requiring salvage surgery (tamoxifen failure [TF] patients) were compared with 17 patients who were disease free 5 years after surgery plus tamoxifen adjuvant therapy (control patients). cDNA microarray, real-time quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays were used to generate and confirm a gene signature associated with tamoxifen failure. An independent series of 33 breast tumor samples from patients who relapsed (n = 14) or did not relapse (n = 19) under tamoxifen treatment from a different geographic location was subsequently used to explore the gene expression signature identified. Using a screening set of 18 tumor samples (from eight control patients and 10 TF patients), a 47-gene signature discriminating between TF and control samples was identified using cDNA arrays. In addition to ESR1/ERalpha, the top-ranked genes selected by statistical cross-analyses were MET, FOS, SNCG, IGFBP4, and BCL2, which were subsequently validated in a larger set of tumor samples (from 17 control patients and 18 TF patients). Confirmation at the protein level by tissue microarray immunohistochemistry was observed for ER-alpha, gamma-synuclein, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 proteins in the 35 original samples. In an independent series of breast tumor samples (19 nonrelapsing and 14 relapsing), reduced expression of ESR1/ERalpha, IGFBP4, SNCG, BCL2, and FOS was observed in the relapsing group and was associated with a shorter overall survival. Low mRNA expression levels of ESR1/ERalpha, BCL2, and FOS were also associated with a shorter relapse-free survival (RFS). Using a Cox multivariate regression

  19. Molecular signatures for the main phyla of photosynthetic bacteria and their subgroups.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S

    2010-06-01

    The bacterial groups corresponding to different photosynthetic prokaryotes are presently identified mainly on the basis of their branching in phylogenetic trees. The availability of genome sequences is enabling identification of many molecular signatures that are specific for different groups of photosynthetic bacteria. Our recent work has identified large numbers of signatures consisting of conserved inserts or deletions (indels) in widely distributed proteins, as well as whole proteins that are specific for various sequenced species/strains from Cyanobacteria, Chlorobi, and Proteobacteria phyla. Based upon these signatures, it is now possible to identify/distinguish bacteria from these phyla of photosynthetic bacteria as well as their major subclades in clear molecular terms. The use of these signatures in conjunction with phylogenomic analyses, summarized here, is leading to a holistic picture concerning the branching order and evolutionary relationships among the above groups of photosynthetic bacteria. Although detailed studies in this regard have not yet been carried on Chloroflexi and Heliobacteriaceae, we have identified some conserved indels that are specific for these groups. Some of the conserved indels for the photosynthetic bacteria are present in photosynthesis-related proteins. These include a 4 aa insert in the pyruvate flavodoxin/ferridoxin oxidoreductase that is specific for the genus Chloroflexus, a 2 aa insert in magnesium chelatase that is uniquely shared by all Cyanobacteria except the deepest branching Clade A (Gloebacterales), a 6 aa insert in an A-type flavoprotein that is specific for various marine unicellular Cyanobacteria, a 2 aa insert in heme oxygenase that is specific for various Prochlorococcus strains/isolates, and 1 aa deletion in the protein protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase that is commonly shared by various Prochlorococcus strains except the deepest branching isolates MIT 9303 and MIT 9313. The identified CSIs are located in

  20. Molecular signatures of biogeochemical transformations in dissolved organic matter from ten World Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Thomas; Zark, Maren; Vähätalo, Anssi; Niggemann, Jutta; Spencer, Robert; Hernes, Peter; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Rivers carry large amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the oceans thereby connecting terrestrial and marine element cycles. Photo-degradation in conjunction with microbial turnover is considered a major pathway by which terrigenous DOM is decomposed. To reveal globally relevant patterns behind this process, we performed photo-degradation experiments and year-long bio-assays on DOM from ten of the largest world rivers that collectively account for more than one-third of the fresh water discharge to the global ocean. We furthermore tested the hypothesis that the terrigenous component in deep ocean DOM may be far higher than biomarker studies suggest, because of the selective photochemical destruction of characteristic biomolecules from vascular plants. DOM was molecularly characterized by a combination of non-targeted ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry and quantitative molecular tracer analyses. We show that the reactivity of DOM is globally related to broad catchment properties. Basins that are dominated by forest and grassland export more photo-degradable DOM than other rivers. Chromophoric compounds are mainly vascular plant-derived polyphenols, and partially carry a pyrogenic signature from vegetation fires. These forest and grassland dominated rivers lost up to 50% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during irradiation, and up to 85% of DOC was lost in total if subsequently bio-incubated for one year. Basins covered by cropland, on the other hand, export DOM with a higher proportion of photo-resistant and bio-available DOM which is enriched in nitrogen. In these rivers, 30% or less of DOC was photodegraded. Consistent with previous studies, we found that riverine DOM resembled marine DOM in its broad molecular composition after extensive degradation, mainly due to almost complete removal of aromatics. More detailed molecular fingerprinting analysis (based on the relative abundance of >4000 DOM molecular formulae), however, revealed clear differences

  1. A gene expression inflammatory signature specifically predicts multiple myeloma evolution and patients survival

    PubMed Central

    Botta, C; Di Martino, M T; Ciliberto, D; Cucè, M; Correale, P; Rossi, M; Tagliaferri, P; Tassone, P

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is closely dependent on cross-talk between malignant plasma cells and cellular components of the inflammatory/immunosuppressive bone marrow milieu, which promotes disease progression, drug resistance, neo-angiogenesis, bone destruction and immune-impairment. We investigated the relevance of inflammatory genes in predicting disease evolution and patient survival. A bioinformatics study by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on gene expression profiling dataset of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering and symptomatic-MM, identified inflammatory and cytokine/chemokine pathways as the most progressively affected during disease evolution. We then selected 20 candidate genes involved in B-cell inflammation and we investigated their role in predicting clinical outcome, through univariate and multivariate analyses (log-rank test, logistic regression and Cox-regression model). We defined an 8-genes signature (IL8, IL10, IL17A, CCL3, CCL5, VEGFA, EBI3 and NOS2) identifying each condition (MGUS/smoldering/symptomatic-MM) with 84% accuracy. Moreover, six genes (IFNG, IL2, LTA, CCL2, VEGFA, CCL3) were found independently correlated with patients' survival. Patients whose MM cells expressed high levels of Th1 cytokines (IFNG/LTA/IL2/CCL2) and low levels of CCL3 and VEGFA, experienced the longest survival. On these six genes, we built a prognostic risk score that was validated in three additional independent datasets. In this study, we provide proof-of-concept that inflammation has a critical role in MM patient progression and survival. The inflammatory-gene prognostic signature validated in different datasets clearly indicates novel opportunities for personalized anti-MM treatment. PMID:27983725

  2. Multiple genomic signatures of selection in goats and sheep indigenous to a hot arid environment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E-S; Elbeltagy, A R; Aboul-Naga, A M; Rischkowsky, B; Sayre, B; Mwacharo, J M; Rothschild, M F

    2016-01-01

    Goats and sheep are versatile domesticates that have been integrated into diverse environments and production systems. Natural and artificial selection have shaped the variation in the two species, but natural selection has played the major role among indigenous flocks. To investigate signals of natural selection, we analyzed genotype data generated using the caprine and ovine 50K SNP BeadChips from Barki goats and sheep that are indigenous to a hot arid environment in Egypt's Coastal Zone of the Western Desert. We identify several candidate regions under selection that spanned 119 genes. A majority of the genes were involved in multiple signaling and signal transduction pathways in a wide variety of cellular and biochemical processes. In particular, selection signatures spanning several genes that directly or indirectly influenced traits for adaptation to hot arid environments, such as thermo-tolerance (melanogenesis) (FGF2, GNAI3, PLCB1), body size and development (BMP2, BMP4, GJA3, GJB2), energy and digestive metabolism (MYH, TRHDE, ALDH1A3), and nervous and autoimmune response (GRIA1, IL2, IL7, IL21, IL1R1) were identified. We also identified eight common candidate genes under selection in the two species and a shared selection signature that spanned a conserved syntenic segment to bovine chromosome 12 on caprine and ovine chromosomes 12 and 10, respectively, providing, most likely, the evidence for selection in a common environment in two different but closely related species. Our study highlights the importance of indigenous livestock as model organisms for investigating selection sweeps and genome-wide association mapping. PMID:26555032

  3. Multiple genomic signatures of selection in goats and sheep indigenous to a hot arid environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, E-S; Elbeltagy, A R; Aboul-Naga, A M; Rischkowsky, B; Sayre, B; Mwacharo, J M; Rothschild, M F

    2016-03-01

    Goats and sheep are versatile domesticates that have been integrated into diverse environments and production systems. Natural and artificial selection have shaped the variation in the two species, but natural selection has played the major role among indigenous flocks. To investigate signals of natural selection, we analyzed genotype data generated using the caprine and ovine 50K SNP BeadChips from Barki goats and sheep that are indigenous to a hot arid environment in Egypt's Coastal Zone of the Western Desert. We identify several candidate regions under selection that spanned 119 genes. A majority of the genes were involved in multiple signaling and signal transduction pathways in a wide variety of cellular and biochemical processes. In particular, selection signatures spanning several genes that directly or indirectly influenced traits for adaptation to hot arid environments, such as thermo-tolerance (melanogenesis) (FGF2, GNAI3, PLCB1), body size and development (BMP2, BMP4, GJA3, GJB2), energy and digestive metabolism (MYH, TRHDE, ALDH1A3), and nervous and autoimmune response (GRIA1, IL2, IL7, IL21, IL1R1) were identified. We also identified eight common candidate genes under selection in the two species and a shared selection signature that spanned a conserved syntenic segment to bovine chromosome 12 on caprine and ovine chromosomes 12 and 10, respectively, providing, most likely, the evidence for selection in a common environment in two different but closely related species. Our study highlights the importance of indigenous livestock as model organisms for investigating selection sweeps and genome-wide association mapping.

  4. Ontology based molecular signatures for immune cell types via gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Terrence F; Vasilevsky, Nicole A; Mungall, Christopher J; Dougall, David S; Haendel, Melissa A; Blake, Judith A; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-08-30

    New technologies are focusing on characterizing cell types to better understand their heterogeneity. With large volumes of cellular data being generated, innovative methods are needed to structure the resulting data analyses. Here, we describe an 'Ontologically BAsed Molecular Signature' (OBAMS) method that identifies novel cellular biomarkers and infers biological functions as characteristics of particular cell types. This method finds molecular signatures for immune cell types based on mapping biological samples to the Cell Ontology (CL) and navigating the space of all possible pairwise comparisons between cell types to find genes whose expression is core to a particular cell type's identity. We illustrate this ontological approach by evaluating expression data available from the Immunological Genome project (IGP) to identify unique biomarkers of mature B cell subtypes. We find that using OBAMS, candidate biomarkers can be identified at every strata of cellular identity from broad classifications to very granular. Furthermore, we show that Gene Ontology can be used to cluster cell types by shared biological processes in order to find candidate genes responsible for somatic hypermutation in germinal center B cells. Moreover, through in silico experiments based on this approach, we have identified genes sets that represent genes overexpressed in germinal center B cells and identify genes uniquely expressed in these B cells compared to other B cell types. This work demonstrates the utility of incorporating structured ontological knowledge into biological data analysis - providing a new method for defining novel biomarkers and providing an opportunity for new biological insights.

  5. Signatures of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamic shocks in turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Andrew; Wardle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The character of star formation is intimately related to the supersonic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent dynamics of the molecular clouds in which stars form. A significant amount of the turbulent energy dissipates in low-velocity shocks. Fast and slow MHD shocks differ in how they compress and heat the molecular gas, and so their radiative signatures reveal distinct physical conditions. We use a two-fluid model to compare one-dimensional fast and slow MHD shocks propagating at low speeds (a few km s- 1). Fast shocks are magnetically driven, forcing ion species to stream through the neutral gas ahead of the shock front. This magnetic precursor heats the gas sufficiently to create a large, warm transition zone where all the fluid variables smoothly change in the shock front. In contrast, slow shocks are driven by gas pressure, and neutral species collide with ion species in a thin hot slab that closely resembles an ordinary gas dynamic shock. We consider shocks at velocities vs = 2-4 km s- 1 and pre-shock hydrogen nuclei densities nH = 102-104 cm-3. We include a simple oxygen chemistry and cooling by CO, H2 and H2O. CO rotational lines above J = 6-5 are more strongly excited in slow shocks. These slow-shock signatures may have already been observed in infrared dark clouds in the Milky Way.

  6. The molecular signature of AML mesenchymal stromal cells reveals candidate genes related to the leukemogenic process.

    PubMed

    Binato, Renata; de Almeida Oliveira, Nathalia Correa; Du Rocher, Barbara; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by myeloid precursor proliferation in the bone marrow, apoptosis reduction and differentiation arrest. Although there are several studies in this field, events related to disease initiation and progression remain unknown. The malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is thought to generate leukemic stem cells, and this transformation could be related to changes in mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) signaling. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the gene expression profile of hMSC from AML patients (hMSC-AML) compared to healthy donors hMSCs (hMSC-HD). The results showed a common molecular signature for all hMSC-AML. Other assays were performed with a large number of patients and the results confirmed a molecular signature that is capable of distinguishing hMSC-AML from hMSC-HD. Moreover, CCL2 and BMP4 genes encode secreted proteins that could affect HSCs. To verify whether these proteins are differentially expressed in AML patients, ELISA was performed with plasma samples. CCL2 and BMP4 proteins are differentially expressed in AML patients, indicating changes in hMSC-AML signaling. Altogether, hMSCs-AML signaling alterations could be an important factor in the leukemic transformation process.

  7. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies IRF4-Associated Molecular Signatures in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Yao, Zhi Q.; Moorman, Jonathan P.; Xu, Yanji; Ning, Shunbin

    2014-01-01

    The lymphocyte-specific transcription factor Interferon (IFN) Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) is implicated in certain types of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its interactions with these malignancies are largely unknown. In this study, we have first profiled molecular signatures associated with IRF4 expression in associated cancers, by analyzing existing gene expression profiling datasets. Our results show that IRF4 is overexpressed in melanoma, in addition to previously reported contexts including leukemia, myeloma, and lymphoma, and that IRF4 is associated with a unique gene expression pattern in each context. A pool of important genes involved in B-cell development, oncogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and cell death including BATF, LIMD1, CFLAR, PIM2, and CCND2 are common signatures associated with IRF4 in non-Hodgkin B cell lymphomas. We confirmed the correlation of IRF4 with LIMD1 and CFLAR in a panel of cell lines derived from lymphomas. Moreover, we profiled the IRF4 transcriptome in the context of EBV latent infection, and confirmed several genes including IFI27, IFI44, GBP1, and ARHGAP18, as well as CFLAR as novel targets for IRF4. These results provide valuable information for understanding the IRF4 regulatory network, and improve our knowledge of the unique roles of IRF4 in different hematological malignancies. PMID:25207815

  8. Molecular and Anatomical Signatures of Sleep Deprivation in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Carol L.; Wisor, Jonathan P.; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Pathak, Sayan D.; Gerashchenko, Dmitry; Smith, Kimberly A.; Fischer, Shanna R.; Kuan, Chihchau L.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Ng, Lydia L.; Lau, Christopher; Hawrylycz, Michael; Jones, Allan R.; Kilduff, Thomas S.; Lein, Edward S.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) leads to a suite of cognitive and behavioral impairments, and yet the molecular consequences of SD in the brain are poorly understood. Using a systematic immediate-early gene (IEG) mapping to detect neuronal activation, the consequences of SD were mapped primarily to forebrain regions. SD was found to both induce and suppress IEG expression (and thus neuronal activity) in subregions of neocortex, striatum, and other brain regions. Laser microdissection and cDNA microarrays were used to identify the molecular consequences of SD in seven brain regions. In situ hybridization (ISH) for 222 genes selected from the microarray data and other sources confirmed that robust molecular changes were largely restricted to the forebrain. Analysis of the ISH data for 222 genes (publicly accessible at http://sleep.alleninstitute.org) provided a molecular and anatomic signature of the effects of SD on the brain. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the neocortex exhibited differential regulation of the same genes, such that in the SCN genes exhibited time-of-day effects while in the neocortex, genes exhibited only SD and waking (W) effects. In the neocortex, SD activated gene expression in areal-, layer-, and cell type-specific manner. In the forebrain, SD preferentially activated excitatory neurons, as demonstrated by double-labeling, except for striatum which consists primarily of inhibitory neurons. These data provide a characterization of the anatomical and cell type-specific signatures of SD on neuronal activity and gene expression that may account for the associated cognitive and behavioral effects. PMID:21088695

  9. Identification of Single- and Multiple-Class Specific Signature Genes from Gene Expression Profiles by Group Marker Index

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R.; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  10. Identification of single- and multiple-class specific signature genes from gene expression profiles by group marker index.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  11. A pharmacogenetic signature of high response to Copaxone in late-phase clinical-trial cohorts of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Colin J; Towfic, Fadi; Shankar, Jyoti; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Thoma, Mathis; Davis, Matthew; Weiner, Brian; Kusko, Rebecca; Zeskind, Ben; Knappertz, Volker; Grossman, Iris; Hayden, Michael R

    2017-05-31

    Copaxone is an efficacious and safe therapy that has demonstrated clinical benefit for over two decades in patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). On an individual level, patients show variability in their response to Copaxone, with some achieving significantly higher response levels. The involvement of genes (e.g., HLA-DRB1*1501) with high inter-individual variability in Copaxone's mechanism of action (MoA) suggests the potential contribution of genetics to treatment response. This study aimed to identify genetic variants associated with Copaxone response in patient cohorts from late-phase clinical trials. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with high and low levels of response to Copaxone were identified using genome-wide SNP data in a discovery cohort of 580 patients from two phase III clinical trials of Copaxone. Multivariable Bayesian modeling on the resulting SNPs in an expanded discovery cohort with 1171 patients identified a multi-SNP signature of Copaxone response. This signature was examined in 941 Copaxone-treated MS patients from seven independent late-phase trials of Copaxone and assessed for specificity to Copaxone in 310 Avonex-treated and 311 placebo-treated patients, also from late-phase trials. A four-SNP signature consisting of rs80191572 (in UVRAG), rs28724893 (in HLA-DQB2), rs1789084 (in MBP), and rs139890339 (in ZAK(CDCA7)) was identified as significantly associated with Copaxone response. Copaxone-treated signature-positive patients had a greater reduction in annualized relapse rate (ARR) compared to signature-negative patients in both discovery and independent cohorts, an effect not observed in Avonex-treated patients. Additionally, signature-positive placebo-treated cohorts did not show a reduction in ARR, demonstrating the predictive as opposed to prognostic nature of the signature. A 10% subset of patients, delineated by the signature, showed marked improvements across multiple clinical parameters

  12. Molecular signatures (unique proteins and conserved indels) that are specific for the epsilon proteobacteria (Campylobacterales)

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Radhey S

    2006-01-01

    Background The epsilon proteobacteria, which include many important human pathogens, are presently recognized solely on the basis of their branching in rRNA trees. No unique molecular or biochemical characteristics specific for this group are known. Results Comparative analyses of proteins in the genomes of Wolinella succinogenes DSM 1740 and Campylobacter jejuni RM1221 against all available sequences have identified a large number of proteins that are unique to various epsilon proteobacteria (Campylobacterales), but whose homologs are not detected in other organisms. Of these proteins, 49 are uniquely found in nearly all sequenced epsilon-proteobacteria (viz. Helicobacter pylori (26695 and J99), H. hepaticus, C. jejuni (NCTC 11168, RM1221, HB93-13, 84-25, CF93-6, 260.94, 11168 and 81-176), C. lari, C. coli, C. upsaliensis, C. fetus, W. succinogenes DSM 1740 and Thiomicrospira denitrificans ATCC 33889), 11 are unique for the Wolinella and Helicobacter species (i.e. Helicobacteraceae family) and many others are specific for either some or all of the species within the Campylobacter genus. The primary sequences of many of these proteins are highly conserved and provide novel resources for diagnostics and therapeutics. We also report four conserved indels (i.e. inserts or deletions) in widely distributed proteins (viz. B subunit of exinuclease ABC, phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, RNA polymerase β '-subunit and FtsH protein) that are specific for either all epsilon proteobacteria or different subgroups. In addition, a rare genetic event that caused fusion of the genes for the largest subunits of RNA polymerase (rpoB and rpoC) in Wolinella and Helicobacter is also described. The inter-relationships amongst Campylobacterales as deduced from these molecular signatures are in accordance with the phylogenetic trees based on the 16S rRNA and concatenated sequences for nine conserved proteins. Conclusion These molecular signatures provide novel tools for identifying and

  13. Specific molecular signatures of non-tumor liver tissue may predict a risk of hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Tohru; Shimada, Mitsuo; Morine, Yuji; Tajima, Atsushi; Imoto, Issei

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common human cancers and a major cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The bleak outcomes of HCC patients even after curative treatment have been, at least partially, attributed to its multicentric origin. Therefore, it is necessary to examine not only tumor tissue but also non-tumor liver tissue to investigate the molecular mechanisms operating during hepatocarcinogenesis based on the concept of “field cancerization”. Several studies previously investigated the association of molecular alterations in non-tumor liver tissue with clinical features and prognosis in HCC patients on a genome-wide scale. In particular, specific alterations of DNA methylation profiles have been confirmed in non-tumor liver tissue. This review focuses on the possible clinical value of array-based comprehensive analyses of molecular alterations, especially aberrant DNA methylation, in non-tumor liver tissue to clarify the risk of hepatocarcinogenesis. Carcinogenetic risk estimation based on specific methylation signatures may be advantageous for close follow-up of patients who are at high risk of HCC development. Furthermore, epigenetic therapies for patients with chronic liver diseases may be helpful to reduce the risk of HCC development because epigenetic alterations are potentially reversible, and thus provide promising molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24766251

  14. Phylogenetic Framework and Molecular Signatures for the Main Clades of the Phylum Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Beile

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The phylum Actinobacteria harbors many important human pathogens and also provides one of the richest sources of natural products, including numerous antibiotics and other compounds of biotechnological interest. Thus, a reliable phylogeny of this large phylum and the means to accurately identify its different constituent groups are of much interest. Detailed phylogenetic and comparative analyses of >150 actinobacterial genomes reported here form the basis for achieving these objectives. In phylogenetic trees based upon 35 conserved proteins, most of the main groups of Actinobacteria as well as a number of their superageneric clades are resolved. We also describe large numbers of molecular markers consisting of conserved signature indels in protein sequences and whole proteins that are specific for either all Actinobacteria or their different clades (viz., orders, families, genera, and subgenera) at various taxonomic levels. These signatures independently support the existence of different phylogenetic clades, and based upon them, it is now possible to delimit the phylum Actinobacteria (excluding Coriobacteriia) and most of its major groups in clear molecular terms. The species distribution patterns of these markers also provide important information regarding the interrelationships among different main orders of Actinobacteria. The identified molecular markers, in addition to enabling the development of a stable and reliable phylogenetic framework for this phylum, also provide novel and powerful means for the identification of different groups of Actinobacteria in diverse environments. Genetic and biochemical studies on these Actinobacteria-specific markers should lead to the discovery of novel biochemical and/or other properties that are unique to different groups of Actinobacteria. PMID:22390973

  15. Phylogenetic framework and molecular signatures for the main clades of the phylum Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gao, Beile; Gupta, Radhey S

    2012-03-01

    The phylum Actinobacteria harbors many important human pathogens and also provides one of the richest sources of natural products, including numerous antibiotics and other compounds of biotechnological interest. Thus, a reliable phylogeny of this large phylum and the means to accurately identify its different constituent groups are of much interest. Detailed phylogenetic and comparative analyses of >150 actinobacterial genomes reported here form the basis for achieving these objectives. In phylogenetic trees based upon 35 conserved proteins, most of the main groups of Actinobacteria as well as a number of their superageneric clades are resolved. We also describe large numbers of molecular markers consisting of conserved signature indels in protein sequences and whole proteins that are specific for either all Actinobacteria or their different clades (viz., orders, families, genera, and subgenera) at various taxonomic levels. These signatures independently support the existence of different phylogenetic clades, and based upon them, it is now possible to delimit the phylum Actinobacteria (excluding Coriobacteriia) and most of its major groups in clear molecular terms. The species distribution patterns of these markers also provide important information regarding the interrelationships among different main orders of Actinobacteria. The identified molecular markers, in addition to enabling the development of a stable and reliable phylogenetic framework for this phylum, also provide novel and powerful means for the identification of different groups of Actinobacteria in diverse environments. Genetic and biochemical studies on these Actinobacteria-specific markers should lead to the discovery of novel biochemical and/or other properties that are unique to different groups of Actinobacteria.

  16. Molecular signature of differential virulence in natural isolates of Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongping; Korban, Schuyler S; Zhao, Youfu

    2010-02-01

    ABSTRACT Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight, is considered to be a genetically homogeneous species based on physiological, biochemical, phylogenetic, and genetic analysis. However, E. amylovora strains exhibiting differential virulence are isolated from nature. The exopolysaccharide amylovoran and type III secretion system (T3SS) are two major yet separate virulence factors in E. amylovora. The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is a correlation between E. amylovora virulence and levels of virulence gene expression. Four wild-type strains (Ea1189, Ea273, Ea110, and CFBP1430), widely used in studies of E. amylovora pathogenesis, have been analyzed and compared. E. amylovora strains Ea273 and Ea110 elicited higher severity of disease symptoms than those of Ea1189 and CFBP1430 on apple cv. Golden Delicious and G16 apple root stock plants but not on susceptible Gala plants. In addition, Ea273 and Ea110 elicited severe hypersensitive responses within shorter periods of time at lower inoculum concentrations than those of Ea1189 and CFBP1430 on tobacco plants. Further molecular analyses have revealed that amylovoran production and expression of both amylovoran (amsG) and T3SS (dspE and hrpL) genes were significantly higher in Ea273 and Ea110 than those in Ea1189 and CFBP1430. Other phenotypes such as swarming motility in these four strains also differed significantly. These results indicate that E. amylovora strains of different origin can be divided into subgroups based on molecular signatures of virulence gene expression. Therefore, these molecular signatures may be used to differentiate E. amylovora strains, which may have taxonomical and evolutionary implications.

  17. AGE AND MASS SEGREGATION OF MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THEIR OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Hagai B.; Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) are known to exist around massive black holes in galactic nuclei. They are thought to have formed through in situ star formation following gas inflow to the nucleus of the galaxy and/or through the infall of multiple stellar clusters. Here we study the latter, and explore the composite structure of the NSC and its relation to the various stellar populations originating from its progenitor infalling clusters. We use N-body simulations of cluster infalls and show that this scenario may produce observational signatures in the form of age segregation: the distribution of the stellar properties (e.g., stellar age and/or metallicity) in the NSCs reflects the infall history of the different clusters. The stellar populations of clusters, infalling at different times (dynamical ages), are differentially segregated in the NSC and are not fully mixed even after a few gigayears of evolution. Moreover, the radial properties of stellar populations in the progenitor cluster are mapped to their radial distribution in the final NSC, potentially leading to efficient mass segregation in NSCs, even those where relaxation times are longer than a Hubble time. Finally, the overall structures of the stellar populations present non-spherical configurations and show significant cluster to cluster population differences.

  18. biosigner: A New Method for the Discovery of Significant Molecular Signatures from Omics Data

    PubMed Central

    Rinaudo, Philippe; Boudah, Samia; Junot, Christophe; Thévenot, Etienne A.

    2016-01-01

    identify robust molecular signatures from large omics datasets in the process of developing new diagnostics. PMID:27446929

  19. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haumann, F. A.; Batenburg, A. M.; Pieterse, G.; Gerbig, C.; Krol, M. C.; Röckmann, T.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H2) over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H2 and several other species as well as the H2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia) aircraft campaign during the dry season. We derive a relative H2 emission ratio with respect to carbon monoxide (CO) of 0.31 ± 0.04 ppb ppb-1 and an isotopic source signature of -280 ± 41‰ in the air masses influenced by tropical biomass burning. In order to retrieve a clear source signal that is not influenced by the soil uptake of H2, we exclude samples from the atmospheric boundary layer. This procedure is supported by data from a global chemistry transport model. The ΔH2 / ΔCO emission ratio is significantly lower than some earlier estimates for the tropical rainforest. In addition, our results confirm the lower values of the previously conflicting estimates of the H2 isotopic source signature from biomass burning. These values for the emission ratio and isotopic source signatures of H2 from tropical biomass burning can be used in future bottom-up and top-down approaches aiming to constrain the strength of the biomass-burning source for H2. Hitherto, these two quantities relied only on combustion experiments or on statistical relations, since no direct signal had been obtained from in-situ observations.

  20. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haumann, F. A.; Batenburg, A. M.; Pieterse, G.; Gerbig, C.; Krol, M. C.; Röckmann, T.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H2) over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H2 and several other species as well as the H2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia) aircraft campaign during the dry season. We derive a relative H2 emission ratio with respect to carbon monoxide (CO) of 0.31 ± 0.04 ppb/ppb and an isotopic source signature of -280 ± 41‰ in the air masses influenced by tropical biomass burning. In order to retrieve a clear source signal that is not influenced by the soil uptake of H2, we exclude samples from the atmospheric boundary layer. This procedure is supported by data from a global chemistry transport model. The ΔH2/ΔCO emission ratio is significantly lower than some earlier estimates for the tropical rainforest. In addition, our results confirm the lower values of the previously conflicting estimates of the H2 isotopic source signature from biomass burning. These values for the emission ratio and isotopic source signatures of H2 from tropical biomass burning can be used in future bottom-up and top-down approaches aiming to constrain the strength of the biomass-burning source for H2. Hitherto, these two quantities relied only on combustion experiments or on statistical relations, since no direct signal had been obtained from in-situ observations.

  1. Identification of a molecular signature in human type 1 diabetes mellitus using serum and functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xujing; Jia, Shuang; Geoffrey, Rhonda; Alemzadeh, Ramin; Ghosh, Soumitra; Hessner, Martin J

    2008-02-01

    Understanding active proinflammatory mechanisms at and before type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) onset is hindered in humans, given that the relevant tissues are inaccessible and pancreatic immune responses are difficult to measure in the periphery by traditional approaches. Therefore, we investigated the use of a sensitive and comprehensive genomics strategy to investigate the presence of proinflammatory factors in serum. The sera of recent onset diabetes patients (n = 15, 12 possessing and 3 lacking islet cell autoantibodies), long-standing diabetes patients (n = 12), "at risk" siblings of diabetes patients (n = 9), and healthy controls (n = 12) were used to induce gene expression in unrelated, healthy PBMC. After culture, gene expression was measured with microarrays and normalized expression data were subjected to hierarchical clustering and multidimensional scaling. All recent onset sera induced an expression signature (192 UniGenes; fold change: >1.5, p < 0.01; false discovery rate: <0.01) that included IL-1 cytokine family members and chemokines involved in monocyte/macrophage and neutrophil chemotaxis, as well as numerous receptors and signaling molecules. This molecular signature was not induced with the sera of healthy controls or long standing diabetes patients, where longitudinal analysis of "at risk" siblings (n = 3) before and after onset support the hypothesis that the signature emerges years before onset. This study supports prior investigations of serum that reflect disease processes associated with progression to T1DM. Identification of unique inflammatory mediators may improve disease prediction beyond current islet autoantibodies. Furthermore, proinflammatory serum markers may be used as inclusion criteria or endpoint measures in clinical trials aimed at preventing T1DM.

  2. biosigner: A New Method for the Discovery of Significant Molecular Signatures from Omics Data.

    PubMed

    Rinaudo, Philippe; Boudah, Samia; Junot, Christophe; Thévenot, Etienne A

    2016-01-01

    identify robust molecular signatures from large omics datasets in the process of developing new diagnostics.

  3. Molecular signature of hypersaline adaptation: insights from genome and proteome composition of halophilic prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sandip; Bag, Sumit K; Das, Sabyasachi; Harvill, Eric T; Dutta, Chitra

    2008-01-01

    Background Halophilic prokaryotes are adapted to thrive in extreme conditions of salinity. Identification and analysis of distinct macromolecular characteristics of halophiles provide insight into the factors responsible for their adaptation to high-salt environments. The current report presents an extensive and systematic comparative analysis of genome and proteome composition of halophilic and non-halophilic microorganisms, with a view to identify such macromolecular signatures of haloadaptation. Results Comparative analysis of the genomes and proteomes of halophiles and non-halophiles reveals some common trends in halophiles that transcend the boundary of phylogenetic relationship and the genomic GC-content of the species. At the protein level, halophilic species are characterized by low hydrophobicity, over-representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, under-representation of Cys, lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil structure. At the DNA level, the dinucleotide abundance profiles of halophilic genomes bear some common characteristics, which are quite distinct from those of non-halophiles, and hence may be regarded as specific genomic signatures for salt-adaptation. The synonymous codon usage in halophiles also exhibits similar patterns regardless of their long-term evolutionary history. Conclusion The generality of molecular signatures for environmental adaptation of extreme salt-loving organisms, demonstrated in the present study, advocates the convergent evolution of halophilic species towards specific genome and amino acid composition, irrespective of their varying GC-bias and widely disparate taxonomic positions. The adapted features of halophiles seem to be related to physical principles governing DNA and protein stability, in response to the extreme environmental conditions under which they thrive. PMID:18397532

  4. Molecular signature of hypersaline adaptation: insights from genome and proteome composition of halophilic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sandip; Bag, Sumit K; Das, Sabyasachi; Harvill, Eric T; Dutta, Chitra

    2008-04-09

    Halophilic prokaryotes are adapted to thrive in extreme conditions of salinity. Identification and analysis of distinct macromolecular characteristics of halophiles provide insight into the factors responsible for their adaptation to high-salt environments. The current report presents an extensive and systematic comparative analysis of genome and proteome composition of halophilic and non-halophilic microorganisms, with a view to identify such macromolecular signatures of haloadaptation. Comparative analysis of the genomes and proteomes of halophiles and non-halophiles reveals some common trends in halophiles that transcend the boundary of phylogenetic relationship and the genomic GC-content of the species. At the protein level, halophilic species are characterized by low hydrophobicity, over-representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, under-representation of Cys, lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil structure. At the DNA level, the dinucleotide abundance profiles of halophilic genomes bear some common characteristics, which are quite distinct from those of non-halophiles, and hence may be regarded as specific genomic signatures for salt-adaptation. The synonymous codon usage in halophiles also exhibits similar patterns regardless of their long-term evolutionary history. The generality of molecular signatures for environmental adaptation of extreme salt-loving organisms, demonstrated in the present study, advocates the convergent evolution of halophilic species towards specific genome and amino acid composition, irrespective of their varying GC-bias and widely disparate taxonomic positions. The adapted features of halophiles seem to be related to physical principles governing DNA and protein stability, in response to the extreme environmental conditions under which they thrive.

  5. Connectivity mapping using a combined gene signature from multiple colorectal cancer datasets identified candidate drugs including existing chemotherapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background While the discovery of new drugs is a complex, lengthy and costly process, identifying new uses for existing drugs is a cost-effective approach to therapeutic discovery. Connectivity mapping integrates gene expression profiling with advanced algorithms to connect genes, diseases and small molecule compounds and has been applied in a large number of studies to identify potential drugs, particularly to facilitate drug repurposing. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a commonly diagnosed cancer with high mortality rates, presenting a worldwide health problem. With the advancement of high throughput omics technologies, a number of large scale gene expression profiling studies have been conducted on CRCs, providing multiple datasets in gene expression data repositories. In this work, we systematically apply gene expression connectivity mapping to multiple CRC datasets to identify candidate therapeutics to this disease. Results We developed a robust method to compile a combined gene signature for colorectal cancer across multiple datasets. Connectivity mapping analysis with this signature of 148 genes identified 10 candidate compounds, including irinotecan and etoposide, which are chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat CRCs. These results indicate that we have discovered high quality connections between the CRC disease state and the candidate compounds, and that the gene signature we created may be used as a potential therapeutic target in treating the disease. The method we proposed is highly effective in generating quality gene signature through multiple datasets; the publication of the combined CRC gene signature and the list of candidate compounds from this work will benefit both cancer and systems biology research communities for further development and investigations. PMID:26356760

  6. Securing optical code-division multiple-access networks with a postswitching coding scheme of signature reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jen-Fa; Meng, Sheng-Hui; Lin, Ying-Chen

    2014-11-01

    The optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) technique is considered a good candidate for providing optical layer security. An enhanced OCDMA network security mechanism with a pseudonoise (PN) random digital signals type of maximal-length sequence (M-sequence) code switching to protect against eavesdropping is presented. Signature codes unique to individual OCDMA-network users are reconfigured according to the register state of the controlling electrical shift registers. Examples of signature reconfiguration following state switching of the controlling shift register for both the network user and the eavesdropper are numerically illustrated. Dynamically changing the PN state of the shift register to reconfigure the user signature sequence is shown; this hinders eavesdroppers' efforts to decode correct data sequences. The proposed scheme increases the probability of eavesdroppers committing errors in decoding and thereby substantially enhances the degree of an OCDMA network's confidentiality.

  7. Comparative Systems Analyses Reveal Molecular Signatures of Clinically tested Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn A.; Lindqvist, Madelene; Nookaew, Intawat; Andersen, Peter; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Persson, Josefine; Christensen, Dennis; Zhang, Yuan; Anderson, Jenna; Khoomrung, Sakda; Sen, Partho; Agger, Else Marie; Coler, Rhea; Carter, Darrick; Meinke, Andreas; Rappuoli, Rino; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Reed, Steven G.; Harandi, Ali M.

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants could inform a rational development of next generation vaccines for human use. Here, we exploited a genome wide transcriptomics analysis combined with a systems biology approach to determine the molecular signatures induced by four clinically tested vaccine adjuvants, namely CAF01, IC31, GLA-SE and Alum in mice. We report signature molecules, pathways, gene modules and networks, which are shared by or otherwise exclusive to these clinical-grade adjuvants in whole blood and draining lymph nodes of mice. Intriguingly, co-expression analysis revealed blood gene modules highly enriched for molecules with documented roles in T follicular helper (TFH) and germinal center (GC) responses. We could show that all adjuvants enhanced, although with different magnitude and kinetics, TFH and GC B cell responses in draining lymph nodes. These results represent, to our knowledge, the first comparative systems analysis of clinically tested vaccine adjuvants that may provide new insights into the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants. PMID:27958370

  8. Comparative Systems Analyses Reveal Molecular Signatures of Clinically tested Vaccine Adjuvants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn A.; Lindqvist, Madelene; Nookaew, Intawat; Andersen, Peter; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Persson, Josefine; Christensen, Dennis; Zhang, Yuan; Anderson, Jenna; Khoomrung, Sakda; Sen, Partho; Agger, Else Marie; Coler, Rhea; Carter, Darrick; Meinke, Andreas; Rappuoli, Rino; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Reed, Steven G.; Harandi, Ali M.

    2016-12-01

    A better understanding of the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants could inform a rational development of next generation vaccines for human use. Here, we exploited a genome wide transcriptomics analysis combined with a systems biology approach to determine the molecular signatures induced by four clinically tested vaccine adjuvants, namely CAF01, IC31, GLA-SE and Alum in mice. We report signature molecules, pathways, gene modules and networks, which are shared by or otherwise exclusive to these clinical-grade adjuvants in whole blood and draining lymph nodes of mice. Intriguingly, co-expression analysis revealed blood gene modules highly enriched for molecules with documented roles in T follicular helper (TFH) and germinal center (GC) responses. We could show that all adjuvants enhanced, although with different magnitude and kinetics, TFH and GC B cell responses in draining lymph nodes. These results represent, to our knowledge, the first comparative systems analysis of clinically tested vaccine adjuvants that may provide new insights into the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants.

  9. Comparative Systems Analyses Reveal Molecular Signatures of Clinically tested Vaccine Adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn A; Lindqvist, Madelene; Nookaew, Intawat; Andersen, Peter; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Persson, Josefine; Christensen, Dennis; Zhang, Yuan; Anderson, Jenna; Khoomrung, Sakda; Sen, Partho; Agger, Else Marie; Coler, Rhea; Carter, Darrick; Meinke, Andreas; Rappuoli, Rino; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Reed, Steven G; Harandi, Ali M

    2016-12-13

    A better understanding of the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants could inform a rational development of next generation vaccines for human use. Here, we exploited a genome wide transcriptomics analysis combined with a systems biology approach to determine the molecular signatures induced by four clinically tested vaccine adjuvants, namely CAF01, IC31, GLA-SE and Alum in mice. We report signature molecules, pathways, gene modules and networks, which are shared by or otherwise exclusive to these clinical-grade adjuvants in whole blood and draining lymph nodes of mice. Intriguingly, co-expression analysis revealed blood gene modules highly enriched for molecules with documented roles in T follicular helper (TFH) and germinal center (GC) responses. We could show that all adjuvants enhanced, although with different magnitude and kinetics, TFH and GC B cell responses in draining lymph nodes. These results represent, to our knowledge, the first comparative systems analysis of clinically tested vaccine adjuvants that may provide new insights into the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants.

  10. Genetics and molecular profiling of multiple myeloma: novel tools for clinical management?

    PubMed

    Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Rossi, Marco; Gaspari, Marco; Terracciano, Rosa; Venuta, Salvatore

    2006-07-01

    The understanding of molecular events involved in multiple myeloma (MM) development as well as of mechanisms underlying sensitivity/resistance to anticancer drugs has been dramatically increased by the wide-spread use of modern technologies for genetic analysis, global gene expression and proteomic profiling. Such analytical approaches, which are presently supported by reliable bioinformatic tools, have depicted a new scenario for the development of molecular-based anti-MM agents and for predicting clinical outcome. IgH translocations or a hyperdiploid state are emerging as early genetic signatures of MM which lead to deregulated expression of cyclin D. At present however, the major challenge remains the definition of the potential role of cytogenetic techniques and molecular profiling technologies in individual patient management. Here we will describe the prospective potential and current achievements of such technologies which might produce major advancements in the treatment of this still incurable disease.

  11. Molecular signatures associated with ZIKV exposure in human cortical neural progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feiran; Hammack, Christy; Ogden, Sarah C.; Cheng, Yichen; Lee, Emily M.; Wen, Zhexing; Qian, Xuyu; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Li, Yujing; Yao, Bing; Xu, Miao; Xu, Tianlei; Chen, Li; Wang, Zhiqin; Feng, Hao; Huang, Wei-Kai; Yoon, Ki-jun; Shan, Chao; Huang, Luoxiu; Qin, Zhaohui; Christian, Kimberly M.; Shi, Pei-Yong; Xu, Mingjiang; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Hao; Song, Hongjun; Tang, Hengli; Ming, Guo-Li; Jin, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection causes microcephaly and has been linked to other brain abnormalities. How ZIKV impairs brain development and function is unclear. Here we systematically profiled transcriptomes of human neural progenitor cells exposed to Asian ZIKVC, African ZIKVM, and dengue virus (DENV). In contrast to the robust global transcriptome changes induced by DENV, ZIKV has a more selective and larger impact on expression of genes involved in DNA replication and repair. While overall expression profiles are similar, ZIKVC, but not ZIKVM, induces upregulation of viral response genes and TP53. P53 inhibitors can block the apoptosis induced by both ZIKVC and ZIKVM in hNPCs, with higher potency against ZIKVC-induced apoptosis. Our analyses reveal virus- and strain-specific molecular signatures associated with ZIKV infection. These datasets will help to investigate ZIKV-host interactions and identify neurovirulence determinants of ZIKV. PMID:27580721

  12. Molecular signatures of age-associated chronic degeneration of shoulder muscles.

    PubMed

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; Kolk, Arjen; Tatum, Zuotian; Groosjohan, Niels Kuipers; Verwey, Nisha E; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Kielbasa, Szymon M; Nagels, Jochem; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Raz, Vered

    2016-02-23

    Chronic muscle diseases are highly prevalent in the elderly causing severe mobility limitations, pain and frailty. The intrinsic molecular mechanisms are poorly understood due to multifactorial causes, slow progression with age and variations between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms could lead to new treatment options which are currently limited. Shoulder complaints are highly common in the elderly, and therefore, muscles of the shoulder's rotator cuff could be considered as a model for chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. Diseased shoulder muscles were characterized by muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration compared with unaffected shoulder muscles. We confirmed fatty infiltration using histochemical analysis. Additionally, fibrosis and loss of contractile myosin expression were found in diseased muscles. Most cellular features, including proliferation rate, apoptosis and cell senescence, remained unchanged and genome-wide molecular signatures were predominantly similar between diseased and intact muscles. However, we found down-regulation of a small subset of muscle function genes, and up-regulation of extracellular region genes. Myogenesis was defected in muscle cell culture from diseased muscles but was restored by elevating MyoD levels. We suggest that impaired muscle functionality in a specific environment of thickened extra-cellular matrix is crucial for the development of chronic age-associated muscle degeneration.

  13. Molecular signatures distinguish human central memory from effector memory CD8 T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Willinger, Tim; Freeman, Tom; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; McMichael, Andrew J; Callan, Margaret F C

    2005-11-01

    Memory T cells are heterogeneous in terms of their phenotype and functional properties. We investigated the molecular profiles of human CD8 naive central memory (T(CM)), effector memory (T(EM)), and effector memory RA (T(EMRA)) T cells using gene expression microarrays and phospho-protein-specific intracellular flow cytometry. We demonstrate that T(CM) have a gene expression and cytokine signaling signature that lies between that of naive and T(EM) or T(EMRA) cells, whereas T(EM) and T(EMRA) are closely related. Our data define the molecular basis for the different functional properties of central and effector memory subsets. We show that T(EM) and T(EMRA) cells strongly express genes with known importance in CD8 T cell effector function. In contrast, T(CM) are characterized by high basal and cytokine-induced STAT5 phosphorylation, reflecting their capacity for self-renewal. Altogether, our results distinguish T(CM) and T(EM)/T(EMRA) at the molecular level and are consistent with the concept that T(CM) represent memory stem cells.

  14. Molecular signatures of age-associated chronic degeneration of shoulder muscles

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; Kolk, Arjen; Tatum, Zuotian; Groosjohan, Niels Kuipers; Verwey, Nisha E.; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Kielbasa, Szymon M.; Nagels, Jochem; Hoen, Peter A. C. 't; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2016-01-01

    Chronic muscle diseases are highly prevalent in the elderly causing severe mobility limitations, pain and frailty. The intrinsic molecular mechanisms are poorly understood due to multifactorial causes, slow progression with age and variations between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms could lead to new treatment options which are currently limited. Shoulder complaints are highly common in the elderly, and therefore, muscles of the shoulder's rotator cuff could be considered as a model for chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. Diseased shoulder muscles were characterized by muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration compared with unaffected shoulder muscles. We confirmed fatty infiltration using histochemical analysis. Additionally, fibrosis and loss of contractile myosin expression were found in diseased muscles. Most cellular features, including proliferation rate, apoptosis and cell senescence, remained unchanged and genome-wide molecular signatures were predominantly similar between diseased and intact muscles. However, we found down-regulation of a small subset of muscle function genes, and up-regulation of extracellular region genes. Myogenesis was defected in muscle cell culture from diseased muscles but was restored by elevating MyoD levels. We suggest that impaired muscle functionality in a specific environment of thickened extra-cellular matrix is crucial for the development of chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. PMID:26885755

  15. Molecular signature of amniotic fluid derived stem cells in the fetal sheep model of myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Pozzo, Enrico; Scorletti, Federico; Benedetti, Laura; Cusella, Gabriella; Ronzoni, Flavio Lorenzo; Sahakyan, Vardine; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mimmi, Maria Chiara; Calcaterra, Valeria; Deprest, Jan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2015-09-01

    Abnormal cord development results in spinal cord damage responsible for myelomeningocele (MMC). Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) have emerged as a potential candidate for applications in regenerative medicine. However, their differentiation potential is largely unknown as well as the molecular signaling orchestrating the accurate spinal cord development. Fetal lambs underwent surgical creation of neural tube defect and its subsequent repair. AFSCs were isolated, cultured and characterized at the 12th (induction of MMC), 16th (repair of malformation), and 20th week of gestation (delivery). After performing open hysterectomy, AF collections on fetuses with sham procedures at the same time points as the MMC creation group have been used as controls. Cytological analyses with the colony forming unit assay, XTT and alkaline-phosphatase staining, qRT-PCR gene expression analyses (normalized with aged match controls) and NMR metabolomics profiling were performed. Here we show for the first time the metabolomics and molecular signature variation in AFSCs isolated in the sheep model of MMC, which may be used as diagnostic tools for the in utero identification of the neural tube damage. Intriguingly, PAX3 gene involved in the murine model for spina bifida is modulated in AFSCs reaching the peak of expression at 16 weeks of gestation, 4 weeks after the intervention. Our data strongly suggest that AFSCs reorganize their differentiation commitment in order to generate PAX3-expressing progenitors to counteract the MMC induced in the sheep model. The gene expression signature of AFSCs highlights the plasticity of these cells reflecting possible alterations of embryonic development.

  16. Molecular Signatures of the Evolving Immune Response in Mice following a Bordetella pertussis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Raeven, René H. M.; Brummelman, Jolanda; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Nijst, Olaf E. M.; Kuipers, Betsy; Blok, Laura E. R.; Helm, Kina; van Riet, Elly; Jiskoot, Wim; van Els, Cecile A. C. M.; Han, Wanda G. H.; Kersten, Gideon F. A.; Metz, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide resurgence of pertussis necessitates the need for improvement of pertussis vaccines and vaccination strategies. Since natural infections induce a longer-lasting immunity than vaccinations, detailed knowledge of the immune responses following natural infection can provide important clues for such improvement. The purpose was to elucidate the kinetics of the protective immune response evolving after experimental Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) infection in mice. Data were collected from (i) individual analyses, i.e. microarray, flow cytometry, multiplex immunoassays, and bacterial clearance; (ii) twelve time points during the infection; and (iii) different tissues involved in the immune responses, i.e. lungs, spleen and blood. Combined data revealed detailed insight in molecular and cellular sequence of events connecting different phases (innate, bridging and adaptive) of the immune response following the infection. We detected a prolonged acute phase response, broad pathogen recognition, and early gene signatures of subsequent T-cell recruitment in the lungs. Activation of particular transcription factors and specific cell markers provided insight into the time course of the transition from innate towards adaptive immune responses, which resulted in a broad spectrum of systemic antibody subclasses and splenic Th1/Th17 memory cells against B. pertussis. In addition, signatures preceding the local generation of Th1 and Th17 cells as well as IgA in the lungs, considered key elements in protection against B. pertussis, were established. In conclusion, molecular and cellular immunological processes in response to live B. pertussis infection were unraveled, which may provide guidance in selecting new vaccine candidates that should evoke local and prolonged protective immune responses. PMID:25137043

  17. Molecular Signatures of Psychosocial Stress and Cognition Are Modulated by Chronic Lithium Treatment.

    PubMed

    Brzózka, Magdalena M; Havemann-Reinecke, Ursula; Wichert, Sven P; Falkai, Peter; Rossner, Moritz J

    2016-07-01

    Chronic psychosocial stress is an important environmental risk factor of psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia. Social defeat in rodents has been shown to be associated with maladaptive cellular and behavioral consequences including cognitive impairments. Although gene expression changes upon psychosocial stress have been described, a comprehensive transcriptome profiling study at the global level in precisely defined hippocampal subregions which are associated with learning has been lacking. In this study, we exposed adult C57Bl/6N mice for 3 weeks to "resident-intruder" paradigm and combined laser capture microdissection with microarray analyses to identify transcriptomic signatures of chronic psychosocial stress in dentate gyrus and CA3 subregion of the dorsal hippocampus. At the individual transcript level, we detected subregion specific stress responses whereas gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA) identified several common pathways upregulated upon chronic psychosocial stress related to proteasomal function and energy supply. Behavioral profiling revealed stress-associated impairments most prominent in fear memory formation which was prevented by chronic lithium treatment. Thus, we again microdissected the CA3 region and performed global transcriptome analysis to search for molecular signatures altered by lithium treatment in stressed animals. By combining GSEA with unsupervised clustering, we detected pathways that are regulated by stress and lithium in the CA3 region of the hippocampus including proteasomal components, oxidative phosphorylation, and anti-oxidative mechanisms. Our study thus provides insight into hidden molecular phenotypes of chronic psychosocial stress and lithium treatment and proves a beneficial role for lithium treatment as an agent attenuating negative effects of psychosocial stress on cognition.

  18. Osmoadaptative Strategy and Its Molecular Signature in Obligately Halophilic Heterotrophic Protists

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Tommy; Brown, Matthew W.; Simpson, Alastair G.B.; Roger, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Halophilic microbes living in hypersaline environments must counteract the detrimental effects of low water activity and salt interference. Some halophilic prokaryotes equilibrate their intracellular osmotic strength with the extracellular milieu by importing inorganic solutes, mainly potassium. These “salt-in” organisms characteristically have proteins that are highly enriched with acidic and hydrophilic residues. In contrast, “salt-out” halophiles accumulate large amounts of organic solutes like amino acids, sugars and polyols, and lack a strong signature of halophilicity in the amino acid composition of cytoplasmic proteins. Studies to date have examined halophilic prokaryotes, yeasts, or algae, thus virtually nothing is known about the molecular adaptations of the other eukaryotic microbes, that is, heterotrophic protists (protozoa), that also thrive in hypersaline habitats. We conducted transcriptomic investigations to unravel the molecular adaptations of two obligately halophilic protists, Halocafeteria seosinensis and Pharyngomonas kirbyi. Their predicted cytoplasmic proteomes showed increased hydrophilicity compared with marine protists. Furthermore, analysis of reconstructed ancestral sequences suggested that, relative to mesophiles, proteins in halophilic protists have undergone fewer substitutions from hydrophilic to hydrophobic residues since divergence from their closest relatives. These results suggest that these halophilic protists have a higher intracellular salt content than marine protists. However, absence of the acidic signature of salt-in microbes suggests that Haloc. seosinensis and P. kirbyi utilize organic osmolytes to maintain osmotic equilibrium. We detected increased expression of enzymes involved in synthesis and transport of organic osmolytes, namely hydroxyectoine and myo-inositol, at maximal salt concentration for growth in Haloc. seosinensis, suggesting possible candidates for these inferred organic osmolytes. PMID:27412608

  19. Molecular signatures of the evolving immune response in mice following a Bordetella pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Raeven, René H M; Brummelman, Jolanda; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Nijst, Olaf E M; Kuipers, Betsy; Blok, Laura E R; Helm, Kina; van Riet, Elly; Jiskoot, Wim; van Els, Cecile A C M; Han, Wanda G H; Kersten, Gideon F A; Metz, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide resurgence of pertussis necessitates the need for improvement of pertussis vaccines and vaccination strategies. Since natural infections induce a longer-lasting immunity than vaccinations, detailed knowledge of the immune responses following natural infection can provide important clues for such improvement. The purpose was to elucidate the kinetics of the protective immune response evolving after experimental Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) infection in mice. Data were collected from (i) individual analyses, i.e. microarray, flow cytometry, multiplex immunoassays, and bacterial clearance; (ii) twelve time points during the infection; and (iii) different tissues involved in the immune responses, i.e. lungs, spleen and blood. Combined data revealed detailed insight in molecular and cellular sequence of events connecting different phases (innate, bridging and adaptive) of the immune response following the infection. We detected a prolonged acute phase response, broad pathogen recognition, and early gene signatures of subsequent T-cell recruitment in the lungs. Activation of particular transcription factors and specific cell markers provided insight into the time course of the transition from innate towards adaptive immune responses, which resulted in a broad spectrum of systemic antibody subclasses and splenic Th1/Th17 memory cells against B. pertussis. In addition, signatures preceding the local generation of Th1 and Th17 cells as well as IgA in the lungs, considered key elements in protection against B. pertussis, were established. In conclusion, molecular and cellular immunological processes in response to live B. pertussis infection were unraveled, which may provide guidance in selecting new vaccine candidates that should evoke local and prolonged protective immune responses.

  20. The growing contributions of molecular biology and immunology to protistan ecology: molecular signatures as ecological tools.

    PubMed

    Caron, David A; Countway, Peter D; Brown, Mark V

    2004-01-01

    Modern genetic and immunological techniques have become important tools for assessing protistan species diversity for both the identification and quantification of specific taxa in natural microbial communities. Although these methods are still gaining use among ecologists, the new approaches have already had a significant impact on our understanding of protistan diversity and biogeography. For example, genetic studies of environmental samples have uncovered many protistan phylotypes that do not match the DNA sequences of any cultured organisms, and whose morphological identities are unknown at the present time. Additionally, rapid and sensitive methods for detecting and enumerating taxa of special importance (e.g. bloom-forming algae, parasitic protists) have enabled much more detailed distributional and experimental studies than have been possible using traditional methods. Nevertheless, while the application of molecular approaches has advanced some aspects of aquatic protistan ecology, significant issues still thwart the widespread adoption of these approaches. These issues include the highly technical nature of some of the molecular methods, the reconciliation of morphology-based and sequence-based species identifications, and the species concept itself.

  1. Molecular Signatures Discriminating the Male and the Female Sexual Pathways in the Pearl Oyster Pinctada margaritifera

    PubMed Central

    Teaniniuraitemoana, Vaihiti; Huvet, Arnaud; Levy, Peva; Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila; Gueguen, Yannick; Le Moullac, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The genomics of economically important marine bivalves is studied to provide better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying their different reproductive strategies. The recently available gonad transcriptome of the black-lip pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera is a novel and powerful resource to study these mechanisms in marine mollusks displaying hermaphroditic features. In this study, RNAseq quantification data of the P. margaritifera gonad transcriptome were analyzed to identify candidate genes in histologically-characterized gonad samples to provide molecular signatures of the female and male sexual pathway in this pearl oyster. Based on the RNAseq data set, stringent expression analysis identified 1,937 contigs that were differentially expressed between the gonad histological categories. From the hierarchical clustering analysis, a new reproduction model is proposed, based on a dual histo-molecular analytical approach. Nine candidate genes were identified as markers of the sexual pathway: 7 for the female pathway and 2 for the male one. Their mRNA levels were assayed by real-time PCR on a new set of gonadic samples. A clustering method revealed four principal expression patterns based on the relative gene expression ratio. A multivariate regression tree realized on these new samples and validated on the previously analyzed RNAseq samples showed that the sexual pathway of P. margaritifera can be predicted by a 3-gene-pair expression ratio model of 4 different genes: pmarg-43476, pmarg-foxl2, pmarg-54338 and pmarg-fem1-like. This 3-gene-pair expression ratio model strongly suggests only the implication of pmarg-foxl2 and pmarg-fem1-like in the sex inversion of P. margaritifera. This work provides the first histo-molecular model of P. margaritifera reproduction and a gene expression signature of its sexual pathway discriminating the male and female pathways. These represent useful tools for understanding and studying sex inversion, sex

  2. A Schnorr Multiple Digital Signatures Based on the Hyperelliptic Curve Cryptosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Gege; Wang, Xueming; Zhang, Yansheng

    The hyperelliptic curve cryptosystem is based on the hyperelliptic curve discrete logarithm problem, and has the higher safety and the shorter operands as compared to the elliptic curve cryptosystem. In this paper, the thought of Schnorr broadcasting multi-signature scheme is used in hyperelliptic digital signature, put forward a new kind of Schnorr type broadcasting multi signature based on Hyperelliptic Curve Cryptosystem, and the safety of the scheme is analyzed. By comparison, the scheme is more safety than which based on elliptic curve cryptosystem. There is a good application in network communication.

  3. Searching for chemical signatures of multiple stellar populations in the old, massive open cluster NGC 6791

    SciTech Connect

    Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio; Sneden, Christopher; Gratton, Raffaele G.; Lucatello, Sara; Bernath, Peter F.; Brooke, James S. A.; Ram, Ram S. E-mail: eugenio.carretta@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: raffaele.gratton@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: pbernath@odu.edu E-mail: rr662@york.ac.uk

    2014-11-20

    Galactic open and globular clusters (OCs, GCs) appear to inhabit separate regions of the age-mass plane. However, the transition between them is not easily defined because there is some overlap between high-mass, old OCs and low-mass, young GCs. We are exploring the possibility of a clear-cut separation between OCs and GCs using an abundance feature that has been found so far only in GCs: (anti)correlations between light elements. Among the coupled abundance trends, the Na-O anticorrelation is the most widely studied. These anticorrelations are the signature of self-enrichment, i.e., of a formation mechanism that implies multiple generations of stars. Here we concentrate on the old, massive, metal-rich OC NGC 6791. We analyzed archival Keck/HIRES spectra of 15 NGC 6791 main-sequence turnoff and evolved stars, concentrating on the derivation of C, N, O, and Na abundances. We also used WIYN/Hydra spectra of 21 evolved stars (one is in common). Given the spectral complexity of the very metal-rich NGC 6791 stars, we employed spectrum synthesis to measure most of the abundances. We confirmed the cluster super-solar metallicity and abundances of Ca and Ni that have been derived in past studies. More importantly, we did not detect any significant star-to-star abundance dispersion in C, N, O, and Na. Based on the absence of a clear Na-O anticorrelation, NGC 6791 can still be considered a true OC, hosting a single generation of stars and not a low-mass GC.

  4. Baseline Gene Expression Signatures in Monocytes from Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Nurtdinov, Ramil N.; Río, Jordi; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background A relatively large proportion of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFNb) treatment. In previous studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we identified a subgroup of IFNb non-responders that was characterized by a baseline over-expression of type I IFN inducible genes. Additional mechanistic experiments carried out in IFNb non-responders suggested a selective alteration of the type I IFN signaling pathway in the population of blood monocytes. Here, we aimed (i) to investigate whether the type I IFN signaling pathway is up-regulated in isolated monocytes from IFNb non-responders at baseline; and (ii) to search for additional biological pathways in this cell population that may be implicated in the response to IFNb treatment. Methods Twenty RRMS patients classified according to their clinical response to IFNb treatment and 10 healthy controls were included in the study. Monocytes were purified from PBMC obtained before treatment by cell sorting and the gene expression profiling was determined with oligonucleotide microarrays. Results and discussion Purified monocytes from IFNb non-responders were characterized by an over-expression of type I IFN responsive genes, which confirms the type I IFN signature in monocytes suggested from previous studies. Other relevant signaling pathways that were up-regulated in IFNb non-responders were related with the mitochondrial function and processes such as protein synthesis and antigen presentation, and together with the type I IFN signaling pathway, may also be playing roles in the response to IFNb. PMID:23637780

  5. Interim Report on Multiple Sequence Alignments and TaqMan Signature Mapping to Phylogenetic Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The goal of this project is to develop forensic genotyping assays for select agent viruses, addressing a significant capability gap for the viral bioforensics and law enforcement community. We used a multipronged approach combining bioinformatics analysis, PCR-enriched samples, microarrays and TaqMan assays to develop high resolution and cost effective genotyping methods for strain level forensic discrimination of viruses. We have leveraged substantial experience and efficiency gained through year 1 on software development, SNP discovery, TaqMan signature design and phylogenetic signature mapping to scale up the development of forensics signatures in year 2. In this report, we have summarized the Taqman signature development for South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis viruses and henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

  6. A multiple redundant genetic switch locks in the transcriptional signature of T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wenxian; Ergun, Ayla; Lu, Ting; Hill, Jonathan A.; Haxhinasto, Sokol; Fassett, Marlys S.; Gazit, Roi; Adoro, Stanley; Glimcher, Laurie; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Rossi, Derrick; Collins, James J.; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor FoxP3 partakes dominantly in the specification and function of FoxP3+CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs), but is neither strictly necessary nor sufficient to determine the characteristic Treg signature. Computational network inference and experimental testing assessed the contribution of other transcription factors (TF). Enforced expression of Helios or Xbp1 elicited specific signatures, but Eos, Irf4, Satb1, Lef1 and Gata1 elicited exactly the same outcome, synergizing with FoxP3 to activate most of the Treg signature, including key TFs, and enhancing FoxP3 occupancy at its genomic targets. Conversely, the Treg signature was robust to inactivation of any single cofactor. A redundant genetic switch thus locks-in the Treg phenotype, a model which accounts for several aspects of Treg physiology, differentiation and stability. PMID:22961053

  7. Phylogenomic Analyses and Comparative Studies on Genomes of the Bifidobacteriales: Identification of Molecular Signatures Specific for the Order Bifidobacteriales and Its Different Subclades

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Grace; Gao, Beile; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Khadka, Bijendra; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2016-01-01

    The order Bifidobacteriales comprises a diverse variety of species found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other animals, some of which are opportunistic pathogens, whereas a number of others exhibit health-promoting effects. However, currently very few biochemical or molecular characteristics are known which are specific for the order Bifidobacteriales, or specific clades within this order, which distinguish them from other bacteria. This study reports the results of detailed comparative genomic and phylogenetic studies on 62 genome-sequenced species/strains from the order Bifidobacteriales. In a robust phylogenetic tree for the Bifidobacteriales constructed based on 614 core proteins, a number of well-resolved clades were observed including a clade separating the Scarodvia-related genera (Scardovia clade) from the genera Bifidobacterium and Gardnerella, as well as a number of previously reported clusters of Bifidobacterium spp. In parallel, our comparative analyses of protein sequences from the Bifidobacteriales genomes have identified numerous molecular markers that are specific for this group of bacteria. Of these markers, 32 conserved signature indels (CSIs) in widely distributed proteins and 10 signature proteins are distinctive characteristics of all sequenced Bifidobacteriales species and provide novel and highly specific means for distinguishing these bacteria. In addition, multiple other molecular signatures are specific for the following clades of Bifidobacteriales: (i) 5 CSIs specific for a clade comprising of the Scardovia-related genera; (ii) 3 CSIs and 2 CSPs specific for a clade consisting of the Bifidobacterium and Gardnerella spp.; (iii) multiple other signatures demarcating a number of clusters of the B. asteroides-and B. longum- related species. The described molecular markers provide novel and reliable means for distinguishing the Bifidobacteriales and a number of their clades in molecular terms and for the classification of these

  8. Fuzzy logic selection as a new reliable tool to identify molecular grade signatures in breast cancer--the INNODIAG study.

    PubMed

    Kempowsky-Hamon, Tatiana; Valle, Carine; Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Hedjazi, Lyamine; Trouilh, Lidwine; Lamarre, Sophie; Labourdette, Delphine; Roger, Laurence; Mhamdi, Loubna; Dalenc, Florence; Filleron, Thomas; Favre, Gilles; François, Jean-Marie; Le Lann, Marie-Véronique; Anton-Leberre, Véronique

    2015-02-07

    Personalized medicine has become a priority in breast cancer patient management. In addition to the routinely used clinicopathological characteristics, clinicians will have to face an increasing amount of data derived from tumor molecular profiling. The aims of this study were to develop a new gene selection method based on a fuzzy logic selection and classification algorithm, and to validate the gene signatures obtained on breast cancer patient cohorts. We analyzed data from four published gene expression datasets for breast carcinomas. We identified the best discriminating genes by comparing molecular expression profiles between histologic grade 1 and 3 tumors for each of the training datasets. The most pertinent probes were selected and used to define fuzzy molecular grade 1-like (good prognosis) and fuzzy molecular grade 3-like (poor prognosis) profiles. To evaluate the prognostic performance of the fuzzy grade signatures in breast cancer tumors, a Kaplan-Meier analysis was conducted to compare the relapse-free survival deduced from histologic grade and fuzzy molecular grade classification. We applied the fuzzy logic selection on breast cancer databases and obtained four new gene signatures. Analysis in the training public sets showed good performance of these gene signatures for grade (sensitivity from 90% to 95%, specificity 67% to 93%). To validate these gene signatures, we designed probes on custom microarrays and tested them on 150 invasive breast carcinomas. Good performance was obtained with an error rate of less than 10%. For one gene signature, among 74 histologic grade 3 and 18 grade 1 tumors, 88 cases (96%) were correctly assigned. Interestingly histologic grade 2 tumors (n = 58) were split in these two molecular grade categories. We confirmed the use of fuzzy logic selection as a new tool to identify gene signatures with good reliability and increased classification power. This method based on artificial intelligence algorithms was successfully

  9. Lock-in by molecular multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter; Libchaber, Albert

    2003-12-01

    A lock-in amplifier is physically realized at the level of fluorescent dye molecules. It is based on the general property that the emission of a fluorescent dye is the product of quantum efficiency and illumination intensity. For each pixel of a microscopic image, we measure in amplitude and phase an environment property of the dye, such as conformation, membrane voltage, or temperature. This lock-in implementation is highly parallel and reaches the ultimate photon shot noise limit. Using fast temperature oscillations, we apply it to measure the opening/closing kinetics of a molecular beacon (DNA hairpin) at 5 μs resolution.

  10. Phylogenomics and molecular signatures for species from the plant pathogen-containing order xanthomonadales.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Hafiz Sohail; Gupta, Radhey S

    2013-01-01

    The species from the order Xanthomonadales, which harbors many important plant pathogens and some human pathogens, are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA tree. No molecular or biochemical characteristic is known that is specific for these bacteria. Phylogenetic and comparative analyses were conducted on 26 sequenced Xanthomonadales genomes to delineate their branching order and to identify molecular signatures consisting of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in protein sequences that are specific for these bacteria. In a phylogenetic tree based upon sequences for 28 proteins, Xanthomonadales species formed a strongly supported clade with Rhodanobacter sp. 2APBS1 as its deepest branch. Comparative analyses of protein sequences have identified 13 CSIs in widely distributed proteins such as GlnRS, TypA, MscL, LysRS, LipA, Tgt, LpxA, TolQ, ParE, PolA and TyrB that are unique to all species/strains from this order, but not found in any other bacteria. Fifteen additional CSIs in proteins (viz. CoxD, DnaE, PolA, SucA, AsnB, RecA, PyrG, LigA, MutS and TrmD) are uniquely shared by different Xanthomonadales except Rhodanobacter and in a few cases by Pseudoxanthomonas species, providing further support for the deep branching of these two genera. Five other CSIs are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and 1-3 species from the orders Chromatiales, Methylococcales and Cardiobacteriales suggesting that these deep branching orders of Gammaproteobacteria might be specifically related. Lastly, 7 CSIs in ValRS, CarB, PyrE, GlyS, RnhB, MinD and X001065 are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and a limited number of Beta- or Gamma-proteobacteria. Our analysis indicates that these CSIs have likely originated independently and they are not due to lateral gene transfers. The Xanthomonadales-specific CSIs reported here provide novel molecular markers for the identification of these important plant and human pathogens and also as potential targets

  11. Phylogenomics and Molecular Signatures for Species from the Plant Pathogen-Containing Order Xanthomonadales

    PubMed Central

    Naushad, Hafiz Sohail; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2013-01-01

    The species from the order Xanthomonadales, which harbors many important plant pathogens and some human pathogens, are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA tree. No molecular or biochemical characteristic is known that is specific for these bacteria. Phylogenetic and comparative analyses were conducted on 26 sequenced Xanthomonadales genomes to delineate their branching order and to identify molecular signatures consisting of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in protein sequences that are specific for these bacteria. In a phylogenetic tree based upon sequences for 28 proteins, Xanthomonadales species formed a strongly supported clade with Rhodanobacter sp. 2APBS1 as its deepest branch. Comparative analyses of protein sequences have identified 13 CSIs in widely distributed proteins such as GlnRS, TypA, MscL, LysRS, LipA, Tgt, LpxA, TolQ, ParE, PolA and TyrB that are unique to all species/strains from this order, but not found in any other bacteria. Fifteen additional CSIs in proteins (viz. CoxD, DnaE, PolA, SucA, AsnB, RecA, PyrG, LigA, MutS and TrmD) are uniquely shared by different Xanthomonadales except Rhodanobacter and in a few cases by Pseudoxanthomonas species, providing further support for the deep branching of these two genera. Five other CSIs are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and 1–3 species from the orders Chromatiales, Methylococcales and Cardiobacteriales suggesting that these deep branching orders of Gammaproteobacteria might be specifically related. Lastly, 7 CSIs in ValRS, CarB, PyrE, GlyS, RnhB, MinD and X001065 are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and a limited number of Beta- or Gamma-proteobacteria. Our analysis indicates that these CSIs have likely originated independently and they are not due to lateral gene transfers. The Xanthomonadales-specific CSIs reported here provide novel molecular markers for the identification of these important plant and human pathogens and also as potential

  12. Nuclear signature effect on spatial distribution of molecular harmonic in the presence of spatial inhomogeneous field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liqiang; Li, Wenliang

    2017-01-01

    Spatial distribution of the molecular harmonic spectra from \\text{H}\\text{2}+ in the presence of inhomogeneous field has been theoretically investigated. It shows that (i) the harmonic intensities from the negative-H nucleus play the dominating role in harmonic emission spectra. (ii) Through the investigations of the nuclear signature effect on the spatial distribution of the molecular harmonic spectra, the differences of the harmonic intensities between the negative-H nucleus and the positive-H nucleus can be enhanced and reduced with the introduction of the higher vibrational state and the heavy nucleus (i.e. \\text{D}2+ ), respectively. The time-frequency analyses of the harmonic spectra, the time-dependent wave function and the electron localization have been shown to explain the harmonic spatial distribution and the electron motion. (iii) Due to the plasmon-resonance-enhancement near the metallic nanostructure, the harmonic cutoff can be remarkably enhanced as the spatial position of the inhomogeneous field moving away from the gap center. The ionization probabilities have been shown to explain the harmonic cutoff extension.

  13. Single-cell transcriptomics uncovers distinct molecular signatures of stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Giustacchini, Alice; Thongjuea, Supat; Barkas, Nikolaos; Woll, Petter S; Povinelli, Benjamin J; Booth, Christopher A G; Sopp, Paul; Norfo, Ruggiero; Rodriguez-Meira, Alba; Ashley, Neil; Jamieson, Lauren; Vyas, Paresh; Anderson, Kristina; Segerstolpe, Åsa; Qian, Hong; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Mustjoki, Satu; Sandberg, Rickard; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Mead, Adam J

    2017-06-01

    Recent advances in single-cell transcriptomics are ideally placed to unravel intratumoral heterogeneity and selective resistance of cancer stem cell (SC) subpopulations to molecularly targeted cancer therapies. However, current single-cell RNA-sequencing approaches lack the sensitivity required to reliably detect somatic mutations. We developed a method that combines high-sensitivity mutation detection with whole-transcriptome analysis of the same single cell. We applied this technique to analyze more than 2,000 SCs from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) throughout the disease course, revealing heterogeneity of CML-SCs, including the identification of a subgroup of CML-SCs with a distinct molecular signature that selectively persisted during prolonged therapy. Analysis of nonleukemic SCs from patients with CML also provided new insights into cell-extrinsic disruption of hematopoiesis in CML associated with clinical outcome. Furthermore, we used this single-cell approach to identify a blast-crisis-specific SC population, which was also present in a subclone of CML-SCs during the chronic phase in a patient who subsequently developed blast crisis. This approach, which might be broadly applied to any malignancy, illustrates how single-cell analysis can identify subpopulations of therapy-resistant SCs that are not apparent through cell-population analysis.

  14. Molecular signature of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: an insight from genotype to phenotype and challenges for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ibrahim H; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; O’Reilly, Eileen M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains one of the most clinically challenging cancers despite an in-depth characterization of the molecular underpinnings and biology of this disease. Recent whole-genome-wide studies have elucidated the diverse and complex genetic alterations which generate a unique oncogenic signature for an individual pancreatic cancer patient and which may explain diverse disease behavior in a clinical setting. Areas covered In this review article, we discuss the key oncogenic pathways of pancreatic cancer including RAS-MAPK, PI3KCA and TGF-β signaling, as well as the impact of these pathways on the disease behavior and their potential targetability. The role of tumor suppressors particularly BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and their role in pancreatic cancer treatment are elaborated upon. We further review recent genomic studies and their impact on future pancreatic cancer treatment. Expert opinion Targeted therapies inhibiting pro-survival pathways have limited impact on pancreatic cancer outcomes. Activation of pro-apoptotic pathways along with suppression of cancer-stem-related pathways may reverse treatment resistance in pancreatic cancer. While targeted therapy or a ‘precision medicine’ approach in pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains an elusive challenge for the majority of patients, there is a real sense of optimism that the strides made in understanding the molecular underpinnings of this disease will translate into improved outcomes. PMID:26439702

  15. Low variance RNAs identify Parkinson’s disease molecular signature in blood

    PubMed Central

    Chikina, Maria D.; Gerald, Christophe P.; Li, Xianting; Ge, Yongchao; Pincas, Hanna; Nair, Venugopalan D.; Wong, Aaron K.; Krishnan, Arjun; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Raymond, Deborah; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Bressman, Susan B.; Yue, Zhenyu; Sealfon, Stuart C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is usually not established until advanced neurodegeneration leads to clinically detectable symptoms. Previous blood PD transcriptome studies show low concordance, possibly due to the use of microarray technology, which has high measurement variation. The Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) G2019S mutation predisposes to PD. Using preclinical and clinical studies, we sought to develop a novel statistically motivated transcriptomic-based approach to identify a molecular signature in the blood of Ashkenazi Jewish PD patients including LRRK2 mutation carriers. Methods Using a digital gene expression platform to quantify 175 mRNA markers with low coefficients of variation (CV), we first compared whole blood transcript levels in mouse models 1) over-expressing wild-type (WT) LRRK2, 2) overexpressing G2019S LRRK2, 3) lacking LRRK2 (knockout), 4) and in WT controls. We then studied an Ashkenazi Jewish cohort of 34 symptomatic PD patients (both WT LRRK2 and G2019S LRRK2) and 32 asymptomatic controls. Results The expression profiles distinguished the 4 mouse groups with different genetic background. In patients, we detected significant differences in blood transcript levels both between individuals differing in LRRK2 genotype and between PD patients and controls. Discriminatory PD markers included genes associated with innate and adaptive immunity and inflammatory disease. Notably, gene expression patterns in L-DOPA-treated PD patients were significantly closer to those of healthy controls in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions We identify whole blood mRNA signatures correlating with LRRK2 genotype and with PD disease state. This approach may provide insight into pathogenesis and a route to early disease detection. PMID:25786808

  16. Whole-genome resequencing uncovers molecular signatures of natural and sexual selection in wild bighorn sheep.

    PubMed

    Kardos, Marty; Luikart, Gordon; Bunch, Rowan; Dewey, Sarah; Edwards, William; McWilliam, Sean; Stephenson, John; Allendorf, Fred W; Hogg, John T; Kijas, James

    2015-11-01

    The identification of genes influencing fitness is central to our understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation and how it shapes phenotypic variation in wild populations. Here, we used whole-genome resequencing of wild Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) to >50-fold coverage to identify 2.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genomic regions bearing signatures of directional selection (i.e. selective sweeps). A comparison of SNP diversity between the X chromosome and the autosomes indicated that bighorn males had a dramatically reduced long-term effective population size compared to females. This probably reflects a long history of intense sexual selection mediated by male-male competition for mates. Selective sweep scans based on heterozygosity and nucleotide diversity revealed evidence for a selective sweep shared across multiple populations at RXFP2, a gene that strongly affects horn size in domestic ungulates. The massive horns carried by bighorn rams appear to have evolved in part via strong positive selection at RXFP2. We identified evidence for selection within individual populations at genes affecting early body growth and cellular response to hypoxia; however, these must be interpreted more cautiously as genetic drift is strong within local populations and may have caused false positives. These results represent a rare example of strong genomic signatures of selection identified at genes with known function in wild populations of a nonmodel species. Our results also showcase the value of reference genome assemblies from agricultural or model species for studies of the genomic basis of adaptation in closely related wild taxa.

  17. Histology-driven data mining of lipid signatures from multiple imaging mass spectrometry analyses: application to human colorectal cancer liver metastasis biopsies.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Aurélien; Patterson, Nathan Heath; Marcinkiewicz, Martin M; Lazaris, Anthoula; Metrakos, Peter; Chaurand, Pierre

    2013-03-05

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) represents an innovative tool in the cancer research pipeline, which is increasingly being used in clinical and pharmaceutical applications. The unique properties of the technique, especially the amount of data generated, make the handling of data from multiple IMS acquisitions challenging. This work presents a histology-driven IMS approach aiming to identify discriminant lipid signatures from the simultaneous mining of IMS data sets from multiple samples. The feasibility of the developed workflow is evaluated on a set of three human colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRCLM) tissue sections. Lipid IMS on tissue sections was performed using MALDI-TOF/TOF MS in both negative and positive ionization modes after 1,5-diaminonaphthalene matrix deposition by sublimation. The combination of both positive and negative acquisition results was performed during data mining to simplify the process and interrogate a larger lipidome into a single analysis. To reduce the complexity of the IMS data sets, a sub data set was generated by randomly selecting a fixed number of spectra from a histologically defined region of interest, resulting in a 10-fold data reduction. Principal component analysis confirmed that the molecular selectivity of the regions of interest is maintained after data reduction. Partial least-squares and heat map analyses demonstrated a selective signature of the CRCLM, revealing lipids that are significantly up- and down-regulated in the tumor region. This comprehensive approach is thus of interest for defining disease signatures directly from IMS data sets by the use of combinatory data mining, opening novel routes of investigation for addressing the demands of the clinical setting.

  18. Competence for chemical reprogramming of sexual fate correlates with an intersexual molecular signature in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Elena P; Gasch, Audrey P; Kimble, Judith

    2014-10-01

    In multicellular organisms, genetic programs guide cells to adopt cell fates as tissues are formed during development, maintained in adults, and repaired after injury. Here we explore how a small molecule in the environment can switch a genetic program from one fate to another. Wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans XX adult hermaphrodites make oocytes continuously, but certain mutant XX adults make sperm instead in an otherwise hermaphrodite soma. Thus, puf-8; lip-1 XX adults make only sperm, but they can be switched from sperm to oocyte production by treatment with a small-molecule MEK inhibitor. To ask whether this chemical reprogramming is common, we tested six XX sperm-only mutants, but found only one other capable of cell fate switching, fbf-1; lip-1. Therefore, reprogramming competence relies on genotype, with only certain mutants capable of responding to the MEK inhibitor with a cell fate change. To gain insight into the molecular basis of competence for chemical reprogramming, we compared polyadenylated transcriptomes of competent and noncompetent XX sperm-only mutants in the absence of the MEK inhibitor and hence in the absence of cell fate reprogramming. Despite their cellular production of sperm, competent mutants were enriched for oogenic messenger RNAs relative to mutants lacking competence for chemical reprogramming. In addition, competent mutants expressed the oocyte-specific protein RME-2, whereas those lacking competence did not. Therefore, mutants competent for reprogramming possess an intersexual molecular profile at both RNA and protein levels. We suggest that this intersexual molecular signature is diagnostic of an intermediate network state that poises the germline tissue for changing its cellular fate in response to environmental cues.

  19. Competence for Chemical Reprogramming of Sexual Fate Correlates with an Intersexual Molecular Signature in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Elena P.; Gasch, Audrey P.; Kimble, Judith

    2014-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, genetic programs guide cells to adopt cell fates as tissues are formed during development, maintained in adults, and repaired after injury. Here we explore how a small molecule in the environment can switch a genetic program from one fate to another. Wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans XX adult hermaphrodites make oocytes continuously, but certain mutant XX adults make sperm instead in an otherwise hermaphrodite soma. Thus, puf-8; lip-1 XX adults make only sperm, but they can be switched from sperm to oocyte production by treatment with a small-molecule MEK inhibitor. To ask whether this chemical reprogramming is common, we tested six XX sperm-only mutants, but found only one other capable of cell fate switching, fbf-1; lip-1. Therefore, reprogramming competence relies on genotype, with only certain mutants capable of responding to the MEK inhibitor with a cell fate change. To gain insight into the molecular basis of competence for chemical reprogramming, we compared polyadenylated transcriptomes of competent and noncompetent XX sperm-only mutants in the absence of the MEK inhibitor and hence in the absence of cell fate reprogramming. Despite their cellular production of sperm, competent mutants were enriched for oogenic messenger RNAs relative to mutants lacking competence for chemical reprogramming. In addition, competent mutants expressed the oocyte-specific protein RME-2, whereas those lacking competence did not. Therefore, mutants competent for reprogramming possess an intersexual molecular profile at both RNA and protein levels. We suggest that this intersexual molecular signature is diagnostic of an intermediate network state that poises the germline tissue for changing its cellular fate in response to environmental cues. PMID:25146970

  20. Integrated, multi-cohort analysis identifies conserved transcriptional signatures across multiple respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Andres-Terre, Marta; McGuire, Helen M; Pouliot, Yannick; Bongen, Erika; Sweeney, Timothy E.; Tato, Cristina M; Khatri, Purvesh

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory viral infections are a significant burden to healthcare worldwide. Many whole genome expression profiles have identified different respiratory viral infection signatures, but these have not translated to clinical practice. Here, we performed two integrated, multi-cohort analyses of publicly available transcriptional data of viral infections. First, we identified a common host signature across different respiratory viral infections that could distinguish (a) individuals with viral infections from healthy controls and from those with bacterial infections, and (b) symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects prior to symptom onset in challenge studies. Second, we identified an influenza-specific host response signature that (a) could distinguish influenza-infected samples from those with bacterial and other respiratory viral infections, (b) was a diagnostic and prognostic marker in influenza-pneumonia patients and influenza challenge studies, and (c) was predictive of response to influenza vaccine. Our results have applications in the diagnosis, prognosis, and identification of drug targets in viral infections. PMID:26682989

  1. Multiple Sclerosis: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Miljković, Djordje; Spasojević, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) involves several components: redox, inflammatory/autoimmune, vascular, and neurodegenerative. All of them are supported by the intertwined lines of evidence, and none of them should be written off. However, the exact mechanisms of MS initiation, its development, and progression are still elusive, despite the impressive pace by which the data on MS are accumulating. In this review, we will try to integrate the current facts and concepts, focusing on the role of redox changes and various reactive species in MS. Knowing the schedule of initial changes in pathogenic factors and the key turning points, as well as understanding the redox processes involved in MS pathogenesis is the way to enable MS prevention, early treatment, and the development of therapies that target specific pathophysiological components of the heterogeneous mechanisms of MS, which could alleviate the symptoms and hopefully stop MS. Pertinent to this, we will outline (i) redox processes involved in MS initiation; (ii) the role of reactive species in inflammation; (iii) prooxidative changes responsible for neurodegeneration; and (iv) the potential of antioxidative therapy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2286–2334. PMID:23473637

  2. Integrative network analysis of nineteen brain regions identifies molecular signatures and networks underlying selective regional vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghui; Roussos, Panos; McKenzie, Andrew; Zhou, Xianxiao; Kajiwara, Yuji; Brennand, Kristen J; De Luca, Gabriele C; Crary, John F; Casaccia, Patrizia; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Ehrlich, Michelle; Gandy, Sam; Goate, Alison; Katsel, Pavel; Schadt, Eric; Haroutunian, Vahram; Zhang, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by progressive cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. However, despite extensive clinical and genomic studies, the molecular basis of AD development and progression remains elusive. To elucidate molecular systems associated with AD, we developed a large scale gene expression dataset from 1053 postmortem brain samples across 19 cortical regions of 125 individuals with a severity spectrum of dementia and neuropathology of AD. We excluded brain specimens that evidenced neuropathology other than that characteristic of AD. For the first time, we performed a pan-cortical brain region genomic analysis, characterizing the gene expression changes associated with a measure of dementia severity and multiple measures of the severity of neuropathological lesions associated with AD (neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles) and constructing region-specific co-expression networks. We rank-ordered 44,692 gene probesets, 1558 co-expressed gene modules and 19 brain regions based upon their association with the disease traits. The neurobiological pathways identified through these analyses included actin cytoskeleton, axon guidance, and nervous system development. Using public human brain single-cell RNA-sequencing data, we computed brain cell type-specific marker genes for human and determined that many of the abnormally expressed gene signatures and network modules were specific to oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and neurons. Analysis based on disease severity suggested that: many of the gene expression changes, including those of oligodendrocytes, occurred early in the progression of disease, making them potential translational/treatment development targets and unlikely to be mere bystander result of degeneration; several modules were closely linked to cognitive compromise with lesser association with traditional measures of neuropathology. The brain regional analyses identified temporal lobe gyri as

  3. Determination of the molecular signature of fossil conifers by experimental palaeochemotaxonomy - Part 1: The Araucariaceae family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Hautevelle, Y.; Michels, R.

    2013-03-01

    Twelve species of the conifer family Araucariaceae, including Araucaria (6 species), Agathis (3 species) and Wollemia (1 species) genera, were submitted to artificial maturation by confined pyrolysis. The aim of these experiments is to transform the biomolecules synthesized by these species into their homologous geomolecules in laboratory conditions. Determination of the diagenetic molecular signatures of Araucariaceae through experimentation on extant representatives allows us to complete our knowledge in botanical palaeochemotaxonomy. Such knowledge is relevant to palaeoenvironmental, environmental and archaeology purposes. All artificially diagenetic species of Araucariaceae are firstly characterized by a predominance of saturated tetracyclic diterpenoids including ent-beyerane, phyllocladanes and ent-kauranes. Moreover, Araucaria genus shows a high relative abundance of bicyclic sesquiterpenoids, particularly the cadalane-type compounds accompanied by those of eudesmane and bisabolane types as well as chamazulene and pentamethyl-dihydroindenes. Diterpenoids are of labdane, isopimarane and abietane types (essentially derived from abietanoic acids) as well as isohexyl alkylaromatic hydrocarbons. Compared to the tetracyclic diterpenoids, these compounds show a relatively lower abundance, reaching trace levels in the case of saturated abietanes. Distributions of sesquiterpenoids and diterpenoids of Agathis show some similarities to that of Araucaria, with the exception of one species, in which the tetracyclic compounds are absent and the abietane type (essentially derived from abietanoic acids) predominant. High similarities between the Wollemia and Araucaria genera are observed. Both are characterized by some high relative abundance of tetracyclic compounds with no predominance of other specific diterpenoids.

  4. Four alpha ganglion cell types in mouse retina: Function, structure, and molecular signatures

    PubMed Central

    Sanes, Joshua R.

    2017-01-01

    The retina communicates with the brain using ≥30 parallel channels, each carried by axons of distinct types of retinal ganglion cells. In every mammalian retina one finds so-called "alpha" ganglion cells (αRGCs), identified by their large cell bodies, stout axons, wide and mono-stratified dendritic fields, and high levels of neurofilament protein. In the mouse, three αRGC types have been described based on responses to light steps: On-sustained, Off-sustained, and Off-transient. Here we employed a transgenic mouse line that labels αRGCs in the live retina, allowing systematic targeted recordings. We characterize the three known types and identify a fourth, with On-transient responses. All four αRGC types share basic aspects of visual signaling, including a large receptive field center, a weak antagonistic surround, and absence of any direction selectivity. They also share a distinctive waveform of the action potential, faster than that of other RGC types. Morphologically, they differ in the level of dendritic stratification within the IPL, which accounts for their response properties. Molecularly, each type has a distinct signature. A comparison across mammals suggests a common theme, in which four large-bodied ganglion cell types split the visual signal into four channels arranged symmetrically with respect to polarity and kinetics. PMID:28753612

  5. In vivo epigenomic profiling of germ cells reveals germ cell molecular signatures.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jia-Hui; Kumar, Vibhor; Muratani, Masafumi; Kraus, Petra; Yeo, Jia-Chi; Yaw, Lai-Ping; Xue, Kun; Lufkin, Thomas; Prabhakar, Shyam; Ng, Huck-Hui

    2013-02-11

    The limited number of in vivo germ cells poses an impediment to genome-wide studies. Here, we applied a small-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) method on purified mouse fetal germ cells to generate genome-wide maps of four histone modifications (H3K4me3, H3K27me3, H3K27ac, and H2BK20ac). Comparison of active chromatin state between somatic, embryonic stem, and germ cells revealed promoters and enhancers needed for stem cell maintenance and germ cell development. We found the nuclear receptor Nr5a2 motif to be enriched at a subset of germ cell cis-regulatory regions, and our results implicate Nr5a2 in germ cell biology. Interestingly, in germ cells, the H3K27me3 histone modification occurs more frequently at regions that are enriched for retrotransposons and MHC genes, indicating that these loci are specifically silenced in germ cells. Together, our study provides genome-wide histone modification maps of in vivo germ cells and reveals the molecular chromatin signatures of germ cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural signatures of DRD4 mutants revealed using molecular dynamics simulations: Implications for drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Jatana, Nidhi; Thukral, Lipi; Latha, N

    2016-01-01

    Human Dopamine Receptor D4 (DRD4) orchestrates several neurological functions and represents a target for many psychological disorders. Here, we examined two rare variants in DRD4; V194G and R237L, which elicit functional alterations leading to disruption of ligand binding and G protein coupling, respectively. Using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we provide in-depth analysis to reveal structural signatures of wild and mutant complexes with their bound agonist and antagonist ligands. We constructed intra-protein network graphs to discriminate the global conformational changes induced by mutations. The simulations also allowed us to elucidate the local side-chain dynamical variations in ligand-bound mutant receptors. The data suggest that the mutation in transmembrane V (V194G) drastically disrupts the organization of ligand binding site and causes disorder in the native helical arrangement. Interestingly, the R237L mutation leads to significant rewiring of side-chain contacts in the intracellular loop 3 (site of mutation) and also affects the distant transmembrane topology. Additionally, these mutations lead to compact ICL3 region compared to the wild type, indicating that the receptor would be inaccessible for G protein coupling. Our findings thus reveal unreported structural determinants of the mutated DRD4 receptor and provide a robust framework for design of effective novel drugs.

  7. Molecular signatures of mouse TRPV1-lineage neurons revealed by RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Samridhi C.; Mishra, Santosh K.; Maric, Dragan; Kaszas, Krisztian; Gonnella, Gian Luigi; Clokie, Samuel J.; Kominsky, Hal D.; Gross, Jacklyn R.; Keller, Jason M.; Mannes, Andrew J.; Hoon, Mark A.; Iadarola, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of pain neural systems are frequently chronic and, when recalcitrant to treatment, can severely degrade the quality of life. The pain pathway begins with sensory neurons in dorsal root or trigeminal ganglia and the neuronal subpopulations that express the TRPV1 ion channel transduce sensations of painful heat and inflammation, and play a fundamental role in clinical pain arising from cancer and arthritis. In the present study we elucidate the complete transcriptomes of neurons from the TRPV1 lineage and a non-TRPV1 neuro-glial population in sensory ganglia through the combined application of next-gen deep RNA-Seq, genetic neuronal labeling with fluorescence-activated cell sorting, or neuron-selective chemoablation. RNA-Seq accurately quantitates gene expression, a difficult parameter to determine with most other methods especially for very low and very high expressed genes. Differentially expressed genes are present at every level of cellular function from the nucleus to the plasma membrane. We identified many ligand receptor pairs in the TRPV1 population suggesting that autonomous presynaptic regulation maybe a major regulatory mechanism in nociceptive neurons. The data define, in a quantitative, cell population specific fashion, the molecular signature of a distinct and clinically important group of pain-sensing neurons and provide an overall framework for understanding the transcriptome of TRPV1 nociceptive neurons. PMID:25281809

  8. Ontology based molecular signatures for immune cell types via gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New technologies are focusing on characterizing cell types to better understand their heterogeneity. With large volumes of cellular data being generated, innovative methods are needed to structure the resulting data analyses. Here, we describe an ‘Ontologically BAsed Molecular Signature’ (OBAMS) method that identifies novel cellular biomarkers and infers biological functions as characteristics of particular cell types. This method finds molecular signatures for immune cell types based on mapping biological samples to the Cell Ontology (CL) and navigating the space of all possible pairwise comparisons between cell types to find genes whose expression is core to a particular cell type’s identity. Results We illustrate this ontological approach by evaluating expression data available from the Immunological Genome project (IGP) to identify unique biomarkers of mature B cell subtypes. We find that using OBAMS, candidate biomarkers can be identified at every strata of cellular identity from broad classifications to very granular. Furthermore, we show that Gene Ontology can be used to cluster cell types by shared biological processes in order to find candidate genes responsible for somatic hypermutation in germinal center B cells. Moreover, through in silico experiments based on this approach, we have identified genes sets that represent genes overexpressed in germinal center B cells and identify genes uniquely expressed in these B cells compared to other B cell types. Conclusions This work demonstrates the utility of incorporating structured ontological knowledge into biological data analysis – providing a new method for defining novel biomarkers and providing an opportunity for new biological insights. PMID:24004649

  9. Molecular signatures to define spermatogenic cells in common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Lin, Zachary Yu-Ching; Imamura, Masanori; Sano, Chiaki; Nakajima, Ryusuke; Suzuki, Tomoko; Yamadera, Rie; Takehara, Yuji; Okano, Hirotaka James; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki

    2012-05-01

    Germ cell development is a fundamental process required to produce offspring. The developmental program of spermatogenesis has been assumed to be similar among mammals. However, recent studies have revealed differences in the molecular properties of primate germ cells compared with the well-characterized mouse germ cells. This may prevent simple application of rodent insights into higher primates. Therefore, thorough investigation of primate germ cells is necessary, as this may lead to the development of more appropriate animal models. The aim of this study is to define molecular signatures of spermatogenic cells in the common marmoset, Callithrix jacchus. Interestingly, NANOG, PRDM1, DPPA3 (STELLA), IFITM3, and ZP1 transcripts, but no POU5F1 (OCT4), were detected in adult marmoset testis. Conversely, mouse testis expressed Pou5f1 but not Nanog, Prdm1, Dppa3, Ifitm3, and Zp1. Other previously described mouse germ cell markers were conserved in marmoset and mouse testes. Intriguingly, marmoset spermatogenic cells underwent dynamic protein expression in a developmental stage-specific manner; DDX4 (VASA) protein was present in gonocytes, diminished in spermatogonial cells, and reexpressed in spermatocytes. To investigate epigenetic differences between adult marmoset and mice, DNA methylation analyses identified unique epigenetic profiles to marmoset and mice. Marmoset NANOG and POU5F1 promoters in spermatogenic cells exhibited a methylation status opposite to that in mice, while the DDX4 and LEFTY1 loci, as well as imprinted genes, displayed an evolutionarily conserved methylation pattern. Marmosets have great advantages as models for human reproductive biology and are also valuable as experimental nonhuman primates; thus, the current study provides an important platform for primate reproductive biology, including possible applications to humans.

  10. DNA methylation-based immune response signature improves patient diagnosis in multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Jana; Bizet, Martin; Desmedt, Christine; Calonne, Emilie; Dedeurwaerder, Sarah; Garaud, Soizic; Koch, Alexander; Larsimont, Denis; Salgado, Roberto; Van den Eynden, Gert; Willard Gallo, Karen; Bontempi, Gianluca; Defrance, Matthieu; Sotiriou, Christos; Fuks, François

    2017-08-01

    The tumor immune response is increasingly associated with better clinical outcomes in breast and other cancers. However, the evaluation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) relies on histopathological measurements with limited accuracy and reproducibility. Here, we profiled DNA methylation markers to identify a methylation of TIL (MeTIL) signature that recapitulates TIL evaluations and their prognostic value for long-term outcomes in breast cancer (BC). MeTIL signature scores were correlated with clinical endpoints reflecting overall or disease-free survival and a pathologic complete response to preoperative anthracycline therapy in 3 BC cohorts from the Jules Bordet Institute in Brussels and in other cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The MeTIL signature measured TIL distributions in a sensitive manner and predicted survival and response to chemotherapy in BC better than did histopathological assessment of TILs or gene expression-based immune markers, respectively. The MeTIL signature also improved the prediction of survival in other malignancies, including melanoma and lung cancer. Furthermore, the MeTIL signature predicted differences in survival for malignancies in which TILs were not known to have a prognostic value. Finally, we showed that MeTIL markers can be determined by bisulfite pyrosequencing of small amounts of DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissue, supporting clinical applications for this methodology. This study highlights the power of DNA methylation to evaluate tumor immune responses and the potential of this approach to improve the diagnosis and treatment of breast and other cancers. This work was funded by the Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique (FNRS) and Télévie, the INNOVIRIS Brussels Region BRUBREAST Project, the IUAP P7/03 program, the Belgian "Foundation against Cancer," the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF), and the Fonds Gaston Ithier.

  11. Effect of heparin on the biological properties and molecular signature of human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Ling; Camilleri, Emily T.; Helledie, Torben; Samsonraj, Rebekah M.; Titmarsh, Drew M.; Chua, Ren Jie; Dreesen, Oliver; Dombrowski, Christian; Rider, David A.; Galindo, Mario; Lee, Ian; Hong, Wanjin; Hui, James H.; Nurcombe, Victor; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Cool, Simon M.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic use of heparin as an anti-coagulant for the treatment of thrombosis or embolism invokes many adverse systemic events including thrombocytopenia, vascular reactions and osteoporosis. Here, we addressed whether adverse effects might also be directed to mesenchymal stem cells that reside in the bone marrow compartment. Harvested human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were exposed to varying doses of heparin and their responses profiled. At low doses (<200 ng/ml), serial passaging with heparin exerted a variable effect on hMSC proliferation and multipotentiality across multiple donors, while at higher doses (≥100 µg/ml), heparin supplementation inhibited cell growth and increased both senescence and cell size. Gene expression profiling using cDNA arrays and RNA-seq analysis revealed pleiotropic effects of low-dose heparin on signaling pathways essential to hMSC growth and differentiation (including the TGFβ/BMP superfamily, FGFs, and Wnts). Cells serially passaged in low-dose heparin possess a donor-dependent gene signature that reflects their altered phenotype. Our data indicate that heparin supplementation during the culturing of hMSCs can alter their biological properties, even at low doses. This warrants caution in the application of heparin as a culture supplement for the ex vivo expansion of hMSCs. It also highlights the need for careful evaluation of the bone marrow compartment in patients receiving chronic heparin treatment. PMID:26484394

  12. Effect of heparin on the biological properties and molecular signature of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ling; Camilleri, Emily T; Helledie, Torben; Samsonraj, Rebekah M; Titmarsh, Drew M; Chua, Ren Jie; Dreesen, Oliver; Dombrowski, Christian; Rider, David A; Galindo, Mario; Lee, Ian; Hong, Wanjin; Hui, James H; Nurcombe, Victor; van Wijnen, Andre J; Cool, Simon M

    2016-01-15

    Chronic use of heparin as an anti-coagulant for the treatment of thrombosis or embolism invokes many adverse systemic events including thrombocytopenia, vascular reactions and osteoporosis. Here, we addressed whether adverse effects might also be directed to mesenchymal stem cells that reside in the bone marrow compartment. Harvested human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were exposed to varying doses of heparin and their responses profiled. At low doses (<200 ng/ml), serial passaging with heparin exerted a variable effect on hMSC proliferation and multipotentiality across multiple donors, while at higher doses (≥ 100 μg/ml), heparin supplementation inhibited cell growth and increased both senescence and cell size. Gene expression profiling using cDNA arrays and RNA-seq analysis revealed pleiotropic effects of low-dose heparin on signaling pathways essential to hMSC growth and differentiation (including the TGFβ/BMP superfamily, FGFs, and Wnts). Cells serially passaged in low-dose heparin possess a donor-dependent gene signature that reflects their altered phenotype. Our data indicate that heparin supplementation during the culturing of hMSCs can alter their biological properties, even at low doses. This warrants caution in the application of heparin as a culture supplement for the ex vivo expansion of hMSCs. It also highlights the need for careful evaluation of the bone marrow compartment in patients receiving chronic heparin treatment.

  13. Molecular signatures for the phylum Synergistetes and some of its subclades.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Vaibhav; Gupta, Radhey S

    2012-11-01

    Species belonging to the phylum Synergistetes are poorly characterized. Though the known species display Gram-negative characteristics and the ability to ferment amino acids, no single characteristic is known which can define this group. For eight Synergistetes species, complete genome sequences or draft genomes have become available. We have used these genomes to construct detailed phylogenetic trees for the Synergistetes species and carried out comprehensive analysis to identify molecular markers consisting of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in protein sequences that are specific for either all Synergistetes or some of their sub-groups. We report here identification of 32 CSIs in widely distributed proteins such as RpoB, RpoC, UvrD, GyrA, PolA, PolC, MraW, NadD, PyrE, RpsA, RpsH, FtsA, RadA, etc., including a large >300 aa insert within the RpoC protein, that are present in various Synergistetes species, but except for isolated bacteria, these CSIs are not found in the protein homologues from any other organisms. These CSIs provide novel molecular markers that distinguish the species of the phylum Synergistetes from all other bacteria. The large numbers of other CSIs discovered in this work provide valuable information that supports and consolidates evolutionary relationships amongst the sequenced Synergistetes species. Of these CSIs, seven are specifically present in Jonquetella, Pyramidobacter and Dethiosulfovibrio species indicating a cladal relationship among them, which is also strongly supported by phylogenetic trees. A further 15 CSIs that are only present in Jonquetella and Pyramidobacter indicate a close association between these two species. Additionally, a previously described phylogenetic relationship between the Aminomonas and Thermanaerovibrio species was also supported by 9 CSIs. The strong relationships indicated by the indel analysis provide incentives for the grouping of species from these clades into higher taxonomic groups such as families

  14. Phylogeny and molecular signatures for the phylum Thermotogae and its subgroups.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S; Bhandari, Vaibhav

    2011-06-01

    Thermotogae species are currently identified mainly on the basis of their unique toga and distinct branching in the rRNA and other phylogenetic trees. No biochemical or molecular markers are known that clearly distinguish the species from this phylum from all other bacteria. The taxonomic/evolutionary relationships within this phylum, which consists of a single family, are also unclear. We report detailed phylogenetic analyses on Thermotogae species based on concatenated sequences for many ribosomal as well as other conserved proteins that identify a number of distinct clades within this phylum. Additionally, comprehensive analyses of protein sequences from Thermotogae genomes have identified >60 Conserved Signature Indels (CSI) that are specific for the Thermotogae phylum or its different subgroups. Eighteen CSIs in important proteins such as PolI, RecA, TrpRS and ribosomal proteins L4, L7/L12, S8, S9, etc. are uniquely present in various Thermotogae species and provide molecular markers for the phylum. Many CSIs were specific for a number of Thermotogae subgroups. Twelve of these CSIs were specific for a clade consisting of various Thermotoga species except Tt. lettingae, which was separated from other Thermotoga species by a long branch in phylogenetic trees; Fourteen CSIs were specific for a clade consisting of the Fervidobacterium and Thermosipho genera and eight additional CSIs were specific for the genus Thermosipho. In addition, the existence of a clade consisting of the deep branching species Petrotoga mobilis, Kosmotoga olearia and Thermotogales bacterium mesG1 was supported by seven CSIs. The deep branching of this clade was also supported by a number of CSIs that were present in various Thermotogae species, but absent in this clade and all other bacteria. Most of these clades were strongly supported by phylogenetic analyses based on two datasets of protein sequences and they identify potential higher taxonomic grouping (viz. families) within this phylum

  15. Tissue-Specific Molecular Biomarker Signatures of Type 2 Diabetes: An Integrative Analysis of Transcriptomics and Protein-Protein Interaction Data.

    PubMed

    Calimlioglu, Beste; Karagoz, Kubra; Sevimoglu, Tuba; Kilic, Elif; Gov, Esra; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major global public health burden. A complex metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes affects multiple different tissues, demanding a "systems medicine" approach to biomarker and novel diagnostic discovery, not to mention data integration across omics-es. In the present study, transcriptomics data from different tissues including beta-cells, pancreatic islets, arterial tissue, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, liver, and skeletal muscle of 228 samples were integrated with protein-protein interaction data and genome scale metabolic models to unravel the molecular and tissue-specific biomarker signatures of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Classifying differentially expressed genes, reconstruction and topological analysis of active protein-protein interaction subnetworks indicated that genomic reprogramming depends on the type of tissue, whereas there are common signatures at different levels. Among all tissue and cell types, Mannosidase Alpha Class 1A Member 2 was the common signature at genome level, and activation-ppara reaction, which stimulates a nuclear receptor protein, was found out as the mutual reporter at metabolic level. Moreover, miR-335 and miR-16-5p came into prominence in regulation of transcription at different tissues. On the other hand, distinct signatures were observed for different tissues at the metabolome level. Various coenzyme-A derivatives were significantly enriched metabolites in pancreatic islets, whereas skeletal muscle was enriched for cholesterol, malate, L-carnitine, and several amino acids. Results have showed utmost importance concerning relations between T2D and cancer, blood coagulation, neurodegenerative diseases, and specific metabolic and signaling pathways.

  16. Multiplicity derivative: A new signature of a first-order phase transition in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, S.; Chaudhuri, G.; Das, P.; Das Gupta, S.

    2017-06-01

    Measurement of M , the total multiplicity, for central collision between comparable mass heavy ions can provide a signature for first-order phase transition. The derivative of M with respect to E*/A , where E* is the excitation energy in the center of mass and A is the total mass of the dissociating system, is expected to go through maximum as a function of E*. Theoretical modeling shows that this is the energy where the specific heat Cv maximizes, which typically happens at the first-order phase transition. The measurement of total M is probably feasible in more than one laboratory.

  17. Genome Diversity and Divergence in Drosophila mauritiana: Multiple Signatures of Faster X Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Garrigan, Daniel; Kingan, Sarah B.; Geneva, Anthony J.; Vedanayagam, Jeffrey P.; Presgraves, Daven C.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila mauritiana is an Indian Ocean island endemic species that diverged from its two sister species, Drosophila simulans and Drosophila sechellia, approximately 240,000 years ago. Multiple forms of incomplete reproductive isolation have evolved among these species, including sexual, gametic, ecological, and intrinsic postzygotic barriers, with crosses among all three species conforming to Haldane’s rule: F1 hybrid males are sterile and F1 hybrid females are fertile. Extensive genetic resources and the fertility of hybrid females have made D. mauritiana, in particular, an important model for speciation genetics. Analyses between D. mauritiana and both of its siblings have shown that the X chromosome makes a disproportionate contribution to hybrid male sterility. But why the X plays a special role in the evolution of hybrid sterility in these, and other, species remains an unsolved problem. To complement functional genetic analyses, we have investigated the population genomics of D. mauritiana, giving special attention to differences between the X and the autosomes. We present a de novo genome assembly of D. mauritiana annotated with RNAseq data and a whole-genome analysis of polymorphism and divergence from ten individuals. Our analyses show that, relative to the autosomes, the X chromosome has reduced nucleotide diversity but elevated nucleotide divergence; an excess of recurrent adaptive evolution at its protein-coding genes; an excess of recent, strong selective sweeps; and a large excess of satellite DNA. Interestingly, one of two centimorgan-scale selective sweeps on the D. mauritiana X chromosome spans a region containing two sex-ratio meiotic drive elements and a high concentration of satellite DNA. Furthermore, genes with roles in reproduction and chromosome biology are enriched among genes that have histories of recurrent adaptive protein evolution. Together, these genome-wide analyses suggest that genetic conflict and frequent positive natural

  18. A Comparative Survey of the Topographical Distribution of Signature Molecular Lesions in Major Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Steven E.; Toledo, Jon B.; Appleby, Dina H.; Xie, Sharon X.; Wang, Li-San; Baek, Young; Wolk, David A.; Lee, Edward B.; Miller, Bruce L.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the anatomic distributions of major neurodegenerative disease lesions is important to appreciate the differential clinical profiles of these disorders and to serve as neuropathological standards for emerging molecular neuroimaging methods. To address these issues, here we present a comparative survey of the topographical distribution of the defining molecular neuropathological lesions among ten neurodegenerative diseases from a large and uniformly assessed brain collection. Ratings of pathological severity in sixteen brain regions from 671 cases with diverse neurodegenerative diseases were summarized and analyzed. These included: a) amyloid-β and tau lesions in Alzheimer’s disease, b) tau lesions in three other tauopathies including Pick’s disease, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, c) α-synuclein inclusion ratings in four synucleinopathies including Parkinson’s disease, Parkinson’s disease with dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy, and d) TDP-43 lesions in two TDP-43 proteinopathies, including frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with TDP-43 and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The data presented graphically and topographically confirm and extend previous pathological anatomic descriptions and statistical comparisons highlight the lesion distributions that either overlap or distinguish the diseases in each molecular disease category. PMID:23881776

  19. Molecular Signatures Reveal Circadian Clocks May Orchestrate the Homeorhetic Response to Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Theresa; Patel, Osman; Dykema, Karl; Dover, Heather; Furge, Kyle; Plaut, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Genes associated with lactation evolved more slowly than other genes in the mammalian genome. Higher conservation of milk and mammary genes suggest that species variation in milk composition is due in part to the environment and that we must look deeper into the genome for regulation of lactation. At the onset of lactation, metabolic changes are coordinated among multiple tissues through the endocrine system to accommodate the increased demand for nutrients and energy while allowing the animal to remain in homeostasis. This process is known as homeorhesis. Homeorhetic adaptation to lactation has been extensively described; however how these adaptations are orchestrated among multiple tissues remains elusive. To develop a clearer picture of how gene expression is coordinated across multiple tissues during the pregnancy to lactation transition, total RNA was isolated from mammary, liver and adipose tissues collected from rat dams (n = 5) on day 20 of pregnancy and day 1 of lactation, and gene expression was measured using Affymetrix GeneChips. Two types of gene expression analysis were performed. Genes that were differentially expressed between days within a tissue were identified with linear regression, and univariate regression was used to identify genes commonly up-regulated and down-regulated across all tissues. Gene set enrichment analysis showed genes commonly up regulated among the three tissues enriched gene ontologies primary metabolic processes, macromolecular complex assembly and negative regulation of apoptosis ontologies. Genes enriched in transcription regulator activity showed the common up regulation of 2 core molecular clock genes, ARNTL and CLOCK. Commonly down regulated genes enriched Rhythmic process and included: NR1D1, DBP, BHLHB2, OPN4, and HTR7, which regulate intracellular circadian rhythms. Changes in mammary, liver and adipose transcriptomes at the onset of lactation illustrate the complexity of homeorhetic adaptations and suggest that

  20. Signatures of Hot Molecular Hydrogen Absorption from Protoplanetary Disks. I. Non-thermal Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Keri; France, Kevin; Arulanantham, Nicole; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Kruczek, Nicholas

    2017-09-01

    The environment around protoplanetary disks (PPDs) regulates processes that drive the chemical and structural evolution of circumstellar material. We perform a detailed empirical survey of warm molecular hydrogen (H2) absorption observed against H i-Lyα (Lyα: λ1215.67) emission profiles for 22 PPDs, using archival Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet (UV) spectra to identify H2 absorption signatures and quantify the column densities of H2 ground states in each sightline. We compare thermal equilibrium models of H2 to the observed H2 rovibrational level distributions. We find that, for the majority of targets, there is a clear deviation in high-energy states (T exc ≳ 20,000 K) away from thermal equilibrium populations (T(H2) ≳ 3500 K). We create a metric to estimate the total column density of non-thermal H2 (N(H2)nLTE) and find that the total column densities of thermal (N(H2)) and N(H2)nLTE correlate for transition disks and targets with detectable C iv-pumped H2 fluorescence. We compare N(H2) and N(H2)nLTE to circumstellar observables and find that N(H2)nLTE correlates with X-ray and far-UV luminosities, but no correlations are observed with the luminosities of discrete emission features (e.g., Lyα, C iv). Additionally, N(H2) and N(H2)nLTE are too low to account for the H2 fluorescence observed in PPDs, so we speculate that this H2 may instead be associated with a diffuse, hot, atomic halo surrounding the planet-forming disk. We create a simple photon-pumping model for each target to test this hypothesis and find that Lyα efficiently pumps H2 levels with T exc ≥ 10,000 K out of thermal equilibrium.

  1. Aqueous Cation-Amide Binding: Free Energies and IR Spectral Signatures by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pluharova, Eva; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schmidt, Burkhard; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-07-03

    Understanding specific ion effects on proteins remains a considerable challenge. N-methylacetamide serves as a useful proxy for the protein backbone that can be well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic signatures in the amide I band reflecting the strength of the interaction of alkali cations and alkali earth dications with the carbonyl group remain difficult to assign and controversial to interpret. Herein, we directly compute the IR shifts corresponding to the binding of either sodium or calcium to aqueous N-methylacetamide using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the two cations interact with aqueous N-methylacetamide with different affinities and in different geometries. Since sodium exhibits a weak interaction with the carbonyl group, the resulting amide I band is similar to an unperturbed carbonyl group undergoing aqueous solvation. In contrast, the stronger calcium binding results in a clear IR shift with respect to N-methylacetamide in pure water. Support from the Czech Ministry of Education (grant LH12001) is gratefully acknowledged. EP thanks the International Max-Planck Research School for support and the Alternative Sponsored Fellowship program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PJ acknowledges the Praemium Academie award from the Academy of Sciences. Calculations of the free energy profiles were made possible through generous allocation of computer time from the North-German Supercomputing Alliance (HLRN). Calculations of vibrational spectra were performed in part using the computational resources in the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grant CHE-0431312. CJM is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. PNNL is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. MDB is

  2. The proteome signature of the inflammatory breast cancer plasma membrane identifies novel molecular markers of disease

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Arroyo, Ivette J; Feliz-Mosquea, Yismeilin R; Pérez-Laspiur, Juliana; Arju, Rezina; Giashuddin, Shah; Maldonado-Martínez, Gerónimo; Cubano, Luis A; Schneider, Robert J; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of breast cancer with a 35% 5-year survival rate. The accurate and early diagnosis of IBC and the development of targeted therapy against this deadly disease remain a great medical challenge. Plasma membrane proteins (PMPs) such as E-cadherin and EGFR, play an important role in the progression of IBC. Because the critical role of PMPs in the oncogenic processes they are the perfect candidates as molecular markers and targets for cancer therapies. In the present study, Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) followed by mass spectrometry analysis was used to compare the relative expression levels of membrane proteins (MP) between non-cancerous mammary epithelial and IBC cells, MCF-10A and SUM-149, respectively. Six of the identified PMPs were validated by immunoblotting using the membrane fractions of non-IBC and IBC cell lines, compared with MCF-10A cells. Immunohistochemical analysis using IBC, invasive ductal carcinoma or normal mammary tissue samples was carried out to complete the validation method in nine of the PMPs. We identified and quantified 278 MPs, 76% of which classified as PMPs with 1.3-fold or higher change. We identified for the first time the overexpression of the novel plasminogen receptor, PLGRKT in IBC and of the carrier protein, SCAMP3. Furthermore, we describe the positive relationship between L1CAM expression and metastasis in IBC patients and the role of SCAMP3 as a tumor-related protein. Overall, the membrane proteomic signature of IBC reflects a global change in cellular organization and suggests additional strategies for cancer progression. Together, this study provides insight into the specialized IBC plasma membrane proteome with the potential to identify a number of novel therapeutic targets for IBC. PMID:27648361

  3. Comparative analyses identify molecular signature of MRI-classified SVZ-associated glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Hsing Annie; Rhodes, Christopher T; Lin, ChenWei; Phillips, Joanna J; Berger, Mitchel S

    2017-04-18

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with limited therapeutic options. While efforts to identify genes responsible for GBM have revealed mutations and aberrant gene expression associated with distinct types of GBM, patients with GBM are often diagnosed and classified based on MRI features. Therefore, we seek to identify molecular representatives in parallel with MRI classification for group I and group II primary GBM associated with the subventricular zone (SVZ). As group I and II GBM contain stem-like signature, we compared gene expression profiles between these 2 groups of primary GBM and endogenous neural stem progenitor cells to reveal dysregulation of cell cycle, chromatin status, cellular morphogenesis, and signaling pathways in these 2 types of MRI-classified GBM. In the absence of IDH mutation, several genes associated with metabolism are differentially expressed in these subtypes of primary GBM, implicating metabolic reprogramming occurs in tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, histone lysine methyltransferase EZH2 was upregulated while histone lysine demethylases KDM2 and KDM4 were downregulated in both group I and II primary GBM. Lastly, we identified 9 common genes across large data sets of gene expression profiles among MRI-classified group I/II GBM, a large cohort of GBM subtypes from TCGA, and glioma stem cells by unsupervised clustering comparison. These commonly upregulated genes have known functions in cell cycle, centromere assembly, chromosome segregation, and mitotic progression. Our findings highlight altered expression of genes important in chromosome integrity across all GBM, suggesting a common mechanism of disrupted fidelity of chromosome structure in GBM.

  4. Determination of the molecular signature of fossil conifers by experimental palaeochemotaxonomy - Part 1: The Araucariaceae family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Hautevelle, Y.; Michels, R.

    2012-08-01

    Several extant species of the Araucariaceae family (one of the families of conifers) were invested for the experimental artificial maturation by confined pyrolysis, in order to realize the transformation of biomolecules to geomolecules in laboratory conditions. The experimental study of diagenetized molecular signatures of the Araucariaceae species (common, inter- and infra-generic characteristics) allow to complete our knowledge in botanical palaeochemotaxonomy. Such knowledge is relevant to the reconstitution of palaeoflora and palaeoclimatic reconstruction, archaeology and environmental studies. In this work, major carbon skeleton types of Araucariaceae are detected in the organic solvent extracts of fresh and pyrolyzed plants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that all species of Araucariaceae are firstly characterized by a predominance of saturated tetracyclic diterpenoids. Moreover, the Araucaria genus shows a high relative abundance of bicyclic sesquiterpenoids, particularly compounds of the cadalane-type compounds accompanied by those of eudesmane-type, bisabolane-type as well as chamazulene, pentamethyl-dihydroindenes. Diterpenoids are of the labdane-type, isopimarane, abietane-type (essentially derived from abietanoic acids) as well as isohexyl alkylaromatic hydrocarbons. Compared to the tetracyclic diterpenoids, these compounds show a relatively lower abundance, reaching trace levels in the case of saturated abietanes. Distribution of sesqui- and diterpenoids of Agathis shows some similarities to that of Araucaria, with the exception of one species, in which the tetracyclic compounds are absent and the abietane-type (essentially derived from abietanoic acids) predominant. High similarities between the Wollemia and Araucaria genera are observed. Both are characterized by some high relative abundance of tetracyclic compounds with no predominance of other specific diterpenoids.

  5. Infrared (1-12 Micrometers) Atomic and Molecular Emission Signatures from Energetic Materials using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    chlorate and nitrate compounds including KClO3, NaClO3, KNO3, and NaNO3 to produce intense plasma at the target surface. IR LIBS studies on...molecular LIBS signatures from chlorate and nitrate compounds were observed at ~10 um and ~7.3 um, respectively. The observed molecular emissions showed... chlorate and nitrate compounds including KClO3, NaClO3, KNO3, and NaNO3 to produce intense plasma at the target surface. IR LIBS studies on

  6. Using Multiple Sulfur Isotope Signatures to Delineate Terrane Boundaries and Investigate Crustal Formation Mechanisms during the Paleoproterozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFlamme, C.; Fiorentini, M. L.; Johnson, S.; Occhipinti, S.; Wing, B. A.; Jeon, H.

    2015-12-01

    Proterozoic cratonic margins are structurally and magmatically complex areas of the Earth's crust, having undergone one or more orogenic cycles. Syn- to late-orogenic plutonic suites have a profound effect on the stabilization of cratonic margins by enabling the development of a refractory and buoyant subcontinental mantle and/or lower crust from which they were derived. In addition, these intrusive bodies act as isotopic tracers to the underlying lithospheric keel and its intricate and often obscured architecture. In situ multiple sulfur isotope systematics are a robust and powerful tool for fingerprinting spatially and temporally anomalous signatures found in the crust. When combined, δ34S and Δ33S have the potential to link source environment and age of a sulfur-bearing mineral. Here, we investigate the multiple sulfur isotopic signatures of two syn- to late-orogenic supersuites that form a large component of the Paleoproterozoic Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia: the ca. 1820-1775 Ma Moorarie Supersuite and the ca. 1680-1620 Ma Durlacher Supersuite. Results from secondary ion mass spectrometry demonstrate that the magmatic pyrite from the Moorarie Supersuite yields two differing signatures with δ34S and Δ33S equal to: 1) 3.1-4.8; ~0.00, and 2) 5.1-8.4; 0.1-0.24. This dichotomy is spatially associated with unexposed seismic blocks defined by Johnson et al., (2013).Multiple sulfur isotope systematics also lend insight into the poorly understood formation mechanisms and sources of syn- to late-orogenic plutonic suites. The Durlacher Supersuite does not preserve sample-to-sample variation (δ34S=5.0-8.3; Δ33S=0.0), indicating that it crystallized from a widespread and homogeneous source. This is in direct contrast to the systematic δ34S and Δ33S variation preserved in the Moorarie Supersuite, a feature that we attribute to smaller batch melting of localized and isotopically separate blocks. Lastly, the Durlacher Supersuite contains anomalous within

  7. Molecular Profiling of Glatiramer Acetate Early Treatment Effects in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Achiron, Anat; Feldman, Anna; Gurevich, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background: Glatiramer acetate (GA, Copaxone®) has beneficial effects on the clinical course of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). However, the exact molecular mechanisms of GA effects are only partially understood. Objective: To characterized GA molecular effects in RRMS patients within 3 months of treatment by microarray profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods: Gene-expression profiles were determined in RRMS patients before and at 3 months after initiation of GA treatment using Affimetrix (U133A-2) microarrays containing 14,500 well-characterized human genes. Most informative genes (MIGs) of GA-induced biological convergent pathways operating in RRMS were constructed using gene functional annotation, enrichment analysis and pathway reconstruction bioinformatic softwares. Verification at the mRNA and protein level was performed by qRT-PCR and FACS. Results: GA induced a specific gene expression molecular signature that included altered expression of 480 genes within 3 months of treatment; 262 genes were up-regulated, and 218 genes were down-regulated. The main convergent mechanisms of GA effects were related to antigen-activated apoptosis, inflammation, adhesion, and MHC class-I antigen presentation. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that GA treatment induces alternations of immunomodulatory gene expression patterns that are important for suppression of disease activity already at three months of treatment and can be used as molecular markers of GA activity. PMID:19893201

  8. Explosive radiation or cryptic mass extinction? Interpreting signatures in molecular phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Michael D; Cook, Lyn G

    2009-09-01

    How biodiversity is generated and maintained underlies many major questions in evolutionary biology, particularly relating to the tempo and pattern of diversification through time. Molecular phylogenies and new analytical methods provide additional tools to help interpret evolutionary processes. Evolutionary rates in lineages sometimes appear punctuated, and such "explosive" radiations are commonly interpreted as adaptive, leading to causative key innovations being sought. Here we argue that an alternative process might explain apparently rapid radiations ("broom-and-handle" or "stemmy" patterns seen in many phylogenies) with no need to invoke dramatic increase in the rate of diversification. We use simulations to show that mass extinction events can produce the same phylogenetic pattern as that currently being interpreted as due to an adaptive radiation. By comparing simulated and empirical phylogenies of Australian and southern African legumes, we find evidence for coincident mass extinctions in multiple lineages that could have resulted from global climate change at the end of the Eocene.

  9. The use of molecular-based risk stratification and pharmacogenomics for outcome prediction and personalized therapeutic management of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah K; Heuck, Christoph J; Albino, Anthony P; Qu, Pingping; Zhang, Qing; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D

    2011-10-01

    Despite improvement in therapeutic efficacy, multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable with a median survival of approximately 10 years. Gene-expression profiling (GEP) can be used to elucidate the molecular basis for resistance to chemotherapy through global assessment of molecular alterations that exist at diagnosis, after therapeutic treatment and that evolve during tumor progression. Unique GEP signatures associated with recurrent chromosomal translocations and ploidy changes have defined molecular classes with differing clinical features and outcomes. When compared to other stratification systems the GEP70 test remained a significant predictor of outcome, reduced the number of patients classified with a poor prognosis, and identified patients at increased risk of relapse despite their standard clinico-pathologic and genetic findings. GEP studies of serial samples showed that risk increases over time, with relapsed disease showing GEP shifts toward a signature of poor outcomes. GEP signatures of myeloma cells after therapy were prognostic for event-free and overall survival and thus may be used to identify novel strategies for overcoming drug resistance. This brief review will focus on the use of GEP of MM to define high-risk myeloma, and elucidate underlying mechanisms that are beginning to change clinical decision-making and inform drug design.

  10. The use of molecular-based risk stratification and pharmacogenomics for outcome prediction and personalized therapeutic management of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah K.; Heuck, Christoph J.; Albino, Anthony P.; Qu, Pingping; Zhang, Qing; Barlogie, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvement in therapeutic efficacy, multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable with a median survival of approximately 10 years. Gene-expression profiling (GEP) can be used to elucidate the molecular basis for resistance to chemotherapy through global assessment of molecular alterations that exist at diagnosis, after therapeutic treatment and that evolve during tumor progression. Unique GEP signatures associated with recurrent chromosomal translocations and ploidy changes have defined molecular classes with differing clinical features and outcomes. When compared to other stratification systems the GEP70 test remained a significant predictor of outcome, reduced the number of patients classified with a poor prognosis, and identified patients at increased risk of relapse despite their standard clinico-pathologic and genetic findings. GEP studies of serial samples showed that risk increases over time, with relapsed disease showing GEP shifts toward a signature of poor outcomes. GEP signatures of myeloma cells after therapy were prognostic for event-free and overall survival and thus may be used to identify novel strategies for overcoming drug resistance. This brief review will focus on the use of GEP of MM to define high-risk myeloma, and elucidate underlying mechanisms that are beginning to change clinical decision-making and inform drug design. PMID:22002477

  11. Molecular signatures of plastic phenotypes in two eusocial insect species with simple societies

    PubMed Central

    Patalano, Solenn; Vlasova, Anna; Wyatt, Chris; Ewels, Philip; Camara, Francisco; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Asher, Claire L.; Jurkowski, Tomasz P.; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Bachman, Martin; González-Navarrete, Irene; Minoche, André E.; Krueger, Felix; Lowy, Ernesto; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Rodriguez-Ales, Jose Luis; Nascimento, Fabio S.; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Gabaldon, Toni; Tarver, James E.; Andrews, Simon; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Hughes, William O. H.; Guigó, Roderic; Reik, Wolf; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is important in adaptation and shapes the evolution of organisms. However, we understand little about what aspects of the genome are important in facilitating plasticity. Eusocial insect societies produce plastic phenotypes from the same genome, as reproductives (queens) and nonreproductives (workers). The greatest plasticity is found in the simple eusocial insect societies in which individuals retain the ability to switch between reproductive and nonreproductive phenotypes as adults. We lack comprehensive data on the molecular basis of plastic phenotypes. Here, we sequenced genomes, microRNAs (miRNAs), and multiple transcriptomes and methylomes from individual brains in a wasp (Polistes canadensis) and an ant (Dinoponera quadriceps) that live in simple eusocial societies. In both species, we found few differences between phenotypes at the transcriptional level, with little functional specialization, and no evidence that phenotype-specific gene expression is driven by DNA methylation or miRNAs. Instead, phenotypic differentiation was defined more subtly by nonrandom transcriptional network organization, with roles in these networks for both conserved and taxon-restricted genes. The general lack of highly methylated regions or methylome patterning in both species may be an important mechanism for achieving plasticity among phenotypes during adulthood. These findings define previously unidentified hypotheses on the genomic processes that facilitate plasticity and suggest that the molecular hallmarks of social behavior are likely to differ with the level of social complexity. PMID:26483466

  12. Molecular signatures of plastic phenotypes in two eusocial insect species with simple societies.

    PubMed

    Patalano, Solenn; Vlasova, Anna; Wyatt, Chris; Ewels, Philip; Camara, Francisco; Ferreira, Pedro G; Asher, Claire L; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Bachman, Martin; González-Navarrete, Irene; Minoche, André E; Krueger, Felix; Lowy, Ernesto; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Rodriguez-Ales, Jose Luis; Nascimento, Fabio S; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Gabaldon, Toni; Tarver, James E; Andrews, Simon; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Hughes, William O H; Guigó, Roderic; Reik, Wolf; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-11-10

    Phenotypic plasticity is important in adaptation and shapes the evolution of organisms. However, we understand little about what aspects of the genome are important in facilitating plasticity. Eusocial insect societies produce plastic phenotypes from the same genome, as reproductives (queens) and nonreproductives (workers). The greatest plasticity is found in the simple eusocial insect societies in which individuals retain the ability to switch between reproductive and nonreproductive phenotypes as adults. We lack comprehensive data on the molecular basis of plastic phenotypes. Here, we sequenced genomes, microRNAs (miRNAs), and multiple transcriptomes and methylomes from individual brains in a wasp (Polistes canadensis) and an ant (Dinoponera quadriceps) that live in simple eusocial societies. In both species, we found few differences between phenotypes at the transcriptional level, with little functional specialization, and no evidence that phenotype-specific gene expression is driven by DNA methylation or miRNAs. Instead, phenotypic differentiation was defined more subtly by nonrandom transcriptional network organization, with roles in these networks for both conserved and taxon-restricted genes. The general lack of highly methylated regions or methylome patterning in both species may be an important mechanism for achieving plasticity among phenotypes during adulthood. These findings define previously unidentified hypotheses on the genomic processes that facilitate plasticity and suggest that the molecular hallmarks of social behavior are likely to differ with the level of social complexity.

  13. Different FTE signatures generated by the bursty single X line reconnection and the multiple X line reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. [flux transfer events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, D. Q.; Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines magnetic signatures associated with the time-dependent magnetic reconnection processes at the dayside magnetopause, using two-dimensional compressible MHD simulations. Emphasis is placed on the different flux-transfer-event (FTE) signatures generated by the bursty single X-line reconnection (BSXR) and the multiple X-line reconnection processes. It is shown that the FTE magnetic signatures are not exhibited on the magnetospheric side if the FTEs are due to the BSXR process and the ratio between the magnetic field strength in the magnetosheath to that in the magnetosphere is not less than 1.7. The simulation results are compared with satellite observations.

  14. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling the Molecular Signatures of Annexin A5 in Lung Squamous Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gong, Linlin; Qi, Xiaoyu; Li, Huizhen; Wang, Faming; Chi, Xinming; Jiang, Yulin; Shao, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer around the world. It’s crucial to identify newer mechanism-based targets to effectively manage lung cancer. Annexin A5 (ANXA5) is a protein kinase C inhibitory protein and calcium dependent phospholipid-binding protein, which may act as an endogenous regulator of various pathophysiological processes. However, its molecular mechanism in lung cancer remains poorly understood. This study was designed to determine the mechanism of ANXA5 in lung cancer with a hope to obtain useful information to provide a new therapeutic target. We used a stable isotope dimethyl labeling based quantitative proteomic method to identify differentially expressed proteins in NSCLC cell lines after ANXA5 transfection. Out of 314 proteins, we identified 26 and 44 proteins that were down- and up-regulated upon ANXA5 modulation, respectively. The IPA analysis revealed that glycolysis and gluconeogenesis were the predominant pathways modulated by ANXA5. Multiple central nodes, namely HSPA5, FN1, PDIA6, ENO1, ALDOA, JUP and KRT6A appeared to occupy regulatory nodes in the protein-protein networks upon ANXA5 modulation. Taken together, ANXA5 appears to have pleotropic effects, as it modulates multiple key signaling pathways, supporting the potential usefulness of ANXA5 as a potential target in lung cancer. This study might provide a new insight into the mechanism of ANXA5 in lung cancer. PMID:27684953

  15. Early and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis: distinct molecular signatures identified by gene-expression profiling in synovia

    PubMed Central

    Lequerré, Thierry; Bansard, Carine; Vittecoq, Olivier; Derambure, Céline; Hiron, Martine; Daveau, Maryvonne; Tron, François; Ayral, Xavier; Biga, Norman; Auquit-Auckbur, Isabelle; Chiocchia, Gilles; Le Loët, Xavier; Salier, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a heterogeneous disease and its underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Because previous microarray studies have only focused on long-standing (LS) RA compared to osteoarthritis, we aimed to compare the molecular profiles of early and LS RA versus control synovia. Methods Synovial biopsies were obtained by arthroscopy from 15 patients (4 early untreated RA, 4 treated LS RA and 7 controls, who had traumatic or mechanical lesions). Extracted mRNAs were used for large-scale gene-expression profiling. The different gene-expression combinations identified by comparison of profiles of early, LS RA and healthy synovia were linked to the biological processes involved in each situation. Results Three combinations of 719, 116 and 52 transcripts discriminated, respectively, early from LS RA, and early or LS RA from healthy synovia. We identified several gene clusters and distinct molecular signatures specifically expressed during early or LS RA, thereby suggesting the involvement of different pathophysiological mechanisms during the course of RA. Conclusions Early and LS RA have distinct molecular signatures with different biological processes participating at different times during the course of the disease. These results suggest that better knowledge of the main biological processes involved at a given RA stage might help to choose the most appropriate treatment. PMID:19563633

  16. Attentional Signatures of Perception: Multiple Object Tracking Reveals the Automaticity of Contour Interpolation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keane, Brian P.; Mettler, Everett; Tsoi, Vicky; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple object tracking (MOT) is an attentional task wherein observers attempt to track multiple targets among moving distractors. Contour interpolation is a perceptual process that fills-in nonvisible edges on the basis of how surrounding edges (inducers) are spatiotemporally related. In five experiments, we explored the automaticity of…

  17. Attentional Signatures of Perception: Multiple Object Tracking Reveals the Automaticity of Contour Interpolation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keane, Brian P.; Mettler, Everett; Tsoi, Vicky; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple object tracking (MOT) is an attentional task wherein observers attempt to track multiple targets among moving distractors. Contour interpolation is a perceptual process that fills-in nonvisible edges on the basis of how surrounding edges (inducers) are spatiotemporally related. In five experiments, we explored the automaticity of…

  18. Application of cascaded frequency multiplication to molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Maiwald, Frank W.; Pearson, John C.

    2005-09-01

    Laboratory molecular spectroscopy provides the basis for interpretation of atmospheric, planetary, and astrophysical data gathered by remote sensing. Laboratory studies of atomic and molecular signatures across the electromagnetic spectrum provide high-precision, quantitative data used to interpret the observed environment from remote measurements. Historically, the region of the spectrum above 500 GHz has been relatively unexplored due to atmospheric absorption and technical difficulties generating and detecting radiation. Laboratory spectroscopy at these frequencies has traditionally involved measurement of one or two absorption features and relied on fitting of models to the limited data. We report a new spectrometer built around a computer-controlled commercial synthesizer and millimeter-wave module driving a series of amplifiers followed by a series of wide-bandwidth frequency doublers and triplers. The spectrometer provides the ability to rapidly measure large pieces of frequency space with higher resolution, accuracy, and sensitivity than with Fourier transform infrared techniques. The approach is simple, modular, and requires no custom-built electronics or high voltage and facilitates the use of infrared data analysis techniques on complex submillimeter spectra.

  19. Xmrk, kras and myc transgenic zebrafish liver cancer models share molecular signatures with subsets of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiling; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Li, Caixia; Emelyanov, Alexander; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Previously three oncogene transgenic zebrafish lines with inducible expression of xmrk, kras or Myc in the liver have been generated and these transgenic lines develop oncogene-addicted liver tumors upon chemical induction. In the current study, comparative transcriptomic approaches were used to examine the correlation of the three induced transgenic liver cancers with human liver cancers. RNA profiles from the three zebrafish tumors indicated relatively small overlaps of significantly deregulated genes and biological pathways. Nevertheless, the three transgenic tumor signatures all showed significant correlation with advanced or very advanced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interestingly, molecular signature from each oncogene-induced zebrafish liver tumor correlated with only a small subset of human HCC samples (24-29%) and there were conserved up-regulated pathways between the zebrafish and correlated human HCC subgroup. The three zebrafish liver cancer models together represented nearly half (47.2%) of human HCCs while some human HCCs showed significant correlation with more than one signature defined from the three oncogene-addicted zebrafish tumors. In contrast, commonly deregulated genes (21 up and 16 down) in the three zebrafish tumor models generally showed accordant deregulation in the majority of human HCCs, suggesting that these genes might be more consistently deregulated in a broad range of human HCCs with different molecular mechanisms and thus serve as common diagnosis markers and therapeutic targets. Thus, these transgenic zebrafish models with well-defined oncogene-induced tumors are valuable tools for molecular classification of human HCCs and for understanding of molecular drivers in hepatocarcinogenesis in each human HCC subgroup.

  20. Xmrk, Kras and Myc Transgenic Zebrafish Liver Cancer Models Share Molecular Signatures with Subsets of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiling; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Li, Caixia; Emelyanov, Alexander; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Previously three oncogene transgenic zebrafish lines with inducible expression of xmrk, kras or Myc in the liver have been generated and these transgenic lines develop oncogene-addicted liver tumors upon chemical induction. In the current study, comparative transcriptomic approaches were used to examine the correlation of the three induced transgenic liver cancers with human liver cancers. RNA profiles from the three zebrafish tumors indicated relatively small overlaps of significantly deregulated genes and biological pathways. Nevertheless, the three transgenic tumor signatures all showed significant correlation with advanced or very advanced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interestingly, molecular signature from each oncogene-induced zebrafish liver tumor correlated with only a small subset of human HCC samples (24–29%) and there were conserved up-regulated pathways between the zebrafish and correlated human HCC subgroup. The three zebrafish liver cancer models together represented nearly half (47.2%) of human HCCs while some human HCCs showed significant correlation with more than one signature defined from the three oncogene-addicted zebrafish tumors. In contrast, commonly deregulated genes (21 up and 16 down) in the three zebrafish tumor models generally showed accordant deregulation in the majority of human HCCs, suggesting that these genes might be more consistently deregulated in a broad range of human HCCs with different molecular mechanisms and thus serve as common diagnosis markers and therapeutic targets. Thus, these transgenic zebrafish models with well-defined oncogene-induced tumors are valuable tools for molecular classification of human HCCs and for understanding of molecular drivers in hepatocarcinogenesis in each human HCC subgroup. PMID:24633177

  1. Very Important Pool (VIP) genes – an application for microarray-based molecular signatures

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhenqiang; Hong, Huixiao; Fang, Hong; Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida

    2008-01-01

    Background Advances in DNA microarray technology portend that molecular signatures from which microarray will eventually be used in clinical environments and personalized medicine. Derivation of biomarkers is a large step beyond hypothesis generation and imposes considerably more stringency for accuracy in identifying informative gene subsets to differentiate phenotypes. The inherent nature of microarray data, with fewer samples and replicates compared to the large number of genes, requires identifying informative genes prior to classifier construction. However, improving the ability to identify differentiating genes remains a challenge in bioinformatics. Results A new hybrid gene selection approach was investigated and tested with nine publicly available microarray datasets. The new method identifies a Very Important Pool (VIP) of genes from the broad patterns of gene expression data. The method uses a bagging sampling principle, where the re-sampled arrays are used to identify the most informative genes. Frequency of selection is used in a repetitive process to identify the VIP genes. The putative informative genes are selected using two methods, t-statistic and discriminatory analysis. In the t-statistic, the informative genes are identified based on p-values. In the discriminatory analysis, disjoint Principal Component Analyses (PCAs) are conducted for each class of samples, and genes with high discrimination power (DP) are identified. The VIP gene selection approach was compared with the p-value ranking approach. The genes identified by the VIP method but not by the p-value ranking approach are also related to the disease investigated. More importantly, these genes are part of the pathways derived from the common genes shared by both the VIP and p-ranking methods. Moreover, the binary classifiers built from these genes are statistically equivalent to those built from the top 50 p-value ranked genes in distinguishing different types of samples. Conclusion The

  2. Molecular Signature of Organic Carbon Along a Salinity Gradient in Suwannee River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Bianchi, T. S.; Ward, N. D.; Arellano, A. R.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Tolic, N.; Kuo, L. J.

    2016-12-01

    Humic and fulvic acid isolates from Suwannee River dissolved organic matter (DOM) have served as reference standards for the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) for many decades. The large database on Suwannee DOM provides an excellent framework to further expand the application of Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in characterizing the chemical composition of aquatic DOM. In this study, we examined the DOM signature of the lower Suwannee River and plume region at 5 stations along a salinity gradient (0 to 28) using FT-ICR-MS. The chemical characteristics of DOM show distinct differences across this steep salinity gradient. In general, samples collected from the coastal station have lower carbon number and are less aromatic. Molecular level analysis reveals that the magnitude weighted proportion of lipids increased as salinity increased. Interestingly, a similar trend was observed for lignin-like compounds. Target quantification of lignin-phenols showed that while the concentrations of these compounds were lower at the coastal station, the DOC-normalized concentrations were not significantly different between the river and coastal stations. In addition to traditional DOM moieties, we identified for the first time, halogenated organic compounds (HOC). We observed more chlorinated compounds in DOM and increased Cl/C as salinity increased. A relatively high proportion of halogenated lipids (compared to non-halogenated) were observed in the total pool of HOC across all stations. Although not significant in relative proportion, halogenated lignin-like compounds were the most abundant HOC moieties in our samples. CO2 concentrations decreased and became more 13C-enriched along the salinity gradient, ranging from 3,990 ppm (13CO2 = -17.3‰) at salinity 0 to 520 ppm (13CO2 = -7.5‰) at salinity 28, indicating high levels of DOM degradation in the river and a shift to primary production in the marine receiving waters, which is

  3. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. II. Signatures of gravitational collapse of IRDCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Klessen, R. S.; Tremblin, P.; Ossenkopf, V.; Peretto, N.; Simon, R.; Bontemps, S.; Federrath, C.

    2015-06-01

    We analyse column density and temperature maps derived from Herschel dust continuum observations of a sample of prominent, massive infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) i.e. G11.11-0.12, G18.82-0.28, G28.37+0.07, and G28.53-0.25. We disentangle the velocity structure of the clouds using 13CO 1→0 and 12CO 3→2 data, showing that these IRDCs are the densest regions in massive giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and not isolated features. The probability distribution function (PDF) of column densities for all clouds have a power-law distribution over all (high) column densities, regardless of the evolutionary stage of the cloud: G11.11-0.12, G18.82-0.28, and G28.37+0.07 contain (proto)-stars, while G28.53-0.25 shows no signs of star formation. This is in contrast to the purely log-normal PDFs reported for near and/or mid-IR extinction maps. We only find a log-normal distribution for lower column densities, if we perform PDFs of the column density maps of the whole GMC in which the IRDCs are embedded. By comparing the PDF slope and the radial column density profile of three of our clouds, we attribute the power law to the effect of large-scale gravitational collapse and to local free-fall collapse of pre- and protostellar cores for the highest column densities. A significant impact on the cloud properties from radiative feedback is unlikely because the clouds are mostly devoid of star formation. Independent from the PDF analysis, we find infall signatures in the spectral profiles of 12CO for G28.37+0.07 and G11.11-0.12, supporting the scenario of gravitational collapse. Our results are in line with earlier interpretations that see massive IRDCs as the densest regions within GMCs, which may be the progenitors of massive stars or clusters. At least some of the IRDCs are probably the same features as ridges (high column density regions with N> 1023 cm-2 over small areas), which were defined for nearby IR-bright GMCs. Because IRDCs are only confined to the densest (gravity dominated

  4. Study of correlations in molecular motion by multiple quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.H.

    1981-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a very useful tool for characterizing molecular configurations through the measurement of transition frequencies and dipolar couplings. The measurement of spectral lineshapes, spin-lattice relaxation times, and transverse relaxation times also provide us with valuable information about correlations in molecular motion. The new technique of multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance has numerous advantages over the conventional single quantum NMR techniques in obtaining information about static and dynamic interactions of coupled spin systems. In the first two chapters, the theoretical background of spin Hamiltonians and the density matrix formalism of multiple quantum NMR is discussed. The creation and detection of multiple quantum coherence by multiple pulse sequence are discussed. Prototype multiple quantum spectra of oriented benzene are presented. Redfield relaxation theory and the application of multiple quantum NMR to the study of correlations in fluctuations are presented. A specific example of an oriented methyl group relaxed by paramagnetic impurities is studied in detail. The study of possible correlated motion between two coupled methyl groups by multiple quantum NMR is presented. For a six spin system it is shown that the four-quantum spectrum is sensitive to two-body correlations, and serves a ready test of correlated motion. The study of the spin-lattice dynamics of orienting or tunneling methyl groups (CH/sub 3/ and CD/sub 3/) at low temperatures is presented. The anisotropic spin-lattice relaxation of deuterated hexamethylbenzene, caused by the sixfold reorientation of the molecules, is investigated, and the NMR spectrometers and other experimental details are discussed.

  5. Identification of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections at Ulysses Using Multiple Solar Wind Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have discussed the identification of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near the Earth based on various solar wind signatures. In particular, methods have been developed of identifying regions of anomalously low solar wind proton temperatures ( T p) and plasma compositional anomalies relative to the composition of the ambient solar wind that are frequently indicative of ICMEs. In this study, similar methods are applied to observations from the Ulysses spacecraft that was launched in 1990 and placed in a heliocentric orbit over the poles of the Sun. Some 279 probable ICMEs are identified during the spacecraft mission, which ended in 2009. The identifications complement those found independently in other studies of the Ulysses data, but a number of additional events are identified. The properties of the ICMEs detected at Ulysses and those observed near the Earth and in the inner heliosphere are compared.

  6. Multiple time step integrators in ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-02-28

    Multiple time-scale algorithms exploit the natural separation of time-scales in chemical systems to greatly accelerate the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations. Although the utility of these methods in systems where the interactions are described by empirical potentials is now well established, their application to ab initio molecular dynamics calculations has been limited by difficulties associated with splitting the ab initio potential into fast and slowly varying components. Here we present two schemes that enable efficient time-scale separation in ab initio calculations: one based on fragment decomposition and the other on range separation of the Coulomb operator in the electronic Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for both water clusters and a solvated hydroxide ion that multiple time-scale molecular dynamics allows for outer time steps of 2.5 fs, which are as large as those obtained when such schemes are applied to empirical potentials, while still allowing for bonds to be broken and reformed throughout the dynamics. This permits computational speedups of up to 4.4x, compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics with a 0.5 fs time step, while maintaining the same energy conservation and accuracy.

  7. Germline genes hypomethylation and expression define a molecular signature in peripheral blood of ICF patients: implications for diagnosis and etiology.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Guillaume; Walton, Emma L; Sterlin, Delphine; Hédouin, Sabrine; Nitta, Hirohisa; Ito, Yuya; Fouyssac, Fanny; Mégarbané, André; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Picard, Capucine; Francastel, Claire

    2014-04-17

    Immunodeficiency Centromeric Instability and Facial anomalies (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by reduction in serum immunoglobulins with severe recurrent infections, facial dysmorphism, and more variable symptoms including mental retardation. ICF is directly related to a genomic methylation defect that mainly affects juxtacentromeric heterochromatin regions of certain chromosomes, leading to chromosomal rearrangements that constitute a hallmark of this syndrome upon cytogenetic testing. Mutations in the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, the protein ZBTB24 of unknown function, or loci that remain to be identified, lie at its origin. Despite unifying features, common or distinguishing molecular signatures are still missing for this disease. We used the molecular signature that we identified in a mouse model for ICF1 to establish transcriptional biomarkers to facilitate diagnosis and understanding of etiology of the disease. We assayed the expression and methylation status of a set of genes whose expression is normally restricted to germ cells, directly in whole blood samples and epithelial cells of ICF patients. We report that DNA hypomethylation and expression of MAEL and SYCE1 represent robust biomarkers, easily testable directly from uncultured cells to diagnose the most prevalent sub-type of the syndrome. In addition, we identified the first unifying molecular signatures for ICF patients. Of importance, we validated the use of our biomarkers to diagnose a baby born to a family with a sick child. Finally, our analysis revealed unsuspected complex molecular signatures in two ICF patients suggestive of a novel genetic etiology for the disease. Early diagnosis of ICF syndrome is crucial since early immunoglobulin supplementation can improve the course of disease. However, ICF is probably underdiagnosed, especially in patients that present with incomplete phenotype or born to families with no affected relatives. The specific and robust

  8. Germline genes hypomethylation and expression define a molecular signature in peripheral blood of ICF patients: implications for diagnosis and etiology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunodeficiency Centromeric Instability and Facial anomalies (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by reduction in serum immunoglobulins with severe recurrent infections, facial dysmorphism, and more variable symptoms including mental retardation. ICF is directly related to a genomic methylation defect that mainly affects juxtacentromeric heterochromatin regions of certain chromosomes, leading to chromosomal rearrangements that constitute a hallmark of this syndrome upon cytogenetic testing. Mutations in the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, the protein ZBTB24 of unknown function, or loci that remain to be identified, lie at its origin. Despite unifying features, common or distinguishing molecular signatures are still missing for this disease. Method We used the molecular signature that we identified in a mouse model for ICF1 to establish transcriptional biomarkers to facilitate diagnosis and understanding of etiology of the disease. We assayed the expression and methylation status of a set of genes whose expression is normally restricted to germ cells, directly in whole blood samples and epithelial cells of ICF patients. Results We report that DNA hypomethylation and expression of MAEL and SYCE1 represent robust biomarkers, easily testable directly from uncultured cells to diagnose the most prevalent sub-type of the syndrome. In addition, we identified the first unifying molecular signatures for ICF patients. Of importance, we validated the use of our biomarkers to diagnose a baby born to a family with a sick child. Finally, our analysis revealed unsuspected complex molecular signatures in two ICF patients suggestive of a novel genetic etiology for the disease. Conclusions Early diagnosis of ICF syndrome is crucial since early immunoglobulin supplementation can improve the course of disease. However, ICF is probably underdiagnosed, especially in patients that present with incomplete phenotype or born to families with no affected

  9. The Dual Wavelength Ratio knee: a signature of multiple scattering in airborne Ku-Ka observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Alessandro; Tanelli, Simone; Heymsfield, Gerald; Tian, Lin

    2014-05-01

    Deep convective systems observed by the HIWRAP radar during the 2011 MC3E field campaign in Oklahoma provide the first evidence of multiple scattering effects simultaneously at Ku and Ka band. One feature is novel and noteworthy: often, in correspondence to shafts with strong convection and when moving from the top of the cloud downward, the dual wavelength ratio (DWR) first increases as usual in Ku-/Ka-band observations, but then it reaches a maximum and after that point it steadily decreases all the way to the surface, forming what will be hereinafter referred to as a knee. This DWR knee cannot be reproduced by single-scattering theory under almost any plausible cloud microphysical profile, on the other hand it is explained straightforwardly with the help of multiple scattering theory when simulations involving hail-bearing convective cores with large horizontal extents are performed. The DWR reduction in the lower troposphere (i.e., DWR increasing with altitude) is interpreted as the result of multiple scattering pulse stretching caused by the highly-diffusive hail layer positioned high up in the atmosphere, with Ka multiple scattering typically exceeding that occurring in the Ku channel. Since the effects of multiple scattering increase with increasing footprint size, if multiple scattering effects are present in the aircraft measurements, they are likely to be more pronounced in the space-borne dual-frequency Ku - Ka radar observations, envisaged for the NASA-JAXA Global Precipitation (GPM) Measurement Mission, whose launch is expected in February 2014. Our notional study supports the idea that DWR knees will be observed by the GPM radar when overflying high-density ice shafts embedded in large convective systems and suggests that their explanation must not be sought in differential attenuation or differential Mie but via multiple scattering effects.

  10. The molecular characterization and clinical management of multiple myeloma in the post-genome era

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y; Barlogie, B; Shaughnessy, JD

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-causing mutations disrupt coordinated, precise programs of gene expression that govern cell growth and differentiation. Microarray-based gene-expression profiling (GEP) is a powerful tool to globally analyze these changes to study cancer biology and clinical behavior. Despite overwhelming genomic chaos in multiple myeloma (MM), expression patterns within tumor samples are remarkably stable and reproducible. Unique expression patterns associated with recurrent chromosomal translocations and ploidy changes defined molecular classes with differing clinical features and outcomes. Combined molecular techniques also dissected two distinct, reproducible forms of hyperdiploid disease and have molecularly defined MM with high risk for poor clinical outcome. GEP is now used to risk-stratify patients with newly diagnosed MM. Groups with high-risk features are evident in all GEP-defined MM classes, and GEP studies of serial samples showed that risk increases over time, with relapsed disease showing dramatic GEP shifts toward a signature of poor outcomes. This suggests a common mechanism of disease evolution and potentially reflects preferential expansion of therapy-resistant cells. Correlating GEP-defined disease class and risk with outcomes of therapeutic regimens reveals class– specific benefits for individual agents, as well as mechanistic insights into drug sensitivity and resistance. Here, we review modern genomics contributions to understanding MM pathogenesis, prognosis, and therapy. PMID:19657360

  11. Dissecting the molecular signatures of apical cell-type shoot meristems from two ancient land plant lineages.

    PubMed

    Frank, Margaret H; Edwards, Molly B; Schultz, Eric R; McKain, Michael R; Fei, Zhangjun; Sørensen, Iben; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Scanlon, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Shoot apical meristem (SAM) structure varies markedly within the land plants. The SAMs of many seedless vascular plants contain a conspicuous inverted, pyramidal cell called the apical cell (AC), which is unidentified in angiosperms. In this study, we use transcriptomic sequencing with precise laser microdissections of meristem subdomains to define the molecular signatures of anatomically distinct zones from the AC-type SAMs of a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii) and a monilophyte (Equisetum arvense). The two model species for this study represent vascular plant lineages that diverged > 400 million yr ago. Our data comprise comprehensive molecular signatures for the distinct subdomains within AC-type SAMs, an anatomical anomaly whose functional significance has been debated in the botanical literature for over two centuries. Moreover, our data provide molecular support for distinct gene expression programs between the AC-type SAMs of Selaginella and Equisetum, as compared with the SAM transcriptome of the angiosperm maize. The results are discussed in light of the functional significance and evolutionary success of the AC-type SAM within the embryophytes.

  12. Derivation of molecular signatures for breast cancer recurrence prediction using a two-way validation approach

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yijun; Urquidi, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential value of gene expression signatures in assessing the risk of post-surgical breast cancer recurrence, however, many of these predictive models have been derived using simple computational algorithms and validated internally or using one-way validation on a single dataset. We have recently developed a new feature selection algorithm that overcomes some limitations inherent to high-dimensional data analysis. In this study, we applied this algorithm to two publicly available gene expression datasets obtained from over 400 patients with breast cancer to investigate whether we could derive more accurate prognostic signatures and reveal common predictive factors across independent datasets. We compared the performance of three advanced computational algorithms using a robust two-way validation method, where one dataset was used for training and to establish a prediction model that was then blindly tested on the other dataset. The experiment was then repeated in the reverse direction. Analyses identified prognostic signatures that while comprised of only 10–13 genes, significantly outperformed previously reported signatures for breast cancer evaluation. The cross-validation approach revealed CEGP1 and PRAME as major candidates for breast cancer biomarker development. PMID:19291396

  13. Gene Expression Deconvolution for Uncovering Molecular Signatures in Response to Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Alan M.; Yeung, Rae S. M.; Morris, Quaid

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression-based signatures help identify pathways relevant to diseases and treatments, but are challenging to construct when there is a diversity of disease mechanisms and treatments in patients with complex diseases. To overcome this challenge, we present a new application of an in silico gene expression deconvolution method, ISOpure-S1, and apply it to identify a common gene expression signature corresponding to response to treatment in 33 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Using pre- and post-treatment gene expression profiles only, we found a gene expression signature that significantly correlated with a reduction in the number of joints with active arthritis, a measure of clinical outcome (Spearman rho = 0.44, p = 0.040, Bonferroni correction). This signature may be associated with a decrease in T-cells, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets. The products of most differentially expressed genes include known biomarkers for JIA such as major histocompatibility complexes and interleukins, as well as novel biomarkers including α-defensins. This method is readily applicable to expression datasets of other complex diseases to uncover shared mechanistic patterns in heterogeneous samples. PMID:27244050

  14. Signatures of complex magnetic topologies from multiple reconnection sites induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernisse, Y.; Lavraud, B.; Eriksson, S.; Gershman, D. J.; Dorelli, J.; Pollock, C.; Giles, B.; Aunai, N.; Avanov, L.; Burch, J.; Chandler, M.; Coffey, V.; Dargent, J.; Ergun, R. E.; Farrugia, C. J.; Génot, V.; Graham, D. B.; Hasegawa, H.; Jacquey, C.; Kacem, I.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Li, W.; Magnes, W.; Marchaudon, A.; Moore, T.; Paterson, W.; Penou, E.; Phan, T. D.; Retino, A.; Russell, C. T.; Saito, Y.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Torbert, R.; Wilder, F. D.; Yokota, S.

    2016-10-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale mission has demonstrated the frequent presence of reconnection exhausts at thin current sheets within Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) waves at the flank magnetopause. Motivated by these recent observations, we performed a statistical analysis of the boundary layers on the magnetosheath side of all KH current sheets on 8 September 2015. We show 86% consistency between the exhaust flows and particle leakage in the magnetosheath boundary layers but further highlight the very frequent presence of additional boundary layer signatures that do not come from the locally observed reconnection exhausts. These additional electron and ion boundary layers, of various durations and at various positions with respect to the leading and trailing boundaries of the KH waves, signal connections to reconnection sites at other locations. Based on the directionality and extent of these layers, we provide an interpretation whereby complex magnetic topologies can arise within KH waves from the combination of reconnection in the equatorial plane and at midlatitudes in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres, where additional reconnection sites are expected to be triggered by the three-dimensional field lines interweaving induced by the KH waves at the flanks (owing to differential flow and magnetic field shear with latitude). The present event demonstrates that the three-dimensional development of KH waves can induce plasma entry (through reconnection at both midlatitude and equatorial regions) already sunward of the terminator where the instability remains in its linear stage.

  15. Monitoring a Nuclear Factor-κB Signature of Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma*

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yun; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R.; Oliveira, Vasco; Yarde, Danielle; He, Lili; Cheng, Jin Q.; Mathews, Linda; Boucher, Kelly; Cubitt, Christopher; Perez, Lia; Gauthier, Ted J.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Shain, Kenneth H.; Dalton, William S.; Hazlehurst, Lori; Koomen, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of acquired drug resistance results from multiple compensatory mechanisms acting to prevent cell death. Simultaneous monitoring of proteins involved in drug resistance is a major challenge for both elucidation of the underlying biology and development of candidate biomarkers for assessment of personalized cancer therapy. Here, we have utilized an integrated analytical platform based on SDS-PAGE protein fractionation prior to liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, a versatile and powerful tool for targeted quantification of proteins in complex matrices, to evaluate a well-characterized model system of melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). Quantitative assays were developed to measure protein expression related to signaling events and biological processes relevant to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma, specifically: nuclear factor-κB subunits, members of the Bcl-2 family of apoptosis-regulating proteins, and Fanconi Anemia DNA repair components. SDS-PAGE protein fractionation prior to liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring methods were developed for quantification of these selected target proteins in amounts of material compatible with direct translation to clinical specimens (i.e. less than 50,000 cells). As proof of principle, both relative and absolute quantification were performed on cell line models of MM to compare protein expression before and after drug treatment in naïve cells and in drug resistant cells; these liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring results are compared with existing literature and Western blots. The initial stage of a systems biology platform for examining drug resistance in MM has been implemented in cell line models and has been translated to MM cells isolated from a patient. The ultimate application of this platform could assist in clinical decision-making for individualized patient treatment. Although these specific assays have

  16. Non-linear molecular pattern classification using molecular beacons with multiple targets.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Hee; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Tai Hyun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2013-12-01

    In vitro pattern classification has been highlighted as an important future application of DNA computing. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of linear classifiers using DNA-based molecular computing. However, complex tasks require non-linear classification capability. Here we design a molecular beacon that can interact with multiple targets and experimentally shows that its fluorescent signals form a complex radial-basis function, enabling it to be used as a building block for non-linear molecular classification in vitro. The proposed method was successfully applied to solving artificial and real-world classification problems: XOR and microRNA expression patterns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. New Molecular Assay for the Proliferation Signature in Mantle Cell Lymphoma Applicable to Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Scott, David W; Abrisqueta, Pau; Wright, George W; Slack, Graham W; Mottok, Anja; Villa, Diego; Jares, Pedro; Rauert-Wunderlich, Hilka; Royo, Cristina; Clot, Guillem; Pinyol, Magda; Boyle, Merrill; Chan, Fong Chun; Braziel, Rita M; Chan, Wing C; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Cook, James R; Greiner, Timothy C; Fu, Kai; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Holte, Harald; Jaffe, Elaine S; Steidl, Christian; Connors, Joseph M; Gascoyne, Randy D; Rosenwald, Andreas; Staudt, Louis M; Campo, Elias; Rimsza, Lisa M

    2017-05-20

    Purpose Mantle cell lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell neoplasm that displays heterogeneous outcomes after treatment. In 2003, the Lymphoma/Leukemia Molecular Profiling Project described a powerful biomarker-the proliferation signature-using gene expression in fresh frozen material. Herein, we describe the training and validation of a new assay that measures the proliferation signature in RNA derived from routinely available formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies. Methods Forty-seven FFPE biopsies were used to train an assay on the NanoString platform, using microarray gene expression data of matched fresh frozen biopsies as a gold standard. The locked assay was applied to pretreatment FFPE lymph node biopsies from an independent cohort of 110 patients uniformly treated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone. Seventeen biopsies were tested across three laboratories to assess assay reproducibility. Results The MCL35 assay, which contained a 17-gene proliferation signature, yielded gene expression of sufficient quality to assign an assay score and risk group in 108 (98%) of 110 archival FFPE biopsies. The MCL35 assay assigned patients to high-risk (26%), standard-risk (29%), and low-risk (45%) groups, with different lengths of overall survival (OS): a median of 1.1, 2.6, and 8.6 years, respectively (log-rank for trend, P < .001). In multivariable analysis, these risk groups and the Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index were independently associated with OS ( P < .001 for both variables). Concordance of risk assignment across the three independent laboratories was 100%. Conclusion The newly developed and validated MCL35 assay for FFPE biopsies uses the proliferation signature to define groups of patients with significantly different OS independent of the Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index. Importantly, the analytic and clinical validity of this assay defines it as a reliable biomarker to

  18. Efficient Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Multiple Radical Center Systems Based on the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree–Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  19. Efficient molecular dynamics simulations of multiple radical center systems based on the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  20. Understanding the molecular signatures in leaves and flowers by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, R G; Pradeep, T

    2013-08-07

    The difference in size, shape, and chemical cues of leaves and flowers display the underlying genetic makeup and their interactions with the environment. The need to understand the molecular signatures of these fragile plant surfaces is illustrated with a model plant, Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don). Flat, thin layer chromatographic imprints of leaves/petals were imaged using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS), and the results were compared with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) of their extracts. Tandem mass spectrometry with DESI and ESI, in conjunction with database records, confirmed the molecular species. This protocol has been extended to other plants. Implications of this study in identifying varietal differences, toxic metabolite production, changes in metabolites during growth, pest/pathogen attack, and natural stresses are shown with illustrations. The possibility to image subtle features like eye color of petals, leaf vacuole, leaf margin, and veins is demonstrated.

  1. Hypodiploid multiple myeloma is characterized by more aggressive molecular markers than non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Van Wier, Scott; Braggio, Esteban; Baker, Angela; Ahmann, Gregory; Levy, Joan; Carpten, John D.; Fonseca, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma can be categorized into hyperdiploid or non-hyperdiploid myeloma based on the number of chromosomes found in the tumor clone. Among the non-hyperdiploid myelomas, the hypodiploid subtype has the most aggressive clinical phenotype, but the genetic differences between groups are not completely defined. In order to understand the genetic background of hypodiploid multiple myeloma better, we compared the genomic (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) and transcriptomic (gene expression profiling) background of 49 patients with hypodiploid myeloma with 50 other non-hyperdiploid and 125 hyperdiploid myeloma patients. There were significant chromosomal and gene expression differences between hyperdiploid patients and non-hyperdiploid and hypodiploid patients. Non-hyperdiploid and hypodiploid patients shared most of the chromosomal abnormalities; nevertheless a subset of these abnormalities, such as monosomies 13, 14 and 22, was markedly increased in hypodiploid patients. Furthermore, deletions of 1p, 12p, 16q and 17p, all associated with poor outcome or progression in multiple myeloma, were significantly enriched in hypodiploid patients. Molecular risk-stratification indices reinforce the worse prognosis associated with hypodiploid multiple myeloma compared with non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma. Gene expression profiling clustered hypodiploid and non-hyperdiploid subgroups closer than hyperdiploid myeloma but also highlighted the up-regulation of CCND2, WHSC1/MMSET and FGFR3 in the hypodiploid subtype. In summary, hypodiploid multiple myeloma is genetically similar to non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma but characterized by a higher prevalence of genetic alterations associated with poor outcome and disease progression. It is provocative to hypothesize that hypodiploid multiple myeloma is an advanced stage of non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma. PMID:23716545

  2. Gene signatures associated with mouse postnatal hindbrain neural stem cells and medulloblastoma cancer stem cells identify novel molecular mediators and predict human medulloblastoma molecular classification.

    PubMed

    Corno, Daniela; Daniela, Corno; Pala, Mauro; Cominelli, Manuela; Cipelletti, Barbara; Leto, Ketty; Croci, Laura; Barili, Valeria; Brandalise, Federico; Melzi, Raffaella; Di Gregorio, Alessandra; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Bulfone, Alessandro; Rossi, Paola; Rossi, Ferdinando; Consalez, Gian Giacomo; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Galli, Rossella

    2012-06-01

    Medulloblastoma arises from mutations occurring in stem/progenitor cells located in restricted hindbrain territories. Here we report that the mouse postnatal ventricular zone lining the IV ventricle also harbors bona fide stem cells that, remarkably, share the same molecular profile with cerebellar white matter-derived neural stem cells (NSC). To identify novel molecular mediators involved in medulloblastomagenesis, we compared these distinct postnatal hindbrain-derived NSC populations, which are potentially tumor initiating, with murine compound Ptch/p53 mutant medulloblastoma cancer stem cells (CSC) that faithfully phenocopy the different variants of human medulloblastoma in vivo. Transcriptome analysis of both hindbrain NSCs and medulloblastoma CSCs resulted in the generation of well-defined gene signatures, each reminiscent of a specific human medulloblastoma molecular subclass. Most interestingly, medulloblastoma CSCs upregulated developmentally related genes, such as Ebfs, that were shown to be highly expressed in human medulloblastomas and play a pivotal role in experimental medullo-blastomagenesis. These data indicate that gene expression analysis of medulloblastoma CSCs holds great promise not only for understanding functional differences between distinct CSC populations but also for identifying meaningful signatures that might stratify medulloblastoma patients beyond histopathologic staging.

  3. Molecular Signatures for the PVC Clade (Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae, and Lentisphaerae) of Bacteria Provide Insights into Their Evolutionary Relationships.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S; Bhandari, Vaibhav; Naushad, Hafiz Sohail

    2012-01-01

    The PVC superphylum is an amalgamation of species from the phyla Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Chlamydiae, along with the Lentisphaerae, Poribacteria, and two other candidate divisions. The diverse species of this superphylum lack any significant marker that differentiates them from other bacteria. Recently, genome sequences for 37 species covering all of the main PVC groups of bacteria have become available. We have used these sequences to construct a phylogenetic tree based upon concatenated sequences for 16 proteins and identify molecular signatures in protein sequences that are specific for the species from these phyla or those providing molecular links among them. Of the useful molecular markers identified in the present work, six conserved signature indels (CSIs) in the proteins Cyt c oxidase, UvrD helicase, urease, and a helicase-domain containing protein are specific for the species from the Verrucomicrobia phylum; three other CSIs in an ABC transporter protein, cobyrinic acid ac-diamide synthase, and SpoVG protein are specific for the Planctomycetes species. Additionally, a 3 aa insert in the RpoB protein is uniquely present in all sequenced Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, and Lentisphaerae species, providing evidence for the shared ancestry of the species from these three phyla. Lastly, we have also identified a conserved protein of unknown function that is exclusively found in all sequenced species from the phyla Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, Lentisphaerae, and Planctomycetes suggesting a specific linkage among them. The absence of this protein in Poribacteria, which branches separately from other members of the PVC clade, indicates that it is not specifically related to the PVC clade of bacteria. The molecular markers described here in addition to clarifying the evolutionary relationships among the PVC clade of bacteria also provide novel tools for their identification and for genetic and biochemical studies on these organisms.

  4. Molecular Signatures for the PVC Clade (Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae, and Lentisphaerae) of Bacteria Provide Insights into Their Evolutionary Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Radhey S.; Bhandari, Vaibhav; Naushad, Hafiz Sohail

    2012-01-01

    The PVC superphylum is an amalgamation of species from the phyla Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Chlamydiae, along with the Lentisphaerae, Poribacteria, and two other candidate divisions. The diverse species of this superphylum lack any significant marker that differentiates them from other bacteria. Recently, genome sequences for 37 species covering all of the main PVC groups of bacteria have become available. We have used these sequences to construct a phylogenetic tree based upon concatenated sequences for 16 proteins and identify molecular signatures in protein sequences that are specific for the species from these phyla or those providing molecular links among them. Of the useful molecular markers identified in the present work, six conserved signature indels (CSIs) in the proteins Cyt c oxidase, UvrD helicase, urease, and a helicase-domain containing protein are specific for the species from the Verrucomicrobia phylum; three other CSIs in an ABC transporter protein, cobyrinic acid ac-diamide synthase, and SpoVG protein are specific for the Planctomycetes species. Additionally, a 3 aa insert in the RpoB protein is uniquely present in all sequenced Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, and Lentisphaerae species, providing evidence for the shared ancestry of the species from these three phyla. Lastly, we have also identified a conserved protein of unknown function that is exclusively found in all sequenced species from the phyla Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, Lentisphaerae, and Planctomycetes suggesting a specific linkage among them. The absence of this protein in Poribacteria, which branches separately from other members of the PVC clade, indicates that it is not specifically related to the PVC clade of bacteria. The molecular markers described here in addition to clarifying the evolutionary relationships among the PVC clade of bacteria also provide novel tools for their identification and for genetic and biochemical studies on these organisms. PMID:23060863

  5. Singlet oxygen signatures are detected independent of light or chloroplasts in response to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    Mor, Avishai; Koh, Eugene; Weiner, Lev; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Sibony-Benyamini, Hadas; Fluhr, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The production of singlet oxygen is typically associated with inefficient dissipation of photosynthetic energy or can arise from light reactions as a result of accumulation of chlorophyll precursors as observed in fluorescent (flu)-like mutants. Such photodynamic production of singlet oxygen is thought to be involved in stress signaling and programmed cell death. Here we show that transcriptomes of multiple stresses, whether from light or dark treatments, were correlated with the transcriptome of the flu mutant. A core gene set of 118 genes, common to singlet oxygen, biotic and abiotic stresses was defined and confirmed to be activated photodynamically by the photosensitizer Rose Bengal. In addition, induction of the core gene set by abiotic and biotic selected stresses was shown to occur in the dark and in nonphotosynthetic tissue. Furthermore, when subjected to various biotic and abiotic stresses in the dark, the singlet oxygen-specific probe Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green detected rapid production of singlet oxygen in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root. Subcellular localization of Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green fluorescence showed its accumulation in mitochondria, peroxisomes, and the nucleus, suggesting several compartments as the possible origins or targets for singlet oxygen. Collectively, the results show that singlet oxygen can be produced by multiple stress pathways and can emanate from compartments other than the chloroplast in a light-independent manner. The results imply that the role of singlet oxygen in plant stress regulation and response is more ubiquitous than previously thought.

  6. Molecular systems pharmacology: isoelectric focusing signature of protein kinase Cδ provides an integrated measure of its modulation in response to ligands.

    PubMed

    Kedei, Noemi; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Telek, Andrea; Goldsmith, Paul K; Petersen, Mark E; Keck, Gary E; Blumberg, Peter M

    2014-06-26

    Protein kinase C (PKC), a validated therapeutic target for cancer chemotherapy, provides a paradigm for assessing structure-activity relations, where ligand binding has multiple consequences for a target. For PKC, ligand binding controls not only PKC activation and multiple phosphorylations but also subcellular localization, affecting subsequent signaling. Using a capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay system, we could visualize a high resolution isoelectric focusing signature of PKCδ upon stimulation by ligands of the phorbol ester and bryostatin classes. Derivatives that possessed different physicochemical characteristics and induced different patterns of biological response generated different signatures. Consistent with different patterns of PKCδ localization as one factor linked to these different signatures, we found different signatures for activated PKCδ from the nuclear and non-nuclear fractions. We conclude that the capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay system may provide a window into the integrated consequences of ligand binding and thus afford a powerful platform for compound development.

  7. Molecular Systems Pharmacology: Isoelectric Focusing Signature of Protein Kinase Cδ Provides an Integrated Measure of Its Modulation in Response to Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC), a validated therapeutic target for cancer chemotherapy, provides a paradigm for assessing structure–activity relations, where ligand binding has multiple consequences for a target. For PKC, ligand binding controls not only PKC activation and multiple phosphorylations but also subcellular localization, affecting subsequent signaling. Using a capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay system, we could visualize a high resolution isoelectric focusing signature of PKCδ upon stimulation by ligands of the phorbol ester and bryostatin classes. Derivatives that possessed different physicochemical characteristics and induced different patterns of biological response generated different signatures. Consistent with different patterns of PKCδ localization as one factor linked to these different signatures, we found different signatures for activated PKCδ from the nuclear and non-nuclear fractions. We conclude that the capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay system may provide a window into the integrated consequences of ligand binding and thus afford a powerful platform for compound development. PMID:24906106

  8. Hyperspectral molecular imaging of multiple receptors using immunolabeled plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Matthew J.; Seekell, Kevin; Marinakos, Stella; Ostrander, Julie; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Wax, Adam P.

    2011-03-01

    This work presents simultaneous imaging and detection of three types of cell receptors using three types of plasmonic nanoparticles. The size, shape, and composition-dependent scattering profiles of these particles allow for a system of multiple distinct molecular markers using a single optical source. With this goal in mind, a system of tags consisting of anti-EGFR gold nanorods, anti-IGF1R silver nanospheres, and anti-HER-2 gold nanospheres was developed for monitoring the expression of three commonly overexpressed receptors in cancer cells. These labels were chosen because they each scatter strongly in a distinct spectral window. A hyperspectral dark-field microscope was developed to record the scattering spectra of cells labeled with these molecular tags. The ability to monitor multiple tags simultaneously may lead to applications such as profiling the immunophenotype of cell lines and gaining better knowledge of receptor signaling pathways. Single, dual, and triple tag experiments were performed to analyze the specificity of the nanoparticle tags as well as their effect on one another. While distinct resonance peaks in these studies show the ability to characterize cell lines using conjugated nanoparticles, shifts in these peaks also indicate changes in the cellular dielectric environment which may not be distinct from plasmon coupling between nanoparticles bound to proximal receptors.

  9. Hyperspectral molecular imaging of multiple receptors using immunolabeled plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, Kevin; Crow, Matthew J.; Marinakos, Stella; Ostrander, Julie; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Wax, Adam

    2011-11-01

    This work presents simultaneous imaging and detection of three different cell receptors using three types of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs). The size, shape, and composition-dependent scattering profiles of these NPs allow for a system of multiple distinct molecular markers using a single optical source. With this goal in mind, tags consisting of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor gold nanorods, anti-insulin-like growth factor 1-R silver nanospheres, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2Ab gold nanospheres were developed to monitor the expression of receptors commonly overexpressed by cancer cells. These labels were chosen because they scatter strongly in distinct spectral windows. A hyperspectral darkfield microspectroscopy system was developed to record the scattering spectra of cells labeled with these molecular tags. Simultaneous monitoring of multiple tags may lead to applications such as profiling of cell line immunophenotype and investigation of receptor signaling pathways. Single, dual, and triple tag experiments were performed to analyze NP tag specificity as well as their interactions. Distinct resonance peaks were observed in these studies, showing the ability to characterize cell lines using conjugated NPs. However, interpreting shifts in these peaks due to changes in a cellular dielectric environment may be complicated by plasmon coupling between NPs bound to proximal receptors and other coupling mechanisms due to the receptors themselves.

  10. Dexamethasone-induced cell death is restricted to specific molecular subgroups of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kervoëlen, Charlotte; Ménoret, Emmanuelle; Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Bataille, Régis; Godon, Catherine; Marionneau-Lambot, Séverine; Moreau, Philippe; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Amiot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Due to its cytotoxic effect in lymphoid cells, dexamethasone is widely used in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). However, only a subset of myeloma patients responds to high-dose dexamethasone. Despite the undeniable anti-myeloma benefits of dexamethasone, significant adverse effects have been reported. We re-evaluate the anti-tumor effect of dexamethasone according to the molecular heterogeneity of MM. We demonstrated that the pro-death effect of dexamethasone is related to the genetic heterogeneity of MM because sensitive cell lines were restricted to MAF and MMSET signature subgroups, whereas all CCND1 cell lines (n = 10) were resistant to dexamethasone. We demonstrated that the glucocorticoid receptor expression was an important limiting factor for dexamethasone-induced cell death and we found a correlation between glucocorticoid receptor levels and the induction of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) under dexamethasone treatment. By silencing GILZ, we next demonstrated that GILZ is necessary for Dex induced apoptosis while triggering an imbalance between anti- and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Finally, the heterogeneity of the dexamethasone response was further confirmed in vivo using myeloma xenograft models. Our findings suggested that the effect of dexamethasone should be re-evaluated within molecular subgroups of myeloma patients to improve its efficacy and reduce its adverse effects. PMID:26323097

  11. Distinct T cell signatures define subsets of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark C.; Pierson, Emily R.; Spieker, Andrew J.; Nielsen, A. Scott; Posso, Sylvia; Kita, Mariko; Buckner, Jane H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated T cell responses to myelin proteins in the blood of healthy controls and 2 groups of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who exhibited lesions either predominantly in the brain or predominantly in the spinal cord in order to assess whether distinct neuroinflammatory patterns were associated with different myelin protein–specific T cell effector function profiles and whether these profiles differed from healthy controls. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from patients with brain-predominant RRMS, patients with spinal cord–predominant RRMS, and age-matched healthy controls and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assays to quantify interferon gamma–secreting (Th1) and interleukin 17–secreting (Th17) cells responding directly ex vivo to myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Results: Although MBP and MOG elicited different responses, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had spinal cord–predominant lesions exhibited significantly higher Th17:Th1 ratios in response to both MBP and MOG compared to patients with brain-predominant MS. Incorporating the cytokine responses to both antigens into logistic regression models showed that these cytokine responses were able to provide good discrimination between patients with distinct neuroinflammatory patterns. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the localization of lesions within the brain vs the spinal cord in patients with MS is associated with different effector T cell responses to myelin proteins. Further investigation of the relationship between T cell effector function, antigen specificities, and lesion sites may reveal features of pathogenic pathways that are distinct to patients with different neuroinflammatory patterns. PMID:27606354

  12. A Novel Molecular Signature for Elevated Tricuspid Regurgitation Velocity in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ankit A.; Zhou, Tong; Ahmad, Homaa; Zhang, Wei; Mu, Wenbo; Trevino, Sharon; Wade, Michael S.; Raghavachari, Nalini; Kato, Gregory J.; Peters-Lawrence, Marlene H.; Thiruvoipati, Tejas; Turner, Kristin; Artz, Nicole; Huang, Yong; Patel, Amit R.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Lang, Roberto M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: An increased tricuspid regurgitation jet velocity (TRV > 2.5 m/s) and pulmonary hypertension defined by right heart catheterization both independently confer increased mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD). Objectives: We explored the usefulness of peripheral blood mononuclear cell–derived gene signatures as biomarkers for an elevated TRV in SCD. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with SCD underwent echocardiography and peripheral blood mononuclear cell isolation for expression profiling and 112 patients with SCD were genotyped for single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Measurements and Main Results: Genome-wide gene and miRNA expression profiles were correlated against TRV, yielding 631 transcripts and 12 miRNAs. Support vector machine analysis identified a 10-gene signature including GALNT13 (encoding polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 13) that discriminates patients with and without increased TRV with 100% accuracy. This finding was then validated in a cohort of patients with SCD without (n = 10) and with pulmonary hypertension (n = 10, 90% accuracy). Increased TRV-related miRNAs revealed strong in silico binding predictions of miR-301a to GALNT13 corroborated by microarray analyses demonstrating an inverse correlation between their expression. A genetic association study comparing patients with an elevated (n = 49) versus normal (n = 63) TRV revealed five significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms within GALNT13 (P < 0.005), four trans-acting (P < 2.1 × 10−7) and one cis-acting (P = 0.6 × 10−4) expression quantitative trait locus upstream of the adenosine-A2B receptor gene (ADORA2B). Conclusions: These studies validate the clinical usefulness of genomic signatures as potential biomarkers and highlight ADORA2B and GALNT13 as potential candidate genes in SCD-associated elevated TRV. PMID:22679008

  13. Multiple-time-scale motion in molecularly linked nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    George, Christopher; Szleifer, Igal; Ratner, Mark

    2013-01-22

    We explore the transport of electrons between electrodes that encase a two-dimensional array of metallic quantum dots linked by molecular bridges (such as α,ω alkaline dithiols). Because the molecules can move at finite temperatures, the entire transport structure comprising the quantum dots and the molecules is in dynamical motion while the charge is being transported. There are then several physical processes (physical excursions of molecules and quantum dots, electronic migration, ordinary vibrations), all of which influence electronic transport. Each can occur on a different time scale. It is therefore not appropriate to use standard approaches to this sort of electron transfer problem. Instead, we present a treatment in which three different theoretical approaches-kinetic Monte Carlo, classical molecular dynamics, and quantum transport-are all employed. In certain limits, some of the dynamical effects are unimportant. But in general, the transport seems to follow a sort of dynamic bond percolation picture, an approach originally introduced as formal models and later applied to polymer electrolytes. Different rate-determining steps occur in different limits. This approach offers a powerful scheme for dealing with multiple time scale transport problems, as will exist in many situations with several pathways through molecular arrays or even individual molecules that are dynamically disordered.

  14. Molecular signatures for obesity and associated disorders identified through partial least square regression models.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Neeraj; Sharma, Sachin; Tripathi, Parul; Negi, Simarjeet Kaur; Tikoo, Kamiya; Kumar, Dhiraj; Rao, Kanury V S; Chatterjee, Samrat

    2014-08-30

    Obesity is now a worldwide epidemic disease and poses a major risk for diet related diseases like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke and fatty liver among others. In the present study we employed the murine model of diet-induced obesity to determine the early, tissue-specific, gene expression signatures that characterized progression to obesity and type 2 diabetes. We used the C57BL/6 J mouse which is known as a counterpart for diet-induced human diabetes and obesity model. Our initial experiments involved two groups of mice, one on normal diet (ND) and the other on high-fat and high-sucrose (HFHSD). The later were then further separated into subgroups that either received no additional treatment, or were treated with different doses of the Ayurvedic formulation KAL-1. At different time points (week3, week6, week9, week12, week15 and week18) eight different tissues were isolated from mice being fed on different diet compositions. These tissues were used to extract gene-expression data through microarray experiment. Simultaneously, we also measured different body parameters like body weight, blood Glucose level and cytokines profile (anti-inflammatory & pro-inflammatory) at each time point for all the groups. Using partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) method we identified gene-expression signatures that predict physiological parameters like blood glucose levels, body weight and the balance of pro- versus anti-inflammatory cytokines. The resulting models successfully predicted diet-induced changes in body weight and blood glucose levels, although the predictive power for cytokines profiles was relatively poor. In the former two instances, however, we could exploit the models to further extract the early gene-expression signatures that accurately predict the onset of diabetes and obesity. These extracted genes allowed definition of the regulatory network involved in progression of disease. We identified the early gene-expression signature

  15. Defining the Molecular Signature of Chemotherapy-Mediated Lung Tumor Phenotype Modulation and Increased Susceptibility to T-Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Caballero, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Chemotherapy with platinum doublets, including cisplatin plus vinorelbine, is standard of care for non–small-cell lung cancer. Sublethal exposure to certain chemotherapeutic agents has been demonstrated to alter the phenotype or biology of human tumor cells, rendering them more susceptible to cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)–mediated lysis. The effects of cisplatin/vinorelbine on tumor sensitivity to T-cell cytotoxicity and its molecular mechanisms, however, have not been fully elucidated. We examined the effect of this chemotherapy on growth, cell-surface phenotype, and CTL-mediated lysis of five distinct human lung carcinoma cell lines in vitro and examined the molecular mechanisms associated with enhanced CTL sensitivity. These studies demonstrate that sublethal exposure of human lung tumor cells to the platinum doublet modulates tumor cell phenotype and increases sensitivity to major histocompatibility complex–restricted perforin/granzyme–mediated CTL killing. These studies also demonstrate that exposure to chemotherapy markedly decreased the protein secretion ratio of transforming growth factor-β/interleukin (IL)-8. We examined the gene expression profile of two lung tumor cell lines to identify a shared gene signature in response to sublethal cisplatin/vinorelbine and found coordinate expression of only 16 transcripts, including those for cytokine/chemokine expression and apoptosis such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL8, CXCL5, and B cell lymphoma-2–like genes (BCL-2). Overall, these results suggest that sublethal exposure to cisplatin/vinorelbine increases sensitivity to perforin/granzyme–mediated CTL killing by modulation of (a) tumor phenotype, (b) cytokine/chemokine milieu, and (c) the proapoptotic/antiapoptotic gene ratio. The data presented here propose a complex mechanism that is distinct from and complementary to that of immunogenic cell death. This molecular signature may be useful in predicting responses to immunotherapy as well as

  16. Transcriptome analysis using next generation sequencing reveals molecular signatures of diabetic retinopathy and efficacy of candidate drugs

    PubMed Central

    Rajasimha, Harsha K.; Brooks, Matthew J.; Nellissery, Jacob; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Kern, Timothy S.; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To define gene expression changes associated with diabetic retinopathy in a mouse model using next generation sequencing, and to utilize transcriptome signatures to assess molecular pathways by which pharmacological agents inhibit diabetic retinopathy. Methods We applied a high throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy using Illumina GAIIx to characterize the entire retinal transcriptome from nondiabetic and from streptozotocin-treated mice 32 weeks after induction of diabetes. Some of the diabetic mice were treated with inhibitors of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase, which have previously been shown to inhibit diabetic retinopathy in rodent models. The transcripts and alternatively spliced variants were determined in all experimental groups. Results Next generation sequencing-based RNA-seq profiles provided comprehensive signatures of transcripts that are altered in early stages of diabetic retinopathy. These transcripts encoded proteins involved in distinct yet physiologically relevant disease-associated pathways such as inflammation, microvasculature formation, apoptosis, glucose metabolism, Wnt signaling, xenobiotic metabolism, and photoreceptor biology. Significant upregulation of crystallin transcripts was observed in diabetic animals, and the diabetes-induced upregulation of these transcripts was inhibited in diabetic animals treated with inhibitors of either RAGE or p38 MAP kinase. These two therapies also showed dissimilar regulation of some subsets of transcripts that included alternatively spliced versions of arrestin, neutral sphingomyelinase activation associated factor (Nsmaf), SH3-domain GRB2-like interacting protein 1 (Sgip1), and axin. Conclusions Diabetes alters many transcripts in the retina, and two therapies that inhibit the vascular pathology similarly inhibit a portion of these changes, pointing to possible molecular mechanisms for their beneficial effects. These

  17. A miRNA Signature of Chemoresistant Mesenchymal Phenotype Identifies Novel Molecular Targets Associated with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Alakesh; VenkataSubbaRao, Kolaparthi; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Hill, Ping; Freeman, James W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study a microRNA (miRNA) signature was identified in a gemcitabine resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell line model (BxPC3-GZR) and this signature was further examined in advanced PDAC tumor specimens from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. BxPC3-GZR showed a mesenchymal phenotype, expressed high levels of CD44 and showed a highly significant deregulation of 17 miRNAs. Based on relevance to cancer, a seven-miRNA signature (miR-100, miR-125b, miR-155, miR-21, miR-205, miR-27b and miR-455-3p) was selected for further studies. A strong correlation was observed for six of the seven miRNAs in 43 advanced tumor specimens compared to normal pancreas tissue. To assess the functional relevance we initially focused on miRNA-125b, which is over-expressed in both the BxPC3-GZR model and advanced PDAC tumor specimens. Knockdown of miRNA-125b in BxPC3-GZR and Panc-1 cells caused a partial reversal of the mesenchymal phenotype and enhanced response to gemcitabine. Moreover, RNA-seq data from each of 40 advanced PDAC tumor specimens from the TCGA data base indicate a negative correlation between expression of miRNA-125b and five of six potential target genes (BAP1, BBC3, NEU1, BCL2, STARD13). Thus far, two of these target genes, BBC3 and NEU1, that are tumor suppressor genes but not yet studied in PDAC, appear to be functional targets of miR-125b since knockdown of miR125b caused their up regulation. These miRNAs and their molecular targets may serve as targets to enhance sensitivity to chemotherapy and reduce metastatic spread. PMID:25184537

  18. A miRNA signature of chemoresistant mesenchymal phenotype identifies novel molecular targets associated with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bera, Alakesh; VenkataSubbaRao, Kolaparthi; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Hill, Ping; Freeman, James W

    2014-01-01

    In this study a microRNA (miRNA) signature was identified in a gemcitabine resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell line model (BxPC3-GZR) and this signature was further examined in advanced PDAC tumor specimens from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. BxPC3-GZR showed a mesenchymal phenotype, expressed high levels of CD44 and showed a highly significant deregulation of 17 miRNAs. Based on relevance to cancer, a seven-miRNA signature (miR-100, miR-125b, miR-155, miR-21, miR-205, miR-27b and miR-455-3p) was selected for further studies. A strong correlation was observed for six of the seven miRNAs in 43 advanced tumor specimens compared to normal pancreas tissue. To assess the functional relevance we initially focused on miRNA-125b, which is over-expressed in both the BxPC3-GZR model and advanced PDAC tumor specimens. Knockdown of miRNA-125b in BxPC3-GZR and Panc-1 cells caused a partial reversal of the mesenchymal phenotype and enhanced response to gemcitabine. Moreover, RNA-seq data from each of 40 advanced PDAC tumor specimens from the TCGA data base indicate a negative correlation between expression of miRNA-125b and five of six potential target genes (BAP1, BBC3, NEU1, BCL2, STARD13). Thus far, two of these target genes, BBC3 and NEU1, that are tumor suppressor genes but not yet studied in PDAC, appear to be functional targets of miR-125b since knockdown of miR125b caused their up regulation. These miRNAs and their molecular targets may serve as targets to enhance sensitivity to chemotherapy and reduce metastatic spread.

  19. Molecular Code Division Multiple Access: Gaussian Mixture Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamiri-Jafarian, Yeganeh

    Communications between nano-devices is an emerging research field in nanotechnology. Molecular Communication (MC), which is a bio-inspired paradigm, is a promising technique for communication in nano-network. In MC, molecules are administered to exchange information among nano-devices. Due to the nature of molecular signals, traditional communication methods can't be directly applied to the MC framework. The objective of this thesis is to present novel diffusion-based MC methods when multi nano-devices communicate with each other in the same environment. A new channel model and detection technique, along with a molecular-based access method, are proposed in here for communication between asynchronous users. In this work, the received molecular signal is modeled as a Gaussian mixture distribution when the MC system undergoes Brownian noise and inter-symbol interference (ISI). This novel approach demonstrates a suitable modeling for diffusion-based MC system. Using the proposed Gaussian mixture model, a simple receiver is designed by minimizing the error probability. To determine an optimum detection threshold, an iterative algorithm is derived which minimizes a linear approximation of the error probability function. Also, a memory-based receiver is proposed to improve the performance of the MC system by considering previously detected symbols in obtaining the threshold value. Numerical evaluations reveal that theoretical analysis of the bit error rate (BER) performance based on the Gaussian mixture model match simulation results very closely. Furthermore, in this thesis, molecular code division multiple access (MCDMA) is proposed to overcome the inter-user interference (IUI) caused by asynchronous users communicating in a shared propagation environment. Based on the selected molecular codes, a chip detection scheme with an adaptable threshold value is developed for the MCDMA system when the proposed Gaussian mixture model is considered. Results indicate that the

  20. MicroRNA Signatures and Molecular Subtypes of Glioblastoma: The Role of Extracellular Transfer.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Jakub; Ferrer-Luna, Ruben; Rooj, Arun K; Mineo, Marco; Ricklefs, Franz; Takeda, Yuji S; Nowicki, M Oskar; Salińska, Elżbieta; Nakano, Ichiro; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph; Beroukhim, Rameen; Chiocca, E Antonio; Bronisz, Agnieszka

    2017-06-06

    Despite the importance of molecular subtype classification of glioblastoma (GBM), the extent of extracellular vesicle (EV)-driven molecular and phenotypic reprogramming remains poorly understood. To reveal complex subpopulation dynamics within the heterogeneous intratumoral ecosystem, we characterized microRNA expression and secretion in phenotypically diverse subpopulations of patient-derived GBM stem-like cells (GSCs). As EVs and microRNAs convey information that rearranges the molecular landscape in a cell type-specific manner, we argue that intratumoral exchange of microRNA augments the heterogeneity of GSC that is reflected in highly heterogeneous profile of microRNA expression in GBM subtypes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. No quiet surrender: molecular guardians in multiple sclerosis brain

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The brain under immunological attack does not surrender quietly. Investigation of brain lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) reveals a coordinated molecular response involving various proteins and small molecules ranging from heat shock proteins to small lipids, neurotransmitters, and even gases, which provide protection and foster repair. Reduction of inflammation serves as a necessary prerequisite for effective recovery and regeneration. Remarkably, many lesion-resident molecules activate pathways leading to both suppression of inflammation and promotion of repair mechanisms. These guardian molecules and their corresponding physiologic pathways could potentially be exploited to silence inflammation and repair the injured and degenerating brain and spinal cord in both relapsing-remitting and progressive forms of MS and may be beneficial in other neurologic and psychiatric conditions. PMID:25831441

  2. Connecting genes, coexpression modules, and molecular signatures to environmental stress phenotypes in plants

    PubMed Central

    Weston, David J; Gunter, Lee E; Rogers, Alistair; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2008-01-01

    Background One of the eminent opportunities afforded by modern genomic technologies is the potential to provide a mechanistic understanding of the processes by which genetic change translates to phenotypic variation and the resultant appearance of distinct physiological traits. Indeed much progress has been made in this area, particularly in biomedicine where functional genomic information can be used to determine the physiological state (e.g., diagnosis) and predict phenotypic outcome (e.g., patient survival). Ecology currently lacks an analogous approach where genomic information can be used to diagnose the presence of a given physiological state (e.g., stress response) and then predict likely phenotypic outcomes (e.g., stress duration and tolerance, fitness). Results Here, we demonstrate that a compendium of genomic signatures can be used to classify the plant abiotic stress phenotype in Arabidopsis according to the architecture of the transcriptome, and then be linked with gene coexpression network analysis to determine the underlying genes governing the phenotypic response. Using this approach, we confirm the existence of known stress responsive pathways and marker genes, report a common abiotic stress responsive transcriptome and relate phenotypic classification to stress duration. Conclusion Linking genomic signatures to gene coexpression analysis provides a unique method of relating an observed plant phenotype to changes in gene expression that underlie that phenotype. Such information is critical to current and future investigations in plant biology and, in particular, to evolutionary ecology, where a mechanistic understanding of adaptive physiological responses to abiotic stress can provide researchers with a tool of great predictive value in understanding species and population level adaptation to climate change. PMID:18248680

  3. Neurodegenerative disease-associated mutants of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase present individual molecular signatures

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Claude; Lorber, Bernard; Gaudry, Agnès; Karim, Loukmane; Schwenzer, Hagen; Wien, Frank; Roblin, Pierre; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The effects of these mutations on the structure and function of the enzymes remain to be established. Here, we investigate six mutants of the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase correlated with leukoencephalopathies. Our integrated strategy, combining an ensemble of biochemical and biophysical approaches, reveals that mutants are diversely affected with respect to their solubility in cellular extracts and stability in solution, but not in architecture. Mutations with mild effects on solubility occur in patients as allelic combinations whereas those with strong effects on solubility or on aminoacylation are necessarily associated with a partially functional allele. The fact that all mutations show individual molecular and cellular signatures and affect amino acids only conserved in mammals, points towards an alternative function besides aminoacylation. PMID:26620921

  4. Optical signatures of molecular particles via mass-selected cluster spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    A new molecular beam apparatus was developed to study optical absorption in cold (less than 100 K) atomic clusters and complexes produced by their condensation with simple molecular gases. In this instrument, ionized clusters produced in a laser vaporization nozzle source are mass selected and studied with photodissociation spectroscopy at visible and ultraviolet wavelengths. This new approach can be applied to synthesize and characterize numerous particulates and weakly bound complexes expected in planetary atmospheres and in comets.

  5. Valproic acid, a molecular lead to multiple regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Kostrouchová, M; Kostrouch, Z; Kostrouchová, M

    2007-01-01

    Valproic acid (2-propyl pentanoic acid) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Although very rare, side effects such as spina bifida and other defects of neural tube closure indicate that valproic acid interferes with developmental regulatory pathways. Recently obtained data show that valproic acid affects cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and immunogenicity of cultured cancer cells and tumours. Focused studies uncovered the potential of valproic acid to interfere with multiple regulatory mechanisms including histone deacetylases, GSK3 alpha and beta, Akt, the ERK pathway, the phosphoinositol pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, GABA, and the OXPHOS system. Valproic acid is emerging as a potential anticancer drug and may also serve as a molecular lead that can help design drugs with more specific and more potent effects on the one side and drugs with wide additive but weaker effects on the other. Valproic acid is thus a powerful molecular tool for better understanding and therapeutic targeting of pathways that regulate the behaviour of cancer cells.

  6. Multistep tumorigenesis of multiple myeloma: its molecular delineation.

    PubMed

    Iida, Shinsuke; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2003-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable malignant neoplasm affecting terminally differentiated B-cells. It derives from post-germinal center B-cells and develops as a result of multistep tumorigenic events, because approximately one third of all MM cases have a history of preceding monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) or smoldering myeloma. MM terminates in the formation of extramedullary invasion or in secondary plasma cell leukemia. To account for this clinical experience, investigators have found that intrinsic chromosomal instability followed by complex chromosomal translocations/deletions plays a crucial role in the development from MGUS to MM. Representative aberrations include chromosomal rearrangements involving 14q32 loci and deletion at the long arm of chromosome 13. Contributing to the progression of MM itself are genomic instability and altered methylation of the specific gene promoters. The former results in activation of specific oncogenes such as RAS and FGFR3 or in inactivation of p53, and the latter results in inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, including p16. An accurate understanding of each of these molecular events should help clarify the development of specific molecular targeting therapies based on the differences in dysfunctional signaling pathways found in the cells of all MM patients.

  7. Identifying the molecular signature of the interstitial deletion 7q subgroup of uterine leiomyomata using a paired analysis.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Jennelle C; Park, Peter J; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M; Assil-Kishawi, Iman; Somasundaram, Priya; Semere, Luwam G; Quade, Bradley J; Lynch, Allison M; Stewart, Elizabeth A; Morton, Cynthia C

    2009-10-01

    Uterine leiomyomata (UL), the most common neoplasm in reproductive-age women, have recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities including interstitial deletion of 7q. To develop a molecular signature, matched del(7q) and non-del(7q) tumors identified by FISH or karyotyping from 11 women were profiled with expression arrays. Our analysis using paired t tests demonstrates this matched design is critical to eliminate the confounding effects of genotype and environment that underlie patient variation. A gene list ordered by genome-wide significance showed enrichment for the 7q22 target region. Modification of the gene list by weighting each sample for percent of del(7q) cells to account for the mosaic nature of these tumors further enhanced the frequency of 7q22 genes. Pathway analysis revealed two of the 19 significant functional networks were associated with development and the most represented pathway was protein ubiquitination, which can influence tumor development by stabilizing oncoproteins and destabilizing tumor suppressor proteins. Array CGH (aCGH) studies determined the only consistent genomic imbalance was deletion of 9.5 megabases from 7q22-7q31.1. Combining the aCGH data with the del(7q) UL mosaicism-weighted expression analysis resulted in a list of genes that are commonly deleted and whose copy number is correlated with significantly decreased expression. These genes include the proliferation inhibitor HPB1, the loss of expression of which has been associated with invasive breast cancer, as well as the mitosis integrity-maintenance tumor suppressor RINT1. This study provides a molecular signature of the del(7q) UL subgroup and will serve as a platform for future studies of tumor pathogenesis. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Glover, William J.; Martinez, Todd J.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.

    2014-08-01

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as "cloning," in analogy to the "spawning" procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, "trains," as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  9. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makhov, Dmitry V; Glover, William J; Martinez, Todd J; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V

    2014-08-07

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as "cloning," in analogy to the "spawning" procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, "trains," as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  10. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.; Glover, William J.; Martinez, Todd J.

    2014-08-07

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as “cloning,” in analogy to the “spawning” procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, “trains,” as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  11. Identification of Multiple Hypoxia Signatures in Neuroblastoma Cell Lines by l1-l2 Regularization and Data Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Fardin, Paolo; Cornero, Andrea; Barla, Annalisa; Mosci, Sofia; Acquaviva, Massimo; Rosasco, Lorenzo; Gambini, Claudio; Verri, Alessandro; Varesio, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia is a condition of low oxygen tension occurring in the tumor and negatively correlated with the progression of the disease. We studied the gene expression profiles of nine neuroblastoma cell lines grown under hypoxic conditions to define gene signatures that characterize hypoxic neuroblastoma. The l1-l2 regularization applied to the entire transcriptome identified a single signature of 11 probesets discriminating the hypoxic state. We demonstrate that new hypoxia signatures, with similar discriminatory power, can be generated by a prior knowledge-based filtering in which a much smaller number of probesets, characterizing hypoxia-related biochemical pathways, are analyzed. l1-l2 regularization identified novel and robust hypoxia signatures within apoptosis, glycolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation Gene Ontology classes. We conclude that the filtering approach overcomes the noisy nature of the microarray data and allows generating robust signatures suitable for biomarker discovery and patients risk assessment in a fraction of computer time. PMID:20652058

  12. Phylogenetic analysis and molecular signatures defining a monophyletic clade of heterocystous cyanobacteria and identifying its closest relatives.

    PubMed

    Howard-Azzeh, Mohammad; Shamseer, Larissa; Schellhorn, Herb E; Gupta, Radhey S

    2014-11-01

    Detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses are reported on 140 genome sequenced cyanobacteria with the main focus on the heterocyst-differentiating cyanobacteria. In a phylogenetic tree for cyanobacteria based upon concatenated sequences for 32 conserved proteins, the available cyanobacteria formed 8-9 strongly supported clades at the highest level, which may correspond to the higher taxonomic clades of this phylum. One of these clades contained all heterocystous cyanobacteria; within this clade, the members exhibiting either true (Nostocales) or false (Stigonematales) branching of filaments were intermixed indicating that the division of the heterocysts-forming cyanobacteria into these two groups is not supported by phylogenetic considerations. However, in both the protein tree as well as in the 16S rRNA gene tree, the akinete-forming heterocystous cyanobacteria formed a distinct clade. Within this clade, the members which differentiate into hormogonia or those which lack this ability were also separated into distinct groups. A novel molecular signature identified in this work that is uniquely shared by the akinete-forming heterocystous cyanobacteria provides further evidence that the members of this group are specifically related and they shared a common ancestor exclusive of the other cyanobacteria. Detailed comparative analyses on protein sequences from the genomes of heterocystous cyanobacteria reported here have also identified eight conserved signature indels (CSIs) in proteins involved in a broad range of functions, and three conserved signature proteins, that are either uniquely or mainly found in all heterocysts-forming cyanobacteria, but generally not found in other cyanobacteria. These molecular markers provide novel means for the identification of heterocystous cyanobacteria, and they provide evidence of their monophyletic origin. Additionally, this work has also identified seven CSIs in other proteins which in addition to the heterocystous

  13. Evidence for Multiple Outbursts from the Cepheus A Molecular Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Gopal; Walker, Christopher K.

    1996-08-01

    We report evidence for multiple episodes of outflow activity in the Cepheus A star-forming region. We present new, high signal-to-noise CSO observations of 12CO J = 3 2, 13CO J = 3 → 2, and CS J = 7 → 6 emission. We also present new, interferometric and single-dish observations of 12CO J = 1 → 0 emission toward the Cepheus A molecular outflow. Using line core velocity centroid maps, we argue that the multiple self-absorption features in the CO J = 3 → 2 line profiles are tracing cool shells of material swept-up by an episodic outflow. We present the results of a flexible three-dimensional LTE outflow model and radiative transfer code that best explain the observations as tracing multiple generations of outflow. The difference in the dynamical timescales between the "old" and "new" swept-up shells gives an estimate of ˜1.6 x 105 yr between the two generations of outbursts. The high-resolution 12CO J = 1 → 0 maps obtained by combining single-dish observations with interferometric data clearly show a shell-like morphology at low velocities. This cool shell appears to encompass the hot, extremely high velocity (EHV) winds seen in the J = 3 → 2 transition. The interferometric observations show that the current generation of outflow is being powered by the object Cepheus A-HW 2. There is also evidence for redirection of the blueshifted lobe of the current generation of outflow, possibly by the extended NH3 structure Cep A-3. We present a model of the outflow geometry that can explain most of the observed structures in Cepheus A. The rotating, dense core traced by the CS observations is ˜0.32 pc in diameter and has an estimated dynamical mass of 330 Msun. The velocity structure of the core suggests that it is being disrupted by the high-velocity winds driving the molecular outflow. This new technique of extracting information from self-absorbed line profiles could be used to study other deeply embedded protostellar systems. Since outflows are believed to be

  14. Molecular Signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana in Response to Insect Attack and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barah, Pankaj; Winge, Per; Kusnierczyk, Anna; Tran, Diem Hong; Bones, Atle M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Under the threat of global climatic change and food shortages, it is essential to take the initiative to obtain a comprehensive understanding of common and specific defence mechanisms existing in plant systems for protection against different types of biotic invaders. We have implemented an integrated approach to analyse the overall transcriptomic reprogramming and systems-level defence responses in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana henceforth) during insect Brevicoryne brassicae (B. brassicae henceforth) and bacterial Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (P. syringae henceforth) attacks. The main aim of this study was to identify the attacker-specific and general defence response signatures in A. thaliana when attacked by phloem-feeding aphids or pathogenic bacteria. Results The obtained annotated networks of differentially expressed transcripts indicated that members of transcription factor families, such as WRKY, MYB, ERF, BHLH and bZIP, could be crucial for stress-specific defence regulation in Arabidopsis during aphid and P. syringae attack. The defence response pathways, signalling pathways and metabolic processes associated with aphid attack and P. syringae infection partially overlapped. Components of several important biosynthesis and signalling pathways, such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET) and glucosinolates, were differentially affected during the two the treatments. Several stress-regulated transcription factors were known to be associated with stress-inducible microRNAs. The differentially regulated gene sets included many signature transcription factors, and our co-expression analysis showed that they were also strongly co-expressed during 69 other biotic stress experiments. Conclusions Defence responses and functional networks that were unique and specific to aphid or P. syringae stresses were identified. Furthermore, our analysis revealed a probable link between biotic stress and

  15. The nanomechanical signature of liver cancer tissues and its molecular origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Mengxin; Li, Yiran; Liu, Weiren; Jin, Lei; Jiang, Xifei; Wang, Xinyan; Ding, Zhenbin; Peng, Yuanfei; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei; Shi, Yinghong

    2015-07-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are at higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Although HCC diagnosis based on conventional morphological characteristics serves as the ``gold standard'' in the clinic, there is a high demand for more convenient and effective diagnostic methods that employ new biophysical perspectives. Here, we show that the nanomechanical signature of liver tissue is directly correlated with the development of HCC. Using indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM), we demonstrate that the lowest elasticity peak (LEP) in the Young's modulus distribution of surgically removed liver cancer tissues can serve as a mechanical fingerprint to evaluate the malignancy of liver cancer. Cirrhotic tissues shared the same LEP as normal tissues. However, a noticeable downward shift in the LEP was detected when the cirrhotic tissues progressed to a malignant state, making the tumor tissues more prone to microvascular invasion. Cell-level mechanistic studies revealed that the expression level of a Rho-family effector (mDia1) was consistent with the mechanical trend exhibited by the tissue. Our findings indicate that the mechanical profiles of liver cancer tissues directly varied with tumor progression, providing an additional platform for the future diagnosis of HCC.Patients with cirrhosis are at higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Although HCC diagnosis based on conventional morphological characteristics serves as the ``gold standard'' in the clinic, there is a high demand for more convenient and effective diagnostic methods that employ new biophysical perspectives. Here, we show that the nanomechanical signature of liver tissue is directly correlated with the development of HCC. Using indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM), we demonstrate that the lowest elasticity peak (LEP) in the Young's modulus

  16. HLA DNA Sequence Variation among Human Populations: Molecular Signatures of Demographic and Selective Events

    PubMed Central

    Buhler, Stéphane; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Molecular differences between HLA alleles vary up to 57 nucleotides within the peptide binding coding region of human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes, but it is still unclear whether this variation results from a stochastic process or from selective constraints related to functional differences among HLA molecules. Although HLA alleles are generally treated as equidistant molecular units in population genetic studies, DNA sequence diversity among populations is also crucial to interpret the observed HLA polymorphism. In this study, we used a large dataset of 2,062 DNA sequences defined for the different HLA alleles to analyze nucleotide diversity of seven HLA genes in 23,500 individuals of about 200 populations spread worldwide. We first analyzed the HLA molecular structure and diversity of these populations in relation to geographic variation and we further investigated possible departures from selective neutrality through Tajima's tests and mismatch distributions. All results were compared to those obtained by classical approaches applied to HLA allele frequencies. Our study shows that the global patterns of HLA nucleotide diversity among populations are significantly correlated to geography, although in some specific cases the molecular information reveals unexpected genetic relationships. At all loci except HLA-DPB1, populations have accumulated a high proportion of very divergent alleles, suggesting an advantage of heterozygotes expressing molecularly distant HLA molecules (asymmetric overdominant selection model). However, both different intensities of selection and unequal levels of gene conversion may explain the heterogeneous mismatch distributions observed among the loci. Also, distinctive patterns of sequence divergence observed at the HLA-DPB1 locus suggest current neutrality but old selective pressures on this gene. We conclude that HLA DNA sequences advantageously complement HLA allele frequencies as a source of data used to explore the

  17. Multiple biomarkers in molecular oncology. I. Molecular diagnostics applications in cervical cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Douglas P

    2007-03-01

    The screening for cervical carcinoma and its malignant precursors (cervical neoplasia) currently employs morphology-based detection methods (Papanicolaou [Pap] smear) in addition to the detection of high-risk human papillomavirus. The combination of the Pap smear with human papillomavirus testing has achieved significant improvements in sensitivity for the detection of cervical disease. Diagnosis of cervical neoplasia is dependent upon histology assessment of cervical biopsy specimens. Attempts to improve the specificity of cervical disease screening have focused on the investigation of molecular biomarkers for adjunctive use in combination with the Pap smear. Active research into the genomic and proteomic alterations that occur during human papillomavirus-induced neoplastic transformation have begun to characterize some of the basic mechanisms inherent to the disease process of cervical cancer development. This research continues to demonstrate the complexity of multiple genomic and proteomic alterations that accumulate during the tumorigenesis process. Despite this diversity, basic patterns of uncontrolled signal transduction, cell cycle deregulation, activation of DNA replication and altered extracellular matrix interactions are beginning to emerge as common features inherent to cervical cancer development. Some of these gene or protein expression alterations have been investigated as potential biomarkers for screening and diagnostics applications. The contribution of multiple gene alterations in the development of cervical cancer suggests that the application of multiple biomarker panels has the potential to develop clinically useful molecular diagnostics. In this review, the application of biomarkers for the improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the detection of cervical neoplasia within cytology specimens will be discussed.

  18. DNA methylation signatures define molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shaknovich, Rita; Geng, Huimin; Johnson, Nathalie A.; Tsikitas, Lucas; Cerchietti, Leandro; Greally, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Expression profiling has shown 2 main and clinically distinct subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs): germinal-center B cell–like (GCB) and activated B cell–like (ABC) DLBCLs. Further work has shown that these subtypes are partially characterized by distinct genetic alterations and different survival. Here, we show with the use of an assay that measures DNA methylation levels of 50 000 CpG motifs distributed among more than 14 000 promoters that these 2 DLBCL subtypes are also characterized by distinct epigenetic profiles. DNA methylation and gene expression profiling were performed on a cohort of 69 patients with DLBCL. After assigning ABC or GCB labels with a Bayesian expression classifier trained on an independent dataset, a supervised analysis identified 311 differentially methylated probe sets (263 unique genes) between ABC and GCB DLBCLs. Integrated analysis of methylation and gene expression showed a core tumor necrosis factor-α signaling pathway as the principal differentially perturbed gene network. Sixteen genes overlapped between the core ABC/GCB methylation and expression signatures and encoded important proteins such as IKZF1. This reduced gene set was an accurate predictor of ABC and GCB subtypes. Collectively, the data suggest that epigenetic patterning contributes to the ABC and GCB DLBCL phenotypes and could serve as useful biomarker. PMID:20610814

  19. The nanomechanical signature of liver cancer tissues and its molecular origin.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mengxin; Li, Yiran; Liu, Weiren; Jin, Lei; Jiang, Xifei; Wang, Xinyan; Ding, Zhenbin; Peng, Yuanfei; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei; Shi, Yinghong

    2015-08-14

    Patients with cirrhosis are at higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Although HCC diagnosis based on conventional morphological characteristics serves as the "gold standard" in the clinic, there is a high demand for more convenient and effective diagnostic methods that employ new biophysical perspectives. Here, we show that the nanomechanical signature of liver tissue is directly correlated with the development of HCC. Using indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM), we demonstrate that the lowest elasticity peak (LEP) in the Young's modulus distribution of surgically removed liver cancer tissues can serve as a mechanical fingerprint to evaluate the malignancy of liver cancer. Cirrhotic tissues shared the same LEP as normal tissues. However, a noticeable downward shift in the LEP was detected when the cirrhotic tissues progressed to a malignant state, making the tumor tissues more prone to microvascular invasion. Cell-level mechanistic studies revealed that the expression level of a Rho-family effector (mDia1) was consistent with the mechanical trend exhibited by the tissue. Our findings indicate that the mechanical profiles of liver cancer tissues directly varied with tumor progression, providing an additional platform for the future diagnosis of HCC.

  20. The effect of turbulence and molecular relaxation on sonic boom signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Our objectives are to assess the effect of turbulence and molecular absorption (which is now known to be a key factor in sonic boom shock structure) on shaped sonic booms. Today I will discuss the combination of physical mechanisms for idealized turbulence. In parallel, we are reviewing models for mixed layer turbulence, and these physical effects will eventually be generalized.

  1. Multiple biomarkers in molecular oncology. II. Molecular diagnostics applications in breast cancer management.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Douglas P

    2007-05-01

    In recent years, the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to the problem of breast cancer prognosis and the prediction of therapy response have begun to yield encouraging results. Independent studies employing transcriptional profiling of primary breast cancer specimens using DNA microarrays have identified gene expression profiles that correlate with clinical outcome in primary breast biopsy specimens. Recent advances in microarray technology have demonstrated reproducibility, making clinical applications more achievable. In this regard, one such DNA microarray device based upon a 70-gene expression signature was recently cleared by the US FDA for application to breast cancer prognosis. These DNA microarrays often employ at least 70 gene targets for transcriptional profiling and prognostic assessment in breast cancer. The use of PCR-based methods utilizing a small subset of genes has recently demonstrated the ability to predict the clinical outcome in early-stage breast cancer. Furthermore, protein-based immunohistochemistry methods have progressed from using gene clusters and gene expression profiling to smaller subsets of expressed proteins to predict prognosis in early-stage breast cancer. Beyond prognostic applications, DNA microarray-based transcriptional profiling has demonstrated the ability to predict response to chemotherapy in early-stage breast cancer patients. In this review, recent advances in the use of multiple markers for prognosis of disease recurrence in early-stage breast cancer and the prediction of therapy response will be discussed.

  2. Enhancement of signal denoising and multiple fault signatures detecting in rotating machinery using dual-tree complex wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanxue; He, Zhengjia; Zi, Yanyang

    2010-01-01

    In order to enhance the desired features related to some special type of machine fault, a technique based on the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) is proposed in this paper. It is demonstrated that DTCWT enjoys better shift invariance and reduced spectral aliasing than second-generation wavelet transform (SGWT) and empirical mode decomposition by means of numerical simulations. These advantages of the DTCWT arise from the relationship between the two dual-tree wavelet basis functions, instead of the matching of the used single wavelet basis function to the signal being analyzed. Since noise inevitably exists in the measured signals, an enhanced vibration signals denoising algorithm incorporating DTCWT with NeighCoeff shrinkage is also developed. Denoising results of vibration signals resulting from a crack gear indicate the proposed denoising method can effectively remove noise and retain the valuable information as much as possible compared to those DWT- and SGWT-based NeighCoeff shrinkage denoising methods. As is well known, excavation of comprehensive signatures embedded in the vibration signals is of practical importance to clearly clarify the roots of the fault, especially the combined faults. In the case of multiple features detection, diagnosis results of rolling element bearings with combined faults and an actual industrial equipment confirm that the proposed DTCWT-based method is a powerful and versatile tool and consistently outperforms SGWT and fast kurtogram, which are widely used recently. Moreover, it must be noted, the proposed method is completely suitable for on-line surveillance and diagnosis due to its good robustness and efficient algorithm.

  3. Molecular Surveillance Identifies Multiple Transmissions of Typhoid in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vanessa K.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Okoro, Chinyere; Baker, Stephen; Pickard, Derek J.; Marks, Florian; Page, Andrew J.; Olanipekun, Grace; Munir, Huda; Alter, Roxanne; Fey, Paul D.; Feasey, Nicholas A.; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Le Hello, Simon; Hart, Peter J.; Kariuki, Samuel; Breiman, Robert F.; Gordon, Melita A.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Jacobs, Jan; Lunguya, Octavie; Msefula, Chisomo; MacLennan, Calman A.; Keddy, Karen H.; Smith, Anthony M.; Onsare, Robert S.; De Pinna, Elizabeth; Nair, Satheesh; Amos, Ben; Dougan, Gordon; Obaro, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background The burden of typhoid in sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries has been difficult to estimate, in part, due to suboptimal laboratory diagnostics. However, surveillance blood cultures at two sites in Nigeria have identified typhoid associated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) as an important cause of bacteremia in children. Methods A total of 128 S. Typhi isolates from these studies in Nigeria were whole-genome sequenced, and the resulting data was used to place these Nigerian isolates into a worldwide context based on their phylogeny and carriage of molecular determinants of antibiotic resistance. Results Several distinct S. Typhi genotypes were identified in Nigeria that were related to other clusters of S. Typhi isolates from north, west and central regions of Africa. The rapidly expanding S. Typhi clade 4.3.1 (H58) previously associated with multiple antimicrobial resistances in Asia and in east, central and southern Africa, was not detected in this study. However, antimicrobial resistance was common amongst the Nigerian isolates and was associated with several plasmids, including the IncHI1 plasmid commonly associated with S. Typhi. Conclusions These data indicate that typhoid in Nigeria was established through multiple independent introductions into the country, with evidence of regional spread. MDR typhoid appears to be evolving independently of the haplotype H58 found in other typhoid endemic countries. This study highlights an urgent need for routine surveillance to monitor the epidemiology of typhoid and evolution of antimicrobial resistance within the bacterial population as a means to facilitate public health interventions to reduce the substantial morbidity and mortality of typhoid. PMID:27657909

  4. Molecular Surveillance Identifies Multiple Transmissions of Typhoid in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vanessa K; Holt, Kathryn E; Okoro, Chinyere; Baker, Stephen; Pickard, Derek J; Marks, Florian; Page, Andrew J; Olanipekun, Grace; Munir, Huda; Alter, Roxanne; Fey, Paul D; Feasey, Nicholas A; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Le Hello, Simon; Hart, Peter J; Kariuki, Samuel; Breiman, Robert F; Gordon, Melita A; Heyderman, Robert S; Jacobs, Jan; Lunguya, Octavie; Msefula, Chisomo; MacLennan, Calman A; Keddy, Karen H; Smith, Anthony M; Onsare, Robert S; De Pinna, Elizabeth; Nair, Satheesh; Amos, Ben; Dougan, Gordon; Obaro, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The burden of typhoid in sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries has been difficult to estimate, in part, due to suboptimal laboratory diagnostics. However, surveillance blood cultures at two sites in Nigeria have identified typhoid associated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) as an important cause of bacteremia in children. A total of 128 S. Typhi isolates from these studies in Nigeria were whole-genome sequenced, and the resulting data was used to place these Nigerian isolates into a worldwide context based on their phylogeny and carriage of molecular determinants of antibiotic resistance. Several distinct S. Typhi genotypes were identified in Nigeria that were related to other clusters of S. Typhi isolates from north, west and central regions of Africa. The rapidly expanding S. Typhi clade 4.3.1 (H58) previously associated with multiple antimicrobial resistances in Asia and in east, central and southern Africa, was not detected in this study. However, antimicrobial resistance was common amongst the Nigerian isolates and was associated with several plasmids, including the IncHI1 plasmid commonly associated with S. Typhi. These data indicate that typhoid in Nigeria was established through multiple independent introductions into the country, with evidence of regional spread. MDR typhoid appears to be evolving independently of the haplotype H58 found in other typhoid endemic countries. This study highlights an urgent need for routine surveillance to monitor the epidemiology of typhoid and evolution of antimicrobial resistance within the bacterial population as a means to facilitate public health interventions to reduce the substantial morbidity and mortality of typhoid.

  5. Gene expression profiling of CD34+ cells identifies a molecular signature of chronic myeloid leukemia blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, C; Li, L; Haak, M; Brors, B; Frank, O; Giehl, M; Fabarius, A; Schatz, M; Weisser, A; Lorentz, C; Gretz, N; Hehlmann, R; Hochhaus, A; Seifarth, W

    2006-06-01

    Despite recent success in the treatment of early-stage disease, blastic phase (BP) of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) that is characterized by rapid expansion of therapy-refractory and differentiation-arrested blasts, remains a therapeutic challenge. The development of resistance upon continuous administration of imatinib mesylate is associated with poor prognosis pointing to the need for alternative therapeutic strategies and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying disease progression. To identify transcriptional signatures that may explain pathological characteristics and aggressive behavior of BP blasts, we performed comparative gene expression profiling on CD34+ Ph+ cells purified from patients with untreated newly diagnosed chronic phase CML (CP, n=11) and from patients in BP (n=9) using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. Supervised microarray data analysis revealed 114 differentially expressed genes (P<10(-4)), 34 genes displaying more than two-fold transcriptional changes when comparing CP and BP groups. While 24 of these genes were downregulated, 10 genes, especially suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (SOCS2), CAMPATH-1 antigen (CD52), and four human leukocyte antigen-related genes were strongly overexpressed in BP. Expression of selected genes was validated by real-time-polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. Our data suggest the existence of a common gene expression profile of CML-BP and provide new insight into the molecular phenotype of blasts associated with disease progression and high malignancy.

  6. Kinematic Results From a Systematic Search for Infall Signatures Towards the Starless Core Population in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker-LaFollette, Amanda; Shirley, Y. L.; Amaya, H.; Becker, S. L.; Biddle, L. I.; Lichtenberger, M.; Nieberding, M. N.; Raphael, B. A.; Romine, J. M.; Small, L.; Stanford-Jones, C.; Smith, C.; Thompson, R.; Towner, A. P.; Turner, J.; Watson, Z.; Cates, I.; McGraw, A. M.; Pearson, K.; Robertson, A.; Tombleson, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a survey searching for infall signatures toward 72 starless cores in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of the ground state rotational transitions of HCN, HNC, and H13CN were carried out using the 12-m radio telescope on Kitt Peak operated by the Arizona Radio Observatory. All three molecules are tracers of dense molecular gas. HCN 1-0 is an excellent infall tracer, with its three hyperfine lines probing different optical depths. We examined the spectra for signs of infall by comparing observed line asymmetries with the velocity peak of the optically thin isotopologue H13CN. We find that there is an excess of blue asymmetries, but clearly self-absorbed profiles are rare (< 20%). We compare typical measures of asymmetry such as δv and skewness. By comparing the number of blue asymmetric and blue skewed profiles to the number of class II protostars, we find a range for the observable collapse lifetime of 6x10^4-2x10^5yrs, which is commensurate with the gravitational free-fall time (5x10^4yrs) for the observed central densities of Perseus starless cores. The best infall candidates all have observed masses that are above the Jeans mass. We calculate the infall speeds for the best collapse candidates and compare their dynamics to other known collapsing starless cores. This project was observed by The University of Arizona Undergraduate Astronomy Club.

  7. Analysis of neural crest cells from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease patients demonstrates disease-relevant molecular signature.

    PubMed

    Kitani-Morii, Fukiko; Imamura, Keiko; Kondo, Takayuki; Ohara, Ryo; Enami, Takako; Shibukawa, Ran; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sekiguchi, Kazuya; Toguchida, Junya; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2017-09-06

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited neuropathy. The majority of CMT is demyelinating type (demyelinating CMT) caused by Schwann cell involvement. Although a large number of genes responsible for demyelinating CMT have been found, the common molecular target of the pathophysiology caused by these different genes in demyelinating CMT is still unknown. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from healthy controls and patients with demyelinating CMT caused by duplication in peripheral myelin protein 22 kDa (PMP22) or point mutations in myelin protein zero (MPZ) or early growth response 2 (EGR2). iPSCs were differentiated into neural crest cells, progenitors of Schwann cells, followed by purification using the neural crest cell markers p75 and human natural killer-1. To identify a disease-relevant molecular signature at the early stage of demyelinating CMT, we conducted global gene expression analysis of iPSC-derived neural crest cells and found that a glutathione-mediated detoxification pathway was one of the related pathways in demyelinating CMT. mRNA expression of glutathione S-transferase theta 2 (GSTT2), encoding an important enzyme for glutathione-mediated detoxification, and production of reactive oxygen species were increased in demyelinating CMT. Our study suggested that patient-iPSC-derived neural crest cells could be a cellular model for investigating genetically heterogeneous disease CMT and might provide a therapeutic target for the disease.

  8. X-ray absorption signatures of the molecular environment in water and ice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Wu, Xifan; Car, Roberto

    2010-07-02

    The x-ray absorption spectra of water and ice are calculated with a many-body approach for electron-hole excitations. The experimental features, including the effects of temperature change in the liquid, are reproduced from configurations generated by ab initio molecular dynamics. The spectral difference between the solid and the liquid is due to two major short-range order effects. One, due to breaking of hydrogen bonds, enhances the pre-edge intensity in the liquid. The other, due to a nonbonded molecular fraction in the first coordination shell, affects the main spectral edge in the conversion of ice to water. This effect may not involve hydrogen bond breaking as shown by experiment in high-density amorphous ice.

  9. Molecular Signatures of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)-Induced Type II Mixed Cryoglobulinemia (MCII)

    PubMed Central

    Sautto, Giuseppe; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the induction of type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MCII) and the possible establishment of related lymphoproliferative disorders, such as B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), is well ascertained. However, the molecular pathways involved and the factors predisposing to the development of these HCV-related extrahepatic complications deserve further consideration and clarification. To date, several host- and virus-related factors have been implicated in the progression to MCII, such as the virus-induced expansion of selected subsets of B-cell clones expressing discrete immunoglobulin variable (IgV) gene subfamilies, the involvement of complement factors and the specific role of some HCV proteins. In this review, we will analyze the host and viral factors taking part in the development of MCII in order to give a general outlook of the molecular mechanisms implicated. PMID:23202510

  10. Signature of an Intermediate-Mass Black Hole in the Central Molecular Zone of Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tomoharu; Mizuno, Reiko; Miura, Kodai; Takekawa, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    The high-velocity compact cloud CO-0.40-0.22 was mapped in 22 molecular lines with the NRO 45 m radio telescope and the ASTE 10 m telescope. The map of each detected line shows that this cloud has a compact appearance (d~=3 pc) and extremely broad velocity width (Δ V~=100 km s-1). The representative position-velocity map along the major axis shows that CO-0.40-0.22 consists of an intense region with a shallow velocity gradient and a less intense high-velocity wing. This kinematical structure can be attributed to a gravitational kick to the molecular cloud caused by an invisible compact object with a mass of ~105 M ⊙. Its compactness and the absence of a counterpart at other wavelengths suggest that this massive object is an intermediate-mass black hole.

  11. Imaging Molecular Signatures of Breast Cancer with X-ray-Activated Nanophosphors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Additionally, there is a lack of interventional tools to help perform image-guided biopsies and surgeries . Towards these goals, year 2 of this fellowship...based RLI Currently, biopsy is guided by X-ray fluoroscopy or ultrasound; these imaging modalities do not offer the ability to image molecular...indicators for vascular angiogenesis [3], and the translocation of phosphatidylserine for apoptosis [4]. The advantage of nanoparticles in this

  12. Imaging Molecular Signatures of Breast Cancer with X-ray-Activated Nanophosphors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    characteristics. Finally, the contrast produced by these phosphors was compared to that of X-ray fluoroscopy . Figure 1 shows the characteristics of... surgery , where the ability to resolve lesions at depths of several centimetres, which can be the key to successful resection. The goal of X-ray...ray fluoroscopy or ultrasound; these imaging modalities do not offer the ability to image molecular contrasts of tissue, and thus are limited in

  13. The molecular signature and cis-regulatory architecture of a C. elegans gustatory neuron

    PubMed Central

    Etchberger, John F.; Lorch, Adam; Sleumer, Monica C.; Zapf, Richard; Jones, Steven J.; Marra, Marco A.; Holt, Robert A.; Moerman, Donald G.; Hobert, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Taste receptor cells constitute a highly specialized cell type that perceives and conveys specific sensory information to the brain. The detailed molecular composition of these cells and the mechanisms that program their fate are, in general, poorly understood. We have generated serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) libraries from two distinct populations of single, isolated sensory neuron classes, the gustatory neuron class ASE and the thermosensory neuron class AFD, from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. By comparing these two libraries, we have identified >1000 genes that define the ASE gustatory neuron class on a molecular level. This set of genes contains determinants of the differentiated state of the ASE neuron, such as a surprisingly complex repertoire of transcription factors (TFs), ion channels, neurotransmitters, and receptors, as well as seven-transmembrane receptor (7TMR)-type putative gustatory receptor genes. Through the in vivo dissection of the cis-regulatory regions of several ASE-expressed genes, we identified a small cis-regulatory motif, the “ASE motif,” that is required for the expression of many ASE-expressed genes. We demonstrate that the ASE motif is a binding site for the C2H2 zinc finger TF CHE-1, which is essential for the correct differentiation of the ASE gustatory neuron. Taken together, our results provide a unique view of the molecular landscape of a single neuron type and reveal an important aspect of the regulatory logic for gustatory neuron specification in C. elegans. PMID:17606643

  14. The molecular signature and cis-regulatory architecture of a C. elegans gustatory neuron.

    PubMed

    Etchberger, John F; Lorch, Adam; Sleumer, Monica C; Zapf, Richard; Jones, Steven J; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Moerman, Donald G; Hobert, Oliver

    2007-07-01

    Taste receptor cells constitute a highly specialized cell type that perceives and conveys specific sensory information to the brain. The detailed molecular composition of these cells and the mechanisms that program their fate are, in general, poorly understood. We have generated serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) libraries from two distinct populations of single, isolated sensory neuron classes, the gustatory neuron class ASE and the thermosensory neuron class AFD, from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. By comparing these two libraries, we have identified >1000 genes that define the ASE gustatory neuron class on a molecular level. This set of genes contains determinants of the differentiated state of the ASE neuron, such as a surprisingly complex repertoire of transcription factors (TFs), ion channels, neurotransmitters, and receptors, as well as seven-transmembrane receptor (7TMR)-type putative gustatory receptor genes. Through the in vivo dissection of the cis-regulatory regions of several ASE-expressed genes, we identified a small cis-regulatory motif, the "ASE motif," that is required for the expression of many ASE-expressed genes. We demonstrate that the ASE motif is a binding site for the C2H2 zinc finger TF CHE-1, which is essential for the correct differentiation of the ASE gustatory neuron. Taken together, our results provide a unique view of the molecular landscape of a single neuron type and reveal an important aspect of the regulatory logic for gustatory neuron specification in C. elegans.

  15. A molecular signature of an arrest of descent in human parturition

    PubMed Central

    MITTAL, Pooja; ROMERO, Roberto; TARCA, Adi L.; DRAGHICI, Sorin; NHAN-CHANG, Chia-Ling; CHAIWORAPONGSA, Tinnakorn; HOTRA, John; GOMEZ, Ricardo; KUSANOVIC, Juan Pedro; LEE, Deug-Chan; KIM, Chong Jai; HASSAN, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to identify the molecular basis of an arrest of descent. Study Design Human myometrium was obtained from women in term labor (TL; n=29) and arrest of descent (AODes, n=21). Gene expression was characterized using Illumina® HumanHT-12 microarrays. A moderated t-test and false discovery rate adjustment were applied for analysis. Confirmatory qRT-PCR and immunoblot was performed in an independent sample set. Results 400 genes were differentially expressed between women with an AODes compared to those with TL. Gene Ontology analysis indicated enrichment of biological processes and molecular functions related to inflammation and muscle function. Impacted pathways included inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton. Overexpression of HIF1A, IL-6, and PTGS2 in AODES was confirmed. Conclusion We have identified a stereotypic pattern of gene expression in the myometrium of women with an arrest of descent. This represents the first study examining the molecular basis of an arrest of descent using a genome-wide approach. PMID:21284969

  16. Molecular Signature of a Right Heart Failure Program in Chronic Severe Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Jennifer I.; Bogaard, Herman J.; Mizuno, Shiro; Clifton, Berrick; Xie, Bin; Gao, Yuan; Dumur, Catherine I.; Fawcett, Paul; Natarajan, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Right heart failure is the cause of death of most patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertensive (PAH) disorders, yet little is known about the cellular and molecular causes of right ventricular failure (RVF). We first showed a differential gene expression pattern between normal rat right and left ventricles, and postulated the existence of a molecular right heart failure program that distinguishes RVF from adaptive right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), and that may differ in some respects from a left heart failure program. By means of microarrays and transcriptional sequencing strategies, we used two models of adaptive RVH to characterize a gene expression pattern reflective of growth and the maintenance of myocardial structure. Moreover, two models of RVF were associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, the decreased expression of genes encoding the angiogenesis factors vascular endothelial growth factor, insulin-like growth factor 1, apelin, and angiopoeitin-1, and the increased expression of genes encoding a set of glycolytic enzymes. The treatment of established RVF with a β-adrenergic receptor blocker reversed RVF, and partly reversed the molecular RVF program. We conclude that normal right and left ventricles demonstrate clearly discernable differences in the expression of mRNA and microRNA, and that RVH and RVF are characterized by distinct patterns of gene expression that relate to cell growth, angiogenesis, and energy metabolism. PMID:21719795

  17. Emergence of canine distemper virus strains with modified molecular signature and enhanced neuronal tropism leading to high mortality in wild carnivores.

    PubMed

    Origgi, F C; Plattet, P; Sattler, U; Robert, N; Casaubon, J; Mavrot, F; Pewsner, M; Wu, N; Giovannini, S; Oevermann, A; Stoffel, M H; Gaschen, V; Segner, H; Ryser-Degiorgis, M-P

    2012-11-01

    An ongoing canine distemper epidemic was first detected in Switzerland in the spring of 2009. Compared to previous local canine distemper outbreaks, it was characterized by unusually high morbidity and mortality, rapid spread over the country, and susceptibility of several wild carnivore species. Here, the authors describe the associated pathologic changes and phylogenetic and biological features of a multiple highly virulent canine distemper virus (CDV) strain detected in and/or isolated from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), Eurasian badgers (Meles meles), stone (Martes foina) and pine (Martes martes) martens, from a Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), and a domestic dog. The main lesions included interstitial to bronchointerstitial pneumonia and meningopolioencephalitis, whereas demyelination--the classic presentation of CDV infection--was observed in few cases only. In the brain lesions, viral inclusions were mainly in the nuclei of the neurons. Some significant differences in brain and lung lesions were observed between foxes and mustelids. Swiss CDV isolates shared together with a Hungarian CDV strain detected in 2004. In vitro analysis of the hemagglutinin protein from one of the Swiss CDV strains revealed functional and structural differences from that of the reference strain A75/17, with the Swiss strain showing increased surface expression and binding efficiency to the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). These features might be part of a novel molecular signature, which might have contributed to an increase in virus pathogenicity, partially explaining the high morbidity and mortality, the rapid spread, and the large host spectrum observed in this outbreak.

  18. Multiple program/multiple data molecular dynamics method with multiple time step integrator for large biological systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaewoon; Sugita, Yuji

    2017-06-15

    Parallelization of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is essential for investigating conformational dynamics of large biological systems, such as ribosomes, viruses, and multiple proteins in cellular environments. To improve efficiency in the parallel computation, we have to reduce the amount of data transfer between processors by introducing domain decomposition schemes. Also, it is important to optimize the computational balance between real-space non-bonded interactions and reciprocal-space interactions for long-range electrostatic interactions. Here, we introduce a novel parallelization scheme for large-scale MD simulations on massively parallel supercomputers consisting of only CPUs. We make use of a multiple program/multiple data (MPMD) approach for separating the real-space and reciprocal-space computations on different processors. We also utilize the r-RESPA multiple time step integrator on the framework of the MPMD approach in an efficient way: when the reciprocal-space computations are skipped in r-RESPA, processors assigned for them are utilized for half of the real-space computations. The new scheme allows us to use twice as many as processors that are available in the conventional single program approach. The best performances of all-atom MD simulations for 1 million (STMV), 8.5 million (8_STMV), and 28.8 million (27_STMV) atom systems on K computer are 65, 36, and 24 ns/day, respectively. The MPMD scheme can accelerate 23.4, 10.2, and 9.2 ns/day from the maximum performance of single-program approach for STMV, 8_STMV, and 27_STMV systems, respectively, which correspond to 57%, 39%, and 60% speed up. This suggests significant speedups by increasing the number of processors without losing parallel computational efficiency. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Neural Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis: The Functional and Molecular Background

    PubMed Central

    Glabinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune neurodegenerative disorder resulting in motor dysfunction and cognitive decline. The inflammatory and neurodegenerative changes seen in the brains of MS patients lead to progressive disability and increasing brain atrophy. The most common type of MS is characterized by episodes of clinical exacerbations and remissions. This suggests the presence of compensating mechanisms for accumulating damage. Apart from the widely known repair mechanisms like remyelination, another important phenomenon is neuronal plasticity. Initially, neuroplasticity was connected with the developmental stages of life; however, there is now growing evidence confirming that structural and functional reorganization occurs throughout our lifetime. Several functional studies, utilizing such techniques as fMRI, TBS, or MRS, have provided valuable data about the presence of neuronal plasticity in MS patients. CNS ability to compensate for neuronal damage is most evident in RR-MS; however it has been shown that brain plasticity is also preserved in patients with substantial brain damage. Regardless of the numerous studies, the molecular background of neuronal plasticity in MS is still not well understood. Several factors, like IL-1β, BDNF, PDGF, or CB1Rs, have been implicated in functional recovery from the acute phase of MS and are thus considered as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26229689

  20. Many Multiple Myelomas: Making More of the Molecular Mayhem

    PubMed Central

    Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P. Leif

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is malignancy of isotype-switched, BM-localized plasma cells that frequently results in bone destruction, BM failure, and death. Important molecular subgroups are identified by three classes of recurrent immunoglobulin gene translocations and hyperdiploidy, both of which affect disease course. From a clinical standpoint, it is critical to identify MM patients carrying the t(4;14) translocation, which is present in 15% of myelomas and is associated with dysregulation of WHSC1/MMSET and often FGFR3. These patients should all receive bortezomib as part of their initial induction treatment because this has been shown to significantly prolong survival. In contrast, patients with translocations affecting the MAF family of transcription factors, del17p, or gene-expression profiling (GEP)–defined high-risk disease appear to have a worse prognosis that is not dramatically improved by any intervention. These patients should be enrolled in innovative clinical trials. The remaining patients with cyclin D translocations or hyperdiploidy do well with most therapies, and the goal should be to control disease while minimizing toxicity. PMID:22160056

  1. Neural Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis: The Functional and Molecular Background.

    PubMed

    Ksiazek-Winiarek, Dominika Justyna; Szpakowski, Piotr; Glabinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune neurodegenerative disorder resulting in motor dysfunction and cognitive decline. The inflammatory and neurodegenerative changes seen in the brains of MS patients lead to progressive disability and increasing brain atrophy. The most common type of MS is characterized by episodes of clinical exacerbations and remissions. This suggests the presence of compensating mechanisms for accumulating damage. Apart from the widely known repair mechanisms like remyelination, another important phenomenon is neuronal plasticity. Initially, neuroplasticity was connected with the developmental stages of life; however, there is now growing evidence confirming that structural and functional reorganization occurs throughout our lifetime. Several functional studies, utilizing such techniques as fMRI, TBS, or MRS, have provided valuable data about the presence of neuronal plasticity in MS patients. CNS ability to compensate for neuronal damage is most evident in RR-MS; however it has been shown that brain plasticity is also preserved in patients with substantial brain damage. Regardless of the numerous studies, the molecular background of neuronal plasticity in MS is still not well understood. Several factors, like IL-1β, BDNF, PDGF, or CB1Rs, have been implicated in functional recovery from the acute phase of MS and are thus considered as potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Molecular biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Brit; Hecker, Michael; Zettl, Uwe Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system, usually occurring in young adults and leading to disability. Despite the progress in technology and intensive research work of the last years, diagnosing MS can still be challenging. A heterogenic and complex pathophysiology with various types of disease courses makes MS unique for each patient. There is an urgent need to identify markers facilitating rapid and accurate diagnosis and prognostic assessments with regard to optimal therapy for each MS patient. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an outstanding source of specific markers related to MS pathology. Molecules reflecting specific pathological processes, such as inflammation, cellular damage, and loss of blood-brain-barrier integrity, are detectable in CSF. Clinically used biomarkers of CSF are oligoclonal bands, IgG-index, measles-rubella-zoster-reaction, anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies, and antibodies against John Cunningham virus. Many other potential biomarkers have been proposed in recent years. In this review we examine the current scientific knowledge on CSF molecular markers that could guide diagnosis and discrimination of different MS forms, support treatment decisions, or be helpful in monitoring and predicting disease progression, therapy response, and complications such as opportunistic infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrated molecular profiling of SOD2 expression in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Elaine M; Thomas, Suneetha B; Peng, Benjamin; Farrar, William L

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species are known to be involved in several cellular processes, including cell signaling. SOD2 is a key enzyme in the conversion of reactive oxygen species and has been implicated in a host of disease states, including cancer. Using an integrated, whole-cell approach encompassing epigenetics, genomics, and proteomics, we have defined the role of SOD2 in multiple myeloma. We show that the SOD2 promoter is methylated in several cell lines and there is a correlative decrease in expression. Furthermore, myeloma patient samples have decreased SOD2 expression compared with healthy donors. Overexpression of SOD2 results in decreased proliferation and altered sensitivity to 2-methoxyestradiol-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Genomic profiling revealed regulation of 65 genes, including genes involved in tumorigenesis, and proteomic analysis identified activation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Analysis of nearly 400 activated transcription factors identified 31 transcription factors with altered DNA binding activity, including XBP1, NFAT, forkhead, and GAS binding sites. Integration of data from our gestalt molecular analysis has defined a role for SOD2 in cellular proliferation, JAK/STAT signaling, and regulation of several transcription factors.

  4. A molecular signature in blood identifies early Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The search for biomarkers in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is crucial to identify the disease early and monitor the effectiveness of neuroprotective therapies. We aim to assess whether a gene signature could be detected in blood from early/mild PD patients that could support the diagnosis of early PD, focusing on genes found particularly altered in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD. Results The transcriptional expression of seven selected genes was examined in blood samples from 62 early stage PD patients and 64 healthy age-matched controls. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis identified five genes as optimal predictors of PD: p19 S-phase kinase-associated protein 1A (odds ratio [OR] 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60–0.90), huntingtin interacting protein-2 (OR 1.32; CI 1.08–1.61), aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 subfamily A1 (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.75–0.99), 19 S proteasomal protein PSMC4 (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.60–0.89) and heat shock 70-kDa protein 8 (OR 1.39; 95% CI 1.14–1.70). At a 0.5 cut-off the gene panel yielded a sensitivity and specificity in detecting PD of 90.3 and 89.1 respectively and the area under the receiving operating curve (ROC AUC) was 0.96. The performance of the five-gene classifier on the de novo PD individuals alone composing the early PD cohort (n = 38), resulted in a similar ROC with an AUC of 0.95, indicating the stability of the model and also, that patient medication had no significant effect on the predictive probability (PP) of the classifier for PD risk. The predictive ability of the model was validated in an independent cohort of 30 patients at advanced stage of PD, classifying correctly all cases as PD (100% sensitivity). Notably, the nominal average value of the PP for PD (0.95 (SD = 0.09)) in this cohort was higher than that of the early PD group (0.83 (SD = 0.22)), suggesting a potential for the model to assess disease severity. Lastly, the gene panel fully discriminated between PD

  5. Striatal Molecular Signature of Subchronic Subthalamic Nucleus High Frequency Stimulation in Parkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lortet, Sylviane; Lacombe, Emilie; Boulanger, Nicolas; Rihet, Pascal; Nguyen, Catherine; Goff, Lydia Kerkerian-Le; Salin, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses the molecular mechanisms underlying the action of subthalamic nucleus high frequency stimulation (STN-HFS) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and its interaction with levodopa (L-DOPA), focusing on the striatum. Striatal gene expression profile was assessed in rats with nigral dopamine neuron lesion, either treated or not, using agilent microarrays and qPCR verification. The treatments consisted in anti-akinetic STN-HFS (5 days), chronic L-DOPA treatment inducing dyskinesia (LIDs) or the combination of the two treatments that exacerbated LIDs. STN-HFS modulated 71 striatal genes. The main biological processes associated with the differentially expressed gene products include regulation of growth, of apoptosis and of synaptic transmission, and extracellular region is a major cellular component implicated. In particular, several of these genes have been shown to support survival or differentiation of striatal or of dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate that STN HFS may induce widespread anatomo-functional rearrangements in the striatum and create a molecular environment favorable for neuroprotection and neuroplasticity. STN-HFS and L-DOPA treatment share very few common gene regulation features indicating that the molecular substrates underlying their striatal action are mostly different; among the common effects is the down-regulation of Adrb1, which encodes the adrenergic beta-1- receptor, supporting a major role of this receptor in Parkinson's disease. In addition to genes already reported to be associated with LIDs (preprodynorphin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, metabotropic glutamate receptor 4, cannabinoid receptor 1), the comparison between DOPA and DOPA/HFS identifies immunity-related genes as potential players in L-DOPA side effects. PMID:23593219

  6. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling reveals molecular signatures of secondary xylem differentiation in Populus tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, X H; Li, X G; Li, B L; Zhang, D Q

    2014-11-11

    Wood formation occurs via cell division, primary cell wall and secondary wall formation, and programmed cell death in the vascular cambium. Transcriptional profiling of secondary xylem differentiation is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying wood formation. Differential gene expression in secondary xylem differentiation of Populus has been previously investigated using cDNA microarray analysis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms from a genome-wide perspective. In this study, the Affymetrix poplar genome chips containing 61,413 probes were used to investigate the changes in the transcriptome during secondary xylem differentiation in Chinese white poplar (Populus tomentosa). Two xylem tissues (newly formed and lignified) were sampled for genome-wide transcriptional profiling. In total, 6843 genes (~11%) were identified with differential expression in the two xylem tissues. Many genes involved in cell division, primary wall modification, and cellulose synthesis were preferentially expressed in the newly formed xylem. In contrast, many genes, including 4-coumarate:cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT), associated with lignin biosynthesis were more transcribed in the lignified xylem. The two xylem tissues also showed differential expression of genes related to various hormones; thus, the secondary xylem differentiation could be regulated by hormone signaling. Furthermore, many transcription factor genes were preferentially expressed in the lignified xylem, suggesting that wood lignification involves extensive transcription regulation. The genome-wide transcriptional profiling of secondary xylem differentiation could provide additional insights into the molecular basis of wood formation in poplar species.

  7. Extending Molecular Signatures of Climatic and Environmental Change to the Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassell, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    The distributions, abundances and isotopic compositions of molecular constituents in sediments depend on their source organisms and the combination of environmental and climatic parameters that constrain or control their biosynthesis. Many such relationships are well documented and understood, thereby providing proxies of proven utility in paleoclimatic reconstructions. Thus, the temperature dependence in the extent of unsaturation in alkenones derived from prymnesiophyte algae, and in the proportion of ring structures in glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) synthesized by crenarchaeota enables determination of sea surface paleotemperatures from sedimentary records. This molecular approach presumes temporal uniformity in the controlling factors on biosynthesis of these lipids, and their survival in the geological record, notwithstanding the challenge of establishing ancient calibrations for such proxies. Thus, alkenone records from marine sediments document cooling at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary but cannot assess changes in ocean temperatures during the Cretaceous, unlike GDGTs, which record fluctuations in ocean temperatures during the Early Cretaceous, and even survive in Jurassic strata. Other molecular measures offer less precise, yet informative, indications of climate. For example, the occurrence of sterol ethers in Valanginian sediments from the mid-Pacific suggests some cooling at that time, since these compounds are only known to occur elsewhere in cold waters or upwelling systems. Molecular compositions can also attest to levels of oxygenation in marine systems. In particular, the occurrence of 13C-depleted isorenieratane indicates the presence of photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria, and therefore anoxic conditions, albeit perhaps short-lived. Intermittent occurrences of isorenieratane often alternate with the appearance of 2-methylhopanoids, which provide separate distinct evidence for variations in oxygenation, linked to circumstances

  8. Signatures of Molecular Orbital Structure in Lateral Electron Momentum Distributions from Strong-Field Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Ingo; Henkel, Jost; Lein, Manfred

    2015-03-01

    Strong-field ionization of aligned diatomic and polyatomic molecules such as O2, N2, C2H4, and others in circularly polarized laser fields is investigated theoretically. By calculating the emission-angle-resolved lateral width of the momentum distribution perpendicular to the polarization plane, we show that nodal planes in molecular orbitals are directly imprinted on the angular dependence of the width. We demonstrate that orbital symmetries can be distinguished with the information obtained by observing the lateral width in addition to the angular distributions.

  9. Outcome-based profiling of astrocytic tumours identifies prognostic gene expression signatures which link molecular and morphology-based pathology.

    PubMed

    Beetz, Christian; Bergner, Sven; Brodoehl, Stefan; Brodhun, Michael; Ewald, Christian; Kalff, Rolf; Krüger, Jutta; Patt, Stephan; Kiehntopf, Michael; Deufel, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    Astrocytomas are intracranial malignancies for which invasive growth and high motility of tumour cells preclude total resection; the tumours usually recur in a more aggressive and, eventually, lethal form. Clinical outcome is highly variable and the accuracy of morphology-based prognostic statements is limited. In order to identify novel molecular markers for prognosis we obtained expression profiles of: i) tumours associated with particularly long recurrence-free intervals, ii) tumours which led to rapid patient death, and iii) tumour-free control brain. Unsupervised data analysis completely separated the three sample entities indicating a strong impact of the selection criteria on general gene expression. Consequently, significant numbers of specifically expressed genes could be identified for each entity. An extended set of tumours was then investigated by RT-PCR targeting 12 selected genes. Data from these experiments were summarised into a sample-specific index which assigns tumours to high- and low-risk groups as successfully as does morphology-based grading. Moreover, this index directly correlates with definite survival suggesting that integrated gene expression data allow individualised prognostic statements. We also analysed localisation of selected marker transcripts by in situ hybridization. Our finding of cell-specificity for some of these outcome-determining genes relates global expression data to the presence of morphological correlates of tumour behaviour and, thus, provides a link between morphology-based and molecular pathology. Our identification of expression signatures that are associated individually with clinical outcome confirms the prognostic relevance of gene expression data and, thus, represents a step towards eventually implementing molecular diagnosis into clinical practice in neuro-oncology.

  10. Signatures of inflammation and impending multiple organ dysfunction in the hyperacute phase of trauma: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Claudia P; Manson, Joanna; Shepherd, Joanna M; Torrance, Hew D; Watson, David; Longhi, M Paula; Hoti, Mimoza; Patel, Minal B; O'Dwyer, Michael; Nourshargh, Sussan; Pennington, Daniel J; Barnes, Michael R; Brohi, Karim

    2017-07-01

    Severe trauma induces a widespread response of the immune system. This "genomic storm" can lead to poor outcomes, including Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS). MODS carries a high mortality and morbidity rate and adversely affects long-term health outcomes. Contemporary management of MODS is entirely supportive, and no specific therapeutics have been shown to be effective in reducing incidence or severity. The pathogenesis of MODS remains unclear, and several models are proposed, such as excessive inflammation, a second-hit insult, or an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. We postulated that the hyperacute window after trauma may hold the key to understanding how the genomic storm is initiated and may lead to a new understanding of the pathogenesis of MODS. We performed whole blood transcriptome and flow cytometry analyses on a total of 70 critically injured patients (Injury Severity Score [ISS] ≥ 25) at The Royal London Hospital in the hyperacute time period within 2 hours of injury. We compared transcriptome findings in 36 critically injured patients with those of 6 patients with minor injuries (ISS ≤ 4). We then performed flow cytometry analyses in 34 critically injured patients and compared findings with those of 9 healthy volunteers. Immediately after injury, only 1,239 gene transcripts (4%) were differentially expressed in critically injured patients. By 24 hours after injury, 6,294 transcripts (21%) were differentially expressed compared to the hyperacute window. Only 202 (16%) genes differentially expressed in the hyperacute window were still expressed in the same direction at 24 hours postinjury. Pathway analysis showed principally up-regulation of pattern recognition and innate inflammatory pathways, with down-regulation of adaptive responses. Immune deconvolution, flow cytometry, and modular analysis suggested a central role for neutrophils and Natural Killer (NK) cells, with underexpression of T- and B cell responses. In

  11. Signatures of inflammation and impending multiple organ dysfunction in the hyperacute phase of trauma: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, M. Paula; Hoti, Mimoza; Patel, Minal B.; O’Dwyer, Michael; Nourshargh, Sussan; Barnes, Michael R.; Brohi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Background Severe trauma induces a widespread response of the immune system. This “genomic storm” can lead to poor outcomes, including Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS). MODS carries a high mortality and morbidity rate and adversely affects long-term health outcomes. Contemporary management of MODS is entirely supportive, and no specific therapeutics have been shown to be effective in reducing incidence or severity. The pathogenesis of MODS remains unclear, and several models are proposed, such as excessive inflammation, a second-hit insult, or an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. We postulated that the hyperacute window after trauma may hold the key to understanding how the genomic storm is initiated and may lead to a new understanding of the pathogenesis of MODS. Methods and findings We performed whole blood transcriptome and flow cytometry analyses on a total of 70 critically injured patients (Injury Severity Score [ISS] ≥ 25) at The Royal London Hospital in the hyperacute time period within 2 hours of injury. We compared transcriptome findings in 36 critically injured patients with those of 6 patients with minor injuries (ISS ≤ 4). We then performed flow cytometry analyses in 34 critically injured patients and compared findings with those of 9 healthy volunteers. Immediately after injury, only 1,239 gene transcripts (4%) were differentially expressed in critically injured patients. By 24 hours after injury, 6,294 transcripts (21%) were differentially expressed compared to the hyperacute window. Only 202 (16%) genes differentially expressed in the hyperacute window were still expressed in the same direction at 24 hours postinjury. Pathway analysis showed principally up-regulation of pattern recognition and innate inflammatory pathways, with down-regulation of adaptive responses. Immune deconvolution, flow cytometry, and modular analysis suggested a central role for neutrophils and Natural Killer (NK) cells, with

  12. Atypical scrapie isolates involve a uniform prion species with a complex molecular signature.

    PubMed

    Götte, Dorothea R; Benestad, Sylvie L; Laude, Hubert; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Oevermann, Anna; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    The pathobiology of atypical scrapie, a prion disease affecting sheep and goats, is still poorly understood. In a previous study, we demonstrated that atypical scrapie affecting small ruminants in Switzerland differs in the neuroanatomical distribution of the pathological prion protein (PrP(d)). To investigate whether these differences depend on host-related vs. pathogen-related factors, we transmitted atypical scrapie to transgenic mice over-expressing the ovine prion protein (tg338). The clinical, neuropathological, and molecular phenotype of tg338 mice is similar between mice carrying the Swiss atypical scrapie isolates and the Nor98, an atypical scrapie isolate from Norway. Together with published data, our results suggest that atypical scrapie is caused by a uniform type of prion, and that the observed phenotypic differences in small ruminants are likely host-dependant. Strikingly, by using a refined SDS-PAGE technique, we established that the prominent proteinase K-resistant prion protein fragment in atypical scrapie consists of two separate, unglycosylated peptides with molecular masses of roughly 5 and 8 kDa. These findings show similarities to those for other prion diseases in animals and humans, and lay the groundwork for future comparative research.

  13. Multiparametric MRI reveals dynamic changes in molecular signatures of injured spinal cord in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Qi, Hui-Xin; Zu, Zhongliang; Mishra, Arabinda; Tang, Chaohui; Gore, John C; Chen, Li Min

    2015-10-01

    To monitor the spontaneous recovery of cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) using longitudinal multiparametric MRI methods. Quantitative MRI imaging including diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer (MT), and chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) were conducted in anesthetized squirrel monkeys at 9.4T. The structural, cellular, and molecular features of the spinal cord were examined before and at different time points after a dorsal column lesion in each monkey. Images with MT contrast enhanced visualization of the gray and white matter boundaries and the lesion and permitted differentiation of core and rim compartments within an abnormal volume (AV). In the early weeks after SCI, both core and rim exhibited low cellular density and low protein content, with high levels of exchanging hydroxyl, amine, and amide protons, as evidenced by increased apparent diffusion coefficient, decreased fractional anisotropy, decreased MT ratio, decreased nuclear Overhauser effect, and large CEST effects. Over time, cellular density and fiber density increased, whereas amide, amine, and hydroxyl levels dropped significantly, but at differing rates. Histology confirmed the nature of the AV to be a cyst. Multiparametric MRI offers a novel method to quantify the spontaneous changes in structure and cellular and molecular compositions of SC during spontaneous recovery from injury. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Conserved molecular signatures of neurogenesis in the hippocampal subgranular zone of rodents and primates

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeremy A.; Nathanson, Jason; Franjic, Daniel; Shim, Sungbo; Dalley, Rachel A.; Shapouri, Sheila; Smith, Kimberly A.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Bernard, Amy; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Jones, Allan R.; Amaral, David G.; Sestan, Nenad; Gage, Fred H.; Lein, Ed S.

    2013-01-01

    The neurogenic potential of the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus is likely to be regulated by molecular cues arising from its complex heterogeneous cellular environment. Through transcriptome analysis using laser microdissection coupled with DNA microarrays, in combination with analysis of genome-wide in situ hybridization data, we identified 363 genes selectively enriched in adult mouse SGZ. These genes reflect expression in the different constituent cell types, including progenitor and dividing cells, immature granule cells, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and GABAergic interneurons. Similar transcriptional profiling in the rhesus monkey dentate gyrus across postnatal development identified a highly overlapping set of SGZ-enriched genes, which can be divided based on temporal profiles to reflect maturation of glia versus granule neurons. Furthermore, we identified a neurogenesis-related gene network with decreasing postnatal expression that is highly correlated with the declining number of proliferating cells in dentate gyrus over postnatal development. Many of the genes in this network showed similar postnatal downregulation in mouse, suggesting a conservation of molecular mechanisms underlying developmental and adult neurogenesis in rodents and primates. Conditional deletion of Sox4 and Sox11, encoding two neurogenesis-related transcription factors central in this network, produces a mouse with no hippocampus, confirming the crucial role for these genes in regulating hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:24154525

  15. A boosting approach for adapting the sparsity of risk prediction signatures based on different molecular levels.

    PubMed

    Sariyar, Murat; Schumacher, Martin; Binder, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Risk prediction models can link high-dimensional molecular measurements, such as DNA methylation, to clinical endpoints. For biological interpretation, often a sparse fit is desirable. Different molecular aggregation levels, such as considering DNA methylation at the CpG, gene, or chromosome level, might demand different degrees of sparsity. Hence, model building and estimation techniques should be able to adapt their sparsity according to the setting. Additionally, underestimation of coefficients, which is a typical problem of sparse techniques, should also be addressed. We propose a comprehensive approach, based on a boosting technique that allows a flexible adaptation of model sparsity and addresses these problems in an integrative way. The main motivation is to have an automatic sparsity adaptation. In a simulation study, we show that this approach reduces underestimation in sparse settings and selects more adequate model sizes than the corresponding non-adaptive boosting technique in non-sparse settings. Using different aggregation levels of DNA methylation data from a study in kidney carcinoma patients, we illustrate how automatically selected values of the sparsity tuning parameter can reflect the underlying structure of the data. In addition to that, prediction performance and variable selection stability is compared to the non-adaptive boosting approach.

  16. SIGNATURE OF AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE IN THE CENTRAL MOLECULAR ZONE OF OUR GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Tomoharu; Mizuno, Reiko; Miura, Kodai; Takekawa, Shunya

    2016-01-01

    We mapped the high-velocity compact cloud CO–0.40–0.22 in 21 molecular lines in the 3 mm band using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m radio telescope. Eighteen lines were detected from CO–0.40–0.22. The map of each detected line shows that this cloud has a compact appearance (d ≃ 3 pc) and extremely broad velocity width (ΔV ≃ 100 km s{sup −1}). The mass and kinetic energy of CO–0.40–0.22 are estimated to be 10{sup 3.6} M{sub ⊙} and 10{sup 49.7} erg, respectively. The representative position–velocity map along the major axis shows that CO–0.40–0.22 consists of an intense region with a shallow velocity gradient and a less intense high-velocity wing. Here, we show that this kinematical structure can be attributed to a gravitational kick to the molecular cloud caused by an invisible compact object with a mass of ∼10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙}. Its compactness and the absence of counterparts at other wavelengths suggest that this massive object is an intermediate-mass black hole.

  17. Mid-infrared, long wave infrared (4-12 μm) molecular emission signatures from pharmaceuticals using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Ei E; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe H; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Samuels, Alan C; Snyder, A Peter

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to augment the atomic emission spectra of conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and to provide an increase in selectivity, mid-wave to long-wave infrared (IR), LIBS studies were performed on several organic pharmaceuticals. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signature molecular emissions of target organic compounds are observed for the first time in the IR fingerprint spectral region between 4-12 μm. The IR emission spectra of select organic pharmaceuticals closely correlate with their respective standard Fourier transform infrared spectra. Intact and/or fragment sample molecular species evidently survive the LIBS event. The combination of atomic emission signatures derived from conventional ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared LIBS with fingerprints of intact molecular entities determined from IR LIBS promises to be a powerful tool for chemical detection.

  18. The molecular signatures of Taxodiaceae / Cupressaceae / Taxaceae (TCT) leaf waxes in modern and ancient samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, M.; Zinniker, D.; Green Nylen, N.; Moldowan, J. M.; Denisevich, P.

    2005-12-01

    optimized for the synthesis of C34 and C36 fatty acids. The bimodal distribution of n-alkanes (abundant C25 and C27 and abundant C33 and C35) in some Cupressus species indicates that the expression of this VLCFA elongase may be spatially or temporally limited in some taxa. Examples of fossil TCT leaf waxes have been observed in Pleistocene coastal sediments from California and Washington and in Jurassic coals from the Turpan basin in western China. These wax contributions can be identified by their unique n-alkane and diterpenoid signatures and their relationship with macrofossil and/or microfossil remains tied to members of the TCT complex. The carbon isotopic composition of Pleistocene waxes is consistent with a rainforest or marsh adapted TCT taxon (possibly Thuja plicata), while the isotopic composition of the Jurassic waxes is indicative of a highly water stressed taxon. Unique enzymes for very long chain n-alkane biosynthesis in the core group of TCT taxa listed above may have arisen during the early Mesozoic in a desert or salt marsh adapted species in response to extreme temperatures or water stress.

  19. Tannin signatures of barks, needles, leaves, cones, and wood at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernes, Peter J.; Hedges, John I.

    2004-03-01

    We analyzed 117 tissues from 77 different plant species for molecular tannin. Tannin was measured in 89 tissues (as high as 10.5 wt.% total tannin), including procyanidin (PC) tannin in 88 tissues, prodelphinidin (PD) tannin in 50, and propelargonidin (PP) tannin in 24. In addition to tannin, several flavones, flavanones, and triterpenoids were measured, the latter which yielded as much as 4.5 wt.%. Compositions varied considerably between species, including several that yielded comparatively rare tannin or triterpenoids. Conifer needles were distinguished by high yields of PD tannin overall and relative to PC tannin. Dicotyledon leaves were characterized by the presence of flavones and triterpenoids. Barks were marked by flavanones and tetracosanoic acid. Based on these trends, relationships that could be useful as geochemical parameters were developed for distinguishing needles, leaves, and barks as possible components of litter, soil, or sedimentary mixtures.

  20. Emissions of molecular hydrogen (H2) and its isotopic signature from residential heaters and waste incinerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S. W.; Roeckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric molecular hydrogen (H2) has recently received increased interest in the scientific community because of a potential shift to a global hydrogen energy economy which could potentially alter the atmospheric budget of H2 due to substantial leakage. This calls for an improved understanding of the present day's atmospheric H2 budget. One of the major sources of H2 are emissions from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel. While emissions of H2 from car exhaust have been studied extensively, those from fossil fuel based heating systems have remained a matter of speculation. Here we present results from measurements of a variety of residential heating systems covering oil, gas, and wood heating with various burner capacities. For oil and gas heating systems we surprisingly find no net H2 emissions, i.e. the exhaust air contains H2 at or below the mole fractions of the intake air (approx. 0.5 ppm). While H2 emissions are virtually absent, those of carbon monoxide (CO) are not. As a consequence, caution has to be exercised when modeling H2 emissions based on assumed H2/CO ratios and using CO emission inventories. We also find that the molecular hydrogen in the approx. 0.5 ppm exhaust air is isotopically strongly depleted (-20 permil to -200 permil) compared to the ambient air (+130 permil). This suggests that H2 is involved in the combustion processes, and therefore the H2 of the intake air is not the same H2 in the exhaust air. Exhausts from waste incinerator plants are generally also depleted in H2 mole fractions and in their H/D isotopic composition.

  1. Molecular signatures in rainbow darter (Etheostoma caeruleum) inhabiting an urbanized river reach receiving wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde, P A; Tetreault, G R; McMaster, M E; Servos, M R; Martyniuk, C J; Munkittrick, K R

    2014-03-01

    darter, with emphasis on the differences in transcript abundance between sexes and how these changes relate to exposures to MWWEs. Molecular approaches are being investigated for their potential application to field ecotoxicology, and molecular bioassays for relevant, sentinel species in environmental monitoring programs are required to better understand the impact of anthropogenic impacts on species at risk in river systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular Signatures of Nicotinoid-Pathogen Synergy in the Termite Gut

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Ruchira; Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Cai, Yunpeng; Sun, Yijun; Lietze, Verena-Ulrike; Peterson, Brittany F.; Scharf, Michael E.; Boucias, Drion G.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in lower termites revealed unexpected synergies between nicotinoid insecticides and fungal entomopathogens. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of nicotinoid-pathogen synergy in the lower termite Reticulitermes flavipes, using the nicotinoid, imidacloprid, in combination with fungal and bacterial entomopathogens. Particular focus was placed on metatranscriptome composition and microbial dynamics in the symbiont-rich termite gut, which houses diverse mixes of protists and bacteria. cDNA microarrays containing a mix of host and protist symbiont oligonucleotides were used to simultaneously assess termite and protist gene expression. Five treatments were compared that included single challenges with sublethal doses of fungi (Metharizium anisopliae), bacteria (Serratia marcescens) or imidacloprid, and dual challenges with fungi + imidacloprid or bacteria + imidacloprid. Our findings point towards protist dysbiosis and compromised social behavior, rather than suppression of stereotypical immune defense mechanisms, as the dominant factors underlying nicotinoid-pathogen synergy in termites. Also, greater impacts observed for the fungal pathogen than for the bacterial pathogen suggest that the rich bacterial symbiont community in the R. flavipes gut (>5000 species-level phylotypes) exists in an ecological balance that effectively excludes exogenous bacterial pathogens. These findings significantly advance our understanding of antimicrobial defenses in this important eusocial insect group, as well as provide novel insights into how nicotinoids can exert deleterious effects on social insect colonies. PMID:25837376

  3. Adaptive prediction model in prospective molecular-signature-based clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guanghua; Ma, Shuangge; Minna, John; Xie, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Use of molecular profiles and clinical information can help predict which treatment would give the best outcome and survival for each individual patient, and thus guide optimal therapy, which offers great promise for the future of clinical trials and practice. High prediction accuracy is essential for selecting the best treatment plan. The gold standard for evaluating the prediction models is prospective clinical studies, where patients are enrolled sequentially. However, there is no statistical method utilizing this sequential feature to adapt the prediction model to the current patient cohort. In this paper, we proposed a re-weighted random forest (RWRF) model, which updates the weight of each decision tree whenever additional patient information is available, in order to account for the potential heterogeneity between training and testing data. A simulation study and a lung cancer example were used to show that the proposed method can adapt the prediction model to current patients’ characteristics, and therefore improve prediction accuracy significantly. We also showed that the proposed method can identify important and consistent predictive variables. Compared to rebuilding the prediction model, the RWRF updates a well-tested model gradually, and all of the adaptive procedure/parameters used in the RWRF model are pre-specified before patient recruitment, which are important practical advantages for prospective clinical studies. PMID:24323903

  4. Adaptive prediction model in prospective molecular signature-based clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guanghua; Ma, Shuangge; Minna, John; Xie, Yang

    2014-02-01

    Use of molecular profiles and clinical information can help predict which treatment would give the best outcome and survival for each individual patient, and thus guide optimal therapy, which offers great promise for the future of clinical trials and practice. High prediction accuracy is essential for selecting the best treatment plan. The gold standard for evaluating the prediction models is prospective clinical studies, in which patients are enrolled sequentially. However, there is no statistical method using this sequential feature to adapt the prediction model to the current patient cohort. In this article, we propose a reweighted random forest (RWRF) model, which updates the weight of each decision tree whenever additional patient information is available, to account for the potential heterogeneity between training and testing data. A simulation study and a lung cancer example are used to show that the proposed method can adapt the prediction model to current patients' characteristics, and, therefore, can improve prediction accuracy significantly. We also show that the proposed method can identify important and consistent predictive variables. Compared with rebuilding the prediction model, the RWRF updates a well-tested model gradually, and all of the adaptive procedure/parameters used in the RWRF model are prespecified before patient recruitment, which are important practical advantages for prospective clinical studies. ©2013 AACR.

  5. Molecular Signature of HPV-Induced Carcinogenesis: pRb, p53 and Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Pérez, Águeda; Garaulet, Guillermo; Vázquez-Carballo, Ana; Paramio, Jesús M; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2009-01-01

    The infection by mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with tumor development in cervix and oropharynx. The mechanisms responsible for this oncogenic potential are mainly due to the product activities of two early viral oncogenes: E6 and E7. Although a large number of cellular targets have been described for both oncoproteins, the interaction with tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma protein (pRb) emerged as the key functional activities. E6 degrades tumor suppressor p53, thus inhibiting p53-dependent functions, whereas E7 binds and degrades pRb, allowing the transcription of E2F-dependent genes. Since these two tumor suppressors exert their actions through transcriptional modulation, functional genomics has provided a large body of data that reflects the altered gene expression of HPVinfected cells or tissues. Here we will review the similarities and differences of these findings, and we also compare them with those obtained with transgenic mouse models bearing the deletion of some of the viral oncogene targets. The comparative analysis supports molecular evidences about the role of oncogenes E6 and E7 in the interference with the mentioned cellular functions, and also suggests that the mentioned transgenic mice can be used as models for HPV-associated diseases such as human cervical, oropharynx, and skin carcinomas. PMID:19721808

  6. Molecular Signature of HPV-Induced Carcinogenesis: pRb, p53 and Gene Expression Profiling.

    PubMed

    Buitrago-Pérez, Agueda; Garaulet, Guillermo; Vázquez-Carballo, Ana; Paramio, Jesús M; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2009-03-01

    The infection by mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with tumor development in cervix and oropharynx. The mechanisms responsible for this oncogenic potential are mainly due to the product activities of two early viral oncogenes: E6 and E7. Although a large number of cellular targets have been described for both oncoproteins, the interaction with tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma protein (pRb) emerged as the key functional activities. E6 degrades tumor suppressor p53, thus inhibiting p53-dependent functions, whereas E7 binds and degrades pRb, allowing the transcription of E2F-dependent genes. Since these two tumor suppressors exert their actions through transcriptional modulation, functional genomics has provided a large body of data that reflects the altered gene expression of HPVinfected cells or tissues. Here we will review the similarities and differences of these findings, and we also compare them with those obtained with transgenic mouse models bearing the deletion of some of the viral oncogene targets. The comparative analysis supports molecular evidences about the role of oncogenes E6 and E7 in the interference with the mentioned cellular functions, and also suggests that the mentioned transgenic mice can be used as models for HPV-associated diseases such as human cervical, oropharynx, and skin carcinomas.

  7. The Biophysical Probes 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine: Spectroscopic Signatures and Molecular Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Ellis, Jonathan M.; Bann, James G.; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R.

    2017-02-01

    Fluorinated amino acids serve as valuable biological probes, by reporting on local protein structure and dynamics through 19F NMR chemical shifts. 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine, studied here with DFT methods, have even more capabilities for biophysical studies, as their altered pKa values, relative to histidine, allow for studies of the role of proton transfer and tautomeric state in enzymatic mechanisms. Considering the two tautomeric forms of histidine, it was found that 2-fluorohistidine primarily forms the common (for histidine) τ-tautomer at neutral pH, while 4-fluorohistidine exclusively forms the less common π-tautomer. This suggests the two isomers of fluorohistidine can also serve as probes of tautomeric form within biomolecules, both by monitoring NMR chemical shifts and by potential perturbation of the tautomeric equilibrium within biomolecules. Fluorine also enables assignment of tautomeric states in crystal structures. The differences in experimental pKa values between the isomers was found to arise from solvation effects, providing insight into the polarization and molecular properties of each isomer. Results also encompass 13C and 19F NMR chemical shifts, from both tautomers of 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine in a number of different environments. This work can serve as a guide for interpretation of spectroscopic results in biophysical studies employing 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine.

  8. Nuclear RNA-seq of single neurons reveals molecular signatures of activation

    PubMed Central

    Lacar, Benjamin; Linker, Sara B.; Jaeger, Baptiste N.; Krishnaswami, Suguna; Barron, Jerika; Kelder, Martijn; Parylak, Sarah; Paquola, Apuã; Venepally, Pratap; Novotny, Mark; O'Connor, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Erwin, Jennifer; Hsu, Jonathan Y.; Husband, David; McConnell, Michael J.; Lasken, Roger; Gage, Fred H.

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing methods have emerged as powerful tools for identification of heterogeneous cell types within defined brain regions. Application of single-cell techniques to study the transcriptome of activated neurons can offer insight into molecular dynamics associated with differential neuronal responses to a given experience. Through evaluation of common whole-cell and single-nuclei RNA-sequencing (snRNA-seq) methods, here we show that snRNA-seq faithfully recapitulates transcriptional patterns associated with experience-driven induction of activity, including immediate early genes (IEGs) such as Fos, Arc and Egr1. SnRNA-seq of mouse dentate granule cells reveals large-scale changes in the activated neuronal transcriptome after brief novel environment exposure, including induction of MAPK pathway genes. In addition, we observe a continuum of activation states, revealing a pseudotemporal pattern of activation from gene expression alone. In summary, snRNA-seq of activated neurons enables the examination of gene expression beyond IEGs, allowing for novel insights into neuronal activation patterns in vivo. PMID:27090946

  9. Nuclear RNA-seq of single neurons reveals molecular signatures of activation.

    PubMed

    Lacar, Benjamin; Linker, Sara B; Jaeger, Baptiste N; Krishnaswami, Suguna; Barron, Jerika; Kelder, Martijn; Parylak, Sarah; Paquola, Apuã; Venepally, Pratap; Novotny, Mark; O'Connor, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Erwin, Jennifer; Hsu, Jonathan Y; Husband, David; McConnell, Michael J; Lasken, Roger; Gage, Fred H

    2016-04-19

    Single-cell sequencing methods have emerged as powerful tools for identification of heterogeneous cell types within defined brain regions. Application of single-cell techniques to study the transcriptome of activated neurons can offer insight into molecular dynamics associated with differential neuronal responses to a given experience. Through evaluation of common whole-cell and single-nuclei RNA-sequencing (snRNA-seq) methods, here we show that snRNA-seq faithfully recapitulates transcriptional patterns associated with experience-driven induction of activity, including immediate early genes (IEGs) such as Fos, Arc and Egr1. SnRNA-seq of mouse dentate granule cells reveals large-scale changes in the activated neuronal transcriptome after brief novel environment exposure, including induction of MAPK pathway genes. In addition, we observe a continuum of activation states, revealing a pseudotemporal pattern of activation from gene expression alone. In summary, snRNA-seq of activated neurons enables the examination of gene expression beyond IEGs, allowing for novel insights into neuronal activation patterns in vivo.

  10. The Biophysical Probes 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine: Spectroscopic Signatures and Molecular Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Ellis, Jonathan M.; Bann, James G.; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorinated amino acids serve as valuable biological probes, by reporting on local protein structure and dynamics through 19F NMR chemical shifts. 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine, studied here with DFT methods, have even more capabilities for biophysical studies, as their altered pKa values, relative to histidine, allow for studies of the role of proton transfer and tautomeric state in enzymatic mechanisms. Considering the two tautomeric forms of histidine, it was found that 2-fluorohistidine primarily forms the common (for histidine) τ-tautomer at neutral pH, while 4-fluorohistidine exclusively forms the less common π-tautomer. This suggests the two isomers of fluorohistidine can also serve as probes of tautomeric form within biomolecules, both by monitoring NMR chemical shifts and by potential perturbation of the tautomeric equilibrium within biomolecules. Fluorine also enables assignment of tautomeric states in crystal structures. The differences in experimental pKa values between the isomers was found to arise from solvation effects, providing insight into the polarization and molecular properties of each isomer. Results also encompass 13C and 19F NMR chemical shifts, from both tautomers of 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine in a number of different environments. This work can serve as a guide for interpretation of spectroscopic results in biophysical studies employing 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine. PMID:28198426

  11. NG2 expression in glioblastoma identifies an actively proliferating population with an aggressive molecular signature

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mayhani, M. Talal F.; Grenfell, Richard; Narita, Masashi; Piccirillo, Sara; Kenney-Herbert, Emma; Fawcett, James W.; Collins, V. Peter; Ichimura, Koichi; Watts, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common type of primary brain tumor and a highly malignant and heterogeneous cancer. Current conventional therapies fail to eradicate or curb GBM cell growth. Hence, exploring the cellular and molecular basis of GBM cell growth is vital to develop novel therapeutic approaches. Neuroglia (NG)-2 is a transmembrane proteoglycan expressed by NG2+ progenitors and is strongly linked to cell proliferation in the normal brain. By using NG2 as a biomarker we identify a GBM cell population (GBM NG2+ cells) with robust proliferative, clonogenic, and tumorigenic capacity. We show that a significant proportion (mean 83%) of cells proliferating in the tumor mass express NG2 and that over 50% of GBM NG2+ cells are proliferating. Compared with the GBM NG2− cells from the same tumor, the GBM of NG2+ cells overexpress genes associated with aggressive tumorigenicity, including overexpression of Mitosis and Cell Cycling Module genes (e.g., MELK, CDC, MCM, E2F), which have been previously shown to correlate with poor survival in GBM. We also show that the coexpression pattern of NG2 with other glial progenitor markers in GBM does not recapitulate that described in the normal brain. The expression of NG2 by such an aggressive and actively cycling GBM population combined with its location on the cell surface identifies this cell population as a potential therapeutic target in a subset of patients with GBM. PMID:21798846

  12. Molecular modeling, spectroscopic signature and NBO analysis of some building blocks of organic conductors.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, V

    2014-11-11

    Vibrational spectra with IR and Raman intensities in optimum state have been calculated for 2,2'-Bi-1,3-diselenole (commonly known as tetraselenafulvalene) and its halogen derivatives. All these calculations have been done by employing density functional theory (DFT) and second order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) methods incorporated with suitable functionals and basis sets. Normal coordinate analysis has also been performed to calculate potential energy distributions (PEDs) to make a conspicuous assignment. The vibrational frequencies of all the four molecules have been assigned using PEDs and the results are compared with available values for the most similar molecules like tetrathiafulvalene. The molecular stability and bond strength have investigated by applying the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The energy gap between HOMO and LUMO is 2.041 eV for tetraselenafulvalene and it is slightly less than 2eV for halogen derivatives which implies that these molecules fall in the wide band gap semiconductor groups.

  13. Molecular profiling of prostate cancer derived exosomes may reveal a predictive signature for response to docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Baltatzis, George; Lennartsson, Lena; Fonseca, Pedro; Azimi, Alireza; Hultenby, Kjell; Zubarev, Roman; Ullén, Anders; Yachnin, Jeffrey; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel is a cornerstone treatment for metastatic, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which remains a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, worldwide. The clinical usage of docetaxel has resulted in modest gains in survival, primarily due to the development of resistance. There are currently no clinical biomarkers available that predict whether a CRPC patient will respond or acquire resistance to this therapy. Comparative proteomics analysis of exosomes secreted from DU145 prostate cancer cells that are sensitive (DU145 Tax-Sen) or have acquired resistance (DU145 Tax-Res) to docetaxel, demonstrated significant differences in the amount of exosomes secreted and in their molecular composition. A panel of proteins was identified by proteomics to be differentially enriched in DU145 Tax-Res compared to DU145 Tax-Sen exosomes and was validated by western blotting. Importantly, we identified MDR-1, MDR-3, Endophilin-A2 and PABP4 that were enriched only in DU145 Tax-Res exosomes. We validated the presence of these proteins in the serum of a small cohort of patients. DU145 cells that have uptaken DU145 Tax-Res exosomes show properties of increased matrix degradation. In summary, exosomes derived from DU145 Tax-Res cells may be a valuable source of biomarkers for response to therapy. PMID:25844599

  14. A Patient-Derived, Pan-Cancer EMT Signature Identifies Global Molecular Alterations and Immune Target Enrichment Following Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Mak, Milena P; Tong, Pan; Diao, Lixia; Cardnell, Robert J; Gibbons, Don L; William, William N; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Parra, Edwin R; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Heymach, John V; Weinstein, John N; Coombes, Kevin R; Wang, Jing; Byers, Lauren Averett

    2016-02-01

    We previously demonstrated the association between epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and drug response in lung cancer using an EMT signature derived in cancer cell lines. Given the contribution of tumor microenvironments to EMT, we extended our investigation of EMT to patient tumors from 11 cancer types to develop a pan-cancer EMT signature. Using the pan-cancer EMT signature, we conducted an integrated, global analysis of genomic and proteomic profiles associated with EMT across 1,934 tumors including breast, lung, colon, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Differences in outcome and in vitro drug response corresponding to expression of the pan-cancer EMT signature were also investigated. Compared with the lung cancer EMT signature, the patient-derived, pan-cancer EMT signature encompasses a set of core EMT genes that correlate even more strongly with known EMT markers across diverse tumor types and identifies differences in drug sensitivity and global molecular alterations at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels. Among those changes associated with EMT, pathway analysis revealed a strong correlation between EMT and immune activation. Further supervised analysis demonstrated high expression of immune checkpoints and other druggable immune targets, such as PD1, PD-L1, CTLA4, OX40L, and PD-L2, in tumors with the most mesenchymal EMT scores. Elevated PD-L1 protein expression in mesenchymal tumors was confirmed by IHC in an independent lung cancer cohort. This new signature provides a novel, patient-based, histology-independent tool for the investigation of EMT and offers insights into potential novel therapeutic targets for mesenchymal tumors, independent of cancer type, including immune checkpoints. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. A patient-derived, pan-cancer EMT signature identifies global molecular alterations and immune target enrichment following epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Milena P.; Tong, Pan; Diao, Lixia; Cardnell, Robert J.; Gibbons, Don L.; William, William N.; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Parra, Edwin R.; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Heymach, John V.; Weinstein, John N.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Wang, Jing; Byers, Lauren Averett

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We previously demonstrated the association between epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and drug response in lung cancer using an EMT signature derived in cancer cell lines. Given the contribution of tumor microenvironments to EMT, we extended our investigation of EMT to patient tumors from 11 cancer types to develop a pan-cancer EMT signature. Experimental Design Using the pan-cancer EMT signature, we conducted an integrated, global analysis of genomic and proteomic profiles associated with EMT across 1,934 tumors including breast, lung, colon, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Differences in outcome and in vitro drug response corresponding to expression of the pan-cancer EMT signature were also investigated. Results Compared to the lung cancer EMT signature, the patient-derived, pan-cancer EMT signature encompasses a set of core EMT genes that correlate even more strongly with known EMT markers across diverse tumor types and identifies differences in drug sensitivity and global molecular alterations at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels. Among those changes associated with EMT, pathway analysis revealed a strong correlation between EMT and immune activation. Further supervised analysis demonstrated high expression of immune checkpoints and other druggable immune targets such as PD1, PD-L1, CTLA4, OX40L, and PDL2, in tumors with the most mesenchymal EMT scores. Elevated PD-L1 protein expression in mesenchymal tumors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in an independent lung cancer cohort. Conclusions This new signature provides a novel, patient-based, histology-independent tool for the investigation of EMT and offers insights into potential novel therapeutic targets for mesenchymal tumors, independent of cancer type, including immune checkpoints. PMID:26420858

  16. Mining the mouse transcriptome of receptive endometrium reveals distinct molecular signatures for the luminal and glandular epithelium.

    PubMed

    Niklaus, Andrea L; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2006-07-01

    Epithelia coat most tissues where they sense and respond to the environment and participate in innate immune responses. In the adult mouse uterus, columnar epithelium lines the central lumen and the glands that penetrate the underlying stroma. A nidatory surge of estrogen causes differentiation of the luminal epithelium to the receptive state that permits blastocyst attachment and allows subsequent implantation. Here, using laser-capture microdissection to isolate the luminal and glandular epithelia separately, we have profiled gene expression 2 h before embryo attachment to determine whether there are unique roles for these two epithelial structures in this process. Although most genes were expressed in both compartments, there was greater expression of 153 and 118 genes in the lumen and glands, respectively. In the luminal epithelium, there is enrichment in lipid, metal-ion binding, and carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes, whereas in the glands, immune response genes are emphasized. In situ hybridization to uterine sections obtained from mice during the preimplantation period validated these data and indicated an array of previously undocumented genes expressed with unique patterns in these epithelia. The data show that each epithelial compartment has a distinct molecular signature and that they act differentially and synergistically to permit blastocyst implantation.

  17. Vibrational signatures of cation-anion hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids: a periodic density functional theory and molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Anirban; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2015-02-05

    Hydrogen bonding in alkylammonium based protic ionic liquids was studied using density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. Normal-mode analysis within the harmonic approximation and power spectra of velocity autocorrelation functions were used as tools to obtain the vibrational spectra in both the gas phase and the crystalline phases of these protic ionic liquids. The hydrogen bond vibrational modes were identified in the 150-240 cm(-1) region of the far-infrared (far-IR) spectra. A blue shift in the far-IR mode was observed with an increasing number of hydrogen-bonding sites on the cation; the exact peak position is modulated by the cation-anion hydrogen bond strength. Sub-100 cm(-1) bands in the far-IR spectrum are assigned to the rattling motion of the anions. Calculated NMR chemical shifts of the acidic protons in the crystalline phase of these salts also exhibit the signature of cation-anion hydrogen bonding.

  18. Molecular signature of salivary gland tumors: potential use as diagnostic and prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Sena Filho, Marcondes; Altemani, Albina; Speight, Paul M; Vargas, Pablo Agustin

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland tumors are a highly heterogeneous group of lesions with diverse microscopic appearances and variable clinical behavior. The use of clinical and histological parameters to predict patient prognosis and survival rates has been of limited utility, and the search for new biomarkers that could not only aid in a better understanding of their pathogenesis but also be reliable auxiliaries for prognostic determination and useful diagnostic tools has been performed in the last decades with very exciting results. Hence, gene rearrangements such as CRTC1-MAML2 in mucoepidermoid carcinomas have shown excellent specificity, and more than that, it has been strongly correlated with low-grade tumors and consequently with an increased survival rate and better prognosis of patients affected by neoplasms carrying this translocation. Moreover, MYB-NFIB and EWSR1-ATF1 gene fusions were shown to be specifically found in cases of adenoid cystic carcinomas and hyalinizing clear cell carcinomas, respectively, in the context of salivary gland tumors, becoming reliable diagnostic tools for these entities and potential therapeutic targets for future therapeutic protocols. Finally, the identification of ETV6-NTRK3 in cases previously diagnosed as uncommon acinic cell carcinomas, cystadenocarcinomas, and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified led to the characterization of a completely new and now widely accepted entity, including, therefore, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma in the list of well-recognized salivary gland carcinomas. Thus, further molecular investigations of salivary gland tumors are warranted, and the recognition of other genetic abnormalities can lead to the acknowledgment of new entities and the acquirement of reliable biomarkers.

  19. Different molecular signatures in magnetic resonance imaging-staged facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy muscles.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giorgio; Pescatori, Mario; Monforte, Mauro; Mirabella, Massimiliano; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Frusciante, Roberto; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Laschena, Francesco; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Ricci, Enzo

    2012-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common muscular dystrophies and is characterized by a non-conventional genetic mechanism activated by pathogenic D4Z4 repeat contractions. By muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) we observed that T2-short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) sequences identify two different conditions in which each muscle can be found before the irreversible dystrophic alteration, marked as T1-weighted sequence hyperintensity, takes place. We studied these conditions in order to obtain further information on the molecular mechanisms involved in the selective wasting of single muscles or muscle groups in this disease. Histopathology, gene expression profiling and real time PCR were performed on biopsies from FSHD muscles with different MRI pattern (T1-weighted normal/T2-STIR normal and T1-weighted normal/T2-STIR hyperintense). Data were compared with those from inflammatory myopathies, dysferlinopathies and normal controls. In order to validate obtained results, two additional FSHD samples with different MRI pattern were analyzed. Myopathic and inflammatory changes characterized T2-STIR hyperintense FSHD muscles, at variance with T2-STIR normal muscles. These two states could be easily distinguished from each other by their transcriptional profile. The comparison between T2-STIR hyperintense FSHD muscles and inflammatory myopathy muscles showed peculiar changes, although many alterations were shared among these conditions. At the single muscle level, different stages of the disease correspond to the two MRI patterns. T2-STIR hyperintense FSHD muscles are more similar to inflammatory myopathies than to T2-STIR normal FSHD muscles or other muscular dystrophies, and share with them upregulation of genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. Our data suggest that selective inflammation, together with perturbation in biological processes such as neoangiogenesis, lipid metabolism and adipokine production, may contribute

  20. A molecular signature of normal breast epithelial and stromal cells from Li-Fraumeni syndrome mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Brittney-Shea; Chanoux, Rebecca A.; Liu, Yunlong; Baenziger, Peter H.; Goswami, Chirayu P.; McClintick, Jeanette N.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Pennington, Robert E.; Lipkin, Steven M.; Kopelovich, Levy

    2010-01-01

    Specific changes in gene expression during cancer initiation should enable discovery of biomarkers for risk assessment, early detection and targets for chemoprevention. It has been previously demonstrated that altered mRNA and proteome signatures of morphologically normal cells bearing a single inherited “hit” in a tumor suppressor gene parallel many changes observed in the corresponding sporadic cancer. Here, we report on the global gene expression profile of morphologically normal, cultured primary breast epithelial and stromal cells from Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) TP53 mutation carriers. Our analyses identified multiple changes in gene expression in both morphologically normal breast epithelial and stromal cells associated with TP53 haploinsufficiency, as well as interlocking pathways. Notably, a dysregulated p53 signaling pathway was readily detectable. Pharmacological intervention with the p53 rescue compounds CP-31398 and PRIMA-1 provided further evidence in support of the central role of p53 in affecting these changes in LFS cells and treatment for this cancer. Because loss of signaling mediated by TP53 is associated with the development and survival of many human tumors, identification of gene expression profiles in morphologically normal cells that carry “one-hit” p53 mutations may reveal novel biomarkers, enabling the discovery of potential targets for chemoprevention of sporadic tumors as well. PMID:21311097

  1. Antirheumatic drug response signatures in human chondrocytes: potential molecular targets to stimulate cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Kristin; Häupl, Thomas; Lübke, Carsten; Ringe, Jochen; Morawietz, Lars; Wachtel, Anja; Sittinger, Michael; Kaps, Christian

    2009-01-01

    treatment with NSAIDs and the DMARD chloroquine phosphate had only moderate to minor effects. Treatment with the DMARDs azathioprine, gold sodium thiomalate, and methotrexate efficiently reverted chondrocyte RA-related gene expression toward the 'healthy' level. Pathways of cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, transforming growth factor-beta/Toll-like receptor/Jak-STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) signalling and extracellular matrix receptor interaction were targeted by antirheumatics. Conclusions Our findings indicate that RA-relevant stimuli result in the molecular activation of catabolic and inflammatory processes in human chondrocytes that are reverted by antirheumatic treatment. Candidate genes that evolved in this study for new therapeutic approaches include suppression of specific immune responses (COX-2, IL-23A, and IL-6) and activation of cartilage regeneration (CTGF and CYR-61). PMID:19192274

  2. Characterization of key transcription factors as molecular signatures of HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral cancers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Gaurav; Vishnoi, Kanchan; Tyagi, Abhishek; Jadli, Mohit; Singh, Tejveer; Goel, Ankit; Sharma, Ankita; Agarwal, Kiran; Prasad, Subhash Chandra; Pandey, Durgatosh; Sharma, Shashi; Mehrotra, Ravi; Singh, Sukh Mahendra; Bharti, Alok Chandra

    2017-03-01

    Prior studies established constitutively active AP-1, NF-κB, and STAT3 signaling in oral cancer. Differential expression/activation of specific members of these transcription factors has been documented in HPV-positive oral lesions that respond better to therapy. We performed a comprehensive analysis of differentially expressed, transcriptionally active members of these pivotal signaling mediators to develop specific signatures of HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral lesions by immunohistochemical method that is applicable in low-resource settings. We examined a total of 31 prospective and 30 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from treatment-naïve, histopathologically and clinically confirmed cases diagnosed as oral or oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC/OPSCC). Following determination of their HPV status by GP5 + /GP6 +  PCR, the sequential sections of the tissues were evaluated for expression of JunB, JunD, c-Fos, p50, p65, STAT3, and pSTAT3(Y705), along with two key regulatory proteins pEGFR and p16 by IHC. Independent analysis of JunB and p65 showed direct correlation with HPV positivity, whereas STAT3 and pSTAT3 were inversely correlated. A combined analysis of transcription factors revealed a more restrictive combination, characterized by the presence of AP-1 and NF-κB lacking involvement of STAT3 that strongly correlated with HPV-positive tumors. Presence of STAT3/pSTAT3 with NF-κB irrespective of the presence or absence of AP-1 members was present in HPV-negative lesions. Expression of pSTAT3 strongly correlated with all the AP-1/NF-κB members (except JunD), its upstream activator pEGFR(Y)(1092) , and HPV infection-related negative regulator p16. Overall, we show a simple combination of AP-1, NF-κB, and STAT3 members' expression that may serve as molecular signature of HPV-positive lesions or more broadly the tumors that show better prognosis.

  3. Study of correlations in molecular motion by multiple quantum NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. H.

    1981-11-01

    The theoretical background of spin Hamiltonians, the density matrix formalism of multiple quantum NMR are discussed as well as creation and detection of multiple quantum coherence by multiple pulse sequence. Prototype multiple quantum spectra of oriented benzene are presented. Redfield relaxation theory and the application of multiple quantum NMR to the study of correlations in fluctuations are considered. An oriented methyl group relaxed by paramagnetic impurities is examined and possible correlated motion between two coupled methyl groups is investigated by multiple quantum NMR. For a six spin system it is shown that the four quantum spectrum is sensitive to two body correlations, and serves a ready test of correlated motion. The spin lattice dynamics of orienting or tunneling methyl groups (CH3 and CD3) at low temperatures and the anisotropic spin lattice relaxation of deuterated hexamethylbenzene, caused by the sixfold reorientation of the molecules are described as well as NMR spectrometers.

  4. Molecular signatures (conserved indels) in protein sequences that are specific for the order Pasteurellales and distinguish two of its main clades.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Hafiz Sohail; Gupta, Radhey S

    2012-01-01

    The members of the order Pasteurellales are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the rRNA trees and no convincing biochemical or molecular markers are known that distinguish them from all other bacteria. The genome sequences for 20 Pasteurellaceae species/strains are now publicly available. We report here detailed analyses of protein sequences from these genomes to identify conserved signature indels (CSIs) that are specific for either all Pasteurellales or its major clades. We describe more than 23 CSIs in widely distributed genes/proteins that are uniquely shared by all sequenced Pasteurellaceae species/strains but are not found in any other bacteria. Twenty-one additional CSIs are also specific for the Pasteurellales except in some of these cases homologues were not detected in a few species or the CSI was also present in an isolated non-Pasteurellaceae species. The sequenced Pasteurellaceae species formed two distinct clades in a phylogenetic tree based upon concatenated sequences for 10 conserved proteins. The first of these clades consisting of Aggregatibacter, Pasteurella, Actinobacillus succinogenes, Mannheimia succiniciproducens, Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus somnus was also independently supported by 13 uniquely shared CSIs that are not present in other Pasteurellaceae species or other bacteria. Another clade consisting of the remaining Pasteurellaceae species (viz. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Actinobacillus minor, Haemophilus ducryi, Mannheimia haemolytica and Haemophilus parasuis) was also strongly and independently supported by nine CSIs that are uniquely present in these bacteria. The order Pasteurellales is presently made up of a single family, Pasteurellaceae, that encompasses all of its genera. In this context, our identification of two distinct clades within the Pasteurellales, which are supported by both phylogenetic analyses and by multiple highly specific molecular markers, strongly argues for and

  5. Orthogonal Comparison of Molecular Signatures of Kidney Transplants With Subclinical and Clinical Acute Rejection: Equivalent Performance Is Agnostic to Both Technology and Platform.

    PubMed

    Kurian, S M; Velazquez, E; Thompson, R; Whisenant, T; Rose, S; Riley, N; Harrison, F; Gelbart, T; Friedewald, J J; Charette, J; Brietigam, S; Peysakhovich, J; First, M R; Abecassis, M M; Salomon, D R

    2017-08-01

    We performed orthogonal technology comparisons of concurrent peripheral blood and biopsy tissue samples from 69 kidney transplant recipients who underwent comprehensive algorithm-driven clinical phenotyping. The sample cohort included patients with normal protocol biopsies and stable transplant (sTx) function (n = 25), subclinical acute rejection (subAR, n = 23), and clinical acute rejection (cAR, n = 21). Comparisons between microarray and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) signatures were performed and demonstrated a strong correlation between the blood and tissue compartments for both technology platforms. A number of shared differentially expressed genes and pathways between subAR and cAR in both platforms strongly suggest that these two clinical phenotypes form a continuum of alloimmune activation. SubAR is associated with fewer or less expressed genes than cAR in blood, whereas in biopsy tissues, this clinical phenotype demonstrates a more robust molecular signature for both platforms. The discovery work done in this study confirms a clear ability to detect gene expression profiles for sTx, subAR, and cAR in both blood and biopsy tissue, yielding equivalent predictive performance that is agnostic to both technology and platform. Our data also provide strong biological insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying these signatures, underscoring their logistical potential as molecular diagnostics to improve clinical outcomes following kidney transplantation. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  6. Molecular Signatures of Natural Selection for Polymorphic Genes of the Human Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Systems: A Review.

    PubMed

    Taub, Daniel R; Page, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A large body of research has examined the behavioral and mental health consequences of polymorphisms in genes of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. Along with this, there has been considerable interest in the possibility that these polymorphisms have developed and/or been maintained due to the action of natural selection. Episodes of natural selection on a gene are expected to leave molecular "footprints" in the DNA sequences of the gene and adjacent genomic regions. Here we review the research literature investigating molecular signals of selection for genes of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. The gene SLC6A4, which codes for a serotonin transport protein, was the one gene for which there was consistent support from multiple studies for a selective episode. Positive selection on SLC6A4 appears to have been initiated ∼ 20-25,000 years ago in east Asia and possibly in Europe. There are scattered reports of molecular signals of selection for other neurotransmitter genes, but these have generally failed at replication across studies. In spite of speculation in the literature about selection on these genes, current evidence from population genomic analyses supports selectively neutral processes, such as genetic drift and population dynamics, as the principal drivers of recent evolution in dopaminergic and serotonergic genes other than SLC6A4.

  7. Molecular Signatures of Natural Selection for Polymorphic Genes of the Human Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Systems: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Taub, Daniel R.; Page, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A large body of research has examined the behavioral and mental health consequences of polymorphisms in genes of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. Along with this, there has been considerable interest in the possibility that these polymorphisms have developed and/or been maintained due to the action of natural selection. Episodes of natural selection on a gene are expected to leave molecular “footprints” in the DNA sequences of the gene and adjacent genomic regions. Here we review the research literature investigating molecular signals of selection for genes of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. The gene SLC6A4, which codes for a serotonin transport protein, was the one gene for which there was consistent support from multiple studies for a selective episode. Positive selection on SLC6A4 appears to have been initiated ∼ 20–25,000 years ago in east Asia and possibly in Europe. There are scattered reports of molecular signals of selection for other neurotransmitter genes, but these have generally failed at replication across studies. In spite of speculation in the literature about selection on these genes, current evidence from population genomic analyses supports selectively neutral processes, such as genetic drift and population dynamics, as the principal drivers of recent evolution in dopaminergic and serotonergic genes other than SLC6A4. PMID:27375535

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of canine distemper virus in South America clade 1 reveals unique molecular signatures of the local epidemic.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Cristine D B; Gräf, Tiago; Ikuta, Nilo; Lehmann, Fernanda K M; Passos, Daniel T; Makiejczuk, Aline; Silveira, Marcos A T; Fonseca, André S K; Canal, Cláudio W; Lunge, Vagner R

    2016-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious pathogen for domestic dogs and several wild carnivore species. In Brazil, natural infection of CDV in dogs is very high due to the large non-vaccinated dog population, a scenario that calls for new studies on the molecular epidemiology. This study investigates the phylodynamics and amino-acid signatures of CDV epidemic in South America by analyzing a large dataset compiled from publicly available sequences and also by collecting new samples from Brazil. A population of 175 dogs with canine distemper (CD) signs was sampled, from which 89 were positive for CDV, generating 42 new CDV sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the new and publicly available sequences revealed that Brazilian sequences mainly clustered in South America 1 (SA1) clade, which has its origin estimated to the late 1980's. The reconstruction of the demographic history in SA1 clade showed an epidemic expanding until the recent years, doubling in size every nine years. SA1 clade epidemic distinguished from the world CDV epidemic by the emergence of the R580Q strain, a very rare and potentially detrimental substitution in the viral genome. The R580Q substitution was estimated to have happened in one single evolutionary step in the epidemic history in SA1 clade, emerging shortly after introduction to the continent. Moreover, a high prevalence (11.9%) of the Y549H mutation was observed among the domestic dogs sampled here. This finding was associated (p<0.05) with outcome-death and higher frequency in mixed-breed dogs, the later being an indicator of a continuous exchange of CDV strains circulating among wild carnivores and domestic dogs. The results reported here highlight the diversity of the worldwide CDV epidemic and reveal local features that can be valuable for combating the disease.

  9. Ectomycorrhizal fungi increase soil carbon storage: molecular signatures of mycorrhizal competition driving soil C storage at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, C.; Barry, B. K.; Hawkes, C.

    2015-12-01

    Soil carbon storage and decay is regulated by the activity of free-living decomposer microbes, which can be limited by nitrogen availability. Many plants associate with symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi on their roots, which produce nitrogen-degrading enzymes and may be able to compete with free-living decomposers for soil organic nitrogen. By doing so, ectomycorrhizal fungi may able to induce nitrogen limitation and reduce activity of free-living microbial decomposition by mining soil organic nitrogen. The implication is that ectomycorrhizal-dominated systems should have increased soil carbon storage relative to non-ectomycorrhizal systems, which has been confirmed at a global scale. To investigate these effects, we analyzed 364 globally distributed observations of soil fungal communities using 454 sequencing of the ITS region, along with soil C and N concentrations, climate and chemical data. We assigned operational taxonomic units using the QIIME pipeline and UNITE fungal database and assigned fungal reads as ectomycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal based on current taxonomic knowledge. We tested for associations between ectomycorrhizal abundance, climate, and soil carbon and nitrogen. Sites with greater soil carbon had quantitatively more ectomycorrhizal fungi within the soil microbial community based on fungal sequence abundance, after accounting for soil nitrogen availability. This is consistent with our hypothesis that ectomycorrhizal fungi induce nitrogen-limitation of free-living decomposers and thereby increase soil carbon storage. The strength of the mycorrhizal effect increased non-linearly with ectomycorrhizal abundance: the greater the abundance, the greater the effect size. Mean annual temperature, potential evapotranspiration, soil moisture and soil pH were also significant predictors in the final AIC selected model. This analysis suggests that molecular data on soil microbial communities can be used to make quantitative biogeochemical predictions. The

  10. Molecular signatures order the potency of topically applied anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Ungar, Benjamin; Malik, Kunal; Dickstein, Daniel; Suprun, Maria; Estrada, Yeriel D; Xu, Hui; Peng, Xiangyu; Oliva, Margeaux; Todd, Dan; Labuda, Tord; Suarez-Farinas, Mayte; Bissonnette, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a large unmet need for treatments with better safety and efficacy. To facilitate development of topical therapeutics, we need an efficient model for assessing different formulations and concentrations. The "plaque model" has been successfully implemented in patients with psoriasis, another common inflammatory disease, to assess the efficacy of topical treatments. This model has not been validated for AD, which has higher placebo responses and less stable lesions than psoriasis. We aimed to assess changes in molecular signatures of intrapatient target lesions treated with topical therapeutics. We enrolled 30 patients with mild-to-moderate AD in a randomized, double-blind, intraindividual comparison of 3 approved agents applied blindly at the investigator site daily for 14 days: pimecrolimus, betamethasone dipropionate, clobetasol propionate, and a vehicle/emollient control. Changes in total sign scores (TSSs), transepidermal water loss, and tissue biomarkers (determined by using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry) were evaluated. TSSs showed improvements of 30%, 40%, 68%, and 76% at 2 weeks with vehicle, pimecrolimus, betamethasone, and clobetasol, respectively, with parallel changes in transepidermal water loss (P < .05). Significant differences versus vehicle values were limited to steroids (P < .0001). Steroids (particularly clobetasol) restored epidermal hyperplasia and terminal differentiation versus minimal changes with vehicle or pimecrolimus (P < .001). Levels of cellular infiltrates and cytokines (IL-13, IL-22, and S100As) were similarly reduced only by steroids (P < .001). TSS improvement correlated with changes in hyperplasia, infiltrates, and differentiation markers. We detected significant clinical and tissue differences between agents, providing a novel approach to study the differential effects of topical formulations using a limited sample size. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  11. AUREA: an open-source software system for accurate and user-friendly identification of relative expression molecular signatures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Public databases such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus contain extensive and exponentially increasing amounts of high-throughput data that can be applied to molecular phenotype characterization. Collectively, these data can be analyzed for such purposes as disease diagnosis or phenotype classification. One family of algorithms that has proven useful for disease classification is based on relative expression analysis and includes the Top-Scoring Pair (TSP), k-Top-Scoring Pairs (k-TSP), Top-Scoring Triplet (TST) and Differential Rank Conservation (DIRAC) algorithms. These relative expression analysis algorithms hold significant advantages for identifying interpretable molecular signatures for disease classification, and have been implemented previously on a variety of computational platforms with varying degrees of usability. To increase the user-base and maximize the utility of these methods, we developed the program AUREA (Adaptive Unified Relative Expression Analyzer)—a cross-platform tool that has a consistent application programming interface (API), an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI), fast running times and automated parameter discovery. Results Herein, we describe AUREA, an efficient, cohesive, and user-friendly open-source software system that comprises a suite of methods for relative expression analysis. AUREA incorporates existing methods, while extending their capabilities and bringing uniformity to their interfaces. We demonstrate that combining these algorithms and adaptively tuning parameters on the training sets makes these algorithms more consistent in their performance and demonstrate the effectiveness of our adaptive parameter tuner by comparing accuracy across diverse datasets. Conclusions We have integrated several relative expression analysis algorithms and provided a unified interface for their implementation while making data acquisition, parameter fixing, data merging, and results analysis ‘point-and-click’ simple

  12. Detection of molecular signatures of oral squamous cell carcinoma and normal epithelium – application of a novel methodology for unsupervised segmentation of imaging mass spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    Mrukwa, Grzegorz; Kalinowska, Magdalena; Pietrowska, Monika; Chekan, Mykola; Wierzgon, Janusz; Gawin, Marta; Drazek, Grzegorz; Polanska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Intra‐tumor heterogeneity is a vivid problem of molecular oncology that could be addressed by imaging mass spectrometry. Here we aimed to assess molecular heterogeneity of oral squamous cell carcinoma and to detect signatures discriminating normal and cancerous epithelium. Tryptic peptides were analyzed by MALDI‐IMS in tissue specimens from five patients with oral cancer. Novel algorithm of IMS data analysis was developed and implemented, which included Gaussian mixture modeling for detection of spectral components and iterative k‐means algorithm for unsupervised spectra clustering performed in domain reduced to a subset of the most dispersed components. About 4% of the detected peptides showed significantly different abundances between normal epithelium and tumor, and could be considered as a molecular signature of oral cancer. Moreover, unsupervised clustering revealed two major sub‐regions within expert‐defined tumor areas. One of them showed molecular similarity with histologically normal epithelium. The other one showed similarity with connective tissue, yet was markedly different from normal epithelium. Pathologist's re‐inspection of tissue specimens confirmed distinct features in both tumor sub‐regions: foci of actual cancer cells or cancer microenvironment‐related cells prevailed in corresponding areas. Hence, molecular differences detected during automated segmentation of IMS data had an apparent reflection in real structures present in tumor. PMID:27168173

  13. Cardio-chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging reveals molecular signatures of endogenous fibrosis and exogenous contrast media.

    PubMed

    Vandsburger, Moriel; Vandoorne, Katrien; Oren, Roni; Leftin, Avigdor; Mpofu, Senzeni; Delli Castelli, Daniela; Aime, Silvio; Neeman, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Application of emerging molecular MRI techniques, including chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST)-MRI, to cardiac imaging is desirable; however, conventional methods are poorly suited for cardiac imaging, particularly in small animals with rapid heart rates. We developed a CEST-encoded steady state and retrospectively gated cardiac cine imaging sequence in which the presence of fibrosis or paraCEST contrast agents was directly encoded into the steady-state myocardial signal intensity (cardioCEST). Development of cardioCEST: A CEST-encoded cardiac cine MRI sequence was implemented on a 9.4T small animal scanner. CardioCEST of fibrosis was serially performed by acquisition of a series of CEST-encoded cine images at multiple offset frequencies in mice (n=7) after surgically induced myocardial infarction. Scar formation was quantified using a spectral modeling approach and confirmed with histological staining. Separately, circulatory redistribution kinetics of the paramagnetic CEST agent Eu-HPDO3A were probed in mice using cardioCEST imaging, revealing rapid myocardial redistribution, and washout within 30 minutes (n=6). Manipulation of vascular tone resulted in heightened peak CEST contrast in the heart, but did not alter redistribution kinetics (n=6). At 28 days after myocardial infarction (n=3), CEST contrast kinetics in infarct zone tissue were altered, demonstrating gradual accumulation of Eu-HPDO3A in the increased extracellular space. cardioCEST MRI enables in vivo imaging of myocardial fibrosis using endogenous contrast mechanisms, and of exogenously delivered paraCEST agents, and can enable multiplexed imaging of multiple molecular targets at high-resolution coupled with conventional cardiac MRI scans. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Molecular pathogenesis of multiple myeloma: basic and clinical updates.

    PubMed

    Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif

    2013-03-01

    Multiple myeloma is divided into two distinct genetic subtypes based on chromosome content. Hyperdiploid myeloma is characterized by multiple trisomies of chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 9 11, 15, 19 and 21, and lacks recurrent immunoglobulin gene translocations. Non-hyperdiploid myeloma in contrast is characterized by chromosome translocations t(4;14), t(14;16), t(14;20), t(6;14) and t(11;14). A unifying event in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma is the dysregulated expression of a cyclin D gene, either directly by juxtaposition to an immunoglobulin enhancer, as a result of ectopic expression of a MAF family transcription factor, or indirectly by as yet unidentified mechanisms. Secondary genetic events include rearrangements of MYC, activating mutations of NRAS, KRAS or BRAF, a promiscuous array of mutations that activate NFkB and deletions of 17p. Among the poor-risk genetic features are t(4;14), t(14;16), t(14;20), del 17p and gains of 1q. Available evidence supports the use of a risk-stratified approach to the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma, with the early and prolonged use of bortezomib particularly in patients with t(4;14) and del 17p.

  15. Molecular pathogenesis of multiple myeloma: basic and clinical updates

    PubMed Central

    Chesi, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is divided into two distinct genetic subtypes based on chromosome content. Hyperdiploid myeloma is characterized by multiple trisomies of chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 9 11, 15, 19 and 21, and lacks recurrent immunoglobulin gene translocations. Non-hyperdiploid myeloma in contrast is characterized by chromosome translocations t(4;14), t(14;16), t(14;20), t(6;14) and t(11;14). A unifying event in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma is the dysregulated expression of a cyclin D gene, either directly by juxtaposition to an immunoglobulin enhancer, as a result of ectopic expression of a MAF family transcription factor, or indirectly by as yet unidentified mechanisms. Secondary genetic events include rearrangements of MYC, activating mutations of NRAS, KRAS or BRAF, a promiscuous array of mutations that activate NFkB and deletions of 17p. Among the poor-risk genetic features are t(4;14), t(14;16), t(14;20), del 17p and gains of 1q. Available evidence supports the use of a risk-stratified approach to the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma, with the early and prolonged use of bortezomib particularly in patients with t(4;14) and del 17p. PMID:23456262

  16. A Simple and Convenient Method of Multiple Linear Regression to Calculate Iodine Molecular Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure using a student-friendly least-squares multiple linear-regression technique utilizing a function within Microsoft Excel is described that enables students to calculate molecular constants from the vibronic spectrum of iodine. This method is advantageous pedagogically as it calculates molecular constants for ground and excited…

  17. A Simple and Convenient Method of Multiple Linear Regression to Calculate Iodine Molecular Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure using a student-friendly least-squares multiple linear-regression technique utilizing a function within Microsoft Excel is described that enables students to calculate molecular constants from the vibronic spectrum of iodine. This method is advantageous pedagogically as it calculates molecular constants for ground and excited…

  18. Dynamic Signature Verification System Based on One Real Signature.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Moises; Fischer, Andreas; Ferrer, Miguel A; Plamondon, Rejean

    2016-12-06

    The dynamic signature is a biometric trait widely used and accepted for verifying a person's identity. Current automatic signature-based biometric systems typically require five, ten, or even more specimens of a person's signature to learn intrapersonal variability sufficient to provide an accurate verification of the individual's identity. To mitigate this drawback, this paper proposes a procedure for training with only a single reference signature. Our strategy consists of duplicating the given signature a number of times and training an automatic signature verifier with each of the resulting signatures. The duplication scheme is based on a sigma lognormal decomposition of the reference signature. Two methods are presented to create human-like duplicated signatures: the first varies the strokes' lognormal parameters (stroke-wise) whereas the second modifies their virtual target points (target-wise). A challenging benchmark, assessed with multiple state-of-the-art automatic signature verifiers and multiple databases, proves the robustness of the system. Experimental results suggest that our system, with a single reference signature, is capable of achieving a similar performance to standard verifiers trained with up to five signature specimens.

  19. Multiple Point Dynamic Gas Density Measurements Using Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard; Panda, Jayanta

    1999-01-01

    A nonintrusive technique for measuring dynamic gas density properties is described. Molecular Rayleigh scattering is used to measure the time-history of gas density simultaneously at eight spatial locations at a 50 kHz sampling rate. The data are analyzed using the Welch method of modified periodograms to reduce measurement uncertainty. Cross-correlations, power spectral density functions, cross-spectral density functions, and coherence functions may be obtained from the data. The technique is demonstrated using low speed co-flowing jets with a heated inner jet.

  20. Notch signaling deregulation in multiple myeloma: A rational molecular target

    PubMed Central

    Garavelli, Silvia; Platonova, Natalia; Paoli, Alessandro; Basile, Andrea; Taiana, Elisa; Neri, Antonino; Chiaramonte, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, multiple myeloma (MM) is still an incurable neoplasia due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to therapy. Myeloma cell localization in the bone marrow milieu allows direct interactions between tumor cells and non-tumor bone marrow cells which promote neoplastic cell growth, survival, bone disease, acquisition of drug resistance and consequent relapse. Twenty percent of MM patients are at high-risk of treatment failure as defined by tumor markers or presentation as plasma cell leukemia. Cumulative evidences indicate a key role of Notch signaling in multiple myeloma onset and progression. Unlike other Notch-related malignancies, where the majority of patients carry gain-of-function mutations in Notch pathway members, in MM cell Notch signaling is aberrantly activated due to an increased expression of Notch receptors and ligands; notably, this also results in the activation of Notch signaling in surrounding stromal cells which contributes to myeloma cell proliferation, survival and migration, as well as to bone disease and intrinsic and acquired pharmacological resistance. Here we review the last findings on the mechanisms and the effects of Notch signaling dysregulation in MM and provide a rationale for a therapeutic strategy aiming at inhibiting Notch signaling, along with a complete overview on the currently available Notch-directed approaches. PMID:26308486

  1. Infrared (1-12 μm) atomic and molecular emission signatures from energetic materials using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumi Barimah, E.; Hömmerich, U.; Brown, E.; Yang, C. S.-C.; Trivedi, S. B.; Jin, F.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Samuels, A. C.; Snyder, A. P.

    2013-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful analytical technique to detect the elemental composition of solids, liquids, and gases in real time. For example, recent advances in UV-VIS LIBS have shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive sensing. The extension of conventional UVVIS LIBS to the near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and long wave infrared (LWIR) regions (~1-12 μm) offers the potential to provide additional information due to IR atomic and molecular signatures. In this work, a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1064 nm was employed as the excitation source and focused onto several chlorate and nitrate compounds including KClO3, NaClO3, KNO3, and NaNO3 to produce intense plasma at the target surface. IR LIBS studies on background air, KCl , and NaCl were also included for comparison. All potassium and sodium containing samples revealed narrow-band, atomic-like emissions assigned to transitions of neutral alkali-metal atoms in accordance with the NIST atomic spectra database. In addition, first evidence of broad-band molecular LIBS signatures from chlorate and nitrate compounds were observed at ~10 μm and ~7.3 μm, respectively. The observed molecular emissions showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the investigated materials.

  2. Molecular Subtyping of Serous Ovarian Tumors Reveals Multiple Connections to Intrinsic Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Johansson, Ida; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Kimbung, Siker; Jönsson, Mats; Bonde, Jesper Hansen; Kannisto, Päivi; Måsbäck, Anna; Malander, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transcriptional profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer has revealed molecular subtypes correlating to biological and clinical features. We aimed to determine gene expression differences between malignant, benign and borderline serous ovarian tumors, and investigate similarities with the well-established intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Methods Global gene expression profiling using Illumina's HT12 Bead Arrays was applied to 59 fresh-frozen serous ovarian malignant, benign and borderline tumors. Nearest centroid classification was performed applying previously published gene profiles for the ovarian and breast cancer subtypes. Correlations to gene expression modules representing key biological breast cancer features were also sought. Validation was performed using an independent, publicly available dataset. Results 5,944 genes were significantly differentially expressed between benign and malignant serous ovarian tumors, with cell cycle processes enriched in the malignant subgroup. Borderline tumors were split between the two clusters. Significant correlations between the malignant serous tumors and the highly aggressive ovarian cancer signatures, and the basal-like breast cancer subtype were found. The benign and borderline serous tumors together were significantly correlated to the normal-like breast cancer subtype and the ovarian cancer signature derived from borderline tumors. The borderline tumors in the study dataset, in addition, also correlated significantly to the luminal A breast cancer subtype. These findings remained when analyzed in an independent dataset, supporting links between the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and breast cancer beyond those recently acknowledged. Conclusions These data link the transcriptional profiles of serous ovarian cancer to the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer, in line with the shared clinical and molecular features between high-grade serous ovarian cancer and basal-like breast

  3. Molecular subtyping of serous ovarian tumors reveals multiple connections to intrinsic breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Johansson, Ida; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Kimbung, Siker; Jönsson, Mats; Bonde, Jesper Hansen; Kannisto, Päivi; Måsbäck, Anna; Malander, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer has revealed molecular subtypes correlating to biological and clinical features. We aimed to determine gene expression differences between malignant, benign and borderline serous ovarian tumors, and investigate similarities with the well-established intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Global gene expression profiling using Illumina's HT12 Bead Arrays was applied to 59 fresh-frozen serous ovarian malignant, benign and borderline tumors. Nearest centroid classification was performed applying previously published gene profiles for the ovarian and breast cancer subtypes. Correlations to gene expression modules representing key biological breast cancer features were also sought. Validation was performed using an independent, publicly available dataset. 5,944 genes were significantly differentially expressed between benign and malignant serous ovarian tumors, with cell cycle processes enriched in the malignant subgroup. Borderline tumors were split between the two clusters. Significant correlations between the malignant serous tumors and the highly aggressive ovarian cancer signatures, and the basal-like breast cancer subtype were found. The benign and borderline serous tumors together were significantly correlated to the normal-like breast cancer subtype and the ovarian cancer signature derived from borderline tumors. The borderline tumors in the study dataset, in addition, also correlated significantly to the luminal A breast cancer subtype. These findings remained when analyzed in an independent dataset, supporting links between the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and breast cancer beyond those recently acknowledged. These data link the transcriptional profiles of serous ovarian cancer to the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer, in line with the shared clinical and molecular features between high-grade serous ovarian cancer and basal-like breast cancer, and suggest that biomarkers and

  4. Multiple molecular and neuropharmacological effects of MDMA (Ecstasy).

    PubMed

    Simantov, Rabi

    2004-01-02

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), commonly referred to as Ecstasy, is a widely abused, psychoactive recreational drug, which induces short- and long-term neuropsychiatric behaviors. This drug is neurotoxic to serotonergic neurons in vivo, and induces programmed cell death in cultured human serotonergic cells and rat neocortical neurons. Over the years it has been shown that MDMA alters the release of several neurotransmitters in the brain, it induces recompartmentation of intracellular serotonin and c-fos, and modifies the expression of a few genes. Recently, we observed changes in gene expression in mice treated with MDMA, and cloned and sequenced 11 cDNAs thus affected (4 correspond to known and 7 to unknown genes). The effect of MDMA on two of these genes, GABA transporter 1 and synaptotagmin IV was studied in detail. Characterization of the relationship between a given gene and certain physiological or behavioral effects of MDMA could shed light on the mechanism of the drug's action. However, establishing such a connection is difficult for several reasons, including that serotonergic neurons are not the only cells affected by MDMA. In this review, molecular and neurochemical events that occur in the brain following exposure to MDMA, and link between the observed molecular changes with known physiological effects of the drug are discussed. It is indicated that MDMA alters the expression of several proteins involved in GABA neurotransmission, thus having critical effect on thermoregulation and MDMA acute toxicity. This analysis should facilitate development of novel approaches to prevent deleterious effects, especially mortality induced by MDMA and other abused psychostimulants.

  5. Molecular chaperones: multiple functions, pathologies, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alberto J L; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2007-01-01

    Cell stressors are ubiquitous and frequent, challenging cells often, which leads to the stress response with activation of anti-stress mechanisms. These mechanisms involve a variety of molecules, including molecular chaperones also known as heat-shock proteins (Hsp). The chaperones treated in this article are proteins that assist other proteins to fold, refold, travel to their place of residence (cytosol, organelle, membrane, extracellular space), and translocate across membranes. Molecular chaperones participate in a variety of physiological processes and are widespread in organisms, tissues, and cells. It follows that chaperone failure will have an impact, possibly serious, on one or more cellular function, which may lead to disease. Chaperones must recognize and interact with proteins in need of assistance or client polypeptides (e.g., nascent at the ribosome, or partially denatured by stressors), and have to interact with other chaperones because the chaperoning mechanism involves teams of chaperone molecules, i.e., multimolecular assemblies or chaperone machines. Consequently, chaperone molecules have structural domains with distinctive functions: bind the client polypeptide, interact with other chaperone molecules to build a machine, and interact with other complexes that integrate the chaperoning network. Also, various chaperones have ATP-binding and ATPase sites because the chaperoning process requires as, a rule, energy from ATP hydrolysis. Alterations in any one of these domains due to a mutation or an aberrant post-translational modification can disrupt the chaperoning process and cause diseases termed chaperonopathies. This article presents the pathologic concept of chaperonopathy with examples, and discusses the potential of using chaperones (genes or proteins) in treatment (chaperonotherapy). In addition, emerging topics within the field of study of chaperones (chaperonology) are highlighted, e.g., genomics (chaperonomics), systems biology

  6. Molecular Genetic and Epigenetic Basis of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hojati, Zohreh

    2017-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of spinal cord and brain. The initial event in MS occurs when activated CD4(+) T cells in periphery exacerbates immune responses by stimulating immune cells such as B cells, CD8(+) cells, mast cells, granulocytes and monocytes. These proinflammatory cells pass blood brain barrier by secreting proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and INF-γ which activate adhesion factors. APCs (antigen-presenting cells) reactivate CD4(+) T cells after infiltrating the CNS and CD4(+) T cells produce cytokines and chemokines. These proinflammatory cytokines aggravate inflammation by inducing myelin phagocytosis through microglia and astrocytes activation. MS is believed to have a multifactorial origin that includes a combination of multiple genetic, environmental and stochastic factors. Although the exact component of MS risks that can be explained by these factors is difficult to determine, estimates based on genetic and epidemiological studies suggest that up to 60-70 % of the total risk of MS may be contribute to genetic factors. In continue, firstly we provide an overview of the current understanding of epigenetic mechanisms, and so present evidence of how the epigenetic modifications contribute to increased susceptibility of MS. We also explain how specified epigenetic modifications may influence the pathophysiology and key aspects of disease in MS (demyelination, remyelination, inflammation, and neurodegeneration). Finally, we tend to discuss how environmental factors and epigenetic mechanisms may interact to have an effect on MS risk and clinical outcome and recommend new therapeutic interventions that might modulate patients' epigenetic profiles.

  7. The PAX2-null immunophenotype defines multiple lineages with common expression signatures in benign and neoplastic oviductal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Gang; Bijron, Jonathan G.; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Wang, Xia; Howitt, Brooke E.; Herfs, Michael; Yang, Eric; Hong, Yue; Cornille, Maxence; Wu, Lingyan; Hanamornroongruang, Suchanan; McKeon, Frank D.; Crum, Christopher P.; Xian, Wa

    2014-01-01

    The oviducts contain high grade serous cancer (HGSC) precursors (serous tubal intraepithelial neoplasia or STINs), which are γ-H2AXp- and TP53 mutation-positive. Although they express wild type p53, secretory cell outgrowths (SCOUTs) are associated with older age and serous cancer; moreover both STINs and SCOUTs share a loss of PAX2 expression (PAX2n). We evaluated PAX2 expression in proliferating adult and embryonic oviductal cells, normal mucosa, SCOUTs, Walthard cell nests (WCNs), STINs and HGSCs, and the expression of genes chosen empirically or from SCOUT expression arrays. Clones generated in vitro from embryonic gynecologic tract and adult fallopian tube were Krt7p/PAX2n/EZH2p and underwent ciliated (PAX2n/EZH2n/FOXJ1p) and basal (Krt7n/EZH2n/Krt5p) differentiation. Similarly non-ciliated cells in normal mucosa were PAX2p but became PAX2n in multilayered epithelium undergoing ciliated or basal (Walthard cell nests or WCN) cell differentiation. PAX2n SCOUTs fell into two groups; Type I were secretory or secretory/ciliated with a “tubal” phenotype and were ALDH1n and β-cateninmem (membraneous only). Type II displayed a columnar to pseudostratified (endometrioid) phenotype, with an EZH2p, ALDH1p, β-cateninnc (nuclear and cytoplasmic), stathminp, LEF1p, RCN1p and RUNX2p expression signature. STINs and HGSCs shared the Type I immunophenotype of PAX2n, ALDH1n, β-cateninmem, but highly expressed EZH2p, LEF1p, RCN1p, and stathminp. This study, for the first time, links PAX2n with proliferating fetal and adult oviductal cells undergoing basal and ciliated differentiation and shows that this expression state is maintained in SCOUTs, STINs and HGSCs. All three entities can demonstrate a consistent perturbation of genes involved in potential tumor suppressor gene silencing (EZH2), transcriptional regulation (LEF1), regulation of differentiation (RUNX2), calcium binding (RCN1) and oncogenesis (stathmin). This shared expression signature between benign and

  8. A C(18)O survey of dense cores in the Taurus molecular cloud: Signatures of evolution and protostellar collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Shudong; Evans, Neal J., II; Wang, Yangsheng; Peng, Ruisheng; Lo, K. Y.

    1994-01-01

    We have mapped 11 dense cores in the Taurus molecular cloud in the C(18)O J = 2 goes to 1 line at a linear resolution of 0.02 pc. The core masses derived from C(18)O range from 0.06 to 5 solar mass. Five of them have embedded infrared sources, and six do not. Dense cores without infrared sources show multiple emission peaks. In contrast, dense cores with infrared sources have a single peak and smaller sizes. The cores with infrared sources have line widths that are 2-3 times the value expected from correlations found in previous surveys. This enhancement may be accounted for by models of gravitational collapse. The data are consistent with the idea that dense cores evolve first toward smaller sizes and smaller line width along the line width-size relation, and then toward larger line width and constant or smaller sizes as an infrared source becomes observable. A good collapse candidate, L1527, is identified based on the shapes of C(18)O and H2CO lines.

  9. A C(18)O survey of dense cores in the Taurus molecular cloud: Signatures of evolution and protostellar collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Shudong; Evans, Neal J., II; Wang, Yangsheng; Peng, Ruisheng; Lo, K. Y.

    1994-01-01

    We have mapped 11 dense cores in the Taurus molecular cloud in the C(18)O J = 2 goes to 1 line at a linear resolution of 0.02 pc. The core masses derived from C(18)O range from 0.06 to 5 solar mass. Five of them have embedded infrared sources, and six do not. Dense cores without infrared sources show multiple emission peaks. In contrast, dense cores with infrared sources have a single peak and smaller sizes. The cores with infrared sources have line widths that are 2-3 times the value expected from correlations found in previous surveys. This enhancement may be accounted for by models of gravitational collapse. The data are consistent with the idea that dense cores evolve first toward smaller sizes and smaller line width along the line width-size relation, and then toward larger line width and constant or smaller sizes as an infrared source becomes observable. A good collapse candidate, L1527, is identified based on the shapes of C(18)O and H2CO lines.

  10. A molecular portrait of microsatellite instability across multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Lee, Sejoon; Park, Woong-Yang; Kim, Tae-Min; Park, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) refers to the hypermutability of short repetitive sequences in the genome caused by impaired DNA mismatch repair. Although MSI has been studied for decades, large amounts of sequencing data now available allows us to examine the molecular fingerprints of MSI in greater detail. Here, we analyse ∼8,000 exomes and ∼1,000 whole genomes of cancer patients across 23 cancer types. Our analysis reveals that the frequency of MSI events is highly variable within and across tumour types. We also identify genes in DNA repair and oncogenic pathways recurrently subject to MSI and uncover non-coding loci that frequently display MSI. Finally, we propose a highly accurate exome-based predictive model for the MSI phenotype. These results advance our understanding of the genomic drivers and consequences of MSI, and our comprehensive catalogue of tumour-type-specific MSI loci will enable panel-based MSI testing to identify patients who are likely to benefit from immunotherapy. PMID:28585546

  11. Gegenees: Fragmented Alignment of Multiple Genomes for Determining Phylogenomic Distances and Genetic Signatures Unique for Specified Target Groups

    PubMed Central

    Håfström, Therese; Segerman, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of Next Generation Sequencing technologies leads to the accumulation of huge amounts of sequencing data. The scientific community faces an enormous challenge in how to deal with this explosion. Here we present a software tool, ‘Gegenees’, that uses a fragmented alignment approach to facilitate the comparative analysis of hundreds of microbial genomes. The genomes are fragmented and compared, all against all, by a multithreaded BLAST control engine. Ready-made alignments can be complemented with new genomes without recalculating the existing data points. Gegenees gives a phylogenomic overview of the genomes and the alignment can then be mined for genomic regions with conservation patterns matching a defined target group and absent from a background group. The genomic regions are given biomarker scores forming a uniqueness signature that can be viewed and explored, graphically and in tabular form. A primer/probe alignment tool is also included for specificity verification of currently used or new primers. We exemplify the use of Gegenees on the Bacillus cereus group, on Foot and Mouth Disease Viruses, and on strains from the 2011 Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreak. Gegenees contributes towards an increased capacity of fast and efficient data mining as more and more genomes become sequenced. PMID:22723939

  12. Gegenees: fragmented alignment of multiple genomes for determining phylogenomic distances and genetic signatures unique for specified target groups.

    PubMed

    Agren, Joakim; Sundström, Anders; Håfström, Therese; Segerman, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of Next Generation Sequencing technologies leads to the accumulation of huge amounts of sequencing data. The scientific community faces an enormous challenge in how to deal with this explosion. Here we present a software tool, 'Gegenees', that uses a fragmented alignment approach to facilitate the comparative analysis of hundreds of microbial genomes. The genomes are fragmented and compared, all against all, by a multithreaded BLAST control engine. Ready-made alignments can be complemented with new genomes without recalculating the existing data points. Gegenees gives a phylogenomic overview of the genomes and the alignment can then be mined for genomic regions with conservation patterns matching a defined target group and absent from a background group. The genomic regions are given biomarker scores forming a uniqueness signature that can be viewed and explored, graphically and in tabular form. A primer/probe alignment tool is also included for specificity verification of currently used or new primers. We exemplify the use of Gegenees on the Bacillus cereus group, on Foot and Mouth Disease Viruses, and on strains from the 2011 Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreak. Gegenees contributes towards an increased capacity of fast and efficient data mining as more and more genomes become sequenced.

  13. Molecular Signatures Identify a Candidate Target of Balancing Selection in an arcD-Like Gene of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangfen; Thomas, Jonathan C.; Didelot, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    A comparative population genetics study revealed high levels of nucleotide polymorphism and intermediate-frequency alleles in an arcC gene of Staphylococcus epidermidis, but not in a homologous gene of the more aggressive human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus. Further investigation showed that the arcC genes used in the multilocus sequence typing schemes of these two species were paralogs. Phylogenetic analyses of arcC-containing loci, including the arginine catabolic mobile element, from both species, suggested that these loci had an eventful history involving gene duplications, rearrangements, deletions, and horizontal transfers. The peak signatures in the polymorphic S. epidermidis locus were traced to an arcD-like gene adjacent to arcC; these signatures consisted of unusually elevated Tajima’s D and π/K ratios, which were robust to assumptions about recombination and species divergence time and among the most elevated in the S. epidermidis genome. Amino acid polymorphisms, including one that differed in polarity and hydropathy, were located in the peak signatures and defined two allelic lineages. Recombination events were detected between these allelic lineages and potential donors and recipients of S. epidermidis were identified in each case. By comparison, the orthologous gene of S. aureus showed no unusual signatures. The ArcD-like protein belonged to the unknown ion transporter 3 family and appeared to be unrelated to ArcD from the arginine deiminase pathway. These studies report the first comparative population genetics results for staphylococci and the first statistical evidence for a candidate target of balancing selection in S. epidermidis. PMID:23053194

  14. Molecular signatures identify a candidate target of balancing selection in an arcD-like gene of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangfen; Thomas, Jonathan C; Didelot, Xavier; Robinson, D Ashley

    2012-08-01

    A comparative population genetics study revealed high levels of nucleotide polymorphism and intermediate-frequency alleles in an arcC gene of Staphylococcus epidermidis, but not in a homologous gene of the more aggressive human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus. Further investigation showed that the arcC genes used in the multilocus sequence typing schemes of these two species were paralogs. Phylogenetic analyses of arcC-containing loci, including the arginine catabolic mobile element, from both species, suggested that these loci had an eventful history involving gene duplications, rearrangements, deletions, and horizontal transfers. The peak signatures in the polymorphic S. epidermidis locus were traced to an arcD-like gene adjacent to arcC; these signatures consisted of unusually elevated Tajima's D and π/K ratios, which were robust to assumptions about recombination and species divergence time and among the most elevated in the S. epidermidis genome. Amino acid polymorphisms, including one that differed in polarity and hydropathy, were located in the peak signatures and defined two allelic lineages. Recombination events were detected between these allelic lineages and potential donors and recipients of S. epidermidis were identified in each case. By comparison, the orthologous gene of S. aureus showed no unusual signatures. The ArcD-like protein belonged to the unknown ion transporter 3 family and appeared to be unrelated to ArcD from the arginine deiminase pathway. These studies report the first comparative population genetics results for staphylococci and the first statistical evidence for a candidate target of balancing selection in S. epidermidis.

  15. Association of tRNA methyltransferase NSUN2/IGF-II molecular signature with ovarian cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia-Cheng; Risch, Eric; Zhang, Meiqin; Huang, Chan; Huang, Huatian; Lu, Lingeng

    2017-08-22

    To investigate the association between NSUN2/IGF-II signature and ovarian cancer survival. Using a publicly accessible dataset of RNA sequencing and clinical follow-up data, we performed Classification and Regression Tree and survival analyses. Patients with NSUN2 (high) IGF-II (low) had significantly superior overall and disease progression-free survival, followed by NSUN2 (low) IGF-II (low), NSUN2 (high) IGF-II (high) and NSUN2 (low) IGF-II (high) (p < 0.0001 for overall, p = 0.0024 for progression-free survival, respectively). The associations of NSUN2/IGF-II signature with the risks of death and relapse remained significant in multivariate Cox regression models. Random-effects meta-analyses show the upregulated NSUN2 and IGF-II expression in ovarian cancer versus normal tissues. The NSUN2/IGF-II signature associates with heterogeneous outcome and may have clinical implications in managing ovarian cancer.

  16. A phylogenomic and molecular signature based approach for characterization of the phylum Spirochaetes and its major clades: proposal for a taxonomic revision of the phylum.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S; Mahmood, Sharmeen; Adeolu, Mobolaji

    2013-01-01

    The Spirochaetes species cause many important diseases including syphilis and Lyme disease. Except for their containing a distinctive endoflagella, no other molecular or biochemical characteristics are presently known that are specific for either all Spirochaetes or its different families. We report detailed comparative and phylogenomic analyses of protein sequences from Spirochaetes genomes to understand their evolutionary relationships and to identify molecular signatures for this group. These studies have identified 38 conserved signature indels (CSIs) that are specific for either all members of the phylum Spirochaetes or its different main clades. Of these CSIs, a 3 aa insert in the FlgC protein is uniquely shared by all sequenced Spirochaetes providing a molecular marker for this phylum. Seven, six, and five CSIs in different proteins are specific for members of the families Spirochaetaceae, Brachyspiraceae, and Leptospiraceae, respectively. Of the 19 other identified CSIs, 3 are uniquely shared by members of the genera Sphaerochaeta, Spirochaeta, and Treponema, whereas 16 others are specific for the genus Borrelia. A monophyletic grouping of the genera Sphaerochaeta, Spirochaeta, and Treponema distinct from the genus Borrelia is also strongly supported by phylogenetic trees based upon concatenated sequences of 22 conserved proteins. The molecular markers described here provide novel and more definitive means for identification and demarcation of different main groups of Spirochaetes. To accommodate the extensive genetic diversity of the Spirochaetes as revealed by different CSIs and phylogenetic analyses, it is proposed that the four families of this phylum should be elevated to the order level taxonomic ranks (viz. Spirochaetales, Brevinematales ord. nov., Brachyspiriales ord. nov., and Leptospiriales ord. nov.). It is further proposed that the genera Borrelia and Cristispira be transferred to a new family Borreliaceae fam. nov. within the order

  17. Authentication of animal signatures in traditional Chinese medicine of Lingyang Qingfei Wan using routine molecular diagnostic assays.

    PubMed

    Cao, Meng; Wang, Jikun; Yao, Lu; Xie, Suhua; Du, Jing; Zhao, Xingbo

    2014-01-01

    Lingyang Qingfei Wan produced by Beijing TongRenTang is a long-standing and popular medicine in China and international pharmaceutical markets. Concerns continue to be raised about the legality of usage of saiga antelope, which was defined as endangered species by Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora legislation and internal legislation in China. Therefore, the alternative pill in which substitutes saiga antelope with goat in the formula of Lingyang Qingfei Wan was developed. In order to authenticate the origin of animal contents in Lingyang Qingfei Wan and its alternative pill, molecular diagnostic assay was utilized by mtDNA polymorphism analysis. Four universal primer pairs containing mtDNA 12SrRNA, 16SrRNA, cytochrome b gene and cytochrome oxidase I were employed to obtain species-specific sequences of saiga antelope and goat, and multiple species-specific primer pairs for saiga antelope and goat were used to identify the animal origin in patent pills according to nucleotide polymorphisms between the two species. In additions, alternative techniques were attempted surrounding dilemmas of low concentration of target DNAs and presence of PCR-inhibitory substances in organic ingredients within complex pill. Results revealed that all species-specific primers could be successfully used for authentication of animal origin within complex pill, and sample preprocessing was critical during experimental manipulation. Internal positive control was an efficient and cost-effective way to assist in monitoring the potential interference from inhibitory substances which existed in the highly processed pills.

  18. Common immunogenetic profile in children with multiple autoimmune diseases: the signature of HLA-DQ pleiotropic genes.

    PubMed

    Larizza, Daniela; Calcaterra, Valeria; Klersy, Catherine; Badulli, Carla; Caramagna, Claudia; Ricci, Antonio; Brambilla, Paola; Salvaneschi, Laura; Martinetti, Miryam

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), celiac disease (CD) and autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) are autoimmune conditions relatively common in paediatric age and frequently occur in association in the same subject. This event is not by chance and requires an explanation. Here, we studied the distribution of HLA-DQ αβ heterodimers in 334 Italian children with T1DM, ATD and CD alone or in association and in 224 Italian healthy controls. In particular, 164 patients had T1DM (133 alone, 20+ATD, 7+CD and 4+CD+ATD), 118 had ATD (110 alone, 8+CD) and 52 had CD (40 alone, 11+ATD and 1+T1DM). 51 patients suffered from multiple autoimmune diseases. The risk for multiple autoimmune diseases was significantly associated with the increased number of HLA-DQ markers of susceptibility for both T1DM (p = 0.003) and CD (p = 0.006). The presence of one or more diabetogenic DQ molecules significantly increased the probability of developing not only T1DM (p < 0.001) but also CD (p < 0.001) and ATD (p = 0.001). Similarly, the presence of one or more celiac HLA-DQ heterodimers significantly increased the likelihood of developing not only CD (p < 0.001), but also T1DM (p < 0.001) and ATD (p < 0.001). We confirm that the sharing of the immunogenetic background is responsible for the development of multiple autoimmune diseases although with a different risk according to the number and type of susceptible HLA-DQ heterodimers as reported in the algorithm proposed here. It is likely that combinations of DQA1 and DQB1 alleles are the real culprits of the progression towards multiple autoimmune diseases and HLA-DQ genomic typing will improve the capability to predict associated autoimmune diseases in infancy.

  19. Signature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyati, Vittal P.

    The reduction of vehicle radar signature is accomplished by means of vehicle shaping, the use of microwave frequencies-absorbent materials, and either passive or active cancellation techniques; such techniques are also useful in the reduction of propulsion system-associated IR emissions. In some anticipated scenarios, the objective is not signature-reduction but signature control, for deception, via decoy vehicles that mimic the signature characteristics of actual weapons systems. As the stealthiness of airframes and missiles increases, their propulsion systems' exhaust plumes assume a more important role in detection by an adversary.

  20. Noninvasive imaging of multiple myeloma using near infrared fluorescent molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Bollerman-Nowlis, Alex; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by monoclonal gammopathy and osteolytic bone lesions. Multiple myeloma is most commonly diagnosed in late disease stages, presenting with pathologic fracture. Early diagnosis and monitoring of disease status may improve quality of life and long-term survival for multiple myeloma patients from what is now a devastating and fatal disease. We have developed a near-infrared targeted fluorescent molecular probe with high affinity to the α4β1 integrin receptor (VLA-4)overexpressed by a majority of multiple myeloma cells as a non-radioactive analog to PET/CT tracer currently being developed for human diagnostics. A near-infrared dye that emits about 700 nm was conjugated to a high affinity peptidomimmetic. Binding affinity and specificity for multiple myeloma cells was investigated in vitro by tissue staining and flow cytometry. After demonstration of sensitivity and specificity, preclinical optical imaging studies were performed to evaluate tumor specificity in murine subcutaneous and metastatic multiple myeloma models. The VLA-4-targeted molecular probe showed high affinity for subcutaneous MM tumor xenografts. Importantly, tumor cells specific accumulation in the bone marrow of metastatic multiple myeloma correlated with GFP signal from transfected cells. Ex vivo flow cytometry of tumor tissue and bone marrow further corroborated in vivo imaging data, demonstrating the specificity of the novel agent and potential for quantitative imaging of multiple myeloma burden in these models.

  1. Resolving Multiple Molecular Orbitals Using Two-Dimensional High-Harmonic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hyeok; Lee, Kyung-Min; Sung, Jae Hee; Kim, Kyung Taec; Kim, Hyung Taek; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-04-01

    High-harmonic radiation emitted from molecules in a strong laser field contains information on molecular structure and dynamics. When multiple molecular orbitals participate in high-harmonic generation, resolving the contribution of each orbital is crucial for understanding molecular dynamics and for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to more complicated molecules. We show that two-dimensional high-harmonic spectroscopy can resolve high-harmonic radiation emitted from the two highest-occupied molecular orbitals, HOMO and HOMO-1, of aligned molecules. By the application of an orthogonally polarized two-color laser field that consists of the fundamental and its second-harmonic fields to aligned CO2 molecules, the characteristics attributed to the two orbitals are found to be separately imprinted in odd and even harmonics. Two-dimensional high-harmonic spectroscopy may open a new route to investigate ultrafast molecular dynamics during chemical processes.

  2. Resolving multiple molecular orbitals using two-dimensional high-harmonic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyeok; Lee, Kyung-Min; Sung, Jae Hee; Kim, Kyung Taec; Kim, Hyung Taek; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-04-17

    High-harmonic radiation emitted from molecules in a strong laser field contains information on molecular structure and dynamics. When multiple molecular orbitals participate in high-harmonic generation, resolving the contribution of each orbital is crucial for understanding molecular dynamics and for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to more complicated molecules. We show that two-dimensional high-harmonic spectroscopy can resolve high-harmonic radiation emitted from the two highest-occupied molecular orbitals, HOMO and HOMO-1, of aligned molecules. By the application of an orthogonally polarized two-color laser field that consists of the fundamental and its second-harmonic fields to aligned CO2 molecules, the characteristics attributed to the two orbitals are found to be separately imprinted in odd and even harmonics. Two-dimensional high-harmonic spectroscopy may open a new route to investigate ultrafast molecular dynamics during chemical processes.

  3. Overexpression of ERG in cord blood progenitors promotes expansion and recapitulates molecular signatures of high ERG leukemias.

    PubMed

    Tursky, M L; Beck, D; Thoms, J A I; Huang, Y; Kumari, A; Unnikrishnan, A; Knezevic, K; Evans, K; Richards, L A; Lee, E; Morris, J; Goldberg, L; Izraeli, S; Wong, J W H; Olivier, J; Lock, R B; MacKenzie, K L; Pimanda, J E

    2015-04-01

    High expression of the ETS family transcription factor ERG is associated with poor clinical outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). In murine models, high ERG expression induces both T-ALL and AML. However, no study to date has defined the effect of high ERG expression on primary human hematopoietic cells. In the present study, human CD34+ cells were transduced with retroviral vectors to elevate ERG gene expression to levels detected in high ERG AML. RNA sequencing was performed on purified populations of transduced cells to define the effects of high ERG on gene expression in human CD34+ cells. Integration of the genome-wide expression data with other data sets revealed that high ERG drives an expression signature that shares features of normal hematopoietic stem cells, high ERG AMLs, early T-cell precursor-ALLs and leukemic stem cell signatures associated with poor clinical outcome. Functional assays linked this gene expression profile to enhanced progenitor cell expansion. These results support a model whereby a stem cell gene expression network driven by high ERG in human cells enhances the expansion of the progenitor pool, providing opportunity for the acquisition and propagation of mutations and the development of leukemia.

  4. Strategy to Find Molecular Signatures in a Small Series of Rare Cancers: Validation for Radiation-Induced Breast and Thyroid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lefevre, Emilie; Benhabiles, Nora; Hofman, Paul; Schlumberger, Martin; Chevillard, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Methods of classification using transcriptome analysis for case-by-case tumor diagnosis could be limited by tumor heterogeneity and masked information in the gene expression profiles, especially as the number of tumors is small. We propose a new strategy, EMts_2PCA, based on: 1) The identification of a gene expression signature with a great potential for discriminating subgroups of tumors (EMts stage), which includes: a) a learning step, based on an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, to select sets of candidate genes whose expressions discriminate two subgroups, b) a training step to select from the sets of candidate genes those with the highest potential to classify training tumors, c) the compilation of genes selected during the training step, and standardization of their levels of expression to finalize the signature. 2) The predictive classification of independent prospective tumors, according to the two subgroups of interest, by the definition of a validation space based on a two-step principal component analysis (2PCA). The present method was evaluated by classifying three series of tumors and its robustness, in terms of tumor clustering and prediction, was further compared with that of three classification methods (Gene expression bar code, Top-scoring pair(s) and a PCA-based method). Results showed that EMts_2PCA was very efficient in tumor classification and prediction, with scores always better that those obtained by the most common methods of tumor clustering. Specifically, EMts_2PCA permitted identification of highly discriminating molecular signatures to differentiate post-Chernobyl thyroid or post-radiotherapy breast tumors from their sporadic counterparts that were previously unsuccessfully classified or classified with errors. PMID:21853153

  5. SignS: a parallelized, open-source, freely available, web-based tool for gene selection and molecular signatures for survival and censored data

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Uriarte, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Background Censored data are increasingly common in many microarray studies that attempt to relate gene expression to patient survival. Several new methods have been proposed in the last two years. Most of these methods, however, are not available to biomedical researchers, leading to many re-implementations from scratch of ad-hoc, and suboptimal, approaches with survival data. Results We have developed SignS (Signatures for Survival data), an open-source, freely-available, web-based tool and R package for gene selection, building molecular signatures, and prediction with survival data. SignS implements four methods which, according to existing reviews, perform well and, by being of a very different nature, offer complementary approaches. We use parallel computing via MPI, leading to large decreases in user waiting time. Cross-validation is used to asses predictive performance and stability of solutions, the latter an issue of increasing concern given that there are often several solutions with similar predictive performance. Biological interpretation of results is enhanced because genes and signatures in models can be sent to other freely-available on-line tools for examination of PubMed references, GO terms, and KEGG and Reactome pathways of selected genes. Conclusion SignS is the first web-based tool for survival analysis of expression data, and one of the very few with biomedical researchers as target users. SignS is also one of the few bioinformatics web-based applications to extensively use parallelization, including fault tolerance and crash recovery. Because of its combination of methods implemented, usage of parallel computing, code availability, and links to additional data bases, SignS is a unique tool, and will be of immediate relevance to biomedical researchers, biostatisticians and bioinformaticians. PMID:18208605

  6. Placental mitochondrial DNA and CYP1A1 gene methylation as molecular signatures for tobacco smoke exposure in pregnant women and the relevance for birth weight.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Bram G; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Byun, Hyang-Min; Roels, Harry A; Cuypers, Ann; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Nawrot, Tim S

    2017-01-04

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy results in an increased risk of low birth weight through perturbations in the utero-placental exchange. Epigenetics and mitochondrial function in fetal tissues might be molecular signatures responsive to in utero tobacco smoke exposure. In the framework of the ENVIRONAGE birth cohort, we investigated the effect of self-reported tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy on birth weight and the relation with placental tissue markers such as, (1) relative mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content as determined by real-time quantitative PCR, (2) DNA methylation of specific loci of mtDNA (D-loop and MT-RNR1), and (3) DNA methylation of the biotransformation gene CYP1A1 (the last two determined by bisulfite-pyrosequencing). The total pregnant mother sample included 255 non-smokers, 65 former-smokers who had quit smoking before pregnancy, and 62 smokers who continued smoking during pregnancy. Smokers delivered newborns with a birth weight on average 208 g lower [95% confidence interval (CI) -318 to -99, p = 0.0002] than mothers who did not smoke during pregnancy. In the smoker group, the relative mtDNA content was lower (-21.6%, 95% CI -35.4 to -4.9%, p = 0.01) than in the non-smoker group; whereas, absolute mtDNA methylation levels of MT-RNR1 were higher (+0.62%, 95% CI 0.21 to 1.02%, p = 0.003). Lower CpG-specific methylation of CYP1A1 in placental tissue (-4.57%, 95% CI -7.15 to -1.98%, p < 0.0001) were observed in smokers compared with non-smokers. Nevertheless, no mediation of CYP1A1 methylation nor any other investigated molecular signature was observed for the association between tobacco smoke exposure and birth weight. mtDNA content, methylation of specific loci of mtDNA, and CYP1A1 methylation in placental tissue may serve as molecular signatures for the association between gestational tobacco smoke exposure and low birth weight.

  7. Primary multiple sulfur isotopic compositions of pyrite in 2.7 Ga shales from the Joy Lake sequence (Superior Province) show felsic volcanic array-like signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianghanyang; Zhang, Zhe; Stern, Richard A.; Hannah, Judith L.; Stein, Holly J.; Yang, Gang; Li, Long

    2017-04-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes provide a powerful tool to study photochemical and biological processes controlling the Archean sulfur cycle and infer related atmospheric and marine environments. However, our understanding of early Earth's environment remains limited by the availability of well-preserved geological samples, as most Archean sedimentary rocks have experienced some degree of metamorphic alteration. To evaluate sulfur isotopic behavior during post-depositional processes and elucidate the sulfur cycle at 2.7 Ga, we use high-resolution in situ analytical techniques (EPMA and SIMS) to determine elemental compositions and multiple sulfur isotopic compositions of large diagenetic pyrite nodules and fine-grained secondary pyrite disseminated in quartz veins (formed during a lower greenschist metamorphic event) in shales from the 2.7 Ga Joy Lake sequence in the southwest Superior Province. Results show that trace metals and sulfur in the secondary pyrite were derived from both metamorphic fluid and pre-existing diagenetic pyrite. Diagenetic pyrite nodules could have been partially dissolved by metamorphic fluid. But the surviving nodules show elemental and isotopic features different from those of the deduced metamorphic fluid endmember, suggesting the nodules were not geochemically altered by metamorphism, and thus preserve primary isotopic signatures acquired during diagenesis. The sulfur isotopic ratios of pyrite nodules show strong variations, with decreasing δ34S values and increasing Δ33S values from cores to rims. This negative Δ33S-δ34S relationship is different from the commonly observed 'Archean reference line' defined by most Archean pyrite data, but similar to the 'felsic volcanic array'. Our observation provides a first possible case from 2.7 Ga, the age of peak crustal growth in the Archean, to support the hypothesis that photochemical pathways could be different under conditions of intense volcanic emission. This study also shows that high

  8. MULTIPLE FAST MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN THE PRE-PLANETARY NEBULA CRL 618

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Huang, Po-Sheng; Sahai, Raghvendra; Sánchez Contreras, Carmen; Tay, Jeremy Jian Hao

    2013-11-01

    CRL 618 is a well-studied pre-planetary nebula. It has multiple highly collimated optical lobes, fast molecular outflows along the optical lobes, and an extended molecular envelope that consists of a dense torus in the equator and a tenuous round halo. Here we present our observations of this source in CO J = 3-2 and HCN J = 4-3 obtained with the Submillimeter Array at up to ∼0.''3 resolutions. We spatially resolve the fast molecular outflow region previously detected in CO near the central star and find it to be composed of multiple outflows that have similar dynamical ages and are oriented along the different optical lobes. We also detect fast molecular outflows further away from the central star near the tips of the extended optical lobes and a pair of equatorial outflows inside the dense torus. We find that two episodes of bullet ejections in different directions are needed, one producing the fast molecular outflows near the central star and one producing the fast molecular outflows near the tips of the extended optical lobes. One possibility to launch these bullets is a magneto-rotational explosion of the stellar envelope.

  9. Complete protection against aflatoxin B(1)-induced liver cancer with a triterpenoid: DNA adduct dosimetry, molecular signature, and genotoxicity threshold.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Natalie M; Egner, Patricia A; Baxter, Victoria K; Sporn, Michael B; Wible, Ryan S; Sutter, Thomas R; Groopman, John D; Kensler, Thomas W; Roebuck, Bill D

    2014-07-01

    In experimental animals and humans, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a potent hepatic toxin and carcinogen. The synthetic oleanane triterpenoid 1-[2-cyano-3-,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oyl]imidazole (CDDO-Im), a powerful activator of Keap1-Nrf2 signaling, protects against AFB1-induced toxicity and preneoplastic lesion formation (GST-P-positive foci). This study assessed and mechanistically characterized the chemoprotective efficacy of CDDO-Im against AFB1-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A lifetime cancer bioassay was undertaken in F344 rats dosed with AFB1 (200 μg/kg rat/day) for four weeks and receiving either vehicle or CDDO-Im (three times weekly), one week before and throughout the exposure period. Weekly, 24-hour urine samples were collected for analysis of AFB1 metabolites. In a subset of rats, livers were analyzed for GST-P foci. The comparative response of a toxicogenomic RNA expression signature for AFB1 was examined. CDDO-Im completely protected (0/20) against AFB1-induced liver cancer compared with a 96% incidence (22/23) observed in the AFB1 group. With CDDO-Im treatment, integrated level of urinary AFB1-N(7)-guanine was significantly reduced (66%) and aflatoxin-N-acetylcysteine, a detoxication product, was consistently elevated (300%) after the first AFB1 dose. In AFB1-treated rats, the hepatic burden of GST-P-positive foci increased substantially (0%-13.8%) over the four weeks, but was largely absent with CDDO-Im intervention. The toxicogenomic RNA expression signature characteristic of AFB1 was absent in the AFB1 + CDDO-Im-treated rats. The remarkable efficacy of CDDO-Im as an anticarcinogen is established even in the face of a significant aflatoxin adduct burden. Consequently, the absence of cancer requires a concept of a threshold for DNA damage for cancer development. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Epidemic and maintenance of rabies in Chinese ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) indicated by epidemiology and the molecular signatures of rabies viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shoufeng; Liu, Ye; Hou, Yanli; Zhao, Jinghui; Zhang, Fei; Wang, Ying; Hu, Rongliang

    2013-06-01

    An epidemic of Chinese ferret badger-associated human rabies was investigated in Wuyuan county, Jiangxi province and rabies viruses isolates from ferret badgers in different districts in Jiangxi and Zhejiang provinces were sequenced with their nucleotides and amino acids and aligned for epidemiological analysis. The results showed that the human rabies in Wuyuan are only associated with ferret badger bites; the rabies virus can be isolated in a high percentage of ferret badgers in the epidemic areas in Jiangxi and Zhejiang provinces; the isolates share the same molecular features in nucleotides and have characteristic amino acid signatures, i.e., 2 sites in the nucleoprotein and 3 sites in the glycoprotein, that are distinct from virus isolates from dogs in the same region. We conclude that rabies in Chinese ferret badgers has formed an independent transmission cycle and ferret badgers may serve as another important rabies reservoir independent of dog rabies in China.

  11. Switchable Multiple Spin States in the Kondo description of Doped Molecular Magnets

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Rajyavardhan; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    We show that introducing electrons in magnetic clusters and molecular magnets lead to rich phase diagrams with a variety of low-spin and high-spin states allowing for multiple switchability. The analysis is carried out for a quantum spin-fermion model using the exact diagonalization, and the cluster mean-field approach. The model is relevant for a number of molecular magnets with triangular motifs consisting of transition metal ions such as Cr, Cu and V. Re-entrant spin-state behavior and chirality on-off transitions exist over a wide parameter regime. A subtle competition among geometrical frustration effects, electron itinerancy, and Kondo coupling at the molecular level is highlighted. Our results demonstrate that electron doping provides a viable mean to tame the magnetic properties of molecular magnets towards potential technological applications. PMID:28176869

  12. Switchable Multiple Spin States in the Kondo description of Doped Molecular Magnets.

    PubMed

    Ray, Rajyavardhan; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-02-08

    We show that introducing electrons in magnetic clusters and molecular magnets lead to rich phase diagrams with a variety of low-spin and high-spin states allowing for multiple switchability. The analysis is carried out for a quantum spin-fermion model using the exact diagonalization, and the cluster mean-field approach. The model is relevant for a number of molecular magnets with triangular motifs consisting of transition metal ions such as Cr, Cu and V. Re-entrant spin-state behavior and chirality on-off transitions exist over a wide parameter regime. A subtle competition among geometrical frustration effects, electron itinerancy, and Kondo coupling at the molecular level is highlighted. Our results demonstrate that electron doping provides a viable mean to tame the magnetic properties of molecular magnets towards potential technological applications.

  13. Switchable Multiple Spin States in the Kondo description of Doped Molecular Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Rajyavardhan; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-02-01

    We show that introducing electrons in magnetic clusters and molecular magnets lead to rich phase diagrams with a variety of low-spin and high-spin states allowing for multiple switchability. The analysis is carried out for a quantum spin-fermion model using the exact diagonalization, and the cluster mean-field approach. The model is relevant for a number of molecular magnets with triangular motifs consisting of transition metal ions such as Cr, Cu and V. Re-entrant spin-state behavior and chirality on-off transitions exist over a wide parameter regime. A subtle competition among geometrical frustration effects, electron itinerancy, and Kondo coupling at the molecular level is highlighted. Our results demonstrate that electron doping provides a viable mean to tame the magnetic properties of molecular magnets towards potential technological applications.

  14. Transcriptome profile analysis of flowering molecular processes of early flowering trifoliate orange mutant and the wild-type [Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.] by massively parallel signature sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background After several years in the juvenile phase, trees undergo flowering transition to become mature (florally competent) trees. This transition depends on the balanced expression of a complex network of genes that is regulated by both endogenous and environmental factors. However, relatively little is known about the molecular processes regulating flowering transition in woody plants compared with herbaceous plants. Results Comparative transcript profiling of spring shoots after self-pruning was performed on a spontaneously early flowering trifoliate orange mutant (precocious trifoliate orange, Poncirus trifoliata) with a short juvenile phase and the wild-type (WT) tree by using massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS). A total of 16,564,500 and 16,235,952 high quality reads were obtained for the WT and the mutant (MT), respectively. Interpretation of the MPSS signatures revealed that the total number of transcribed genes in the MT (31,468) was larger than in the WT (29,864), suggesting that newly initiated transcription occurs in the MT. Further comparison of the transcripts revealed that 2735 genes had more than twofold expression difference in the MT compared with the WT. In addition, we identified 110 citrus flowering-time genes homologous with known elements of flowering-time pathways through sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. These genes are highly conserved in citrus and other species, suggesting that the functions of the related proteins in controlling reproductive development may be conserved as well. Conclusion Our results provide a foundation for comparative gene expression studies between WT and precocious trifoliate orange. Additionally, a number of candidate genes required for the early flowering process of precocious trifoliate orange were identified. These results provide new insight into the molecular processes regulating flowering time in citrus. PMID:21269450

  15. Communication: Multiple-timestep ab initio molecular dynamics with electron correlation.

    PubMed

    Steele, Ryan P

    2013-07-07

    A time-reversible, multiple-timestep protocol is presented for ab initio molecular dynamics simulations using correlated, wavefunction-based underlying potentials. The method is motivated by the observation that electron correlation contributions to forces vary on a slower timescale than their Hartree-Fock counterparts. An efficient dynamics algorithm, involving short-timestep Hartree-Fock and long-timestep Moøller-Plesset perturbation theory, is presented and tested. Results indicate stable trajectories and relative speedups comparable to those seen in force field-based multiple-timestep schemes, with the highest efficiency improvement occurring for large systems.

  16. Communication: Multiple-timestep ab initio molecular dynamics with electron correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Ryan P.

    2013-07-01

    A time-reversible, multiple-timestep protocol is presented for ab initio molecular dynamics simulations using correlated, wavefunction-based underlying potentials. The method is motivated by the observation that electron correlation contributions to forces vary on a slower timescale than their Hartree-Fock counterparts. An efficient dynamics algorithm, involving short-timestep Hartree-Fock and long-timestep Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, is presented and tested. Results indicate stable trajectories and relative speedups comparable to those seen in force field-based multiple-timestep schemes, with the highest efficiency improvement occurring for large systems.

  17. Identifying molecular signatures of hypoxia adaptation from sex chromosomes: A case for Tibetan Mastiff based on analyses of X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Liu, Yan-Hu; Wang, Guo-Dong; Yang, Chun-Tao; Otecko, Newton O; Liu, Fei; Wu, Shi-Fang; Wang, Lu; Yu, Li; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2016-10-07

    Genome-wide studies on high-altitude adaptation have received increased attention as a classical case of organismal evolution under extreme environment. However, the current genetic understanding of high-altitude adaptation emanated mainly from autosomal analyses. Only a few earlier genomic studies paid attention to the allosome. In this study, we performed an intensive scan of the X chromosome of public genomic data generated from Tibetan Mastiff (TM) and five other dog populations for indications of high-altitude adaptation. We identified five genes showing signatures of selection on the X chromosome. Notable among these genes was angiomotin (AMOT), which is related to the process of angiogenesis. We sampled additional 11 dog populations (175 individuals in total) at continuous altitudes in China from 300 to 4,000 meters to validate and test the association between the haplotype frequency of AMOT gene and altitude adaptation. The results suggest that AMOT gene may be a notable candidate gene for the adaptation of TM to high-altitude hypoxic conditions. Our study shows that X chromosome deserves consideration in future studies of adaptive evolution.

  18. Identifying molecular signatures of hypoxia adaptation from sex chromosomes: A case for Tibetan Mastiff based on analyses of X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Liu, Yan-Hu; Wang, Guo-Dong; Yang, Chun-Tao; Otecko, Newton O.; Liu, Fei; Wu, Shi-Fang; Wang, Lu; Yu, Li; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide studies on high-altitude adaptation have received increased attention as a classical case of organismal evolution under extreme environment. However, the current genetic understanding of high-altitude adaptation emanated mainly from autosomal analyses. Only a few earlier genomic studies paid attention to the allosome. In this study, we performed an intensive scan of the X chromosome of public genomic data generated from Tibetan Mastiff (TM) and five other dog populations for indications of high-altitude adaptation. We identified five genes showing signatures of selection on the X chromosome. Notable among these genes was angiomotin (AMOT), which is related to the process of angiogenesis. We sampled additional 11 dog populations (175 individuals in total) at continuous altitudes in China from 300 to 4,000 meters to validate and test the association between the haplotype frequency of AMOT gene and altitude adaptation. The results suggest that AMOT gene may be a notable candidate gene for the adaptation of TM to high-altitude hypoxic conditions. Our study shows that X chromosome deserves consideration in future studies of adaptive evolution. PMID:27713520

  19. A Novel Molecular and Functional Stemness Signature Assessing Human Cord Blood-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cell Immaturity

    PubMed Central

    Pascaud, Juliette; Driancourt, Catherine; Boyer-Di-Ponio, Julie; Uzan, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs), a distinct population of Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) progeny, display phenotypic and functional characteristics of endothelial cells while retaining features of stem/progenitor cells. Cord blood-derived ECFCs (CB-ECFCs) have a high clonogenic and proliferative potentials and they can acquire different endothelial phenotypes, this requiring some plasticity. These properties provide angiogenic and vascular repair capabilities to CB-ECFCs for ischemic cell therapies. However, the degree of immaturity retained by EPCs is still confused and poorly defined. Consequently, to better characterize CB-ECFC stemness, we quantified their clonogenic potential and demonstrated that they were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) more efficiently and rapidly than adult endothelial cells. Moreover, we analyzed the transcriptional profile of a broad gene panel known to be related to stem cells. We showed that, unlike mature endothelial cells, CB-ECFCs expressed genes involved in the maintenance of embryonic stem cell properties such as DNMT3B, GDF3 or SOX2. Thus, these results provide further evidence and tools to appreciate EPC-derived cell stemness. Moreover this novel stem cell transcriptional signature of ECFCs could help better characterizing and ranging EPCs according to their immaturity profile. PMID:27043207

  20. Robust Selection of Cancer Survival Signatures from High-Throughput Genomic Data Using Two-Fold Subsampling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangkyun; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Lang, Michel; De Preter, Katleen; Mestdagh, Pieter; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Stallings, Raymond L.; Varesio, Luigi; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Schulte, Johannes H.; Fielitz, Kathrin; Schwermer, Melanie; Morik, Katharina; Schramm, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Identifying relevant signatures for clinical patient outcome is a fundamental task in high-throughput studies. Signatures, composed of features such as mRNAs, miRNAs, SNPs or other molecular variables, are often non-overlapping, even though they have been identified from similar experiments considering samples with the same type of disease. The lack of a consensus is mostly due to the fact that sample sizes are far smaller than the numbers of candidate features to be considered, and therefore signature selection suffers from large variation. We propose a robust signature selection method that enhances the selection stability of penalized regression algorithms for predicting survival risk. Our method is based on an aggregation of multiple, possibly unstable, signatures obtained with the preconditioned lasso algorithm applied to random (internal) subsamples of a given cohort data, where the aggregated signature is shrunken by a simple thresholding strategy. The resulting method, RS-PL, is conceptually simple and easy to apply, relying on parameters automatically tuned by cross validation. Robust signature selection using RS-PL operates within an (external) subsampling framework to estimate the selection probabilities of features in multiple trials of RS-PL. These probabilities are used for identifying reliable features to be included in a signature. Our method was evaluated on microarray data sets from neuroblastoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and breast cancer patients, extracting robust and relevant signatures for predicting survival risk. Signatures obtained by our method achieved high prediction performance and robustness, consistently over the three data sets. Genes with high selection probability in our robust signatures have been reported as cancer-relevant. The ordering of predictor coefficients associated with signatures was well-preserved across multiple trials of RS-PL, demonstrating the capability of our method for identifying a transferable consensus signature

  1. Molecular Scale Theoretical Studies of Energy Deposition and Redistribution in Crystalline High Explosives to Stimulate Enhanced Detectable Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-07

    T» .1 15. SUBJECT TERMS Terahertz spectroscopy, Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate, PETN, Molecular dynamics, Vibrational energy transfer, Infrared...2009). Terahertz spectrum and normal- mode relaxation in pentaerythritol tetranitrate: Effect of changes in bond-stretching force field terms. Andrey...Pereverzev and Thomas D. Sewell. Journal of Chemical Physics 134, 224502 (2011). Terahertz spectrum and normal- mode relaxation in pentaerythritol

  2. THE VLA NASCENT DISK AND MULTIPLICITY SURVEY OF PERSEUS PROTOSTARS (VANDAM). II. MULTIPLICITY OF PROTOSTARS IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Harris, Robert J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Perez, Laura; Dunham, Michael M.; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Melis, Carl; Kratter, Kaitlin

    2016-02-10

    We present a multiplicity study of all known protostars (94) in the Perseus molecular cloud from a Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array survey at Ka-band (8 mm and 1 cm) and C-band (4 and 6.6 cm). The observed sample has a bolometric luminosity range between 0.1 L{sub ⊙} and ∼33 L{sub ⊙}, with a median of 0.7 L{sub ⊙}. This multiplicity study is based on the Ka-band data, having a best resolution of ∼0.″065 (15 au) and separations out to ∼43″ (10,000 au) can be probed. The overall multiplicity fraction (MF) is found to be 0.40 ± 0.06 and the companion star fraction (CSF) is 0.71 ± 0.06. The MF and CSF of the Class 0 protostars are 0.57 ± 0.09 and 1.2 ± 0.2, and the MF and CSF of Class I protostars are both 0.23 ± 0.08. The distribution of companion separations appears bi-modal, with a peak at ∼75 au and another peak at ∼3000 au. Turbulent fragmentation is likely the dominant mechanism on >1000 au scales and disk fragmentation is likely to be the dominant mechanism on <200 au scales. Toward three Class 0 sources we find companions separated by <30 au. These systems have the smallest separations of currently known Class 0 protostellar binary systems. Moreover, these close systems are embedded within larger (50–400 au) structures and may be candidates for ongoing disk fragmentation.

  3. The VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity Survey of Perseus Protostars (VANDAM). II. Multiplicity of Protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Dunham, Michael M.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Melis, Carl; Harris, Robert J.; Kratter, Kaitlin; Perez, Laura

    2016-02-01

    We present a multiplicity study of all known protostars (94) in the Perseus molecular cloud from a Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array survey at Ka-band (8 mm and 1 cm) and C-band (4 and 6.6 cm). The observed sample has a bolometric luminosity range between 0.1 L⊙ and ˜33 L⊙, with a median of 0.7 L⊙. This multiplicity study is based on the Ka-band data, having a best resolution of ˜0.″065 (15 au) and separations out to ˜43″ (10,000 au) can be probed. The overall multiplicity fraction (MF) is found to be 0.40 ± 0.06 and the companion star fraction (CSF) is 0.71 ± 0.06. The MF and CSF of the Class 0 protostars are 0.57 ± 0.09 and 1.2 ± 0.2, and the MF and CSF of Class I protostars are both 0.23 ± 0.08. The distribution of companion separations appears bi-modal, with a peak at ˜75 au and another peak at ˜3000 au. Turbulent fragmentation is likely the dominant mechanism on >1000 au scales and disk fragmentation is likely to be the dominant mechanism on <200 au scales. Toward three Class 0 sources we find companions separated by <30 au. These systems have the smallest separations of currently known Class 0 protostellar binary systems. Moreover, these close systems are embedded within larger (50-400 au) structures and may be candidates for ongoing disk fragmentation.

  4. May Diet and Dietary Supplements Improve the Wellness of Multiple Sclerosis Patients? A Molecular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex and multifactorial neurological disease, and nutrition is one of the environmental factors possibly involved in its pathogenesis. At present, the role of nutrition is unclear, and MS therapy is not associated to a particular diet. MS clinical trials based on specific diets or dietary supplements are very few and in some cases controversial. To understand how diet can influence the course of MS and improve the wellness of MS patients, it is necessary to identify the dietary molecules, their targets and the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of the disease. The aim of this paper is to provide a molecular basis for the nutritional intervention in MS by evaluating at molecular level the effect of dietary molecules on the inflammatory and autoimmune processes involved in the disease. PMID:21461338

  5. Gene trio signatures as molecular markers to predict response to doxorubicin cyclophosphamide neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Barros Filho, M C; Katayama, M L H; Brentani, H; Abreu, A P S; Barbosa, E M; Oliveira, C T; Góes, J C S; Brentani, M M; Folgueira, M A A K

    2010-12-01

    In breast cancer patients submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (4 cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide, AC), expression of groups of three genes (gene trio signatures) could distinguish responsive from non-responsive tumors, as demonstrated by cDNA microarray profiling in a previous study by our group. In the current study, we determined if the expression of the same genes would retain the predictive strength, when analyzed by a more accessible technique (real-time RT-PCR). We evaluated 28 samples already analyzed by cDNA microarray, as a technical validation procedure, and 14 tumors, as an independent biological validation set. All patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (4 AC). Among five trio combinations previously identified, defined by nine genes individually investigated (BZRP, CLPTM1, MTSS1, NOTCH1, NUP210, PRSS11, RPL37A, SMYD2, and XLHSRF-1), the most accurate were established by RPL37A, XLHSRF-1 based trios, with NOTCH1 or NUP210. Both trios correctly separated 86% of tumors (87% sensitivity and 80% specificity for predicting response), according to their response to chemotherapy (82% in a leave-one-out cross-validation method). Using the pre-established features obtained by linear discriminant analysis, 71% samples from the biological validation set were also correctly classified by both trios (72% sensitivity; 66% specificity). Furthermore, we explored other gene combinations to achieve a higher accuracy in the technical validation group (as a training set). A new trio, MTSS1, RPL37 and SMYD2, correctly classified 93% of samples from the technical validation group (95% sensitivity and 80% specificity; 86% accuracy by the cross-validation method) and 79% from the biological validation group (72% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Therefore, the combined expression of MTSS1, RPL37 and SMYD2, as evaluated by real-time RT-PCR, is a potential candidate to predict response to neoadjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide in breast cancer patients.

  6. Genome-Wide Profiling of Pluripotent Cells Reveals a Unique Molecular Signature of Human Embryonic Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pashai, Nikta; Hao, Haiping; All, Angelo; Gupta, Siddharth; Chaerkady, Raghothama; De Los Angeles, Alejandro; Gearhart, John D.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic germ cells (EGCs) provide a powerful model for identifying molecules involved in the pluripotent state when compared to their progenitors, primordial germ cells (PGCs), and other pluripotent stem cells. Microarray and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) reveals for the first time that human EGCs possess a transcription profile distinct from PGCs and other pluripotent stem cells. Validation with qRT-PCR confirms that human EGCs and PGCs express many pluripotency-associated genes but with quantifiable differences compared to pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs), and embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs). Analyses also identified a number of target genes that may be potentially associated with their unique pluripotent states. These include IPO7, MED7, RBM26, HSPD1, and KRAS which were upregulated in EGCs along with other pluripotent stem cells when compared to PGCs. Other potential target genes were also found which may contribute toward a primed ESC-like state. These genes were exclusively up-regulated in ESCs, IPSCs and ECCs including PARP1, CCNE1, CDK6, AURKA, MAD2L1, CCNG1, and CCNB1 which are involved in cell cycle regulation, cellular metabolism and DNA repair and replication. Gene classification analysis also confirmed that the distinguishing feature of EGCs compared to ESCs, ECCs, and IPSCs lies primarily in their genetic contribution to cellular metabolism, cell cycle, and cell adhesion. In contrast, several genes were found upregulated in PGCs which may help distinguish their unipotent state including HBA1, DMRT1, SPANXA1, and EHD2. Together, these findings provide the first glimpse into a unique genomic signature of human germ cells and pluripotent stem cells and provide genes potentially involved in defining different states of germ-line pluripotency. PMID:22737227

  7. Integrated Molecular Signature of Disease: Analysis of Influenza Virus-Infected Macaques through Functional Genomics and Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Baas, T.; Baskin, C. R.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Garcia-Sastre, A.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H.; Tumpey, T. M.; Thomas, M. J.; Carter, V. S.; Teal, T. H.; Van Hoven, N.; Proll, Sean; Jacobs, Jon M.; Caldwell, Z.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hukkanen, R.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2006-11-01

    Recent outbreaks of avian influenza in humans have stressed the need for an improved non-human primate model of influenza pathogenesis. In order to develop our macaque model, we expanded our in vivo and functional genomics experiments: We focused on the innate immune response at day 2 post-inoculation and on gene expression in affected lung tissue with viral genetic material present; finally, we sought to identify signature genes for early infection in whole blood. For these purposes, we infected six pigtailed macaques with 107 TCID50 of influenza A/Texas/36/91 virus and three control animals with a sham inoculate. We sacrificed one control and two experimental animals at day 2, 4, and 7 and lung tissue was harvested for pathology, gene expression profiling, and proteomics. Additionally, blood was collected for genomics every other day from each animal until its endpoint. Gross and microscopic pathology, immunohistochemistry, viral gene expression by arrays and/or quantitative real-time RT-PCR confirmed successful yet mild infection in all experimental animals. Genomic experiments were performed using second generation macaque-specific oligonucleotide arrays and high-throughput proteomics revealed host response to infection at the protein level. Our data showed dramatic differences in gene expression within the same influenza-induced lesion based on the presence or absence of viral mRNA. We also identified genes tightly co-regulated in peripheral white blood cells and in lung tissue at day 2 post-inoculation. This latter finding opens the possibility of using gene expression arrays on whole blood to detect infection after exposure but prior to onset of symptoms or shedding.

  8. BRAF inhibitors reverse the unique molecular signature and phenotype of hairy cell leukemia and exert potent antileukemic activity.

    PubMed

    Pettirossi, Valentina; Santi, Alessia; Imperi, Elisa; Russo, Guido; Pucciarini, Alessandra; Bigerna, Barbara; Schiavoni, Gianluca; Fortini, Elisabetta; Spanhol-Rosseto, Ariele; Sportoletti, Paolo; Mannucci, Roberta; Martelli, Maria Paola; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Falini, Brunangelo; Tiacci, Enrico

    2015-02-19

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) shows unique clinicopathological and biological features. HCL responds well to purine analogs but relapses are frequent and novel therapies are required. BRAF-V600E is the key driver mutation in HCL and distinguishes it from other B-cell lymphomas, including HCL-like leukemias/lymphomas (HCL-variant and splenic marginal zone lymphoma). The kinase-activating BRAF-V600E mutation also represents an ideal therapeutic target in HCL. Here, we investigated the biological and therapeutic importance of the activated BRAF-mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in HCL by exposing in vitro primary leukemic cells purified from 26 patients to clinically available BRAF (vemurafenib; dabrafenib) or MEK (trametinib) inhibitors. Results were validated in vivo in samples from vemurafenib-treated HCL patients within a phase 2 clinical trial. BRAF and MEK inhibitors caused, specifically in HCL (but not HCL-like) cells, marked MEK/ERK dephosphorylation, silencing of the BRAF-MEK-ERK pathway transcriptional output, loss of the HCL-specific gene expression signature, downregulation of the HCL markers CD25, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and cyclin D1, smoothening of leukemic cells' hairy surface, and, eventually, apoptosis. Apoptosis was partially blunted by coculture with bone marrow stromal cells antagonizing MEK-ERK dephosphorylation. This protective effect could be counteracted by combined BRAF and MEK inhibition. Our results strongly support and inform the clinical use of BRAF and MEK inhibitors in HCL. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. BRAF inhibitors reverse the unique molecular signature and phenotype of hairy cell leukemia and exert potent antileukemic activity

    PubMed Central

    Pettirossi, Valentina; Santi, Alessia; Imperi, Elisa; Russo, Guido; Pucciarini, Alessandra; Bigerna, Barbara; Schiavoni, Gianluca; Fortini, Elisabetta; Spanhol-Rosseto, Ariele; Sportoletti, Paolo; Mannucci, Roberta; Martelli, Maria Paola; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Falini, Brunangelo

    2015-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) shows unique clinicopathological and biological features. HCL responds well to purine analogs but relapses are frequent and novel therapies are required. BRAF-V600E is the key driver mutation in HCL and distinguishes it from other B-cell lymphomas, including HCL-like leukemias/lymphomas (HCL-variant and splenic marginal zone lymphoma). The kinase-activating BRAF-V600E mutation also represents an ideal therapeutic target in HCL. Here, we investigated the biological and therapeutic importance of the activated BRAF–mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)–extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in HCL by exposing in vitro primary leukemic cells purified from 26 patients to clinically available BRAF (vemurafenib; dabrafenib) or MEK (trametinib) inhibitors. Results were validated in vivo in samples from vemurafenib-treated HCL patients within a phase 2 clinical trial. BRAF and MEK inhibitors caused, specifically in HCL (but not HCL-like) cells, marked MEK/ERK dephosphorylation, silencing of the BRAF-MEK-ERK pathway transcriptional output, loss of the HCL-specific gene expression signature, downregulation of the HCL markers CD25, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and cyclin D1, smoothening of leukemic cells’ hairy surface, and, eventually, apoptosis. Apoptosis was partially blunted by coculture with bone marrow stromal cells antagonizing MEK-ERK dephosphorylation. This protective effect could be counteracted by combined BRAF and MEK inhibition. Our results strongly support and inform the clinical use of BRAF and MEK inhibitors in HCL. PMID:25480661

  10. Derivation of cancer diagnostic and prognostic signatures from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Goodison, Steve; Sun, Yijun; Urquidi, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    The ability to compare genome-wide expression profiles in human tissue samples has the potential to add an invaluable molecular pathology aspect to the detection and evaluation of multiple diseases. Applications include initial diagnosis, evaluation of disease subtype, monitoring of response to therapy and the prediction of disease recurrence. The derivation of molecular signatures that can predict tumor recurrence in breast cancer has been a particularly intense area of investigation and a number of studies have shown that molecular signatures can outperform currently used clinicopathologic factors in predicting relapse in this disease. However, many of these predictive models have been derived using relatively simple computational algorithms and whether these models are at a stage of development worthy of large-cohort clinical trial validation is currently a subject of debate. In this review, we focus on the derivation of optimal molecular signatures from high-dimensional data and discuss some of the expected future developments in the field. PMID:21083217

  11. High BAALC expression associates with other molecular prognostic markers, poor outcome, and a distinct gene-expression signature in cytogenetically normal patients younger than 60 years with acute myeloid leukemia: a Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) study.

    PubMed

    Langer, Christian; Radmacher, Michael D; Ruppert, Amy S; Whitman, Susan P; Paschka, Peter; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Baldus, Claudia D; Vukosavljevic, Tamara; Liu, Chang-Gong; Ross, Mary E; Powell, Bayard L; de la Chapelle, Albert; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Larson, Richard A; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2008-06-01

    BAALC expression is considered an independent prognostic factor in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML), but has yet to be investigated together with multiple other established prognostic molecular markers in CN-AML. We analyzed BAALC expression in 172 primary CN-AML patients younger than 60 years of age, treated similarly on CALGB protocols. High BAALC expression was associated with FLT3-ITD (P = .04), wild-type NPM1 (P < .001), mutated CEBPA (P = .003), MLL-PTD (P = .009), absent FLT3-TKD (P = .005), and high ERG expression (P = .05). In multivariable analysis, high BAALC expression independently predicted lower complete remission rates (P = .04) when adjusting for ERG expression and age, and shorter survival (P = .04) when adjusting for FLT3-ITD, NPM1, CEBPA, and white blood cell count. A gene-expression signature of 312 probe sets differentiating high from low BAALC expressers was identified. High BAALC expression was associated with overexpression of genes involved in drug resistance (MDR1) and stem cell markers (CD133, CD34, KIT). Global microRNA-expression analysis did not reveal significant differences between BAALC expression groups. However, an analysis of microRNAs that putatively target BAALC revealed a potentially interesting inverse association between expression of miR-148a and BAALC. We conclude that high BAALC expression is an independent adverse prognostic factor and is associated with a specific gene-expression profile.

  12. Multispectral excitation based multiple fluorescent targets resolving in fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan; Guang, Huizhi; Pu, Huangsheng; Zhang, Jiulou; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can visualize biological activities at cellular and molecular levels in vivo, and has been extensively used in drug delivery and tumor detection research of small animals. The ill-posedness of the FMT inverse problem makes it difficult to reconstruct and resolve multiple adjacent fluorescent targets that have different functional features but are labeled with the same fluorochrome. An algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) for multispectral excited FMT is proposed to resolve multiple fluorescent targets in this study. Fluorescent targets are excited by multispectral excitation, and the three-dimensional distribution of fluorescent yields under the excitation spectrum is reconstructed by an iterative Tikhonov regularization algorithm. Subsequently, multiple fluorescent targets are resolved from mixed fluorescence signals by employing ICA. Simulations were performed and the results demonstrate that multiple adjacent fluorescent targets can be resolved if the number of excitation wavelengths is not smaller than that of fluorescent targets with different concentrations. The algorithm obtains both independent components that provide spatial information of different fluorescent targets and spectral courses that reflect variation trends of fluorescent yields along with the excitation spectrum. By using this method, it is possible to visualize the metabolism status of drugs in different structure organs, and quantitatively depict the variation trends of fluorescent yields of each functional organ under the excitation spectrum. This method may provide a pattern for tumor detection, drug delivery and treatment monitoring in vivo.

  13. Experimentally-Derived Fibroblast Gene Signatures Identify Molecular Pathways Associated with Distinct Subsets of Systemic Sclerosis Patients in Three Independent Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michael E.; Mahoney, J. Matthew; Taroni, Jaclyn; Sargent, Jennifer L.; Marmarelis, Eleni; Wu, Ming-Ru; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E.; Whitfield, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide expression profiling in systemic sclerosis (SSc) has identified four ‘intrinsic’ subsets of disease (fibroproliferative, inflammatory, limited, and normal-like), each of which shows deregulation of distinct signaling pathways; however, the full set of pathways contributing to this differential gene expression has not been fully elucidated. Here we examine experimentally derived gene expression signatures in dermal fibroblasts for thirteen different signaling pathways implicated in SSc pathogenesis. These data show distinct and overlapping sets of genes induced by each pathway, allowing for a better understanding of the molecular relationship between profibrotic and immune signaling networks. Pathway-specific gene signatures were analyzed across a compendium of microarray datasets consisting of skin biopsies from three independent cohorts representing 80 SSc patients, 4 morphea, and 26 controls. IFNα signaling showed a strong association with early disease, while TGFβ signaling spanned the fibroproliferative and inflammatory subsets, was associated with worse MRSS, and was higher in lesional than non-lesional skin. The fibroproliferative subset was most strongly associated with PDGF signaling, while the inflammatory subset demonstrated strong activation of innate immune pathways including TLR signaling upstream of NF-κB. The limited and normal-like subsets did not show associations with fibrotic and inflammatory mediators such as TGFβ and TNFα. The normal-like subset showed high expression of genes associated with lipid signaling, which was absent in the inflammatory and limited subsets. Together, these data suggest a model by which IFNα is involved in early disease pathology, and disease severity is associated with active TGFβ signaling. PMID:25607805

  14. Multiple sulfur isotope signatures of sulfite and thiosulfate reduction by the model dissimilatory sulfate-reducer, Desulfovibrio alaskensis str. G20.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Cummins, Renata; Schmidt, Marian L; Sim, Min S; Ono, Shuhei; Bradley, Alexander S; Johnston, David T

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction serves as a key metabolic carbon remineralization process in anoxic marine environments. Sulfate reducing microorganisms can impart a wide range in mass-dependent sulfur isotopic fractionation. As such, the presence and relative activity of these organisms is identifiable from geological materials. By extension, sulfur isotope records are used to infer the redox balance of marine sedimentary environments, and the oxidation state of Earth's oceans and atmosphere. However, recent work suggests that our understanding of microbial sulfate reduction (MSRs) may be missing complexity associated with the presence and role of key chemical intermediates in the reductive process. This study provides a test of proposed metabolic models of sulfate reduction by growing an axenic culture of the well-studied MSRs, Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20, under electron donor limited conditions on the terminal electron acceptors sulfate, sulfite or thiosulfate, and tracking the multiple S isotopic consequences of each condition set. The dissimilatory reduction of thiosulfate and sulfite produce unique minor isotope effects, as compared to the reduction of sulfate. Further, these experiments reveal a complex biochemistry associated with sulfite reduction. That is, under high sulfite concentrations, sulfur is shuttled to an intermediate pool of thiosulfate. Site-specific isotope fractionation (within thiosulfate) is very large ((34)ε ~ 30‰) while terminal product sulfide carries only a small fractionation from the initial sulfite ((34)ε < 10‰): a signature similar in magnitude to sulfate and thiosulfate reduction. Together these findings show that microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) is highly sensitive to the concentration of environmentally important sulfur-cycle intermediates (sulfite and thiosulfate), especially when thiosulfate and the large site-specific isotope effects are involved.

  15. Multiple sulfur isotope signatures of sulfite and thiosulfate reduction by the model dissimilatory sulfate-reducer, Desulfovibrio alaskensis str. G20

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Cummins, Renata; Schmidt, Marian L.; Sim, Min S.; Ono, Shuhei; Bradley, Alexander S.; Johnston, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction serves as a key metabolic carbon remineralization process in anoxic marine environments. Sulfate reducing microorganisms can impart a wide range in mass-dependent sulfur isotopic fractionation. As such, the presence and relative activity of these organisms is identifiable from geological materials. By extension, sulfur isotope records are used to infer the redox balance of marine sedimentary environments, and the oxidation state of Earth's oceans and atmosphere. However, recent work suggests that our understanding of microbial sulfate reduction (MSRs) may be missing complexity associated with the presence and role of key chemical intermediates in the reductive process. This study provides a test of proposed metabolic models of sulfate reduction by growing an axenic culture of the well-studied MSRs, Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20, under electron donor limited conditions on the terminal electron acceptors sulfate, sulfite or thiosulfate, and tracking the multiple S isotopic consequences of each condition set. The dissimilatory reduction of thiosulfate and sulfite produce unique minor isotope effects, as compared to the reduction of sulfate. Further, these experiments reveal a complex biochemistry associated with sulfite reduction. That is, under high sulfite concentrations, sulfur is shuttled to an intermediate pool of thiosulfate. Site-specific isotope fractionation (within thiosulfate) is very large (34ε ~ 30‰) while terminal product sulfide carries only a small fractionation from the initial sulfite (34ε < 10‰): a signature similar in magnitude to sulfate and thiosulfate reduction. Together these findings show that microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) is highly sensitive to the concentration of environmentally important sulfur-cycle intermediates (sulfite and thiosulfate), especially when thiosulfate and the large site-specific isotope effects are involved. PMID:25505449

  16. A 16-Gene Signature Distinguishes Anaplastic Astrocytoma from Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Soumya Alige Mahabala; Srinivasan, Sujaya; Patric, Irene Rosita Pia; Hegde, Alangar Sathyaranjandas; Chandramouli, Bangalore Ashwathnarayanara; Arimappamagan, Arivazhagan; Santosh, Vani; Kondaiah, Paturu; Rao, Manchanahalli R. Sathyanarayana; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA; Grade III) and glioblastoma (GBM; Grade IV) are diffusely infiltrating tumors and are called malignant astrocytomas. The treatment regimen and prognosis are distinctly different between anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma patients. Although histopathology based current grading system is well accepted and largely reproducible, intratumoral histologic variations often lead to difficulties in classification of malignant astrocytoma samples. In order to obtain a more robust molecular classifier, we analysed RT-qPCR expression data of 175 differentially regulated genes across astrocytoma using Prediction Analysis of Microarrays (PAM) and found the most discriminatory 16-gene expression signature for the classification of anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma. The 16-gene signature obtained in the training set was validated in the test set with diagnostic accuracy of 89%. Additionally, validation of the 16-gene signature in multiple independent cohorts revealed that the signature predicted anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples with accuracy rates of 99%, 88%, and 92% in TCGA, GSE1993 and GSE4422 datasets, respectively. The protein-protein interaction network and pathway analysis suggested that the 16-genes of the signature identified epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway as the most differentially regulated pathway in glioblastoma compared to anaplastic astrocytoma. In addition to identifying 16 gene classification signature, we also demonstrated that genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in distinguishing glioblastoma from anaplastic astrocytoma. PMID:24475040

  17. Tumor suppressive microRNAs (miR-222 and miR-31) regulate molecular pathways based on microRNA expression signature in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Miki; Kojima, Satoko; Enokida, Hideki; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Nohata, Nijiro; Kinoshita, Takashi; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Naya, Yukio; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Seki, Naohiko

    2012-11-26

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have key roles in human tumorigenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. miRNAs are aberrantly expressed in many human cancers and can function as tumor suppressors or oncogenes that target many cancer-related genes. This study seeks to identify novel miRNA-regulated molecular pathways in prostate cancer (PCa). The miRNA expression signature in clinical specimens of PCa showed that 56 miRNAs were significantly downregulated in PCa compared with non-PCa tissues. We focused on the top four downregulated miRNAs (miR-187, miR-205, miR-222 and miR-31) to investigate their functional significance in PCa cells. Expression levels of these four miRNAs were validated in PCa specimens (15 PCa tissues and 17 non-PCa tissues) to confirm that they were significantly reduced in these PCa tissues. Gain-of-function analysis demonstrated that miR-222 and miR-31 inhibited cell proliferation, invasion and migration in PCa cell lines (PC3 and DU145), suggesting that miR-222 and miR-31 may act as tumor suppressors in PCa. Genome-wide gene expression analysis using miR-222 or miR-31 transfectants to identify the pathways they affect showed that many cancer-related genes are regulated by these miRNAs in PC3 cells. Identification and categorization of the molecular pathways regulated by tumor suppressive miRNAs could provide new information about the molecular mechanisms of PCa tumorigenesis.

  18. Positional isomers of cyanostilbene: two-component molecular assembly and multiple-stimuli responsive luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guoling; Yan, Dongpeng

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of the aggregates and properties of positional isomers can not only uncover how a slight difference in molecular structure alter crystal packing and bulk solid-state properties, but also plays an important role in developing new types of molecule-based functional materials. Herein, we report a study of the molecular packing and static/dynamic luminescence properties of three cyanostilbene (CS)-based isomers (CS1, CS2, CS3) within their single- and two-component molecular solids. Changing the positions of the cyano substitutents in the CS isomers has a marked influence on their packing modes and luminescent properties. Moreover, two-component CS-based materials have been constructed, which exhibit tunable conformations and packing fashions, as well as fluorescence properties, which differ from the pristine CS solids. The CS-based two-component molecular materials show solvent-responsive luminescence due to the dynamic disassembly of the samples. Moreover, it was found that the system based on CS2 and octafluoronaphthalene shows reversible photochromic fluorescence upon alternating light illumination and grinding. Such co-assembly procedures provide a facile way to fabricate patterned luminescent film materials. Therefore, this work not only affords new insight into the relationship between isomers and luminescence from molecular and supramolecular perspectives, but provides an effective strategy to develop multiple-stimuli-responsive luminescent materials. PMID:24816686

  19. Modeling Stochastic Kinetics of Molecular Machines at Multiple Levels: From Molecules to Modules

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2013-01-01

    A molecular machine is either a single macromolecule or a macromolecular complex. In spite of the striking superficial similarities between these natural nanomachines and their man-made macroscopic counterparts, there are crucial differences. Molecular machines in a living cell operate stochastically in an isothermal environment far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In this mini-review we present a catalog of the molecular machines and an inventory of the essential toolbox for theoretically modeling these machines. The tool kits include 1), nonequilibrium statistical-physics techniques for modeling machines and machine-driven processes; and 2), statistical-inference methods for reverse engineering a functional machine from the empirical data. The cell is often likened to a microfactory in which the machineries are organized in modular fashion; each module consists of strongly coupled multiple machines, but different modules interact weakly with each other. This microfactory has its own automated supply chain and delivery system. Buoyed by the success achieved in modeling individual molecular machines, we advocate integration of these models in the near future to develop models of functional modules. A system-level description of the cell from the perspective of molecular machinery (the mechanome) is likely to emerge from further integrations that we envisage here. PMID:23746505

  20. Modeling stochastic kinetics of molecular machines at multiple levels: from molecules to modules.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2013-06-04

    A molecular machine is either a single macromolecule or a macromolecular complex. In spite of the striking superficial similarities between these natural nanomachines and their man-made macroscopic counterparts, there are crucial differences. Molecular machines in a living cell operate stochastically in an isothermal environment far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In this mini-review we present a catalog of the molecular machines and an inventory of the essential toolbox for theoretically modeling these machines. The tool kits include 1), nonequilibrium statistical-physics techniques for modeling machines and machine-driven processes; and 2), statistical-inference methods for reverse engineering a functional machine from the empirical data. The cell is often likened to a microfactory in which the machineries are organized in modular fashion; each module consists of strongly coupled multiple machines, but different modules interact weakly with each other. This microfactory has its own automated supply chain and delivery system. Buoyed by the success achieved in modeling individual molecular machines, we advocate integration of these models in the near future to develop models of functional modules. A system-level description of the cell from the perspective of molecular machinery (the mechanome) is likely to emerge from further integrations that we envisage here. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of multiple low molecular weight placental prolactin-like proteins produced by rat trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Soares, M J; De, S K; Foster, B A; Julian, J A; Glasser, S R

    1988-01-01

    Rat trophoblast tissue was found to synthesize a number of low molecular weight proteins possessing prolactin-like characteristics. There appear to be at least three proteins that cross-react with antisera to pituitary prolactin. Two of the proteins had a molecular weight of 25,000, similar to ovine pituitary prolactin, and isoelectric points of 6.8 and 7.0. The third immunoreactive protein had a lower molecular weight (23,500), similar in size to human placental lactogen, and a slightly more acidic isoelectric point of 6.75. The molecular weight variants cross-reacted with an antipeptide serum that was generated to a synthetic peptide representing amino acids 150 to 164 of rat placental lactogen-2 (PL-2). Based on this analysis, we consider these proteins to be related to PL-2. Analysis of trophoblast proteins by gel-filtration chromatography resulted in the identification of another trophoblast prolactin. This material eluted earlier than PL-2-related proteins on a gel-filtration column, possessed prolactin-like activity (determined by competition with ovine pituitary prolactin for rabbit mammary gland or rat liver prolactin receptors) but showed limited cross-reactivity with either the antiserum to pituitary prolactin or the antiserum to the PL-2 peptide. We have thus identified multiple low molecular weight trophoblast prolactins, possessing different biochemical and immunological characteristics.

  2. Positional isomers of cyanostilbene: two-component molecular assembly and multiple-stimuli responsive luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guoling; Yan, Dongpeng

    2014-05-01

    An understanding of the aggregates and properties of positional isomers can not only uncover how a slight difference in molecular structure alter crystal packing and bulk solid-state properties, but also plays an important role in developing new types of molecule-based functional materials. Herein, we report a study of the molecular packing and static/dynamic luminescence properties of three cyanostilbene (CS)-based isomers (CS1, CS2, CS3) within their single- and two-component molecular solids. Changing the positions of the cyano substitutents in the CS isomers has a marked influence on their packing modes and luminescent properties. Moreover, two-component CS-based materials have been constructed, which exhibit tunable conformations and packing fashions, as well as fluorescence properties, which differ from the pristine CS solids. The CS-based two-component molecular materials show solvent-responsive luminescence due to the dynamic disassembly of the samples. Moreover, it was found that the system based on CS2 and octafluoronaphthalene shows reversible photochromic fluorescence upon alternating light illumination and grinding. Such co-assembly procedures provide a facile way to fabricate patterned luminescent film materials. Therefore, this work not only affords new insight into the relationship between isomers and luminescence from molecular and supramolecular perspectives, but provides an effective strategy to develop multiple-stimuli-responsive luminescent materials.

  3. A systems biology pipeline identifies new immune and disease related molecular signatures and networks in human cells during microgravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sayak; Saha, Rohini; Palanisamy, Anbarasi; Ghosh, Madhurima; Biswas, Anupriya; Roy, Saheli; Pal, Arijit; Sarkar, Kathakali; Bagh, Sangram

    2016-05-01

    Microgravity is a prominent health hazard for astronauts, yet we understand little about its effect at the molecular systems level. In this study, we have integrated a set of systems-biology tools and databases and have analysed more than 8000 molecular pathways on published global gene expression datasets of human cells in microgravity. Hundreds of new pathways have been identified with statistical confidence for each dataset and despite the difference in cell types and experiments, around 100 of the new pathways are appeared common across the datasets. They are related to reduced inflammation, autoimmunity, diabetes and asthma. We have identified downregulation of NfκB pathway via Notch1 signalling as new pathway for reduced immunity in microgravity. Induction of few cancer types including liver cancer and leukaemia and increased drug response to cancer in microgravity are also found. Increase in olfactory signal transduction is also identified. Genes, based on their expression pattern, are clustered and mathematically stable clusters are identified. The network mapping of genes within a cluster indicates the plausible functional connections in microgravity. This pipeline gives a new systems level picture of human cells under microgravity, generates testable hypothesis and may help estimating risk and developing medicine for space missions.

  4. Signature of coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in two-dimensional NbSe2 triggered by surface molecular adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaojiao; Guo, Yuqiao; Cheng, Hao; Dai, Jun; An, Xingda; Zhao, Jiyin; Tian, Kangzhen; Wei, Shiqiang; Cheng Zeng, Xiao; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Ferromagnetism is usually deemed incompatible with superconductivity. Consequently, the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism is usually observed only in elegantly designed multi-ingredient structures in which the two competing electronic states originate from separate structural components. Here we report the use of surface molecular adsorption to induce ferromagnetism in two-dimensional superconducting NbSe2, representing the freestanding case of the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in one two-dimensional nanomaterial. Surface-structural modulation of the ultrathin superconducting NbSe2 by polar reductive hydrazine molecules triggers a slight elongation of the covalent Nb–Se bond, which weakens the covalent interaction and enhances the ionicity of the tetravalent Nb with unpaired electrons, yielding ferromagnetic ordering. The induced ferromagnetic momentum couples with conduction electrons generating unique correlated effects of intrinsic negative magnetoresistance and the Kondo effect. We anticipate that the surface molecular adsorption will be a powerful tool to regulate spin ordering in the two-dimensional paradigm. PMID:27039840

  5. A systems biology pipeline identifies new immune and disease related molecular signatures and networks in human cells during microgravity exposure

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Sayak; Saha, Rohini; Palanisamy, Anbarasi; Ghosh, Madhurima; Biswas, Anupriya; Roy, Saheli; Pal, Arijit; Sarkar, Kathakali; Bagh, Sangram

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity is a prominent health hazard for astronauts, yet we understand little about its effect at the molecular systems level. In this study, we have integrated a set of systems-biology tools and databases and have analysed more than 8000 molecular pathways on published global gene expression datasets of human cells in microgravity. Hundreds of new pathways have been identified with statistical confidence for each dataset and despite the difference in cell types and experiments, around 100 of the new pathways are appeared common across the datasets. They are related to reduced inflammation, autoimmunity, diabetes and asthma. We have identified downregulation of NfκB pathway via Notch1 signalling as new pathway for reduced immunity in microgravity. Induction of few cancer types including liver cancer and leukaemia and increased drug response to cancer in microgravity are also found. Increase in olfactory signal transduction is also identified. Genes, based on their expression pattern, are clustered and mathematically stable clusters are identified. The network mapping of genes within a cluster indicates the plausible functional connections in microgravity. This pipeline gives a new systems level picture of human cells under microgravity, generates testable hypothesis and may help estimating risk and developing medicine for space missions. PMID:27185415

  6. Signature of coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in two-dimensional NbSe2 triggered by surface molecular adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaojiao; Guo, Yuqiao; Cheng, Hao; Dai, Jun; An, Xingda; Zhao, Jiyin; Tian, Kangzhen; Wei, Shiqiang; Cheng Zeng, Xiao; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2016-04-04

    Ferromagnetism is usually deemed incompatible with superconductivity. Consequently, the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism is usually observed only in elegantly designed multi-ingredient structures in which the two competing electronic states originate from separate structural components. Here we report the use of surface molecular adsorption to induce ferromagnetism in two-dimensional superconducting NbSe2, representing the freestanding case of the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in one two-dimensional nanomaterial. Surface-structural modulation of the ultrathin superconducting NbSe2 by polar reductive hydrazine molecules triggers a slight elongation of the covalent Nb-Se bond, which weakens the covalent interaction and enhances the ionicity of the tetravalent Nb with unpaired electrons, yielding ferromagnetic ordering. The induced ferromagnetic momentum couples with conduction electrons generating unique correlated effects of intrinsic negative magnetoresistance and the Kondo effect. We anticipate that the surface molecular adsorption will be a powerful tool to regulate spin ordering in the two-dimensional paradigm.

  7. Hepatitis C-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Epidemiology, molecular signature and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Peveling-Oberhag, Jan; Arcaini, Luca; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    There is ample epidemiologic evidence for an association of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). B-NHL subtypes most frequently associated with HCV are marginal zone lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The most convincing evidence for a causal relationship between HCV infection and lymphoma development is the observation of B-NHL regression after HCV eradication by antiviral therapy (AVT). In fact, for indolent HCV-associated B-NHL, first-line AVT instead of standard immune-chemotherapy might be considered. Molecular mechanisms of HCV-NHL development are still poorly understood. Three general theories have emerged to understand the HCV-induced lymphomagenesis: (1) continuous external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by viral antigens and consecutive proliferation; (2) HCV replication in B cells with oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular viral proteins; (3) permanent B-cell damage, e.g., mutation of tumor suppressor genes, caused by a transiently intracellular virus ("hit and run" theory). This review systematically summarizes the data on epidemiology, interventional studies, and molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated B-NHL. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular Signatures of Self-Renewal, Differentiation, and Lineage Choice in Multipotential Hemopoietic Progenitor Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Ludovica; Hoffmann, Reinhard; McBlane, Fraser; Brown, John; Gupta, Rajeev; Joshi, Chirag; Pearson, Stella; Seidl, Thomas; Heyworth, Clare; Enver, Tariq

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing self-renewal, differentiation, and lineage specification remain unknown. Transcriptional profiling is likely to provide insight into these processes but, as yet, has been confined to “static” molecular profiles of stem and progenitors cells. We now provide a comprehensive, statistically robust, and “dynamic” analysis of multipotent hemopoietic progenitor cells undergoing self-renewal in response to interleukin-3 (IL-3) and multilineage differentiation in response to lineage-affiliated cytokines. Cells undergoing IL-3-dependent proliferative self-renewal displayed striking complexity, including expression of genes associated with different lineage programs, suggesting a highly responsive compartment poised to rapidly execute intrinsically or extrinsically initiated cell fate decisions. A remarkable general feature of early differentiation was a resolution of complexity through the downregulation of gene expression. Although effector genes characteristic of mature cells were upregulated late, coincident with morphological changes, lineage-specific changes in gene expression were observed prior to this, identifying genes which may provide early harbingers of unilineage commitment. Of particular interest were genes that displayed differential behavior irrespective of the lineage elaborated, many of which were rapidly downregulated within 4 to 8 h after exposure to a differentiation cue. These are likely to include genes important in self-renewal, the maintenance of multipotentiality, or the negative regulation of differentiation per se. PMID:14701746

  9. Signature of coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in two-dimensional NbSe2 triggered by surface molecular adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaojiao; Guo, Yuqiao; Cheng, Hao; Dai, Jun; An, Xingda; Zhao, Jiyin; Tian, Kangzhen; Wei, Shiqiang; Cheng Zeng, Xiao; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Ferromagnetism is usually deemed incompatible with superconductivity. Consequently, the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism is usually observed only in elegantly designed multi-ingredient structures in which the two competing electronic states originate from separate structural components. Here we report the use of surface molecular adsorption to induce ferromagnetism in two-dimensional superconducting NbSe2, representing the freestanding case of the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in one two-dimensional nanomaterial. Surface-structural modulation of the ultrathin superconducting NbSe2 by polar reductive hydrazine molecules triggers a slight elongation of the covalent Nb-Se bond, which weakens the covalent interaction and enhances the ionicity of the tetravalent Nb with unpaired electrons, yielding ferromagnetic ordering. The induced ferromagnetic momentum couples with conduction electrons generating unique correlated effects of intrinsic negative magnetoresistance and the Kondo effect. We anticipate that the surface molecular adsorption will be a powerful tool to regulate spin ordering in the two-dimensional paradigm.

  10. Molecular signatures of enzyme-solid interactions: thermodynamics of protein binding to alpha-Zr(IV) phosphate nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Duff, Michael R; Kumar, Challa V

    2009-11-12

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to determine the thermodynamics of protein binding to the nanoplates of alpha-Zr(HPO4)2.H2O (alpha-ZrP). The binding constants (K(b)) and DeltaG, DeltaH, and DeltaS have been evaluated for a small set of proteins, and K(b) values are in the range of 2-760 x 10(5) M(-1). The binding of positively charged proteins to the negatively charged alpha-ZrP was endothermic, while the binding of negatively charged proteins was exothermic, and these are contrary to expectations based on a simple electrostatic model. The binding enthalpies of the proteins varied over a range of -24 to +25 kcal/mol, and these correlated roughly with the net charge on the protein (R2 = 0.964) but not with other properties such as the number of basic residues, polar residues, isoelectric point, surface area, or molecular mass. Linear fits to the enthalpy plots indicated that each charge on the protein contributes 1.18 kcal/mol toward the binding enthalpy. Binding entropies of positively charged proteins we