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Sample records for molecular structure input

  1. Molecular structure input on the web.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Peter

    2010-02-02

    A molecule editor, that is program for input and editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. This review focuses on a special type of molecule editors, namely those that are used for molecule structure input on the web. Scientific computing is now moving more and more in the direction of web services and cloud computing, with servers scattered all around the Internet. Thus a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, and a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential.The review covers a history of web-based structure input, starting with simple text entry boxes and early molecule editors based on clickable maps, before moving to the current situation dominated by Java applets. One typical example - the popular JME Molecule Editor - will be described in more detail. Modern Ajax server-side molecule editors are also presented. And finally, the possible future direction of web-based molecule editing, based on technologies like JavaScript and Flash, is discussed.

  2. The energy and momentum input of supernova explosions in structured and ionized molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walch, Stefanie; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the early impact of single and binary supernova (SN) explosions on dense gas clouds with three-dimensional, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulations. The effect of cloud structure, radiative cooling and ionizing radiation from the progenitor stars on the net input of kinetic energy, fkin = Ekin/ESN, thermal energy, ftherm = Etherm/ESN, and gas momentum, fP = P/PSN, to the interstellar medium (ISM) is tested. For clouds with bar{n} = 100cm^{-3}, the momentum generating Sedov and pressure-driven snowplough phases are terminated early (∝0.01 Myr) and radiative cooling limits the coupling to ftherm ˜ 0.01, fkin ˜ 0.05, and fP ˜ 9, significantly lower than for the case without cooling. For pre-ionized clouds, these numbers are only increased by ˜50 per cent, independent of the cloud structure. This only suffices to accelerate ˜5 per cent of the cloud to radial velocities ≳30 km s-1. A second SN might enhance the coupling efficiencies if delayed past the Sedov phase of the first explosion. Such very low coupling efficiencies cast doubts on many subresolution models for SN feedback, which are, in general, validated a posteriori. Ionizing radiation appears not to significantly enhance the coupling of SNe to the surrounding gas as it drives the ISM into inert dense shells and cold clumps, a process which is unresolved in galaxy-scale simulations. Our results indicate that the momentum input of SNe in ionized, structured clouds is larger (more than a factor of 10) than the corresponding momentum yield of the progenitor's stellar winds.

  3. Input File Creation for the Molecular Dynamics Program LAMMPS.

    2001-05-30

    The program creates an input data file for the molecular dynamics program LAMMPS. The input file created is a liquid mixture between two walls explicitly composed of particles. The liquid molecules are modeled as a bead-spring molecule. The input data file specifies the position and topology of the starting state. The data structure of input allows for dynamic bond creation (cross-linking) within the LAMMPS code.

  4. Structural response and input identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, G. D.; Callahan, J. C.; Mcelman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Three major goals were delineated: (1) to develop a general method for determining the response of a structure to combined base and acoustic random excitation: (2) to develop parametric relationships to aid in the design of plates which are subjected to random force or random base excitation: (3) to develop a method to identify the individual acoustic and base input to a structure with only a limited number of measurement channels, when both types of excitation act simultaneously.

  5. Input estimation from measured structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin; Cross, Elizabeth; Silva, Ramon A; Farrar, Charles R; Bement, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This report will focus on the estimation of unmeasured dynamic inputs to a structure given a numerical model of the structure and measured response acquired at discrete locations. While the estimation of inputs has not received as much attention historically as state estimation, there are many applications where an improved understanding of the immeasurable input to a structure is vital (e.g. validating temporally varying and spatially-varying load models for large structures such as buildings and ships). In this paper, the introduction contains a brief summary of previous input estimation studies. Next, an adjoint-based optimization method is used to estimate dynamic inputs to two experimental structures. The technique is evaluated in simulation and with experimental data both on a cantilever beam and on a three-story frame structure. The performance and limitations of the adjoint-based input estimation technique are discussed.

  6. A dual input DNA-based molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, Irina V; Elsiddieg, Siddieg O; Nesterov, Evgueni E

    2014-11-01

    We have designed and characterized a DNA-based molecular switch which processes two physiologically relevant inputs: pH (i.e. alkalinisation) and enzymatic activity, and generates a chemical output (in situ synthesized oligonucleotide). The design, based on allosteric interactions between i-motif and hairpin stem within the DNA molecule, addresses such critical physiological system parameters as molecular simplicity, tunability, orthogonality of the two input sensing domains, and compatibility with intracellular operation/delivery. PMID:25099914

  7. Partially connected feedforward neural networks structured by input types.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sanggil; Isik, Can

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to model partially connected feedforward neural networks (PCFNNs) from the identified input type (IT) which refers to whether each input is coupled with or uncoupled from other inputs in generating output. The identification is done by analyzing input sensitivity changes as amplifying the magnitude of inputs. The sensitivity changes of the uncoupled inputs are not correlated with the variation on any other input, while those of the coupled inputs are correlated with the variation on any one of the coupled inputs. According to the identified ITs, a PCFNN can be structured. Each uncoupled input does not share the neurons in the hidden layer with other inputs in order to contribute to output in an independent manner, while the coupled inputs share the neurons with one another. After deriving the mathematical input sensitivity analysis for each IT, several experiments, as well as a real example (blood pressure (BP) estimation), are described to demonstrate how well our method works.

  8. Minimizing structural vibrations with Input Shaping (TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhose, Bill; Singer, Neil

    1995-01-01

    A new method for commanding machines to move with increased dynamic performance was developed. This method is an enhanced version of input shaping, a patented vibration suppression algorithm. This technique intercepts a command input to a system command that moves the mechanical system with increased performance and reduced residual vibration. This document describes many advanced methods for generating highly optimized shaping sequences which are tuned to particular systems. The shaping sequence is important because it determines the trade off between move/settle time of the system and the insensitivity of the input shaping algorithm to variations or uncertainties in the machine which can be controlled. For example, a system with a 5 Hz resonance that takes 1 second to settle can be improved to settle instantaneously using a 0.2 shaping sequence (thus improving settle time by a factor of 5). This system could vary by plus or minus 15% in its natural frequency and still have no apparent vibration. However, the same system shaped with a 0.3 second shaping sequence could tolerate plus or minus 40% or more variation in natural frequency. This document describes how to generate sequences that maximize performance, sequences that maximize insensitivity, and sequences that trade off between the two. Several software tools are documented and included.

  9. Molecularly Defined Circuitry Reveals Input-Output Segregation in Deep Layers of the Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Sürmeli, Gülşen; Marcu, Daniel Cosmin; McClure, Christina; Garden, Derek L F; Pastoll, Hugh; Nolan, Matthew F

    2015-12-01

    Deep layers of the medial entorhinal cortex are considered to relay signals from the hippocampus to other brain structures, but pathways for routing of signals to and from the deep layers are not well established. Delineating these pathways is important for a circuit level understanding of spatial cognition and memory. We find that neurons in layers 5a and 5b have distinct molecular identities, defined by the transcription factors Etv1 and Ctip2, and divergent targets, with extensive intratelencephalic projections originating in layer 5a, but not 5b. This segregation of outputs is mirrored by the organization of glutamatergic input from stellate cells in layer 2 and from the hippocampus, with both preferentially targeting layer 5b over 5a. Our results suggest a molecular and anatomical organization of input-output computations in deep layers of the MEC, reveal precise translaminar microcircuitry, and identify molecularly defined pathways for spatial signals to influence computation in deep layers.

  10. Reconstruction of dynamic structural inputs in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Solomon, O.M. Jr.

    1986-08-01

    This report describes a technique to reconstruct dynamic structural inputs by deconvolution of measured data. The structure to which this technique has been applied is a mild steel bar (3 in diameter and 60 in. long) with a conical nose which provides some geometric simulation of penetrating structures which are used in field test. The deconvolution technique successfully reconstructs dynamic inputs to the bar with and without additive white noise present in the measured response.

  11. Framework for single input single output nanonetwork-based realistic molecular communication.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Atty, Saied M; Gharsseldien, Zakaria M; Lizos, Konstantinos A

    2015-12-01

    Mobile ad hoc molecular nanonetwork (MAMNET) is a new paradigm for the realisation of future nanonetworks. In MAMNET, transmission of nanoscale information from nanomachine to infostation is based on collision and adhesion. In this study, the authors develop a realistic framework for encompassing the electronic structure of the neurotransmitter in the process of transmitting nanoscale information at a single input single output nanonetwork. Nanonetwork performance is evaluated in terms of average packet delay, throughput and incurred traffic rate. Numerical results demonstrate the influence of the neurotransmitter's electronic structure over the performance of nanonetworks. PMID:26647808

  12. Framework for single input single output nanonetwork-based realistic molecular communication.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Atty, Saied M; Gharsseldien, Zakaria M; Lizos, Konstantinos A

    2015-12-01

    Mobile ad hoc molecular nanonetwork (MAMNET) is a new paradigm for the realisation of future nanonetworks. In MAMNET, transmission of nanoscale information from nanomachine to infostation is based on collision and adhesion. In this study, the authors develop a realistic framework for encompassing the electronic structure of the neurotransmitter in the process of transmitting nanoscale information at a single input single output nanonetwork. Nanonetwork performance is evaluated in terms of average packet delay, throughput and incurred traffic rate. Numerical results demonstrate the influence of the neurotransmitter's electronic structure over the performance of nanonetworks.

  13. Input clustering and the microscale structure of local circuits

    PubMed Central

    DeBello, William M.; McBride, Thomas J.; Nichols, Grant S.; Pannoni, Katy E.; Sanculi, Daniel; Totten, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of powerful tools for high-throughput mapping of synaptic networks promises major advances in understanding brain function. One open question is how circuits integrate and store information. Competing models based on random vs. structured connectivity make distinct predictions regarding the dendritic addressing of synaptic inputs. In this article we review recent experimental tests of one of these models, the input clustering hypothesis. Across circuits, brain regions and species, there is growing evidence of a link between synaptic co-activation and dendritic location, although this finding is not universal. The functional implications of input clustering and future challenges are discussed. PMID:25309336

  14. Input Shaping to Reduce Solar Array Structural Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael J.; Tolson, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Structural vibrations induced by actuators can be minimized using input shaping. Input shaping is a feedforward method in which actuator commands are convolved with shaping functions to yield a shaped set of commands. These commands are designed to perform the maneuver while minimizing the residual structural vibration. In this report, input shaping is extended to stepper motor actuators. As a demonstration, an input-shaping technique based on pole-zero cancellation was used to modify the Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) actuator commands for the Lewis satellite. A series of impulses were calculated as the ideal SADA output for vibration control. These impulses were then discretized for use by the SADA stepper motor actuator and simulated actuator outputs were used to calculate the structural response. The effectiveness of input shaping is limited by the accuracy of the knowledge of the modal frequencies. Assuming perfect knowledge resulted in significant vibration reduction. Errors of 10% in the modal frequencies caused notably higher levels of vibration. Controller robustness was improved by incorporating additional zeros in the shaping function. The additional zeros did not require increased performance from the actuator. Despite the identification errors, the resulting feedforward controller reduced residual vibrations to the level of the exactly modeled input shaper and well below the baseline cases. These results could be easily applied to many other vibration-sensitive applications involving stepper motor actuators.

  15. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  16. Long-term variation in above and belowground plant inputs alters soil organic matter biogeochemistry at the molecular-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, M. J.; Pisani, O.; Lin, L.; Lun, O.; Simpson, A.; Lajtha, K.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The long-term fate of soil carbon reserves with global environmental change remains uncertain. Shifts in moisture, altered nutrient cycles, species composition, or rising temperatures may alter the proportions of above and belowground biomass entering soil. However, it is unclear how long-term changes in plant inputs may alter the composition of soil organic matter (SOM) and soil carbon storage. Advanced molecular techniques were used to assess SOM composition in mineral soil horizons (0-10 cm) after 20 years of Detrital Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) at the Harvard Forest. SOM biomarkers (solvent extraction, base hydrolysis and cupric (II) oxide oxidation) and both solid-state and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to identify changes in SOM composition and stage of degradation. Microbial activity and community composition were assessed using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Doubling aboveground litter inputs decreased soil carbon content, increased the degradation of labile SOM and enhanced the sequestration of aliphatic compounds in soil. The exclusion of belowground inputs (No roots and No inputs) resulted in a decrease in root-derived components and enhanced the degradation of leaf-derived aliphatic structures (cutin). Cutin-derived SOM has been hypothesized to be recalcitrant but our results show that even this complex biopolymer is susceptible to degradation when inputs entering soil are altered. The PLFA data indicate that changes in soil microbial community structure favored the accelerated processing of specific SOM components with littler manipulation. These results collectively reveal that the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs alters the molecular-level composition of SOM and in some cases, enhances the degradation of recalcitrant SOM. Our study also suggests that increased litterfall is unlikely to enhance soil carbon storage over the long-term in temperate forests.

  17. Combustion inputs into a terrestrial archive over 265 years as evidenced by BPCA molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Wiedemeier, Daniel B.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.

    2015-04-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) such as char and soot is produced during the incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel. It is composed of condensed aromatic structures and can resist degradation processes, maybe over long periods of time. Land-use changes, industrial activity and its transport by wind and water affect the fluxes of PyOM from the source to its sedimentary archive. Investigating environmental PyOM with the molecular marker benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method provides various information about quantity, quality (BPCA distribution pattern) and about its isotopic composition (13C and 14C). Assessing PyOM quality can indicate whether it is mostly combustion condensate (soot) or combustion residue (charcoal) and potentially allow source apportionment. Our study area is the Pettaquamscutt River catchment area (35 km2), Rhode Island, U.S.A. It is located down-wind of industrial areas recording deposition of long-distance atmospheric transport as well as local catchment inputs, both from natural and anthropogenic sources. We investigated 50 samples of a sediment record over a time span of 265 years (1733-1998 AD). Previous investigations provided information on the age of deposition, the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as well as of the radiocarbon contents of total organic carbon (TOC) and PAH (Lima, 2004). We used the BPCA molecular marker method to quantify and characterize PyOM in the same record. First results show that quantity and quality of PyOM change over 265 years. Our investigation aims at understanding how different sources of PyOM are reflected in terrestrial archives by comparing the results of BPCA with radiocarbon-dated TOC and PAH records. Among other aspects, the PAH record reflects the Great Depression and the 1970s oil embargo in North America. We interpret the BPCA distribution patterns regarding the simultaneous shift of dominant fuels including wood, coal, petroleum and gas. Future work will include

  18. Fragility index of a simple liquid from structural inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, Leishangthem; Das, Shankar P.

    2016-09-01

    We make a first-principles calculation of the fragility index m of a simple liquid with known inter particle interaction. The latter determines the corresponding equilibrium structure factor which is treated as an input in the calculation. Using the density functional theory (DFT) of classical liquids, we determine the configurational entropy {{S}c} at moderate supercooling and extrapolate this data to estimate the Kauzmann temperature T K. The relaxation time {τα} for the simple liquid has been obtained from direct solutions of the equations of fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics (FNH). These equations also form the basis of the mode coupling theory (MCT) for glassy dynamics. Using the Adam-Gibbs relation, we link the configurational entropy {{S}c} to the relaxation time {τα} of the supercooled liquid. The fragility index for the supercooled liquid is estimated from analysis of the curves on the Angell plot.

  19. Dynamic response and input identification of MDOF structures subjected to coupled random vector inputs. [Multiple Degree Of Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocallahan, J. C.; Shepard, G. D.; Mcelman, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A method of random dynamic analysis is presented which is based on the classical approach applied to a discretized structure. The method assumes that the system identification is available in the form of natural modes and frequencies. These modes and frequencies can be found from either available solutions or approximately from finite element programs. A computer program has been developed to perform the computations required in the analysis. All computations are performed with transformed modal variables, which results in significant economy since the number of modal degrees of freedom is almost always less than the number of physical degrees of freedom. The program computes the response to force and base inputs which are statistically coupled. A method is also presented for predicting one of the inputs if the second input and the acceleration response at a point on the structure are known. Finally, results are presented for the random response of a rectangular plate subjected to a random pressure and a random base input. The inputs are considered individually and with various degrees of statistical coupling.

  20. An aptazyme-based molecular device that converts a small-molecule input into an RNA output.

    PubMed

    Ayukawa, Shotaro; Sakai, Yoko; Kiga, Daisuke

    2012-08-01

    We describe the construction of an aptazyme-based molecular device that converts, through a cascade of reactions, a small-molecule input into output RNA strands. This device is applicable as an interface between a small molecule and a molecular system that accepts only nucleic acid input.

  1. Design of two and three input molecular logic gates using non-Watson-Crick base pairing-based molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2014-03-21

    This study presents a single, resettable, and sensitive molecular beacon (MB) used to operate molecular-scale logic gates. The MB consists of a random DNA sequence, a fluorophore at the 5'-end, and a quencher at the 3'-end. The presence of Hg(2+), Ag(+), and coralyne promoted the formation of stable T-Hg(2+)-T, C-Ag(+)-C, and A2-coralyne-A2 coordination in the MB probe, respectively, thereby driving its conformational change. The metal ion or small molecule-mediated coordination of mismatched DNA brought the fluorophore and the quencher into close proximity, resulting in collisional quenching of fluorescence between the two organic dyes. Because thiol can bind Hg(2+) and remove it from the T-Hg(2+)-T-based MB, adding thiol to a solution of the T-Hg(2+)-T-based MB allowed the fluorophore and the quencher to be widely separated. A similar phenomenon was observed when replacing Hg(2+) with Ag(+). Because Ag(+) strongly binds to iodide, cyanide, and cysteine, they were capable of removing Ag(+) from the C-Ag(+)-C-based MB, restoring the fluorescence of the MB. Moreover, the fluorescence of the A2-coralyne-A2-based MB could be switched on by adding polyadenosine. Using these analytes as inputs and the MB as a signal transducer, we successfully developed a series of two-input, three-input, and set-reset logic gates at the molecular level.

  2. Three new crystal structures in the Na-Pb system: solving structures without additional experimental input.

    PubMed

    Ward, Logan; Michel, Kyle; Wolverton, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The structures of three Na-Pb compounds, γ, δ and δ', have remained incompletely solved for nearly 60 years. The space group, lattice parameters and positions of the Pb atoms of these three structures have been determined, but the positions of the Na atoms are still unknown. In this work, the First-Principles Assisted Structure Solution (FPASS) method [Meredig & Wolverton (2013). Nat. Mater. 12, 123-127] has been used to complete the description of these three structures using only experimental information available from the literature as input. The paper also discusses the relative advantages of constrained crystal structure prediction tools, like FPASS, in comparison to conventional crystal structure prediction methods in reference to their abilities to complete the solution of other unsolved structures. PMID:26317197

  3. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  4. Improved input and output couplers for SC acceleration structure

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.; Latina, A.; Lunin, A.; Poloubotko, V.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Different couplers are described that allow the reduction of both transverse wake potential and RF kick in the SC acceleration structure of ILC. A simple rotation of the couplers reducing the RF kick and transverse wake kick is discussed for both the main linac and bunch compressors, along with possible limitations of this method. Designs of a coupler unit are presented which preserve axial symmetry of the structure, and provide reduced both the RF kick and transverse wake field.

  5. Neural Microstates Govern Perception of Auditory Input without Rhythmic Structure.

    PubMed

    Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Obleser, Jonas

    2016-01-20

    Human perception fluctuates with the phase of neural oscillations in the presence of environmental rhythmic structure by which neural oscillations become entrained. However, in the absence of predictability afforded by rhythmic structure, we hypothesize that the neural dynamical states associated with optimal psychophysical performance are more complex than what has been described previously for rhythmic stimuli. The current electroencephalography study characterized the brain dynamics associated with optimal detection of gaps embedded in narrow-band acoustic noise stimuli lacking low-frequency rhythmic structure. Optimal gap detection was associated with three spectrotemporally distinct delta-governed neural microstates. Individual microstates were characterized by unique instantaneous combinations of neural phase in the delta, theta, and alpha frequency bands. Critically, gap detection was not predictable from local fluctuations in stimulus acoustics. The current results suggest that, in the absence of rhythmic structure to entrain neural oscillations, good performance hinges on complex neural states that vary from moment to moment. Significance statement: Our ability to hear faint sounds fluctuates together with slow brain activity that synchronizes with environmental rhythms. However, it is so far not known how brain activity at different time scales might interact to influence perception when there is no rhythm with which brain activity can synchronize. Here, we used electroencephalography to measure brain activity while participants listened for short silences that interrupted ongoing noise. We examined brain activity in three different frequency bands: delta, theta, and alpha. Participants' ability to detect gaps depended on different numbers of frequency bands--sometimes one, sometimes two, and sometimes three--at different times. Changes in the number of frequency bands that predict perception are a hallmark of a complex neural system. PMID:26791216

  6. Neural Microstates Govern Perception of Auditory Input without Rhythmic Structure.

    PubMed

    Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Obleser, Jonas

    2016-01-20

    Human perception fluctuates with the phase of neural oscillations in the presence of environmental rhythmic structure by which neural oscillations become entrained. However, in the absence of predictability afforded by rhythmic structure, we hypothesize that the neural dynamical states associated with optimal psychophysical performance are more complex than what has been described previously for rhythmic stimuli. The current electroencephalography study characterized the brain dynamics associated with optimal detection of gaps embedded in narrow-band acoustic noise stimuli lacking low-frequency rhythmic structure. Optimal gap detection was associated with three spectrotemporally distinct delta-governed neural microstates. Individual microstates were characterized by unique instantaneous combinations of neural phase in the delta, theta, and alpha frequency bands. Critically, gap detection was not predictable from local fluctuations in stimulus acoustics. The current results suggest that, in the absence of rhythmic structure to entrain neural oscillations, good performance hinges on complex neural states that vary from moment to moment. Significance statement: Our ability to hear faint sounds fluctuates together with slow brain activity that synchronizes with environmental rhythms. However, it is so far not known how brain activity at different time scales might interact to influence perception when there is no rhythm with which brain activity can synchronize. Here, we used electroencephalography to measure brain activity while participants listened for short silences that interrupted ongoing noise. We examined brain activity in three different frequency bands: delta, theta, and alpha. Participants' ability to detect gaps depended on different numbers of frequency bands--sometimes one, sometimes two, and sometimes three--at different times. Changes in the number of frequency bands that predict perception are a hallmark of a complex neural system.

  7. Band Spectra and Molecular Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronig, R. De L.

    2011-06-01

    Introduction; Part I. The Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules and their Classification by Means of Quantum Numbers: 1. General foundations; 2. Wave mechanics of diatomic molecules; 3. Electronic levels; 4. Vibrational levels; 5. Rotational levels; 6. Stark and Zeeman effect; 7. Energy levels of polyatomic molecules; Part II. Fine Structure and Wave Mechanical Properties of the Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules: 8. The perturbation function; 9. Rotational distortion of spin multiplets; 10. Fine structure; 11. Perturbations and predissociation; 12. Even and odd levels; 13. Symmetrical and antisymmetrical levels; Part III. Selection Rules and Intensities in Diatomic Molecules: 14. General foundations; 15. Electronic bands; 16. Vibrational bands; 17. Rotational bands; 18. Band spectra and nuclear structure; 19. Transitions in the Stark and Zeeman effect; Part IV. Macroscopic Properties of Molecular Gases: 20. Scattering; 21. Dispersion; 22. Kerr and Faraday effect; 23. Dielectric constants; 24. Magnetic susceptibilities; 25. Specific heats; Part V. Molecule Formation and Chemical Binding: 26. Heteropolar molecules; 27. Homopolar molecules. Chemical forces between two H-atoms and two He-atoms; 28. The general theory of homopolar compounds; Bibliography; Subject index.

  8. Learning structure of sensory inputs with synaptic plasticity leads to interference

    PubMed Central

    Chrol-Cannon, Joseph; Jin, Yaochu

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is often explored as a form of unsupervised adaptation in cortical microcircuits to learn the structure of complex sensory inputs and thereby improve performance of classification and prediction. The question of whether the specific structure of the input patterns is encoded in the structure of neural networks has been largely neglected. Existing studies that have analyzed input-specific structural adaptation have used simplified, synthetic inputs in contrast to complex and noisy patterns found in real-world sensory data. In this work, input-specific structural changes are analyzed for three empirically derived models of plasticity applied to three temporal sensory classification tasks that include complex, real-world visual and auditory data. Two forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and the Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM) plasticity rule are used to adapt the recurrent network structure during the training process before performance is tested on the pattern recognition tasks. It is shown that synaptic adaptation is highly sensitive to specific classes of input pattern. However, plasticity does not improve the performance on sensory pattern recognition tasks, partly due to synaptic interference between consecutively presented input samples. The changes in synaptic strength produced by one stimulus are reversed by the presentation of another, thus largely preventing input-specific synaptic changes from being retained in the structure of the network. To solve the problem of interference, we suggest that models of plasticity be extended to restrict neural activity and synaptic modification to a subset of the neural circuit, which is increasingly found to be the case in experimental neuroscience. PMID:26300769

  9. Learning Complex Grammar in the Virtual Classroom: A Comparison of Processing Instruction, Structured Input, Computerized Visual Input Enhancement, and Traditional Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of processing instruction (PI) and structured input (SI) on the acquisition of the subjunctive in adjectival clauses by 92 second-semester distance learners of Spanish. Computerized visual input enhancement (VIE) was combined with PI and SI in an attempt to increase the salience of the targeted grammatical form…

  10. Properties and molecular identity of NMDA receptors at synaptic and non-synaptic inputs in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Bidoret, Céline; Bouvier, Guy; Ayon, Annick; Szapiro, Germán; Casado, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) are expressed and activated in unusual ways: at parallel fibre (PF) synapses they are only recruited by repetitive stimuli, suggesting an extrasynaptic location, whereas their activation by climbing fibre is purely mediated by spillover. NMDARs are thought to play an important role in plasticity at different levels of the cerebellar circuitry. Evaluation of the location, functional properties and physiological roles of NMDARs will be facilitated by knowledge of the NMDAR isoforms recruited. Here we show that MLI-NMDARs activated by both PF and climbing fibre inputs have similar kinetics and contain GluN2B but not GluN2A subunits. On the other hand, no evidence was found of functional NMDARs in the axons of MLIs. At the PF-Purkinje cell (PF-PC) synapse, the activation of GluN2A-containing NMDARs has been shown to be necessary for the induction of long-term depression (LTD). Our results therefore provide a clear distinction between the NMDARs located on MLIs and those involved in plasticity at PF-PC synapses. PMID:25750623

  11. Synchronization in neuronal oscillator networks with input heterogeneity and arbitrary network structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Elizabeth; Dey, Biswadip; Leonard, Naomi

    Mathematical studies of synchronization in networks of neuronal oscillators offer insight into neuronal ensemble behavior in the brain. Systematic means to understand how network structure and external input affect synchronization in network models have the potential to improve methods for treating synchronization-related neurological disorders such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. To elucidate the complex relationships between network structure, external input, and synchronization, we investigate synchronous firing patterns in arbitrary networks of neuronal oscillators coupled through gap junctions with heterogeneous external inputs. We first apply a passivity-based Lyapunov analysis to undirected networks of homogeneous FitzHugh-Nagumo (FN) oscillators with homogeneous inputs and derive a sufficient condition on coupling strength that guarantees complete synchronization. In biologically relevant regimes, we employ Gronwall's inequality to obtain a bound tighter than those previously reported. We extend both analyses to a homogeneous FN network with heterogeneous inputs and show how cluster synchronization emerges under conditions on the symmetry of the coupling matrix and external inputs. Our results can be generalized to any network of semi-passive oscillators.

  12. Multiple actor-critic structures for continuous-time optimal control using input-output data.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruizhuo; Lewis, Frank; Wei, Qinglai; Zhang, Hua-Guang; Jiang, Zhong-Ping; Levine, Dan

    2015-04-01

    In industrial process control, there may be multiple performance objectives, depending on salient features of the input-output data. Aiming at this situation, this paper proposes multiple actor-critic structures to obtain the optimal control via input-output data for unknown nonlinear systems. The shunting inhibitory artificial neural network (SIANN) is used to classify the input-output data into one of several categories. Different performance measure functions may be defined for disparate categories. The approximate dynamic programming algorithm, which contains model module, critic network, and action network, is used to establish the optimal control in each category. A recurrent neural network (RNN) model is used to reconstruct the unknown system dynamics using input-output data. NNs are used to approximate the critic and action networks, respectively. It is proven that the model error and the closed unknown system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the proposed optimal control scheme for the unknown nonlinear system.

  13. Loss of sensory input causes rapid structural changes of inhibitory neurons in adult mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Keck, Tara; Scheuss, Volker; Jacobsen, R Irene; Wierenga, Corette J; Eysel, Ulf T; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Hübener, Mark

    2011-09-01

    A fundamental property of neuronal circuits is the ability to adapt to altered sensory inputs. It is well established that the functional synaptic changes underlying this adaptation are reflected by structural modifications in excitatory neurons. In contrast, the degree to which structural plasticity in inhibitory neurons accompanies functional changes is less clear. Here, we use two-photon imaging to monitor the fine structure of inhibitory neurons in mouse visual cortex after deprivation induced by retinal lesions. We find that a subset of inhibitory neurons carry dendritic spines, which form glutamatergic synapses. Removal of visual input correlates with a rapid and lasting reduction in the number of inhibitory cell spines. Similar to the effects seen for dendritic spines, the number of inhibitory neuron boutons dropped sharply after retinal lesions. Together, these data suggest that structural changes in inhibitory neurons may precede structural changes in excitatory circuitry, which ultimately result in functional adaptation following sensory deprivation.

  14. Image inputs in Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry: optimising image greyscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, James; Smith, Mike J.; James, Mike R.

    2016-04-01

    Structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry is an emerging technology receiving much attention within the geoscience community due to its ease of use and the lack of prior information required to build topographic models from images. However, little consideration is given to image inputs considering image sharpness and contrast both have an effect on the quality of photogrammetric outputs. This task is made more challenging across natural image sequences due to the presence of low-contrast surfaces which are often at oblique angles to input images. As most feature detectors operate on a single image channel, monochrome inputs can be pre-processed for input into SfM workflows and relative accuracy measured. In this contribution we process two sets of imagery from both a real world, close range scenario (Constitution Hill, Aberystwyth) and a controlled dataset in laboratory conditions simulating a UAV flight with convergent viewing geometry. With each, we generate greyscale subsets comprised of weighted combinations of the spectral bands of the input images prior to executing SfM workflows. Output point clouds are measured against high-accuracy terrestrial laser scans in order to assess residual error and compare output solutions. When compared with untreated image inputs into a commonly used commercial package (Agisoft Photoscan Pro) we show minor improvements in the accuracy of photogrammetrically derived products.

  15. A Bayesian approach to model structural error and input variability in groundwater modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Valocchi, A. J.; Lin, Y. F. F.; Liang, F.

    2015-12-01

    Effective water resource management typically relies on numerical models to analyze groundwater flow and solute transport processes. Model structural error (due to simplification and/or misrepresentation of the "true" environmental system) and input forcing variability (which commonly arises since some inputs are uncontrolled or estimated with high uncertainty) are ubiquitous in groundwater models. Calibration that overlooks errors in model structure and input data can lead to biased parameter estimates and compromised predictions. We present a fully Bayesian approach for a complete assessment of uncertainty for spatially distributed groundwater models. The approach explicitly recognizes stochastic input and uses data-driven error models based on nonparametric kernel methods to account for model structural error. We employ exploratory data analysis to assist in specifying informative prior for error models to improve identifiability. The inference is facilitated by an efficient sampling algorithm based on DREAM-ZS and a parameter subspace multiple-try strategy to reduce the required number of forward simulations of the groundwater model. We demonstrate the Bayesian approach through a synthetic case study of surface-ground water interaction under changing pumping conditions. It is found that explicit treatment of errors in model structure and input data (groundwater pumping rate) has substantial impact on the posterior distribution of groundwater model parameters. Using error models reduces predictive bias caused by parameter compensation. In addition, input variability increases parametric and predictive uncertainty. The Bayesian approach allows for a comparison among the contributions from various error sources, which could inform future model improvement and data collection efforts on how to best direct resources towards reducing predictive uncertainty.

  16. RATFOR: user's guide. [Preprocessor allowing structured control statements and free form input

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, B. E.

    1980-06-01

    RATFOR is a preprocessor for Fortran that allows the programmer to use structured control statements and free form input. This manual describes a version of RATFOR developed at Sandia National Laboratories that has a number of enhancements over the original version developed at Bell Laboratories.

  17. Guidance manual for the input of biological information to water-intake-structure design

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Simmons, M.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    This manual is intended to provide guidance to the biologist who is asked to provide biological input during the construction or subsequent alteration of a water intake structure. Examples of the types of biological information that might be included in intake design are presented. Procedures for quantifying biological information and defining specific tasks that will generate quantifiable data are discussed. Procedures described apply both to new and modified water intake structures.

  18. Molecular and Supermolecular Structure of Commercial Pyrodextrins.

    PubMed

    Le Thanh-Blicharz, Joanna; Błaszczak, Wioletta; Szwengiel, Artur; Paukszta, Dominik; Lewandowicz, Grażyna

    2016-09-01

    Size exclusion chromatography with triple detection as well as infrared spectroscopy studies of commercially available pyrodextrins proved that these molecules are characterized not only by significantly lower molecular mass, in comparison to that of native starch, but also by increased branching. Therefore, pyrodextrins adopt a very compact structure in solution and show Newtonian behavior under shear in spite of their molecular masses of tens of thousands Daltons. The results also indicate that 50% reduction of digestibility of pyrodextrins is, to a minor extent, caused by formation of low-molecular color compounds containing carbonyl functional groups. The main reason is, as postulated in the literature, transglycosidation that leads to decreased occurrence of α-1,4-glycoside bonds in the molecular structure. In the process of dextrinization starch also undergoes changes in supermolecular structure, which, however, have no influence on digestibility. Likewise, the effect of formation of low-molecular colorful compounds containing carbonyl groups is not crucial.

  19. Molecular and Supermolecular Structure of Commercial Pyrodextrins.

    PubMed

    Le Thanh-Blicharz, Joanna; Błaszczak, Wioletta; Szwengiel, Artur; Paukszta, Dominik; Lewandowicz, Grażyna

    2016-09-01

    Size exclusion chromatography with triple detection as well as infrared spectroscopy studies of commercially available pyrodextrins proved that these molecules are characterized not only by significantly lower molecular mass, in comparison to that of native starch, but also by increased branching. Therefore, pyrodextrins adopt a very compact structure in solution and show Newtonian behavior under shear in spite of their molecular masses of tens of thousands Daltons. The results also indicate that 50% reduction of digestibility of pyrodextrins is, to a minor extent, caused by formation of low-molecular color compounds containing carbonyl functional groups. The main reason is, as postulated in the literature, transglycosidation that leads to decreased occurrence of α-1,4-glycoside bonds in the molecular structure. In the process of dextrinization starch also undergoes changes in supermolecular structure, which, however, have no influence on digestibility. Likewise, the effect of formation of low-molecular colorful compounds containing carbonyl groups is not crucial. PMID:27447364

  20. Computational Mechanics of Input-Output Processes: Structured Transformations and the ɛ -Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Nix; Crutchfield, James P.

    2015-10-01

    Computational mechanics quantifies structure in a stochastic process via its causal states, leading to the process's minimal, optimal predictor—the ɛ {{-}}machine. We extend computational mechanics to communication channels coupling two processes, obtaining an analogous optimal model—the ɛ {{-}}transducer—of the stochastic mapping between them. Here, we lay the foundation of a structural analysis of communication channels, treating joint processes and processes with input. The result is a principled structural analysis of mechanisms that support information flow between processes. It is the first in a series on the structural information theory of memoryful channels, channel composition, and allied conditional information measures.

  1. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-10-01

    The chemical structure of penicillin was determined between 1942 and 1945 under conditions of secrecy established by the U.S. and U.K. governments. The evidence was not published in the open literature but as a monograph. This complex volume does not present a structure proof that can be readily comprehended by a student. In this article, a basic structural proof for the penicillin molecule is provided, emphasizing the chemical work. The stereochemistry of penicillin is also described, and various rearrangements are considered on the basis of the accepted β-lactam structure.

  2. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Overviews of the observations that constitute a structure proof for penicillin, specifically aimed at the general student population, are presented. Melting points and boiling points were criteria of purity and a crucial tool was microanalysis leading to empirical formulas.

  3. Procedure for developing biological input for the design, location, or modification of water-intake structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    To minimize adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems resulting from the operation of water intake structures, design engineers must have relevant information on the behavior, physiology and ecology of local fish and shellfish. Identification of stimulus/response relationships and the environmental factors that influence them is the first step in incorporating biological information in the design, location or modification of water intake structures. A procedure is presented in this document for providing biological input to engineers who are designing, locating or modifying a water intake structure. The authors discuss sources of stimuli at water intakes, historical approaches in assessing potential/actual impact and review biological information needed for intake design.

  4. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  5. Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational force inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders is analytically and experimentally studied. The primary (noise) field in the cylinder model is generated by the coupled dynamic response of the shell under loading by a single exterior acoustic source. Control of the interior sound field is achieved by applying vibrational force inputs directly to the shell wall. Action of the point controllers serve to increase the input impedance of select structural modes of the shell which are well-coupled to the interior acoustic cavity, thus substantially reducing sound transmission into the cavity. Spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 30 dB are demonstrated for acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity. Twin controller configurations are presented which demonstrate the ability to independently control orthogonal modes of the interior acoustic space. Benefits and drawbacks of this new methodology for noise control are discussed and clearly demonstrated.

  6. Multiple actor-critic structures for continuous-time optimal control using input-output data.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruizhuo; Lewis, Frank; Wei, Qinglai; Zhang, Hua-Guang; Jiang, Zhong-Ping; Levine, Dan

    2015-04-01

    In industrial process control, there may be multiple performance objectives, depending on salient features of the input-output data. Aiming at this situation, this paper proposes multiple actor-critic structures to obtain the optimal control via input-output data for unknown nonlinear systems. The shunting inhibitory artificial neural network (SIANN) is used to classify the input-output data into one of several categories. Different performance measure functions may be defined for disparate categories. The approximate dynamic programming algorithm, which contains model module, critic network, and action network, is used to establish the optimal control in each category. A recurrent neural network (RNN) model is used to reconstruct the unknown system dynamics using input-output data. NNs are used to approximate the critic and action networks, respectively. It is proven that the model error and the closed unknown system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the proposed optimal control scheme for the unknown nonlinear system. PMID:25730830

  7. Structures in Molecular Clouds: Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Mizuta, A; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D

    2006-04-20

    We attempt to predict the observed morphology, column density and velocity gradient of Pillar II of the Eagle Nebula, using Rayleigh Taylor (RT) models in which growth is seeded by an initial perturbation in density or in shape of the illuminated surface, and cometary models in which structure is arises from a initially spherical cloud with a dense core. Attempting to mitigate suppression of RT growth by recombination, we use a large cylindrical model volume containing the illuminating source and the self-consistently evolving ablated outflow and the photon flux field, and use initial clouds with finite lateral extent. An RT model shows no growth, while a cometary model appears to be more successful at reproducing observations.

  8. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    PubMed

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  9. Inputs of anthropogenic nitrogen influence isotopic composition and trophic structure in SE Australian estuaries.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Debashish; Saintilan, Neil; Alderson, Brendan; Hollins, Suzanne

    2015-11-15

    Urban development in coastal settings has increased the input of nitrogen into estuaries globally, in many cases changing the composition of estuarine ecosystems. By focussing on three adjacent estuaries with a gradient of anthropogenic N loadings, we used stable isotopes of N and C to test for changes due to increased anthropogenic N input on the structure of some key trophic linkages in estuaries. We found a consistent enrichment in δ(15)N corresponding to increased anthropogenic N at the three ecosystem levels studied: fine benthic organic matter, grazing invertebrate, and planktivorous fish. The degree of enrichment in δ(15)N between fine benthic organic matter and the grapsid crab Parasesarma erythrodactyla was identical across the three sites. The glassfish Ambassis jacksoniensis showed lower levels of enrichment compared to basal food sources at the higher N-loaded sites, suggesting a possible effect of anthropogenic N in decreasing food-chain length in these estuaries.

  10. Input/Output of ab-initio nuclear structure calculations for improved performance and portability

    SciTech Connect

    Laghave, Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    Many modern scientific applications rely on highly computation intensive calculations. However, most applications do not concentrate as much on the role that input/output operations can play for improved performance and portability. Parallelizing input/output operations of large files can significantly improve the performance of parallel applications where sequential I/O is a bottleneck. A proper choice of I/O library also offers a scope for making input/output operations portable across different architectures. Thus, use of parallel I/O libraries for organizing I/O of large data files offers great scope in improving performance and portability of applications. In particular, sequential I/O has been identified as a bottleneck for the highly scalable MFDn (Many Fermion Dynamics for nuclear structure) code performing ab-initio nuclear structure calculations. We develop interfaces and parallel I/O procedures to use a well-known parallel I/O library in MFDn. As a result, we gain efficient I/O of large datasets along with their portability and ease of use in the down-stream processing. Even situations where the amount of data to be written is not huge, proper use of input/output operations can boost the performance of scientific applications. Application checkpointing offers enormous performance improvement and flexibility by doing a negligible amount of I/O to disk. Checkpointing saves and resumes application state in such a manner that in most cases the application is unaware that there has been an interruption to its execution. This helps in saving large amount of work that has been previously done and continue application execution. This small amount of I/O provides substantial time saving by offering restart/resume capability to applications. The need for checkpointing in optimization code NEWUOA has been identified and checkpoint/restart capability has been implemented in NEWUOA by using simple file I/O.

  11. On the emergence of molecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Matyus, Edit; Reiher, Markus; Hutter, Juerg; Mueller-Herold, Ulrich

    2011-05-15

    The structure of (a{sup {+-}},a{sup {+-}},b{sup {+-}})-type Coulombic systems is characterized by the effective ground-state density of the a-type particles, computed via nonrelativistic quantum mechanics without introduction of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A structural transition is observed when varying the relative mass of the a- and b-type particles, e.g., between atomic H{sup -} and molecular H{sub 2}{sup +}. The particle-density profile indicates a molecular-type behavior for the positronium ion, Ps{sup -}.

  12. A new extension of unscented Kalman filter for structural health assessment with unknown input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hussein, Abdullah; Haldar, Achintya

    2014-03-01

    A time-domain nonlinear system identification (SI)-based structural health assessment (SHA) procedure, using Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) concept, is presented in this paper. It is a two-stage procedure. It integrates an iterative least squares technique and the unscented Kalman filter concept. The authors believe that the integrated procedure significantly improves the basic UKF concept. The procedure can assess the health of a structure using only a limited number of noise-contaminated acceleration time-histories measured only at a small part of a structure and does not need information on input excitation. The structures are represented by finite element models and the location and severity of defect(s) are assessed by tracking the changes in the stiffness properties of individual elements from their expected values. With the help of examples, it is demonstrated that the method is capable of accurately identifying defect-free and defective states of structures. Small and relatively large defects are introduced at different locations in the structure and the capability of the method to detect the health of the structure is examined. It is demonstrated that the accuracy of the method is much better than the other methods currently available for the structural health assessment. It is also superior to the extended Kalman filter. Considering the accuracy and robustness, the procedure can be used as a nondestructive structural health assessment procedure.

  13. Theoretical investigation of the molecular structure of the isoquercitrin molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornard, J. P.; Boudet, A. C.; Merlin, J. C.

    1999-09-01

    Isoquercitrin is a glycosilated flavonoid that has received a great deal of attention because of its numerous biological effects. We present a theoretical study on isoquercitrin using both empirical (Molecular Mechanics (MM), with MMX force field) and quantum chemical (AM1 semiempirical method) techniques. The most stable structures of the molecule obtained by MM calculations have been used as input data for the semiempirical treatment. The position and orientation of the glucose moiety with regard to the remainder of the molecule have been investigated. The flexibility of isoquercitrin principally lies in rotations around the inter-ring bond and the sugar link. In order to know the structural modifications generated by the substitution by a sugar, geometrical parameters of quercetin (aglycon) and isoquercitrin have been compared. The good accordance between theoretical and experimental electronic spectra permits to confirm the reliability of the structural model.

  14. Explicitly integrating parameter, input, and structure uncertainties into Bayesian Neural Networks for probabilistic hydrologic forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuesong; Liang, Faming; Yu, Beibei; Zong, Ziliang

    2011-11-09

    Estimating uncertainty of hydrologic forecasting is valuable to water resources and other relevant decision making processes. Recently, Bayesian Neural Networks (BNNs) have been proved powerful tools for quantifying uncertainty of streamflow forecasting. In this study, we propose a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) framework to incorporate the uncertainties associated with input, model structure, and parameter into BNNs. This framework allows the structure of the neural networks to change by removing or adding connections between neurons and enables scaling of input data by using rainfall multipliers. The results show that the new BNNs outperform the BNNs that only consider uncertainties associated with parameter and model structure. Critical evaluation of posterior distribution of neural network weights, number of effective connections, rainfall multipliers, and hyper-parameters show that the assumptions held in our BNNs are not well supported. Further understanding of characteristics of different uncertainty sources and including output error into the MCMC framework are expected to enhance the application of neural networks for uncertainty analysis of hydrologic forecasting.

  15. ATLAS, an integrated structural analysis and design system. Volume 3: User's manual, input and execution data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreisbach, R. L. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The input data and execution control statements for the ATLAS integrated structural analysis and design system are described. It is operational on the Control Data Corporation (CDC) 6600/CYBER computers in a batch mode or in a time-shared mode via interactive graphic or text terminals. ATLAS is a modular system of computer codes with common executive and data base management components. The system provides an extensive set of general-purpose technical programs with analytical capabilities including stiffness, stress, loads, mass, substructuring, strength design, unsteady aerodynamics, vibration, and flutter analyses. The sequence and mode of execution of selected program modules are controlled via a common user-oriented language.

  16. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bin; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Chen, Cheng; Li, Jialun; Powell, Prudence O.; Hu, Zhenxia; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets. PMID:26934359

  17. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  18. How We Teach Molecular Structure to Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Michael O.

    2002-01-01

    Currently molecular structure is taught in general chemistry using three theories, this being based more on historical development rather than logical pedagogy. Electronegativity is taught with a confusing mixture of definitions that do not correspond to modern practice. Valence bond theory and VSEPR are used together in a way that often confuses…

  19. Students' Understanding of Molecular Structure Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferk, Vesna; Vrtacnik, Margareta; Blejec, Andrej; Gril, Alenka

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine the meanings attached by students to the different kinds of molecular structure representations used in chemistry teaching. The students (n = 124) were from primary (aged 13-14 years) and secondary (aged 17-18 years) schools and a university (aged 21-25 years). A computerised "Chemical…

  20. Molecular Tracers of Saturated and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Inputs into Central Park Lake, New York City

    PubMed Central

    YAN, BEIZHAN; ABRAJANO, TEOFILO A.; BOPP, RICHARD F.; CHAKY, DAMON A.; BENEDICT, LUCILLE A.; CHILLRUD, STEVEN N.

    2011-01-01

    Saturated hydrocarbons (SH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been quantified in a sediment core obtained from Central Park Lake, New York City. Radionuclides 210Pb and 137Cs were used to assign approximate dates to each individual section in the core. The dating profile based on 210Pb matches very well with the time constraints provided by 137Cs. Radionuclide-derived depositional dates are consistent with temporal information from the petroleum-indicator ratio U/R [the ratio of unresolved complex mixture (UCM) to saturated hydrocarbons in the aliphatic fraction] and the history of fuel use in the NYC area. Ratios of 1,7-dimethylphenanthrane (DMP) to 1,7-DMP plus 2,6-DMP [1,7/(1,7 + 2,6)-DMP], retene to retene plus chrysene [Ret/(Ret + Chy)], and fluoranthene to fluoranthene plus pyrene [Fl/(Fl + Py)] provide additional source discrimination throughout the core. Results show that the ratio U/R is sensitive to petroleum inputs and Ret/(Ret + Chy) is responsive to contributions from softwood combustion, whereas both Fl/(Fl + Py) and 1,7/(1,7 + 2,6)-DMP can be used to discriminate among wood, coal, and petroleum combustion sources. Combined use of these ratios suggests that in New York City, wood combustion dominated 100 years ago, with a shift to coal combustion occurring from the 1900s to the 1950s. Petroleum use began around the 1920s and has dominated since the 1940s. PMID:16201624

  1. Molecular and structural analysis of viscoelastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapp, Rebecca D.; Kalyanam, Sureshkumar; Insana, Michael F.

    2007-03-01

    Elasticity imaging is emerging as an important tool for breast cancer detection and monitoring of treatment. Viscoelastic image contrast in breast lesions is generated by disease specific processes that modify the molecular structure of connective tissues. We showed previously that gelatin hydrogels exhibit mechanical behavior similar to native collagen found in breast tissue and therefore are suitable as phantoms for elasticity imaging. This paper summarizes our study of the viscoelastic properties of hydrogels designed to discover molecular-scale sources of elasticity image contrast.

  2. Molecular tracers of saturated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon inputs into Central Park Lake, New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Beizhan Yan; Teofilo A. Abrajano; Richard F. Bopp; Damon A. Chaky; Lucille A. Benedict; Steven N. Chillrud

    2005-09-15

    Saturated hydrocarbons (SH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been quantified in a sediment core obtained from Central Park Lake, New York City. Radionuclides {sup 210}Pb and {sup 137}Cs were used to assign approximate dates to each individual section in the core. The dating profile based on {sup 210}Pb matches very well with the time constraints provided by {sup 137}Cs. Radionuclide-derived depositional dates are consistent with temporal information from the petroleum-indicator ratio U/R (the ratio of unresolved complex mixture (UCM) to saturated hydrocarbons in the aliphatic fraction) and the history of fuel use in the NYC area. Ratios of 1,7-dimethylphenanthrane (DMP) to 1,7-DMP plus 2,6-DMP (1,7/(1,7 + 2,6)-DMP), retene to retene plus chrysene (Ret/(Ret + Chy)), and fluoranthene to fluoranthene plus pyrene (Fl/(Fl + Py))) provide additional source discrimination throughout the core. Results show that the ratio U/R is sensitive to petroleum inputs and Ret/(Ret + Chy) is responsive to contributions from softwood combustion, whereas both Fl/(Fl + Py) and 1,7/(1,7 + 2,6)-DMP can be used to discriminate among wood, coal, and petroleum combustion sources. Combined use of these ratios suggests that in New York City, wood combustion dominated 100 years ago, with a shift to coal combustion occurring from the 1900s to the 1950s. Petroleum use began around the 1920s and has dominated since the 1940s. 33 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Molecular information structures in the brain.

    PubMed

    Conrad, M

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a theory of memory and memory mediated learning based on the manipulation of macromolecular conformations. The main features of the theory are: 1) the brain contains primary and reference neurons; 2) inputs from the external environment produce particular patterns of primary firing; 3) the firing of a primary neuron sensitizes certain of its dendrites; 4) the sensitized primaries are loaded by the reference neuron active at the time and in such a way that they fire when called by this reference neuron, thus reconstructing the original pattern of primary activity. The reference neurons may also be loaded by primaries, thus making it possible for the reconstruction process to be initiated by some feature of the initial input. Each reference neuron loads and calls at most one primary pattern of activity, thereby preventing superposition of memories. If the primaries are loadable by sequences of impulses, this makes it possible to increase the connectivity among the various types of neurons by using party-line organization. The loading and calling processes themselves are mediated by call molecules. These are allosteric enzymes, located in the dendrites of primary and reference neurons, whose states are set either by an impulse or sequence of impulses and which catalyze events leading to impulse formation whenever this input recurs. The call molecules are capable of duplicating their setting (or conformation) using either intra- or interneuronal potentials, thereby ensuring stability of the memory trace. The theory allows for general powers of memory manipulation (by rememorization), for the construction of time ordered, content ordered, and associative data structures, and for computation with global representations of the environment. It makes a large number of testable predictions, provides a natural interpretation for the structure of the cerebral cortex, and accounts for: resistance to cooling, differential effects of chemical agents on short

  4. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  5. Silylated carbodiimides in molecular and extended structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Peter; Riedel, Ralf; Hoffmann, Roald

    1999-08-01

    This work studies the ternary Si-C-N phases SiC2N4 and Si2CN4,exploiting an analogy between the NCN and O groups. Starting from the molecular model of N,N'-bis(trimethylsilyl)-carbodiimide and proceeding to extended models, we calculate that the energy hypersurface associated with the Si-N=C bond angle φN is very shallow, for both molecular and extended structures. We propose a crystal structure for the low-temperature modification α-SiC2N4 in space group P4322 (95), which is 40 meV (~4 kJ/mol) lower in energy than an ideal cubic arrangement in space group Pn3¯m.A second structure, β-SiC2N4 [space group P4¯n2 (118)], is slightly higher in energy than α-SiC2N4,but still more stable than the cubic structure, and may be the high-temperature structure of SiC2N4.Both variants of SiC2N4 show a small bulk modulus of about 8 GPa (~0.13 Mbar),suggesting a high compressibility of these nonoxide covalently bonded materials. For Si2CN4 we refined the crystal structure of the compound within the experimentally determined space group Aba2 (41). We also found a second candidate nearly equal in energy, with space group Cmc21,differing only in the connection pattern of the SiN2 layered sheets. Both ternary compounds appear to be thermodynamically unstable with respect to decomposition into Si3N4,C, and molecular N2.

  6. Evaluation of severe accident risks: Quantification of major input parameters. Experts` determination of structural response issues

    SciTech Connect

    Breeding, R.J.; Harper, F.T.; Brown, T.D.; Gregory, J.J.; Payne, A.C.; Gorham, E.D.; Murfin, W.; Amos, C.N.

    1992-03-01

    In support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) assessment of the risk from severe accidents at commercial nuclear power plants in the US reported in NUREG-1150, the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program (SAARP) has completed a revised calculation of the risk to the general public from severe accidents at five nuclear power plants: Surry, Sequoyah, Zion, Peach Bottom, and Grand Gulf. The emphasis in this risk analysis was not on determining a ``so-called`` point estimate of risk. Rather, it was to determine the distribution of risk, and to discover the uncertainties that account for the breadth of this distribution. Off-site risk initiation by events, both internal to the power station and external to the power station were assessed. Much of the important input to the logic models was generated by expert panels. This document presents the distributions and the rationale supporting the distributions for the questions posed to the Structural Response Panel.

  7. Bacterial community structure is indicative of chemical inputs in the Upper Mississippi River

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J.; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Local and regional associations between bacterial communities and nutrient and chemical concentrations were assessed in the Upper Mississippi River in Minnesota to determine if community structure was associated with discrete types of chemical inputs associated with different land cover. Bacterial communities were characterized by Illumina sequencing of the V6 region of 16S rDNA and compared to >40 chemical and nutrient concentrations. Local bacterial community structure was shaped primarily by associations among bacterial orders. However, order abundances were correlated regionally with nutrient and chemical concentrations, and were also related to major land coverage types. Total organic carbon and total dissolved solids were among the primary abiotic factors associated with local community composition and co-varied with land cover. Escherichia coli concentration was poorly related to community composition or nutrient concentrations. Abundances of 14 bacterial orders were related to land coverage type, and seven showed significant differences in abundance (P ≤ 0.046) between forested or anthropogenically-impacted sites. This study identifies specific bacterial orders that were associated with chemicals and nutrients derived from specific land cover types and may be useful in assessing water quality. Results of this study reveal the need to investigate community dynamics at both the local and regional scales and to identify shifts in taxonomic community structure that may be useful in determining sources of pollution in the Upper Mississippi River. PMID:25339945

  8. Spatial structure of the meroplankton community along a Patagonian fjord - The role of changing freshwater inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerhoff, Erika; Tapia, Fabián J.; Castro, Leonardo R.

    2014-12-01

    Freshwater inputs are major drivers of circulation, hydrographic structure, and productivity patterns along estuarine systems. We assessed the degree to which meroplankton community structure in the Baker/Martinez fjord complex (Chilean Patagonia, 47.5°S) responds to spatial and temporal changes in hydrographic conditions driven by seasonal changes in Baker river outflow. Zooplankton and hydrographic measurements were conducted along the fjord in early spring (October) and late summer (February), when river outflow was minimal and maximal, respectively. Major meroplankton groups found on these surveys were larval barnacles, crabs, bivalves and gastropods. There was a clear change in community structure between October and February, explained by a switch in the numerically dominant group from barnacle to bivalve larvae. This change in community structure was related to changes in hydrographic structure along the fjord, which are mainly associated with seasonal changes in the Baker river outflow. A variance partition analysis showed no significant spatial trend that could account for the variation in meroplankton along the Martinez channel, whereas temporal variability and environmental variables accounted for 36.6% and 27.6% of the variance, respectively. When comparing meroplankton among the Baker and Martinez channels in October, changes in environmental variables explained 44.9% of total variance, whereas spatial variability accounted for 23.5%. Early and late-stage barnacle larvae (i.e. nauplii and cyprids) were more abundant in water with lower temperature, and higher dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll-a concentration, whereas bivalve larvae were more strongly associated to warmer waters. The seasonal shift in numerical dominance, from barnacle larvae in early spring to bivalve larvae in late summer, suggests that reproduction of these groups is triggered by substantially different sets of conditions, both in terms of hydrography and food availability. The

  9. Large woody debris input and its influence on channel structure in agricultural lands of Southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Felipe Rossetti; Ferraz, Silvio Frosini de Barros; Gerhard, Pedro; Vettorazzi, Carlos Alberto; Ferreira, Anderson

    2011-10-01

    Riparian forests are important for the structure and functioning of stream ecosystems, providing structural components such as large woody debris (LWD). Changes in these forests will cause modifications in the LWD input to streams, affecting their structure. In order to assess the influence of riparian forests changes in LWD supply, 15 catchments (third and fourth order) with riparian forests at different conservation levels were selected for sampling. In each catchment we quantified the abundance, volume and diameter of LWD in stream channels; the number, area and volume of pools formed by LWD and basal area and tree diameter of riparian forest. We found that riparian forests were at a secondary successional stage with predominantly young trees (diameter at breast height <10 cm) in all studied streams. Results showed that basal area and diameter of riparian forest differed between the stream groups (forested and non-forested), but tree density did not differ between groups. Differences were also observed in LWD abundance, volume, frequency of LWD pools with subunits and area and volume of LWD pools. LWD diameter, LWD that form pools diameter and frequency of LWD pools without subunits did not differ between stream groups. Regression analyses showed that LWD abundance and volume, and frequency of LWD pools (with and without subunits) were positively related with the proportion of riparian forest. LWD diameter was not correlated to riparian tree diameter. The frequency of LWD pools was correlated to the abundance and volume of LWD, but characteristics of these pools (area and volume) were not correlated to the diameter of LWD that formed the pools. These results show that alterations in riparian forest cause modifications in the LWD abundance and volume in the stream channel, affecting mainly the structural complexity of these ecosystems (reduction in the number and structural characteristics of LWD pools). Our results also demonstrate that riparian forest

  10. Local structure of subcellular input retinotopy in an identified visual interneuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ying; Gabbiani, Fabrizio; Fabrizio Gabbiani's lab Team

    2015-03-01

    How does the spatial layout of the projections that a neuron receives impact its synaptic integration and computation? What is the mapping topography of subcellular wiring at the single neuron level? The LGMD (lobula giant movement detector) neuron in the locust is an identified neuron that responds preferentially to objects approaching on a collision course. It receives excitatory inputs from the entire visual hemifield through calcium-permeable nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Previous work showed that the projection from the locust compound eye to the LGMD preserved retinotopy down to the level of a single ommatidium (facet) by employing in vivo widefield calcium imaging. Because widefield imaging relies on global excitation of the preparation and has a relatively low resolution, previous work could not investigate this retinotopic mapping at the level of individual thin dendritic branches. Our current work employs a custom-built two-photon microscope with sub-micron resolution in conjunction with a single-facet stimulation setup that provides visual stimuli to the single ommatidium of locust adequate to explore the local structure of this retinotopy at a finer level. We would thank NIMH for funding this research.

  11. Input-output oriented computation algorithms for the control of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minto, K. D.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of work in progress aimed at developing computational algorithms addressing two important aspects in the control of large flexible space structures; namely, the selection and placement of sensors and actuators, and the resulting multivariable control law design problem. The issue of sensor/actuator set selection is particularly crucial to obtaining a satisfactory control design, as clearly a poor choice will inherently limit the degree to which good control can be achieved. With regard to control law design, the researchers are driven by concerns stemming from the practical issues associated with eventual implementation of multivariable control laws, such as reliability, limit protection, multimode operation, sampling rate selection, processor throughput, etc. Naturally, the burden imposed by dealing with these aspects of the problem can be reduced by ensuring that the complexity of the compensator is minimized. Our approach to these problems is based on extensions to input/output oriented techniques that have proven useful in the design of multivariable control systems for aircraft engines. In particular, researchers are exploring the use of relative gain analysis and the condition number as a means of quantifying the process of sensor/actuator selection and placement for shape control of a large space platform.

  12. Light-operated machines based on threaded molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Credi, Alberto; Silvi, Serena; Venturi, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Rotaxanes and related species represent the most common implementation of the concept of artificial molecular machines, because the supramolecular nature of the interactions between the components and their interlocked architecture allow a precise control on the position and movement of the molecular units. The use of light to power artificial molecular machines is particularly valuable because it can play the dual role of "writing" and "reading" the system. Moreover, light-driven machines can operate without accumulation of waste products, and photons are the ideal inputs to enable autonomous operation mechanisms. In appropriately designed molecular machines, light can be used to control not only the stability of the system, which affects the relative position of the molecular components but also the kinetics of the mechanical processes, thereby enabling control on the direction of the movements. This step forward is necessary in order to make a leap from molecular machines to molecular motors.

  13. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  14. Computing stoichiometric molecular composition from crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Gražulis, Saulius; Merkys, Andrius; Vaitkus, Antanas; Okulič-Kazarinas, Mykolas

    2015-01-01

    Crystallographic investigations deliver high-accuracy information about positions of atoms in crystal unit cells. For chemists, however, the structure of a molecule is most often of interest. The structure must thus be reconstructed from crystallographic files using symmetry information and chemical properties of atoms. Most existing algorithms faithfully reconstruct separate molecules but not the overall stoichiometry of the complex present in a crystal. Here, an algorithm that can reconstruct stoichiometrically correct multimolecular ensembles is described. This algorithm uses only the crystal symmetry information for determining molecule numbers and their stoichiometric ratios. The algorithm can be used by chemists and crystallographers as a standalone implementation for investigating above-molecular ensembles or as a function implemented in graphical crystal analysis software. The greatest envisaged benefit of the algorithm, however, is for the users of large crystallographic and chemical databases, since it will permit database maintainers to generate stoichiometrically correct chemical representations of crystal structures automatically and to match them against chemical databases, enabling multidisciplinary searches across multiple databases. PMID:26089747

  15. Molecular composition, structure, and sensitivity of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, C.B.; Travis, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    High explosives, blasting agents, propellants, and pyrotechnics are all metastable relative to reaction products and are termed energetic materials. They are thermodynamically unstable but the kinetics of decomposition at ambient conditions are sufficiently slow that they can be handled safely under controlled conditions. The ease with which an energetic material can be caused to undergo a violent reaction or detonation is called its sensitivity. Sensitivity tests for energetic materials are aimed at defining the response of the material to a specific situation, usually prompt shock initiation or a delayed reaction in an accident. The observed response is always due to a combination of the physical state and the molecular structure of the material. Modeling of any initiation process must consider both factors. The physical state of the material determines how and where the energy is deposited in the material. The molecular structure determines the mechanism of decomposition of the material and the rate of energy release. Slower inherent reaction chemistry leads to longer reaction zones in detonation and inherently safer materials. Slower chemistry also requires hot spots involved in initiation to be hotter and to survive for longer periods of time. High thermal conductivity also leads to quenching of small hot spots and makes a material more difficult to initiate. Early endothermic decomposition chemistry also delays initiation by delaying heat release to support hot spot growth. The growth to violent reaction or detonation also depends on the nature of the early reaction products. If chemical intermediates are produced that drive further accelerating autocatalytic decomposition the initiation will grow rapidly to a violent reaction.

  16. Plant sex chromosomes: molecular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Jamilena, M; Mariotti, B; Manzano, S

    2008-01-01

    Recent molecular and genomic studies carried out in a number of model dioecious plant species, including Asparagus officinalis, Carica papaya, Silene latifolia, Rumex acetosa and Marchantia polymorpha, have shed light on the molecular structure of both homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and also on the gene functions they have maintained since their evolution from a pair of autosomes. The molecular structure of sex chromosomes in species from different plant families represents the evolutionary pathway followed by sex chromosomes during their evolution. The degree of Y chromosome degeneration that accompanies the suppression of recombination between the Xs and Ys differs among species. The primitive Ys of A. officinalis and C. papaya have only diverged from their homomorphic Xs in a short male-specific and non-recombining region (MSY), while the heteromorphic Ys of S. latifolia, R. acetosa and M. polymorpha have diverged from their respective Xs. As in the Y chromosomes of mammals and Drosophila, the accumulation of repetitive DNA, including both transposable elements and satellite DNA, has played an important role in the divergence and size enlargement of plant Ys, and consequently in reducing gene density. Nevertheless, the degeneration process in plants does not appear to have reached the Y-linked genes. Although a low gene density has been found in the sequenced Y chromosome of M. polymorpha, most of its genes are essential and are expressed in the vegetative and reproductive organs in both male and females. Similarly, most of the Y-linked genes that have been isolated and characterized up to now in S. latifolia are housekeeping genes that have X-linked homologues, and are therefore expressed in both males and females. Only one of them seems to be degenerate with respect to its homologous region in the X. Sequence analysis of larger regions in the homomorphic X and Y chromosomes of papaya and asparagus, and also in the heteromorphic sex chromosomes

  17. Why are some verbs learned before other verbs? Effects of input frequency and structure on children's early verb use.

    PubMed

    Naigles, L R; Hoff-Ginsberg, E

    1998-02-01

    This study investigated the extent to which the nature of verb input accounts for the order in which children acquire verbs. We assessed the nature of verb input using a combined sample of the speech of 57 mothers addressing their Stage I children. We assessed the order of verb acquisition using as our database a combined sample of those children's speech 10 weeks later and using as our measure of order of acquisition the frequency of verb occurrence. The first set of analyses established the validity of this measure of acquisition order by comparing it with order of acquisition data obtained from checklist and diary data. The second set of analyses revealed that three properties of the input were significant predictors of the order of acquisition of the 25 verbs that were the focus of this study. The predictive properties of input were the total frequency, final position frequency, and diversity of syntactic environments in which the verbs appeared. These findings suggest that the way verbs appear in input influences their ease of acquisition. More specifically, the effect of syntactic diversity in input provides support for the syntactic bootstrapping account of how children use structural information to learn the meaning of new verbs. PMID:9604570

  18. Input-based structure-specific proficiency predicts the neural mechanism of adult L2 syntactic processing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Taiping; Zhou, Huixia; Bi, Hong-Yan; Chen, Baoguo

    2015-06-12

    This study used Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) to explore the role of input-based structure-specific proficiency in L2 syntactic processing, using English subject-verb agreement structures as the stimuli. A pre-test/trainings/post-test paradigm of experimental and control groups was employed, and Chinese speakers who learned English as a second language (L2) participated in the experiment. At pre-test, no ERP component related to the subject-verb agreement structures violations was observed in either group. At training session, the experimental group learned the subject-verb agreement structures, while the control group learned other syntactic structures. After two continuously intensive input trainings, at post-test, a significant P600 component related to the subject-verb agreement structures violations was elicited in the experimental group, but not in the control group. These findings suggest that input training improves structure-specific proficiency, which is reflected in the neural mechanism of L2 syntactic processing.

  19. Parallel computing structures capable of flexible associations and recognition of fuzzy inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, T.; Huberman, B. A.

    1985-10-01

    We experimentally show that computing with attractors leads to fast adaptive behavior in which dynamical associations can be made between different inputs which initially produce sharply distinct outputs. We do so by first defining a set of simple local procedures which allow a computing array to change its state in time so as to produce classical Pavlovian conditioning. We then examine the dynamics of coalescence and dissociation of attractors with a number of quantitative experiments. We also show how such arrays exhibit generalization and differentiation of inputs in their behavior.

  20. Emergence of network structure due to spike-timing-dependent plasticity in recurrent neuronal networks. I. Input selectivity--strengthening correlated input pathways.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Matthieu; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B; Thomas, Doreen A; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2009-08-01

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) determines the evolution of the synaptic weights according to their pre- and post-synaptic activity, which in turn changes the neuronal activity. In this paper, we extend previous studies of input selectivity induced by (STDP) for single neurons to the biologically interesting case of a neuronal network with fixed recurrent connections and plastic connections from external pools of input neurons. We use a theoretical framework based on the Poisson neuron model to analytically describe the network dynamics (firing rates and spike-time correlations) and thus the evolution of the synaptic weights. This framework incorporates the time course of the post-synaptic potentials and synaptic delays. Our analysis focuses on the asymptotic states of a network stimulated by two homogeneous pools of "steady" inputs, namely Poisson spike trains which have fixed firing rates and spike-time correlations. The (STDP) model extends rate-based learning in that it can implement, at the same time, both a stabilization of the individual neuron firing rates and a slower weight specialization depending on the input spike-time correlations. When one input pathway has stronger within-pool correlations, the resulting synaptic dynamics induced by (STDP) are shown to be similar to those arising in the case of a purely feed-forward network: the weights from the more correlated inputs are potentiated at the expense of the remaining input connections. PMID:19536560

  1. The Roles of Structured Input Activities in Processing Instruction and the Kinds of Knowledge They Promote

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Emma; Chen, Hsin-Ying

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to isolate the effects of the two input activities in Processing Instruction: referential activities, which force learners to focus on a form and its meaning, and affective activities, which contain exemplars of the target form and require learners to process sentence meaning. One hundred and twenty 12-year-old Taiwanese learners…

  2. Combined Influence of Landscape Composition and Nutrient Inputs on Lake Trophic Structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of chlorophyll a is a measure of the biological productivity of a lake and is largely (but not exclusively) determined by available nutrients. As nutrient inputs increase, productivity increases and lakes transition from low trophic state (e.g. oligotrophic) to...

  3. The Determination of Molecular Structure from Rotational Spectra

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laurie, V. W.; Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-07-01

    An analysis is presented concerning the average molecular configuration variations and their effects on molecular structure determinations. It is noted that the isotopic dependence of the zero-point is often primarily governed by the isotopic variation of the average molecular configuration. (J.R.D.)

  4. Molecular cloning of chicken aggrecan. Structural analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, L; Tanzer, M L

    1992-01-01

    The large, aggregating chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan of cartilage, aggrecan, has served as a generic model of proteoglycan structure. Molecular cloning of aggrecans has further defined their amino acid sequences and domain structures. In this study, we have obtained the complete coding sequence of chicken sternal cartilage aggrecan by a combination of cDNA and genomic DNA sequencing. The composite sequence is 6117 bp in length, encoding 1951 amino acids. Comparison of chicken aggrecan protein primary structure with rat, human and bovine aggrecans has disclosed both similarities and differences. The domains which are most highly conserved at 70-80% identity are the N-terminal domains G1 and G2 and the C-terminal domain G3. The chondroitin sulphate domain of chicken aggrecan is smaller than that of rat and human aggrecans and has very distinctive repeat sequences. It has two separate sections, one comprising 12 consecutive Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 20 amino acids each, adjacent to the other which has 23 discontinuous Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 10 amino acids each; this latter region, N-terminal to the former one, appears to be unique to chicken aggrecan. The two regions contain a total of 94 potential chondroitin sulphate attachment sites. Genomic comparison shows that, although chicken exons 11-14 are identical in size to the rat and human exons, chicken exon 10 is the smallest of the three species. This is also reflected in the size of its chondroitin sulphate coding region and in the total number of Ser-Gly pairs. The putative keratan sulphate domain shows 31-45% identity with the other species and lacks the repetitive sequences seen in the others. In summary, while the linear arrangement of specific domains of chicken aggrecan is identical to that in the aggrecans of other species, and while there is considerable identity of three separate domains, chicken aggrecan demonstrates unique features, notably in its chondroitin sulphate domain and its keratan sulphate

  5. Effects of switchgrass cultivars and intraspecific differences in root structure on soil carbon inputs and accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Jaron; Jastrow, Julie D.; Morris, Geoffrey P.; Six, Johan; de Graaff, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L), a cellulosic biofuel feedstock, may promote soil C 21 accumulation compared to annual cropping systems by increasing the amount and retention of 22 root-derived soil C inputs. The aim of this study was to assess how different switchgrass 23 cultivars impact soil C inputs and retention, whether these impacts vary with depth, and whether 24 specific root length (SRL) explains these impacts. We collected soil to a depth of 30 cm from six 25 switchgrass cultivars with root systems ranging from high to low SRL. The cultivars (C4 species) 26 were grown for 27 months on soils previously dominated by C3 plants, allowing us to use the 27 natural difference in 13C isotopic signatures between C3 soils and C4 plants to quantify 28 switchgrass-derived C accumulation. The soil was fractionated into coarse particulate organic 29 matter (CPOM), fine particulate organic matter (FPOM), silt, and clay-sized fractions. We 30 measured total C and plant-derived C in all soil fractions across all depths. The study led to two main results: (1) bulk soil C concentrations beneath switchgrass cultivars varied by 40% in the 0-32 10 cm soil depth and by 70% in the 10-20 cm soil depth, and cultivars with high bulk soil C 33 concentrations tended to have relatively high C concentrations in the mineral soil fractions and 34 relatively low C concentrations in the POM fractions; (2) there were significant differences in 35 switchgrass-derived soil C between cultivars at the 0-10 cm depth, where soil C inputs ranged 36 from 1.2 to 3.2 mg C g-1 dry soil. There was also evidence of a positive correlation between SRL 37 and switchgrass-derived C inputs when one outlier data point was removed. These results 38 indicate that switchgrass cultivars differentially impact mechanisms contributing to soil C accumulation.

  6. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  7. Molecular clouds and galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    Galactic CO line emission at 115 GHz was surveyed in order to study the distribution of molecular clouds in the inner galaxy. Comparison of this survey with similar H1 data reveals a detailed correlation with the most intense 21 cm features. To each of the classical 21 cm H1 spiral arms of the inner galaxy there corresponds a CO molecular arm which is generally more clearly defined and of higher contrast. A simple model is devised for the galactic distribution of molecular clouds. The modeling results suggest that molecular clouds are essentially transient objects, existing for 15 to 40 million years after their formation in a spiral arm, and are largely confined to spiral features about 300 pc wide.

  8. Spatial structure of cone inputs to receptive fields in primate lateral geniculate nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, R. Clay; Shapley, Robert M.

    1992-04-01

    HUMAN colour vision depends on three classes of cone photoreceptors, those sensitive to short (S), medium (M) or long (L) wavelengths, and on how signals from these cones are combined by neurons in the retina and brain. Macaque monkey colour vision is similar to human, and the receptive fields of macaque visual neurons have been used as an animal model of human colour processing1. P retinal ganglion cells and parvocellular neurons are colour-selective neurons in macaque retina and lateral geniculate nucleus. Interactions between cone signals feeding into these neurons are still unclear. On the basis of experimental results with chromatic adaptation, excitatory and inhibitory inputs from L and M cones onto P cells (and parvocellular neurons) were thought to be quite specific2,3 (Fig. la). But these experiments with spatially diffuse adaptation did not rule out the 'mixed-surround' hypothesis: that there might be one cone-specific mechanism, the receptive field centre, and a surround mechanism connected to all cone types indiscriminately (Fig. le). Recent work has tended to support the mixed-surround hypothesis4-8. We report here the development of new stimuli to measure spatial maps of the linear L-, M- and S-cone inputs to test the hypothesis definitively. Our measurements contradict the mixed-surround hypothesis and imply cone specificity in both centre and surround.

  9. An Integrated Hydrologic Bayesian Multi-Model Combination Framework: Confronting Input, parameter and model structural uncertainty in Hydrologic Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Ajami, N K; Duan, Q; Sorooshian, S

    2006-05-05

    This paper presents a new technique--Integrated Bayesian Uncertainty Estimator (IBUNE) to account for the major uncertainties of hydrologic rainfall-runoff predictions explicitly. The uncertainties from the input (forcing) data--mainly the precipitation observations and from the model parameters are reduced through a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) scheme named Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis (SCEM) algorithm which has been extended to include a precipitation error model. Afterwards, the Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) scheme is employed to further improve the prediction skill and uncertainty estimation using multiple model output. A series of case studies using three rainfall-runoff models to predict the streamflow in the Leaf River basin, Mississippi are used to examine the necessity and usefulness of this technique. The results suggests that ignoring either input forcings error or model structural uncertainty will lead to unrealistic model simulations and their associated uncertainty bounds which does not consistently capture and represent the real-world behavior of the watershed.

  10. Influence of allochtonous carbon input and food-web structure on freshwater biotic communities and sedimentation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrault, Loïc; Allard, Béatrice; Mériguet, Jacques; Carmignac, David; Perret, Samuel; Huon, Sylvain; Edeline, Eric; Lacroix, Gérard

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion in freshwaters induces important changes in lake metabolism. The organic matter and the nutrients supplied by soil inputs can change internal biogeochemical cycles and subsidize the whole food web from basal organisms to top-predators. Since the last two decades, the role of allochthonous organic matter as a basal resource for aquatic food webs in natural and controlled conditions has received a growing attention. We studied the impact of soil on the functioning of pond ecosystems by performing monthly additions of soil in freshwater mesocosms. In addition, the food-web structure was manipulated by addition of omnivorous fish to study interactions between the bottom-up effect of soil addition and the top-down effect of fish. The effects of soil and fish addition on the, the elemental and the biochemical compositions of pelagic compartments and recent sediment, on the biomass of seston and zooplankton and on the sediment rates were studied. Soil inputs had no effect on biomass, stoichiometry and lipid composition of seston and zooplankton but fish growth was enhanced by soil addition. Soil treatment had several (but idiosyncratic) effects on the stoichiometry and on the lipid composition of recent sediment. However, the sedimentation rates and the potential biodegradability of recent sediment were not affected by soil inputs. Fish addition affected chlorophyll-a concentration of the water column, seston biomass, sedimentation rates and stoichiometry of seston, zooplankton and short-term sediment. The lipid composition of recent sediment was also influenced by fish addition. However, fish addition did not change the biodegradability of recent sediment. Finally, we did not observe any significant interaction between soil and fish treatments. Our results suggest that the addition of soil as allochthonous inputs to aquatic ecosystem induced a subsidize of the food web only on fish, probably due to direct foraging on bottom sediment. Nevertheless, this

  11. Structures in Galaxies: Nature versus Nurture. Input from Theory and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    2010-10-01

    Galaxies, in particular disc galaxies, contain a number of structures and substructures with well defined morphological, photometric and kinematic properties. Considerable theoretical effort has been put into explaining their formation and evolution, both analytically and with numerical simulations. In some theories, structures form during the natural evolution of the galaxy, i.e. they are a result of nature. For others, it is the interaction with other galaxies, or with the intergalactic medium—i.e. nurture—that accounts for a structure. Either way, the existence and properties of these structures reveal important information on the underlying potential of the galaxy, i.e. on the amount and distribution of matter—including the dark matter—in it, and on the evolutionary history of the galaxy. Here, I will briefly review the various formation scenarios and the respective role of nature and nurture in the formation, evolution and properties of the main structures and substructures.

  12. Two worlds collide: Image analysis methods for quantifying structural variation in cluster molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Steenbergen, K. G.; Gaston, N.

    2014-02-14

    Inspired by methods of remote sensing image analysis, we analyze structural variation in cluster molecular dynamics (MD) simulations through a unique application of the principal component analysis (PCA) and Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC). The PCA analysis characterizes the geometric shape of the cluster structure at each time step, yielding a detailed and quantitative measure of structural stability and variation at finite temperature. Our PCC analysis captures bond structure variation in MD, which can be used to both supplement the PCA analysis as well as compare bond patterns between different cluster sizes. Relying only on atomic position data, without requirement for a priori structural input, PCA and PCC can be used to analyze both classical and ab initio MD simulations for any cluster composition or electronic configuration. Taken together, these statistical tools represent powerful new techniques for quantitative structural characterization and isomer identification in cluster MD.

  13. Efficient Structure-Aware Selection Techniques for 3D Point Cloud Visualizations with 2DOF Input.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyun; Efstathiou, K; Isenberg, P; Isenberg, T

    2012-12-01

    Data selection is a fundamental task in visualization because it serves as a pre-requisite to many follow-up interactions. Efficient spatial selection in 3D point cloud datasets consisting of thousands or millions of particles can be particularly challenging. We present two new techniques, TeddySelection and CloudLasso, that support the selection of subsets in large particle 3D datasets in an interactive and visually intuitive manner. Specifically, we describe how to spatially select a subset of a 3D particle cloud by simply encircling the target particles on screen using either the mouse or direct-touch input. Based on the drawn lasso, our techniques automatically determine a bounding selection surface around the encircled particles based on their density. This kind of selection technique can be applied to particle datasets in several application domains. TeddySelection and CloudLasso reduce, and in some cases even eliminate, the need for complex multi-step selection processes involving Boolean operations. This was confirmed in a formal, controlled user study in which we compared the more flexible CloudLasso technique to the standard cylinder-based selection technique. This study showed that the former is consistently more efficient than the latter - in several cases the CloudLasso selection time was half that of the corresponding cylinder-based selection.

  14. The molecular structure of 1-methyl- trans-cyclooctene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traetteberg, M.; Bakken, P.; Almenningen, A.

    1981-07-01

    The molecular structure of 1 -methyl- trans-cyclooctene has been studied by the gas electron diffraction method. A molecular mechanics calculation has been done for the title compound and for trans-cyclooctene and 1,2-dimethyl- trans-cyclooctene.

  15. Structures of High Density Molecular Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, B; Cynn, H; Iota, V; Yoo, C-S

    2002-02-01

    The goal of this proposal is to develop an in-situ probe for high density molecular fluids. We will, therefore, use Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) applied to laser heated samples in a diamond-anvil cell (DAC) to investigate molecular fluids at simultaneous conditions of high temperatures (T > 2000K) and high pressures (P > 10 GPa.) Temperatures sufficient to populate vibrational levels above the ground state will allow the vibrational potential to be mapped by CARS. A system capable of heating and probing these samples will be constructed. Furthermore, the techniques that enable a sample to be sufficiently heated and probed while held at static high pressure in a diamond-anvil-cell will be developed. This will be an in-situ investigation of simple molecules under conditions relevant to the study of detonation chemistry and the Jovain planet interiors using state of the art non-linear spectroscopy, diamond-anvil-cells, and laser heating technology.

  16. Colour Chemistry, Part I, Principles, Colour, and Molecular Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallas, G.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses various topics in color chemistry, including the electromagnetic spectrum, the absorption and reflection of light, additive and subtractive color mixing, and the molecular structure of simple colored substances. (MLH)

  17. Damage Characterization Method for Structural Health Management Using Reduced Number of Sensor Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Gallegos, Adam M.

    2012-01-01

    The development of validated multidisciplinary Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) tools, technologies, and techniques to enable detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation in the presence of adverse conditions during flight will provide effective solutions to deal with safety related challenges facing next generation aircraft. The adverse conditions include loss of control caused by environmental factors, actuator and sensor faults or failures, and damage conditions. A major concern in these structures is the growth of undetected damage (cracks) due to fatigue and low velocity foreign impacts that can reach a critical size during flight, resulting in loss of control of the aircraft. Hence, development of efficient methodologies to determine the presence, location, and severity of damage in critical structural components is highly important in developing efficient structural health management systems.

  18. Role of intraglomerular circuits in shaping temporally structured responses to naturalistic inhalation-driven sensory input to the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Ryan M.; Sherwood, William Erik; Shipley, Michael T.; Borisyuk, Alla

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction in mammals is a dynamic process driven by the inhalation of air through the nasal cavity. Inhalation determines the temporal structure of sensory neuron responses and shapes the neural dynamics underlying central olfactory processing. Inhalation-linked bursts of activity among olfactory bulb (OB) output neurons [mitral/tufted cells (MCs)] are temporally transformed relative to those of sensory neurons. We investigated how OB circuits shape inhalation-driven dynamics in MCs using a modeling approach that was highly constrained by experimental results. First, we constructed models of canonical OB circuits that included mono- and disynaptic feedforward excitation, recurrent inhibition and feedforward inhibition of the MC. We then used experimental data to drive inputs to the models and to tune parameters; inputs were derived from sensory neuron responses during natural odorant sampling (sniffing) in awake rats, and model output was compared with recordings of MC responses to odorants sampled with the same sniff waveforms. This approach allowed us to identify OB circuit features underlying the temporal transformation of sensory inputs into inhalation-linked patterns of MC spike output. We found that realistic input-output transformations can be achieved independently by multiple circuits, including feedforward inhibition with slow onset and decay kinetics and parallel feedforward MC excitation mediated by external tufted cells. We also found that recurrent and feedforward inhibition had differential impacts on MC firing rates and on inhalation-linked response dynamics. These results highlight the importance of investigating neural circuits in a naturalistic context and provide a framework for further explorations of signal processing by OB networks. PMID:25717156

  19. Role of intraglomerular circuits in shaping temporally structured responses to naturalistic inhalation-driven sensory input to the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Carey, Ryan M; Sherwood, William Erik; Shipley, Michael T; Borisyuk, Alla; Wachowiak, Matt

    2015-05-01

    Olfaction in mammals is a dynamic process driven by the inhalation of air through the nasal cavity. Inhalation determines the temporal structure of sensory neuron responses and shapes the neural dynamics underlying central olfactory processing. Inhalation-linked bursts of activity among olfactory bulb (OB) output neurons [mitral/tufted cells (MCs)] are temporally transformed relative to those of sensory neurons. We investigated how OB circuits shape inhalation-driven dynamics in MCs using a modeling approach that was highly constrained by experimental results. First, we constructed models of canonical OB circuits that included mono- and disynaptic feedforward excitation, recurrent inhibition and feedforward inhibition of the MC. We then used experimental data to drive inputs to the models and to tune parameters; inputs were derived from sensory neuron responses during natural odorant sampling (sniffing) in awake rats, and model output was compared with recordings of MC responses to odorants sampled with the same sniff waveforms. This approach allowed us to identify OB circuit features underlying the temporal transformation of sensory inputs into inhalation-linked patterns of MC spike output. We found that realistic input-output transformations can be achieved independently by multiple circuits, including feedforward inhibition with slow onset and decay kinetics and parallel feedforward MC excitation mediated by external tufted cells. We also found that recurrent and feedforward inhibition had differential impacts on MC firing rates and on inhalation-linked response dynamics. These results highlight the importance of investigating neural circuits in a naturalistic context and provide a framework for further explorations of signal processing by OB networks.

  20. Adaptive modelling of structured molecular representations for toxicity prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertinetto, Carlo; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Solaro, Roberto; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of modelling structure-toxicity relationships by direct treatment of the molecular structure (without using descriptors) through an adaptive model able to retain the appropriate structural information. With respect to traditional descriptor-based approaches, this provides a more general and flexible way to tackle prediction problems that is particularly suitable when little or no background knowledge is available. Our method employs a tree-structured molecular representation, which is processed by a recursive neural network (RNN). To explore the realization of RNN modelling in toxicological problems, we employed a data set containing growth impairment concentrations (IGC50) for Tetrahymena pyriformis.

  1. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  2. Synthesis and molecular structure of gold triarylcorroles.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kolle E; Alemayehu, Abraham B; Conradie, Jeanet; Beavers, Christine; Ghosh, Abhik

    2011-12-19

    A number of third-row transition-metal corroles have remained elusive as synthetic targets until now, notably osmium, platinum, and gold corroles. Against this backdrop, we present a simple and general synthesis of β-unsubstituted gold(III) triarylcorroles and the first X-ray crystal structure of such a complex. Comparison with analogous copper and silver corrole structures, supplemented by extensive scalar-relativistic, dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations, suggests that "inherent saddling" may occur for of all coinage metal corroles. The degree of saddling, however, varies considerably among the three metals, decreasing conspicuously along the series Cu > Ag > Au. The structural differences reflect significant differences in metal-corrole bonding, which are also reflected in the electrochemistry and electronic absorption spectra of the complexes. From Cu to Au, the electronic structure changes from noninnocent metal(II)-corrole(•2-) to relatively innocent metal(III)-corrole(3-). PMID:22111600

  3. Multiple-response Bayesian calibration of watershed water quality models with significant input and model structure errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Feng; Zheng, Yi

    2016-02-01

    While watershed water quality (WWQ) models have been widely used to support water quality management, their profound modeling uncertainty remains an unaddressed issue. Data assimilation via Bayesian calibration is a promising solution to the uncertainty, but has been rarely practiced for WWQ modeling. This study applied multiple-response Bayesian calibration (MRBC) to SWAT, a classic WWQ model, using the nitrate pollution in the Newport Bay Watershed (southern California, USA) as the study case. How typical input and model structure errors would impact modeling uncertainty, parameter identification and management decision-making was systematically investigated through both synthetic and real-situation modeling cases. The main study findings include: (1) with an efficient sampling scheme, MRBC is applicable to WWQ modeling in characterizing its parametric and predictive uncertainties; (2) incorporating hydrology responses, which are less susceptible to input and model structure errors than water quality responses, can improve the Bayesian calibration results and benefit potential modeling-based management decisions; and (3) the value of MRBC to modeling-based decision-making essentially depends on pollution severity, management objective and decision maker's risk tolerance.

  4. Molecular and cluster structures in 18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Dorsch, T.; Bohlen, H. G.; Krücken, R.; Faestermann, T.; Hertenberger, R.; Kokalova, Tz.; Mahgoub, M.; Milin, M.; Wheldon, C.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the multi-nucleon transfer reaction 12C ( 7Li ,p) at E lab = 44 MeV, populating states in the oxygen isotope 18O . The experiments were performed at the Tandem accelerator of the Maier-Leibniz Laboratory in Munich using the high-resolution Q3D magnetic spectrograph. States were populated up to an excitation energy of 21.2MeV with an overall energy resolution of 45keV, and 30 new states of 18O have been identified. The structure of the rotational bands observed is discussed in terms of cluster bands with the underlying cluster structures: 14C ⊗ α and 12C ⊗ 2 n ⊗ α . Because of the broken intrinsic reflection symmetry in these structures the corresponding rotational bands appear as parity doublets.

  5. Input shaping filter methods for the control of structurally flexible, long-reach manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Dong-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Hwan; Babcock, S.M.; Burks, B.L.

    1993-11-01

    Within the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program of the US Department of Energy, the remediation of single-shell radioactive waste storage tanks is one of the areas that challenge state-of-the-art equipment and methods. Concepts that utilize long-reach manipulators are being seriously considered for this task. Due to high payload capacity and high length-to-cross-section ratio requirements, these long-reach manipulator systems are expected to exhibit significant structural flexibility. To avoid structural vibrations during operation, various types of shaping filter methods have been investigated. A robust notch filtering method and an impulse shaping method were used as simulation benchmarks. In addition to that, two very different approaches have been developed and compared. One new approach, referred to as a ``feedforward simulation filter,`` uses imbedded simulation with complete knowledge of the system dynamics. The other approach, ``fuzzy shaping method,`` employs a fuzzy logic method to modify the joint trajectory from the desired end-position trajectory without precise knowledge of the system dynamics.

  6. The computational structural mechanics testbed architecture. Volume 5: The Input-Output Manager DMGASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fifth of a set of five volumes which describe the software architecture for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed. Derived from NICE, an integrated software system developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the architecture is composed of the command language (CLAMP), the command language interpreter (CLIP), and the data manager (GAL). Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (NASA CR's 178384, 178385, and 178386, respectively) describe CLAMP and CLIP and the CLIP-processor interface. Volumes 4 and 5 (NASA CR's 178387 and 178388, respectively) describe GAL and its low-level I/O. CLAMP, an acronym for Command Language for Applied Mechanics Processors, is designed to control the flow of execution of processors written for NICE. Volume 5 describes the low-level data management component of the NICE software. It is intended only for advanced programmers involved in maintenance of the software.

  7. A novel cyanide-selective colorimetric and fluorescent chemosensor: first molecular security keypad lock based on phosphotungstic acid and CN- inputs.

    PubMed

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Parhami, Abolfath; Hasanli, Nahid

    2014-02-15

    Rhodamine B (RhB) an available dye has been developed as novel and efficient colorimetric and fluorometric chemosensor for cyanide ions in an absolutely aqueous media. The UV-vis absorption and fluorescent emission titrations experiments have been employed to study the sensing process. RhB could act as an efficient "ON-OFF" fluorescent response for phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40 or PTA) based on an ion associate process. Also (RhB(+))3 · PTA(3-) could operate as an "OFF-ON" fluorescent sensor for cyanide anions based on a ligand substitution process. It has been identified as highly sensitive probe for CN(-) which responds at 0.3 and 0.04 μmol L(-1) concentration levels by absorption and fluorescent method respectively. Depending upon the sequence of addition of PTA and CN(-) ions into the solution, RhB could be as a molecular security keypad lock with PTA and CN(-) inputs. The ionic inputs to new fluorophore have been mimicked as a superimposed electronic molecular keypad lock. The results were compared successfully (>96%) with the data of a spectrophotometry approved method (EPA 9014-1) for cyanide ions.

  8. Who gets credit for input? Demographic and structural status cues in voice recognition.

    PubMed

    Howell, Taeya M; Harrison, David A; Burris, Ethan R; Detert, James R

    2015-11-01

    The authors investigate the employee features that, alongside overall voice expression, affect supervisors' voice recognition. Drawing primarily from status characteristics and network position theories, the authors propose and find in a study of 693 employees from 89 different credit union units that supervisors are more likely to credit those reporting the same amount of voice if the employees have higher ascribed or assigned (by the organization) status--cued by demographic variables such as majority ethnicity and full-time work hours. Further, supervisors are more likely to recognize voice from employees who have higher achieved status--cued by their centrality in informal social structures. The authors also find that even when certain groups of lower status employees speak up more, they cannot compensate for the negative effect of their demographic membership on voice recognition by their boss. The authors underscore how recognition of employee voice by supervisors matters for employees. It carries (mediates) the effects of voice expression and status onto performance evaluations 1 year later, which means that demographic differences in the assignment of credit for voice can serve as an implicit pathway for discrimination. PMID:25915784

  9. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  10. Cross-frequency coupling in deep brain structures upon processing the painful sensory inputs.

    PubMed

    Liu, C C; Chien, J H; Kim, J H; Chuang, Y F; Cheng, D T; Anderson, W S; Lenz, F A

    2015-09-10

    Cross-frequency coupling has been shown to be functionally significant in cortical information processing, potentially serving as a mechanism for integrating functionally relevant regions in the brain. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that pain-related gamma oscillatory responses are coupled with low-frequency oscillations in the frontal lobe, amygdala and hippocampus, areas known to have roles in pain processing. We delivered painful laser pulses to random locations on the dorsal hand of five patients with uncontrolled epilepsy requiring depth electrode implantation for seizure monitoring. Two blocks of 40 laser stimulations were delivered to each subject and the pain-intensity was controlled at five in a 0-10 scale by adjusting the energy level of the laser pulses. Local-field-potentials (LFPs) were recorded through bilaterally implanted depth electrode contacts to study the oscillatory responses upon processing the painful laser stimulations. Our results show that painful laser stimulations enhanced low-gamma (LH, 40-70 Hz) and high-gamma (HG, 70-110 Hz) oscillatory responses in the amygdala and hippocampal regions on the right hemisphere and these gamma responses were significantly coupled with the phases of theta (4-7 Hz) and alpha (8-1 2 Hz) rhythms during pain processing. Given the roles of these deep brain structures in emotion, these findings suggest that the oscillatory responses in these regions may play a role in integrating the affective component of pain, which may contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the affective information processing in humans.

  11. Glyphosate input modifies microbial community structure in clear and turbid freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, H; Vera, M S; Vinocur, A; Pérez, G; Ferraro, M; Menéndez Helman, R J; Dos Santos Afonso, M

    2016-03-01

    Since it was commercially introduced in 1974, glyphosate has been one of the most commonly used herbicides in agriculture worldwide, and there is growing concern about its adverse effects on the environment. Assuming that glyphosate may increase the organic turbidity of water bodies, we evaluated the effect of a single application of 2.4 ± 0.1 mg l(-1) of glyphosate (technical grade) on freshwater bacterioplankton and phytoplankton (pico, micro, and nanophytoplankton) and on the physical and chemical properties of the water. We used outdoor experimental mesocosms under clear and oligotrophic (phytoplanktonic chlorophyll a = 2.04 μg l(-1); turbidity = 2.0 NTU) and organic turbid and eutrophic (phytoplanktonic chlorophyll a = 50.3 μg l(-1); turbidity = 16.0 NTU) scenarios. Samplings were conducted at the beginning of the experiment and at 1, 8, 19, and 33 days after glyphosate addition. For both typologies, the herbicide affected the abiotic water properties (with a marked increase in total phosphorus), but it did not affect the structure of micro and nanophytoplankton. In clear waters, glyphosate treatment induced a trend toward higher bacteria and picoeukaryotes abundances, while there was a 2 to 2.5-fold increase in picocyanobacteria number. In turbid waters, without picoeukaryotes at the beginning of the experiment, glyphosate decreased bacteria abundance but increased the number of picocyanobacteria, suggesting a direct favorable effect. Moreover, our results show that the impact of the herbicide was observed in microorganisms from both oligo and eutrophic conditions, indicating that the impact would be independent of the trophic status of the water body. PMID:26552793

  12. Evidence of sewage input to inner shelf sediments in the NE coast of Brazil obtained by molecular markers distribution.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Renato S; Albergaria-Barbosa, Ana Cecília R; Arguelho, Maria L P M; Garcia, Carlos A B

    2015-01-15

    Coprostanol (5β-cholestan-3β-ol) and other fecal steroids were used as markers to trace the input of sewage to the shelf along the coast of Sergipe and Alagoas States, in NE Brazil. Surface sediment samples in shallow regions (<50 m depth) on the shelf were collected adjacent to four fluvial systems, whose drainage basins exhibit distinct levels of human influence. Highest coprostanol concentrations were observed in the area under influence of the Sergipe River (58.6 ± 74.6 ng g(-)(1); maximum of 184.1 ng g(-)(1)), whereas in the Vaza-Barris (18.9 ± 23.6 ng g(-)(1)) and the Piaui/Real (12.3 ± 6.7 ng g(-)(1)) rivers the levels of coprostanol were near the method's limit of detection. Nearby the São Francisco River, the largest in the NE Brazil, coprostanol was virtually absent. The findings of the present study, supported by coprostanol-based diagnostic ratios, revealed that, when sanitation is lacking in the coastal region, even a small-sized river like the Sergipe River can effectively contribute to the export of sewage-derived organic matter to the inner continental shelf in the studied region. PMID:25467184

  13. Evidence of sewage input to inner shelf sediments in the NE coast of Brazil obtained by molecular markers distribution.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Renato S; Albergaria-Barbosa, Ana Cecília R; Arguelho, Maria L P M; Garcia, Carlos A B

    2015-01-15

    Coprostanol (5β-cholestan-3β-ol) and other fecal steroids were used as markers to trace the input of sewage to the shelf along the coast of Sergipe and Alagoas States, in NE Brazil. Surface sediment samples in shallow regions (<50 m depth) on the shelf were collected adjacent to four fluvial systems, whose drainage basins exhibit distinct levels of human influence. Highest coprostanol concentrations were observed in the area under influence of the Sergipe River (58.6 ± 74.6 ng g(-)(1); maximum of 184.1 ng g(-)(1)), whereas in the Vaza-Barris (18.9 ± 23.6 ng g(-)(1)) and the Piaui/Real (12.3 ± 6.7 ng g(-)(1)) rivers the levels of coprostanol were near the method's limit of detection. Nearby the São Francisco River, the largest in the NE Brazil, coprostanol was virtually absent. The findings of the present study, supported by coprostanol-based diagnostic ratios, revealed that, when sanitation is lacking in the coastal region, even a small-sized river like the Sergipe River can effectively contribute to the export of sewage-derived organic matter to the inner continental shelf in the studied region.

  14. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  15. Linking numerical simulations of molecular cloud structure with observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainulainen, Jouni

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the physical processes that control the life-cycle of the cold interstellar medium (ISM) is one of the key themes in the astrophysics of galaxies today. This importance derives from the role of the cold ISM as the birthplace of new stars, and consequently, as an indivisible constituent of galaxy evolution. In the current paradigm of turbulence-regulated ISM, star formation is controlled by the internal structure of individual molecular clouds, which in turn is set by a complex interplay of turbulence, gravity, and magnetic fields in the clouds. It is in the very focus of the field to determine how these processes give rise to the observed structure of molecular clouds. In this talk, I will review our current efforts to confront this paradigm with the goal of observationally constraining how different processes regulate molecular cloud structure and star formation. At the heart of these efforts lies the use of numerical simulations of gravo-turbulent media to A) define physically meaningful characteristics that are sensitive to the different cloud-shaping processes, and B) determine if and how such characteristics can be recovered by observations. I will show in my talk how this approach has recently led to new constraints for some fundamental measures of the molecular cloud structure. Such constraints allow us to assess the roles of turbulence and gravity in controlling the ISM structure and star formation. I will also highlight specific recent results, focusing on the nature of filamentary structures within molecular clouds. These results may provide a novel set of observational constraints with which to challenge the turbulence-regulated ISM paradigm. Finally, I will discuss the current challenges and open questions in understanding the link between molecular cloud structure and star formation, and speculate on key directions to aim the near-future studies.

  16. Molecular structure of vapor-deposited amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, A. H.; Li, C.; Pennycook, S. J.; Schneider, J.; Blom, A.; Zhao, W.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of amorphous selenium is clouded with much uncertainty and contradictory results regarding the dominance of polymeric chains versus monomer rings. The analysis of the diffraction radial distribution functions are inconclusive because of the similarities between the crystalline allotropes of selenium in terms of the coordination number, bond length, bond angle, and dihedral angle. Here, we took a much different approach and probed the molecular symmetry of the thermodynamically unstable amorphous state via analysis of structural phase transformations. We verified the structure of the converted metastable and stable crystalline structures using scanning transmission electron microscopy. In addition, given that no experimental technique can tell us the exact three-dimensional atomic arrangements in glassy semiconductors, we performed molecular-dynamic simulations using a well-established empirical three-body interatomic potential. We developed a true vapor-deposited process for the deposition of selenium molecules onto a substrate using empirical molecular vapor compositions and densities. We prepared both vapor-deposited and melt-quenched samples and showed that the simulated radial distribution functions match very well to experiment. The combination of our experimental and molecular-dynamic analyses shows that the structures of vapor- and melt-quenched glassy/amorphous selenium are quite different, based primarily on rings and chains, respectively, reflecting the predominant structure of the parent phase in its thermodynamic equilibrium.

  17. Structural Refinement of Proteins by Restrained Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Non-interacting Molecular Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rong; Han, Wei; Fiorin, Giacomo; Islam, Shahidul M.; Schulten, Klaus; Roux, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of multiple conformational states is a prerequisite to understand the function of membrane transport proteins. Unfortunately, the determination of detailed atomic structures for all these functionally important conformational states with conventional high-resolution approaches is often difficult and unsuccessful. In some cases, biophysical and biochemical approaches can provide important complementary structural information that can be exploited with the help of advanced computational methods to derive structural models of specific conformational states. In particular, functional and spectroscopic measurements in combination with site-directed mutations constitute one important source of information to obtain these mixed-resolution structural models. A very common problem with this strategy, however, is the difficulty to simultaneously integrate all the information from multiple independent experiments involving different mutations or chemical labels to derive a unique structural model consistent with the data. To resolve this issue, a novel restrained molecular dynamics structural refinement method is developed to simultaneously incorporate multiple experimentally determined constraints (e.g., engineered metal bridges or spin-labels), each treated as an individual molecular fragment with all atomic details. The internal structure of each of the molecular fragments is treated realistically, while there is no interaction between different molecular fragments to avoid unphysical steric clashes. The information from all the molecular fragments is exploited simultaneously to constrain the backbone to refine a three-dimensional model of the conformational state of the protein. The method is illustrated by refining the structure of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of the Kv1.2 potassium channel in the resting state and by exploring the distance histograms between spin-labels attached to T4 lysozyme. The resulting VSD structures are in good agreement with

  18. Structural Refinement of Proteins by Restrained Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Non-interacting Molecular Fragments.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rong; Han, Wei; Fiorin, Giacomo; Islam, Shahidul M; Schulten, Klaus; Roux, Benoît

    2015-10-01

    The knowledge of multiple conformational states is a prerequisite to understand the function of membrane transport proteins. Unfortunately, the determination of detailed atomic structures for all these functionally important conformational states with conventional high-resolution approaches is often difficult and unsuccessful. In some cases, biophysical and biochemical approaches can provide important complementary structural information that can be exploited with the help of advanced computational methods to derive structural models of specific conformational states. In particular, functional and spectroscopic measurements in combination with site-directed mutations constitute one important source of information to obtain these mixed-resolution structural models. A very common problem with this strategy, however, is the difficulty to simultaneously integrate all the information from multiple independent experiments involving different mutations or chemical labels to derive a unique structural model consistent with the data. To resolve this issue, a novel restrained molecular dynamics structural refinement method is developed to simultaneously incorporate multiple experimentally determined constraints (e.g., engineered metal bridges or spin-labels), each treated as an individual molecular fragment with all atomic details. The internal structure of each of the molecular fragments is treated realistically, while there is no interaction between different molecular fragments to avoid unphysical steric clashes. The information from all the molecular fragments is exploited simultaneously to constrain the backbone to refine a three-dimensional model of the conformational state of the protein. The method is illustrated by refining the structure of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of the Kv1.2 potassium channel in the resting state and by exploring the distance histograms between spin-labels attached to T4 lysozyme. The resulting VSD structures are in good agreement with

  19. Reverse engineering chemical structures from molecular descriptors : how many solutions?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-06-01

    Physical, chemical and biological properties are the ultimate information of interest for chemical compounds. Molecular descriptors that map structural information to activities and properties are obvious candidates for information sharing. In this paper, we consider the feasibility of using molecular descriptors to safely exchange chemical information in such a way that the original chemical structures cannot be reverse engineered. To investigate the safety of sharing such descriptors, we compute the degeneracy (the number of structure matching a descriptor value) of several 2D descriptors, and use various methods to search for and reverse engineer structures. We examine degeneracy in the entire chemical space taking descriptors values from the alkane isomer series and the PubChem database. We further use a stochastic search to retrieve structures matching specific topological index values. Finally, we investigate the safety of exchanging of fragmental descriptors using deterministic enumeration.

  20. Importance of Molecular Structure on the Thermophoresis of Binary Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pardeep; Goswami, Debabrata

    2014-12-26

    Using thermal lens spectroscopy, we study the role of molecular structural isomers of butanol on the thermophoresis (or Soret effect) of binary mixtures of methanol in butanol. In this study, we show that the thermal lens signal due to the Soret effect changes its sign for all the different concentrations of binary mixtures of butanol with methanol except for the one containing tertiary-butanol. The magnitude and sign of the Soret coefficients strongly depend on the molecular structure of the isomers of butanol in the binary mixture with methanol. This isomerization dependence is in stark contrast to the expected mass dependence of the Soret effect.

  1. Local Protein Structure Refinement via Molecular Dynamics Simulations with locPREFMD.

    PubMed

    Feig, Michael

    2016-07-25

    A method for the local refinement of protein structures that targets improvements in local stereochemistry while preserving the overall fold is presented. The method uses force field-based minimization and sampling via molecular dynamics simulations with a modified force field to bring bonds, angles, and torsion angles into an acceptable range for high-resolution protein structures. The method is implemented in the locPREFMD web server and was tested on computational models submitted to CASP11. Using MolProbity scores as the main assessment criterion, the locPREFMD method significantly improves the stereochemical quality of given input models close to the quality expected for experimental structures while maintaining the Cα coordinates of the initial model.

  2. Local Protein Structure Refinement via Molecular Dynamics Simulations with locPREFMD.

    PubMed

    Feig, Michael

    2016-07-25

    A method for the local refinement of protein structures that targets improvements in local stereochemistry while preserving the overall fold is presented. The method uses force field-based minimization and sampling via molecular dynamics simulations with a modified force field to bring bonds, angles, and torsion angles into an acceptable range for high-resolution protein structures. The method is implemented in the locPREFMD web server and was tested on computational models submitted to CASP11. Using MolProbity scores as the main assessment criterion, the locPREFMD method significantly improves the stereochemical quality of given input models close to the quality expected for experimental structures while maintaining the Cα coordinates of the initial model. PMID:27380201

  3. From non-random molecular structure to life and mind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1989-01-01

    The evolutionary hierarchy molecular structure-->macromolecular structure-->protobiological structure-->biological structure-->biological functions has been traced by experiments. The sequence always moves through protein. Extension of the experiments traces the formation of nucleic acids instructed by proteins. The proteins themselves were, in this picture, instructed by the self-sequencing of precursor amino acids. While the sequence indicated explains the thread of the emergence of life, protein in cellular membrane also provides the only known material basis for the emergence of mind in the context of emergence of life.

  4. Intensity Inhomogeneity Correction of Structural MR Images: A Data-Driven Approach to Define Input Algorithm Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ganzetti, Marco; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Intensity non-uniformity (INU) in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a major issue when conducting analyses of brain structural properties. An inaccurate INU correction may result in qualitative and quantitative misinterpretations. Several INU correction methods exist, whose performance largely depend on the specific parameter settings that need to be chosen by the user. Here we addressed the question of how to select the best input parameters for a specific INU correction algorithm. Our investigation was based on the INU correction algorithm implemented in SPM, but this can be in principle extended to any other algorithm requiring the selection of input parameters. We conducted a comprehensive comparison of indirect metrics for the assessment of INU correction performance, namely the coefficient of variation of white matter (CVWM), the coefficient of variation of gray matter (CVGM), and the coefficient of joint variation between white matter and gray matter (CJV). Using simulated MR data, we observed the CJV to be more accurate than CVWM and CVGM, provided that the noise level in the INU-corrected image was controlled by means of spatial smoothing. Based on the CJV, we developed a data-driven approach for selecting INU correction parameters, which could effectively work on actual MR images. To this end, we implemented an enhanced procedure for the definition of white and gray matter masks, based on which the CJV was calculated. Our approach was validated using actual T1-weighted images collected with 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T MR scanners. We found that our procedure can reliably assist the selection of valid INU correction algorithm parameters, thereby contributing to an enhanced inhomogeneity correction in MR images. PMID:27014050

  5. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-01

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under -15 dB, transmission up to -1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under -20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation. PMID:26133854

  6. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-01

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under -15 dB, transmission up to -1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under -20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  7. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-15

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under −15 dB, transmission up to −1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under −20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  8. Connecting molecular structure and exciton diffusion length in rubrene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mullenbach, Tyler K; McGarry, Kathryn A; Luhman, Wade A; Douglas, Christopher J; Holmes, Russell J

    2013-07-19

    Connecting molecular structure and exciton diffusion length in rubrene derivatives demonstrates how the diffusion length of rubrene can be enhanced through targeted functionalization aiming to enhance self-Förster energy transfer. Functionalization adds steric bulk, forcing the molecules farther apart on average, and leading to increased photoluminescence efficiency. A diffusion length enhancement greater than 50% is realized over unsubstituted rubrene. PMID:23754475

  9. Advanced Structural Determination of Diterpene Esters Using Molecular Modeling and NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Gallard, Jean-François; Dumontet, Vincent; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Iorga, Bogdan I; Paolini, Julien; Litaudon, Marc

    2015-10-23

    Three new jatrophane esters (1-3) were isolated from Euphorbia amygdaloides ssp. semiperfoliata, including an unprecedented macrocyclic jatrophane ester bearing a hemiketal substructure, named jatrohemiketal (3). The chemical structures of compounds 1-3 and their relative configurations were determined by spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 3 was determined unambiguously through an original strategy combining NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Conformational search calculations were performed for the four possible diastereomers 3a-3d differing in their C-6 and C-9 stereocenters, and the lowest energy conformer was used as input structure for geometry optimization. The prediction of NMR parameters ((1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and (1)H-(1)H coupling constants) by density functional theory (DFT) calculations allowed identifying the most plausible diastereomer. Finally, the stereostructure of 3 was solved by comparison of the structural features obtained by molecular modeling for 3a-3d with NMR-derived data (the values of dihedral angles deduced from the vicinal proton-proton coupling constants ((3)JHH) and interproton distances determined by ROESY). The methodology described herein provides an efficient way to solve or confirm structural elucidation of new macrocyclic diterpene esters, in particular when no crystal structure is available.

  10. Molecular, Functional, and Structural Imaging of Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Yunqi; Zhu, Yuankai; Wu, Shuang; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Caiyun; Zhang, Hong; Hayashi, Takuya; Tian, Mei

    2016-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, correlating with genetic susceptibility and environmental risk factors. Molecular, functional, and structural imaging approaches have been increasingly used to detect neurobiological changes, analyze neurochemical correlates, and parse pathophysiological mechanisms underlying MDD. We reviewed recent neuroimaging publications on MDD in terms of molecular, functional, and structural alterations as detected mainly by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography. Altered structure and function of brain regions involved in the cognitive control of affective state have been demonstrated. An abnormal default mode network, as revealed by resting-state functional MRI, is likely associated with aberrant metabolic and serotonergic function revealed by radionuclide imaging. Further multi-modal investigations are essential to clarify the characteristics of the cortical network and serotonergic system associated with behavioral and genetic variations in MDD. PMID:27142698

  11. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions.

  12. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons. PMID:27570482

  13. MOLVIE: an interactive visualization environment for molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huandong; Li, Ming; Xu, Ying

    2003-05-01

    A Molecular visualization interactive environment (MOLVIE), is designed to display three-dimensional (3D) structures of molecules and support the structural analysis and research on proteins. The paper presents the features, design considerations and applications of MOLVIE, especially the new functions used to compare the structures of two molecules and view the partial fragment of a molecule. Being developed in JAVA, MOLVIE is platform-independent. Moreover, it may run on a webpage as an applet for remote users. MOLVIE is available at http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~mli/Bioinf/software/index.html. PMID:12725967

  14. Molecular spectroscopy and molecular structure - Selected communications presented at the 1st International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durig, James R.; Fausto, Rui; Ünsalan, Ozan; Bayarı, Sevgi; Kuş, Nihal; Ildız, Gülce Ö.

    2016-01-01

    The First International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013) took place at the Harbiye Cultural Center & Museum, Istanbul, Turkey, September 15-20, 2013. The main aim of the congress was to encourage the exchange of scientific ideas and collaborations all around the world, introduce new techniques and instruments, and discuss recent developments in the field of molecular spectroscopy. Among the different subjects covered, particular emphasis was given to the relevance of spectroscopy to elucidate details of the molecular structure and the chemical and physical behavior of systems ranging from simple molecules to complex biochemical molecules. Besides experimental spectroscopic approaches, related computational and theoretical methods were also considered. In this volume, selected contributions presented at the congress were put together.

  15. Molecular docking and structure-based drug design strategies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo G; Dos Santos, Ricardo N; Oliva, Glaucius; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2015-07-22

    Pharmaceutical research has successfully incorporated a wealth of molecular modeling methods, within a variety of drug discovery programs, to study complex biological and chemical systems. The integration of computational and experimental strategies has been of great value in the identification and development of novel promising compounds. Broadly used in modern drug design, molecular docking methods explore the ligand conformations adopted within the binding sites of macromolecular targets. This approach also estimates the ligand-receptor binding free energy by evaluating critical phenomena involved in the intermolecular recognition process. Today, as a variety of docking algorithms are available, an understanding of the advantages and limitations of each method is of fundamental importance in the development of effective strategies and the generation of relevant results. The purpose of this review is to examine current molecular docking strategies used in drug discovery and medicinal chemistry, exploring the advances in the field and the role played by the integration of structure- and ligand-based methods.

  16. Sampling of Stochastic Input Parameters for Rockfall Calculations and for Structural Response Calculations Under Vibratory Ground Motion

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gross

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to define the sampled values of stochastic (random) input parameters for (1) rockfall calculations in the lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones under vibratory ground motions, and (2) structural response calculations for the drip shield and waste package under vibratory ground motions. This analysis supplies: (1) Sampled values of ground motion time history and synthetic fracture pattern for analysis of rockfall in emplacement drifts in nonlithophysal rock (Section 6.3 of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'', BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]); (2) Sampled values of ground motion time history and rock mechanical properties category for analysis of rockfall in emplacement drifts in lithophysal rock (Section 6.4 of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'', BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]); (3) Sampled values of ground motion time history and metal to metal and metal to rock friction coefficient for analysis of waste package and drip shield damage to vibratory motion in ''Structural Calculations of Waste Package Exposed to Vibratory Ground Motion'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167083]) and in ''Structural Calculations of Drip Shield Exposed to Vibratory Ground Motion'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163425]). The sampled values are indices representing the number of ground motion time histories, number of fracture patterns and rock mass properties categories. These indices are translated into actual values within the respective analysis and model reports or calculations. This report identifies the uncertain parameters and documents the sampled values for these parameters. The sampled values are determined by GoldSim V6.04.007 [DIRS 151202] calculations using appropriate distribution types and parameter ranges. No software development or model development was required for these calculations. The calculation of the sampled values allows parameter uncertainty to be incorporated into the rockfall and structural response calculations that support development of the seismic scenario for the

  17. Improving structure-based function prediction using molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Dariya S.; Radmer, Randall J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The number of molecules with solved three-dimensional structure but unknown function is increasing rapidly. Particularly problematic are novel folds with little detectable similarity to molecules of known function. Experimental assays can determine the functions of such molecules, but are time-consuming and expensive. Computational approaches can identify potential functional sites; however, these approaches generally rely on single static structures and do not use information about dynamics. In fact, structural dynamics can enhance function prediction: we coupled molecular dynamics simulations with structure-based function prediction algorithms that identify Ca2+ binding sites. When applied to 11 challenging proteins, both methods showed substantial improvement in performance, revealing 22 more sites in one case and 12 more in the other, with a modest increase in apparent false positives. Thus, we show that treating molecules as dynamic entities improves the performance of structure-based function prediction methods. PMID:19604472

  18. Detection of internal molecular structural motions using anisotropic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rohit; George, Deepu; Korter, Timothy; Markelz, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    The far infrared spectroscopy of molecular crystals reveals both intra and inter molecular vibrational modes [1,2]. With the significant increase in complexity of structures, one finds increasing overlap in the internal modes. As an overall strategy to measure the correlated structural motions in protein, we use anisotropic and birefringent behavior of molecular crystals to develop a new technique called MOSTS (Modulated Orientation Sensitive THz Spectroscopy). We achieve high sensitivity and mode separation by using single molecular crystal such as sucrose and rapid modulation of the relative alignment of the terahertz polarization and the crystal axes by rotating the sample. By locking into the signal at the rotation frequency we determine the polarization sensitive signal and map out the optically active vibrational resonances. To illustrate the technique we compare our measured spectra with the calculated and find a close agreement. [4pt] [1] D.G. Allis, J.A. Zeitler, P.F.Taday and T.M.Korter, Chem. Phys. Lett., 463, 84 (2008).[0pt] [2] P.U. Jepsen and J.C. Stewart, Chem. Phys. Lett., 442, 275 (2007).

  19. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:25631536

  20. Structure, subunit composition, and molecular weight of RD-114 RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kung, H J; Bailey, J M; Davidson, N; Nicolson, M O; McAllister, R M

    1975-01-01

    The properties and subunit composition of the RNA extracted from RD-114 virions have been studied. The RNA extracted from the virion has a sedimentation coefficient of 52S in a nondenaturing aqueous electrolyte. The estimated molecular weight by sedimentation in nondenaturing and weakly denaturing media is in the range 5.7 X 10(6) to 7.0 X 10(6). By electron microscopy, under moderately denaturing conditions, the 52S molecule is seen to be an extended single strand with a contour length of about 4.0 mum corresponding to a molecular weight of 5.74 X 10(6). It contains two characteristic secondary structure features: (i) a central Y- or T-shaped structure (the rabbit ears) with a molecular weight of 0.3 X 10(6), (ii) two symmetreically disposed loops on each side of and at equal distance from the center. The 52S molecule consists of two half-size molecules, with molecular weight 2.8 X 10(6), joined together within the central rabbit ears feature. Melting of the rabbit ears with concomitant dissociation of the 52S molecule into subunits, has been caused by either one of two strongly denaturing treatments: incubation in a mixture of CH3HgOH and glyoxal at room temperature, or thermal dissociation in a urea-formamide solvent. When half-size molecules are quenched from denaturing temperatures, a new off-center secondary structure feature termed the branch-like structure is seen. The dissociation behavior of the 52S complex and the molecular weight of the subunits have been confirmed by gel electrophoresis studies. The loop structures melt at fairly low temperatures; the dissociation of the 52S molecule into its two subunits occurs at a higher temperature corresponding to a base composition of about 63% guanosine plus cytosine. Polyadenylic acid mapping by electron microscopy shows that the 52S molecule contains two polyadenylic acid segments, one at each end. It thus appears that 52S RD-114 RNA consists of two 2.8 X 10(6) dalton subunits, each with a characteristic

  1. Effects of amine molecular structure on carbon nanotubes functionalization.

    PubMed

    Jimeno, A; Goyanes, S; Eceiza, A; Kortaberria, G; Mondragon, I; Corcuera, M A

    2009-10-01

    Three amines with different molecular structure, triethylenetetramine (TETA) and two polyetheramines (Jeffamine D-230 and Jeffamine T-403) were employed to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) previously oxidized by acid treatment. The functionalized MWCNT were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and the surface modification was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to quantify the amount of amine groups anchored to MWCNTs. The results have shown that the efficiency of amine functionalization is in the order TETA > D-230 > T-403, thus showing that amine chemical structure and molecular weight are important parameters on functionalization of carbon nanotubes. PMID:19908518

  2. Molecular modelling of miraculin: Structural analyses and functional hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Paladino, Antonella; Costantini, Susan; Colonna, Giovanni; Facchiano, Angelo M

    2008-02-29

    Miraculin is a plant protein that displays the peculiar property of modifying taste by swiching sour into a sweet taste. Its monomer is flavourless at all pH as well as at high concentration; the dimer form elicits its taste-modifying activity at acidic pH; a tetrameric form is also reported as active. Two histidine residues, located in exposed regions, are the main responsible of miraculin activity, as demonstrated by mutagenesis studies. Since structural data of miraculin are not available, we have predicted its three-dimensional structure and simulated both its dimer and tetramer forms by comparative modelling and molecular docking techniques. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations at different pH conditions have indicated that at acidic pH the dimer assumes a widely open conformation, in agreement with the hypotheses coming from other studies. PMID:18158914

  3. FilFinder: Filamentary structure in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2016-08-01

    FilFinder extracts and analyzes filamentary structure in molecular clouds. In particular, it is capable of uniformly extracting structure over a large dynamical range in intensity. It returns the main filament properties: local amplitude and background, width, length, orientation and curvature. FilFinder offers additional tools to, for example, create a filament-only image based on the properties of the radial fits. The resulting mask and skeletons may be saved in FITS format, and property tables may be saved as a CSV, FITS or LaTeX table.

  4. Optimization techniques in molecular structure and function elucidation.

    PubMed

    Sahinidis, Nikolaos V

    2009-12-01

    This paper discusses recent optimization approaches to the protein side-chain prediction problem, protein structural alignment, and molecular structure determination from X-ray diffraction measurements. The machinery employed to solve these problems has included algorithms from linear programming, dynamic programming, combinatorial optimization, and mixed-integer nonlinear programming. Many of these problems are purely continuous in nature. Yet, to this date, they have been approached mostly via combinatorial optimization algorithms that are applied to discrete approximations. The main purpose of the paper is to offer an introduction and motivate further systems approaches to these problems. PMID:20160866

  5. Nanoparticle Probes for Structural and Functional Photoacoustic Molecular Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haobin; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, nanoparticle probes have received extensive attention largely due to its potential biomedical applications in structural, functional, and molecular imaging. In addition, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), a method based on the photoacoustic effect, is widely recognized as a robust modality to evaluate the structure and function of biological tissues with high optical contrast and high acoustic resolution. The combination of PAT with nanoparticle probes holds promises for detecting and imaging diseased tissues or monitoring their treatments with high sensitivity. This review will introduce the recent advances in the emerging field of nanoparticle probes and their preclinical applications in PAT, as well as relevant perspectives on future development. PMID:26609534

  6. Biogeography of soil organic matter molecular structure across multiple soil size fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, C. L.; Neff, J.

    2009-12-01

    Recent work suggests that there is a common soil decomposition sequence whereby plant inputs are metabolized into a physiologically constrained set of compounds originating from microbes that may persist in soil over relatively long time-scales. Plant inputs tend to be found in coarse particulate fractions (>180 μm) with relatively fast turnover times, while microbially derived compounds tend to accrue in the finer silt + clay fractions (<53 μm) with relatively long turnover times. To investigate whether a common decomposition sequence exists, we used pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (py-GC/MS) to characterize the molecular structure of soil organic matter (SOM) in three size fractions (590-180 μm, 180-53 μm, and <53 μm), using soils sampled from multiple biomes (alpine tundra, sub-alpine forest, boreal forest, temperate coniferous, temperate deciduous, dry desert/savannah, and tropical forest). We hypothesized that: 1) regardless of biome, fractions >180 μm would be chemically similar, and would be characterized by lignin and other plant-derived compounds; and 2) fractions <53 μm would also be similar across biomes but would be dominated by microbially-derived compounds like polysaccharides. Across all biomes, we found that there was significantly less lignin in <53 μm fractions compared to >180 μm fractions (p<0.0001), providing some support for the idea that plant material is not incorporated into soil C pools with relatively long turnover times. However, a principal components analysis (PCA) showed that the >180 μm coarse particulate fractions also contained compounds associated with microbial origins, indicating that microbial C is not limited to <53 μm size fractions. The PCA also revealed that samples within each of the three size fractions did not cluster together (i.e. they did not share a common molecular structure), but we did note that: 1) cold alpine and sub-alpine sites were unique and chemically similar; and 2) tropical

  7. Hybrid Molecular Structure of the Giant Protease Tripeptidyl Peptidase II

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Crystal K.; Rockel, Beate; Seyit, Gönül; Walian, Peter J.; Schönegge, Anne–Marie; Peters, Jürgen; Zwart, Petrus H.; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Jap, Bing K.

    2010-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is the largest known eukaryotic protease (6MDa). It is believed to act downstream of the 26S proteasome cleaving tripeptides from the N– termini of longer peptides and it is implicated in numerous cellular processes. Here we report the structure of Drosophila TPP II determined by a hybrid approach: The structure of the dimer was solved by x–ray crystallography and docked into the three– dimensional map of the holocomplex obtained by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. The resulting structure reveals the compartmentalization of the active sites inside a system of chambers and suggests the existence of a molecular ruler determining the size of the cleavage products. Furthermore, the structure suggests a model for activation of TPP II involving the relocation of a flexible loop and a repositioning of the active–site serine, coupling it to holocomplex assembly and active site sequestration. PMID:20676100

  8. Structural Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Actin Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Splettstoesser, Thomas; Holmes, Kenneth; Noe, Frank; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized.

  9. Structure and dynamics of complex liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Indrajith V.; Natesan, Baskaran

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out detailed structure and dynamical studies of complex liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. Three different model potentials, namely, TIP3P, TIP4P and SPC-E have been used in the simulations, in order to arrive at the best possible potential function that could reproduce the structure of experimental bulk water. All the simulations were performed in the NVE micro canonical ensemble using LAMMPS. The radial distribution functions, gOO, gOH and gHH and the self diffusion coefficient, Ds, were calculated for all three models. We conclude from our results that the structure and dynamical parameters obtained for SPC-E model matched well with the experimental values, suggesting that among the models studied here, the SPC-E model gives the best structure and dynamics of bulk water.

  10. Molecular structures of amyloid and prion fibrils: consensus versus controversy.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-07-16

    Many peptides and proteins self-assemble into amyloid fibrils. Examples include mammalian and fungal prion proteins, polypeptides associated with human amyloid diseases, and proteins that may have biologically functional amyloid states. To understand the propensity for polypeptides to form amyloid fibrils and to facilitate rational design of amyloid inhibitors and imaging agents, it is necessary to elucidate the molecular structures of these fibrils. Although fibril structures were largely mysterious 15 years ago, a considerable body of reliable structural information about amyloid fibril structures now exists, with essential contributions from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. This Account reviews results from our laboratories and discusses several structural issues that have been controversial. In many cases, the amino acid sequences of amyloid fibrils do not uniquely determine their molecular structures. Self-propagating, molecular-level polymorphism complicates the structure determination problem and can lead to apparent disagreements between results from different laboratories, particularly when different laboratories study different polymorphs. For 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ₁₋₄₀) fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, we have developed detailed structural models from solid state NMR and electron microscopy data for two polymorphs. These polymorphs have similar peptide conformations, identical in-register parallel β-sheet organizations, but different overall symmetry. Other polymorphs have also been partially characterized by solid state NMR and appear to have similar structures. In contrast, cryo-electron microscopy studies that use significantly different fibril growth conditions have identified structures that appear (at low resolution) to be different from those examined by solid state NMR. Based on solid state NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, the in-register parallel β-sheet organization

  11. STOCK: Structure mapper and online coarse-graining kit for molecular simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Bevc, Staš; Junghans, Christoph; Praprotnik, Matej

    2015-03-15

    We present a web toolkit STructure mapper and Online Coarse-graining Kit for setting up coarse-grained molecular simulations. The kit consists of two tools: structure mapping and Boltzmann inversion tools. The aim of the first tool is to define a molecular mapping from high, e.g. all-atom, to low, i.e. coarse-grained, resolution. Using a graphical user interface it generates input files, which are compatible with standard coarse-graining packages, e.g. VOTCA and DL_CGMAP. Our second tool generates effective potentials for coarse-grained simulations preserving the structural properties, e.g. radial distribution functions, of the underlying higher resolution model. The required distribution functions can be providedmore » by any simulation package. Simulations are performed on a local machine and only the distributions are uploaded to the server. The applicability of the toolkit is validated by mapping atomistic pentane and polyalanine molecules to a coarse-grained representation. Effective potentials are derived for systems of TIP3P (transferable intermolecular potential 3 point) water molecules and salt solution. The presented coarse-graining web toolkit is available at http://stock.cmm.ki.si.« less

  12. STOCK: Structure mapper and online coarse-graining kit for molecular simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bevc, Staš; Junghans, Christoph; Praprotnik, Matej

    2015-03-15

    We present a web toolkit STructure mapper and Online Coarse-graining Kit for setting up coarse-grained molecular simulations. The kit consists of two tools: structure mapping and Boltzmann inversion tools. The aim of the first tool is to define a molecular mapping from high, e.g. all-atom, to low, i.e. coarse-grained, resolution. Using a graphical user interface it generates input files, which are compatible with standard coarse-graining packages, e.g. VOTCA and DL_CGMAP. Our second tool generates effective potentials for coarse-grained simulations preserving the structural properties, e.g. radial distribution functions, of the underlying higher resolution model. The required distribution functions can be provided by any simulation package. Simulations are performed on a local machine and only the distributions are uploaded to the server. The applicability of the toolkit is validated by mapping atomistic pentane and polyalanine molecules to a coarse-grained representation. Effective potentials are derived for systems of TIP3P (transferable intermolecular potential 3 point) water molecules and salt solution. The presented coarse-graining web toolkit is available at http://stock.cmm.ki.si.

  13. Biogeochemistry and limnology in Antarctic subglacial weathering: molecular evidence of the linkage between subglacial silica input and primary producers in a perennially ice-covered lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Kojima, Hisaya; Takeda, Eriko; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Fukui, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    We report a 6,000 years record of subglacial weathering and biogeochemical processes in two perennially ice-covered glacial lakes at Rundvågshetta, on the Soya Coast of Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica. The two lakes, Lake Maruwan Oike and Lake Maruwan-minami, are located in a channel that drains subglacial water from the base of the East Antarctic ice sheet. Greenish-grayish organic-rich laminations in sediment cores from the lakes indicate continuous primary production affected by the inflow of subglacial meltwater containing relict carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and other essential nutrients. Biogenic silica, amorphous hydrated silica, and DNA-based molecular signatures of sedimentary facies indicate that diatom assemblages are the dominant primary producers, supported by the input of inorganic silicon (Si) from the subglacial inflow. This study highlights the significance of subglacial water-rock interactions during physical and chemical weathering processes and the importance of such interactions for the supply of bioavailable nutrients.

  14. Parallel molecular computation of modular-multiplication with two same inputs over finite field GF(2(n)) using self-assembly of DNA tiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongnan; Xiao, Limin; Ruan, Li

    2014-06-01

    Two major advantages of DNA computing - huge memory capacity and high parallelism - are being explored for large-scale parallel computing, mass data storage and cryptography. Tile assembly model is a highly distributed parallel model of DNA computing. Finite field GF(2(n)) is one of the most commonly used mathematic sets for constructing public-key cryptosystem. It is still an open question that how to implement the basic operations over finite field GF(2(n)) using DNA tiles. This paper proposes how the parallel tile assembly process could be used for computing the modular-square, modular-multiplication with two same inputs, over finite field GF(2(n)). This system could obtain the final result within less steps than another molecular computing system designed in our previous study, because square and reduction are executed simultaneously and the previous system computes reduction after calculating square. Rigorous theoretical proofs are described and specific computing instance is given after defining the basic tiles and the assembly rules. Time complexity of this system is 3n-1 and space complexity is 2n(2).

  15. A fluorescent molecularly-imprinted polymer gate with temperature and pH as inputs for detection of alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Karfa, Paramita; Roy, Ekta; Patra, Santanu; Kumar, Deepak; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2016-04-15

    In this work, we have reported a new approach on the use of stimuli-responsive molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for trace level sensing of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), which is a well know cancer biomarker. The stimuli-responsive MIP is composed of three components, a thermo-responsive monomer, a pH responsive component (tyrosine derivative) and a highly fluorescent vinyl silane modified carbon dot. The synthesized AFP-imprinted polymer possesses excellent selectivity towards their template molecule and dual-stimuli responsive behavior. Along with this, the imprinted polymer was also explored as 'OR' logic gate with two stimuli (pH and temperature) as inputs. However, the non-imprinted polymers did not have such 'OR' gate property, which confirms the role of template binding. The imprinted polymer was also used for estimation of AFP in the concentration range of 3.96-80.0 ng mL(-1), with limit of detection (LOD) 0.42 ng mL(-1). The role of proposed sensor was successfully exploited for analysis of AFP in real human blood plasma, serum and urine sample.

  16. On how to avoid input and structural uncertainties corrupt the inference of hydrological parameters using a Bayesian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Mario R.; Francés, Félix

    2015-04-01

    One phase of the hydrological models implementation process, significantly contributing to the hydrological predictions uncertainty, is the calibration phase in which values of the unknown model parameters are tuned by optimizing an objective function. An unsuitable error model (e.g. Standard Least Squares or SLS) introduces noise into the estimation of the parameters. The main sources of this noise are the input errors and the hydrological model structural deficiencies. Thus, the biased calibrated parameters cause the divergence model phenomenon, where the errors variance of the (spatially and temporally) forecasted flows far exceeds the errors variance in the fitting period, and provoke the loss of part or all of the physical meaning of the modeled processes. In other words, yielding a calibrated hydrological model which works well, but not for the right reasons. Besides, an unsuitable error model yields a non-reliable predictive uncertainty assessment. Hence, with the aim of prevent all these undesirable effects, this research focuses on the Bayesian joint inference (BJI) of both the hydrological and error model parameters, considering a general additive (GA) error model that allows for correlation, non-stationarity (in variance and bias) and non-normality of model residuals. As hydrological model, it has been used a conceptual distributed model called TETIS, with a particular split structure of the effective model parameters. Bayesian inference has been performed with the aid of a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm called Dream-ZS. MCMC algorithm quantifies the uncertainty of the hydrological and error model parameters by getting the joint posterior probability distribution, conditioned on the observed flows. The BJI methodology is a very powerful and reliable tool, but it must be used correctly this is, if non-stationarity in errors variance and bias is modeled, the Total Laws must be taken into account. The results of this research show that the

  17. A 3D visualization system for molecular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Terry J.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of molecules derive in part from their structures. Because of the importance of understanding molecular structures various methodologies, ranging from first principles to empirical technique, were developed for computing the structure of molecules. For large molecules such as polymer model compounds, the structural information is difficult to comprehend by examining tabulated data. Therefore, a molecular graphics display system, called MOLDS, was developed to help interpret the data. MOLDS is a menu-driven program developed to run on the LADC SNS computer systems. This program can read a data file generated by the modeling programs or data can be entered using the keyboard. MOLDS has the following capabilities: draws the 3-D representation of a molecule using stick, ball and ball, or space filled model from Cartesian coordinates, draws different perspective views of the molecule; rotates the molecule on the X, Y, Z axis or about some arbitrary line in space, zooms in on a small area of the molecule in order to obtain a better view of a specific region; and makes hard copy representation of molecules on a graphic printer. In addition, MOLDS can be easily updated and readily adapted to run on most computer systems.

  18. How Effective Are Affective Activities? Relative Benefits of Two Types of Structured Input Activities as Part of a Computer-Delivered Lesson on the Spanish Subjunctive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henshaw, Florencia

    2012-01-01

    Proponents of Processing Instruction (VanPatten, 2005) claim that learners benefit most when presented with both referential and affective structured input activities. Following a classic pretest-posttest design, the present study investigates the role of these two types of activities on the learning of the Spanish subjunctive. Groups differed…

  19. Large Molecule Structures by Broadband Fourier Transform Molecular Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Spada, Lorenzo; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Fourier transform molecular rotational resonance spectroscopy (FT-MRR) using pulsed jet molecular beam sources is a high-resolution spectroscopy technique that can be used for chiral analysis of molecules with multiple chiral centers. The sensitivity of the molecular rotational spectrum pattern to small changes in the three dimensional structure makes it possible to identify diastereomers without prior chemical separation. For larger molecules, there is the additional challenge that different conformations of each diastereomer may be present and these need to be differentiated from the diastereomers in the spectral analysis. Broadband rotational spectra of several larger molecules have been measured using a chirped-pulse FT-MRR spectrometer. Measurements of nootkatone (C15H22O), cedrol (C15H26O), ambroxide (C16H28O) and sclareolide (C16H26O2) are presented. These spectra are measured with high sensitivity (signal-to-noise ratio near 1,000:1) and permit structure determination of the most populated isomers using isotopic analysis of the 13C and 18O isotopologues in natural abundance. The accuracy of quantum chemistry calculations to identify diastereomers and conformers and to predict the dipole moment properties needed for three wave mixing measurements is examined.

  20. Heat-induced changes to lipid molecular structure in Vimy flaxseed: Spectral intensity and molecular clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peiqiang; Damiran, Daalkhaijav

    2011-06-01

    Autoclaving was used to manipulate nutrient utilization and availability. The objectives of this study were to characterize any changes of the functional groups mainly associated with lipid structure in flaxseed ( Linum usitatissimum, cv. Vimy), that occurred on a molecular level during the treatment process using infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included lipid CH 3 asymmetric (ca. 2959 cm -1), CH 2 asymmetric (ca. 2928 cm -1), CH 3 symmetric (ca. 2871 cm -1) and CH 2 symmetric (ca. 2954 cm -1) functional groups, lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group (ca. 1745 cm -1), lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (ca. 3010 cm -1) as well as their ratios. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were conducted to identify molecular spectral differences. Flaxseed samples were kept raw for the control or autoclaved in batches at 120 °C for 20, 40 or 60 min for treatments 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Molecular spectral analysis of lipid functional group ratios showed a significant decrease ( P < 0.05) in the CH 2 asymmetric to CH 3 asymmetric stretching band peak intensity ratios for the flaxseed. There were linear and quadratic effects ( P < 0.05) of the treatment time from 0, 20, 40 and 60 min on the ratios of the CH 2 asymmetric to CH 3 asymmetric stretching vibration intensity. Autoclaving had no significant effect ( P > 0.05) on lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group and lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (with average spectral peak area intensities of 138.3 and 68.8 IR intensity units, respectively). Multivariate molecular spectral analyses, CLA and PCA, were unable to make distinctions between the different treatment original spectra at the CH 3 and CH 2 asymmetric and symmetric region (ca. 2988-2790 cm -1). The results indicated that autoclaving had an impact to the mid-infrared molecular spectrum of flaxseed to identify heat-induced changes in lipid conformation. A future study

  1. Lightweight Object Oriented Structure analysis: Tools for building Tools to Analyze Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Romo, Tod D.; Leioatts, Nicholas; Grossfield, Alan

    2014-01-01

    LOOS (Lightweight Object-Oriented Structure-analysis) is a C++ library designed to facilitate making novel tools for analyzing molecular dynamics simulations by abstracting out the repetitive tasks, allowing developers to focus on the scientifically relevant part of the problem. LOOS supports input using the native file formats of most common biomolecular simulation packages, including CHARMM, NAMD, Amber, Tinker, and Gromacs. A dynamic atom selection language based on the C expression syntax is included and is easily accessible to the tool-writer. In addition, LOOS is bundled with over 120 pre-built tools, including suites of tools for analyzing simulation convergence, 3D histograms, and elastic network models. Through modern C++ design, LOOS is both simple to develop with (requiring knowledge of only 4 core classes and a few utility functions) and is easily extensible. A python interface to the core classes is also provided, further facilitating tool development. PMID:25327784

  2. Evolution of molecular crystal optical phonons near structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michki, Nigel; Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Markelz, Andrea

    Molecular crystals are increasingly important photonic and electronic materials. For example organic semiconductors are lightweight compared to inorganic semiconductors and have inexpensive scale up processing with roll to roll printing. However their implementation is limited by their environmental sensitivity, in part arising from the weak intermolecular interactions of the crystal. These weak interactions result in optical phonons in the terahertz frequency range. We examine the evolution of intermolecular interactions near structural phase transitions by measuring the optical phonons as a function of temperature and crystal orientation using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The measured orientation dependence of the resonances provides an additional constraint for comparison of the observed spectra with the density functional calculations, enabling us to follow specific phonon modes. We observe crystal reorganization near 350 K for oxalic acid as it transforms from dihydrate to anhydrous form. We also report the first THz spectra for the molecular crystal fructose through its melting point.

  3. The molecular structure of the left-handed supra-molecular helix of eukaryotic polyribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Afonina, Zhanna A.; Ménétret, Jean-François; Shirokov, Vladimir A.; Spirin, Alexander S.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2014-11-01

    During protein synthesis, several ribosomes bind to a single messenger RNA (mRNA) forming large macromolecular assemblies called polyribosomes. Here we report the detailed molecular structure of a 100 MDa eukaryotic poly-ribosome complex derived from cryo electron tomography, sub-tomogram averaging and pseudo-atomic modelling by crystal structure fitting. The structure allowed the visualization of the three functional parts of the polysome assembly, the central core region that forms a rather compact left-handed supra-molecular helix, and the more open regions that harbour the initiation and termination sites at either ends. The helical region forms a continuous mRNA channel where the mRNA strand bridges neighbouring exit and entry sites of the ribosomes and prevents mRNA looping between ribosomes. This structure provides unprecedented insights into protein- and RNA-mediated inter-ribosome contacts that involve conserved sites through 40S subunits and long protruding RNA expansion segments, suggesting a role in stabilizing the overall polyribosomal assembly.

  4. The molecular structure of the left-handed supra-molecular helix of eukaryotic polyribosomes.

    PubMed

    Myasnikov, Alexander G; Afonina, Zhanna A; Ménétret, Jean-François; Shirokov, Vladimir A; Spirin, Alexander S; Klaholz, Bruno P

    2014-11-07

    During protein synthesis, several ribosomes bind to a single messenger RNA (mRNA) forming large macromolecular assemblies called polyribosomes. Here we report the detailed molecular structure of a 100 MDa eukaryotic poly-ribosome complex derived from cryo electron tomography, sub-tomogram averaging and pseudo-atomic modelling by crystal structure fitting. The structure allowed the visualization of the three functional parts of the polysome assembly, the central core region that forms a rather compact left-handed supra-molecular helix, and the more open regions that harbour the initiation and termination sites at either ends. The helical region forms a continuous mRNA channel where the mRNA strand bridges neighbouring exit and entry sites of the ribosomes and prevents mRNA looping between ribosomes. This structure provides unprecedented insights into protein- and RNA-mediated inter-ribosome contacts that involve conserved sites through 40S subunits and long protruding RNA expansion segments, suggesting a role in stabilizing the overall polyribosomal assembly.

  5. Structure of a molecular liquid GeI4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro; Sakagami, Takahiro; Kohara, Shinji; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Asano, Yuta; Hamaya, Nozomu

    2016-11-01

    A molecular liquid GeI4 is a candidate that undergoes a pressure-induced liquid-to-liquid phase transition. This study establishes the reference structure of the low-pressure liquid phase. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out at several temperatures between the melting and the boiling points under ambient pressure. The molecule has regular tetrahedral symmetry, and the intramolecular Ge-I length of 2.51 Å is almost temperature-independent within the measured range. A reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) analysis is employed to find that the distribution of molecular centers remains self-similar against heating, and thus justifying the length-scaling method adopted in determining the density. The RMC analysis also reveals that the vertex-to-face orientation of the nearest molecules are not straightly aligned, but are inclined at about 20 degrees, thereby making the closest intermolecular I-I distance definitely shorter than the intramolecular one. The prepeak observed at  ˜1 Å-1 in the structural factor slightly shifts and increases in height with increasing temperature. The origin of the prepeak is clearly identified to be traces of the 111 diffraction peak in the crystalline state. The prepeak, assuming the residual spatial correlation between germanium sites in the densest direction, thus shifts toward lower wavenumbers with thermal expansion. The aspect that a relative reduction in molecular size associated with the volume expansion is responsible for the increase in the prepeak’s height is confirmed by a simulation, in which the molecular size is changed.

  6. Structure of a molecular liquid GeI4.

    PubMed

    Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro; Sakagami, Takahiro; Kohara, Shinji; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Asano, Yuta; Hamaya, Nozomu

    2016-11-01

    A molecular liquid GeI4 is a candidate that undergoes a pressure-induced liquid-to-liquid phase transition. This study establishes the reference structure of the low-pressure liquid phase. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out at several temperatures between the melting and the boiling points under ambient pressure. The molecule has regular tetrahedral symmetry, and the intramolecular Ge-I length of 2.51 Å is almost temperature-independent within the measured range. A reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) analysis is employed to find that the distribution of molecular centers remains self-similar against heating, and thus justifying the length-scaling method adopted in determining the density. The RMC analysis also reveals that the vertex-to-face orientation of the nearest molecules are not straightly aligned, but are inclined at about 20 degrees, thereby making the closest intermolecular I-I distance definitely shorter than the intramolecular one. The prepeak observed at  ∼1 Å(-1) in the structural factor slightly shifts and increases in height with increasing temperature. The origin of the prepeak is clearly identified to be traces of the 111 diffraction peak in the crystalline state. The prepeak, assuming the residual spatial correlation between germanium sites in the densest direction, thus shifts toward lower wavenumbers with thermal expansion. The aspect that a relative reduction in molecular size associated with the volume expansion is responsible for the increase in the prepeak's height is confirmed by a simulation, in which the molecular size is changed. PMID:27605016

  7. Three decades of structure- and property-based molecular design.

    PubMed

    Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Roche has pioneered structure- and property-based molecular design to drug discovery. While this is an ongoing development, the past three decades feature key events that have revolutionized the way drug discovery is conducted in Big Pharma industry. It has been a great privilege to have been involved in this transformation process, to have been able to collaborate with, direct, guide, or simply encourage outstanding experts in various disciplines to build and further develop what has become a major pillar of modern small-molecule drug discovery. This article is an account of major events that took place since the early decision of Roche to implement computer-assisted molecular modeling 32 years ago and is devoted to the key players involved. It highlights the internal build-up of structural biology, with protein X-ray structure determination at its core, and the early setup of bioinformatics. It describes the strategic shift to large compound libraries and high-throughput screening with the development of novel compound storage and ultra-high-throughput screening facilities, as well as the strategic return to focused screening of small motif-based compound libraries. These developments were accompanied by the rise of miniaturized parallel compound property analytics which resulted in a major paradigm shift in medicinal chemistry from linear to multi-dimensional lead optimization. The rapid growth of huge collections of property data stimulated the development of various novel data mining concepts with 'matched molecular pair' analysis and novel variants thereof playing crucial roles. As compound properties got more prominent in molecular design, exploration of specific structural motifs for property modulation became a research activity complementary to target-oriented medicinal chemistry. The exploration of oxetane is given as an example. For the sake of brevity, this account cannot detail all further developments that have taken place in each individual area of

  8. Roles in Modulation of Molecular Structures on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.-J.

    2007-03-01

    We studied the adsorption of organic molecules, their growth behavior, and their physical properties on silver and gold surfaces at the single molecule or sub-molecular scale by using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopes. Combined with low energy electron diffraction and first-principles density functional theory calculations, the key parameters in modulating molecular structures on metals are analyzed. It is found that the alkyl chains of quinacridone derivatives (QA) determine the orientation of molecular overlayers on an Ag(110) substrate. The interaction of QA and the Ag substrate is primarily due to chemical bonding of oxygen to specific positions at the silver substrate, determining the molecular orientation and preferred adsorption site. However, the intermolecular arrangement can be adjusted via the length of attached alkyl chains. We are thus able to fabricate uniform QA films with very well controlled physical properties. Furthermore, by thermal and chemical control, we are able to self-assemble three dimensional molecular nanostructures, e.g. ordered PTCDA structures exclusively on flat Ag(111) facets, or DMe-DCNQI structures exclusively on stepped Ag(221) facets. It is demonstrated that bonding, the key factor for selectivity, occurs via the end-atoms, while the molecule's mid-region arches away from the substrate. Theoretical results, obtained by high-level theory, are consistent with the experimental observations, which have previously been interpreted in terms of bonding through the mid-region. In collaboration with D.X. Shi, S.X. Du, W. Ji, Z.T. Deng, L. Gao, Institute of Physics, and X. Lin, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; C. Seidel and H. Fuchs, Universit"at M"unster, Germany; W.A. Hofer, The University of Liverpool, Britain; and S. T. Pantelides, Vanderbilt University, USA. [1] D.X. Shi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 226101(2006). [2] S.X. Du et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 226101(2006). [3] L. Gao et al., Phys. Rev. B 73, 075424(2006).

  9. Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structures and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrides, Constantinos

    This dissertation consists of topics in two related areas of research that together provide quantum mechanical descriptions of atomic and molecular interactions and reactions. The first is the ab initio electronic structure calculation that provides the atomic and molecular interaction potential, including the long-range potential. The second is the quantum theory of interactions that uses such potentials to understand scattering, long-range molecules, and reactions. In ab initio electronic structure calculations, we present results of dynamic polarizabilities for a variety of atoms and molecules, and the long-range dispersion coefficients for a number of atom-atom and atom-molecule cases. We also present results of a potential energy surface for the triatomic lithium-ytterbium-lithium system, aimed at understanding the related chemical reactions. In the quantum theory of interactions, we present a multichannel quantum-defect theory (MQDT) for atomic interactions in a magnetic field. This subject, which is complex especially for atoms with hyperfine structure, is essential for the understanding and the realization of control and tuning of atomic interactions by a magnetic field: a key feature that has popularized cold atom physics in its investigations of few-body and many-body quantum systems. Through the example of LiK, we show how MQDT provides a systematic and an efficient understanding of atomic interaction in a magnetic field, especially magnetic Feshbach resonances in nonzero partial waves.

  10. Kinetic Effects of Aromatic Molecular Structures on Diffusion Flame Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Sang Hee; Dooley, S.; Dryer, F. L.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic effects of aromatic molecular structures for jet fuel surrogates on the extinction of diffusion flames have been investigated experimentally and numerically in the counterflow configuration for toluene, n-propylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. Quantitative measurement of OH concentration for aromatic fuels was conducted by directly measuring the quenching rate from the emission lifetimes of OH planar laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The kinetic models for toluene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were validated against the measurements of extinction strain rates and LIF measurements. A semi-detailed n-propylbenzene kinetic model was developed and tested. The experimental results showed that the extinction limits are ranked from highest to lowest as n-propylbenzene, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. The present models for toluene and n-propylbenzene agree reasonably well with the measurements, whereas the model for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene under-estimates extinction limits. Kinetic pathways of OH production and consumption were analyzed to investigate the impact of fuel fragmentation on OH formation. It was found that, for fuels with different molecular structures, the fuel decomposition pathways and their propagation into the formation of radical pool play an important role to determine the extinction limits of diffusion flames. Furthermore, OH concentrations were found to be representative of the entire radical pool concentration, the balance between chain branching and propagation/termination reactions and the balance between heat production from the reaction zone and heat losses to the fuel and oxidizer sides. Finally, a proposed “OH index,” was defined to demonstrate a linear correlation between extinction strain rate and OH index and fuel mole fraction, suggesting that the diffusion flame extinctions for the tested aromatic fuels can be determined by the capability of a fuel to establish a radical pool

  11. Bohm's Quantum Potential and the Visualization of Molecular Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    David Bohm's ontological interpretation of quantum theory can shed light on otherwise counter-intuitive quantum mechanical phenomena including chemical bonding. In the field of quantum chemistry, Richard Bader has shown that the topology of the Laplacian of the electronic charge density characterizes many features of molecular structure and reactivity. Visual and computational examination suggests that the Laplacian of Bader and the quantum potential of Bohm are morphologically equivalent. It appears that Bohmian mechanics and the quantum potential can make chemistry as clear as they makes physics.

  12. Structurally Defined Molecular Hypervalent Iodine Catalysts for Intermolecular Enantioselective Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Haubenreisser, Stefan; Wöste, Thorsten H.; Martínez, Claudio; Ishihara, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Molecular structures of the most prominent chiral non‐racemic hypervalent iodine(III) reagents to date have been elucidated for the first time. The formation of a chirally induced supramolecular scaffold based on a selective hydrogen‐bonding arrangement provides an explanation for the consistently high asymmetric induction with these reagents. As an exploratory example, their scope as chiral catalysts was extended to the enantioselective dioxygenation of alkenes. A series of terminal styrenes are converted into the corresponding vicinal diacetoxylation products under mild conditions and provide the proof of principle for a truly intermolecular asymmetric alkene oxidation under iodine(I/III) catalysis. PMID:26596513

  13. Molecular structural order and anomalies in liquid silica.

    PubMed

    Shell, M Scott; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2002-07-01

    The present investigation examines the relationship between structural order, diffusivity anomalies, and density anomalies in liquid silica by means of molecular dynamics simulations. We use previously defined orientational and translational order parameters to quantify local structural order in atomic configurations. Extensive simulations are performed at different state points to measure structural order, diffusivity, and thermodynamic properties. It is found that silica shares many trends recently reported for water [J. R. Errington and P. G. Debenedetti, Nature 409, 318 (2001)]. At intermediate densities, the distribution of local orientational order is bimodal. At fixed temperature, order parameter extrema occur upon compression: a maximum in orientational order followed by a minimum in translational order. Unlike water, however, silica's translational order parameter minimum is broad, and there is no range of thermodynamic conditions where both parameters are strictly coupled. Furthermore, the temperature-density regime where both structural order parameters decrease upon isothermal compression (the structurally anomalous regime) does not encompass the region of diffusivity anomalies, as was the case for water. PMID:12241346

  14. Structure-Directed Exciton Dynamics in Templated Molecular Nanorings

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated polymers with cyclic structures are interesting because their symmetry leads to unique electronic properties. Recent advances in Vernier templating now allow large shape-persistent fully conjugated porphyrin nanorings to be synthesized, exhibiting unique electronic properties. We examine the impact of different conformations on exciton delocalization and emission depolarization in a range of different porphyrin nanoring topologies with comparable spatial extent. Low photoluminescence anisotropy values are found to occur within the first few hundred femtoseconds after pulsed excitation, suggesting ultrafast delocalization of excitons across the nanoring structures. Molecular dynamics simulations show that further polarization memory loss is caused by out-of-plane distortions associated with twisting and bending of the templated nanoring topologies. PMID:25960822

  15. DFT charge transfer of hybrid molecular ferrocene/Si structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calborean, Adrian; Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Graur, Florin

    2015-05-01

    The electrochemical behavior and electronic properties of redox-active ferrocenes grafted onto semiconductor Si(100) substrate were investigated theoretically by first-principles calculations. Organic molecules were attached via the formation of Si-C covalent bonds through two different linkers: vinyl (direct grafting), and N3(CH2)11 (indirect grafting). Redox energies and the electronic properties relating to different spacers in hybrid ferrocene Fc/Si and ferrocenium Fc+/Si structures were theoretically extracted and compared with experimental cyclic voltametry data. Electronic charge transfers are discussed through the alignment positions of the frontier orbitals of the molecule with respect to the Si substrate gap. Periodic boundary conditions were used to investigate the Si(100) as a slab surface and hybrid Fc/Si structures. The resulting projected density of states (PDOS) were compared with molecular results and discussed in the light of experimental data.

  16. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  17. Molecular structure of uranium carbides: isomers of UC3.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, M Fernanda; Rayón, Víctor M; Largo, Antonio

    2013-03-21

    In this article, the most relevant isomers of uranium tricarbide are studied through quantum chemical methods. It is found that the most stable isomer has a fan geometry in which the uranium atom is bonded to a quasilinear C3 unit. Both, a rhombic and a ring CU(C2) structures are found about 104-125 kJ/mol higher in energy. Other possible isomers including linear geometries are located even higher. For each structure, we provide predictions for those molecular properties (vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, dipole moments) that could eventually help in their experimental detection. We also discuss the possible routes for the formation of the different UC3 isomers as well as the bonding situation by means of a topological analysis of the electron density.

  18. Physics-based protein structure refinement through multiple molecular dynamics trajectories and structure averaging.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, Vahid; Noyes, Keenan; Feig, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for structure refinement of Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction 10 (CASP10) targets. Refinement was achieved by selecting structures from the MD-based ensembles followed by structural averaging. The overall performance of this method in CASP10 is described, and specific aspects are analyzed in detail to provide insight into key components. In particular, the use of different restraint types, sampling from multiple short simulations versus a single long simulation, the success of a quality assessment criterion, the application of scoring versus averaging, and the impact of a final refinement step are discussed in detail.

  19. PCR hot start using primers with the structure of molecular beacons (hairpin-like structure).

    PubMed

    Kaboev, O K; Luchkina, L A; Tret'iakov, A N; Bahrmand, A R

    2000-11-01

    A new technique of PCR hot start using oligonucleotide primers with a stem-loop structure is developed here. The molecular beacon oligonucleotide structure without any chromophore addition to the ends was used. The 3'-end sequence of the primers was complementary to the target and five or six nucleotides complementary to the 3'-end were added to the 5'-end. During preparation of the reaction mixture and initial heating, the oligonucleotide has a stem-loop structure and cannot serve as an effective primer for DNA polymerase. After heating to the annealing temperature it acquires a linear structure and primer extension can begin.

  20. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Monticelli, Luca; Heberle, Frederick A; Kucerka, Norbert; Tieleman, D. Peter; Katsaras, John

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  1. Structure, molecular evolution, and hydrolytic specificities of largemouth bass pepsins.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoko; Suzuki-Matsubara, Mieko; Kageyama, Takashi; Moriyama, Akihiko

    2016-02-01

    The nucleotide sequences of largemouth bass pepsinogens (PG1, 2 and 3) were determined after molecular cloning of the respective cDNAs. Encoded PG1, 2 and 3 were classified as fish pepsinogens A1, A2 and C, respectively. Molecular evolutionary analyses show that vertebrate pepsinogens are classified into seven monophyletic groups, i.e. pepsinogens A, F, Y (prochymosins), C, B, and fish pepsinogens A and C. Regarding the primary structures, extensive deletion was obvious in S'1 loop residues in fish pepsin A as well as tetrapod pepsin Y. This deletion resulted in a decrease in hydrophobic residues in the S'1 site. Hydrolytic specificities of bass pepsins A1 and A2 were investigated with a pepsin substrate and its variants. Bass pepsins preferred both hydrophobic/aromatic residues and charged residues at the P'1 sites of substrates, showing the dual character of S'1 sites. Thermodynamic analyses of bass pepsin A2 showed that its activation Gibbs energy change (∆G(‡)) was lower than that of porcine pepsin A. Several sites of bass pepsin A2 moiety were found to be under positive selection, and most of them are located on the surface of the molecule, where they are involved in conformational flexibility. The broad S'1 specificity and flexible structure of bass pepsin A2 are thought to cause its high proteolytic activity. PMID:26627128

  2. Protein Structure Refinement through Structure Selection and Averaging from Molecular Dynamics Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, Vahid; Feig, Michael

    2013-02-12

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based protocol for structure refinement of template-based model predictions is described. The protocol involves the application of restraints, ensemble averaging of selected subsets, interpolation between initial and refined structures, and assessment of refinement success. It is found that sub-microsecond MD-based sampling when combined with ensemble averaging can produce moderate but consistent refinement for most systems in the CASP targets considered here.

  3. Teaching Structure-Property Relationships: Investigating Molecular Structure and Boiling Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    A concise, well-organized table of the boiling points of 392 organic compounds has facilitated inquiry-based instruction in multiple scientific principles. Many individual or group learning activities can be derived from the tabulated data of molecular structure and boiling point based on the instructor's education objectives and the students'…

  4. Evaluation of Various Spectral Inputs for Estimation of Forest Biochemical and Structural Properties from Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homolová, L.; Janoutová, R.; Malenovský, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this study we evaluated various spectral inputs for retrieval of forest chlorophyll content (Cab) and leaf area index (LAI) from high spectral and spatial resolution airborne imaging spectroscopy data collected for two forest study sites in the Czech Republic (beech forest at Štítná nad Vláří and spruce forest at Bílý Kříž). The retrieval algorithm was based on a machine learning method - support vector regression (SVR). Performance of the four spectral inputs used to train SVR was evaluated: a) all available hyperspectral bands, b) continuum removal (CR) 645 - 710 nm, c) CR 705 - 780 nm, and d) CR 680 - 800 nm. Spectral inputs and corresponding SVR models were first assessed at the level of spectral databases simulated by combined leaf-canopy radiative transfer models PROSPECT and DART. At this stage, SVR models using all spectral inputs provided good performance (RMSE for Cab < 10 μg cm-2 and for LAI < 1.5), with consistently better performance for beech over spruce site. Since application of trained SVRs on airborne hyperspectral images of the spruce site produced unacceptably overestimated values, only the beech site results were analysed. The best performance for the Cab estimation was found for CR bands in range of 645 - 710 nm, whereas CR bands in range of 680 - 800 nm were the most suitable for LAI retrieval. The CR transformation reduced the across-track bidirectional reflectance effect present in airborne images due to large sensor field of view.

  5. Drug repositioning by kernel-based integration of molecular structure, molecular activity, and phenotype data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongcui; Chen, Shilong; Deng, Naiyang; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Computational inference of novel therapeutic values for existing drugs, i.e., drug repositioning, offers the great prospect for faster and low-risk drug development. Previous researches have indicated that chemical structures, target proteins, and side-effects could provide rich information in drug similarity assessment and further disease similarity. However, each single data source is important in its own way and data integration holds the great promise to reposition drug more accurately. Here, we propose a new method for drug repositioning, PreDR (Predict Drug Repositioning), to integrate molecular structure, molecular activity, and phenotype data. Specifically, we characterize drug by profiling in chemical structure, target protein, and side-effects space, and define a kernel function to correlate drugs with diseases. Then we train a support vector machine (SVM) to computationally predict novel drug-disease interactions. PreDR is validated on a well-established drug-disease network with 1,933 interactions among 593 drugs and 313 diseases. By cross-validation, we find that chemical structure, drug target, and side-effects information are all predictive for drug-disease relationships. More experimentally observed drug-disease interactions can be revealed by integrating these three data sources. Comparison with existing methods demonstrates that PreDR is competitive both in accuracy and coverage. Follow-up database search and pathway analysis indicate that our new predictions are worthy of further experimental validation. Particularly several novel predictions are supported by clinical trials databases and this shows the significant prospects of PreDR in future drug treatment. In conclusion, our new method, PreDR, can serve as a useful tool in drug discovery to efficiently identify novel drug-disease interactions. In addition, our heterogeneous data integration framework can be applied to other problems.

  6. Molecular Modeling and Structural Analysis of Arylesterase of Ancylostoma Duodenale

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Subhamay; Panda, Santamay; Kumari, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worm infection of humans is one of the most commonly prevalent helminth infection that has imposed great impact on society and public health in the developing world. The two species of hookworm, namely Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus may be primarily responsible for causing parasitic infections in human beings. The highly prevalent areas for Ancylostoma duodenale infections are mainly India, Middle East, Australia, northern Africa and other parts of the world. The serum arylesterases/paraoxonases are family of enzymes that is involved in the hydrolysis of a number of organophosphorus insecticides to the nontoxic products. The participation of the enzymes in the breakdown of a variety of organophosphate substrates that is generally made up of paraoxon and numerous aromatic carboxylic acid esters (e.g., phenyl acetate), and hence combats the toxic effect of organophosphates. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale giving special importance to structure generation, validation of the generated models, distribution of secondary structural elements and positive charge distribution over the structure. By the implementation of comparative modeling approach we propose the first molecular model structure of arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale. PMID:27642240

  7. Molecular Modeling and Structural Analysis of Arylesterase of Ancylostoma Duodenale

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Subhamay; Panda, Santamay; Kumari, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worm infection of humans is one of the most commonly prevalent helminth infection that has imposed great impact on society and public health in the developing world. The two species of hookworm, namely Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus may be primarily responsible for causing parasitic infections in human beings. The highly prevalent areas for Ancylostoma duodenale infections are mainly India, Middle East, Australia, northern Africa and other parts of the world. The serum arylesterases/paraoxonases are family of enzymes that is involved in the hydrolysis of a number of organophosphorus insecticides to the nontoxic products. The participation of the enzymes in the breakdown of a variety of organophosphate substrates that is generally made up of paraoxon and numerous aromatic carboxylic acid esters (e.g., phenyl acetate), and hence combats the toxic effect of organophosphates. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale giving special importance to structure generation, validation of the generated models, distribution of secondary structural elements and positive charge distribution over the structure. By the implementation of comparative modeling approach we propose the first molecular model structure of arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale.

  8. Molecular Dynamics of Shock Wave Interaction with Nanoscale Structured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qananwah, Ahmad K.

    Typical theoretical treatments of shock wave interactions are based on a continuum approach, which cannot resolve the spatial variations in solids with nano-scale porous structure. Nano-structured materials have the potential to attenuate the strength of traveling shock waves because of their high surface-to-volume ratio. To investigate such interactions we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation model, based on Short Range Attractive interactions. A piston, modeled as a uni-directional repulsive force field translating at a prescribed velocity, impinges on a region of gas which is compressed to form a shock, which in turn is driven against an atomistic solid wall. Periodic boundary conditions are used in the directions orthogonal to the piston motion, and we have considered solids based on either embedded atom potentials (target structure) or tethered potential (rigid piston, holding wall). Velocity, temperature and stress fields are computed locally in both gas and solid regions, and displacements within the solid are interpreted in terms of its elastic constants. In this work we present results of the elastic behavior of solid structures subjected to shock wave impact and analysis of energy transport and absorption in porous materials. The results indicated that the presence of nano-porous material layers in front of a target wall reduced the stress magnitude detected inside and the energy deposited there by about 30 percent while, at the same time, its loading rate was decreased substantially.

  9. Mathematical analysis of compressive/tensile molecular and nuclear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayu

    Mathematical analysis in chemistry is a fascinating and critical tool to explain experimental observations. In this dissertation, mathematical methods to present chemical bonding and other structures for many-particle systems are discussed at different levels (molecular, atomic, and nuclear). First, the tetrahedral geometry of single, double, or triple carbon-carbon bonds gives an unsatisfying demonstration of bond lengths, compared to experimental trends. To correct this, Platonic solids and Archimedean solids were evaluated as atoms in covalent carbon or nitrogen bond systems in order to find the best solids for geometric fitting. Pentagonal solids, e.g. the dodecahedron and icosidodecahedron, give the best fit with experimental bond lengths; an ideal pyramidal solid which models covalent bonds was also generated. Second, the macroscopic compression/tension architectural approach was applied to forces at the molecular level, considering atomic interactions as compressive (repulsive) and tensile (attractive) forces. Two particle interactions were considered, followed by a model of the dihydrogen molecule (H2; two protons and two electrons). Dihydrogen was evaluated as two different types of compression/tension structures: a coaxial spring model and a ring model. Using similar methods, covalent diatomic molecules (made up of C, N, O, or F) were evaluated. Finally, the compression/tension model was extended to the nuclear level, based on the observation that nuclei with certain numbers of protons/neutrons (magic numbers) have extra stability compared to other nucleon ratios. A hollow spherical model was developed that combines elements of the classic nuclear shell model and liquid drop model. Nuclear structure and the trend of the "island of stability" for the current and extended periodic table were studied.

  10. Molecular Clouds in the North American and Pelican Nebulae: Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaobo; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji

    2014-03-01

    We present observations of a 4.25 deg2 area toward the North American and Pelican Nebulae in the J = 1-0 transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O. Three molecules show different emission areas with their own distinct structures. These different density tracers reveal several dense clouds with a surface density of over 500 M ⊙ pc-2 and a mean H2 column density of 5.8, 3.4, and 11.9 × 1021 cm-2 for 12CO, 13CO, and C18O, respectively. We obtain a total mass of 5.4 × 104 M ⊙ (12CO), 2.0 × 104 M ⊙ (13CO), and 6.1 × 103 M ⊙ (C18O) in the complex. The distribution of excitation temperature shows two phases of gas: cold gas (~10 K) spreads across the whole cloud; warm gas (>20 K) outlines the edge of the cloud heated by the W80 H II region. The kinetic structure of the cloud indicates an expanding shell surrounding the ionized gas produced by the H II region. There are six discernible regions in the cloud: the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Islands and Sea, and Pelican's Beak, Hat, and Neck. The areas of 13CO emission range within 2-10 pc2 with mass of (1-5) × 103 M ⊙ and line width of a few km s-1. The different line properties and signs of star-forming activity indicate they are in different evolutionary stages. Four filamentary structures with complicated velocity features are detected along the dark lane in LDN 935. Furthermore, a total of 611 molecular clumps within the 13CO tracing cloud are identified using the ClumpFind algorithm. The properties of the clumps suggest that most of the clumps are gravitationally bound and at an early stage of evolution with cold and dense molecular gas.

  11. Unveiling the molecular mechanism of brassinosteroids: Insights from structure-based molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Lei, Beilei; Liu, Jiyuan; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-12-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) phytohormones play indispensable roles in plant growth and development. Brassinolide (BL) and 24-epibrassinolide (24-epiBL) are the most active ones among the BRs reported thus far. Unfortunately, the extremely low natural content and intricate synthesis process limit their popularization in agricultural production. Earlier reports to discover alternative compounds have resulted in molecules with nearly same scaffold structure and without diversity in chemical space. In the present study, receptors structure based BRs regulation mechanism was analyzed. First, we examined the detailed binding interactions and their dynamic stability between BL and its receptor BRI1 and co-receptor BAK1. Then, the binding modes and binding free energies for 24-epiBL and a series of representative BRs binding with BRI1 and BRI1-BAK1 were carried out by molecular docking, energy minimization and MM-PBSA free energy calculation. The obtained binding structures and energetic results provided vital insights into the structural factors affecting the activity from both receptors and BRs aspects. Subsequently, the obtained knowledge will serve as valuable guidance to build pharmacophore models for rational screening of new scaffold alternative BRs.

  12. The Structure and Evolution of Self-Gravitating Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliman, John Herbert, II

    1995-01-01

    We present a theoretical formalism to evaluate the structure of molecular clouds and to determine precollapse conditions in star-forming regions. Models consist of pressure-bounded, self-gravitating spheres of a single -fluid ideal gas. We treat the case without rotation. The analysis is generalized to consider states in hydrostatic equilibrium maintained by multiple pressure components. Individual pressures vary with density as P_i(r) ~ rho^{gamma {rm p},i}(r), where gamma_{rm p},i is the polytropic index. Evolution depends additionally on whether conduction occurs on a dynamical time scale and on the adiabatic index gammai of each component, which is modified to account for the effects of any thermal coupling to the environment of the cloud. Special attention is given to properly representing the major contributors to dynamical support in molecular clouds: the pressures due to static magnetic fields, Alfven waves, and thermal motions. Straightforward adjustments to the model allow us to treat the intrinsically anisotropic support provided by the static fields. We derive structure equations, as well as perturbation equations for performing a linear stability analysis. The analysis provides insight on the nature of dynamical motions due to collapse from an equilibrium state and estimates the mass of condensed objects that form in such a process. After presenting a set of general results, we describe models of star-forming regions that include the major pressure components. We parameterize the extent of ambipolar diffusion. The analysis contributes to the physical understanding of several key results from observations of these regions. Commonly observed quantities are explicitly cross-referenced with model results. We theoretically determine density and linewidth profiles on scales ranging from that of molecular cloud cores to that of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). The model offers an explanation of the mean pressures in GMCs, which are observed to be high relative

  13. Machine learning for toxicity characterization of organic chemical emissions using USEtox database: Learning the structure of the input space.

    PubMed

    Marvuglia, Antonino; Kanevski, Mikhail; Benetto, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Toxicity characterization of chemical emissions in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a complex task which usually proceeds via multimedia (fate, exposure and effect) models attached to models of dose-response relationships to assess the effects on target. Different models and approaches do exist, but all require a vast amount of data on the properties of the chemical compounds being assessed, which are hard to collect or hardly publicly available (especially for thousands of less common or newly developed chemicals), therefore hampering in practice the assessment in LCA. An example is USEtox, a consensual model for the characterization of human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity. This paper places itself in a line of research aiming at providing a methodology to reduce the number of input parameters necessary to run multimedia fate models, focusing in particular to the application of the USEtox toxicity model. By focusing on USEtox, in this paper two main goals are pursued: 1) performing an extensive exploratory analysis (using dimensionality reduction techniques) of the input space constituted by the substance-specific properties at the aim of detecting particular patterns in the data manifold and estimating the dimension of the subspace in which the data manifold actually lies; and 2) exploring the application of a set of linear models, based on partial least squares (PLS) regression, as well as a nonlinear model (general regression neural network--GRNN) in the seek for an automatic selection strategy of the most informative variables according to the modelled output (USEtox factor). After extensive analysis, the intrinsic dimension of the input manifold has been identified between three and four. The variables selected as most informative may vary according to the output modelled and the model used, but for the toxicity factors modelled in this paper the input variables selected as most informative are coherent with prior expectations based on scientific knowledge

  14. Specifications of input motions for seismic analyses of soil-structure systems within a nonlinear analyses framework. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moriwaki, Y.; Pyke, R.; Bastick, M.; Udaka, T.

    1981-10-01

    A brief assessment of some rational approaches to specifying input motions within a nonlinear analysis framework is presented. Using a modified STEALTH 1D seismic and SHAKE computer codes, some points discussed in the assessment are illustrated. The cases studied in this project are confined to seismic environments with the wave field to consist of vertically propagating body waves, and the site to be horizontally layered. Under this seismic condition, it is possible to specify the control motion either (a) at an outcrop of the baserock, or a given soil layer at some depth, or (b) at the surface of the site profiled.

  15. Machine learning for toxicity characterization of organic chemical emissions using USEtox database: Learning the structure of the input space.

    PubMed

    Marvuglia, Antonino; Kanevski, Mikhail; Benetto, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Toxicity characterization of chemical emissions in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a complex task which usually proceeds via multimedia (fate, exposure and effect) models attached to models of dose-response relationships to assess the effects on target. Different models and approaches do exist, but all require a vast amount of data on the properties of the chemical compounds being assessed, which are hard to collect or hardly publicly available (especially for thousands of less common or newly developed chemicals), therefore hampering in practice the assessment in LCA. An example is USEtox, a consensual model for the characterization of human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity. This paper places itself in a line of research aiming at providing a methodology to reduce the number of input parameters necessary to run multimedia fate models, focusing in particular to the application of the USEtox toxicity model. By focusing on USEtox, in this paper two main goals are pursued: 1) performing an extensive exploratory analysis (using dimensionality reduction techniques) of the input space constituted by the substance-specific properties at the aim of detecting particular patterns in the data manifold and estimating the dimension of the subspace in which the data manifold actually lies; and 2) exploring the application of a set of linear models, based on partial least squares (PLS) regression, as well as a nonlinear model (general regression neural network--GRNN) in the seek for an automatic selection strategy of the most informative variables according to the modelled output (USEtox factor). After extensive analysis, the intrinsic dimension of the input manifold has been identified between three and four. The variables selected as most informative may vary according to the output modelled and the model used, but for the toxicity factors modelled in this paper the input variables selected as most informative are coherent with prior expectations based on scientific knowledge

  16. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  17. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  18. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Mehere, Prajwalini; Han, Qian; Lemkul, Justin A; Vavricka, Christopher J; Robinson, Howard; Bevan, David R; Li, Jianyong

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using α-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  19. Stochastic Molecular Transport on Microtubule Bundles with Structural Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramlich, M. W.; Tabei, S. M. Ali

    Intracellular transport involves complex coordination of multiple components such as: the cytoskeletal network and molecular motors. Perturbations in this process can amplify over time and space, thereby affecting transport. One little studied component of transport are structural defects in the cytoskeletal network. In this talk we will present a stochastic model of the interaction of the molecular motor, kinesin-1, and a bundled cystoskeletal network of microtubules, and explicitly explore the role of microtubule ends (a type of defect) on long-range transport. We will show how different types of end distributions can ultimately result in the same observed transport behavior for bundles. We compare transport on completely uniform bundles, found in the axon, to completely random bundles, found in dendrites. Because of the un-biased random bundle nature, defects affect transport on dendrite bundles more than on uniform bundles in the axon. Further, defects act as large spatial-scale traps that result in random wait-times which have been assumed in previous models.

  20. How does the molecular network structure influence PDMS elastomer wettability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melillo, Matthew; Genzer, Jan

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is one of the most common elastomers, with applications ranging from medical devices to absorbents for water treatment. Fundamental understanding of how liquids spread on the surface of and absorb into PDMS networks is of critical importance for the design and use of another application - microfluidic devices. We have systematically studied the effects of polymer molecular weight, loading of tetra-functional crosslinker, end-group chemical functionality, and the extent of dilution of the curing mixture on the mechanical and surface properties of end-linked PDMS networks. The gel and sol fractions, storage and loss moduli, liquid swelling ratios, and water contact angles have all been shown to vary greatly based on the aforementioned variables. Similar trends were observed for the commercial PDMS material, Sylgard-184. Our results have confirmed theories predicting the relationships between modulus and swelling. Furthermore, we have provided new evidence for the strong influence that substrate modulus and molecular network structure have on the wettability of PDMS elastomers. These findings will aid in the design and implementation of efficient microfluidics and other PDMS-based materials that involve the transport of liquids.

  1. Electronic Structure and Molecular Dynamics Calculations for KBH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios; Shabaev, Andrew; Hoang, Khang; Mehl, Michael; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    In the search for hydrogen storage materials, alkali borohydrides MBH4 (M=Li, Na, K) are especially interesting because of their light weight and the high number of hydrogen atoms per metal atom. Electronic structure calculations can give insights into the properties of these complex hydrides and provide understanding of the structural properties and of the bonding of hydrogen. We have performed first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) and tight-binding (TB) calculations for KBH4 in both the high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) phases to understand its electronic and structural properties. Our DFT calculations were carried out using the VASP code. The results were then used as a database to develop a tight-binding Hamiltonian using the NRL-TB method. This approach allowed for computationally efficient calculations of phonon frequencies and elastic constants using the static module of the NRL-TB, and also using the molecular dynamics module to calculate mean-square displacements and formation energies of hydrogen vacancies.

  2. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-07

    The solvation structures of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -} ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  3. Iron affects the structure of cell membrane molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Martínez, F; Cárdenas, H; Grzyb, J; Strzałka, K

    2005-03-01

    The effects of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) on molecular models of biomembranes were investigated. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), classes of phospholipids located in the outer and inner moieties of cell membranes, respectively. X-ray studies showed that very low concentrations of Fe(3+) affected DMPC organization and 10(-3)M induced a total loss of its multilamellar periodic stacking. Experiments carried out with Fe(2+) on DMPC showed weaker effects than those induced by Fe(3+) ions. Similar experiments were performed on DMPE bilayers. Fe(3+) from 10(-7)M up to 10(-4)M had practically no effect on DMPE structure. However, 10(-3)M Fe(3+) induced a deep perturbation of the multilamellar structure of DMPE. However, 10(-3)M Fe(2+) had no effect on DMPE organization practically. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements also revealed different effects of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) on the phase transition and other thermal properties of the examined lipids. In conclusion, the results obtained indicate that iron ions interact with phospholipid bilayers perturbing their structures. These findings are consistent with the observation that iron ions change cell membrane fluidity and, therefore, affect its functions. PMID:15752465

  4. Towards a molecular description of intermediate filament structure and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, David A.D.; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Burkhard, Peter; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald . E-mail: h.herrmann@dkfz.de

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) represent one of the prominent cytoskeletal elements of metazoan cells. Their constituent proteins are coded by a multigene family, whose members are expressed in complex patterns that are controlled by developmental programs of differentiation. Hence, IF proteins found in epidermis differ significantly from those in muscle or neuronal tissues. Due to their fibrous nature, which stems from a fairly conserved central {alpha}-helical coiled-coil rod domain, IF proteins have long resisted crystallization and thus determination of their atomic structure. Since they represent the primary structural elements that determine the shape of the nucleus and the cell more generally, a major challenge is to arrive at a more rational understanding of how their nanomechanical properties effect the stability and plasticity of cells and tissues. Here, we review recent structural results of the coiled-coil dimer, assembly intermediates and growing filaments that have been obtained by a hybrid methods approach involving a rigorous combination of X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering, cryo-electron tomography, computational analysis and molecular modeling.

  5. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented.

  6. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The solvation structures of Na^+, K^+, and Cl^- ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na^+, K^+, and Cl^-, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  7. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. PMID:25475529

  8. Studies of the correlation of electrode kinetics with molecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, M. J.

    1983-06-01

    The overall objective is to develop our understanding of the connections between the kinetics and mechanisms of heterogeneous electron-transfer reactions at metal-electrolyte interfaces and the molecular structure of the reactant and the interfacial region. We have chiefly focussed attention on transition-metal redox couples, especially Co(III)/(II), Cr(III)/(II), and Ru(III)/(II) containing adsorbing inorganic and organic ligands at a number of electrocatalytic solid surfaces, especially silver, platinum, and gold, as well as at mercury electrodes. By combining electrochemical kinetic and reactant adsorption thermodynamic measurements, along with in situ vibrational spectroscopic studies using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS), the various catalytic influences exerted by the metal interface upon the energetics of electrode reactions have been probed in detail.

  9. Molecular structures and crystal packings of 2-styrylquinoxaline derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'mina, L. G.; Sitin, A. G.; Gulakova, E. N.; Fedorova, O. A.; Lermontova, E. Kh.; Churakov, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of 2-styrylquinoxaline derivatives with different substituents in the styryl fragment are determined. The degree of planarity of the molecules studied varies in a very wide range, from 1.7° to 33.5°. In the ethylene fragment, the double bond is essentially localized. The bicycle-pedal disordering of the ethylene fragment is found in the crystals of the methoxy and oxyacetyl derivatives of 2-styrylquinoxaline. None of the packings contains packing motifs favorable for the photocycloaddition (PCA) reaction with single crystal retention. The crystal packings of these compounds and that of 2-(4-methylstyryl)quinoxaline are characterized by a stacking motif of the head-to-head type, which eliminates the possibility of PCA taking place with single crystal retention but is suitable for this reaction in polycrystalline films. The crystal packing of 2-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl)quinoxaline does not contain elements with stacking interactions.

  10. The E-state as the basis for molecular structure space definition and structure similarity

    PubMed

    Hall; Kier

    2000-05-01

    The electrotopological state (E-state) is presented as a representation of molecular structure useful for definition of a space for chemical structures. This E-state representation provides the basis for chemical database management. The E-state formalism is presented along with its extension to the atom-type E-state. An approach to database organization, using polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) as examples, reveals the descriptive power of the E-state paradigm. A well-organized chemical database, as described here, may be searched to find structures similar to a target structure with the expectation that such structures may exhibit properties similar to the target. Searches using the atom-type E-state indices are demonstrated with two example drug molecules.

  11. Derivatives of Ergot-alkaloids: Molecular structure, physical properties, and structure-activity relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka B.; Spiteller, Michael

    2012-09-01

    A comprehensive screening of fifteen functionalized Ergot-alkaloids, containing bulk aliphatic cyclic substituents at D-ring of the ergoline molecular skeleton was performed, studying their structure-active relationships and model interactions with α2A-adreno-, serotonin (5HT2A) and dopamine D3 (D3A) receptors. The accounted high affinity to the receptors binding loops and unusual bonding situations, joined with the molecular flexibility of the substituents and the presence of proton accepting/donating functional groups in the studied alkaloids, may contribute to further understanding the mechanisms of biological activity in vivo and in predicting their therapeutic potential in central nervous system (CNS), including those related the Schizophrenia. Since the presented correlation between the molecular structure and properties, was based on the comprehensively theoretical computational and experimental physical study on the successfully isolated derivatives, through using routine synthetic pathways in a relatively high yields, marked these derivatives as 'treasure' for further experimental and theoretical studied in areas such as: (a) pharmacological and clinical testing; (b) molecular-drugs design of novel psychoactive substances; (c) development of the analytical protocols for determination of Ergot-alkaloids through a functionalization of the ergoline-skeleton, and more.

  12. General theory for multiple input-output perturbations in complex molecular systems. 1. Linear QSPR electronegativity models in physical, organic, and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Gómez-SanJuan, Asier; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    In general perturbation methods starts with a known exact solution of a problem and add "small" variation terms in order to approach to a solution for a related problem without known exact solution. Perturbation theory has been widely used in almost all areas of science. Bhor's quantum model, Heisenberg's matrix mechanincs, Feyman diagrams, and Poincare's chaos model or "butterfly effect" in complex systems are examples of perturbation theories. On the other hand, the study of Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) in molecular complex systems is an ideal area for the application of perturbation theory. There are several problems with exact experimental solutions (new chemical reactions, physicochemical properties, drug activity and distribution, metabolic networks, etc.) in public databases like CHEMBL. However, in all these cases, we have an even larger list of related problems without known solutions. We need to know the change in all these properties after a perturbation of initial boundary conditions. It means, when we test large sets of similar, but different, compounds and/or chemical reactions under the slightly different conditions (temperature, time, solvents, enzymes, assays, protein targets, tissues, partition systems, organisms, etc.). However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no QSPR general-purpose perturbation theory to solve this problem. In this work, firstly we review general aspects and applications of both perturbation theory and QSPR models. Secondly, we formulate a general-purpose perturbation theory for multiple-boundary QSPR problems. Last, we develop three new QSPR-Perturbation theory models. The first model classify correctly >100,000 pairs of intra-molecular carbolithiations with 75-95% of Accuracy (Ac), Sensitivity (Sn), and Specificity (Sp). The model predicts probabilities of variations in the yield and enantiomeric excess of reactions due to at least one perturbation in boundary conditions (solvent, temperature

  13. General theory for multiple input-output perturbations in complex molecular systems. 1. Linear QSPR electronegativity models in physical, organic, and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Gómez-SanJuan, Asier; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    In general perturbation methods starts with a known exact solution of a problem and add "small" variation terms in order to approach to a solution for a related problem without known exact solution. Perturbation theory has been widely used in almost all areas of science. Bhor's quantum model, Heisenberg's matrix mechanincs, Feyman diagrams, and Poincare's chaos model or "butterfly effect" in complex systems are examples of perturbation theories. On the other hand, the study of Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) in molecular complex systems is an ideal area for the application of perturbation theory. There are several problems with exact experimental solutions (new chemical reactions, physicochemical properties, drug activity and distribution, metabolic networks, etc.) in public databases like CHEMBL. However, in all these cases, we have an even larger list of related problems without known solutions. We need to know the change in all these properties after a perturbation of initial boundary conditions. It means, when we test large sets of similar, but different, compounds and/or chemical reactions under the slightly different conditions (temperature, time, solvents, enzymes, assays, protein targets, tissues, partition systems, organisms, etc.). However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no QSPR general-purpose perturbation theory to solve this problem. In this work, firstly we review general aspects and applications of both perturbation theory and QSPR models. Secondly, we formulate a general-purpose perturbation theory for multiple-boundary QSPR problems. Last, we develop three new QSPR-Perturbation theory models. The first model classify correctly >100,000 pairs of intra-molecular carbolithiations with 75-95% of Accuracy (Ac), Sensitivity (Sn), and Specificity (Sp). The model predicts probabilities of variations in the yield and enantiomeric excess of reactions due to at least one perturbation in boundary conditions (solvent, temperature

  14. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-10-30

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systemsmore » engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. As a result, a basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.« less

  15. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-10-30

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systems engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. As a result, a basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.

  16. Fast electronic structure methods for strongly correlated molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Sodt, Alex; Jung, Yousung

    2005-01-01

    A short review is given of newly developed fast electronic structure methods that are designed to treat molecular systems with strong electron correlations, such as diradicaloid molecules, for which standard electronic structure methods such as density functional theory are inadequate. These new local correlation methods are based on coupled cluster theory within a perfect pairing active space, containing either a linear or quadratic number of pair correlation amplitudes, to yield the perfect pairing (PP) and imperfect pairing (IP) models. This reduces the scaling of the coupled cluster iterations to no worse than cubic, relative to the sixth power dependence of the usual (untruncated) coupled cluster doubles model. A second order perturbation correction, PP(2), to treat the neglected (weaker) correlations is formulated for the PP model. To ensure minimal prefactors, in addition to favorable size-scaling, highly efficient implementations of PP, IP and PP(2) have been completed, using auxiliary basis expansions. This yields speedups of almost an order of magnitude over the best alternatives using 4-center 2-electron integrals. A short discussion of the scope of accessible chemical applications is given.

  17. Chitosan Molecular Structure as a Function of N-Acetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, Eduardo F.; Freitas, Luiz C.; Lins, Roberto D.

    2011-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to characterize the structure and solubility of chitosan nanoparticle-like structures as a function of the deacetylation level (0, 40, 60, and 100%) and the spatial distribution of the N-acetyl groups in the particles. The polysaccharide chains of highly N-deacetylated particles where the N-acetyl groups are uniformly distributed present a high flexibility and preference for the relaxed two-fold helix and five-fold helix motifs. When these groups are confined to a given region of the particle, the chains adopt preferentially a two-fold helix with f and w values close to crystalline chitin. Nanoparticles with up to 40% acetylation are moderately soluble, forming stable aggregates when the N-acetyl groups are unevenly distributed. Systems with 60% or higher N-acetylation levels are insoluble and present similar degrees of swelling regardless the distribution of their N-acetyl groups. Overall particle solvation is highly affected by electrostatic forces resulting from the degree of acetylation. The water mobility and orientation around the polysaccharide chains affects the stability of the intramolecular O3- HO3(n) ... O5(n+ 1) hydrogen bond, which in turn controls particle aggregation.

  18. Molecular structure-adsorption study on current textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Örücü, E; Tugcu, G; Saçan, M T

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the adsorption of a diverse set of textile dyes onto granulated activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch system. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to experimental data and the isotherm constants were calculated for 33 anthraquinone and azo dyes. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted more adequately to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. Added to a qualitative analysis of experimental results, multiple linear regression (MLR), support vector regression (SVR) and back propagation neural network (BPNN) methods were used to develop quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models with the novel adsorption data. The data were divided randomly into training and test sets. The predictive ability of all models was evaluated using the test set. Descriptors were selected with a genetic algorithm (GA) using QSARINS software. Results related to QSPR models on the adsorption capacity of GAC showed that molecular structure of dyes was represented by ionization potential based on two-dimensional topological distances, chromophoric features and a property filter index. Comparison of the performance of the models demonstrated the superiority of the BPNN over GA-MLR and SVR models. PMID:25529487

  19. Molecular structure and absolute configuration of the diterpene lactone, praelolide.

    PubMed

    Dai, J B; Wan, Z L; Rao, Z H; Liang, D C; Fang, Z; Luo, Y K; Long, K H

    1985-11-01

    Praelolide is a new compound which was isolated out from the gorgonian, Menella praelonga (Ridley), collected from the South Sea of China at Zhanjiang, Guangdong. The molecular formula is C28H35O12Cl. The research result by X-ray diffraction method on the crystal structure is presented. The compound is orthorhombic with space group P2(1)2(1)2, cell dimensions a = 16.936, b = 16.709, c = 10.333 A, and Z = 4. The structure has been solved by direct method and refined to R = 0.055 for 2257 unique observable reflexions by least-squares. The molecule is composed of the major conformational isomer in which the three main rings (a six-membered ring, an eight-membered ring, a six-membered ring) take separately the form of chair-chairboat-chair, a five-membered actone ring, a C1 substitution, 4 acetate groups, and a three-membered epoxide ring. The absolute configuration of the molecule has also been determined by statistics (R factor ratio R = 1.012) and Bijvoet pairs observation. For 30 pairs of the greatest anomalous contributions the residuals are R'(+) = 0.057 for the first enantiomorph and R'(-) = 0.005 for the second one, so the latter should unambiguously correspond to the absolute configuration of the molecule.

  20. Molecular clouds in the North American and Pelican Nebulae: structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shaobo; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji

    2014-03-01

    We present observations of a 4.25 deg{sup 2} area toward the North American and Pelican Nebulae in the J = 1-0 transitions of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O. Three molecules show different emission areas with their own distinct structures. These different density tracers reveal several dense clouds with a surface density of over 500 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} and a mean H{sub 2} column density of 5.8, 3.4, and 11.9 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} for {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O, respectively. We obtain a total mass of 5.4 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} ({sup 12}CO), 2.0 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} ({sup 13}CO), and 6.1 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} (C{sup 18}O) in the complex. The distribution of excitation temperature shows two phases of gas: cold gas (∼10 K) spreads across the whole cloud; warm gas (>20 K) outlines the edge of the cloud heated by the W80 H II region. The kinetic structure of the cloud indicates an expanding shell surrounding the ionized gas produced by the H II region. There are six discernible regions in the cloud: the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Islands and Sea, and Pelican's Beak, Hat, and Neck. The areas of {sup 13}CO emission range within 2-10 pc{sup 2} with mass of (1-5) × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} and line width of a few km s{sup –1}. The different line properties and signs of star-forming activity indicate they are in different evolutionary stages. Four filamentary structures with complicated velocity features are detected along the dark lane in LDN 935. Furthermore, a total of 611 molecular clumps within the {sup 13}CO tracing cloud are identified using the ClumpFind algorithm. The properties of the clumps suggest that most of the clumps are gravitationally bound and at an early stage of evolution with cold and dense molecular gas.

  1. Molecular and Supramolecular Structural Studies on Human Tropoelastin Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ostuni, Angela; Bochicchio, Brigida; Armentano, Maria F.; Bisaccia, Faustino; Tamburro, Antonio M.

    2007-01-01

    One of the unusual properties of elastin is its ability to coacervate, which has been proposed to play an important role in the alignment of monomeric elastin for cross-linking into the polymeric elastin matrix. The temperature at which this transition takes place depends on several factors including protein concentration, ionic strength, and pH. Previously, polypeptide sequences encoded by different exons of the human tropoelastin gene have been analyzed for their ability to coacervate and to self-assemble. Few of them were indeed able to coacervate and only one, that encoded by exon 30 (EX30), gave amyloid fibers. In this article, we report on two chemically synthesized peptides—a decapeptide and an octadecapeptide—whose sequences are contained in the longer EX30 peptide and on a polypeptide (EX1–7) of 125 amino-acid residues corresponding to the sequence coded by the exons 1–7 and on a polypeptide (EX2–7) of 99 amino-acid residues encoded by exons 2–7 of human tropoelastin obtained by recombinant DNA techniques. Molecular and supramolecular structural characterization of these peptides showed that a minimum sequence of ∼20 amino acids is needed to form amyloid fibers in the exon 30-derived peptides. The N-terminal region of mature tropoelastin (EX2–7) gives rise to a coacervate and forms elastinlike fibers, whereas the polypeptide sequence containing the signal peptide (EX1–7) forms mainly amyloid fibers. Circular dichroism spectra show that β-structure is ubiquitous in all the sequences studied, suggesting that the presence of a β-structure is a necessary, although not sufficient, requirement for the appearance of amyloid fibers. PMID:17693470

  2. Molecular, morphological and fossil input data for inferring relationship among viviparous brotulas (Bythitidae) - Resulting in a family status change for Dinematichthyidae.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Steen Wilhelm; Møller, Peter Rask; Schwarzhans, Werner; Nielsen, Jørgen G

    2016-09-01

    This article comprise the data related to the research article (Møller et al., 2016) [1], and makes it possible to explore and reproduce the topologies that allowed [1] to infer the relationship between the families Bythitidae and Dinematichthyidae. The supplementary data holds nexus-input files for the Bayesian analysis and the '.xml'-input files - with and without nucleotide data - that are used in the fossil-calibrated phylogenetic analysis with a relaxed clock model. The resulting topologies are provided as '.new'-files together with a characters matrix file for traits to trace across the inferred phylogenies. PMID:27331124

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation study on the molecular structures of the amylin fibril models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weixin; Su, Haibin; Zhang, John Z H; Mu, Yuguang

    2012-12-01

    The structural characterization of amyloid fibers is one of the most investigated areas in structural biology. Recently, protofibril models for amylin, i.e., the 37-residue human islet amyloid polypeptide or hIAPP were suggested by two groups based on NMR (Biochemistry 2007, 46, 13505-13522) and X-ray (Protein Sci. 2008, 17, 1467-1474) techniques. However, there are significant differences in the two models which maybe originate from the polymorphic nature of amylin fibrils. To obtain further insights into the packing and stability features of the different models, we performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations on them. Our analysis showed that even pairs of β-sheets composed of a limited number of β-strands are stable in the 100-ns simulations, which suggests that steric zipper interactions at a β-sheet-β-sheet interface strongly contribute to the stability of these amyloid aggregates. For both models, outer strands are more flexible, which might coincide with the dynamical requirement that outer strands act as growing sites facilitating conformational changes of new incoming chains. Moreover, simulation results showed that the X-ray models are structurally more compact than the NMR models and have more intimate patterns, which lead to more rigid amyloid models. As a result, the X-ray models are energetically more stable than the NMR models. Further modeling analyses verify the most likely amylin fibril model among both NMR and X-ray models. Upon further study of the force-induced dissociation of a single chain from the protofibrils, the binding energy and the mechanical stability of the fibril models are revealed. On these bases, it is possible to reconcile the crystallographic and the NMR data on the basic amylin fiber unit. PMID:23145779

  4. Correlation of molecular structure with fluorescence spectra in rare earth chelates. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Degnan, J.; Filipescu, N.; Mcavoy, N.

    1968-01-01

    Rare earth chelates fluorescence spectra correlation with molecular structure, analyzing emission spectrum internal Stark splitting of tetramethylammonium tetrakis /dibenzoylmethido/europate microcrystals

  5. Using the variation of anammox bacteria community structures as a bio-indicator for anthropogenic/terrestrial nitrogen inputs in the Pearl River Delta (PRD).

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Cao, Huiluo; Hong, Yiguo; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2013-11-01

    The variation of anammox bacteria community composition was evaluated in sediments collected from the Pearl River Delta area with an anthropogenic/terrestrial input gradient. Results indicated that the community composition of anammox bacteria shifted from estuarine environment to the South China Sea deep ocean along with the anthropogenic/terrestrial input gradient, where Scalindua genus of anammox bacteria predominated in the area with less anthropogenic/terrestrial influences, such as in the open oceanic area, while genera of Kuenenia/Brocadia anammox bacteria have higher proportions in the area with higher anthropogenic/terrestrial impacts. The canonical correspondence analysis demonstrated that salinity, organic matter contents, and ratio of NH4 (+) to (NO2 (-)+NO3 (-)) strongly affected the shifting of anammox bacterial community compositions within the same gradients. The results obtained in this study, together with the similar variation of anammox bacteria community structures in other several estuaries in the world, indicated that anammox bacteria might have a habitat-specific distribution pattern according to their living habits, and their community composition could be served as a bio-indicator to monitor the anthropogenic/terrestrial N inputs in coastal environments.

  6. Molecular Population Genetic Structure in the Piping Plover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mark P.; Haig, Susan M.; Gratto-Trevor, Cheri L.; Mullins, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    The Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) is a migratory shorebird currently listed as Endangered in Canada and the U.S. Great Lakes, and threatened throughout the remainder of its U.S. breeding and winter range. In this study, we undertook the first comprehensive molecular genetic-based investigation of Piping Plovers. Our primary goals were to (1) address higher level subspecific taxonomic issues, (2) characterize population genetic structure, and (3) make inferences regarding past bottlenecks or population expansions that have occurred within this species. Our analyses included samples of individuals from 23 U.S. States and Canadian Provinces, and were based on mitochondrial DNA sequences (580 bp, n = 245 individuals) and eight nuclear microsatellite loci (n = 229 individuals). Our findings illustrate strong support for separate Atlantic and Interior Piping Plover subspecies (C. m. melodus and C. m. circumcinctus, respectively). Birds from the Great Lakes region were allied with the Interior subspecies group and should be taxonomically referred to as C. m. circumcinctus. Population genetic analyses suggested that genetic structure was stronger among Atlantic birds relative to the Interior group. This pattern indicates that natal and breeding site fidelity may be reduced among Interior birds. Furthermore, analyses suggested that Interior birds have previously experienced genetic bottlenecks, whereas no evidence for such patterns existed among the Atlantic subspecies. Likewise, genetic analyses indicated that the Great Lakes region has experienced a population expansion. This finding may be interpreted as population growth following a previous bottleneck event. No genetic evidence for population expansions was found for Atlantic, Prairie Canada, or U.S. Northern Great Plains individuals. We interpret our population history insights in light of 25 years of Piping Plover census data. Overall, differences observed between Interior and Atlantic birds may reflect

  7. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The upper respiratory tract is colonized by a diverse array of commensal bacteria that harbor potential pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. As long as the local microbial ecosystem—also called “microbiome”—is in balance, these potentially pathogenic bacterial residents cause no harm to the host. However, similar to macrobiological ecosystems, when the bacterial community structure gets perturbed, potential pathogens can overtake the niche and cause mild to severe infections. Recent studies using next-generation sequencing show that S. pneumoniae, as well as other potential pathogens, might be kept at bay by certain commensal bacteria, including Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum spp. Bomar and colleagues are the first to explore a specific biological mechanism contributing to the antagonistic interaction between Corynebacterium accolens and S. pneumoniae in vitro [L. Bomar, S. D. Brugger, B. H. Yost, S. S. Davies, K. P. Lemon, mBio 7(1):e01725-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01725-15]. The authors comprehensively show that C. accolens is capable of hydrolyzing host triacylglycerols into free fatty acids, which display antipneumococcal properties, suggesting that these bacteria might contribute to the containment of pneumococcus. This work exemplifies how molecular epidemiological findings can lay the foundation for mechanistic studies to elucidate the host-microbe and microbial interspecies interactions underlying the bacterial community structure. Next, translation of these results to an in vivo setting seems necessary to unveil the magnitude and importance of the observed effect in its natural, polymicrobial setting. PMID:26838716

  8. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Community Structure.

    PubMed

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract is colonized by a diverse array of commensal bacteria that harbor potential pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. As long as the local microbial ecosystem-also called "microbiome"-is in balance, these potentially pathogenic bacterial residents cause no harm to the host. However, similar to macrobiological ecosystems, when the bacterial community structure gets perturbed, potential pathogens can overtake the niche and cause mild to severe infections. Recent studies using next-generation sequencing show that S. pneumoniae, as well as other potential pathogens, might be kept at bay by certain commensal bacteria, including Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum spp. Bomar and colleagues are the first to explore a specific biological mechanism contributing to the antagonistic interaction between Corynebacterium accolens and S. pneumoniae in vitro [L. Bomar, S. D. Brugger, B. H. Yost, S. S. Davies, K. P. Lemon, mBio 7(1):e01725-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01725-15]. The authors comprehensively show that C. accolens is capable of hydrolyzing host triacylglycerols into free fatty acids, which display antipneumococcal properties, suggesting that these bacteria might contribute to the containment of pneumococcus. This work exemplifies how molecular epidemiological findings can lay the foundation for mechanistic studies to elucidate the host-microbe and microbial interspecies interactions underlying the bacterial community structure. Next, translation of these results to an in vivo setting seems necessary to unveil the magnitude and importance of the observed effect in its natural, polymicrobial setting. PMID:26838716

  9. Automatic molecular structure perception for the universal force field.

    PubMed

    Artemova, Svetlana; Jaillet, Léonard; Redon, Stephane

    2016-05-15

    The Universal Force Field (UFF) is a classical force field applicable to almost all atom types of the periodic table. Such a flexibility makes this force field a potential good candidate for simulations involving a large spectrum of systems and, indeed, UFF has been applied to various families of molecules. Unfortunately, initializing UFF, that is, performing molecular structure perception to determine which parameters should be used to compute the UFF energy and forces, appears to be a difficult problem. Although many perception methods exist, they mostly focus on organic molecules, and are thus not well-adapted to the diversity of systems potentially considered with UFF. In this article, we propose an automatic perception method for initializing UFF that includes the identification of the system's connectivity, the assignment of bond orders as well as UFF atom types. This perception scheme is proposed as a self-contained UFF implementation integrated in a new module for the SAMSON software platform for computational nanoscience (http://www.samson-connect.net). We validate both the automatic perception method and the UFF implementation on a series of benchmarks. PMID:26927616

  10. The Influence of Molecular Cooling in Pregalactic Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, P. C.; Abel, T.; Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.

    1999-12-01

    The detailed chemistry and cooling in collapsing primordial clouds will be presented for total baryonic densities up to 106 cm-3. The model consists of 160 reactions of 23 species including H2, HD, HeH+, and LiH, and accounts for 8 different cooling and heating mechanisms. The hydrodynamic evolution of the gas is modeled under the assumptions of free-fall, isothermal, and isobaric collapse as well as for the central regions of 105 M⊙ objects in hierarchical scenarios. The latter being drawn from three-dimensional cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The dominant processes in the reaction network are identified and a minimal model that accurately predicts the full chemistry will be presented. It is found that radiative cooling due to collisional excitation of HD can lower the temperature in a primordial cloud below that reachable through H2 cooling alone. Further, the temperature evolution is influenced by the choice of the adopted H2 radiative cooling function. Implications for globular cluster and primordial star formation, as well as structure formation on small scales and the importance of molecular cooling in general will be discussed. The work of P.C.S. was supported by the DoE ORNL LDRD Seed Money Fund. T.A. acknowledges support from NSF Grant ASC--9318185. The work of S.L. and A.D. was supported by NSF Cooperative Agreement OSR-9353227 and Astronomical Sciences Grant AST-93-01099, respectively.

  11. Mineral-Biochar Composites: Molecular Structure and Porosity.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Aditya; Joseph, Stephen D; Hook, James M; Chia, Chee H; Munroe, Paul R; Donne, Scott; Lin, Yun; Phelan, David; Mitchell, David R G; Pace, Ben; Horvat, Joseph; Webber, J Beau W

    2016-07-19

    Dramatic changes in molecular structure, degradation pathway, and porosity of biochar are observed at pyrolysis temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 °C when bamboo biomass is pretreated by iron-sulfate-clay slurries (iron-clay biochar), as compared to untreated bamboo biochar. Electron microscopy analysis of the biochar reveals the infusion of mineral species into the pores of the biochar and the formation of mineral nanostructures. Quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy shows that the presence of the iron clay prevents degradation of the cellulosic fraction at pyrolysis temperatures of 250 °C, whereas at higher temperatures (350-550 °C), the clay promotes biomass degradation, resulting in an increase in both the concentrations of condensed aromatic, acidic, and phenolic carbon species. The porosity of the biochar, as measured by NMR cryoporosimetry, is altered by the iron-clay pretreatment. In the presence of the clay, at lower pyrolysis temperatures, the biochar develops a higher pore volume, while at higher temperature, the presence of clay causes a reduction in the biochar pore volume. The most dramatic reduction in pore volume is observed in the kaolinite-infiltrated biochar at 550 °C, which is attributed to the blocking of the mesopores (2-50 nm pore) by the nonporous metakaolinite formed from kaolinite. PMID:27284608

  12. Molecular advances in understanding social insect population structure.

    PubMed

    Crozier, R H; Oldroyd, B P; Tay, W T; Kaufmann, B E; Johnson, R N; Carew, M E; Jennings, K M

    1997-08-01

    Social insects present many phenomena seen in all organisms but in more extreme forms and with larger sample sizes than those observable in most natural populations of vertebrates. Microsatellites are proving very much more informative than allozymes for the analysis of population biological problems, and prolifically polymorphic markers are fairly readily developed. In addition, the male-haploid genetic system of many social insects facilitates genetic analysis. The ability to amplify DNA from sperm stored in a female's sperm storage device enables the determination of mating types long after the death of the short-lived males, in addition to information on the degree of mixing of sperm from different males. Mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences are also proving important, not only in phylogenetic studies but also in molecular population genetics, as a tracer of female movements. Mitochondrial markers have definitively shown the movement of females between colonies, challenging models giving exclusive primacy to kin selection as the explanation for multiqueen colonies, in Australian meat ants, Iridomyrmex purpureus, and the aridzone queenless ant Rhytidoponera sp. 12. Microsatellite and mtDNA variation are being studied in Camponotus consobrinus sugar ants, showing an unexpected diversity of complexity in colony structure, and microsatellites have shown that transfer of ants between nests of the weaver ant Polyrhachis doddi must be slight, despite an apparent lack of hostility.

  13. Molecular structure from a single NMR sequence (fast-PANACEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupče, Ēriks; Freeman, Ray

    2010-09-01

    The PANACEA experiment combines three standard NMR pulse sequences (INADEQUATE, HSQC and HMBC) into a single entity, and is designed for spectrometers with two or more receivers operating in parallel. For small molecules it offers a direct route to molecular structure. Often the INADEQUATE feature is the rate-determining step, being limited by the low natural abundance of directly coupled 13C sbnd 13C pairs. This new version, fast-PANACEA, speeds up this measurement by two alternative schemes. In the first, the individual 13C sites are excited by selective radiofrequency pulses acting on double-quantum coherence, and encoded according to the rows of a Hadamard matrix. The columns of this matrix are used to decode the experimental data into separate F 2 spectra. This reduction in the number of required scans secures a faster result than the conventional stepwise exploration of the evolution dimension where the Nyquist condition and the resolution requirements must both be satisfied. The second scheme makes use of multiple aliasing in the evolution dimension. Significant speed improvements are achieved by either technique, illustrated by measurements made on samples of menthol and cholesterol. A new stabilization scheme (i-lock) is introduced. This is a software program that corrects the final NMR frequencies based on the observed frequency of a strong X-spin signal. It replaces the conventional deuterium lock, permitting measurements on neat liquids such as peanut oil and silicone oil, and offering advantages where deuterated solvents are undesirable.

  14. Characterization of Chitin and Chitosan Molecular Structure in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, Eduardo D.; Lins, Roberto D.; Freitas, Luiz C.; Straatsma, t. P.

    2008-11-08

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to characterize the structure of chitin and chitosan fibers in aqueous solutions. Chitin fibers, whether isolated or in the form of a β-chitin nanoparticle, adopt the so-called 2-fold helix with Φ and φ values similar to its crystalline state. In solution, the intramolecular hydrogen bond HO3(n)•••O5(n+1) responsible for the 2-fold helical motif is stabilized by hydrogen bonds with water molecules in a well-defined orientation. On the other hand, chitosan can adopt five distinct helical motifs and its conformational equilibrium is highly dependent on pH. The hydrogen bond pattern and solvation around the O3 atom of insoluble chitosan (basic pH) are nearly identical to these quantities in chitin. Our findings suggest that the solubility and conformation of these polysaccharides are related to the stability of the intrachain HO3(n)•••O5(n+1) hydrogen bond, which is affect by the water exchange around the O3-HO3 hydroxyl group.

  15. Modeling Carbon and Hydrocarbon Molecular Structures in EZTB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A software module that models the electronic and mechanical aspects of hydrocarbon molecules and carbon molecular structures on the basis of first principles has been written for incorporation into, and execution within, the Easy (Modular) Tight-Binding (EZTB) software infrastructure, which is summarized briefly in the immediately preceding article. Of particular interest, this module can model carbon crystals and nanotubes characterized by various coordinates and containing defects, without need to adjust parameters of the physical model. The module has been used to study the changes in electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, caused by bending of the nanotubes, for potential utility as the basis of a nonvolatile, electriccharge- free memory devices. For example, in one application of the module, it was found that an initially 50-nmlong carbon, (10,10)-chirality nanotube, which is a metallic conductor when straight, becomes a semiconductor with an energy gap of .3 meV when bent to a lateral displacement of 4 nm at the middle.

  16. Structural basis for the antifolding activity of a molecular chaperone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengdong; Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular chaperones act on non-native proteins in the cell to prevent their aggregation, premature folding or misfolding. Different chaperones often exert distinct effects, such as acceleration or delay of folding, on client proteins via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we report the solution structure of SecB, a chaperone that exhibits strong antifolding activity, in complex with alkaline phosphatase and maltose-binding protein captured in their unfolded states. SecB uses long hydrophobic grooves that run around its disk-like shape to recognize and bind to multiple hydrophobic segments across the length of non-native proteins. The multivalent binding mode results in proteins wrapping around SecB. This unique complex architecture alters the kinetics of protein binding to SecB and confers strong antifolding activity on the chaperone. The data show how the different architectures of chaperones result in distinct binding modes with non-native proteins that ultimately define the activity of the chaperone.

  17. On the interaction structure of linear multi-input feedback control systems. M.S. Thesis; [problem solving, lattices (mathematics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, P. K.

    1975-01-01

    The closely-related problems of designing reliable feedback stabilization strategy and coordinating decentralized feedbacks are considered. Two approaches are taken. A geometric characterization of the structure of control interaction (and its dual) was first attempted and a concept of structural homomorphism developed based on the idea of 'similarity' of interaction pattern. The idea of finding classes of individual feedback maps that do not 'interfere' with the stabilizing action of each other was developed by identifying the structural properties of nondestabilizing and LQ-optimal feedback maps. Some known stability properties of LQ-feedback were generalized and some partial solutions were provided to the reliable stabilization and decentralized feedback coordination problems. A concept of coordination parametrization was introduced, and a scheme for classifying different modes of decentralization (information, control law computation, on-line control implementation) in control systems was developed.

  18. Methods for combining payload parameter variations with input environment. [calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are presented for calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria. The approach is based on the concept that the desired limit load, defined as the largest load occurring in a mission, is a random variable having a specific probability distribution which may be determined from extreme-value theory. The design limit load, defined as a particular of this random limit load, is the value conventionally used in structural design. Methods are presented for determining the limit load probability distributions from both time-domain and frequency-domain dynamic load simulations. Numerical demonstrations of the method are also presented.

  19. The Impact of Adjacent-Dependencies and Staged-Input on the Learnability of Center-Embedded Hierarchical Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Jun; Poletiek, Fenna H.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical debate in artificial grammar learning (AGL) regards the learnability of hierarchical structures. Recent studies using an A[superscript n]B[superscript n] grammar draw conflicting conclusions ([Bahlmann and Friederici, 2006] and [De Vries et al., 2008]). We argue that 2 conditions crucially affect learning A[superscript…

  20. Compact structure and proteins of pasta retard in vitro digestive evolution of branched starch molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Sissons, Mike; Warren, Frederick J; Gidley, Michael J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2016-11-01

    The roles that the compact structure and proteins in pasta play in retarding evolution of starch molecular structure during in vitro digestion are explored, using four types of cooked samples: whole pasta, pasta powder, semolina (with proteins) and extracted starch without proteins. These were subjected to in vitro digestion with porcine α-amylase, collecting samples at different times and characterizing the weight distribution of branched starch molecules using size-exclusion chromatography. Measurement of α-amylase activity showed that a protein (or proteins) from semolina or pasta powder interacted with α-amylase, causing reduced enzymatic activity and retarding digestion of branched starch molecules with hydrodynamic radius (Rh)<100nm; this protein(s) was susceptible to proteolysis. Thus the compact structure of pasta protects the starch and proteins in the interior of the whole pasta, reducing the enzymatic degradation of starch molecules, especially for molecules with Rh>100nm. PMID:27516291

  1. How Molecular Structure Affects Mechanical Properties of an Advanced Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Lee M.; Whitley, Karen S.; Gates, Thomas S.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    density was performed over a range of temperatures below the glass transition temperature. The physical characterization, elastic properties and notched tensile strength all as a function of molecular weight and test temperature were determined. For the uncrosslinked SI material, it was shown that notched tensile strength is a strong function of both temperature and molecular weight, whereas stiffness is only a strong function of temperature. For the crosslinked PETI-SI material, it was shown that the effect of crosslinking significantly enhances the mechanical performance of the low molecular weight material; comparable to that exhibited by the high molecular weight material.

  2. A Structural and Molecular Approach for the Study Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Vali, Hojatollah; Sears, S. Kelly; Roh, Yul

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of the nucleation and growth of crystals in both abiotic and biotic systems is critical to seemingly diverse disciplines of geology, biology, environmental science, and astrobiology. While there are abundant studies devoted to the determination of the structure and composition of inorganic crystals, as well as to the development of thermodynamic and kinetic models, it is only recently that research efforts have been directed towards understanding mineralization in biological systems (i.e., biomineralization). Biomineralization refers to the processes by which living organisms form inorganic solids. Studies of the processes of biomineralization under low temperature aqueous conditions have focused primarily on magnetite forming bacteria and shell forming marine organisms. Many of the biological building materials consist of inorganic minerals (calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, silica or iron oxide) intricately combined with organic polymers (like proteins). More recently, efforts have been undertaken to explore the nature of biological activities in ancient rocks. In the absence of well-preserved microorganisms or genetic material required for the polmerase chain reaction (PCR) method in molecular phylogenetic studies, using biominerals as biomarkers offers an alternative approach for the recognition of biogenic activity in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. The primary driving force in biomineralization is the interaction between organic and inorganic phases. Thus, the investigation of the ultrastructure and the nature of reactions at the molecular level occurring at the interface between inorganic and organic phases is essential to understanding the processes leading to the nucleation and growth of crystals. It is recognized that crystal surfaces can serve as the substrate for the organization of organic molecules that lead to the formation of polymers and other complex organic molecules, and in discussions of the origins of life

  3. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Masataka

    2015-12-31

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method.

  4. Structurally-modified subphthalocyanines: molecular design towards realization of expected properties from the electronic structure and structural features of subphthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Soji; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2014-07-01

    This feature article summarizes recent contributions of the authors in the synthesis of structurally-modified subphthalocyanines. The structural modification covers (1) modification of the conjugated system of subphthalocyanines to create novel conjugated systems comprising three pyrroles or pyrrole-like subunits, (2) core-modification by expansion of the inner pyrrolic five-membered ring to larger six- and seven-membered ring units, and (3) exterior-modification by annulation of functional units to subphthalocyanines. These modifications in the structure of subphthalocyanines have been performed with the aim of demonstrating unique properties originating from the bowl-shaped C3v-symmetric structure as well as the electronic structure delineated by the 14π-electron conjugated system on the curved molecular surface. The possible structural modifications surveyed in this feature article and their concomitant properties will provide important future guidelines to the design of subphthalocyanine-based functional molecules, considering the fact that subphthalocyanines have recently been attracting considerable attention as potential candidates in the field of optoelectronics and molecular electronics. PMID:24710280

  5. A Structural and Molecular Approach for the Study Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Vali, Hojatollah; Sears, S. Kelly; Roh, Yul

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of the nucleation and growth of crystals in both abiotic and biotic systems is critical to seemingly diverse disciplines of geology, biology, environmental science, and astrobiology. While there are abundant studies devoted to the determination of the structure and composition of inorganic crystals, as well as to the development of thermodynamic and kinetic models, it is only recently that research efforts have been directed towards understanding mineralization in biological systems (i.e., biomineralization). Biomineralization refers to the processes by which living organisms form inorganic solids. Studies of the processes of biomineralization under low temperature aqueous conditions have focused primarily on magnetite forming bacteria and shell forming marine organisms. Many of the biological building materials consist of inorganic minerals (calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, silica or iron oxide) intricately combined with organic polymers (like proteins). More recently, efforts have been undertaken to explore the nature of biological activities in ancient rocks. In the absence of well-preserved microorganisms or genetic material required for the polmerase chain reaction (PCR) method in molecular phylogenetic studies, using biominerals as biomarkers offers an alternative approach for the recognition of biogenic activity in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. The primary driving force in biomineralization is the interaction between organic and inorganic phases. Thus, the investigation of the ultrastructure and the nature of reactions at the molecular level occurring at the interface between inorganic and organic phases is essential to understanding the processes leading to the nucleation and growth of crystals. It is recognized that crystal surfaces can serve as the substrate for the organization of organic molecules that lead to the formation of polymers and other complex organic molecules, and in discussions of the origins of life

  6. Structure and function of natural sulphide-oxidizing microbial mats under dynamic input of light and chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Meyer, Steffi; Häusler, Stefan; Macalady, Jennifer L; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2016-04-01

    We studied the interaction between phototrophic and chemolithoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microorganisms in natural microbial mats forming in sulphidic streams. The structure of these mats varied between two end-members: one characterized by a layer dominated by large sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB; mostly Beggiatoa-like) on top of a cyanobacterial layer (B/C mats) and the other with an inverted structure (C/B mats). C/B mats formed where the availability of oxygen from the water column was limited (<5 μm). Aerobic chemolithotrophic activity of the SOB depended entirely on oxygen produced locally by cyanobacteria during high light conditions. In contrast, B/C mats formed at locations where oxygen in the water column was comparatively abundant (>45 μM) and continuously present. Here SOB were independent of the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria and outcompeted the cyanobacteria in the uppermost layer of the mat where energy sources for both functional groups were concentrated. Outcompetition of photosynthetic microbes in the presence of light was facilitated by the decoupling of aerobic chemolithotrophy and oxygenic phototrophy. Remarkably, the B/C mats conserved much less energy than the C/B mats, although similar amounts of light and chemical energy were available. Thus ecosystems do not necessarily develop towards optimal energy usage. Our data suggest that, when two independent sources of energy are available, the structure and activity of microbial communities is primarily determined by the continuous rather than the intermittent energy source, even if the time-integrated energy flux of the intermittent energy source is greater. PMID:26405833

  7. Structure and function of natural sulphide-oxidizing microbial mats under dynamic input of light and chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Meyer, Steffi; Häusler, Stefan; Macalady, Jennifer L; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2016-04-01

    We studied the interaction between phototrophic and chemolithoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microorganisms in natural microbial mats forming in sulphidic streams. The structure of these mats varied between two end-members: one characterized by a layer dominated by large sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB; mostly Beggiatoa-like) on top of a cyanobacterial layer (B/C mats) and the other with an inverted structure (C/B mats). C/B mats formed where the availability of oxygen from the water column was limited (<5 μm). Aerobic chemolithotrophic activity of the SOB depended entirely on oxygen produced locally by cyanobacteria during high light conditions. In contrast, B/C mats formed at locations where oxygen in the water column was comparatively abundant (>45 μM) and continuously present. Here SOB were independent of the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria and outcompeted the cyanobacteria in the uppermost layer of the mat where energy sources for both functional groups were concentrated. Outcompetition of photosynthetic microbes in the presence of light was facilitated by the decoupling of aerobic chemolithotrophy and oxygenic phototrophy. Remarkably, the B/C mats conserved much less energy than the C/B mats, although similar amounts of light and chemical energy were available. Thus ecosystems do not necessarily develop towards optimal energy usage. Our data suggest that, when two independent sources of energy are available, the structure and activity of microbial communities is primarily determined by the continuous rather than the intermittent energy source, even if the time-integrated energy flux of the intermittent energy source is greater.

  8. Probing the molecular structure of interfacial films and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anfeng

    The properties of outside surfaces were found to play an important role in the nucleation and crystallization processes. Thus controlling the surface properties would provide an effective means for crystal engineering. Hydrophobic surface is prepared by self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formation of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) on silicon surface, with the hydrophobicity adjusted by the monolayer coverage. Silicon wafer treated by RCA method is hydrophilic, so are SAMs formed by two amine-terminated organosilanes on silicon. However these three hydrophilic surfaces are unstable, due to contamination of the amine-terminated SAMs and hydrolysis of RCA treated silicon. Polymethine dyes, BDH+Cl- and BDH +ClO4-, are synthesized and characterized by UV spectra and crystal morphology. They have identical UV spectrum in dilute solutions due to the same chromophore, and J-aggregation happens at much higher concentrations. IR spectra are analyzed to monitor the crystallization process of BDH+Cl- OTS SAM surface and the crystallization process of BDH+Cl- on substrates with varying hydrophobicity was monitored by optical microscopy and compared. Due to the extreme flexibility of polysiloxane, silicone surfactants can arrange themselves at the interfaces quickly to adopt configurations with minimum free energy. Polysiloxane is hydrophobic but not oleophilic, which makes them effective emulsifiers and stabilizers in aqueous and nonaqueous media. The interaction between an AFM Si3N4 tip and a hydrophobic surface in silicone polyether (SPE) solution in the presence of ethanol was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) force measurement. ABA triblock type and comb-type SPE surfactants, adsorbed at the liquid-solid interface, provide steric barriers, even with significant addition of ethanol. On the contrary, conventional low-molecular weight and polymeric alkyl surfactants display no steric barrier even in the presence of moderate amount of ethanol. This unique property makes

  9. Structuring expert input for a knowledge-based approach to watershed condition assessment for the Northwest Forest Plan, USA.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sean N; Gallo, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    Assessments of watershed condition for aquatic and riparian species often have to rely on expert opinion because of the complexity of establishing statistical relationships among the many factors involved. Such expert-based assessments can be difficult to document and apply consistently over time and space. We describe and reflect on the process of developing a computer-based decision support application from expert judgments for assessing aquatic and riparian conditions over the 100,000 km² managed by the US federal government under the Northwest Forest Plan. The decision support system helped structure and document the assessment process and provided consistency and transparency to the evaluation methodology. However, many decisions and trade-offs were required in the expert engagement and model-building processes. Knowledge elicitation in an interactive group had a number of benefits over nominal group or Delphi processes, but efficient knowledge capture required considerable planning and expertise in the subject matter and modeling process. Communicating model results for validation was problematic and only effectively accomplished via in-person workshops. The choice to use different expert groups for each biophysical province provided more opportunities for participation and promoted greater ownership in the assessment, but it also led to increased variation among the resulting model structures. We propose three possible approaches for better managing the consistency of assessment models when multiple expert groups are involved.

  10. Evaluation of models for developing biological input for the design and location of water-intake structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    An approach for assessing multiple stimulus/response relations between fish and water intake structures is presented in this report. The approach stresses stimulus/response relations influencing fish and shellfish distribution and is made up of two methods. The first places emphasis on spatial and temperal distributions of populations; information is presented in the form of a non-predictive model, which allows for organizing information and documenting review processes. The second approach encompasses functional relationships between environmental and biological stimuli and responses of organisms. By using the two methods together, functional relationships can be evaluated to define the distribution of a fish or shellfish species. This information can then be used to resolve questions relating to impingement and entrainment.

  11. Laser pulse induced multiple exciton kinetics in molecular ring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiao; Wang, Luxia

    2016-11-01

    Multiple excitons can be formed upon strong optical excitation of molecular aggregates and complexes. Based on a theoretical approach on exciton-exciton annihilation dynamics in supramolecular systems (May et al., 2014), exciton interaction kinetics in ring aggregates of two-level molecules are investigated. Excited by the sub-picosecond laser pulse, multiple excitons keep stable in the molecular ring shaped as a regular polygon. If the symmetry is destroyed by changing the dipole of a single molecule, the excitation of different molecules becomes not identical, and the changed dipole-dipole interaction initiates subsequent energy redistribution. Depending on the molecular distance and the dipole configuration, the kinetics undergo different types of processes, but all get stable within some hundreds of femtoseconds. The study of exciton kinetics will be helpful for further investigations of the efficiency of optical devices based on molecular aggregates.

  12. A chromogenic molecular capsule attributable to dipolar amide resonance structure.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeon Sil; Park, Juwan; Paek, Kyungsoo

    2015-04-01

    A new chromogenic, self-assembled molecular capsule G@22 is developed by introducing four (N,N-dimethyl-4-aminophenyl) azobenzyl moieties on the upper rim of a resorcin[4]arene-based amidoimino-cavitand. The tuning of conjugation between amido and (N,N-dimethyl-4-aminophenyl)azobenzyl groups by acid-base titration allows naked-eye detection of molecular capsule formation. PMID:25740710

  13. Consequences of fission in the coral Siderastrea siderea: growth rates of small colonies and clonal input to population structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, R.; Edmunds, P. J.

    2007-06-01

    Colony age and size can be poorly related in scleractinian corals if colonies undergo fission to form smaller independent patches of living tissue (i.e., ramets), but the implications of this life-history characteristic are unclear. This study explored the ecological consequences of the potential discrepancy between size and age for a massive scleractinian, first by testing the effect of colony origin on the growth of small colonies, and second by quantifying the contribution of ramets to population structure. Using Siderastrea siderea in St. John (US Virgin Islands) as an experimental system, the analyses demonstrated that the growth of small colonies derived from sexual reproduction was 2.5-fold greater than that of small ramets which were estimated to be ≈100 years older based on the age of the parent colonies from which they split. Although fission can generate discrete colonies, which in the case of the study reef accounted for 42% of all colonies, it may depress colony success and reef accretion through lowered colony growth rates.

  14. Solution NMR structure of a designed metalloprotein and complementary molecular dynamics refinement.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Jennifer R; Liu, Weixia; Spiegel, Katrin; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Klein, Michael L; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua; DeGrado, William F

    2008-02-01

    We report the solution NMR structure of a designed dimetal-binding protein, di-Zn(II) DFsc, along with a secondary refinement step employing molecular dynamics techniques. Calculation of the initial NMR structural ensemble by standard methods led to distortions in the metal-ligand geometries at the active site. Unrestrained molecular dynamics using a nonbonded force field for the metal shell, followed by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical dynamics of DFsc, were used to relax local frustrations at the dimetal site that were apparent in the initial NMR structure and provide a more realistic description of the structure. The MD model is consistent with NMR restraints, and in good agreement with the structural and functional properties expected for DF proteins. This work demonstrates that NMR structures of metalloproteins can be further refined using classical and first-principles molecular dynamics methods in the presence of explicit solvent to provide otherwise unavailable insight into the geometry of the metal center.

  15. Designing π-stacked molecular structures to control heat transport through molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiršanskas, Gediminas; Li, Qian; Solomon, Gemma C.; Flensberg, Karsten; Leijnse, Martin

    2014-12-08

    We propose and analyze a way of using π stacking to design molecular junctions that either enhance or suppress a phononic heat current, but at the same time remain conductors for an electric current. Such functionality is highly desirable in thermoelectric energy converters, as well as in other electronic components where heat dissipation should be minimized or maximized. We suggest a molecular design consisting of two masses coupled to each other with one mass coupled to each lead. By having a small coupling (spring constant) between the masses, it is possible to either reduce or perhaps more surprisingly enhance the phonon conductance. We investigate a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use first principle calculations to extract model parameters for a number of specific molecular realizations, confirming that our proposal can indeed be realized using standard molecular building blocks.

  16. Insights from the Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Cellobiohydrolase Cel6A Molecular Structural Model from Aspergillus fumigatus NITDGPKA3.

    PubMed

    Dodda, Subba Reddy; Sarkar, Nibedita; Aikat, Kaustav; Krishnaraj, Navanietha R; Bhattacharjee, Sanchari; Bagchi, Angshuman; Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S

    2016-01-01

    Global demand for bioethanol is increasing tremendously as it could help to replace the conventional fossil fuel and at the same time supporting the bioremediation of huge volume of cellulosic wastes generated from different sources. Ideal genetic engineering approaches are essential to improve the efficacy of the bioethanol production processes for real time applications. A locally isolated fungal strain Aspergillus fumigatus NITDGPKA3 was used in our laboratory for the hydrolysis of lignocellulose with good cellulolytic activity when compared with other contemporary fungal strains. An attempt is made to sequence the cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) of A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3, model its structure to predict its catalytic activity towards improving the protein by genetic engineering approaches. Herein, the structure of the sequenced Cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) of A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3, modelled by homology modelling and its validation is reported. Further the catalytic activity of the modelled CBH enzyme was assessed by molecular docking analysis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CBH from A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3 belongs to the Glycohydro 6 (Cel6A) super family. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation suggest the structural and functional mechanism of the enzyme. The structures of both the cellulose binding (CBD) and catalytic domain (CD) have been compared with most widely studied CBH of Trichoderma reesei. The molecular docking with cellulose suggests that Gln 248, Pro 287, Val236, Asn284, and Ala288 are the main amino acids involved in the hydrolysis of the β, 1-4, glycosidic bonds of cellulose. PMID:27109185

  17. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  18. Comparison of genetic diversity structure analyses of SSR molecular marker data within apple (Malus×domestica) genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Patzak, Josef; Paprštein, František; Henychová, Alena; Sedlák, Jiří

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare traditional hierarchical clustering techniques and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) with the model-based Bayesian cluster analyses in relation to subpopulation differentiation based on breeding history and geographical origin of apple (Malus×domestica Borkh.) cultivars and landraces. We presented the use of a set of 10 microsatellite (SSR) loci for genetic diversity structure analyses of 273 apple accessions from national genetic resources. These SSR loci yielded a total of 113 polymorphic SSR alleles, with 5-18 alleles per locus. SSR molecular data were successfully used in binary and allelic input format for all genetic diversity analyses, but allelic molecular data did not reveal reliable results with the NTSYS-pc and BAPS softwares. A traditional cluster analysis still provided an easy and effective way for determining genetic diversity structure in the apple germplasm collection. A model-based Bayesian analysis also provided the clustering results in accordance to traditional cluster analysis, but the analyses were distorted by the presence of a dominant group of apple genetic resources owing to the narrow origin of the apple genome. PCoA confirmed that there were no noticeable differences in genetic diversity structure of apple genetic resources during the breeding history. The results of our analyses are useful in the context of enhancing apple collection management, sampling of core collections, and improving breeding processes. PMID:22954156

  19. Molecular analysis of neocortical layer structure in the ferret

    PubMed Central

    Rowell, Joanna J.; Mallik, Atul K.; Dugas-Ford, Jennifer; Ragsdale, Clifton W.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular markers that distinguish specific layers of rodent neocortex are increasingly employed to study cortical development and the physiology of cortical circuits. The extent to which these markers represent general features of neocortical cell type identity across mammals is, however, unknown. To assess the conservation of layer markers more broadly, we isolated orthologs for fifteen layer-enriched genes in the ferret, a carnivore with a large, gyrencephalic brain, and analyzed their patterns of neocortical gene expression. Our major findings are: (1) Many but not all layer markers tested show similar patterns of layer-specific gene expression between mouse and ferret cortex, supporting the view that layer-specific cell type identity is conserved at a molecular level across mammalian superorders; (2) Our panel of deep layer markers (ER81/ETV1, SULF2, PCP4, FEZF2/ZNF312, CACNA1H, KCNN2/SK2, SYT6, FOXP2, CTGF) provides molecular evidence that the specific stratifications of layer 5 and 6 into 5a, 5b, 6a and 6b are also conserved between rodents and carnivores. (3) Variations in layer-specific gene expression are more pronounced across areas of ferret cortex than between homologous areas of mouse and ferret cortex; (4) This variation of area gene expression was clearest with the superficial layer markers studied (SERPINE2, MDGA1, CUX1, UNC5D, RORB/NR1F2, EAG2/KCNH5). Most dramatically, the layer 4 markers RORB and EAG2 disclosed a molecular sublamination to ferret visual cortex and demonstrated a molecular dissociation among the so-called agranular areas of the neocortex. Our findings establish molecular markers as a powerful complement to cytoarchitecture for neocortical layer and cell-type comparisons across mammals. PMID:20575059

  20. Application of data science tools to quantify and distinguish between structures and models in molecular dynamics datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalidindi, Surya R.; Gomberg, Joshua A.; Trautt, Zachary T.; Becker, Chandler A.

    2015-08-01

    Structure quantification is key to successful mining and extraction of core materials knowledge from both multiscale simulations as well as multiscale experiments. The main challenge stems from the need to transform the inherently high dimensional representations demanded by the rich hierarchical material structure into useful, high value, low dimensional representations. In this paper, we develop and demonstrate the merits of a data-driven approach for addressing this challenge at the atomic scale. The approach presented here is built on prior successes demonstrated for mesoscale representations of material internal structure, and involves three main steps: (i) digital representation of the material structure, (ii) extraction of a comprehensive set of structure measures using the framework of n-point spatial correlations, and (iii) identification of data-driven low dimensional measures using principal component analyses. These novel protocols, applied on an ensemble of structure datasets output from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have successfully classified the datasets based on several model input parameters such as the interatomic potential and the temperature used in the MD simulations.

  1. Algorithm for Finding Similar Shapes in Large Molecular Structures Libraries

    1994-10-19

    The SHAPES software consists of methods and algorithms for representing and rapidly comparing molecular shapes. Molecular shapes algorithms are a class of algorithm derived and applied for recognizing when two three-dimensional shapes share common features. They proceed from the notion that the shapes to be compared are regions in three-dimensional space. The algorithms allow recognition of when localized subregions from two or more different shapes could never be superimposed by any rigid-body motion. Rigid-body motionsmore » are arbitrary combinations of translations and rotations.« less

  2. Fast metabolite identification with Input Output Kernel Regression

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Céline; Shen, Huibin; Dührkop, Kai; d'Alché-Buc, Florence; Böcker, Sebastian; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: An important problematic of metabolomics is to identify metabolites using tandem mass spectrometry data. Machine learning methods have been proposed recently to solve this problem by predicting molecular fingerprint vectors and matching these fingerprints against existing molecular structure databases. In this work we propose to address the metabolite identification problem using a structured output prediction approach. This type of approach is not limited to vector output space and can handle structured output space such as the molecule space. Results: We use the Input Output Kernel Regression method to learn the mapping between tandem mass spectra and molecular structures. The principle of this method is to encode the similarities in the input (spectra) space and the similarities in the output (molecule) space using two kernel functions. This method approximates the spectra-molecule mapping in two phases. The first phase corresponds to a regression problem from the input space to the feature space associated to the output kernel. The second phase is a preimage problem, consisting in mapping back the predicted output feature vectors to the molecule space. We show that our approach achieves state-of-the-art accuracy in metabolite identification. Moreover, our method has the advantage of decreasing the running times for the training step and the test step by several orders of magnitude over the preceding methods. Availability and implementation: Contact: celine.brouard@aalto.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307628

  3. Impacts of eutrophic freshwater inputs on water quality and phytoplankton size structure in a temperate estuary altered by a sea dike.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yongsik; Hyun, Bongkil; Jeong, Byungkwan; Soh, Ho Young

    2013-04-01

    Phytoplankton size structure and water properties in the Youngsan River estuary, which has been altered by a sea dike, were monitored over an annual cycle (2003-2004) to investigate the effects of freshwater inputs on their spatial and temporal variation. Trophic status was also evaluated using the trophic status index (TRIX). Freshwater was discharged from an artificial reservoir throughout the year, supplying nutrients (except for [Formula: see text] ) and low levels of dissolved oxygen to the estuary, which resulted in eutrophication ("greatest trophic level"). Turbidity increased, and density stratification developed in the water column. The density stratification in turn affected the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration in the bottom water during the freshwater discharge. Chlorophyll a concentrations, dominated by nano-sized (<20 μm) particles, were generally much lower when the water column was stratified by freshwater discharge (.90-5.03 μg chl L(-1)) than when the water column was well-mixed with no freshwater inputs from the dike (3.42-47.0 μg chl L(-1)). The net-scale (>20 μm) decrease in phytoplankton biomass differed from that in tropical estuaries affected by monsoons and in other temperate estuaries. Temporal variations in water quality and phytoplankton size structure were more strongly influenced by artificial regulation of the freshwater discharge than by monsoon meteorological events. This study implies that a different paradigm than that for natural estuaries or larger estuaries with dams is required for the better understanding and management of ecosystems in estuaries altered by anthropogenic activities, such as the construction of sea dikes.

  4. Molecular structure descriptors in the computer-aided design of biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raevsky, Oleg A.

    1999-06-01

    The current state of description of molecular structure in computer-aided molecular design of biologically active compounds by means of descriptors is analysed. The information contents of descriptors increases in the following sequence: element-level descriptors-structural formulae descriptors-electronic structure descriptors-molecular shape descriptors-intermolecular interaction descriptors. Each subsequent class of descriptors normally covers information contained in the previous-level ones. It is emphasised that it is practically impossible to describe all the features of a molecular structure in terms of any single class of descriptors. It is recommended to optimise the number of descriptors used by means of appropriate statistical procedures and characteristics of structure-property models based on these descriptors. The bibliography includes 371 references.

  5. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy & Dynamics Lecture: Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy for Chemical Kinetics, Molecular Structure, and Analytical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pate, Brooks

    2013-03-01

    Advances in high-speed digital electronics have enabled a new generation of molecular rotational spectroscopy techniques that provide instantaneous broadband spectral coverage. These techniques use a chirped excitation pulse to coherently excite the molecular sample over a spectral bandwidth of 10 GHz or larger through rapid passage. The subsequent time-domain emission is recorded using high-speed digitizers (up to 100 Gigasample/s) and the frequency domain spectrum is produced by fast Fourier transformation. The chirped-pulse Fourier transform (CP-FT) method has been implemented in the microwave frequency range (2-40 GHz) for studies of cold samples in pulsed jet sources and in the mm-wave/terahertz (THz) frequency range for studies of samples at room-temperature. The method has opened new applications for molecular rotational spectroscopy in the area of chemical kinetics where dynamic rotational spectroscopy is used to measure the rates of unimolecular isomerization reactions in highly excited molecules prepared by pulsed infrared laser excitation. In these applications, the isomerization rate is obtained from an analysis of the overall line shapes which are modified by chemical exchange leading to coalescence behavior similar to the effect in NMR spectroscopy. The sensitivity of the method and the ability to extend it to low frequency (2-8 GHz) have significantly increased the size range of molecules and molecular clusters for structure determination using isotopic substitution to build up the 3D molecular structures atom-by-atom. Application to the structure of water clusters with up to 15 water molecules will be presented. When coupled with advances in solid-state mm-wave/THz devices, this method provides a direct digital technique for analytical chemistry of room-temperature gases based on molecular rotational spectroscopy. These high-throughput methods can analyze complex sample mixtures with unmatched chemical selectivity and short analysis times. Work

  6. Molecular and structural preservation of dehydrated bio-tissue for THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Png, Gretel M.; Choi, Jin Wook; Guest, Ian; Ng, Brian W.-H.; Mickan, Samuel P.; Abbott, Derek; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2007-12-01

    Terahertz transmission through freshly excised biological tissue is limited by the tissue's high water content. Tissue fixation methods that remove water, such as fixation in Formalin, destroy the structural information of proteins hence are not suitable for THz applications. Dehydration is one possible method for revealing the tissue's underlying molecular structure and components. In this study, we measured the THz responses over time of dehydrating fresh, necrotic and lyophilized rat tissue. Our results show that as expected, THz absorption increases dramatically with drying and tissue freshness can be maintained through lyophilization. Dehydrated biological tissue with retained molecular structure can be useful for future laser-based THz wave molecular analysis.

  7. Supersonic turbulence and structure of interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Nordlund, Ake; Padoan, Paolo

    2002-07-15

    The interstellar medium provides a unique laboratory for highly supersonic, driven hydrodynamic turbulence. We propose a theory of such turbulence, test it by numerical simulations, and use the results to explain observational scaling properties of interstellar molecular clouds, the regions where stars are born.

  8. Molecular structure of the number 21 chromosome and Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 19 papers. Some of the titles are: The Biology of Down Syndrome, Human Chromosome Analysis, Expression of Genes on Human Chromosome 21, Comparative Gene Mapping of Human Chromosome 21 and Mouse Chromosome 16, and Relating Molecular Specificity to Normal and Abnormal Brain Development.

  9. Rapid engineering of versatile molecular logic gates using heterologous genetic transcriptional modules† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary methods, gene regulatory sequences used, the characterised dose responses of the single-input Buffer gate and the three promoter inputs under various cognate chemical induction levels. See DOI: 10.1039/c4cc05264a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We designed and constructed versatile modular genetic logic gates in bacterial cells. These function as digital logic 1-input Buffer gate, 2-input and 3-input AND gates with one inverted input and integrate multiple chemical input signals in customised logic manners. Such rapidly engineered devices serve to achieve increased sensing signal selectivity. PMID:25062273

  10. Habitat management affects soil chemistry and allochthonous organic inputs mediating microbial structure and exo-enzyme activity in Wadden Sea salt-marsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Peter; Granse, Dirk; Thi Do, Hai; Weingartner, Magdalena; Nolte, Stefanie; Hoth, Stefan; Jensen, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The Wadden Sea (WS) region is Europe's largest wetland and home to approximately 20% of its salt marsh area. Mainland salt marshes of the WS are anthropogenically influenced systems and have traditionally been used for livestock grazing in wide parts. After foundation of WS National Parks in the late 1980s and early 1990s, artificial drainage has been abandoned; however, livestock grazing is still common in many areas of the National Parks and is under ongoing discussion as a habitat-management practice. While studies so far focused on effects of livestock grazing on biodiversity, little is known about how biogeochemical processes, element cycling, and particularly carbon sequestration are affected. Here, we present data from a recent field study focusing on grazing effects on soil properties, microbial exo-enzyme activity, microbial abundance and structure. Exo-enzyme activity was studied conducting digestive enzyme assays for various enzymes involved in C- and N cycling. Microbial abundance and structure was assessed measuring specific gene abundance of fungi and bacteria using quantitative PCR. Soil compaction induced by grazing led to higher bulk density and decreases in soil redox (∆ >100 mV). Soil pH was significantly lower in grazed parts. Further, the proportion of allochthonous organic matter (marine input) was significantly smaller in grazed vs. ungrazed sites, likely caused by a higher sediment trapping capacity of the taller vegetation in the ungrazed sites. Grazing induced changes in bulk density, pH and redox resulted in reduced activity of enzymes involved in microbial C acquisition; however, there was no grazing effect on enzymes involved in N acquisition. While changes in pH, bulk density or redox did not affect microbial abundance and structure, the relative amount of marine organic matter significantly reduced the relative abundance of fungi (F:B ratio). We conclude that livestock grazing directly affects microbial exo-enzyme activity, thus

  11. Structural properties and interaction energies affecting drug design. An approach combining molecular simulations, statistics, interaction energies and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Dimitris; Papadopoulos, Georgios E; Anastassopoulos, Georgios; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Anagnostopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-06-01

    In order to elucidate some basic principles for protein-ligand interactions, a subset of 87 structures of human proteins with their ligands was obtained from the PDB databank. After a short molecular dynamics simulation (to ensure structure stability), a variety of interaction energies and structural parameters were extracted. Linear regression was performed to determine which of these parameters have a potentially significant contribution to the protein-ligand interaction. The parameters exhibiting relatively high correlation coefficients were selected. Important factors seem to be the number of ligand atoms, the ratio of N, O and S atoms to total ligand atoms, the hydrophobic/polar aminoacid ratio and the ratio of cavity size to the sum of ligand plus water atoms in the cavity. An important factor also seems to be the immobile water molecules in the cavity. Nine of these parameters were used as known inputs to train a neural network in the prediction of seven other. Eight structures were left out of the training to test the quality of the predictions. After optimization of the neural network, the predictions were fairly accurate given the relatively small number of structures, especially in the prediction of the number of nitrogen and sulfur atoms of the ligand.

  12. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, Ezequiel de la; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J.

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  13. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge.

    PubMed

    de la Llave, Ezequiel; Herrera, Santiago E; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P; Calvo, Ernesto J; Williams, Federico J

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge. PMID:26567676

  14. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Llave, Ezequiel; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J.

    2015-11-01

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  15. Molecular Structures and Functional Relationships in Clostridial Neurotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan S.

    2011-12-01

    The seven serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (A-G) are the deadliest poison known to humans. They share significant sequence homology and hence possess similar structure-function relationships. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) act via a four-step mechanism, viz., binding and internalization to neuronal cells, translocation of the catalytic domain into the cytosol and finally cleavage of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) causing blockage of neurotransmitter release leading to flaccid paralysis. Crystal structures of three holotoxins, BoNT/A, B and E, are available to date. Although the individual domains are remarkably similar, their domain organization is different. These structures have helped in correlating the structural and functional domains. This has led to the determination of structures of individual domains and combinations of them. Crystal structures of catalytic domains of all serotypes and several binding domains are now available. The catalytic domains are zinc endopeptidases and share significant sequence and structural homology. The active site architecture and the catalytic mechanism are similar although the binding mode of individual substrates may be different, dictating substrate specificity and peptide cleavage selectivity. Crystal structures of catalytic domains with substrate peptides provide clues to specificity and selectivity unique to BoNTs. Crystal structures of the receptor domain in complex with ganglioside or the protein receptor have provided information about the binding of botulinum neurotoxin to the neuronal cell. An overview of the structure-function relationship correlating the 3D structures with biochemical and biophysical data and how they can be used for structure-based drug discovery is presented here.

  16. MOLECULAR INTERACTION POTENTIALS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    One reasonable approach to the analysis of the relationships between molecular structure and toxic activity is through the investigation of the forces and intermolecular interactions responsible for chemical toxicity. The interaction between the xenobiotic and the bio...

  17. Ultra-low-molecular-weight heparins: precise structural features impacting specific anticoagulant activities.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marcelo A; Viskov, Christian; Herman, Frederic; Gray, Angel L; de Farias, Eduardo H C; Cavalheiro, Renan P; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Hoppensteadt, Debra; Fareed, Jawed; Nader, Helena B

    2013-03-01

    Ultra-low-molecular-weight heparins (ULMWHs) with better efficacy and safety ratios are under development; however, there are few structural data available. The main structural features and molecular weight of ULMWHs were studied and compared to enoxaparin. Their monosaccharide composition and average molecular weights were determined and preparations studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, scanning ultraviolet spectroscopy, circular dichroism and gel permeation chromatography. In general, ULMWHs presented higher 3-O-sulphated glucosamine and unsaturated uronic acid residues, the latter being comparable with their higher degree of depolymerisation. The analysis showed that ULMWHs are structurally related to LMWHs; however, their monosaccharide/oligosaccharide compositions and average molecular weights differed considerably explaining their different anticoagulant activities. The results relate structural features to activity, assisting the development of new and improved therapeutic agents, based on depolymerised heparin, for the prophylaxis and treatment of thrombotic disorders.

  18. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE USING SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  19. ONTOGENETIC ALTERATIONS IN MOLECULAR AND STRUCTURAL CORRELATES OF DENDRITIC GROWTH FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE TO POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the first report showing both molecular and structural changes in brain following developmental exposure to a neurotoxicant. It is known that perinatal exposure to a neurotoxicant, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), is associated with decreased IQ scores, impaired learnin...

  20. H++ 3.0: automating pK prediction and the preparation of biomolecular structures for atomistic molecular modeling and simulations.

    PubMed

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Aguilar, Boris; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2012-07-01

    The accuracy of atomistic biomolecular modeling and simulation studies depend on the accuracy of the input structures. Preparing these structures for an atomistic modeling task, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, can involve the use of a variety of different tools for: correcting errors, adding missing atoms, filling valences with hydrogens, predicting pK values for titratable amino acids, assigning predefined partial charges and radii to all atoms, and generating force field parameter/topology files for MD. Identifying, installing and effectively using the appropriate tools for each of these tasks can be difficult for novice and time-consuming for experienced users. H++ (http://biophysics.cs.vt.edu/) is a free open-source web server that automates the above key steps in the preparation of biomolecular structures for molecular modeling and simulations. H++ also performs extensive error and consistency checking, providing error/warning messages together with the suggested corrections. In addition to numerous minor improvements, the latest version of H++ includes several new capabilities and options: fix erroneous (flipped) side chain conformations for HIS, GLN and ASN, include a ligand in the input structure, process nucleic acid structures and generate a solvent box with specified number of common ions for explicit solvent MD.

  1. Quantitative structure-activity relationship correlation between molecular structure and the Rayleigh enantiomeric enrichment factor.

    PubMed

    Jammer, S; Rizkov, D; Gelman, F; Lev, O

    2015-08-01

    It was recently demonstrated that under environmentally relevant conditions the Rayleigh equation is valid to describe the enantiomeric enrichment - conversion relationship, yielding a proportional constant called the enantiomeric enrichment factor, εER. In the present study we demonstrate a quantitative structure-activity relationship model (QSAR) that describes well the dependence of εER on molecular structure. The enantiomeric enrichment factor can be predicted by the linear Hansch model, which correlates biological activity with physicochemical properties. Enantioselective hydrolysis of sixteen derivatives of 2-(phenoxy)propionate (PPMs) have been analyzed during enzymatic degradation by lipases from Pseudomonas fluorescens (PFL), Pseudomonas cepacia (PCL), and Candida rugosa (CRL). In all cases the QSAR relationships were significant with R(2) values of 0.90-0.93, and showed high predictive abilities with internal and external validations providing QLOO(2) values of 0.85-0.87 and QExt(2) values of 0.8-0.91. Moreover, it is demonstrated that this model enables differentiation between enzymes with different binding site shapes. The enantioselectivity of PFL and PCL was dictated by electronic properties, whereas the enantioselectivity of CRL was determined by lipophilicity and steric factors. The predictive ability of the QSAR model demonstrated in the present study may serve as a helpful tool in environmental studies, assisting in source tracking of unstudied chiral compounds belonging to a well-studied homologous series.

  2. Representation of molecular structure using quantum topology with inductive logic programming in structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Buttingsrud, Bård; Ryeng, Einar; King, Ross D; Alsberg, Bjørn K

    2006-06-01

    The requirement of aligning each individual molecule in a data set severely limits the type of molecules which can be analysed with traditional structure activity relationship (SAR) methods. A method which solves this problem by using relations between objects is inductive logic programming (ILP). Another advantage of this methodology is its ability to include background knowledge as 1st-order logic. However, previous molecular ILP representations have not been effective in describing the electronic structure of molecules. We present a more unified and comprehensive representation based on Richard Bader's quantum topological atoms in molecules (AIM) theory where critical points in the electron density are connected through a network. AIM theory provides a wealth of chemical information about individual atoms and their bond connections enabling a more flexible and chemically relevant representation. To obtain even more relevant rules with higher coverage, we apply manual postprocessing and interpretation of ILP rules. We have tested the usefulness of the new representation in SAR modelling on classifying compounds of low/high mutagenicity and on a set of factor Xa inhibitors of high and low affinity.

  3. Bias-dependent molecular-level structure of electrical double layer in ionic liquid on graphite.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer M; Walters, Deron; Labuda, Aleksander; Feng, Guang; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Proksch, Roger; Balke, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the bias-evolution of the electrical double layer structure of an ionic liquid on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite measured by atomic force microscopy. We observe reconfiguration under applied bias and the orientational transitions in the Stern layer. The synergy between molecular dynamics simulation and experiment provides a comprehensive picture of structural phenomena and long and short-range interactions, which improves our understanding of the mechanism of charge storage on a molecular level.

  4. Crystal structural and diffusion property in titanium carbides: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yanan; Gao, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    Titanium carbides were studied via molecular dynamics simulation to characterize TiCx structures with respect to the carbon diffusion properties in this study. The effect of carbon concentration on atomic structures of titanium carbides was investigated through discussing the structure variation and the radial distribution functions of carbon atoms in titanium carbides. The carbon diffusion in titanium carbides was also analyzed, focusing on the dependence on carbon concentration and carbide structure. Carbon diffusivity with different carbon concentrations was determined by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations and compared with the available experimental data. The simulation results showed an atomic exchange mechanism for carbon diffusion in titanium carbide.

  5. Application of the AMPLE cluster-and-truncate approach to NMR structures for molecular replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Bibby, Jaclyn; Keegan, Ronan M.; Mayans, Olga; Winn, Martyn D.; Rigden, Daniel J.

    2013-11-01

    Processing of NMR structures for molecular replacement by AMPLE works well. AMPLE is a program developed for clustering and truncating ab initio protein structure predictions into search models for molecular replacement. Here, it is shown that its core cluster-and-truncate methods also work well for processing NMR ensembles into search models. Rosetta remodelling helps to extend success to NMR structures bearing low sequence identity or high structural divergence from the target protein. Potential future routes to improved performance are considered and practical, general guidelines on using AMPLE are provided.

  6. Structure and Molecular Evolution of CDGSH Iron-Sulfur Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shaomei; Ye, Keqiong

    2011-01-01

    The recently discovered CDGSH iron-sulfur domains (CISDs) are classified into seven major types with a wide distribution throughout the three domains of life. The type 1 protein mitoNEET has been shown to fold into a dimer with the signature CDGSH motif binding to a [2Fe-2S] cluster. However, the structures of all other types of CISDs were unknown. Here we report the crystal structures of type 3, 4, and 6 CISDs determined at 1.5 Å, 1.8 Å and 1.15 Å resolution, respectively. The type 3 and 4 CISD each contain one CDGSH motif and adopt a dimeric structure. Although similar to each other, the two structures have permutated topologies, and both are distinct from the type 1 structure. The type 6 CISD contains tandem CDGSH motifs and adopts a monomeric structure with an internal pseudo dyad symmetry. All currently known CISD structures share dual iron-sulfur binding modules and a β-sandwich for either intermolecular or intramolecular dimerization. The iron-sulfur binding module, the β-strand N-terminal to the module and a proline motif are conserved among different type structures, but the dimerization module and the interface and orientation between the two iron-sulfur binding modules are divergent. Sequence analysis further shows resemblance between CISD types 4 and 7 and between 1 and 2. Our findings suggest that all CISDs share common ancestry and diverged into three primary folds with a characteristic phylogenetic distribution: a eukaryote-specific fold adopted by types 1 and 2 proteins, a prokaryote-specific fold adopted by types 3, 4 and 7 proteins, and a tandem-motif fold adopted by types 5 and 6 proteins. Our comprehensive structural, sequential and phylogenetic analysis provides significant insight into the assembly principles and evolutionary relationship of CISDs. PMID:21949752

  7. VAMMPIRE: a matched molecular pairs database for structure-based drug design and optimization.

    PubMed

    Weber, Julia; Achenbach, Janosch; Moser, Daniel; Proschak, Ewgenij

    2013-06-27

    Structure-based optimization to improve the affinity of a lead compound is an established approach in drug discovery. Knowledge-based databases holding molecular replacements can be supportive in the optimization process. We introduce a strategy to relate the substitution effect within matched molecular pairs (MMPs) to the atom environment within the cocrystallized protein-ligand complex. Virtually Aligned Matched Molecular Pairs Including Receptor Environment (VAMMPIRE) database and the supplementary web interface ( http://vammpire.pharmchem.uni-frankfurt.de ) provide valuable information for structure-based lead optimization.

  8. A biomimetic molecular switch at work: coupling photoisomerization dynamics to peptide structural rearrangement.

    PubMed

    García-Iriepa, Cristina; Gueye, Moussa; Léonard, Jérémie; Martínez-López, David; Campos, Pedro J; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Sampedro, Diego; Marazzi, Marco

    2016-03-01

    In spite of considerable interest in the design of molecular switches towards photo-controllable (bio)materials, few studies focused on the major influence of the surrounding environment on the switch photoreactivities. We present a combined experimental and computational study of a retinal-like molecular switch linked to a peptide, elucidating the effects on the photoreactivity and on the α-helix secondary structure. Temperature-dependent, femtosecond UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy and high-level hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods were applied to describe the photoisomerization process and the subsequent peptide rearrangement. It was found that the conformational heterogeneity of the ground state peptide controls the excited state potential energy surface and the thermally activated population decay. Still, a reversible α-helix to α-hairpin conformational change is predicted, paving the way for a fine photocontrol of different secondary structure elements, hence (bio)molecular functions, using retinal-inspired molecular switches. PMID:26876376

  9. Gas-phase molecular structure and energetics of anionic silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, José R. B.; Cordeiro, M. Natália D. S.; Jorge, Miguel

    2008-09-01

    The gas-phase stabilities of linear, branched and cyclic silicates made of up to five silicon atoms were studied with density functional theory (DFT). The starting geometries for the DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level of theory were obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations. We have observed that geometric parameters and charges are mainly affected by the degree of deprotonation. Charges on Si atoms are also influenced by their degree of substitution. The enthalpy of deprotonation of the neutral species was found to decrease with the size of the molecule, while the average deprotonation enthalpy of highly charged compounds increased with molecular size. Furthermore, the formation of rings in highly charged silicates is enthalpically preferred to chain growth. These observations result from two competing effects: the easier distribution of negative charge in silicates with low charge density and the strong intramolecular repulsions present in silicates with high charge density. As a consequence, highly charged silicates in the gas phase tend to be as small and as highly condensed as possible, which is in line with experimental observations from solution NMR.

  10. Exponential repulsion improves structural predictability of molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Bazgier, Václav; Berka, Karel; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2016-10-30

    Molecular docking is a powerful tool for theoretical prediction of the preferred conformation and orientation of small molecules within protein active sites. The obtained poses can be used for estimation of binding energies, which indicate the inhibition effect of designed inhibitors, and therefore might be used for in silico drug design. However, the evaluation of ligand binding affinity critically depends on successful prediction of the native binding mode. Contemporary docking methods are often based on scoring functions derived from molecular mechanical potentials. In such potentials, nonbonded interactions are typically represented by electrostatic interactions between atom-centered partial charges and standard 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential. Here, we present implementation and testing of a scoring function based on more physically justified exponential repulsion instead of the standard Lennard-Jones potential. We found that this scoring function significantly improved prediction of the native binding modes in proteins bearing narrow active sites such as serine proteases and kinases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27620738

  11. Molecular structure of β-amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer’s disease brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun-Xia; Qiang, Wei; Yau, Wai-Ming; Schwieters, Charles D.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In vitro, β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides form polymorphic fibrils, with molecular structures that depend on growth conditions, plus various oligomeric and protofibrillar aggregates. Detailed structural information about Aβ assemblies in the human brain has been lacking. Here, we investigate structures of brain-derived Aβ fibrils, using seeded fibril growth from brain extract and data from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and electron microscopy. Experiments on tissue from two Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients with distinct clinical histories indicate a single predominant 40-residue Aβ (Aβ40) fibril structure in each patient, but different structures in the two patients. A molecular structural model developed for Aβ40 fibrils from one patient reveals features that distinguish in vivo from in vitro fibrils. The data suggest that fibrils in the brain may spread from a single nucleation site, that structural variations may correlate with variations in AD, and that structure-specific amyloid imaging agents may be an important future goal. PMID:24034249

  12. Molecular Modeling of Mechanosensory Ion Channel Structural and Functional Features

    PubMed Central

    Gessmann, Renate; Kourtis, Nikos; Petratos, Kyriacos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2010-01-01

    The DEG/ENaC (Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel) protein family comprises related ion channel subunits from all metazoans, including humans. Members of this protein family play roles in several important biological processes such as transduction of mechanical stimuli, sodium re-absorption and blood pressure regulation. Several blocks of amino acid sequence are conserved in DEG/ENaC proteins, but structure/function relations in this channel class are poorly understood. Given the considerable experimental limitations associated with the crystallization of integral membrane proteins, knowledge-based modeling is often the only route towards obtaining reliable structural information. To gain insight into the structural characteristics of DEG/ENaC ion channels, we derived three-dimensional models of MEC-4 and UNC-8, based on the available crystal structures of ASIC1 (Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1). MEC-4 and UNC-8 are two DEG/ENaC family members involved in mechanosensation and proprioception respectively, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used these models to examine the structural effects of specific mutations that alter channel function in vivo. The trimeric MEC-4 model provides insight into the mechanism by which gain-of-function mutations cause structural alterations that result in increased channel permeability, which trigger cell degeneration. Our analysis provides an introductory framework to further investigate the multimeric organization of the DEG/ENaC ion channel complex. PMID:20877470

  13. Molecular modeling of mechanosensory ion channel structural and functional features.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Renate; Kourtis, Nikos; Petratos, Kyriacos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2010-09-16

    The DEG/ENaC (Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel) protein family comprises related ion channel subunits from all metazoans, including humans. Members of this protein family play roles in several important biological processes such as transduction of mechanical stimuli, sodium re-absorption and blood pressure regulation. Several blocks of amino acid sequence are conserved in DEG/ENaC proteins, but structure/function relations in this channel class are poorly understood. Given the considerable experimental limitations associated with the crystallization of integral membrane proteins, knowledge-based modeling is often the only route towards obtaining reliable structural information. To gain insight into the structural characteristics of DEG/ENaC ion channels, we derived three-dimensional models of MEC-4 and UNC-8, based on the available crystal structures of ASIC1 (Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1). MEC-4 and UNC-8 are two DEG/ENaC family members involved in mechanosensation and proprioception respectively, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used these models to examine the structural effects of specific mutations that alter channel function in vivo. The trimeric MEC-4 model provides insight into the mechanism by which gain-of-function mutations cause structural alterations that result in increased channel permeability, which trigger cell degeneration. Our analysis provides an introductory framework to further investigate the multimeric organization of the DEG/ENaC ion channel complex.

  14. Structure-function relationships of shared-stem and conventional molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Tsourkas, Andrew; Behlke, Mark A; Bao, Gang

    2002-10-01

    Molecular beacons are oligonucleotide probes capable of forming a stem-loop hairpin structure with a reporter dye at one end and a quencher at the other end. Conventional molecular beacons are designed with a target-binding domain flanked by two complementary short arm sequences that are independent of the target sequence. Here we report the design of shared-stem molecular beacons with one arm participating in both stem formation when the beacon is closed and target hybridization when it is open. We performed a systematic study to compare the behavior of conventional and shared-stem molecular beacons by conducting thermodynamic and kinetic analyses. Shared-stem molecular beacons form more stable duplexes with target molecules than conventional molecular beacons; however, conventional molecular beacons may discriminate between targets with a higher specificity. For both conventional and shared-stem molecular beacons, increasing stem length enhanced the ability to differentiate between wild-type and mutant targets over a wider range of temperatures. Interestingly, probe-target hybridization kinetics were similar for both classes of molecular beacons and were influenced primarily by the length and sequence of the stem. These findings should enable better design of molecular beacons for various applications.

  15. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marcia, Marco Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-11-01

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts.

  16. SFG analysis of the molecular structures at the surfaces and buried interfaces of PECVD ultralow-dielectric constant pSiCOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Myers, John N.; Huang, Huai; Shobha, Hosadurga; Chen, Zhan; Grill, Alfred

    2016-02-01

    PECVD deposited porous SiCOH with ultralow dielectric constant has been successfully integrated as the insulator in advanced interconnects to decrease the RC delay. The effects of NH3 plasma treatment and the effectiveness of the dielectric repair on molecular structures at the surface and buried interface of a pSiCOH film deposited on top of a SiCNH film on a Si wafer were fully characterized using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), supplemented by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. After exposure to NH3 plasma for 18 s, about 40% of the methyl groups were removed from the pSiCOH surface, and the average orientation of surface methyl groups tilted more towards the surface. The repair method used here effectively repaired the molecular structures at the pSiCOH surface but did not totally recover the entire plasma-damaged layer. Additionally, simulated SFG spectra with various average orientations of methyl groups at the SiCNH/pSiCOH buried interface were compared with the experimental SFG spectra collected using three different laser input angles to determine the molecular structural information at the SiCNH/pSiCOH buried interface after NH3 plasma treatment and repair. The molecular structures including the coverage and the average orientation of methyl groups at the buried interface were found to be unchanged by NH3 plasma treatment and repair.

  17. Structural Basis for Molecular Recognition at Serotonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Ma, Jinming; Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D.; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Edward X.; Melcher, Karsten; Zhang, Chenghai; Bai, Fang; Yang, Huaiyu; Yang, Linlin; Jiang, Hualiang; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; Xu, H. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) regulates a wide spectrum of human physiology through the 5-HT receptor family. We report the crystal structures of the human 5-HT1B G protein-coupled receptor bound to the agonist anti-migraine medications ergotamine and dihydroergotamine. The structures reveal similar binding modes for these ligands, which occupy the orthosteric pocket and an extended binding pocket close to the extracellular loops. The orthosteric pocket is formed by residues conserved in the 5-HT receptor family, clarifying the family-wide agonist activity of 5-HT. Compared to the accompanying structure of the 5-HT2B receptor, the 5-HT1B receptor displays a 3 angstrom outward shift at the extracellular end of helix V, resulting in a more open extended pocket that explains subtype selectivity. Together with docking and mutagenesis studies, these structures provide a comprehensive structural basis for understanding receptor-ligand interactions and designing subtype-selective serotonergic drugs. PMID:23519210

  18. Molecular Structure of Frizzled, a Drosophila Tissue Polarity Gene

    PubMed Central

    Adler, P. N.; Vinson, C.; Park, W. J.; Conover, S.; Klein, L.

    1990-01-01

    The function of the frizzled (fz) locus is required to coordinate the cytoskeletons of pupal epidermal cells so that a parallel array of cuticular hairs and bristles is produced. We report here the molecular cloning and characterization of the fz locus. The locus is very large. Mutations that inactivate the gene are spread over 100 kb of genomic DNA. The major mRNA product of the gene is a 4-kb RNA that is encoded by 5 exons spread over more than 90 kb of genomic DNA. Conceptual translation of this mRNA indicates that it encodes an integral membrane protein that is likely to contain both extracellular and cytoplasmic domains. PMID:2174014

  19. The Molecular Structure of the Liquid Ordered Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, Edward

    2014-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations reveal substructures within the liquid-ordered phase of lipid bilayers. These substructures, identified in a 10 μsec all-atom trajectory of liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered coexistence (Lo/Ld) , are composed of saturated hydrocarbon chains packed with local hexagonal order, and separated by interstitial regions enriched in cholesterol and unsaturated chains. Lipid hydrocarbon chain order parameters calculated from the Lo phase are in excellent agreement with 2H NMR measurements; the local hexagonal packing is also consistent with 1H-MAS NMR spectra of the Lo phase, NMR diffusion experiments, and small angle X-ray- and neutron scattering. The balance of cholesterol-rich to local hexagonal order is proposed to control the partitioning of membrane components into the Lo regions. The latter have been frequently associated with formation of so-called rafts, platforms in the plasma membranes of cells that facilitate interaction between components of signaling pathways.

  20. The structural, functional, and molecular organization of the brainstem.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuys, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    According to His (1891, 1893) the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature) and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature). Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this "four-functional-zones" concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1) the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2) the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centers (superior and inferior olives). Nevertheless the "functional zonal model" has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioral profiles, as "local hypertrophies" of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units. PMID:21738499

  1. The Structural, Functional, and Molecular Organization of the Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuys, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    According to His (1891, 1893) the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature) and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature). Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this “four-functional-zones” concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1) the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2) the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centers (superior and inferior olives). Nevertheless the “functional zonal model” has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioral profiles, as “local hypertrophies” of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units. PMID:21738499

  2. Direction-of-arrival estimation for co-located multiple-input multiple-output radar using structural sparsity Bayesian learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fang-Qing; Zhang, Gong; Ben, De

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the direction of arrival (DOA) estimation problem for the co-located multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar with random arrays. The spatially distributed sparsity of the targets in the background makes compressive sensing (CS) desirable for DOA estimation. A spatial CS framework is presented, which links the DOA estimation problem to support recovery from a known over-complete dictionary. A modified statistical model is developed to accurately represent the intra-block correlation of the received signal. A structural sparsity Bayesian learning algorithm is proposed for the sparse recovery problem. The proposed algorithm, which exploits intra-signal correlation, is capable being applied to limited data support and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) scene. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm has less computation load compared to the classical Bayesian algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has a more accurate DOA estimation than the traditional multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm and other CS recovery algorithms. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61071163, 61271327, and 61471191), the Funding for Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation in Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China (Grant No. BCXJ14-08), the Funding of Innovation Program for Graduate Education of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. KYLX 0277), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 3082015NP2015504), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PADA), China.

  3. Molecular structure, spectroscopic assignments and other quantum chemical calculations of anticancer drugs - A review.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, A S; Deilam, M; Sharifi-Rad, J; Ashrafi, F; Hoseini-Alfatemi, S M

    2015-01-01

    In many texts, both theoretical and experimental studies on molecular structure and spectroscopic assignments of anticancer medicines have been reported. Molecular geometry parameters have been experimentally obtained by x-ray structure determination method and optimized using computational chemistry method like density functional theory. In this review, we consider calculations based on density function theory at B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) levels of theory. Based on optimized geometric parameters of the molecules, molecular structures (length of bonds, bond angles and torsion angles) and vibrational assignments have been obtained. Molecular stability and bond strength have been investigated by applying natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Other molecular properties such as mulliken population analysis, thermodynamic properties and polarizabitities of these drugs have been reported. Calculated energies of HOMO and LUMO show that charge transfer occurs in the molecular. Information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of molecular chemical reactivity has been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface of electrostatic and compared with experiment data. PMID:26638891

  4. Chemical graphs, molecular matrices and topological indices in chemoinformatics and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu

    2013-06-01

    Chemical and molecular graphs have fundamental applications in chemoinformatics, quantitative structureproperty relationships (QSPR), quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR), virtual screening of chemical libraries, and computational drug design. Chemoinformatics applications of graphs include chemical structure representation and coding, database search and retrieval, and physicochemical property prediction. QSPR, QSAR and virtual screening are based on the structure-property principle, which states that the physicochemical and biological properties of chemical compounds can be predicted from their chemical structure. Such structure-property correlations are usually developed from topological indices and fingerprints computed from the molecular graph and from molecular descriptors computed from the three-dimensional chemical structure. We present here a selection of the most important graph descriptors and topological indices, including molecular matrices, graph spectra, spectral moments, graph polynomials, and vertex topological indices. These graph descriptors are used to define several topological indices based on molecular connectivity, graph distance, reciprocal distance, distance-degree, distance-valency, spectra, polynomials, and information theory concepts. The molecular descriptors and topological indices can be developed with a more general approach, based on molecular graph operators, which define a family of graph indices related by a common formula. Graph descriptors and topological indices for molecules containing heteroatoms and multiple bonds are computed with weighting schemes based on atomic properties, such as the atomic number, covalent radius, or electronegativity. The correlation in QSPR and QSAR models can be improved by optimizing some parameters in the formula of topological indices, as demonstrated for structural descriptors based on atomic connectivity and graph distance. PMID:23701000

  5. Molecular structures of unbound and transcribing RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Niklas A.; Jakobi, Arjen J.; Moreno-Morcillo, Maria; Glatt, Sebastian; Kosinski, Jan; Hagen, Wim J. H.; Sachse, Carsten; Müller, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription of genes encoding small structured RNAs such as tRNAs, spliceosomal U6 snRNA and ribosomal 5S RNA is carried out by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), the largest yet structurally least characterized eukaryotic RNA polymerase. The cryo-EM structures of the S. cerevisiae Pol III elongating complex at 3.9 Å resolution and the apo Pol III enzyme in two different conformations at 4.6 and 4.7 Å resolution, respectively, allow for the first time to build a 17-subunit atomic model of Pol III. The reconstructions reveal the precise orientation of the C82/C34/C31 heterotrimer in close proximity to the stalk. The C53/C37 heterodimer positions residues involved in transcription termination close to the non-template DNA strand. In the apo Pol III structures, the stalk adopts different orientations coupled with closed and open conformations of the clamp. Our results provide novel insights into Pol III-specific transcription and the adaptation of Pol III towards its small transcriptional targets. PMID:26605533

  6. Effects of nanoscale surface texture and lubricant molecular structure on boundary lubrication in liquid.

    PubMed

    Al-Azizi, Ala' A; Eryilmaz, Osman; Erdemir, Ali; Kim, Seong H

    2013-11-01

    Nanoconfinement effects of boundary lubricants can significantly affect the friction behavior of textured solid interfaces. These effects were studied with nanotextured diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces using a reciprocating ball-on-flat tribometer in liquid lubricants with different molecular structures: n-hexadecane and n-pentanol for linear molecular structure and poly(α-olefin) and heptamethylnonane for branched molecular structure. It is well-known that liquid lubricants with linear molecular structures can readily form a long-range ordered structure upon nanoconfinement between flat solid surfaces. This long-range ordering, often called solidification, causes high friction in the boundary lubrication regime. When the solid surface deforms elastically due to the contact pressure and this deformation depth is larger than the surface roughness, even rough surfaces can exhibit the nanoconfinement effects. However, the liquid entrapped in the depressed region of the nanotextured surface would not solidify, which effectively reduces the solidified lubricant area in the contact region and decreases friction. When liquid lubricants are branched, the nanoconfinement-induced solidification does not occur because the molecular structure is not suitable for the long-range ordering. Surface texture, therefore, has an insignificant effect on the boundary lubrication of branched molecules.

  7. Effects of nanoscale surface texture and lubricant molecular structure on boundary lubrication in liquid.

    PubMed

    Al-Azizi, Ala' A; Eryilmaz, Osman; Erdemir, Ali; Kim, Seong H

    2013-11-01

    Nanoconfinement effects of boundary lubricants can significantly affect the friction behavior of textured solid interfaces. These effects were studied with nanotextured diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces using a reciprocating ball-on-flat tribometer in liquid lubricants with different molecular structures: n-hexadecane and n-pentanol for linear molecular structure and poly(α-olefin) and heptamethylnonane for branched molecular structure. It is well-known that liquid lubricants with linear molecular structures can readily form a long-range ordered structure upon nanoconfinement between flat solid surfaces. This long-range ordering, often called solidification, causes high friction in the boundary lubrication regime. When the solid surface deforms elastically due to the contact pressure and this deformation depth is larger than the surface roughness, even rough surfaces can exhibit the nanoconfinement effects. However, the liquid entrapped in the depressed region of the nanotextured surface would not solidify, which effectively reduces the solidified lubricant area in the contact region and decreases friction. When liquid lubricants are branched, the nanoconfinement-induced solidification does not occur because the molecular structure is not suitable for the long-range ordering. Surface texture, therefore, has an insignificant effect on the boundary lubrication of branched molecules. PMID:24156745

  8. Teaching the Structure of Immunoglobulins by Molecular Visualization and SDS-PAGE Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory class combines molecular visualization and laboratory experimentation to teach the structure of the immunoglobulins (Ig). In the first part of the class, the three-dimensional structures of the human IgG and IgM molecules available through the RCSB PDB database are visualized using freely available software. In the second part, IgG…

  9. The Scent of Roses and beyond: Molecular Structures, Analysis, and Practical Applications of Odorants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannschreck, Albrecht; von Angerer, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    A few odorous compounds found in roses are chosen to arouse the reader's interest in their molecular structures. This article differs from some similar reports on odorants mainly by combining the structural description with the presentation of the following types of isomers: constitutional isomers, enantiomers, and diastereomers. The preparation…

  10. Elucidation of Drug Metabolite Structural Isomers Using Molecular Modeling Coupled with Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, Eamonn; Munoz-Muriedas, Jordi; Roberts, Andrew D; Dear, Gordon J; Robinson, Carol V; Beaumont, Claire

    2016-02-16

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) in combination with molecular modeling offers the potential for small molecule structural isomer identification by measurement of their gas phase collision cross sections (CCSs). Successful application of this approach to drug metabolite identification would facilitate resource reduction, including animal usage, and may benefit other areas of pharmaceutical structural characterization including impurity profiling and degradation chemistry. However, the conformational behavior of drug molecules and their metabolites in the gas phase is poorly understood. Here the gas phase conformational space of drug and drug-like molecules has been investigated as well as the influence of protonation and adduct formation on the conformations of drug metabolite structural isomers. The use of CCSs, measured from IM-MS and molecular modeling information, for the structural identification of drug metabolites has also been critically assessed. Detection of structural isomers of drug metabolites using IM-MS is demonstrated and, in addition, a molecular modeling approach has been developed offering rapid conformational searching and energy assessment of candidate structures which agree with experimental CCSs. Here it is illustrated that isomers must possess markedly dissimilar CCS values for structural differentiation, the existence and extent of CCS differences being ionization state and molecule dependent. The results present that IM-MS and molecular modeling can inform on the identity of drug metabolites and highlight the limitations of this approach in differentiating structural isomers. PMID:26752623

  11. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, David S.

    2008-07-15

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages

  12. Guided folding takes a start from the molecular imprinting of structured epitopes.

    PubMed

    Cenci, L; Guella, G; Andreetto, E; Ambrosi, E; Anesi, A; Bossi, A M

    2016-08-25

    A biomimetic route towards assisted folding was explored. Molecularly imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (MIP NPs), i.e. biomimetics with entailed molecular recognition properties made by a template assisted synthesis, were prepared to target a structured epitope: the cystine containing peptide CC9ox, which corresponds to the apical portion of the β-hairpin hormone Hepcidin-25. The structural selection was achieved by the MIP NPs; moreover, the MIP NPs demonstrated favouring the folding of the linear random peptide (CC9red) into the structured one (CC9ox), anticipating the future role of the MIP NPs as in situ nanomachines to counteract folding defects. PMID:27524659

  13. An excursion-set model for the structure of giant molecular clouds and the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2012-07-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) is governed by supersonic turbulence on a range of scales. We use this simple fact to develop a rigorous excursion-set model for the formation, structure and time evolution of dense gas structures [e.g. giant molecular clouds (GMCs), massive clumps and cores]. Supersonic turbulence drives the density distribution in non-self-gravitating regions to a lognormal with dispersion increasing with Mach number. We generalize this to include scales ≳h (the disc scale-height), and use it to construct the statistical properties of the density field smoothed on a scale R. We then compare conditions for self-gravitating collapse including thermal, turbulent and rotational (disc shear) support (reducing to the Jeans/Toomre criterion on small/large scales). We show that this becomes a well-defined barrier crossing problem. As such, an exact 'bound object mass function' can be derived, from scales of the sonic length to well above the disc Jeans mass. This agrees remarkably well with observed GMC mass functions in the Milky Way and other galaxies, with the only inputs being the total mass and size of the galaxies (to normalize the model). This explains the cut-off of the mass function and its power-law slope (close to, but slightly shallower than, -2). The model also predicts the linewidth-size and size-mass relations of clouds and the dependence of residuals from these relations on mean surface density/pressure, in excellent agreement with observations. We use this to predict the spatial correlation function/clustering of clouds and, by extension, star clusters; these also agree well with observations. We predict the size/mass function of 'bubbles' or 'holes' in the ISM, and show that this can account for the observed H I hole distribution without requiring any local feedback/heating sources. We generalize the model to construct time-dependent 'merger/fragmentation trees' which can be used to follow cloud evolution and construct semi

  14. Molecular and supra-molecular structure of waxy starches developed from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Rolland-Sabaté, Agnès; Sanchez, Teresa; Buléon, Alain; Colonna, Paul; Ceballos, Hernan; Zhao, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Peng; Dufour, Dominique

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this work was to characterize the amylopectin of low amylose content cassava starches obtained from transgenesis comparatively with a natural waxy cassava starch (WXN) discovered recently in CIAT (International Center for Tropical Agriculture). Macromolecular features, starch granule morphology, crystallinity and thermal properties of these starches were determined. M¯(w) of amylopectin from the transgenic varieties are lower than WXN. Branched and debranched chain distributions analyses revealed slight differences in the branching degree and structure of these amylopectins, principally on DP 6-9 and DP>37. For the first time, a deep structural characterization of a series of transgenic lines of waxy cassava was carried out and the link between structural features and the mutated gene expression approached. The transgenesis allows to silenced partially or totally the GBSSI, without changing deeply the starch granule ultrastructure and allows to produce clones with similar amylopectin as parental cassava clone.

  15. Molecular and crystal structure of a self-assembling pyridinium cationic lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaban, Alexandru T.; Ilies, Marc A.; Eichhöfer, Andreas; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2010-12-01

    Molecular insights into cationic lipid assemblies are relatively hard to reveal due to intrinsic mobility of the structural elements, hydration of the polar head and counterion, etc. Using X-ray diffraction of 4,6-dimethyl-2-tetradecyl-1-(2-tetradecanoyloxyethyl)pyridinium hexafluorophosphate ( 1) single crystals we succeeded in visualizing the molecular assembly of this amphiphile, in particular its U-shape structure and the impact of various structural parameters, including the counterion. The two alkyl chains lie parallel in orthogonal planes, and that the pyridinium cationic rings appear closely to the hexafluorophosphate anions. The whole assembly has therefore nonpolar zones alternating with polar cationic-anionic channel-zones. The relevance of this molecular and crystal structure to the gene transfection ability of this cationic lipid is also discussed.

  16. Bias-dependent molecular-level structure of electrical double layer in ionic liquid on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Jennifer M; Walters, Deron; Labuda, Aleksander; Feng, Guang; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Proksch, Roger; Balke, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Bias-dependent structure of electrochemical double layers at liquid-solid interfaces underpin a multitude of phenomena in virtually all areas of scientific enquiry ranging from energy storage and conversion systems, biology, to geophysics and geochemistry. Here we report the bias-evolution of the electric double layer structure of an ionic liquid on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite as a model system for carbon-based electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors measured by atomic force microscopy. Matching the observed structures to molecular dynamics simulations allows us to resolve steric effects due to cation and anion layers. We observe reconfiguration under applied bias and the orientational transitions in the Stern layer. The synergy between molecular dynamics simulation and experiment provides a comprehensive picture of structural phenomena and long- and short range interactions. This insight will improve understanding of the mechanism of charge storage in electrochemical capacitors on a molecular level which can be used to enhance their electrochemical performance.

  17. Molecular Structure of o-Benzyne from Microwave Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukolich, Stephen G.; McCarthy, Michael C.; Thaddeus, Patrick

    The o-benzyne mol. has been known for many years to be an important, but short-lived, reaction intermediate in substitution reactions and more recently in cyclization reactions of enediynes. Although there has been widespread interest in this transient mol., previous exptl. structural data were very limited. In the present work, rotational transitions for o-benzyne were measured with a pulsed-beam, Fourier transform microwave spectrometer for all unique, singly substituted 13C and single-D isotopomers. The o-benzyne was efficiently produced by flowing a dil. mixt. of isotopically enriched benzene in neon through a pulsed-DC discharge beam source. The new data, combined with previous data for the normal isotopomer, provide a complete set of structural parameters for this mol. The rs substitution coordinates and the coordinates from a least-squares fit are reported and are in good agreement. When using the least-squares fit to obtain structural parameters, correction terms arising from harmonic terms in the vibrational averaging were subtracted from the measured rotational consts. to obtain a better representation of the planar equil. structure. Further improvements in the fits were obtained by applying small, mass-dependent adjustments to the atom coordinates. Structural parameters obtained from the fit to these modified rotational consts. are an acetylenic C1.tplbond.C2 bond length of 1.264(3) .ANG., and the other bond lengths C2-C3 = 1.390(3) .ANG., C3-C4 = 1.403(3) .ANG., C4-C5 = 1.404(3) .ANG., C3-H1 = 1.095(9) .ANG., and C4-H2 = 1.099(4) .ANG.. The C1.tplbond.C2 bond is only 0.057 .ANG. longer than the free acetylene bond. The other C-C bond lengths are within 0.01 .ANG. of those of benzene C-C bonds. New spectral data for the single-D isotopomers were used to obtain better values for the deuterium quadrupole coupling. Bond-axis deuterium quadrupole coupling consts. are eQqzz(D1) = 188(2) kHz, and eQqzz(D2) = 185(10) kHz, which agree well with the value for

  18. Changes of the molecular structure in polyelectrolyte multilayers under stress.

    PubMed

    Früh, Johannes; Köhler, Ralf; Möhwald, Helmuth; Krastev, Rumen

    2010-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) produced by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly find different applications. Often the PEMs are exposed to mechanical stress which they have to sustain. A correlation of the mechanical properties of PEM on macroscopic level with the ordering of polyelectrolyte molecules on molecular level is of interest. Our study is focused on the changes of orientation of the polyelectrolyte molecules when the PEM is under lateral mechanical stress. The PEM was prepared from pyrene (PY) labeled polystyrene sulfonate (PSS-PY) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDDA) on sheets of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber used as substrates. The LbL dipping technique was used for the formation of PEMs. A special stretching device was constructed which allows the fluorescence of the films under stress to be observed. The change in the fluorescence spectra which can be attributed to a PY ordering change from the PEM under stress of up to 10% was monitored. We observed that PEMs undergo a plastic deformation under external mechanical stretching. We conclude that under mechanical stress the polyelectrolyte molecules organized in polyelectrolyte multilayers experience an irreversible transition from the coiled to decoiled state. PMID:20809658

  19. DNA damage tolerance by recombination: Molecular pathways and DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2016-08-01

    Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways, which are crucial to promote replication completion and to prevent fork breakage, a leading cause of genome instability. One mode of DDT uses translesion synthesis polymerases, which however can also introduce mutations. The other DDT mode involves recombination-mediated mechanisms, which are generally accurate. DDT occurs prevalently postreplicatively, but in certain situations homologous recombination is needed to restart forks. Fork reversal can function to stabilize stalled forks, but may also promote error-prone outcome when used for fork restart. Recent years have witnessed important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and DNA structures that mediate recombination-mediated damage-bypass and highlighted principles that regulate DDT pathway choice locally and temporally. In this review we summarize the current knowledge and paradoxes on recombination-mediated DDT pathways and their workings, discuss how the intermediate DNA structures may influence genome integrity, and outline key open questions for future research. PMID:27236213

  20. Dyes and stains: from molecular structure to histological application.

    PubMed

    Veuthey, Tania; Herrera, Georgina; Dodero, Veronica I

    2014-01-01

    In the present review, the chemistry of dyes as well as the interaction mechanisms between tissue and dye has been detailed, and also some of the key factors affecting the selectivity of dyes by certain cellular structures have been mentioned. Moreover, due to the relevance that histological stains have acquired in biomedical research, some of the most common stains have been described, pointing out previous and current applications in basic and applied research.

  1. Laboratory spectra of C60 and related molecular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janca, J.; Solc, M.; Vetesnik, M.

    1994-01-01

    The electronic spectra of fullerene structures in high frequency discharge are studied in the plasma chemistry laboratory of the Faculty of Science of Masaryk University in Brno. The ultraviolet and visual spectra are investigated in order to be compared with the diffuse interstellar bands and interpreted within the theory of quantum mechanics. The preliminary results of the study are presented here in the form of a poster.

  2. Electron spectra and structure of atomic and molecular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.

    1980-01-01

    Changes in electronic structure that occur during the stepwise transition from gas phase monomers to large clusters which resemble the condensed phase were studied. This basic information on weakly bound clusters is critical to the understanding of such phenomena as nucleation, aerosol formation, catalysis, and gas-to-particle conversion, yet there exist almost no experimental data on neutral particle energy levels or binding energies as a function of cluster size. (GHT)

  3. Crystal and molecular structure of perindopril erbumine salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, M.; Bojarska, J.; Ježko, P.; Sieroń, L.; Olczak, A.; Maniukiewicz, W.

    2011-06-01

    The crystal structure of perindopril (2S,3aS,7aS)-1-[(2S)-2-[[(2S)-1-ethoxy-1-oxopentan-2-yl]amino]propanoyl]-2,3,3a,4,5,6,7,7a-octahydroindole-2-carboxylic acid) erbumine salt C 23H 43N 3O 5, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic, non-centrosymetric space group P1, with unit cell dimensions a = 6.575(3), b = 12.165(5), c = 16.988(8) Å and α = 97.153(4), β = 94.417(4), γ = 90.349(4)°, Z = 2. The structure was refined by full matrix least squares methods to R = 0.037. In the solid state ionized molecules of perindopril and erbumine are linked together forming a complex via O⋯HN + hydrogen bonds between the positively charged amino groups of the erbuminium cations and oxygen atoms of the perindopril carboxylate groups. Intermolecular N sbnd H⋯O and C sbnd H⋯O contacts seem to be effective in the stabilization of the structure, resulting in the formation of a three-dimensional network. The gas-phase structure of perindopril-erbumine complex was optimized by the HF/6-31G(d) and Becke3LYP/6-31G(d) methods. The conformational behavior of this salt in water was examined using the CPCM and Onsager models. In both the gas phase and water solution the perindopril erbumine will exist in prevailing triclinic form.

  4. The many structural faces of calmodulin: a multitasking molecular jackknife.

    PubMed

    Kursula, Petri

    2014-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly conserved protein and a crucial calcium sensor in eukaryotes. CaM is a regulator of hundreds of diverse target proteins. A wealth of studies has been carried out on the structure of CaM, both in the unliganded form and in complexes with target proteins and peptides. The outcome of these studies points toward a high propensity to attain various conformational states, depending on the binding partner. The purpose of this review is to provide examples of different conformations of CaM trapped in the crystal state. In addition, comparisons are made to corresponding studies in solution. The different CaM conformations in crystal structures are also compared based on the positions of the metal ions bound to their EF hands, in terms of distances, angles, and pseudo-torsion angles. Possible caveats and artifacts in CaM crystal structures are discussed, as well as the possibilities of trapping biologically relevant CaM conformations in the crystal state.

  5. Molecular structure of leucine aminopeptidase at 2. 7- angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Burley, S.K. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); David, P.R.; Lipscomb, W.N. ); Taylor, A. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-dimensional structure of bovine lens leucine aminopeptidase complexed with bestatin, a slow-binding inhibitor, has been solved to 3.0-{angstrom} resolution by the multiple isomorphous replacement method with phase combination and density modification. In addition, the structure of the isomorphous native enzyme has been refined at 2.7-{angstrom} resolution, and the current crystallographic R factor is 0.169 for a model that includes the two zinc ions and all 487 amino acid residues comprising the asymmetric unit. The enzyme is physiologically active as a hexamer, which has 32 symmetry and is triangular in shape with a triangle edge length of 115 {angstrom} and maximal thickness of 90 {angstrom}. The monomers are crystallographically equivalent and each is folded into two unequal {alpha}/{beta} domains connected by an {alpha}-helix to give a comma-like shape with approximate maximal dimensions of 90 x 55 x 55 {angstrom}{sup 3}. The secondary structural composition is 40% {alpha}-helix and 19% {beta}-strand. The active site also contains two positively charged residues, Lys-250 and Arg-336. The six active sites are themselves located in the interior of the hexamer, where they line a disk-shaped cavity of radius 15 {angstrom} and thickness 10 {angstrom}. Access to this cavity is provided by solvent channels that run along the twofold symmetry axes.

  6. Structural design and molecular evolution of a cytokine receptor superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, J F

    1990-01-01

    A family of cytokine receptors comprising molecules specific for a diverse group of hematopoietic factors and growth hormones has been principally defined by a striking homology of binding domains. This work proposes that the approximately 200-residue binding segment of the canonical cytokine receptor is composed of two discrete folding domains that share a significant sequence and structural resemblance. Analogous motifs are found in tandem approximately 100-amino acid domains in the extracellular segments of a receptor family formed by the interferon-alpha/beta and -gamma receptors and tissue factor, a membrane tether for a coagulation protease. Domains from the receptor supergroup reveal clear evolutionary links to fibronectin type III structures, approximately 90-amino acid modules that are typically found in cell surface molecules with adhesive functions. Predictive structural analysis of the shared receptor and fibronectin domains locates seven beta-strands in conserved regions of the chain; these strands are modeled to fold into antiparallel beta-sandwiches with a topology that is similar to immunoglobulin constant domains. These findings have strong implications for understanding the evolutionary emergence of an important class of regulatory molecules from primitive adhesive modules. In addition, the resulting double-barrel design of the receptors and the spatial clustering of conserved residues suggest a likely binding site for cytokine ligands. Images PMID:2169613

  7. Molecular dynamics study of grain boundary structure and properties at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fensin, Saryu Jindal

    This thesis reports research involving the development and application of atomistic simulation methods to study the effects of high homologous temperatures on the structural, thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanical properties of grain boundaries in metals. Our interest in these properties is due to the role they play in governing the evolution of microstructure and deformation of metals during solidification processing. The interest in developing more predictive models for the formation of solidification defects highlights a need to better understand the thermodynamic driving forces underlying grain-boundary premelting and the mobility and shear strength of these interfaces at high temperatures. In this work we study two different elemental systems, namely Ni and Cu, and consider a variety of grain boundary structures characterized by different misorientation angles, twist/tilt character and zero-temperature energies. A method to calculate the disjoining potential from molecular dynamics (MD) is developed and applied to grain boundaries in Ni. The disjoining potential characterizes the variation in grain-boundary free energy as a function of the width of a premelted interfacial layer. The MD method for the calculation of this property is applied to grain boundaries that display continuous premelting transitions, as well as a boundary characterized by a disordered atomic structure displaying a finite interfacial width at the melting temperature. The disjoining potential represents an important input property to larger scale models of solidification and grain coalescence. We further develop analysis methods to characterize the change in the atomic structure of an asymmetric tilt grain boundary in elemental Cu as a function of temperature. This boundary is characterized by a potential-energy surface with multiple minima as a function of the relative translation of the grains parallel to the interface plane. The more complex structure of this boundary, relative to the

  8. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  9. Advances in Rosetta structure prediction for difficult molecular-replacement problems

    SciTech Connect

    DiMaio, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Modeling advances using Rosetta structure prediction to aid in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems are discussed. Recent work has shown the effectiveness of structure-prediction methods in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems. The Rosetta protein structure modeling suite can aid in the solution of difficult molecular-replacement problems using templates from 15 to 25% sequence identity; Rosetta refinement guided by noisy density has consistently led to solved structures where other methods fail. In this paper, an overview of the use of Rosetta for these difficult molecular-replacement problems is provided and new modeling developments that further improve model quality are described. Several variations to the method are introduced that significantly reduce the time needed to generate a model and the sampling required to improve the starting template. The improvements are benchmarked on a set of nine difficult cases and it is shown that this improved method obtains consistently better models in less running time. Finally, strategies for best using Rosetta to solve difficult molecular-replacement problems are presented and future directions for the role of structure-prediction methods in crystallography are discussed.

  10. Semifluorinated Alkanes at the Air-Water Interface: Tailoring Structure and Rheology at the Molecular Scale.

    PubMed

    Theodoratou, Antigoni; Jonas, Ulrich; Loppinet, Benoit; Geue, Thomas; Stangenberg, Rene; Keller, Rabea; Li, Dan; Berger, Rüdiger; Vermant, Jan; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Semifluorinated alkanes form monolayers with interesting properties at the air-water interface due to their pronounced amphi-solvophobic nature and the stiffness of the fluorocarbons. In the present work, using a combination of structural and dynamic probes, we investigated how small molecular changes can be used to control the properties of such an interface, in particular its organization, rheology, and reversibility during compression-expansion cycles. Starting from a reference system perfluor(dodecyl)dodecane, we first retained the linear structure but changed the linkage groups between the alkyl chains and the fluorocarbons, by introducing either a phenyl group or two oxygens. Next, the molecular structure was changed from linear to branched, with four side chains (two fluorocarbons and two hydrocarbons) connected to extended aromatic cores. Neutron reflectivity at the air-water interface and scanning force microscopy on deposited films show how the changes in the molecular structure affect molecular arrangement relative to the interface. Rheological and compression-expansion measurements demonstrate the significant consequences of these changes in molecular structure and interactions on the interfacial properties. Remarkably, even with these simple molecules, a wide range of surface rheological behaviors can be engineered, from viscous over viscoelastic to brittle solids, for very similar values of the surface pressure.

  11. A circumstellar molecular gas structure associated with the massive young star Cepheus A-HW 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection via VLA-D observations of ammonia of a circumstellar high-density molecular gas structure toward the massive young star related to the object Cepheus A-HW 2, a firm candidate for the powering source of the high-velocity molecular outflow in the region. We suggest that the circumstellar molecular gas structure could be related to the circumstellar disk previously suggested from infrared, H2O, and OH maser observations. We consider as a plausible scenario that the double radio continuum source of HW 2 could represent the ionized inner part of the circumstellar disk, in the same way as proposed to explain the double radio source in L1551. The observed motions in the circumstellar molecular gas can be produced by bound motions (e.g., infall or rotation) around a central mass of about 10-20 solar masses (B0.5 V star or earlier).

  12. Molecular structure of fulvic acids by electrospray with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Plancque, G; Amekraz, B; Moulin, V; Toulhoat, P; Moulin, C

    2001-01-01

    Characterisation of the molecular structure of aquatic fulvic acids (FA) has been performed using a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionisation interface. Molecular masses centred around 450 Da and sinusoidal spectral distributions have been obtained for all fulvic acids. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments showed losses of 18 Da (H(2)O) and 44 Da (CO(2)), and possible molecular structures were determined for the first time to our knowledge. A methodology is reported for evaluating the average elemental composition of FA from high-resolution mass spectra by processing post-acquisition data calculations using molecular size distributions and atomic compositions of ions. The results are found to be consistent with elemental analysis data.

  13. Structural, magnetic and optical properties of two concomitant molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Manuela Ramos; Milne, Bruce; Coutinho, Joana T.; Pereira, Laura C. J.; Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Pereira da Silva, Pedro S.; Martín-Gil, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    A new 1D complex has been prepared and characterized. X-ray single crystal structure confirms that the Cu(II) ions assemble in alternating chains with Cu … Cu distances of 2.5685(4) and 3.1760(4) Å. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility reveals an antiferromagnetic interaction between the paddle-wheel copper centers with an exchange of -300 cm-1. The exchange integral was also determined by quantum chemical ab-initio calculations, using polarised and unpolarised basis sets reproducing well the experimental value. The second harmonic generation efficiency of a concomitantly crystallized material was evaluated and was found to be comparable to urea.

  14. DFT study of the effect of substitution on the molecular structure of copper phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Sachdeva, Ritika; Singh, Sukhwinder; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-05-01

    To study the effect of sulfonic acid group as substituent on the molecular structure of an organic compound copper Phthalocyanine, the optimized geometry, mulliken charges, energies and dipole momemts of copper phthalocyanine and copper phthalocyaninetetrasulfonic acid tetra sodium salt have been investigated using density functional theory. Also to predict the change in reactive sites after substitution, molecular electrostatic potential maps for both the molecules have been calculated.

  15. CONNECTING LOCAL STRUCTURE TO INTERFACE FORMATION: A Molecular Scale van der Waals Theory of Nonuniform Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, John D.

    2002-10-01

    This article reviews a new and general theory of nonuniform fluids that naturally incorporates molecular scale information into the classical van der Waals theory of slowly varying interfaces. The method optimally combines two standard approximations, molecular (mean) field theory to describe interface formation and linear response (or Gaussian fluctuation) theory to describe local structure. Accurate results have been found in many different applications in nonuniform simple fluids and these ideas may have important implications for the theory of hydrophobic interactions in water.

  16. Application of the AMPLE cluster-and-truncate approach to NMR structures for molecular replacement

    PubMed Central

    Bibby, Jaclyn; Keegan, Ronan M.; Mayans, Olga; Winn, Martyn D.; Rigden, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    AMPLE is a program developed for clustering and truncating ab initio protein structure predictions into search models for molecular replacement. Here, it is shown that its core cluster-and-truncate methods also work well for processing NMR ensembles into search models. Rosetta remodelling helps to extend success to NMR structures bearing low sequence identity or high structural divergence from the target protein. Potential future routes to improved performance are considered and practical, general guidelines on using AMPLE are provided. PMID:24189230

  17. Molecular determinants of staphylococcal biofilm dispersal and structuring

    PubMed Central

    Le, Katherine Y.; Dastgheyb, Sana; Ho, Trung V.; Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are frequently implicated in human infections, and continue to pose a therapeutic dilemma due to their ability to form deeply seated microbial communities, known as biofilms, on the surfaces of implanted medical devices and host tissues. Biofilm development has been proposed to occur in three stages: (1) attachment, (2) proliferation/structuring, and (3) detachment/dispersal. Although research within the last several decades has implicated multiple molecules in the roles as effectors of staphylococcal biofilm proliferation/structuring and detachment/dispersal, to date, only phenol soluble modulins (PSMs) have been consistently demonstrated to serve in this role under both in vitro and in vivo settings. PSMs are regulated directly through a density-dependent manner by the accessory gene regulator (Agr) system. They disrupt the non-covalent forces holding the biofilm extracellular matrix together, which is necessary for the formation of channels, a process essential for the delivery of nutrients to deeper biofilm layers, and for dispersal/dissemination of clusters of biofilm to distal organs in acute infection. Given their relevance in both acute and chronic biofilm-associated infections, the Agr system and the psm genes hold promise as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25505739

  18. Structured attachment of bacterial molecular motors for defined microflow induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woerdemann, Mike; Hörner, Florian; Denz, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial rotational motor complexes that propel flagellated bacteria possess unique properties like their size of a few nanometres and the ability of selfreproduction that have led to various exciting applications including biohybrid nano-machines. One mandatory prerequisite to utilize bacterial nano motors in fluid applications is the ability to transfer force and torque to the fluid, which usually can be achieved by attachment of the bacterial cell to adequate surfaces. Additionally, for optimal transfer of force or torque, precise control of the position down to the single cell level is of utmost importance. Based on a PIV (particle image velocimetry) evaluation of the induced flow of single bacteria,we propose and demonstrate attachment of arbitrary patterns of motile bacterial cells in a fast light-based two-step process for the first time to our knowledge. First, these cells are pre-structured by holographic optical tweezers and then attached to a homogeneous, polystyrene-coated surface. In contrast to the few approaches that have been implemented up to now and which rely on pre-structured surfaces, our scheme allows for precise control on a single bacterium level, is versatile, interactive and has low requirements with respect to the surface preparation.

  19. NMR studies of molecular structure in fruit cuticle polyesters.

    PubMed

    Fang, X; Qiu, F; Yan, B; Wang, H; Mort, A J; Stark, R E

    2001-07-01

    The cuticle of higher plants functions primarily as a protective barrier for the leaves and fruits, controlling microbial attack as well as the diffusion of water and chemicals from the outside environment. Its major chemical constituents are waxes (for waterproofing) and cutin (a structural support polymer). However, the insolubility of cutin has hampered investigations of its covalent structure and domain architecture, which are viewed as essential for the design of crop protection strategies and the development of improved synthetic waterproofing materials. Recently developed strategies designed to meet these investigative challenges include partial depolymerization using enzymatic or chemical reagents and spectroscopic examination of the intact polyesters in a solvent-swelled form. The soluble oligomers from degradative treatments of lime fruit cutin are composed primarily of the expected 10,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic and 16-hydroxy-10-oxo-hexadecanoic acids; low-temperature HF treatments also reveal sugar units that are covalently attached to the hydroxyfatty acids. Parallel investigations of solvent-swollen cutin using 2D NMR spectroscopy assisted by magic-angle spinning yield well-resolved spectra that permit detailed comparisons to be made among chemical moieties present in the intact biopolymer, the soluble degradation products, and the unreacted solid residue. PMID:11423150

  20. Current and emerging opportunities for molecular simulations in structure-based drug design

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Julien

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the current capabilities and limitations of molecular simulation of biomolecular complexes in the context of computer-aided drug design is provided. Steady improvements in computer hardware coupled with more refined representations of energetics are leading to a new appreciation of the driving forces of molecular recognition. Molecular simulations are poised to more frequently guide the interpretation of biophysical measurements of biomolecular complexes. Ligand design strategies emerge from detailed analyses of computed structural ensembles. The feasibility of routine applications to ligand optimization problems hinges upon successful extensive large scale validation studies and the development of protocols to intelligently automate computations. PMID:24469595

  1. Structural and dipolar fluctuations in liquid water: A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Masia, Marco; Guardia, Elvira

    2016-03-01

    A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the local tetrahedral order, molecular dipole fluctuations and their interrelation with hydrogen bonding in liquid water. Water molecules were classified in three types, exhibiting low, intermediate and high tetrahedral order. Transitions from low to high tetrahedrally ordered structures take place only through transitions to the intermediate state. The molecular dipole moments depend strongly on the tetrahedral order and hydrogen bonding. The average dipole moment of water molecules with a strong tetrahedral order around them comes in excellent agreement with previous estimations of the dipole moment of ice Ih molecules.

  2. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16[plus minus]2[degree] from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94[plus minus]0.02[Angstrom]. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27[plus minus]0.04[Angstrom], up from 1.10[Angstrom] for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25[Angstrom] Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20[Angstrom] and 15--23[degrees]) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16[Angstrom] and 19[degrees]. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95[Angstrom] for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius [approximately] 1.5 [Angstrom] for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS [chi](k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  3. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16{plus_minus}2{degree} from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94{plus_minus}0.02{Angstrom}. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27{plus_minus}0.04{Angstrom}, up from 1.10{Angstrom} for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25{Angstrom} Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20{Angstrom} and 15--23{degrees}) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16{Angstrom} and 19{degrees}. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95{Angstrom} for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals` radius {approximately} 1.5 {Angstrom} for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  4. Exploring Molecular and Mechanical Gradients in Structural Bioscaffolds†

    PubMed Central

    Waite, J. Herbert; Lichtenegger, Helga C.; Stucky, Galen D.; Hansma, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Most organisms consist of a functionally adaptive assemblage of hard and soft tissues. Despite the obvious advantages of reinforcing soft protoplasm with a hard scaffold, such composites can lead to tremendous mechanical stresses where the two meet. Although little is known about how nature relieves these stresses, it is generally agreed that fundamental insights about molecular adaptation at hard/soft interfaces could profoundly influence how we think about biomaterials. Based on two noncellular tissues, mussel byssus and polychaete jaws, recent studies suggest that one natural strategy to minimize interfacial stresses between adjoining stiff and soft tissue appears to be the creation of a “fuzzy” boundary, which avoids abrupt changes in mechanical properties. Instead there is a gradual mechanical change that accompanies the transcendence from stiff to soft and vice versa. In byssal threads, the biochemical medium for achieving such a gradual mechanical change involves the elegant use of collagen-based self-assembling block copolymers. There are three distinct diblock copolymer types in which one block is always collagenous, whereas the other can be either elastin-like (soft), amorphous polyglycine (intermediate), or silk-like (stiff). Gradients of these are made by an incrementally titrated expression of the three proteins in secretory cells the titration phenotype of which is linked to their location. Thus, reflecting exactly the composition of each thread, the distal cells secrete primarily the silk– and polyglycine–collagen diblocks, whereas the proximal cells secrete the elastin– and polyglycine–collagen diblocks. Those cells in between exhibit gradations of collagens with silk or elastin blocks. Spontaneous self-assembly appears to be by pH triggered metal binding by histidine (HIS)-rich sequences at both the amino and carboxy termini of the diblocks. In the polychaete jaws, HIS-rich sequences are expanded into a major block domain. Histidine

  5. Atomic spectral methods for molecular electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Langhoff, P W; Boatz, J A; Hinde, R J; Sheehy, J A

    2004-11-15

    Theoretical methods are reported for ab initio calculations of the adiabatic (Born-Oppenheimer) electronic wave functions and potential energy surfaces of molecules and other atomic aggregates. An outer product of complete sets of atomic eigenstates familiar from perturbation-theoretical treatments of long-range interactions is employed as a representational basis without prior enforcement of aggregate wave function antisymmetry. The nature and attributes of this atomic spectral-product basis are indicated, completeness proofs for representation of antisymmetric states provided, convergence of Schrodinger eigenstates in the basis established, and strategies for computational implemention of the theory described. A diabaticlike Hamiltonian matrix representative is obtained, which is additive in atomic-energy and pairwise-atomic interaction-energy matrices, providing a basis for molecular calculations in terms of the (Coulombic) interactions of the atomic constituents. The spectral-product basis is shown to contain the totally antisymmetric irreducible representation of the symmetric group of aggregate electron coordinate permutations once and only once, but to also span other (non-Pauli) symmetric group representations known to contain unphysical discrete states and associated continua in which the physically significant Schrodinger eigenstates are generally embedded. These unphysical representations are avoided by isolating the physical block of the Hamiltonian matrix with a unitary transformation obtained from the metric matrix of the explicitly antisymmetrized spectral-product basis. A formal proof of convergence is given in the limit of spectral closure to wave functions and energy surfaces obtained employing conventional prior antisymmetrization, but determined without repeated calculations of Hamiltonian matrix elements as integrals over explicitly antisymmetric aggregate basis states. Computational implementations of the theory employ efficient recursive

  6. Theoretical studies of molecular spectroscopy at structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hider, Matthew Henry

    2001-07-01

    The fluorescence behavior of molecules at rough surfaces and in cavities forms the major part of this work. The molecule is modeled as a radiating point dipole and a spherical island represents the surface morphology. To accurately model this problem in the near surface region, nonlocal electrodynamic effects are taken into account within the hydrodynamic description of the surface electrons. This nonlocal description for the sphere is taken from the model of Fuchs and Claro, and the solution for the cavity is obtained by reformulating this nonlocal theory. The results for the molecular-sphere system show that the dispersion resonances for the nonlocal case are blue shifted in the frequency spectrum relative to the local case, while the magnitude of the frequency shifts are suppressed in the nonlocal case. The degree of this suppression is found to be more significant closer to the substrate, with a local to nonlocal ratio in magnitude being roughly 2:1 and 10:1 for distances of 11 a.u. and 3 ax (1a.u. = 0.529A), respectively. The results of the cavity case show an even more dramatic blue shift than the sphere case, with similar frequency shift suppression as the case of the sphere. Results for decay rate and for different dipole orientations are also presented. A simple transformation is obtained for the local case, which allows us to transform from the well-known local dipole-sphere solution to the dipole-cavity solution. This transform is shown to break down for the nonlocal case. Our results are compared with cavity results by another group, with comments and criticisms given. Finally, surfaced-enhanced Raman scattering of molecules at rough metal surfaces as a function of temperature is presented. Again the roughness is represented as a metal sphere, and the temperature effects on the surface plasmon are accounted for via a slightly modified Ujihara model. The enhancement ratio is found in general to vary inversely with temperature, with this effect being

  7. Two-dimensional topological insulator molecular networks: dependence on structure, symmetry, and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Liang Z.; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-03-01

    2D molecular networks can be fabricated from a wide variety of molecular building blocks, arranged in many different configurations. Interactions between neighboring molecular building blocks result in the formation of new 2D materials. Examples of 2D organic topological insulators, that contain molecular building blocks and heavy elements arranged in a hexagonal lattice, have been recently proposed by Feng Liu and coworkers (Nano Lett., 13, 2842 (2013)). In this work, we present a systematic study of the design space of 2D molecular network topological insulators, elucidating the role of structure, symmetry, and composition of the networks. We show that the magnitude and presence of spin-orbit gaps in the electronic band structure is strongly dependent on the symmetry properties and arrangement of the individual components of the molecular lattice. We present general rules to maximize the magnitude of spin-orbit gaps and perform ab-initio calculations on promising structures derived from these guidelines. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR10-1006184, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by the NSF through XSEDE resources at NICS.

  8. Unraveling microalgal molecular interactions using evolutionary and structural bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Kazazi, Dorothea; Kossida, Sophia

    2013-10-10

    Microalgae are unicellular microorganisms indispensible for environmental stability and life on earth, because they produce approximately half of the atmospheric oxygen, with simultaneously feeding on the harmful greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Using gene fusion analysis, a series of five fusion/fission events was identified, that provided the basis for critical insights to their evolutionary history. Moreover, the three-dimensional structures of both the fused and the component proteins were predicted, allowing us to envisage putative protein-protein interactions that are invaluable for the efficient usage, handling and exploitation of microalgae. Collectively, our proposed approach on the five fusion/fission alga protein events contributes towards the expansion of the microalgae knowledgebase, bridging protein evolution of the ancient microalgal species and the rapidly evolving, modern, bioinformatics field.

  9. Molecular tools for investigating ANME community structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, Steven J.; Page, Antoine P.; Constan, Lea; Song, Young C.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Brewer, Heather M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-05-20

    Methane production and consumption in anaerobic marine sediments 1 is catalyzed by a series of reversible tetramethanopterin (H4MPT)-linked C1 transfer reactions. Although many of these reactions are conserved between one-carbon compound utilizing microorganisms, two remain diagnostic for archaeal methane metabolism. These include reactions catalyzed by N5-methyltetrahydromethanopterin: coenzyme M methyltransferase and methyl coenzyme M reductase. The latter enzyme is central to C-H bond formation and cleavage underlying methanogenic and reverse methanogenic phenotypes. Here we describe a set of novel tools for the detection and functional analysis of H4MPT-linked C1 transfer reactions mediated by uncultivated anaerobic methane oxidizing archaea (ANME). These tools include polymerase chain reaction primers targeting ANME methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A subgroups and protein extraction methods from marine sediments compatible with high-resolution mass spectrometry for profiling population structure and functional dynamics. [910, 1,043

  10. Molecular Structure and Reactivity in the Pyrolysis of Aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sias, Eric; Cole, Sarah; Sowards, John; Warner, Brian; Wright, Emily; McCunn, Laura R.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of alkyl chain structure on pyrolysis mechanisms has been investigated in a series of aldehydes. Isovaleraldehyde, CH_3CH(CH_3)CH_2CHO, and pivaldehyde, (CH_3)_3CCHO, were subject to thermal decomposition in a resistively heated SiC tubular reactor at 800-1200 °C. Matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify pyrolysis products. Carbon monoxide and isobutene were major products from each of the aldehydes, which is consistent with what is known from previous studies of unbranched alkyl-chain aldehydes. Other products observed include vinyl alcohol, propene, acetylene, and ethylene, revealing complexities to be considered in the pyrolysis of large, branched-chain aldehydes.

  11. Molecular Structure and Chirality Detection by Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lobsiger, Simon; Perez, Cristobal; Evangelisti, Luca; Lehmann, Kevin K; Pate, Brooks H

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three-wave mixing experiment using time-separated microwave pulses to detect the enantiomer-specific emission signal of the chiral molecule using Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy. A chirped-pulse FTMW spectrometer operating in the 2-8 GHz frequency range is used to determine the heavy-atom substitution structure of solketal (2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl-methanol) through analysis of the singly substituted (13)C and (18)O isotopologue rotational spectra in natural abundance. A second set of microwave horn antennas is added to the instrument design to permit three-wave mixing experiments where an enantiomer-specific phase of the signal is observed. Using samples of R-, S-, and racemic solketal, the properties of the three-wave mixing experiment are presented, including the measurement of the corresponding nutation curves to demonstrate the optimal pulse sequence.

  12. Mouse alpha-macroglobulin. Structure, function and a molecular model.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, N W; Kehoe, J M; Koo, P H

    1987-01-01

    Mouse alpha-macroglobulin (M-AMG) is believed to be a functional homologue of human alpha 2-macroglobulin (h-alpha 2M). The subunit composition, the tryptic cleavage pattern before and after methylamine incorporation and the two-dimensional tryptic-peptide mapping, however, indicate that these two proteins are structurally distinct. M-AMG is composed of two major types of polypeptides (Mr 163,000 and 35,000) together with a minor polypeptide (Mr 185,000), whereas h-alpha 2M has only one type of polypeptide (Mr 185,000). After incorporation of methylamine, there is no change in the normal tryptic-cleavage pattern of M-AMG; however, tryptic cleavage of h-alpha 2M is severely retarded [Hudson & Koo (1982) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 704, 290-303]. The N-terminal sequence of the 163,000-Mr polypeptide of M-AMG shows sequence homology with the N-terminal sequence of h-alpha 2M. The amino acid compositions of M-AMG and its two major polypeptide chains are compared. Thermal fragmentation studies show that the 163,000-Mr polypeptide is broken down into 125,000-Mr and 29,000-Mr fragments. Trypsin-binding studies show that M-AMG can bind two molecules of trypsin/molecule. Inactivations of the trypsin-binding property of M-AMG and h-alpha 2M with methylamine show similar kinetics of inhibition at 4 degrees C. A structural model of M-AMG is proposed, based on accumulated data. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2449173

  13. Searching molecular structure databases with tandem mass spectra using CSI:FingerID.

    PubMed

    Dührkop, Kai; Shen, Huibin; Meusel, Marvin; Rousu, Juho; Böcker, Sebastian

    2015-10-13

    Metabolites provide a direct functional signature of cellular state. Untargeted metabolomics experiments usually rely on tandem MS to identify the thousands of compounds in a biological sample. Today, the vast majority of metabolites remain unknown. We present a method for searching molecular structure databases using tandem MS data of small molecules. Our method computes a fragmentation tree that best explains the fragmentation spectrum of an unknown molecule. We use the fragmentation tree to predict the molecular structure fingerprint of the unknown compound using machine learning. This fingerprint is then used to search a molecular structure database such as PubChem. Our method is shown to improve on the competing methods for computational metabolite identification by a considerable margin.

  14. Searching molecular structure databases with tandem mass spectra using CSI:FingerID

    PubMed Central

    Dührkop, Kai; Shen, Huibin; Meusel, Marvin; Rousu, Juho; Böcker, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Metabolites provide a direct functional signature of cellular state. Untargeted metabolomics experiments usually rely on tandem MS to identify the thousands of compounds in a biological sample. Today, the vast majority of metabolites remain unknown. We present a method for searching molecular structure databases using tandem MS data of small molecules. Our method computes a fragmentation tree that best explains the fragmentation spectrum of an unknown molecule. We use the fragmentation tree to predict the molecular structure fingerprint of the unknown compound using machine learning. This fingerprint is then used to search a molecular structure database such as PubChem. Our method is shown to improve on the competing methods for computational metabolite identification by a considerable margin. PMID:26392543

  15. Inhibition of barium sulfate deposition by polycarboxylates of various molecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    van der Leeden, M.C.; van Rosmalen, G.M. )

    1990-02-01

    To establish a relationship between the molecular structure of polycarboxylates and their growth-retarding influence on barium sulfate, seeded-suspension-growth experiments were performed at various inhibitor concentrations and pH values. Two types of polycarboxylates with a molecular structure based on their polyacrylic or maleic acid were studied. The molecular structure of these compounds were varied by particle substitution with monomers containing hydroxyl, amide, and sulfonic acid, as well as hydrophobic groups. Hydrophobic groups are detrimental to good inhibitor performance, whereas the introduction of OH, NH {sub 2}, or SO {sub 3} H groups presents opportunities to enhance the inhibitor effectiveness. The sequence in performance of the compounds on barium sulfate was compared with the sequence formerly obtained for calcium sulfate dihydrate.

  16. Molecular dynamics of protein kinase-inhibitor complexes: a valid structural information.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julio; Alzate-Morales, Jans H

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases (PKs) are key components of protein phosphorylation based signaling networks in eukaryotic cells. They have been identified as being implicated in many diseases. High-resolution X-ray crystallographic data exist for many PKs and, in many cases, these structures are co-complexed with inhibitors. Although this valuable information confirms the precise structure of PKs and their complexes, it ignores the dynamic movements of the structures which are relevant to explain the affinities and selectivity of the ligands, to characterize the thermodynamics of the solvated complexes, and to derive predictive models. Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations present a convenient way to study PK-inhibitor complexes and have been increasingly used in recent years in structure-based drug design. MD is a very useful computational method and a great counterpart for experimentalists, which helps them to derive important additional molecular information. That enables them to follow and understand structure and dynamics of protein-ligand systems with extreme molecular detail on scales where motion of individual atoms can be tracked. MD can be used to sample dynamic molecular processes, and can be complemented with more advanced computational methods (e.g., free energy calculations, structure-activity relationship analysis). This review focuses on the most commonly applications to study PK-inhibitor complexes using MD simulations. Our aim is that researchers working in the design of PK inhibitors be aware of the benefits of this powerful tool in the design of potent and selective PK inhibitors. PMID:22571663

  17. Fragment-Based Electronic Structure Approach for Computing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shifts in Molecular Crystals.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua D; Beran, Gregory J O

    2014-11-11

    First-principles chemical shielding tensor predictions play a critical role in studying molecular crystal structures using nuclear magnetic resonance. Fragment-based electronic structure methods have dramatically improved the ability to model molecular crystal structures and energetics using high-level electronic structure methods. Here, a many-body expansion fragment approach is applied to the calculation of chemical shielding tensors in molecular crystals. First, the impact of truncating the many-body expansion at different orders and the role of electrostatic embedding are examined on a series of molecular clusters extracted from molecular crystals. Second, the ability of these techniques to assign three polymorphic forms of the drug sulfanilamide to the corresponding experimental (13)C spectra is assessed. This challenging example requires discriminating among spectra whose (13)C chemical shifts differ by only a few parts per million (ppm) across the different polymorphs. Fragment-based PBE0/6-311+G(2d,p) level chemical shielding predictions correctly assign these three polymorphs and reproduce the sulfanilamide experimental (13)C chemical shifts with 1 ppm accuracy. The results demonstrate that fragment approaches are competitive with the widely used gauge-invariant projector augmented wave (GIPAW) periodic density functional theory calculations. PMID:26584373

  18. MolLoc: a web tool for the local structural alignment of molecular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Angaran, Stefano; Bock, Mary Ellen; Garutti, Claudio; Guerra, Concettina

    2009-07-01

    MolLoc stands for Molecular Local surface comparison, and is a web server for the structural comparison of molecular surfaces. Given two structures in PDB format, the user can compare their binding sites, cavities or any arbitrary residue selection. Moreover, the web server allows the comparison of a query structure with a list of structures. Each comparison produces a structural alignment that maximizes the extension of the superimposition of the surfaces, and returns the pairs of atoms with similar physicochemical properties that are close in space after the superimposition. Based on this subset of atoms sharing similar physicochemical properties a new rototranslation is derived that best superimposes them. MolLoc approach is both local and surface-oriented, and therefore it can be particularly useful when testing if molecules with different sequences and folds share any local surface similarity. The MolLoc web server is available at http://bcb.dei.unipd.it/MolLoc.

  19. Molecular Structure of Aggregated Amyloid-β: Insights from Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides aggregate to form polymorphic amyloid fibrils and a variety of intermediate assemblies, including oligomers and protofibrils, both in vitro and in human brain tissue. Since the beginning of the 21st century, considerable progress has been made on characterization of the molecular structures of Aβ aggregates. Full molecular structural models that are based primarily on data from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements have been developed for several in vitro Aβ fibrils and one metastable protofibril. Partial structural characterization of other aggregation intermediates has been achieved. One full structural model for fibrils derived from brain tissue has also been reported. Future work is likely to focus on additional structures from brain tissue and on further clarification of nonfibrillar Aβ aggregates. PMID:27481836

  20. The Coevolution of Phycobilisomes: Molecular Structure Adapting to Functional Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fei; Qin, Song; Wang, Yin-Chu

    2011-01-01

    Phycobilisome is the major light-harvesting complex in cyanobacteria and red alga. It consists of phycobiliproteins and their associated linker peptides which play key role in absorption and unidirectional transfer of light energy and the stability of the whole complex system, respectively. Former researches on the evolution among PBPs and linker peptides had mainly focused on the phylogenetic analysis and selective evolution. Coevolution is the change that the conformation of one residue is interrupted by mutation and a compensatory change selected for in its interacting partner. Here, coevolutionary analysis of allophycocyanin, phycocyanin, and phycoerythrin and covariation analysis of linker peptides were performed. Coevolution analyses reveal that these sites are significantly correlated, showing strong evidence of the functional and structural importance of interactions among these residues. According to interprotein coevolution analysis, less interaction was found between PBPs and linker peptides. Our results also revealed the correlations between the coevolution and adaptive selection in PBS were not directly related, but probably demonstrated by the sites coupled under physical-chemical interactions. PMID:21904470

  1. Molecular structure and functional morphology of echinoderm collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Trotter, J A; Thurmond, F A; Koob, T J

    1994-03-01

    The collagenous tissues of echinoderms, which have the unique capacity to rapidly and reversibly alter their mechanical properties, resemble the collagenous tissues of other phyla in consisting of collagen fibrils in a nonfibrillar matrix. Knowledge of the composition and structure of their collagen fibrils and interfibrillar matrix is thus important for an understanding of the physiology of these tissues. In this report it is shown that the collagen molecules from the fibrils of the spine ligament of a sea-urchin and the deep dermis of a sea-cucumber are the same length as those from vertebrate fibrils and that they assemble into fibrils with the same repeat period and gap/overlap ratio as do those of vertebrate fibrils. The distributions of charged residues in echinoderm and vertebrate molecules are somewhat different, giving rise to segment-long-spacing crystallites and fibrils with different banding patterns. Compared to the vertebrate pattern, the banding pattern of echinoderm fibrils is characterized by greatly increased stain intensity in the c3 band and greatly reduced stain intensity in the a3 and b2 bands. The fibrils are spindle-shaped, possessing no constant-diameter region throughout their length. The shape of the fibrils is mechanically advantageous for their reinforcing role in a discontinuous fiber-composite material.

  2. Can we predict lattice energy from molecular structure?

    PubMed

    Ouvrard, Carole; Mitchell, John B O

    2003-10-01

    By using simply the numbers of occurrences of different atom types as descriptors, a conceptually transparent and remarkably accurate model for the prediction of the enthalpies of sublimation of organic compounds has been generated. The atom types are defined on the basis of atomic number, hybridization state and bonded environment. Models of this kind were applied firstly to aliphatic hydrocarbons, secondly to both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, thirdly to a wide range of non-hydrogen-bonding molecules, and finally to a set of 226 organic compounds including 70 containing hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors. The final model gives squared correlation coefficients of 0.925 for the 226 compounds in the training set and 0.937 for an independent test set of 35 compounds. The success of such a simple model implies that the enthalpy of sublimation can be predicted accurately without knowledge of the crystal packing. This hypothesis is in turn consistent with the idea that, rather than being determined by the particular features of the lowest-energy packing, the lattice energy is similar for a number of hypothetical alternative crystal structures of a molecule.

  3. First principles investigations of electronic structure and transport properties of graphitic structures and single molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Jonathan R.

    properties of the IV curves of single molecule nano-junctions. Specifically, these systems consist of a zinc-porphyrin molecule coupled between two gold electrodes, i.e., a nano-gap. The first observation we want to explain is the asymmetric nature of the experimental IV curve for this porphyrin system, where the IV curve is skewed heavily to the negative bias region. Using a plane-wave DFT calculation, we present the density of states of the porphyrin molecule (both in the presence and absence of the electrodes) and indeed see highly delocalized states (as confirmed by site-projection of the DOS) only in the negative bias region, meaning that the channels with high transmission probability reside there, in agreement with experimental observation. The next problem studied pertains to observed switching in an experimentally-measured IV curve, this time of a longer zinc porphyrin molecule, still within a gold nano-gap. The switching behavior is observed only at 300K, not at 4.2K. The temperature-dependance of this problem renders our previous toolset of DFT calculations void; DFT is a ground-state theory. Instead, we employ a density functional-based tight-binding (DFTB) approach in a molecular dynamics simulation. Basically, the structural configuration evaluated at each time step is based on a tight-binding electronic structure calculation, instead of a typical MD force field. Trajectories are presented at varying temperatures and electric field strengths. Indeed, we observe a conformation of the porphyrin molecule between two configurations of the dihedral angle of the central nitrogen ring, ±15. {o} at 300K, but not 4.2K. These confirmations are equally likely, i.e., the structure assumes these configurations an equal number of teams, meaning the average structure has an angle of 0. {o}. After computing the DOS of all three aforementioned configurations (0. {text{o}} and ±15. {text{o}}), we indeed see a difference between the DOS curves at ±15. {text{o}} (which are

  4. Computational nanochemistry study of the molecular structure and properties of ethambutol.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Morán, Guillermo; Ruiz-Nieto, Samuel; Gerli-Candia, Lorena; Flores-Holguín, Norma; Favila-Pérez, Alejandra; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    The M06 family of density functionals was employed to calculate the molecular structure and properties of the ethambutol molecule. Besides determination of molecular structures, UV-vis spectra were computed using TD-DFT in the presence of a solvent and the results compared with available experimental data. The chemical reactivity descriptors were calculated through conceptual DFT. The active sites for nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks have been chosen by relating them to Fukui function indices. A comparison between the descriptors calculated through vertical energy values and those arising from Koopmans' theorem approximation were performed in order to check the validity of the latter procedure.

  5. Molecular modeling, theoretical calculations and property evaluation of three muscarinic agonists. X-ray structures of LU 25-109 and WAL 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmella, A.; Bandoli, G.; Cavallin, M.

    2000-08-01

    LU 25-109 ( II) and WAL 2014 (talsaclidine, III) are two M1 muscarinic agonists chemically related to the natural substance arecoline ( I). All these compounds have beneficial effects on memory and cognition in animals and humans, and they have been proposed in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, but only III will likely find a place in therapy. In this work we have investigated the solid state structures of II and III, and the X-ray structures of the two molecules and of the parent compound I have been used to input a series of computational chemistry efforts. In particular, the X-ray geometries have been manipulated to model 20 molecular structures ( 1- 20) which have been submitted to ab initio, semiempirical quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. The conformational space accessible to the 20 structures has been assessed by means of potential energy maps. The reactivities of 1- 20 have been estimated by examining at the graphics terminal the composition and the extension of the frontier orbitals (HOMOs and LUMOs) and of the molecular electrostatic potential. The information obtained has been interpreted to explain the different degrees of activity shown by I- III. Our data indicate that III has better in vivo activity for its intermediate size, less polar surface, conformational rigidity and orientation of reactive domains.

  6. Modulated structure and molecular dissociation of solid chlorine at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peifang; Gao, Guoying; Ma, Yanming

    2012-08-01

    Among diatomic molecular halogen solids, high pressure structures of solid chlorine (Cl2) remain elusive and least studied. We here report first-principles structural search on solid Cl2 at high pressures through our developed particle-swarm optimization algorithm. We successfully reproduced the known molecular Cmca phase (phase I) at low pressure and found that it remains stable up to a high pressure 142 GPa. At 150 GPa, our structural searches identified several energetically competitive, structurally similar, and modulated structures. Analysis of the structural results and their similarity with those in solid Br2 and I2, it was suggested that solid Cl2 adopts an incommensurate modulated structure with a modulation wave close to 2/7 in a narrow pressure range 142-157 GPa. Eventually, our simulations at >157 GPa were able to predict the molecular dissociation of solid Cl2 into monatomic phases having body centered orthorhombic (bco) and face-centered cubic (fcc) structures, respectively. One unique monatomic structural feature of solid Cl2 is the absence of intermediate body centered tetragonal (bct) structure during the bco → fcc transition, which however has been observed or theoretically predicted in solid Br2 and I2. Electron-phonon coupling calculations revealed that solid Cl2 becomes superconductors within bco and fcc phases possessing a highest superconducting temperature of 13.03 K at 380 GPa. We further probed the molecular Cmca → incommensurate phase transition mechanism and found that the softening of the Ag vibrational (rotational) Raman mode in the Cmca phase might be the driving force to initiate the transition.

  7. Molecular structure and dynamics in bacterial mercury resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Shi, Liang; Miller, Susan M; Summers, Anne O; Liang, Liyuan

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria participate significantly in mercury transformation in natural and industrial environments. Previous studies have shown that bacterial mercury resistance is mediated by the mer operon, typically located on transposons or plasmids. It encodes specific genes that facilitate uptake of mercury species, cleavage of organomercurials, and reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Expression of mer operon genes is regulated by MerR, a metal-responsive regulator protein on the level of transcription. In vitro studies have shown that MerR forms a non-transcribing pre-initiation complex with RNA polymerase and the promoter DNA. Binding of Hg(II) induces conformational changes in MerR and other components of the complex resulting in the transcription of mer operon genes. As part of ongoing investigations on allosteric conformational changes induced by Hg(II) in dimeric MerR, and the implications on the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter of the mer operon, we applied small angle scattering to study the regulatory mechanism of MerR in the presence and absence of Hg(II). Our results show that in the presence of Hg(II) the MerR dimer undergoes a significant reorientation from a compact state to a conformation revealing two distinct domains. Bacterial reduction of Hg(II) can also occur at concentrations too low to induce mer operon functions. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter are able to reduce Hg(II) in the presence of mineral oxides. This process has been linked to the activity of outer membrane multiheme cytochromes. We isolated and purified a decaheme outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and characterized its envelope shape in solution by small angle x-ray scattering. Structural features were identified and compared to homology models. These results show that OmcA is an elongated macromolecule consisting of separate modules, which may be connected by flexible linkers.

  8. Supramolecular structure formation of molecular copper(II)methylsalicylate complexes with nicotinamide or methylnicotinamide - Crystal structure and spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchoňová, Miroslava; Repická, Zuzana; Moncol, Jan; Růžičková, Zdeňka; Mazúr, Milan; Valigura, Dušan

    2015-07-01

    As the systematic investigation of salicylatocopper complexes with nicotinamide derivatives the preparation, characterization and X-ray structure determination of four new molecular copper(II) complexes with x-methylsalicylate anion (x-Mesal-) and nicotinamide (nia) or N-methylnicotinamide (mna) are reported. The molecular complexes [Cu(5-Mesal)2(nia)2] (1), [Cu(3-Mesal)2(nia)2] (2) build up 2-D supramolecular structures of different character. The ladder-type supramolecular structure of (1) is formed by the head-to-head H-bonds of neighbouring carboxamide groups, while the supramolecular structure of (2) is formed by Nsbnd H⋯O H-bonds of carboxamide groups into 1-D chain that are by the additional Hsbnd H⋯O H-bonds of Nsbnd H carboxamide and the carboxylate group oxygen atoms linked to 2-D layers. The centrosymmetrical crystal molecular structure of [Cu(4-Mesal)2(mna)2(H2O)2]ṡ2EtOH (3) or [Cu(5-Mesal)2(mna)2(H2O)2]ṡ2MeOH (4) are forming 1-D supramolecular chains that involve the methylcarboxamide Nsbnd H group, the crystalosolvate alcohol Osbnd H group, the coordinated water molecule Osbnd H bond and oxygen atom of neighbouring complex molecule. The coordination polyhedron symmetry corresponds with the isotropic character of EPR spectra of (1) and (2) while the EPR spectrum of (4) is of axial symmetry.

  9. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-01-01

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects. PMID:24277840

  10. Structure enhancement methodology using theory and experiment: gas-phase molecular structures using a dynamic interaction between electron diffraction, molecular mechanics, and ab initio data.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Graeme R; Masters, Sarah L; Rankin, David W H

    2007-07-01

    A new method of incorporating ab initio theoretical data dynamically into the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) refinement process has been developed to aid the structure determination of large, sterically crowded molecules. This process involves calculating a set of differences between parameters that define the positions of peripheral atoms (usually hydrogen), as determined using molecular mechanics (MM), and those which use ab initio methods. The peripheral-atom positions are then updated continually during the GED refinement process, using MM, and the returned positions are modified using this set of differences to account for the differences between ab initio and MM methods, before being scaled back to the average parameters used to define them, as refined from experimental data. This allows the molecule to adopt a completely asymmetric structure if required, without being constrained by the MM parametrization, whereas the calculations can be performed on a practical time scale. The molecular structures of tri-tert-butylphosphine oxide and tri-tert-butylphosphine imide have been re-examined using this new technique, which we call SEMTEX (Structure Enhancement Methodology using Theory and EXperiment).

  11. Six polycyclic pyrimidoazepine derivatives: syntheses, molecular structures and supramolecular assembly.

    PubMed

    Acosta Quintero, Lina M; Palma, Alirio; Cobo, Justo; Glidewell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    A versatile synthetic method has been developed for the formation of variously substituted polycyclic pyrimidoazepine derivatives, formed by nucleophilic substitution reactions on the corresponding chloro-substituted compounds; the reactions can be promoted either by conventional heating in basic solutions or by microwave heating in solvent-free systems. Thus, (6RS)-6,11-dimethyl-3,5,6,11-tetrahydro-4H-benzo[b]pyrimido[5,4-f]azepin-4-one, C14H15N3O, (I), was isolated from a solution containing (6RS)-4-chloro-8-hydroxy-6,11-dimethyl-6,11-dihydro-5H-benzo[b]pyrimido[5,4-f]azepine and benzene-1,2-diamine; (6RS)-4-butoxy-6,11-dimethyl-6,11-dihydro-5H-benzo[b]pyrimido[5,4-f]azepin-8-ol, C18H23N3O2, (II), was formed by reaction of the corresponding 6-chloro compound with butanol, and (RS)-4-dimethylamino-6,11-dimethyl-6,11-dihydro-5H-benzo[b]pyrimido[5,4-f]azepin-8-ol, C16H20N4O, (III), was formed by reaction of the chloro analogue with alkaline dimethylformamide. (6RS)-N-Benzyl-8-methoxy-6,11-dimethyl-6,11-dihydro-5H-benzo[b]pyrimido[5,4-f]azepin-4-amine, C22H24N4O, (IV), (6RS)-N-benzyl-6-methyl-1,2,6,7-tetrahydropyrimido[5',4':6,7]azepino[3,2,1-hi]indol-8-amine, C22H22N4, (V), and (7RS)-N-benzyl-7-methyl-2,3,7,8-tetrahydro-1H-pyrimido[5',4':6,7]azepino[3,2,1-ij]quinolin-9-amine, C23H24N4, (VI), were all formed by reaction of the corresponding chloro compounds with benzylamine under microwave irradiation. In each of compounds (I)-(IV) and (VI), the azepine ring adopts a conformation close to the boat form, with the C-methyl group in a quasi-equatorial site, whereas the corresponding ring in (V) adopts a conformation intermediate between the twist-boat and twist-chair forms, with the C-methyl group in a quasi-axial site. No two of the structures of (I)-(VI) exhibit the same range of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: different types of sheet are formed in each of (I), (II), (V) and (VI), and different types of chain in each of (III) and (IV). PMID:27045186

  12. ALMOST: an all atom molecular simulation toolkit for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Fu, Biao; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Camilloni, Carlo; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Paci, Emanuele; Caflisch, Amedeo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Cavalli, Andrea

    2014-05-30

    Almost (all atom molecular simulation toolkit) is an open source computational package for structure determination and analysis of complex molecular systems including proteins, and nucleic acids. Almost has been designed with two primary goals: to provide tools for molecular structure determination using various types of experimental measurements as conformational restraints, and to provide methods for the analysis and assessment of structural and dynamical properties of complex molecular systems. The methods incorporated in Almost include the determination of structural and dynamical features of proteins using distance restraints derived from nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, orientational restraints obtained from residual dipolar couplings and the structural restraints from chemical shifts. Here, we present the first public release of Almost, highlight the key aspects of its computational design and discuss the main features currently implemented. Almost is available for the most common Unix-based operating systems, including Linux and Mac OS X. Almost is distributed free of charge under the GNU Public License, and is available both as a source code and as a binary executable from the project web site at http://www.open-almost.org. Interested users can follow and contribute to the further development of Almost on http://sourceforge.net/projects/almost.

  13. ALMOST: an all atom molecular simulation toolkit for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Fu, Biao; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Camilloni, Carlo; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Paci, Emanuele; Caflisch, Amedeo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Cavalli, Andrea

    2014-05-30

    Almost (all atom molecular simulation toolkit) is an open source computational package for structure determination and analysis of complex molecular systems including proteins, and nucleic acids. Almost has been designed with two primary goals: to provide tools for molecular structure determination using various types of experimental measurements as conformational restraints, and to provide methods for the analysis and assessment of structural and dynamical properties of complex molecular systems. The methods incorporated in Almost include the determination of structural and dynamical features of proteins using distance restraints derived from nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, orientational restraints obtained from residual dipolar couplings and the structural restraints from chemical shifts. Here, we present the first public release of Almost, highlight the key aspects of its computational design and discuss the main features currently implemented. Almost is available for the most common Unix-based operating systems, including Linux and Mac OS X. Almost is distributed free of charge under the GNU Public License, and is available both as a source code and as a binary executable from the project web site at http://www.open-almost.org. Interested users can follow and contribute to the further development of Almost on http://sourceforge.net/projects/almost. PMID:24676684

  14. Profiling of the Molecular Weight and Structural Isomer Abundance of Macroalgae-Derived Phlorotannins

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Natalie; Brunton, Nigel P.; FitzGerald, Richard J.; Smyth, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Phlorotannins are a group of complex polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene) unique to macroalgae. These phenolic compounds are integral structural components of the cell wall in brown algae, but also play many secondary ecological roles such as protection from UV radiation and defense against grazing. This study employed Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) with tandem mass spectrometry to investigate isomeric complexity and observed differences in phlorotannins derived from macroalgae harvested off the Irish coast (Fucus serratus, Fucus vesiculosus, Himanthalia elongata and Cystoseira nodicaulis). Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content assays were used as an index for producing phlorotannin fractions, enriched using molecular weight cut-off dialysis with subsequent flash chromatography to profile phlorotannin isomers in these macroalgae. These fractions were profiled using UPLC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) and the level of isomerization for specific molecular weight phlorotannins between 3 and 16 monomers were determined. The majority of the low molecular weight (LMW) phlorotannins were found to have a molecular weight range equivalent to 4–12 monomers of phloroglucinol. The level of isomerization within the individual macroalgal species differed, resulting in substantially different numbers of phlorotannin isomers for particular molecular weights. F. vesiculosus had the highest number of isomers of 61 at one specific molecular mass, corresponding to 12 phloroglucinol units (PGUs). These results highlight the complex nature of these extracts and emphasize the challenges involved in structural elucidation of these compounds. PMID:25603345

  15. Profiling of the molecular weight and structural isomer abundance of macroalgae-derived phlorotannins.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Natalie; Brunton, Nigel P; FitzGerald, Richard J; Smyth, Thomas J

    2015-01-16

    Phlorotannins are a group of complex polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene) unique to macroalgae. These phenolic compounds are integral structural components of the cell wall in brown algae, but also play many secondary ecological roles such as protection from UV radiation and defense against grazing. This study employed Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) with tandem mass spectrometry to investigate isomeric complexity and observed differences in phlorotannins derived from macroalgae harvested off the Irish coast (Fucus serratus, Fucus vesiculosus, Himanthalia elongata and Cystoseira nodicaulis). Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content assays were used as an index for producing phlorotannin fractions, enriched using molecular weight cut-off dialysis with subsequent flash chromatography to profile phlorotannin isomers in these macroalgae. These fractions were profiled using UPLC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) and the level of isomerization for specific molecular weight phlorotannins between 3 and 16 monomers were determined. The majority of the low molecular weight (LMW) phlorotannins were found to have a molecular weight range equivalent to 4-12 monomers of phloroglucinol. The level of isomerization within the individual macroalgal species differed, resulting in substantially different numbers of phlorotannin isomers for particular molecular weights. F. vesiculosus had the highest number of isomers of 61 at one specific molecular mass, corresponding to 12 phloroglucinol units (PGUs). These results highlight the complex nature of these extracts and emphasize the challenges involved in structural elucidation of these compounds.

  16. Using Molecular Replacement Phasing to Study the Structure and Function of RNA.

    PubMed

    Marcia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a wide variety of RNA molecules regulating fundamental cellular processes has been discovered. Therefore, RNA structure determination is experiencing a boost and many more RNA structures are likely to be determined in the years to come. The broader availability of experimentally determined RNA structures implies that molecular replacement (MR) will be used more and more frequently as a method for phasing future crystallographic structures. In this report we describe various aspects relative to RNA structure determination by MR. First, we describe how to select and create MR search models for nucleic acids. Second, we describe how to perform MR searches on RNA using available crystallographic software. Finally, we describe how to refine and interpret the successful MR solutions. These protocols are applicable to determine novel RNA structures as well as to establish structural-functional relationships on existing RNA structures.

  17. Talking Speech Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliss-Vincent, Jane; Whitford, Gigi

    2002-01-01

    This article presents both the factors involved in successful speech input use and the potential barriers that may suggest that other access technologies could be more appropriate for a given individual. Speech input options that are available are reviewed and strategies for optimizing use of speech recognition technology are discussed. (Contains…

  18. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  19. Structural Changes of a Doubly Spin-Labeled Chemically Driven Molecular Shuttle Probed by PELDOR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Paola; Bleve, Valentina; Mezzina, Elisabetta; Schäfer, Christian; Ragazzon, Giulio; Albertini, Marco; Carbonera, Donatella; Credi, Alberto; Di Valentin, Marilena; Lucarini, Marco

    2016-06-20

    Gaining detailed information on the structural rearrangements associated with stimuli-induced molecular movements is of utmost importance for understanding the operation of molecular machines. Pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) was employed to monitor the geometrical changes arising upon chemical switching of a [2]rotaxane that behaves as an acid-base-controlled molecular shuttle. To this aim, the rotaxane was endowed with stable nitroxide radical units in both the ring and axle components. The combination of PELDOR data and molecular dynamic calculations indicates that in the investigated rotaxane, the ring displacement along the axle, caused by the addition of a base, does not alter significantly the distance between the nitroxide labels, but it is accompanied by a profound change in the geometry adopted by the macrocycle. PMID:27123774

  20. The Vertex Version of Weighted Wiener Number for Bicyclic Molecular Structures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Wang, Weifan

    2015-01-01

    Graphs are used to model chemical compounds and drugs. In the graphs, each vertex represents an atom of molecule and edges between the corresponding vertices are used to represent covalent bounds between atoms. We call such a graph, which is derived from a chemical compound, a molecular graph. Evidence shows that the vertex-weighted Wiener number, which is defined over this molecular graph, is strongly correlated to both the melting point and boiling point of the compounds. In this paper, we report the extremal vertex-weighted Wiener number of bicyclic molecular graph in terms of molecular structural analysis and graph transformations. The promising prospects of the application for the chemical and pharmacy engineering are illustrated by theoretical results achieved in this paper. PMID:26640513

  1. The Vertex Version of Weighted Wiener Number for Bicyclic Molecular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Wang, Weifan

    2015-01-01

    Graphs are used to model chemical compounds and drugs. In the graphs, each vertex represents an atom of molecule and edges between the corresponding vertices are used to represent covalent bounds between atoms. We call such a graph, which is derived from a chemical compound, a molecular graph. Evidence shows that the vertex-weighted Wiener number, which is defined over this molecular graph, is strongly correlated to both the melting point and boiling point of the compounds. In this paper, we report the extremal vertex-weighted Wiener number of bicyclic molecular graph in terms of molecular structural analysis and graph transformations. The promising prospects of the application for the chemical and pharmacy engineering are illustrated by theoretical results achieved in this paper. PMID:26640513

  2. Molecular structure and dynamical properties of niosome bilayers with and without cholesterol incorporation: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritwiset, Aksornnarong; Krongsuk, Sriprajak; Johns, Jeffrey Roy

    2016-09-01

    Niosomes are non-ionic surfactant vesicles having a bilayer structure formed by self-assembly of hydrated surfactants, usually with cholesterol incorporation. Stability and mechanical properties of niosomes strongly depend on type of non-ionic surfactants and compositions used. In this study we present the structural and dynamical properties of niosome bilayers composed of sorbitan monostearate (Span60) with 0% and 50% cholesterol compositions which are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations reveal that niosome bilayer without cholesterol prefer to form in the gel phase with a higher order structure, while in the presence of cholesterol the bilayer exhibits more fluidity having a less ordered structure. The niosome bilayer with 50% cholesterol inclusion shows an increase of area per lipid (∼11%) and thickness (∼39%) compared with the niosome bilayer without cholesterol. The Span60 tailgroup orientation of the niosome bilayers without cholesterol exhibits more tilt (34.5o ± 0.5) than that of the bilayer with 50% cholesterol (15.4o ± 0.8). Additionally, our results show that the addition of cholesterol to the bilayer causes the higher in lateral and transverse diffusion, as well as an increase in the hydrogen bond number between Span60 and water. Such characteristics not only enhance the niosome stability but also increase the fluidity, which are necessary for the niosomal drug delivery.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of soliton-like structures in a dusty plasma medium

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar Das, Amita; Sen, Abhijit; Kaw, Predhiman

    2015-03-15

    The existence and evolution of soliton-like structures in a dusty plasma medium are investigated in a first principles approach using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of particles interacting via a Yukawa potential. These localized structures are found to exist in both weakly and strongly coupled regimes with their structures becoming sharper as the correlation effects between the dust particles get stronger. A surprising result, compared to fluid simulations, is the existence of rarefactive soliton-like structures in our non-dissipative system, a feature that arises from the charge conjugation symmetry property of the Yukawa fluid. Our simulation findings closely resemble many diverse experimental results reported in the past.

  4. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Triatomic wake effect and the determination of the molecular structure of HD2+ from the Coulomb explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhou-Sen; Miao, Jing-Wei; Liao, Xue-Hua; Miao, Lei; Yuan, Xue-Dong; Shi, Mian-Gong

    2009-11-01

    A new theoretical model of the triatomic molecular wake effect is proposed and applied to molecular ions D3+ and HD2+ while passing through a solid. The wake effects resulting from the reactions of the two similar ions with thin carbon foil are also investigated by using the Coulomb explosion technique. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical estimates and the molecular structure of HD2+ is determined by using the model.

  5. Search for Length Dependent Stable Structures of Polyglutamaine Proteins with Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, Robert; Cox, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the need to find beta-structure aggregation nuclei for the polyQ diseases such as Huntington's, we have undertaken a search for length dependent structure in model polyglutamine proteins. We use the Onufriev-Bashford-Case (OBC) generalized Born implicit solvent GPU based AMBER11 molecular dynamics with the parm96 force field coupled with a replica exchange method to characterize monomeric strands of polyglutamine as a function of chain length and temperature. This force field and solvation method has been shown among other methods to accurately reproduce folded metastability in certain small peptides, and to yield accurately de novo folded structures in a millisecond time-scale protein. Using GPU molecular dynamics we can sample out into the microsecond range. Additionally, explicit solvent runs will be used to verify results from the implicit solvent runs. We will assess order using measures of secondary structure and hydrogen bond content.

  6. CO mapping of the Orion molecular cloud: The influence of star formation on cloud structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schloerb, F. P.; Snell, R. L.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Morgan, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Regions of massive star formation have long been believed to have a profound influence on the structure of their surrounding molecular clouds. The ways in which massive star formation has altered the structure and kinematics of the Orion Molecular Cloud are discussed. The data to be discussed consists of a large scale map of the CO J=1-0 emission from approximately 3 square degrees of OMC-1. During 1985, the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 14M antenna was used to map a 2 deg x 1 deg region centered on alpha(1950) = 5(h)33(m)00(s) delta(1950) = -5 deg 30 min. The region mapped in 1985 covers the well known HII regions M42, M43, and NGC1977, and the CO map contains abundant evidence of the interaction between these regions and the molecular cloud. Indeed, the global structure of the cloud appears to have been strongly influenced by the continuous formation of massive stars within the cloud. Individual instances of some of these features are discussed. There appear to be two classes of features which are indicative of this interaction: CO bright rims and CO holes. During 1986, we have undertaken further mapping of OMC-1 to the south of the region covered by the 1985 map. This portion of the cloud contains significant regions of star formation, but O star formation has not occured and large HII regions have not developed to alter the appearance of the cloud. A detailed map of this region is thus an opportunity to view the structure of the molecular cloud before it has been altered by massive star formation. Preliminary analysis of data obtained in this region suggests that the structure and kinematics of the southern portion of the Orion cloud are indeed dramatically different from those of the region previously mapped. Comparison of the two regions thus supports models of the development of structure in molecular clouds through interaction with the HII regions formed within them.

  7. Low-resolution molecular structures of isolated functional units from arthropodan and molluscan hemocyanin.

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, J G; Ali, S A; Abbasi, A; Zaidi, Z H; Stoeva, S; Voelter, W; Hasnain, S S

    2000-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements were performed on dilute solutions of the purified hemocyanin subunit (Bsin1) from scorpion (Buthus sindicus) and the N-terminal functional unit (Rta) from a marine snail (Rapana thomasiana). The model-independent approach based on spherical harmonics was applied to calculate the molecular envelopes directly from the scattering profiles. Their molecular shapes in solution could be restored at 2-nm resolution. We show that these units represent stable, globular building blocks of the two hemocyanin families and emphasize their conformational differences on a subunit level. Because no crystallographic or electron microscopy data are available for isolated functional units, this study provides for the first time structural information for isolated, monomeric functional subunits from both hemocyanin families. This has been made possible through the use of low protein concentrations (< or = 1 mg/ml). The observed structural differences may offer advantages in building very different overall molecular architectures of hemocyanin by the two phyla. PMID:10653810

  8. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    PubMed Central

    Marcia, Marco; Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-01-01

    Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts. PMID:24189228

  9. Molecular clouds and the large-scale structure of the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, Patrick; Stacy, J. Gregory

    1990-01-01

    The application of molecular radio astronomy to the study of the large-scale structure of the Galaxy is reviewed and the distribution and characteristic properties of the Galactic population of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs), derived primarily from analysis of the Columbia CO survey, and their relation to tracers of Population 1 and major spiral features are described. The properties of the local molecular interstellar gas are summarized. The CO observing programs currently underway with the Center for Astrophysics 1.2 m radio telescope are described, with an emphasis on projects relevant to future comparison with high-energy gamma-ray observations. Several areas are discussed in which high-energy gamma-ray observations by the EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope) experiment aboard the Gamma Ray Observatory will directly complement radio studies of the Milky Way, with the prospect of significant progress on fundamental issues related to the structure and content of the Galaxy.

  10. Ab initio molecular dynamics: Relationship between structural phases and the sound velocity in dense hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Carlo L.; Cuesta-Lopez, Santiago; Perlado, Jose M.

    2014-10-01

    The phase diagram and the possible stable structures of molecular solid hydrogen are intriguing physical phenomena that still remain to be fully unveiled. Particularly, its transition to metallic hydrogen at high pressures is currently a hot topic of discussion. This letter reports a simulation method that links the ab initio, quantum molecular dynamic and mechanical properties calculations to study the relation between the structural phase transitions and sound velocity in solid molecular hydrogen. The pressure range studied is from 0.1 GPa to 180 GPa, at 15 K temperature, thereby our aim is to simulate the conditions of manufacture, handling and early stages of compression of the target fuel used in confinement inertial fusion. Phase I degeneration below 1 GPa is discussed.

  11. Molecular structures and protonation state of 2-Mercaptopyridine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, S.; Miedema, P. S.; Quevedo, W.; O'Cinneide, B.; Fondell, M.; Beye, M.; Pietzsch, A.; Ross, M.; Khalil, M.; Föhlisch, A.

    2016-03-01

    The speciation of 2-Mercaptopyridine in aqueous solution has been investigated with nitrogen 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy and time dependent Density Functional Theory. The prevalence of distinct species as a function of the solvent basicity is established. No indications of dimerization towards high concentrations are found. The determination of different molecular structures of 2-Mercaptopyridine in aqueous solution is put into the context of proton-transfer in keto-enol and thione-thiol tautomerisms.

  12. Conformation of the umifenovir cation in the molecular and crystal structures of four carboxylic acid salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orola, Liana; Sarcevica, Inese; Kons, Artis; Actins, Andris; Veidis, Mikelis V.

    2014-01-01

    The umifenovir salts of maleic, salicylic, glutaric, and gentisic acid as well as the chloroform solvate of the salicylate were prepared. Single crystals of the five compounds were obtained and their molecular and crystal structures determined by X-ray diffraction. In each structure the conformation of phenyl ring with respect to the indole group of the umifenovir moiety is different. The water solubility and melting points of the studied umifenovir salts have been determined.

  13. Origami: A Versatile Modeling System for Visualising Chemical Structure and Exploring Molecular Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James; Leslie, Ray; Billington, Susan; Slater, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of "Origami" is presented as an accessible and transferable modeling system through which to convey the intricacies of molecular shape and highlight structure-function relationships. The implementation of origami has been found to be a versatile alternative to conventional ball-and-stick models, possessing the key advantages of being both…

  14. Improved isolation protocol to detect high molecular weight polysaccharide structures of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit K; Felső, Péter; Emődy, Levente; Schneider, György; Kocsis, Béla

    2014-12-01

    Simple detection of high molecular weight, LPS-like structures of Campylobacter jejuni is still an unsolved problem. A phenol-free extraction method for the detection of HMW polysaccharide was developed without the need for Western blot. This method provides a reliable technique for large-scale screening and comparative characterization study of different isolates.

  15. Development and Assessment of a Molecular Structure and Properties Learning Progression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Underwood, Sonia M.; Hilley, Caleb Z.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we found that: (i) many students were unable to construct representations of simple molecular structures; (ii) a majority of students fail to make the important connection between these representations and macroscopic properties of the material; and (iii) they were unable to decode the information contained in such representations.…

  16. Well-ordered monolayers of alkali-doped coronene and picene: Molecular arrangements and electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, M.; Endo, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Okada, R.; Yamada, Y. Sasaki, M.

    2014-07-21

    Adsorptions of alkali metals (such as K and Li) on monolayers of coronene and picene realize the formation of ordered phases, which serve as well-defined model systems for metal-intercalated aromatic superconductors. Upon alkali-doping of the monolayers of coronene and picene, scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed the rearrangement of the entire molecular layer. The K-induced reconstruction of both monolayers resulted in the formation of a structure with a herringbone-like arrangement of molecules, suggesting the intercalation of alkali metals between molecular planes. Upon reconstruction, a shift in both the vacuum level and core levels of coronene was observed as a result of a charge transfer from alkali metals to coronene. In addition, a new density of states near the Fermi level was formed in both the doped coronene and the doped picene monolayers. This characteristic electronic feature of the ordered monolayer has been also reported in the multilayer picene films, ensuring that the present monolayer can model the properties of the metal-intercalated aromatic hydrocarbons. It is suggested that the electronic structure near the Fermi level is sensitive to the molecular arrangement, and that both the strict control and determinations of the molecular structure in the doped phase should be important for the determination of the electronic structure of these materials.

  17. Looking beyond Lewis Structures: A General Chemistry Molecular Modeling Experiment Focusing on Physical Properties and Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Cole, Renee S.; Sarkar, Somnath

    2011-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry experiment using Spartan Student Version, ready to be adapted and implemented into a general chemistry laboratory course. The experiment provides students an experience with Spartan Molecular Modeling software while discovering the relationships between the structure and properties of molecules. Topics discussed within…

  18. Molecular Docking of Enzyme Inhibitors: A Computational Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra; Torok, Bela; Torok, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a frequently used method in structure-based rational drug design. It is used for evaluating the complex formation of small ligands with large biomolecules, predicting the strength of the bonding forces and finding the best geometrical arrangements. The major goal of this advanced undergraduate biochemistry laboratory exercise…

  19. Correlates across the Structural, Functional, and Molecular Phenotypes of Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckel-Mitchener, Andrea; Greenough, William T.

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is characterized by a pattern of morphological, functional, and molecular characteristics with, in at least some cases, apparent relationships among phenotypic features at different levels. Gross morphology differences in the sizes of some human brain regions are accompanied by fine structural alterations in the shapes and…

  20. The History of Molecular Structure Determination Viewed through the Nobel Prizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William P.; Palenik, Gus J.; Suh, Il-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of complex molecular structures. Emphasizes their individual significance through examination of the Nobel Prizes of the 20th century. Highlights prizes awarded to Conrad Rontgen, Francis H.C. Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice H.F. Wilkins, and others. (SOE)

  1. Structure and Function: Insights into Bioinorganic Systems from Molecular Mechanics Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Helder M.; Egan, Timothy J.; de Villiers, Katherine A.

    The use of empirical force field methods for modeling important systems in bioinorganic chemistry, including the cobalt corrins (derivatives of vitamin B12) and the iron porphyrins, is described. Particular attention is given to the use of molecular dynamics and simulated annealing calculations in exploring the solution structures of corrin, and those of likely complexes between the ferriprotoporphyrin-IX and the arylmethanol antimalarials.

  2. GPU-accelerated analysis and visualization of large structures solved by molecular dynamics flexible fitting.

    PubMed

    Stone, John E; McGreevy, Ryan; Isralewitz, Barry; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid structure fitting methods combine data from cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography with molecular dynamics simulations for the determination of all-atom structures of large biomolecular complexes. Evaluating the quality-of-fit obtained from hybrid fitting is computationally demanding, particularly in the context of a multiplicity of structural conformations that must be evaluated. Existing tools for quality-of-fit analysis and visualization have previously targeted small structures and are too slow to be used interactively for large biomolecular complexes of particular interest today such as viruses or for long molecular dynamics trajectories as they arise in protein folding. We present new data-parallel and GPU-accelerated algorithms for rapid interactive computation of quality-of-fit metrics linking all-atom structures and molecular dynamics trajectories to experimentally-determined density maps obtained from cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. We evaluate the performance and accuracy of the new quality-of-fit analysis algorithms vis-à-vis existing tools, examine algorithm performance on GPU-accelerated desktop workstations and supercomputers, and describe new visualization techniques for results of hybrid structure fitting methods. PMID:25340325

  3. GPU-accelerated analysis and visualization of large structures solved by molecular dynamics flexible fitting.

    PubMed

    Stone, John E; McGreevy, Ryan; Isralewitz, Barry; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid structure fitting methods combine data from cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography with molecular dynamics simulations for the determination of all-atom structures of large biomolecular complexes. Evaluating the quality-of-fit obtained from hybrid fitting is computationally demanding, particularly in the context of a multiplicity of structural conformations that must be evaluated. Existing tools for quality-of-fit analysis and visualization have previously targeted small structures and are too slow to be used interactively for large biomolecular complexes of particular interest today such as viruses or for long molecular dynamics trajectories as they arise in protein folding. We present new data-parallel and GPU-accelerated algorithms for rapid interactive computation of quality-of-fit metrics linking all-atom structures and molecular dynamics trajectories to experimentally-determined density maps obtained from cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. We evaluate the performance and accuracy of the new quality-of-fit analysis algorithms vis-à-vis existing tools, examine algorithm performance on GPU-accelerated desktop workstations and supercomputers, and describe new visualization techniques for results of hybrid structure fitting methods.

  4. Molecular structure of amyloid fibrils: insights from solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2006-02-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have made major contributions to our understanding of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils, including fibrils formed by the beta-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, by proteins associated with fungal prions, and by a variety of other polypeptides. Because solid-state NMR techniques can be used to determine interatomic distances (both intramolecular and intermolecular), place constraints on backbone and side-chain torsion angles, and identify tertiary and quaternary contacts, full molecular models for amyloid fibrils can be developed from solid-state NMR data, especially when supplemented by lower-resolution structural constraints from electron microscopy and other sources. In addition, solid-state NMR data can be used as experimental tests of various proposals and hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of amyloid formation, the nature of intermediate structures, and the common structural features within amyloid fibrils. This review introduces the basic experimental and conceptual principles behind solid-state NMR methods that are applicable to amyloid fibrils, reviews the information about amyloid structures that has been obtained to date with these methods, and discusses how solid-state NMR data provide insights into the molecular interactions that stabilize amyloid structures, the generic propensity of polypeptide chains to form amyloid fibrils, and a number of related issues that are of current interest in the amyloid field.

  5. Electronic structure of covalently linked zinc bacteriochlorin molecular arrays: insights into molecular design for NIR light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Kushal; González-Delgado, Jessica M; Blew, James H; Jakubikova, Elena

    2014-10-23

    Pigment-based molecular arrays, especially those based on porphyrins, have been extensively studied as viable components of artificial light harvesting devices. Unlike porphyrins, bacteriochlorins absorb strongly in the NIR, yet little is known of the applicability of covalently linked bacteriochlorin-based arrays in this arena. To lay the foundation for future studies of excited state properties of such arrays, we present a systematic study of the ground state electronic structure of zinc bacteriochlorin (ZnBC) molecular arrays with various linkers and linker attachment sites (meso vs β) employing density functional theory in combination with the energy-based fragmentation (EBF) method, and the EBF with molecular orbitals (EBF-MO) method. We find that the level of steric hindrance between the ZnBC and the linker is directly correlated with the amount of ground sate electronic interactions between the ZnBCs. Low steric hindrance between the ZnBC and the linker found in alkyne-linked arrays results in strongly interacting arrays that are characterized by a decrease in the HOMO-LUMO energy gaps, large orbital energy dispersion in the frontier region, and low ZnBC-linker rotational barriers. In contrast, sterically hindered linkers, such as aryl-based linkers, result in weakly interacting arrays characterized by increased orbital energy degeneracy in the frontier region and high ZnBC-linker rotational barriers. For all linkers studied, the level of steric hindrance decreases when the ZnBCs are linked at the β position. Hence, ZnBC arrays that exhibit strong, weak, or intermediate ground-state electronic interactions can be realized by adjusting the level of steric hindrance with a judicious choice of the linker type and linker attachment site. Such tuning may be essential for design of light harvesting arrays with desired spectral properties.

  6. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  7. Protein-protein structure prediction by scoring molecular dynamics trajectories of putative poses.

    PubMed

    Sarti, Edoardo; Gladich, Ivan; Zamuner, Stefano; Correia, Bruno E; Laio, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of protein-protein interactions and their structural configuration remains a largely unsolved problem. Most of the algorithms aimed at finding the native conformation of a protein complex starting from the structure of its monomers are based on searching the structure corresponding to the global minimum of a suitable scoring function. However, protein complexes are often highly flexible, with mobile side chains and transient contacts due to thermal fluctuations. Flexibility can be neglected if one aims at finding quickly the approximate structure of the native complex, but may play a role in structure refinement, and in discriminating solutions characterized by similar scores. We here benchmark the capability of some state-of-the-art scoring functions (BACH-SixthSense, PIE/PISA and Rosetta) in discriminating finite-temperature ensembles of structures corresponding to the native state and to non-native configurations. We produce the ensembles by running thousands of molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent starting from poses generated by rigid docking and optimized in vacuum. We find that while Rosetta outperformed the other two scoring functions in scoring the structures in vacuum, BACH-SixthSense and PIE/PISA perform better in distinguishing near-native ensembles of structures generated by molecular dynamics in explicit solvent. Proteins 2016; 84:1312-1320. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27253756

  8. Structural characterization of interfacial n-octanol and 3-octanol using molecular dynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    Napoleon, Raeanne L; Moore, Preston B

    2006-03-01

    Structurally isomeric octanol interfacial systems, water/vapor, 3-octanol/vapor, n-octanol/vapor, 3-octanol/water, and n-octanol/water are investigated at 298 K using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The present study is intended to investigate strongly associated liquid/liquid interfaces and probe the atomistic structure of these interfaces. The octanol and water molecules were initially placed randomly into a box and were equilibrated using constant pressure techniques to minimize bias within the initial conditions as well as to fully sample the structural conformations of the interface. An interface formed via phase separation during equilibration and resulted in a slab geometry with a molecularly sharp interface. However, some water molecules remained within the octanol phase with a mole fraction of 0.12 after equilibration. The resulting "wet" octanol interfaces were analyzed using density profiles and orientational order parameters. Our results support the hypothesis of an ordered interface only 1 or 2 molecular layers deep before bulk properties are reached for both the 3-octanol and water systems. However, in contrast to most other interfacial systems studied by molecular dynamics simulations, the n-octanol interface extends for several molecular layers. The octanol hydroxyl groups form a hydrogen-bonding network with water which orders the surface molecules toward a preferred direction and produces a hydrophilic/hydrophobic layering. The ordered n-octanol produces an oscillating low-high density of oxygen atoms out of phase with a high-low density of carbon atoms, consistent with an oscillating dielectric. In contrast, the isomeric 3-octanol has only a single carbon-rich layer directly proximal to the interface, which is a result of the different molecular topology. Both 3-octanol and n-octanol roughen the water interface with respect to the water/vapor interface. The "wet" octanol phases, in the octanol/water systems reach bulk properties in a

  9. Formation, molecular structure, and morphology of humins in biomass conversion: influence of feedstock and processing conditions.

    PubMed

    van Zandvoort, Ilona; Wang, Yuehu; Rasrendra, Carolus B; van Eck, Ernst R H; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Heeres, Hero J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2013-09-01

    Neither the routes through which humin byproducts are formed, nor their molecular structure have yet been unequivocally established. A better understanding of the formation and physicochemical properties of humins, however, would aid in making biomass conversion processes more efficient. Here, an extensive multiple-technique-based study of the formation, molecular structure, and morphology of humins is presented as a function of sugar feed, the presence of additives (e.g., 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene), and the applied processing conditions. Elemental analyses indicate that humins are formed through a dehydration pathway, with humin formation and levulinic acid yields strongly depending on the processing parameters. The addition of implied intermediates to the feedstocks showed that furan and phenol compounds formed during the acid-catalyzed dehydration of sugars are indeed included in the humin structure. IR spectra, sheared sum projections of solid-state 2DPASS (13) C NMR spectra, and pyrolysis GC-MS data indicate that humins consist of a furan-rich polymer network containing different oxygen functional groups. The structure is furthermore found to strongly depend on the type of feedstock. A model for the molecular structure of humins is proposed based on the data presented. PMID:23836679

  10. [Structure of crambin in solution, crystal and in the trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations].

    PubMed

    Abaturov, L V; Nosova, N G

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of the three-dimensional crambin structure alterations in the crystalline environments and in the trajectories of the molecular dynamics simulations in the vacuum and crystal surroundings have been analyzed. In the crystalline state and in the solution the partial regrouping of remote intramolecular packing contacts, involved in the formation and stabilization of the tertiary structure of the crambin molecule, occurs in NMR structures. In the crystalline state it is initiated by the formation of the intermolecular contacts, the conformational influence of its appearance is distributed over the structure. The changes of the conformations and positions of the residues of the loop segments, where the intermolecular contacts of the crystal surroundings are preferably concentrated, are most observable. Under the influence of these contacts the principal change of the regular secondary structure of crambin is taking place: extension of the two-strand beta structure to the three-strand structure with the participation of the single last residue N46 of the C-terminal loop. In comparison with the C-terminal loop the more profound changes are observed in the conformation and the atomic positions of the backbone atoms and in the solvent accessibility of the residues of the interhelical loop. In the solution of the ensemble of the 8 NMR structures relative accessibility to the solvent differs more noticeably also in the region of the loop segments and rather markedly in the interhelical loop. In the crambin cryogenic crystal structures the positions of the atoms of the backbone and/or side chain of 14-18 of 46 residues are discretely disordered. The disorganizations of at least 8 of 14 residues occur directly in the regions of the intermolecular contacts and another 5 residues are disordered indirectly through the intramolecular contacts with the residues of the intermolecular contacts. Upon the molecular dynamics simulation in the vacuum surrounding as in the

  11. Correlating Molecular Structures with Transport Dynamics in High-Efficiency Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiajun; Chen, Yani; Wu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Qian; Kan, Bin; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yongsheng; Huang, Jia; Liang, Ziqi

    2015-06-24

    Efficient charge transport is a key step toward high efficiency in small-molecule organic photovoltaics. Here we applied time-of-flight and organic field-effect transistor to complementarily study the influences of molecular structure, trap states, and molecular orientation on charge transport of small-molecule DRCN7T (D1) and its analogue DERHD7T (D2). It is revealed that, despite the subtle difference of the chemical structures, D1 exhibits higher charge mobility, the absence of shallow traps, and better photosensitivity than D2. Moreover, charge transport is favored in the out-of-plane structure within D1-based organic solar cells, while D2 prefers in-plane charge transport.

  12. Novel aldehyde and thiosemicarbazone derivatives: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, structural studies and molecular docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakurt, Tuncay; Tahtaci, Hakan; Subasi, Nuriye Tuna; Er, Mustafa; Ağar, Erbil

    2016-12-01

    In this study our purpose is that, synthesis and characterization of compounds containing the aldehyde and thiosemicarbazone groups and comparison of the theoretical results with the experimental results. The structures of all synthesized compounds were elucidated by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, elemental analyses techniques. The structure of compound (4) (C9H8N4O2S) was also elucidated by X-ray diffraction analysis. In addition, the theoretical IR spectrum, 1H NMR and 13C NMR chemical shift values, frontier molecular orbital values (FMO) of these molecules were analyzed by using Becke-3- Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) method with LanL2DZ basis set. Finally, molecular docking studies were performed on synthesized compounds using the 4DKI beta-lactam protein structure to determine the potential binding mode of inhibitors.

  13. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Cohen, Bruce E.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Milliron, Delia J.; Prendergast, David; Helms, Brett A.

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons is readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.

  14. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    DOE PAGES

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; et al

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons ismore » readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.« less

  15. Ultra-spatial synchrotron radiation for imaging molecular chemical structure: Applications in plant and animal studies

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical features and make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced synchrotron technique to the study of plant and animal tissues' inherent structure at a cellular or subcellular level. In this article, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of themore » newly developed, advanced synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to reveal molecular structural-chemical features of various plant and animal tissues.« less

  16. Molecular Dynamics Study of Carbon Nanotubes/Polyamide Reverse Osmosis Membranes: Polymerization, Structure, and Hydration.

    PubMed

    Araki, Takumi; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Tejima, Syogo; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Inukai, Shigeki; Noguchi, Toru; Tanioka, Akihiko; Kawaguchi, Takeyuki; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-11-11

    Carbon nanotubes/polyamide (PA) nanocomposite thin films have become very attractive as reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. In this work, we used molecular dynamics to simulate the influence of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the polyamide molecular structure as a model case of a carbon nanotubes/polyamide nanocomposite RO membrane. It was found that the addition of SWCNTs decreases the pore size of the composite membrane and increases the Na and Cl ion rejection. Analysis of the radial distribution function of water confined in the pores of the membranes shows that SWCNT+PA nanocomposite membranes also exhibit smaller clusters of water molecules within the membrane, thus suggesting a dense membrane structure (SWCNT+PA composite membranes were 3.9% denser than bare PA). The results provide new insights into the fabrication of novel membranes reinforced with tubular structures for enhanced desalination performance.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Study of Carbon Nanotubes/Polyamide Reverse Osmosis Membranes: Polymerization, Structure, and Hydration.

    PubMed

    Araki, Takumi; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Tejima, Syogo; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Inukai, Shigeki; Noguchi, Toru; Tanioka, Akihiko; Kawaguchi, Takeyuki; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-11-11

    Carbon nanotubes/polyamide (PA) nanocomposite thin films have become very attractive as reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. In this work, we used molecular dynamics to simulate the influence of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the polyamide molecular structure as a model case of a carbon nanotubes/polyamide nanocomposite RO membrane. It was found that the addition of SWCNTs decreases the pore size of the composite membrane and increases the Na and Cl ion rejection. Analysis of the radial distribution function of water confined in the pores of the membranes shows that SWCNT+PA nanocomposite membranes also exhibit smaller clusters of water molecules within the membrane, thus suggesting a dense membrane structure (SWCNT+PA composite membranes were 3.9% denser than bare PA). The results provide new insights into the fabrication of novel membranes reinforced with tubular structures for enhanced desalination performance. PMID:26505521

  18. Correlating Molecular Structures with Transport Dynamics in High-Efficiency Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiajun; Chen, Yani; Wu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Qian; Kan, Bin; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yongsheng; Huang, Jia; Liang, Ziqi

    2015-06-24

    Efficient charge transport is a key step toward high efficiency in small-molecule organic photovoltaics. Here we applied time-of-flight and organic field-effect transistor to complementarily study the influences of molecular structure, trap states, and molecular orientation on charge transport of small-molecule DRCN7T (D1) and its analogue DERHD7T (D2). It is revealed that, despite the subtle difference of the chemical structures, D1 exhibits higher charge mobility, the absence of shallow traps, and better photosensitivity than D2. Moreover, charge transport is favored in the out-of-plane structure within D1-based organic solar cells, while D2 prefers in-plane charge transport. PMID:26066398

  19. Structural insights into the extra cellular segment of integrinβ5 and molecular interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Setti, Aravind; Sankati, Harsha Sagar; Devi, T A Phazna; Sekhar, A Chandra; Rao, J Venkateshwar; Pawar, Smita C

    2013-10-01

    Primary tumor cells often spread to other organs by metastasis. Despite of it, primary tumor cells break their surrounding extra cellular matrix (ECM) proteins and reach the destination organ by the process of intravasation and extravasation. Metastasized tumor cells induce the process of angiogenesis, this highly regulated process involves several ECM proteins. However, integrins are primarily involved in the blood vessel growth and repair. Therefore, integrins are promising angiogenesis targets. Integrins are receptors on cell surface, involved in signal transduction and attachments in extra cellular matrix (ECM). IntegrinαVβ3 and αVβ5 are implicated in tumor angiogenesis, metastasis, inflammation and bone resorption. The crystal structure of integrinαvβ5 is not available in protein structural databases, therefore; molecular model of integrinβ5 structure was prepared and stereo chemical model quality was checked. Integrin β5 active sites were identified based on insilico analysis tools. Further, molecular level interactions between integrinβ5 and ECM proteins were predicted. In the present study ECM proteins such as focal adhesion kinase 1 (FAK1), annexin A5 and P21 activated kinase 4 (PAK4) were considered for protein-protein docking, to understand inter molecular interactions. The predicted model is conceived to be stereo chemically good and can be used for molecular interaction studies of angiogenic inhibitors. PMID:23962022

  20. Density functional theory studies on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and electronic properties of cyanuric acid.

    PubMed

    Prabhaharan, M; Prabakaran, A R; Srinivasan, S; Gunasekaran, S

    2015-03-01

    The present work has been carried out a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and NBO analysis of cyanuric acid. The FT-IR (100-4000cm(-1)) and FT-Raman spectra (400-4000cm(-1)) of cyanuric acid were recorded. In DFT methods, Becke's three parameter exchange-functional (B3) combined with gradient-corrected correlation functional of Lee, Yang and Parr (LYP) by implementing the split-valence polarized 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets have been considered for the computation of the molecular structure optimization, vibrational frequencies, thermodynamic properties and energies of the optimized structures. The density functional theory (DFT) result complements the experimental findings. The electronic properties, such as HOMO-LUMO energies and molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) are also performed. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also calculated. The first order hyperpolarizability (βtotal) of this molecular system and related properties (β, μ and Δα) are calculated using DFT/B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods. The thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) from spectroscopic data by statistical methods were also obtained for the range of temperature 50-1000K.

  1. Density functional theory studies on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and electronic properties of cyanuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhaharan, M.; Prabakaran, A. R.; Srinivasan, S.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2015-03-01

    The present work has been carried out a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and NBO analysis of cyanuric acid. The FT-IR (100-4000 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (400-4000 cm-1) of cyanuric acid were recorded. In DFT methods, Becke's three parameter exchange-functional (B3) combined with gradient-corrected correlation functional of Lee, Yang and Parr (LYP) by implementing the split-valence polarized 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets have been considered for the computation of the molecular structure optimization, vibrational frequencies, thermodynamic properties and energies of the optimized structures. The density functional theory (DFT) result complements the experimental findings. The electronic properties, such as HOMO-LUMO energies and molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) are also performed. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also calculated. The first order hyperpolarizability (βtotal) of this molecular system and related properties (β, μ and Δα) are calculated using DFT/B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods. The thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) from spectroscopic data by statistical methods were also obtained for the range of temperature 50-1000 K.

  2. Quantum-information analysis of electronic states of different molecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Barcza, G.; Legeza, Oe.; Marti, K. H.; Reiher, M.

    2011-01-15

    We have studied transition metal clusters from a quantum information theory perspective using the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method. We demonstrate the competition between entanglement and interaction localization and discuss the application of the configuration interaction-based dynamically extended active space procedure, which significantly reduces the effective system size and accelerates the speed of convergence for complicated molecular electronic structures. Our results indicate the importance of taking entanglement among molecular orbitals into account in order to devise an optimal DMRG orbital ordering and carry out efficient calculations on transition metal clusters. Apart from these algorithmic observations, which lead to a recipe for black-box DMRG calculations, our work provides physical understanding of electron correlation in molecular and cluster structures in terms of entropy measures of relevance also to recent work on tensor-network representations of electronic states. We also identify those molecular orbitals which are highly entangled and discuss the consequences for chemical bonding and for the structural transition from an dioxygen binding copper cluster to an bis-oxygen-bridged system with broken O-O bond.

  3. Establishing whether the structural feature controlling the mechanical properties of starch films is molecular or crystalline.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Xie, Fengwei; Hasjim, Jovin; Witt, Torsten; Halley, Peter J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2015-03-01

    The effects of molecular and crystalline structures on the tensile mechanical properties of thermoplastic starch (TPS) films from waxy, normal, and high-amylose maize were investigated. Starch structural variations were obtained through extrusion and hydrothermal treatment (HTT). The molecular and crystalline structures were characterized using size-exclusion chromatography and X-ray diffractometry, respectively. TPS from high-amylose maize showed higher elongation at break and tensile strength than those from normal maize and waxy maize starches when processed with 40% plasticizer. Within the same amylose content, the mechanical properties were not affected by amylopectin molecular size or the crystallinity of TPS prior to HTT. This lack of correlation between the molecular size, crystallinity and mechanical properties may be due to the dominant effect of the plasticizer on the mechanical properties. Further crystallization of normal maize TPS by HTT increased the tensile strength and Young's modulus, while decreasing the elongation at break. The results suggest that the crystallinity from the remaining ungelatinized starch granules has less significant effect on the mechanical properties than that resulting from starch recrystallization, possibly due to a stronger network from leached-out amylose surrounding the remaining starch granules. PMID:25498634

  4. Energy-weighted sum rules and the analysis of vibrational structure in molecular spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. L.

    2015-10-01

    The energy-weighted sum SV = Σn (E‧n - E″m)|<ψ″m|ψ‧n>|2 = <ψ″m|ΔV|ψ″m> for the vibrational potential functions V‧, V″ associated with transitions between two electronic states of diatomic molecular species is investigated and specific formulae are given using Morse functions for V‧ and V″. It is found that these formulae are useful approximations which provide a convenient way to analyse the vibrational structure of real spectra to give estimates of molecular parameters such as the change in internuclear distance accompanying a transition.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of structural transitions and melting in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, L.L.

    1996-12-31

    Simple pair potentials are constructed which give hexagonal- or square-lattice ground states in two dimensions, depending on the value of a single parameter controlling the width of the potential well. Molecular dynamics calculations for free clusters of a few hundred particles are used to examine a structural transition from the square lattice, at low temperatures, to the hexagonal lattice at high temperatures. Another structural transition (melting) is identified by the onset of diffusion. The melting temperature is found to be a minimum near the point where the barrier between the two structures, as a function of lattice strain, is also a minimum.

  6. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, T.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Zemek, J.; Marti, X.; Horodyska, P.; Nemec, P.; Holy, V.; Maca, F.; Shick, A. B.; Masek, J.; Kuzel, P.; Nemec, I.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2011-01-15

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  7. Structural and spectral characterizations of C1C2 channelrhodopsin and its mutants by molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Motoshi; Kato, Hideaki E.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and excitation energy calculations of C1C2 chimera channelrhodopsin, a light-gated ion channel protein utilized as a biotechnological tool for optogenetics, based on a protein structure determined recently by X-ray crystallography were performed to investigate its structural and spectral properties. The MD simulations showed stability of hydrogen-bonds responsible for the channel gating observed in the crystallographic structural model. Analysis of electrostatic contribution of the surrounding protein groups to the absorption energy proposes several site-specific mutations that shift absorption maxima significantly, and provides a clear and controlled guide for engineering design of color variant proteins utilized in optogenetics.

  8. Improving NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement: a Molecular Replacement Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelot, T.; Raman, S; Kuzin, A; Hunt, J; Baker, D; Kennedy, M

    2009-01-01

    The structure of human protein HSPC034 has been determined by both solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Refinement of the NMR structure ensemble, using a Rosetta protocol in the absence of NMR restraints, resulted in significant improvements not only in structure quality, but also in molecular replacement (MR) performance with the raw X-ray diffraction data using MOLREP and Phaser. This method has recently been shown to be generally applicable with improved MR performance demonstrated for eight NMR structures refined using Rosetta (Qian et al., Nature 2007;450:259-264). Additionally, NMR structures of HSPC034 calculated by standard methods that include NMR restraints have improvements in the RMSD to the crystal structure and MR performance in the order DYANA, CYANA, XPLOR-NIH, and CNS with explicit water refinement (CNSw). Further Rosetta refinement of the CNSw structures, perhaps due to more thorough conformational sampling and/or a superior force field, was capable of finding alternative low energy protein conformations that were equally consistent with the NMR data according to the Recall, Precision, and F-measure (RPF) scores. On further examination, the additional MR-performance shortfall for NMR refined structures as compared with the X-ray structure were attributed, in part, to crystal-packing effects, real structural differences, and inferior hydrogen bonding in the NMR structures. A good correlation between a decrease in the number of buried unsatisfied hydrogen-bond donors and improved MR performance demonstrates the importance of hydrogen-bond terms in the force field for improving NMR structures. The superior hydrogen-bond network in Rosetta-refined structures demonstrates that correct identification of hydrogen bonds should be a critical goal of NMR structure refinement. Inclusion of nonbivalent hydrogen bonds identified from Rosetta structures as additional restraints in the structure calculation results in

  9. Improving NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement: A Molecular Replacement Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Raman, Srivatsan; Kuzin, Alexander P.; Xiao, Rong; Ma, LiChung; Acton, Thomas; Hunt, John F.; Montelione, Gaetano; Baker, David; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2009-04-01

    The structure of human protein HSPC034 has been determined by both solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Refinement of the NMR structure ensemble, using a Rosetta protocol in the absence of NMR restraints, resulted in significant improvements not only in structure quality, but also in molecular replacement (MR) performance with the raw X-ray diffraction data using MOLREP and Phaser. This method has recently been shown to be generally applicable with improved MR performance demonstrated for eight NMR structures refined using Rosetta (Qian et al., Nature 2007;450:259–264). Additionally, NMR structures of HSPC034 calculated by standard methods that include NMR restraints have improvements in the RMSD to the crystal structure and MR performance in the order DYANA, CYANA, XPLOR-NIH, and CNS with explicit water refinement (CNSw). Further Rosetta refinement of the CNSw structures, perhaps due to more thorough conformational sampling and/or a superior force field, was capable of finding alternative low energy protein conformations that were equally consistent with the NMR data according to the Recall, Precision, and F-measure (RPF) scores. On further examination, the additional MR-performance shortfall for NMR refined structures as compared with the X-ray structure were attributed, in part, to crystal-packing effects, real structural differences, and inferior hydrogen bonding in the NMR structures. A good correlation between a decrease in the number of buried unsatisfied hydrogen-bond donors and improved MR performance demonstrates the importance of hydrogen-bond terms in the force field for improving NMR structures. The superior hydrogen-bond network in Rosetta-refined structures demonstrates that correct identification of hydrogen bonds should be a critical goal of NMR structure refinement. Inclusion of nonbivalent hydrogen bonds identified from Rosetta structures as additional restraints in the structure calculation results

  10. Molecular descriptor subset selection in theoretical peptide quantitative structure-retention relationship model development using nature-inspired optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Žuvela, Petar; Liu, J Jay; Macur, Katarzyna; Bączek, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    In this work, performance of five nature-inspired optimization algorithms, genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimization (PSO), artificial bee colony (ABC), firefly algorithm (FA), and flower pollination algorithm (FPA), was compared in molecular descriptor selection for development of quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) models for 83 peptides that originate from eight model proteins. The matrix with 423 descriptors was used as input, and QSRR models based on selected descriptors were built using partial least squares (PLS), whereas root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) was used as a fitness function for their selection. Three performance criteria, prediction accuracy, computational cost, and the number of selected descriptors, were used to evaluate the developed QSRR models. The results show that all five variable selection methods outperform interval PLS (iPLS), sparse PLS (sPLS), and the full PLS model, whereas GA is superior because of its lowest computational cost and higher accuracy (RMSEP of 5.534%) with a smaller number of variables (nine descriptors). The GA-QSRR model was validated initially through Y-randomization. In addition, it was successfully validated with an external testing set out of 102 peptides originating from Bacillus subtilis proteomes (RMSEP of 22.030%). Its applicability domain was defined, from which it was evident that the developed GA-QSRR exhibited strong robustness. All the sources of the model's error were identified, thus allowing for further application of the developed methodology in proteomics.

  11. A tetraphenylethylene core-based 3D structure small molecular acceptor enabling efficient non-fullerene organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhang; Mu, Cheng; Jiang, Kui; Zhao, Jingbo; Li, Yunke; Zhang, Lu; Li, Zhengke; Lai, Joshua Yuk Lin; Hu, Huawei; Ma, Tingxuan; Hu, Rongrong; Yu, Demei; Huang, Xuhui; Tang, Ben Zhong; Yan, He

    2015-02-01

    A tetraphenylethylene core-based small molecular acceptor with a unique 3D molecular structure is developed. Bulk-heterojunction blend films with a small feature size (≈20 nm) are obtained, which lead to non-fullerene organic solar cells (OSCs) with 5.5% power conversion efficiency. The work provides a new molecular design approach to efficient non-fullerene OSCs based on 3D-structured small-molecule acceptors.

  12. Diversity, population structure, and individual behaviour of parasitoids as seen using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    van Nouhuys, Saskya

    2016-04-01

    Parasitoids have long been models for host-parasite interactions, and are important in biological control. Neutral molecular markers have become increasingly accessible tools, revealing previously unknown parasitoid diversity. Thus, insect communities are now seen as more speciose. They have also been found to be more complex, based on trophic links detected using bits of parasitoid DNA in hosts, and host DNA in adult parasitoids. At the population level molecular markers are used to determine the influence of factors such as host dynamics on parasitoid population structure. Finally, at the individual level, they are used to identify movement of individuals. Overall molecular markers greatly increase the value of parasitoid samples collected, for both basic and applied research, at all levels of study. PMID:27436653

  13. Molecular structure and spectral (FT-IR, Raman) investigations of 3-aminocoumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, Ömer

    2016-05-01

    The molecular structure of 3-Aminocoumarin was determined by conformational analysis. Conformational space was scanned by conformer distribution option of Spartan 08 program package using Merck Molecular Force Field (MMFF) method. Then obtained conformers were optimized by B3LYP/6-311++ G( d, p) and B3LYP/6-311 G( d, p) levels of Density Functional Theory. As a result of these calculations, only one conformer was determined. Vibrational frequencies of this conformer were calculated by Gaussian 03 program package using the same levels of geometry optimizations. The FT-IR and Raman spectra of 3-Aminocoumarin were recorded and compared with the calculated values. Consequently, a good agreement between experimental and the calculated values were founded. Molecular electrostatic potentials (MEPs), HOMO-LUMO energies, thermodynamic properties and Mulliken atomic charges were also covered in this study.

  14. Probing structure and phase-transitions in molecular crystals by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Morten; Fischer, Bernd M.; Walther, Markus

    2011-12-01

    Since the introduction of ultra-fast laser techniques for the generation and detection of broadband terahertz pulses, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy has become a versatile tool for vibrational spectroscopy of molecular systems in the far-infrared. Due to their highly collective and delocalized character vibrational modes in this part of the spectrum are highly sensitive to molecular structure and arrangement within a molecular crystal. Here we utilize this sensitivity to differentiate between the enantiopure amino acid L-cysteine and its racemic crystalline DL-form. Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy we are able to observe temperature induced solid-state phase transitions in polycrystalline DL-cysteine, as well as in polycrystalline benzoic acid. The dynamics of the transitions is studied by tracing the temperature dependency of spectral features that are assigned to certain conformational phases.

  15. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Navdeep S; Schreiber, Kathrin; Pröpper, Kevin; Becker, Stefan; Usón, Isabel; Sheldrick, George M; Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph; Steinfeld, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder.

  16. Metal ion mediated molecularly imprinted polymer for selective capturing antibiotics containing beta-diketone structure.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shanshan; Wang, Xiaobo; Tong, Changlun; Wu, Jianmin

    2010-12-24

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) targeting to quinolones (Qs) and tetracyclines (TCs) was synthesized using itaconic acid (ITA) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) as a functional monomer and template molecule, respectively. Factors affecting the overall performance of MIP were investigated, and the results showed that Fe(3+) ion play a vital role in the formation of MIP with high molecular imprinting effect. Meanwhile, the chelating ability of monomer, species of template molecule, as well as the molar ratio of monomer and template also contribute to the performance of the obtained MIP. Cyclic voltammetry verified that, with the participation of Fe(3+) ions, a ternary complex of ITA-Fe(3+)-CIP could be formed before polymerization. Compared with conventional MIP prepared from commonly used monomer, methacrylic acid (MAA), the new MIP show significantly enhanced molecular imprinting effect and higher capacity for specific adsorption of target compounds as revealed by static and dynamic binding experiments. The MIP was successfully used as solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbent for enriching a broad spectrum of antibiotics containing beta-diketone structure from surface water sample. HPLC detection showed that high recovery rate (78.6-113.6%) was found in these spiked antibiotics, whereas recovery rate for the non structurally related drugs, epinephrine (EP) and dopamine (DOPA), was very low (4.7-7.6%) on the MIP cartridges. The results demonstrate that the MIP prepared by the strategy proposed in this work, could specifically target to a series of structurally related antibiotics containing beta-diketone structure.

  17. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Navdeep S.; Schreiber, Kathrin; Pröpper, Kevin; Becker, Stefan; Usón, Isabel; Sheldrick, George M.; Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph; Steinfeld, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:24816101

  18. Molecular dynamics studies on the structural stability of wild-type dog prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Liu, David D W

    2011-06-01

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. In 2008, canine mammals including dogs (canis familials) were the first time academically reported to be resistant to prion diseases (Vaccine 26: 2601-2614 (2008)). Thus, it is very worth studying the molecular structures of dog prion protein to obtain insights into the immunity of dogs to prion diseases. This paper studies the molecular structural dynamics of wild-type dog prion protein. The comparison analyses with rabbit prion protein show that the dog prion protein has stable molecular structures whether under neutral or low pH environments. We also find that the salt bridges such as D177-R163 contribute to the structural stability of wild-type rabbit prion protein under neutral pH environment. PMID:21469747

  19. Bond energy effects on strength, cooperativity and robustness of molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Ching; Buehler, Markus J

    2011-10-01

    A fundamental challenge in engineering biologically inspired materials and systems is the identification of molecular structures that define fundamental building blocks. Here, we report a systematic study of the effect of the energy of chemical bonds on the mechanical properties of molecular structures, specifically, their strength and robustness. By considering a simple model system of an assembly of bonds in a cluster, we demonstrate that weak bonding, as found for example in H-bonds, results in a highly cooperative behaviour where clusters of bonds operate synergistically to form relatively strong molecular clusters. The cooperative effect of bonding results in an enhanced robustness since the drop of strength owing to the loss of a bond in a larger cluster only results in a marginal reduction of the strength. Strong bonding, as found in covalent interactions such as disulphide bonds or in the backbone of proteins, results in a larger mechanical strength. However, the ability for bonds to interact cooperatively is lost, and, as a result, the overall robustness is lower since the mechanical strength hinges on individual bonds rather than a cluster of bonds. The systematic analysis presented here provides general insight into the interplay of bond energy, robustness and other geometric parameters such as bond spacing. We conclude our analysis with a correlation of structural data of natural protein structures, which confirms the conclusions derived from our study. PMID:23050078

  20. Unoccupied electronic structure and molecular orientation of rubrene; from evaporated films to single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueba, T.; Park, J.; Terawaki, R.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamada, T.; Munakata, T.

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon photoemission (2PPE) spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) have been performed for rubrene single crystals and evaporated thin films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The changes in the 2PPE intensity from the single crystals by the polarization of the light and by the angle of the light incident plane against the crystalline axes indicate that the molecular arrangement on the surface is similar to that in the bulk crystal. On the other hand, in the case of evaporated films, the polarization dependence of 2PPE indicates that the tetracene backbone becomes standing upright as the thickness increases. In spite of the alignment of molecules, the broadened 2PPE spectral features for thick films suggest that the films are amorphous and molecules are in largely different environments. The film structures are confirmed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) derived levels of the single crystal are shifted by + 0.18 and - 0.20 eV, respectively, from those of the 0.8 ML film. The shifts are attributed to the packing density of molecules. It is shown that the unoccupied electronic structure is more sensitively affected by the film structure than the occupied electronic structure.

  1. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, Navdeep S.; Schreiber, Kathrin; Pröpper, Kevin; Becker, Stefan; Usón, Isabel; Sheldrick, George M.; Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph Steinfeld, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that typically manifests itself in childhood and is caused by mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme sulfamidase. The first structure of this enzyme is presented, which provides insight into the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, and the enzymatic mechanism is proposed. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder.

  2. Ab initio NMR Confirmed Evolutionary Structure Prediction for Organic Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cong-Huy; Kucukbenli, Emine; de Gironcoli, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio crystal structure prediction of even small organic compounds is extremely challenging due to polymorphism, molecular flexibility and difficulties in addressing the dispersion interaction from first principles. We recently implemented vdW-aware density functionals and demonstrated their success in energy ordering of aminoacid crystals. In this work we combine this development with the evolutionary structure prediction method to study cholesterol polymorphs. Cholesterol crystals have paramount importance in various diseases, from cancer to atherosclerosis. The structure of some polymorphs (e.g. ChM, ChAl, ChAh) have already been resolved while some others, which display distinct NMR spectra and are involved in disease formation, are yet to be determined. Here we thoroughly assess the applicability of evolutionary structure prediction to address such real world problems. We validate the newly predicted structures with ab initio NMR chemical shift data using secondary referencing for an improved comparison with experiments.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure and dynamics of 5-HT3 serotonin receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, M. Yu.; Popinako, A. V.; Prokopiev, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we investigated structure, dynamics and ion transportation in transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 serotonin receptor. High-resolution (0.35 nm) structure of the 5-HT3 receptor in complex with stabilizing nanobodies was determined by protein crystallography in 2014 (Protein data bank (PDB) code 4PIR). Transmembrane domain of the structure was prepared in complex with explicit membrane environment (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and solvent (TIP3P water model). Molecular dynamics protocols for simulation and stabilization of the transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 receptor model were developed and 60 ns simulation of the structure was conducted in order to explore structural parameters of the system. We estimated the mean force profile for Na+ ions using umbrella sampling method.

  4. Modelling molecular structures for computer-assisted studies of drug structure-activity relations

    SciTech Connect

    Jerman-Blazic, B.; Randic, M.

    1983-01-01

    The characterizations of structure by selected graph invariant is used as an element for model building in the study of quantitative structure activity relations. The path numbers Pi were adopted as the basic graph invariants. Euclidian distance between two sequences of path numbers, which are considered as position vectors in an n-dimensional space, was the measure of similarity between the two structures. The results, which proceeded from the application of the method on a set of 38 substituted barbituratic acids show that path enumeration model offer suitable basis for QSAR analysis and deserve further attention.

  5. Predicting anti-androgenic activity of bisphenols using molecular docking and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianhai; Liu, Huihui; Yang, Qian; Liu, Jining; Chen, Jingwen; Shi, Lili

    2016-11-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro assay indicated that bisphenols can inhibit the androgen receptor. However, the underlying antagonistic mechanism is unclear. In this study, molecular docking was employed to probe the interaction mechanism between bisphenols and human androgen receptor (hAR). The binding pattern of ligands in hAR crystal structures was also analyzed. Results show that hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant interactions between the ligands and hAR. The critical amino acid residues involved in forming hydrogen bonding between bisphenols and hAR is Asn 705 and Gln 711. Furthermore, appropriate molecular structural descriptors were selected to characterize the non-bonded interactions. Stepwise multiple linear regressions (MLR) analysis was employed to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting the anti-androgenic activity of bisphenols. Based on the QSAR development and validation guideline issued by OECD, the goodness-of-fit, robustness and predictive ability of constructed QSAR model were assessed. The model application domain was characterized by the Euclidean distance and Williams plot. The mechanisms of the constructed model were also interpreted based on the selected molecular descriptors i.e. the number of hydroxyl groups (nROH), the most positive values of the molecular surface potential (Vs,max) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (ELUMO). Finally, based on the model developed, the data gap for other twenty-six bisphenols on their anti-androgenic activity was filled. The predicted results indicated that the anti-androgenic activity of seven bisphenols was higher than that of bisphenol A. PMID:27561732

  6. Quantum chemical density functional theory studies on the molecular structure and vibrational spectra of mannitol.

    PubMed

    Moorthi, P P; Gunasekaran, S; Swaminathan, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2015-02-25

    A collective experimental and theoretical study was conducted on the molecular structure and vibrational spectra of mannitol. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of mannitol were recorded in the solid phase. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, thermodynamic functions and atomic charges of mannitol in the ground state have been calculated by using the ab initio HF (Hartree-Fock) and density functional methods (B3LYP) invoking cc-pVDZ basis set. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of Total Energy Distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes. The UV absorption spectra of the title compound dissolved in water. Natural bond orbital analysis has been carried out to explain the charge transfer or delocalization of charge due to the intra-molecular interactions. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by GIAO methods. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) of this novel molecular system and related properties (β, α0 and Δα) of mannitol are calculated using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ and HF/cc-pVDZ methods on the finite-field approach. By using TD-DFT calculation, electronic absorption spectra of the title compound have been predicted and a good agreement with experimental one is established. In addition, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) have been investigated using theoretical calculations, the calculated HOMO and LUMO energies shows that the charge transfer within the molecule.

  7. From molecular systems to continuum solids: A multiscale structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Qi; Li, Shaofan

    2015-08-01

    We propose a concurrent multiscale molecular dynamics for molecular systems in order to apply macroscale mechanical boundary conditions such as traction and average displacement for solid state materials, which is difficult to do in traditional molecular dynamics where boundary conditions are applied in terms of forces and displacements on selected particles. The multiscale model is systematically constructed in terms of multiscale structures of kinematics, force field, and dynamical equations. The idea is to extend the Anderson-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to the cases that have arbitrary finite domain and boundary, thus the model is capable of solving inhomogeneous, non-equilibrium problems. The macroscale stress loading on a representative volume element with periodic boundary condition is generalized to all kinds of macroscale mechanical boundary conditions. Unlike most multiscale techniques, our theory is aimed at understanding fundamental physics rather than achieving computing efficiency. Examples of problems with prescribed average displacements and surface tractions are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed multiscale molecular dynamics.

  8. Enzymatic degradation of monolayer for poly(lactide) revealed by real-time atomic force microscopy: effects of stereochemical structure, molecular weight, and molecular branches on hydrolysis rates.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Albertsson, Ann-Christine; Doi, Yoshiharu; Abe, Hideki

    2008-08-01

    The influences of the stereochemical structure, the molecular weight, and the number of molecular branches for poly(lactide) (PLA) on enzymatic hydrolysis rates of PLA monolayers were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Monolayers of six kinds of PLA with different molecular weights, stereochemical structure, and numbers of molecular branches were prepared by LB techniques and then characterized by AFM in air. The PLA molecules covered homogeneously with a silicon substrate and did not form lamellar crystals in the monolayer. We determined the initial hydrolysis rate of PLA monolayers in presence of proteinase K by volumetric analysis from the continuous AFM height images. The presence of D-lactyl unit reduced the hydrolysis rate of the monolayer. The hydrolysis rate for the linear PLLA samples increased with a decrease in the molecular weight. In contrast, the rates of erosion for branched PLLA monolayers were independent of the molecular weight of samples. The erosion rate of branched PLLA monolayers was found to be dependent on the average molecular weight of PLLA segment in branched molecules, not on the overall molecular weight of samples. From these results, furthermore, the hydrolysis mode of PLAs by proteinase K is discussed.

  9. A general protocol for determining the structures of molecularly ordered but noncrystalline silicate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Darren H; Cadars, Sylvian; Eckert, Juergen; Liu, Zheng; Terasaki, Osamu; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2013-04-17

    A general protocol is demonstrated for determining the structures of molecularly ordered but noncrystalline solids, which combines constraints provided by X-ray diffraction (XRD), one- and two-dimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and first-principles quantum chemical calculations. The approach is used to determine the structure(s) of a surfactant-directed layered silicate with short-range order in two dimensions but without long-range periodicity in three-dimensions (3D). The absence of long-range 3D molecular order and corresponding indexable XRD reflections precludes determination of a space group for this layered silicate. Nevertheless, by combining structural constraints obtained from solid-state (29)Si NMR analyses, including the types and relative populations of distinct (29)Si sites, their respective (29)Si-O-(29)Si connectivities and separation distances, with unit cell parameters (though not space group symmetry) provided by XRD, a comprehensive search of candidate framework structures leads to the identification of a small number of candidate structures that are each compatible with all of the experimental data. Subsequent refinement of the candidate structures using density functional theory calculations allows their evaluation and identification of "best" framework representations, based on their respective lattice energies and quantitative comparisons between experimental and calculated (29)Si isotropic chemical shifts and (2)J((29)Si-O-(29)Si) scalar couplings. The comprehensive analysis identifies three closely related and topologically equivalent framework configurations that are in close agreement with all experimental and theoretical structural constraints. The subtle differences among such similar structural models embody the complexity of the actual framework(s), which likely contain coexisting or subtle distributions of structural order that are intrinsic to the material. PMID:23560776

  10. Coherent structures and turbulent molecular mixing in gaseous planar shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, T. R.; Dutton, J. C.; Lucht, R. P.

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative planar visualization of molecular mixing dynamics in large- and intermediate-scale coherent structures is reported for the first time in the developing and far-field regions of gaseous planar shear layers. A dual-tracer (nitric oxide and acetone) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is implemented as the gaseous analogue to acid/base chemical reactions that have previously been used to study molecular mixing in liquid shear layers. Data on low-speed, high-speed, and total molecularly mixed fluid fractions are collected for low- to high-speed velocity ratios from 0.25 to 0.44 and Reynolds numbers, Re_{delta}, from 18 600 to 103 000. Within this range of conditions, mixed-fluid probability density functions and ensemble-averaged statistics are highly influenced by the homogenizing effect of large-scale Kelvin Helmholtz rollers and the competing action of intermediate-scale secondary instabilities. Small-scale turbulence leads to near-unity mixing efficiencies and mixed-fluid probabilities within the shear layer, with subresolution stirring being detected primarily along the interface with free-stream fluid. Current molecular-mixing data compare favourably with previous time-averaged probe-based measurements while providing new insight on the effects of coherent structures, velocity ratio, downstream distance, and differences between low- and high-speed fluid entrainment.

  11. Molecular structure of yeast RNA polymerase III: demonstration of the tripartite transcriptive system in lower eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, P; Hager, G L; Weinberg, F; Rutter, W J

    1976-01-01

    Homogeneous RNA polymerase III (RNA nucleotidyltransferase III) has been obtained from yeast. The subunit composition of the enzyme was examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The enzyme is composed of 12 putative subunits with molecular weights 160,000, 128,000, 82,000, 41,000, 40,500, 37,000, 34,000, 28,000, 24,000, 20,000, 14,500, and 11,000. The high-molecular-weight subunits and several of the smaller subunits of yeast RNA polymerase III are clearly different from those of enzymes I and II, indicating a distinct molecular structure. However, the molecular weights of some of the small subunits (41,000, 28,000, 24,000, and 14,500) appear to be identical to those of polymerases I and II. Thus, it is possible that the three classes of enzymes in yeast have some common subunits. As in other eukaryotes, yeast polymerase II is inhibited by relatively low concentrations of alpha-amanitin; however, contrary to what has been found in higher eukaryotes, yeast polymerase III is resistant (up to 2 mg/ml) to alpha-amanitin, while yeast polymerase I is sensitive to high concentrations of the drug (50% inhibition at 0.3 mg/ml). These results establish the existence of RNA polymerase III in yeast and provide a structural basis for the discrimination of the three functional polymerases in eukaryotes. Images PMID:772675

  12. Self-Assembled DNA Structures for Molecular Force Measurement: A Magnetically Actuated Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, M.; Lauback, S.; Miller, C.; Peace, C.; Castro, C.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding molecular forces is important to comprehend many of the underlying properties of molecular machines and biological processes. The relevant forces in these cases often lie in the picoNewton range, and thus experiments on individual biomolecules must integrate techniques capable of measuring such forces. A mechanical system to measure molecular forces associated with interacting DNA strands is being developed by using self-assembled DNA nanostructures and super-paramagnetic beads. The DNA nanostructure consists of single-stranded DNA molecules which can be folded into a precise compact geometry using hundreds of short oligonucleotides, i.e., staples, via programmed molecular self-assembly. These nanostructures can be polymerized into micron-scale filaments. By functionalizing the filament ends with bispecific conjugate staples, the structure can be attached to a surface as well as labeled with magnetic beads in order to apply a force on the system. External magnetic fields provide the means to maneuver and manipulate the magnetically labeled DNA structures. Preliminary findings associated with the DNA constructs and their manipulation lay the groundwork to establish real-time control of DNA nanodevices with micromanipulation.

  13. Effect of shampoo, conditioner and permanent waving on the molecular structure of human hair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuchen; Alsop, Richard J.; Soomro, Asfia; Yang, Fei-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The hair is a filamentous biomaterial consisting of the cuticle, the cortex and the medulla, all held together by the cell membrane complex. The cortex mostly consists of helical keratin proteins that spiral together to form coiled-coil dimers, intermediate filaments, micro-fibrils and macro-fibrils. We used X-ray diffraction to study hair structure on the molecular level, at length scales between ∼3–90 Å, in hopes of developing a diagnostic method for diseases affecting hair structure allowing for fast and noninvasive screening. However, such an approach can only be successful if common hair treatments do not affect molecular hair structure. We found that a single use of shampoo and conditioner has no effect on packing of keratin molecules, structure of the intermediate filaments or internal lipid composition of the membrane complex. Permanent waving treatments are known to break and reform disulfide linkages in the hair. Single application of a perming product was found to deeply penetrate the hair and reduce the number of keratin coiled-coils and change the structure of the intermediate filaments. Signals related to the coiled-coil structure of the α-keratin molecules at 5 and 9.5 Å were found to be decreased while a signal associated with the organization of the intermediate filaments at 47 Å was significantly elevated in permed hair. Both these observations are related to breaking of the bonds between two coiled-coil keratin dimers. PMID:26557428

  14. Effect of shampoo, conditioner and permanent waving on the molecular structure of human hair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchen; Alsop, Richard J; Soomro, Asfia; Yang, Fei-Chi; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-01-01

    The hair is a filamentous biomaterial consisting of the cuticle, the cortex and the medulla, all held together by the cell membrane complex. The cortex mostly consists of helical keratin proteins that spiral together to form coiled-coil dimers, intermediate filaments, micro-fibrils and macro-fibrils. We used X-ray diffraction to study hair structure on the molecular level, at length scales between ∼3-90 Å, in hopes of developing a diagnostic method for diseases affecting hair structure allowing for fast and noninvasive screening. However, such an approach can only be successful if common hair treatments do not affect molecular hair structure. We found that a single use of shampoo and conditioner has no effect on packing of keratin molecules, structure of the intermediate filaments or internal lipid composition of the membrane complex. Permanent waving treatments are known to break and reform disulfide linkages in the hair. Single application of a perming product was found to deeply penetrate the hair and reduce the number of keratin coiled-coils and change the structure of the intermediate filaments. Signals related to the coiled-coil structure of the α-keratin molecules at 5 and 9.5 Å were found to be decreased while a signal associated with the organization of the intermediate filaments at 47 Å was significantly elevated in permed hair. Both these observations are related to breaking of the bonds between two coiled-coil keratin dimers. PMID:26557428

  15. Effect of shampoo, conditioner and permanent waving on the molecular structure of human hair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchen; Alsop, Richard J; Soomro, Asfia; Yang, Fei-Chi; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-01-01

    The hair is a filamentous biomaterial consisting of the cuticle, the cortex and the medulla, all held together by the cell membrane complex. The cortex mostly consists of helical keratin proteins that spiral together to form coiled-coil dimers, intermediate filaments, micro-fibrils and macro-fibrils. We used X-ray diffraction to study hair structure on the molecular level, at length scales between ∼3-90 Å, in hopes of developing a diagnostic method for diseases affecting hair structure allowing for fast and noninvasive screening. However, such an approach can only be successful if common hair treatments do not affect molecular hair structure. We found that a single use of shampoo and conditioner has no effect on packing of keratin molecules, structure of the intermediate filaments or internal lipid composition of the membrane complex. Permanent waving treatments are known to break and reform disulfide linkages in the hair. Single application of a perming product was found to deeply penetrate the hair and reduce the number of keratin coiled-coils and change the structure of the intermediate filaments. Signals related to the coiled-coil structure of the α-keratin molecules at 5 and 9.5 Å were found to be decreased while a signal associated with the organization of the intermediate filaments at 47 Å was significantly elevated in permed hair. Both these observations are related to breaking of the bonds between two coiled-coil keratin dimers.

  16. Univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses of lipid related molecular structural components in relation to nutrient profile in feed and food mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, Saman; Damiran, Daalkhaijav; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to determine lipid related molecular structures components (functional groups) in feed combination of cereal grain (barley, Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) based dried distillers grain solubles (wheat DDGSs) from bioethanol processing at five different combination ratios using univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses with infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy, and (ii) to correlate lipid-related molecular-functional structure spectral profile to nutrient profiles. The spectral intensity of (i) CH3 asymmetric, CH2 asymmetric, CH3 symmetric and CH2 symmetric groups, (ii) unsaturation (Cdbnd C) group, and (iii) carbonyl ester (Cdbnd O) group were determined. Spectral differences of functional groups were detected by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal components analysis (PCA). The results showed that the combination treatments significantly inflicted modifications (P < 0.05) in nutrient profile and lipid related molecular spectral intensity (CH2 asymmetric stretching peak height, CH2 symmetric stretching peak height, ratio of CH2 to CH3 symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak area). Ratio of CH2 to CH3 symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak significantly correlated with nutrient profiles. Both PCA and HCA differentiated lipid-related spectrum. In conclusion, the changes of lipid molecular structure spectral profiles through feed combination could be detected using molecular spectroscopy. These changes were associated with nutrient profiles and functionality.

  17. Univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses of lipid related molecular structural components in relation to nutrient profile in feed and food mixtures.

    PubMed

    Abeysekara, Saman; Damiran, Daalkhaijav; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to determine lipid related molecular structures components (functional groups) in feed combination of cereal grain (barley, Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) based dried distillers grain solubles (wheat DDGSs) from bioethanol processing at five different combination ratios using univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses with infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy, and (ii) to correlate lipid-related molecular-functional structure spectral profile to nutrient profiles. The spectral intensity of (i) CH(3) asymmetric, CH(2) asymmetric, CH(3) symmetric and CH(2) symmetric groups, (ii) unsaturation (CC) group, and (iii) carbonyl ester (CO) group were determined. Spectral differences of functional groups were detected by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal components analysis (PCA). The results showed that the combination treatments significantly inflicted modifications (P<0.05) in nutrient profile and lipid related molecular spectral intensity (CH(2) asymmetric stretching peak height, CH(2) symmetric stretching peak height, ratio of CH(2) to CH(3) symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak area). Ratio of CH(2) to CH(3) symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak significantly correlated with nutrient profiles. Both PCA and HCA differentiated lipid-related spectrum. In conclusion, the changes of lipid molecular structure spectral profiles through feed combination could be detected using molecular spectroscopy. These changes were associated with nutrient profiles and functionality.

  18. Input transformation by dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, most inputs received by a neuron are formed on the dendritic tree. In the neocortex, the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are covered by thousands of tiny protrusions known as dendritic spines, which are the major recipient sites for excitatory synaptic information in the brain. Their peculiar morphology, with a small head connected to the dendritic shaft by a slender neck, has inspired decades of theoretical and more recently experimental work in an attempt to understand how excitatory synaptic inputs are processed, stored and integrated in pyramidal neurons. Advances in electrophysiological, optical and genetic tools are now enabling us to unravel the biophysical and molecular mechanisms controlling spine function in health and disease. Here I highlight relevant findings, challenges and hypotheses on spine function, with an emphasis on the electrical properties of spines and on how these affect the storage and integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in pyramidal neurons. In an attempt to make sense of the published data, I propose that the raison d'etre for dendritic spines lies in their ability to undergo activity-dependent structural and molecular changes that can modify synaptic strength, and hence alter the gain of the linearly integrated sub-threshold depolarizations in pyramidal neuron dendrites before the generation of a dendritic spike. PMID:25520626

  19. Input transformation by dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Araya, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, most inputs received by a neuron are formed on the dendritic tree. In the neocortex, the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are covered by thousands of tiny protrusions known as dendritic spines, which are the major recipient sites for excitatory synaptic information in the brain. Their peculiar morphology, with a small head connected to the dendritic shaft by a slender neck, has inspired decades of theoretical and more recently experimental work in an attempt to understand how excitatory synaptic inputs are processed, stored and integrated in pyramidal neurons. Advances in electrophysiological, optical and genetic tools are now enabling us to unravel the biophysical and molecular mechanisms controlling spine function in health and disease. Here I highlight relevant findings, challenges and hypotheses on spine function, with an emphasis on the electrical properties of spines and on how these affect the storage and integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in pyramidal neurons. In an attempt to make sense of the published data, I propose that the raison d'etre for dendritic spines lies in their ability to undergo activity-dependent structural and molecular changes that can modify synaptic strength, and hence alter the gain of the linearly integrated sub-threshold depolarizations in pyramidal neuron dendrites before the generation of a dendritic spike.

  20. Input Decimated Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using an ensemble of classifiers instead of a single classifier has been shown to improve generalization performance in many pattern recognition problems. However, the extent of such improvement depends greatly on the amount of correlation among the errors of the base classifiers. Therefore, reducing those correlations while keeping the classifiers' performance levels high is an important area of research. In this article, we explore input decimation (ID), a method which selects feature subsets for their ability to discriminate among the classes and uses them to decouple the base classifiers. We provide a summary of the theoretical benefits of correlation reduction, along with results of our method on two underwater sonar data sets, three benchmarks from the Probenl/UCI repositories, and two synthetic data sets. The results indicate that input decimated ensembles (IDEs) outperform ensembles whose base classifiers use all the input features; randomly selected subsets of features; and features created using principal components analysis, on a wide range of domains.

  1. Molecular Structures of Polymer/Sulfur Composites for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with Long Cycle Life

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Lifen; Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Jie; Schwenzer, Birgit; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Nie, Zimin; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Liu, Jun

    2013-04-26

    Vulcanizedpolyaniline/sulfur (SPANI/S) nanostructures were investigated for Li-S battery applications, but the detailed molecular structures of such composites have not been fully illustrated. In this paper, we synthesize SPANI/S composites with different S content in a nanorod configuration. FTIR, Raman, XPS, XRD, SEM and elemental analysis methods are used to characterize the molecular structure of the materials. We provide clear evidence that a portion of S was grafted on PANI during heating and connected the PANI chains with disulfide bonds to form a crosslinked network and the rest of S was encapsulated within it.. Polysulfides and elementary sulfur nanoparticles are physically trapped inside the polymer network and are not chemically bound to the polymer. The performance of the composites is further improved by reducing the particle size. Even after 500 cycles a capacity retention rate of 68.8% is observed in the SPANI/S composite with 55% S content.

  2. Quantum chemistry study of molecular structure and vibrational spectrum of naproxen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lekun; Gao, Hongwei

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare the performance of different DFT methods at different basis sets in predicting geometry and vibrational spectrum of naproxen. The molecular structure and infrared spectrum of naproxen was studied. Quantum chemical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) with functions LSDA, B3LYP, B3PW91, BPV86, mPW1PW91 and PBEPBE at various basis set levels (LANL2DZ, SDD, 3-21G, 6-31G, 6-311G and STO-3G) were performed. The computed result indicates that LSDA/6-311G level is distinctly superior to all the remaining DFT methods in predicting molecular structure of naproxen. The vibrational spectral analysis indicates the LSDA/3-21G level and LSDA/6-311G level are both better than the other methods at all the remaining basis sets.

  3. Molecular structure and vibrational spectra of Irinotecan: A density functional theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinna Babu, P.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Sudha, S.; Aroulmoji, V.; Murano, E.

    2012-12-01

    The solid phase FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of Irinotecan have been recorded in the regions 400-4000 and 50-4000 cm-1, respectively. The spectra were interpreted in terms of fundamentals modes, combination and overtone bands. The structure of the molecule was optimized and the structural characteristics were determined by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with 6-31G(d) as basis set. The vibrational frequencies were calculated for Irinotecan by DFT method and were compared with the experimental frequencies, which yield good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. The infrared spectrum was also simulated from the calculated intensities. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) analysis were investigated using theoretical calculations.

  4. Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers: Effect of Molecular Surface Structure on Macroscopic Wetting Properties.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Hedberg, Jonas; Larsson, Per A; Wågberg, Lars; Johnson, C Magnus

    2015-04-21

    Adsorption of a single layer of molecules on a surface, or even a reorientation of already present molecules, can significantly affect the surface properties of a material. In this study, vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) has been used to study the change in molecular structure at the solid-air interface following thermal curing of polyelectrolyte multilayers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(acrylic acid). Significant changes in the VSF spectra were observed after curing. These changes were accompanied by a distinct increase in the static water contact angle, showing how the properties of the layer-by-layer molecular structure are controlled not just by the polyelectrolyte in the outermost layer but ultimately by the orientation of the chemical constituents in the outermost layers. PMID:25859709

  5. Effects of copolymer segment length and reversible deformation on the molecular surface structure of polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitay-Sadovsky, E.; Komvopoulos, K.; Ward, R.; Somorjai, G. A.

    2003-10-01

    The surface molecular structure and the deformation mechanisms of two polyurethane (PUR) short-segmented copolymers were studied by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. These PURs differ only in the length of their hard segment. Surface deformation was induced by cyclically stretching the PUR films to a macroscopic elastic elongation. Results for both PUR compositions indicate that the upward orientation of the methylene groups increases with elongation and decreases upon relaxation. The surface of the stretched PUR films with shorter hard segments exhibited irreversible deformation at the molecular level. This produced a surface composition similar to that of PUR with longer hard segments that deformed only elastically after three stretching cycles. This behavior indicates that the surface structure of PUR copolymers can be controlled by mechanical manipulation or by modification of the copolymer segment length.

  6. Constructing molecular structures on periodic superstructure of graphene/Ru(0001)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Geng; Huang, Li; Xu, Wenyan; Que, Yande; Zhang, Yi; Lu, Jianchen; Du, Shixuan; Liu, Yunqi; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    We review the way to fabricate large-scale, high-quality and single crystalline graphene epitaxially grown on Ru(0001) substrate. A moiré pattern of the graphene/Ru(0001) is formed due to the lattice mismatch between graphene and Ru(0001). This superstructure gives rise to surface charge redistribution and could behave as an ordered quantum dot array, which results in a perfect template to guide the assembly of organic molecular structures. Molecules, for example iron phthalocyanine and C60, on this template show how the molecule–substrate interaction makes different superstructures. These results show the possibility of constructing ordered molecular structures on graphene/Ru(0001), which is helpful for practical applications in the future. PMID:24615151

  7. Molecular Structures of DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases (II) from Calf Thymus and Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. F.; Blatti, S. P.; Rutter, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II has been purified to high specific activity and apparent homogeneity from both calf thymus and rat liver. Two form II enzymes are present in rat-liver preparations, one with the molecular structure [(190,000)1(150,000)1(35,000)1(25,000)1], the other with a molecular structure of [(170,000)1(150,000)1(35,000)1(25,000)1] (molecular weights are within ±5% but the absolute values are approximate). Inclusion of a proteolytic inhibitor during the isolation procedure decreases the proportion of the molecule containing the 170,000 subunit. Calf-thymus RNA polymerase preparations typically exhibit four components on polyacrylamide gels that contain sodium dodecyl sulfate, with an apparent molecular structure of [(190,000)1(150,000)1(35,000)1(25,000)1]. In addition, some calf-thymus polymerase II preparations contain small quantities of the [(170,000)1(150,000)1(35,000)1(25,000)1] species; the quantity of this species may also be increased from less than 5% in the normal preparation to at least 40% in an “aged” preparation. Thus, the 170,000 subunit may be derived from the 190,000 subunit in both tissues. Until unequivocal evidence is obtained on this point, however, the possibility that the large subunits are unique species should not be eliminated. The general structural similarity of the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II with that of the prokaryotic polymerase suggests that the modes of action and regulation may be analogous. Images PMID:5289245

  8. Cluster molecular orbital description of the electronic structures of mixed-valence iron oxides and silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.

    1986-01-01

    A molecular orbital description, based on spin-unrestricted X??-scattered wave calculations, is given for the electronic structures of mixed valence iron oxides and silicates. The cluster calculations show that electron hopping and optical intervalence charge-transger result from weak FeFe bonding across shared edges of FeO6 coordination polyhedra. In agreement with Zener's double exchange model, FeFe bonding is found to stabilize ferromagnetic coupling between Fe2+ and Fe3+ cations. ?? 1986.

  9. CHIH-DFT determination of the molecular structure and IR and UV spectra of solanidine.

    PubMed

    Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Solanidine is the steroidal aglycon of some potato glycoalkaloids and a very important precursor for the synthesis of hormones and some pharmacologically active compounds. In this work, we make use of a new chemistry model within Density Functional Theory, called CHIH-DFT, to calculate the molecular structure of solanidine, as well to predict its infrared and ultraviolet spectra. The calculated values are compared with the experimental data available for this molecule as a means of validation of our proposed chemistry model.

  10. Total assignment and structure in solution of tetrandrine by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevand, André; Stanculescu, Ioana; Mandravel, Cristina; Woisel, Patrice; Surpateanu, Gheorghe

    2004-07-01

    High-resolution 1- and 2D NMR spectra of tetrandrine and molecular modelling were employed to characterise its structure in solution. Complete and unambiguous assignment of all proton and carbon resonance signals is reported. Scalar couplings were determined from dihedral angles with the Karplus equation. Inter-proton distances were evaluated from NOE correlation peaks. Comparison of simulated and X-ray conformations of tetrandrine reveals only small differences.

  11. The molecular structure within dislocations in Cannabis sativa fibres studied by polarised Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Lisbeth G; Gierlinger, Notburga

    2013-06-01

    Polarised Raman micrsospectroscopy was employed to study the molecular structure within dislocations (slip planes) in the cell walls of Hemp fibre cells (Cannabis sativa (L.)). It was found that the cellulose microfibrils within dislocations have a different orientation than in the surrounding cell wall, and that the cellulose in the transition zones between a large dislocation and the surrounding wall may have yet another orientation. Furthermore, cellulose orientation seemed to be less uniform within dislocations than in the surrounding cell wall.

  12. Structural and energy properties of interstitial molecular hydrogen in single-crystal silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, V. V.

    2015-06-15

    The structural and energy characteristics of interstitial molecular hydrogen in single-crystal silicon are theoretically studied. The dependence of the potential energy of the system on the position and orientation of the interstitial defect is investigated, and the mechanism of interaction of a hydrogen molecule with a silicon crystal is considered. A three-dimensional model is employed to calculate the energy spectrum of H{sub 2} in Si, and the obtained dispersion law is analyzed.

  13. STEALTH: a Lagrange explicit finite difference code for solids, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 1B: user's manual - input instructions. Computer code manual. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.

    1981-11-01

    A useful computer simulation method based on the explicit finite difference technique can be used to address transient dynamic situations associated with nuclear reactor design and analysis. This volume is divided into two parts. Part A contains the theoretical background (physical and numerical) and the numerical equations for the STEALTH 1D, 2D, and 3D computer codes. Part B contains input instructions for all three codes. The STEALTH codes are based entirely on the published technology of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  14. A nitrogen-vacancy spin based molecular structure microscope using multiplexed projection reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazariev, Andrii; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan

    2015-09-01

    Methods and techniques to measure and image beyond the state-of-the-art have always been influential in propelling basic science and technology. Because current technologies are venturing into nanoscopic and molecular-scale fabrication, atomic-scale measurement techniques are inevitable. One such emerging sensing method uses the spins associated with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond. The uniqueness of this NV sensor is its atomic size and ability to perform precision sensing under ambient conditions conveniently using light and microwaves (MW). These advantages have unique applications in nanoscale sensing and imaging of magnetic fields from nuclear spins in single biomolecules. During the last few years, several encouraging results have emerged towards the realization of an NV spin-based molecular structure microscope. Here, we present a projection-reconstruction method that retrieves the three-dimensional structure of a single molecule from the nuclear spin noise signatures. We validate this method using numerical simulations and reconstruct the structure of a molecular phantom β-cyclodextrin, revealing the characteristic toroidal shape.

  15. Effects of molecular structure on microscopic heat transport in chain polymer liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Kikugawa, Gota; Bessho, Takeshi; Yamashita, Seiji; Ohara, Taku

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss the molecular mechanism of the heat conduction in a liquid, based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a systematic series of linear- and branched alkane liquids, as a continuation of our previous study on linear alkane [T. Ohara et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034507 (2011)]. The thermal conductivities for these alkanes in a saturated liquid state at the same reduced temperature (0.7Tc) obtained from the simulations are compared in relation to the structural difference of the liquids. In order to connect the thermal energy transport characteristics with molecular structures, we introduce the new concept of the interatomic path of heat transfer (atomistic heat path, AHP), which is defined for each type of inter- and intramolecular interaction. It is found that the efficiency of intermolecular AHP is sensitive to the structure of the first neighbor shell, whereas that of intramolecular AHP is similar for different alkane species. The dependence of thermal conductivity on different lengths of the main and side chain can be understood from the natures of these inter- and intramolecular AHPs.

  16. Effects of molecular structure on microscopic heat transport in chain polymer liquids.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Kikugawa, Gota; Bessho, Takeshi; Yamashita, Seiji; Ohara, Taku

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, we discuss the molecular mechanism of the heat conduction in a liquid, based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a systematic series of linear- and branched alkane liquids, as a continuation of our previous study on linear alkane [T. Ohara et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034507 (2011)]. The thermal conductivities for these alkanes in a saturated liquid state at the same reduced temperature (0.7Tc) obtained from the simulations are compared in relation to the structural difference of the liquids. In order to connect the thermal energy transport characteristics with molecular structures, we introduce the new concept of the interatomic path of heat transfer (atomistic heat path, AHP), which is defined for each type of inter- and intramolecular interaction. It is found that the efficiency of intermolecular AHP is sensitive to the structure of the first neighbor shell, whereas that of intramolecular AHP is similar for different alkane species. The dependence of thermal conductivity on different lengths of the main and side chain can be understood from the natures of these inter- and intramolecular AHPs. PMID:25933776

  17. A nitrogen-vacancy spin based molecular structure microscope using multiplexed projection reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lazariev, Andrii; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Methods and techniques to measure and image beyond the state-of-the-art have always been influential in propelling basic science and technology. Because current technologies are venturing into nanoscopic and molecular-scale fabrication, atomic-scale measurement techniques are inevitable. One such emerging sensing method uses the spins associated with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond. The uniqueness of this NV sensor is its atomic size and ability to perform precision sensing under ambient conditions conveniently using light and microwaves (MW). These advantages have unique applications in nanoscale sensing and imaging of magnetic fields from nuclear spins in single biomolecules. During the last few years, several encouraging results have emerged towards the realization of an NV spin-based molecular structure microscope. Here, we present a projection-reconstruction method that retrieves the three-dimensional structure of a single molecule from the nuclear spin noise signatures. We validate this method using numerical simulations and reconstruct the structure of a molecular phantom β-cyclodextrin, revealing the characteristic toroidal shape. PMID:26370514

  18. Effects of molecular structure on microscopic heat transport in chain polymer liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Hiroki Kikugawa, Gota; Ohara, Taku; Bessho, Takeshi; Yamashita, Seiji

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, we discuss the molecular mechanism of the heat conduction in a liquid, based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a systematic series of linear- and branched alkane liquids, as a continuation of our previous study on linear alkane [T. Ohara et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034507 (2011)]. The thermal conductivities for these alkanes in a saturated liquid state at the same reduced temperature (0.7T{sub c}) obtained from the simulations are compared in relation to the structural difference of the liquids. In order to connect the thermal energy transport characteristics with molecular structures, we introduce the new concept of the interatomic path of heat transfer (atomistic heat path, AHP), which is defined for each type of inter- and intramolecular interaction. It is found that the efficiency of intermolecular AHP is sensitive to the structure of the first neighbor shell, whereas that of intramolecular AHP is similar for different alkane species. The dependence of thermal conductivity on different lengths of the main and side chain can be understood from the natures of these inter- and intramolecular AHPs.

  19. Teaching the structure of immunoglobulins by molecular visualization and SDS-PAGE analysis.

    PubMed

    Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory class combines molecular visualization and laboratory experimentation to teach the structure of the immunoglobulins (Ig). In the first part of the class, the three-dimensional structures of the human IgG and IgM molecules available through the RCSB PDB database are visualized using freely available software. In the second part, IgG and IgM are studied using electrophoretic methods. Through SDS-PAGE analysis under reducing conditions, the students determine the number and molecular masses of the polypeptide chains, while through SDS-PAGE under nonreducing conditions, the students assess the oligomerization of these Ig molecules. The aims of this class are to expand upon the knowledge and understanding of the Ig structure that the students have gained from classroom lectures. The combination of this molecular visualization of the Ig molecules and the SDS-PAGE experimentation ensures variety in the teaching techniques, while the implication of the Ig molecules in human disease promotes interest for biomedical students.

  20. The molecular clock of neutral evolution can be accelerated or slowed by asymmetric spatial structure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Benjamin; Sample, Christine; Dementieva, Yulia; Medeiros, Ruben C; Paoletti, Christopher; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-02-01

    Over time, a population acquires neutral genetic substitutions as a consequence of random drift. A famous result in population genetics asserts that the rate, K, at which these substitutions accumulate in the population coincides with the mutation rate, u, at which they arise in individuals: K = u. This identity enables genetic sequence data to be used as a "molecular clock" to estimate the timing of evolutionary events. While the molecular clock is known to be perturbed by selection, it is thought that K = u holds very generally for neutral evolution. Here we show that asymmetric spatial population structure can alter the molecular clock rate for neutral mutations, leading to either Ku. Our results apply to a general class of haploid, asexually reproducing, spatially structured populations. Deviations from K = u occur because mutations arise unequally at different sites and have different probabilities of fixation depending on where they arise. If birth rates are uniform across sites, then K ≤ u. In general, K can take any value between 0 and Nu. Our model can be applied to a variety of population structures. In one example, we investigate the accumulation of genetic mutations in the small intestine. In another application, we analyze over 900 Twitter networks to study the effect of network topology on the fixation of neutral innovations in social evolution.

  1. Atomic and electronic structures of carbon nanotube covalent connecting with graphene by oxygen molecular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianwei; Wei, Qiang; Ma, Zengwei; Zeng, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Based on density functional theories, we have investigated the nanostructure in which boron and nitrogen co-doped carbon nanotube (CNT)/graphene (GR) were connected by an oxygen molecular. The geometry structure and electronic properties of the system were calculated carefully. The band structures indicate that the impurity state of oxygen transfer the semiconducting co-doped carbon nanotube/graphene into a semimetallic composite material. The results show that the connection can be achieved with energy release under a wider range of distance between the nanotube and graphene. It indicates that the connection between the nanotube and the graphene might be a self-assemble process.

  2. Extracting elements of molecular structure from the all-particle wave function

    SciTech Connect

    Matyus, Edit; Reiher, Markus; Hutter, Juerg; Mueller-Herold, Ulrich

    2011-11-28

    Structural information is extracted from the all-particle (non-Born-Oppenheimer) wave function by calculating radial and angular densities derived from n-particle densities. As a result, one- and two-dimensional motifs of classical molecular structure can be recognized in quantum mechanics. Numerical examples are presented for three- (H{sup -}, Ps{sup -}, H{sub 2}{sup +}), four- (Ps{sub 2}, H{sub 2}), and five-particle (H{sub 2}D{sup +}) systems.

  3. Molecular structure, function, and dynamics of clathrin-mediated membrane traffic.

    PubMed

    Kirchhausen, Tom; Owen, David; Harrison, Stephen C

    2014-05-01

    Clathrin is a molecular scaffold for vesicular uptake of cargo at the plasma membrane, where its assembly into cage-like lattices underlies the clathrin-coated pits of classical endocytosis. This review describes the structures of clathrin, major cargo adaptors, and other proteins that participate in forming a clathrin-coated pit, loading its contents, pinching off the membrane as a lattice-enclosed vesicle, and recycling the components. It integrates as much of the structural information as possible at the time of writing into a sketch of the principal steps in coated-pit and coated-vesicle formation.

  4. Molecular Structure, Function, and Dynamics of Clathrin-Mediated Membrane Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhausen, Tom; Owen, David; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Clathrin is a molecular scaffold for vesicular uptake of cargo at the plasma membrane, where its assembly into cage-like lattices underlies the clathrin-coated pits of classical endocytosis. This review describes the structures of clathrin, major cargo adaptors, and other proteins that participate in forming a clathrin-coated pit, loading its contents, pinching off the membrane as a lattice-enclosed vesicle, and recycling the components. It integrates as much of the structural information as possible at the time of writing into a sketch of the principal steps in coated-pit and coated-vesicle formation. PMID:24789820

  5. Structures of pattern recognition receptors reveal molecular mechanisms of autoinhibition, ligand recognition and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Jin, Tengchuan; Ravilious, Geoffrey; Xiao, T Sam

    2014-02-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are essential sentinels for pathogens or tissue damage and integral components of the innate immune system. Recent structural studies have provided unprecedented insights into the molecular mechanisms of ligand recognition and signal transduction by several PRR families at distinct subcellular compartments. Here we highlight some of the recent discoveries and summarize the common themes that are emerging from these exciting studies. Better mechanistic understanding of the structure and function of the PRRs will improve future prospects of therapeutic targeting of these important innate immune receptors.

  6. Structural transformations from point to extended defects in silicon: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes; Santos, Ivan; Lopez, Pedro; Aboy, Maria

    2008-11-15

    We use classical molecular dynamics simulation techniques to study how point defects aggregate to form extended defects in silicon. We have found that <110> chains of alternating interstitials and bond defects, a generalization of the Si di-interstitial structure, are metastable at room temperature but spontaneously transform into (311) defects when annealed at higher temperatures. Obtained atomic configurations and energetics are in good agreement with experiments and previous theoretical calculations. We have found a (311) structural unit which consists of two interstitial chains along <110> but arranged differently with respect to the known (311) units.

  7. Mesoscopic superposition and sub-Planck-scale structure in molecular wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Suranjana; Banerji, J.; Panigrahi, P. K.; Chiruvelli, Aravind

    2006-01-15

    We demonstrate the possibility of realizing sub-Planck-scale structures in the mesoscopic superposition of molecular wave packets involving vibrational levels. The time evolution of the wave packet, taken here as the SU(2) coherent state of the Morse potential describing hydrogen iodide molecules, produces macroscopic-quantum-superposition-like states, responsible for the above phenomenon. We investigate the phase-space dynamics of the coherent state through the Wigner function approach and identify the interference phenomena behind the sub-Planck-scale structures. The optimal parameter ranges are specified for observing these features.

  8. Spatially resolved dynamic structure factor of finite systems from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Raitza, Thomas; Roepke, Gerd; Reinholz, Heidi; Morozov, Igor

    2011-09-15

    The dynamical response of metallic clusters up to 10{sup 3} atoms is investigated using the restricted molecular dynamics simulations scheme. Exemplarily, a sodium like material is considered. Correlation functions are evaluated to investigate the spatial structure of collective electron excitations and the optical response of laser-excited clusters. In particular, the spectrum of bilocal correlation functions shows resonances representing different modes of collective excitations inside the nano plasma. The spatial structure, the resonance energy, and the width of the eigenmodes have been investigated for various values of electron density, temperature, cluster size, and ionization degree. Comparison with bulk properties is performed and the dispersion relation of collective excitations is discussed.

  9. On the molecular structure of uranium dicarbide: T-shape versus linear isomers.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, M Fernanda; Rayón, Víctor M; Largo, Antonio

    2012-03-22

    A theoretical study of the molecular structure of uranium dicarbide has been carried out employing DFT, coupled cluster, and multiconfigurational methods. A triangular species, corresponding to a (5)A(2) electronic state, has been found to be the most stable UC(2) species. A triplet linear CUC species, which has been observed in recent infrared spectroscopy experiments, lies much higher in energy. A topological analysis of the electronic density has also been carried out. The triangular species is shown to be in fact a T-shape structure with a U-C interaction which can be considered to be a closed-shell interaction.

  10. A molecular dynamics study on the structural and electronic properties of two-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster based structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kah, Cherno Baba; Yu, M.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2014-03-01

    Our previous study on one-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster (α-B12) based chain [Bulletin of APS Annual Meeting, p265 (2013)] and ring structures has prompted us to study the two-dimensional (2D) α-B12 based structures. Recently, we have carried out a systematic molecular dynamics study on the structural stabilities and electronic properties of the 2D α-B12 based structures using the SCED-LCAO method [PRB 74, 15540 (2006)]. We have considered several types of symmetry for these 2D structures such as δ3, δ4, δ6 (flat triangular), and α' types. We have found that the optimized structures are energetically in the order of δ6 < α' < δ3 < δ4 which is different from the energy order of α'< δ6 < δ4 < δ3 found in the 2D boron monolayer sheets [ACS Nano 6, 7443 (2012)]. A detailed discussion of this study will be presented. The first author acknowledges the McSweeny Fellowship for supporting his research in this work.

  11. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies. PMID:26758200

  12. In-silico bonding schemes to encode chemical bonds involving sharing of electrons in molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Punnaivanam, Sankar; Sathiadhas, Jerome Pastal Raj; Panneerselvam, Vinoth

    2016-05-01

    Encoding of covalent and coordinate covalent bonds in molecular structures using ground state valence electronic configuration is achieved. The bonding due to electron sharing in the molecular structures is described with five fundamental bonding categories viz. uPair-uPair, lPair-uPair, uPair-lPair, vPair-lPair, and lPair-lPair. The involvement of lone pair electrons and the vacant electron orbitals in chemical bonding are explained with bonding schemes namely "target vacant promotion", "source vacant promotion", "target pairing promotion", "source pairing promotion", "source cation promotion", "source pairing double bond", "target vacant occupation", and "double pairing promotion" schemes. The bonding schemes are verified with a chemical structure editor. The bonding in the structures like ylides, PCl5, SF6, IF7, N-Oxides, BF4(-), AlCl4(-) etc. are explained and encoded unambiguously. The encoding of bonding in the structures of various organic compounds, transition metals compounds, coordination complexes and metal carbonyls is accomplished.

  13. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  14. Molecular dynamics approach to water structure of HII mesophase of monoolein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Vesselin; Ivanova, Anela; Madjarova, Galia; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-02-01

    The goal of the present work is to study theoretically the structure of water inside the water cylinder of the inverse hexagonal mesophase (HII) of glyceryl monooleate (monoolein, GMO), using the method of molecular dynamics. To simplify the computational model, a fixed structure of the GMO tube is maintained. The non-standard cylindrical geometry of the system required the development and application of a novel method for obtaining the starting distribution of water molecules. A predictor-corrector schema is employed for generation of the initial density of water. Molecular dynamics calculations are performed at constant volume and temperature (NVT ensemble) with 1D periodic boundary conditions applied. During the simulations the lipid structure is kept fixed, while the dynamics of water is unrestrained. Distribution of hydrogen bonds and density as well as radial distribution of water molecules across the water cylinder show the presence of water structure deep in the cylinder (about 6 Å below the GMO heads). The obtained results may help understanding the role of water structure in the processes of insertion of external molecules inside the GMO/water system. The present work has a semi-quantitative character and it should be considered as the initial stage of more comprehensive future theoretical studies.

  15. Structure of DPPC-hyaluronan interfacial layers - effects of molecular weight and ion composition.

    PubMed

    Wieland, D C Florian; Degen, Patrick; Zander, Thomas; Gayer, Sören; Raj, Akanksha; An, Junxue; Dėdinaitė, Andra; Claesson, Per; Willumeit-Römer, Regine

    2016-01-21

    Hyaluronan and phospholipids play an important role in lubrication in articular joints and provide in combination with glycoproteins exceptionally low friction coefficients. We have investigated the structural organization of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) Langmuir layers at the solution-air interface at different length scales with respect to the adsorption of hyaluronan (HA). This allows us to assemble a comprehensive picture of the adsorption and the resulting structures, and how they are affected by the molecular weight of HA and the presence of calcium ions. Brewster angle microscopy and grazing incident diffraction were used to determine the lateral structure at the micro- and macro scale. The data reveals an influence of HA on both the macro and micro structure of the DPPC Langmuir layer, and that the strength of this effect increases with decreasing molecular weight of HA and in presence of calcium ions. Furthermore, from X-ray reflectivity measurements we conclude that HA adsorbs to the hydrophilic part of DPPC, but data also suggest that two types of interfacial structures are formed at the interface. We argue that hydrophobic forces and electrostatic interactions play important rules for the association between DPPC and HA. Surface pressure area isotherms were used to determine the influence of HA on the phase behavior of DPPC while electrophoretic mobility measurements were used to gain insight into the binding of calcium ions to DPPC vesicles and hyaluronan.

  16. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L.; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants. PMID:27005423

  17. Molecular dynamics approach to water structure of H(II) mesophase of monoolein.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Vesselin; Ivanova, Anela; Madjarova, Galia; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-02-21

    The goal of the present work is to study theoretically the structure of water inside the water cylinder of the inverse hexagonal mesophase (H(II)) of glyceryl monooleate (monoolein, GMO), using the method of molecular dynamics. To simplify the computational model, a fixed structure of the GMO tube is maintained. The non-standard cylindrical geometry of the system required the development and application of a novel method for obtaining the starting distribution of water molecules. A predictor-corrector schema is employed for generation of the initial density of water. Molecular dynamics calculations are performed at constant volume and temperature (NVT ensemble) with 1D periodic boundary conditions applied. During the simulations the lipid structure is kept fixed, while the dynamics of water is unrestrained. Distribution of hydrogen bonds and density as well as radial distribution of water molecules across the water cylinder show the presence of water structure deep in the cylinder (about 6 Å below the GMO heads). The obtained results may help understanding the role of water structure in the processes of insertion of external molecules inside the GMO∕water system. The present work has a semi-quantitative character and it should be considered as the initial stage of more comprehensive future theoretical studies.

  18. Crystal structures reveal the molecular basis of ion translocation in sodium/proton antiporters.

    PubMed

    Coincon, Mathieu; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Nji, Emmanuel; Dotson, David L; Winkelmann, Iven; Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Cameron, Alexander D; Beckstein, Oliver; Drew, David

    2016-03-01

    To fully understand the transport mechanism of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, it is necessary to clearly establish the global rearrangements required to facilitate ion translocation. Currently, two different transport models have been proposed. Some reports have suggested that structural isomerization is achieved through large elevator-like rearrangements similar to those seen in the structurally unrelated sodium-coupled glutamate-transporter homolog GltPh. Others have proposed that only small domain movements are required for ion exchange, and a conventional rocking-bundle model has been proposed instead. Here, to resolve these differences, we report atomic-resolution structures of the same Na(+)/H(+) antiporter (NapA from Thermus thermophilus) in both outward- and inward-facing conformations. These data combined with cross-linking, molecular dynamics simulations and isothermal calorimetry suggest that Na(+)/H(+) antiporters provide alternating access to the ion-binding site by using elevator-like structural transitions. PMID:26828964

  19. Protein structure refinement via molecular-dynamics simulations: What works and what does not?

    PubMed

    Feig, Michael; Mirjalili, Vahid

    2016-09-01

    Protein structure refinement during CASP11 by the Feig group was described. Molecular dynamics simulations were used in combination with an improved selection and averaging protocol. On average, modest refinement was achieved with some targets improved significantly. Analysis of the CASP submission from our group focused on refinement success versus amount of sampling, refinement of different secondary structure elements and whether refinement varied as a function of which group provided initial models. The refinement of local stereochemical features was examined via the MolProbity score and an updated protocol was developed that can generate high-quality structures with very low MolProbity scores for most starting structures with modest computational effort. Proteins 2016; 84(Suppl 1):282-292. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Coexisting Honeycomb and Kagome Characteristics in the Electronic Band Structure of Molecular Graphene.

    PubMed

    Paavilainen, Sami; Ropo, Matti; Nieminen, Jouko; Akola, Jaakko; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-06-01

    We uncover the electronic structure of molecular graphene produced by adsorbed CO molecules on a copper (111) surface by means of first-principles calculations. Our results show that the band structure is fundamentally different from that of conventional graphene, and the unique features of the electronic states arise from coexisting honeycomb and Kagome symmetries. Furthermore, the Dirac cone does not appear at the K-point but at the Γ-point in the reciprocal space and is accompanied by a third, almost flat band. Calculations of the surface structure with Kekulé distortion show a gap opening at the Dirac point in agreement with experiments. Simple tight-binding models are used to support the first-principles results and to explain the physical characteristics behind the electronic band structures.