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Sample records for molecular target size

  1. A low molecular weight artificial RNA of unique size with multiple probe target regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitulle, C.; Dsouza, L.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Artificial RNAs (aRNAs) containing novel sequence segments embedded in a deletion mutant of Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA have previously been shown to be expressed from a plasmid borne growth rate regulated promoter in E. coli. These aRNAs accumulate to high levels and their detection is a promising tool for studies in molecular microbial ecology and in environmental monitoring. Herein a new construct is described which illustrates the versatility of detection that is possible with aRNAs. This 3xPen aRNA construct carries a 72 nucleotide insert with three copies of a unique 17 base probe target sequence. This aRNA is 160 nucleotides in length and again accumulates to high levels in the E. coli cytoplasm without incorporating into ribosomes. The 3xPen aRNA illustrates two improvements in detection. First, by appropriate selection of insert size, we obtained an aRNA which provides a unique and hence, easily quantifiable peak, on a high resolution gel profile of low molecular weight RNAs. Second, the existence of multiple probe targets results in a nearly commensurate increase in signal when detection is by hybridization. These aRNAs are naturally amplified and carry sequence segments that are not found in known rRNA sequences. It thus may be possible to detect them directly. An experimental step involving RT-PCR or PCR amplification of the gene could therefore be avoided.

  2. Molecular target size of the vanilloid (capsaicin) receptor in pig dorsal root ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Szallasi, A.; Blumberg, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The size of the vanilloid receptor was examined by high-energy radiation inactivation analysis of the binding of ({sup 3}H)resiniferatoxin to pig dorsal root ganglion membranes; it was found to be 270 {plus minus} 25 kDa. This value most likely represents the size of a receptor complex rather than of an individual subunit. Other ligand-gated cation channel complexes have reported molecular weights in this range, e.g. 300 kDa for the acetylcholine receptor.

  3. Small Molecular-Sized Artesunate Attenuates Ocular Neovascularization via VEGFR2, PKCα, and PDGFR Targets

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Yao; Yuan, Yongguang; Qian, Xiaobing; Huang, Zhen; Yang, Wei; Lin, Leilei; Zheng, Qishan; Li, Yujie; He, Huining; Gao, Qianying

    2016-01-01

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in many ocular diseases. Large molecular weight anti- vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein drugs, such as Avastin and Lucentis, have saved the vision of millions. However, approximately 20–30% of patients respond poorly to anti-VEGF treatment. We found that artesunate (ART), a small molecular derivative of artemisinin, had a significant inhibitory effect on ocular NV by downregulating the expression of VEGFR2, PKCα, and PDGFR. ART significantly inhibited retinal NV in rabbits and macular edema in monkeys with greater anterior chamber penetrability and more durable efficacy than Avastin. Our pilot study showed that intravitreal injection of 80 μg ART significantly inhibited iris and corneal NV in a severe retinal detachment case. Our results suggest that ART might be a potential persistent small-molecule drug to manage ocular NV via multi-targets. PMID:27480521

  4. Molecular Size and Raoult's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    1985-01-01

    The concept of an ideal solution is ordinarily introduced in freshman chemistry by means of Raoult's Law, which states that the vapor pressure of a volatile component of a solution is proportional to its mole fraction. The relationship of this law to molecular size is discussed. (JN)

  5. Molecular-sized fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Igor I.; Shiryaev, Andrey A.; Rendler, Torsten; Steinert, Steffen; Lee, Sang-Yun; Antonov, Denis; Vörös, Márton; Jelezko, Fedor; Fisenko, Anatolii V.; Semjonova, Lubov F.; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Lebedev, Oleg I.; Sildos, Ilmo; Hemmer, Philip. R.; Konov, Vitaly I.; Gali, Adam; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Doping of carbon nanoparticles with impurity atoms is central to their application. However, doping has proven elusive for very small carbon nanoparticles because of their limited availability and a lack of fundamental understanding of impurity stability in such nanostructures. Here, we show that isolated diamond nanoparticles as small as 1.6 nm, comprising only ~400 carbon atoms, are capable of housing stable photoluminescent colour centres, namely the silicon vacancy (SiV). Surprisingly, fluorescence from SiVs is stable over time, and few or only single colour centres are found per nanocrystal. We also observe size-dependent SiV emission supported by quantum-chemical simulation of SiV energy levels in small nanodiamonds. Our work opens the way to investigating the physics and chemistry of molecular-sized cubic carbon clusters and promises the application of ultrasmall non-perturbative fluorescent nanoparticles as markers in microscopy and sensing.

  6. [Molecular targets in colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Borner, M M

    2006-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Switzerland. The nihilism that dominated the treatment of these patients for decades has been replaced by a measure of enthusiasm, given recent therapeutic advances. New anticancer drugs such as irinotecan and oxaliplatin have changed the standard chemotherapy treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, the real hype has come from molecular targeted therapy. Identification of cellular processes characteristic of colon cancer has permitted therapeutic targeting with favorable therapeutic index. Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor in the clinic has provided proof of principle that interruption of signal transduction cascades in patients has therapeutic potential. Angiogenesis, especially the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway, has been proven to be another highly successful molecular target. In this article, we will review molecular targets, which are under active clinical investigation in colon cancer.

  7. Cardiotoxicity of Molecularly Targeted Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hedhli, Nadia; Russell, Kerry S

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity of molecularly targeted cancer agents is increasingly recognized as a significant side effect of chemotherapy. These new potent therapies may not only affect the survival of cancer cells, but have the potential to adversely impact normal cardiac and vascular function. Unraveling the mechanisms by which these therapies affect the heart and vasculature is crucial for improving drug design and finding alternative therapies to protect patients predisposed to cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the classification and side effects of currently approved molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics. PMID:22758623

  8. Targeted Molecular Therapies for SBMA.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Malik, Bilal; Greensmith, Linda

    2016-03-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset neuromuscular disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor gene which results in progressive spinal and bulbar motor neuron degeneration, and muscle atrophy. Although the causative genetic defect is known, until recently, the molecular pathogenesis of the disease was unclear, resulting in few, if any, targets for therapy development. However, over the past decade, our understanding of the pathomechanisms that play a role in SBMA has increased dramatically, and several of these pathways and mechanisms have now been investigated as possible therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss some of the key pathomechanisms implicated in SBMA and describe some of the therapeutic strategies that have been tested in SBMA to date, which fall into four main categories: (i) gene silencing; (ii) protein quality control and/or increased protein degradation; (iii) androgen deprivation; and (iv) modulation of AR function. Finally, it is also now clear that in addition to a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie disease, the development of an effective disease modifying therapy for SBMA will require the coordinated, collaborative effort of research teams with diverse areas of expertise, clinicians, pharmaceutical companies as well as patient groups.

  9. Molecular structure of rat brain apamin receptor: differential photoaffinity labeling of putative K/sup +/ channel subunits and target size analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Seagar, M.J.; Labbe-Jullie, C.; Granier, C.; Goll, A.; Glossmann, H.; Rietschoten, J.V.; Couraud, F.

    1986-07-01

    Two photoreactive apamin derivatives were prepared with an aryl azide group coupled at different positions on the neurotoxin molecule. These ligands were used to identify membrane components in the environment of the neuronal binding site that is associated with a Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/ channel. /sup 125/I-(..cap alpha..-ANPAA-Cys/sub 1/)apamin labeled a single M/sub r/ 86,000 chain in cultured neurons whereas two bands corresponding to M/sub r/ 86,000 and 59,000 were detected in synaptic membrane preparations, suggesting that the M/sub r/ 59,000 polypeptide may be a degradation product. Randomly modified /sup 125/I-ANPAA-apamin gave a cross-linking profile equivalent to the sum of those obtained with the two defined derivatives. The apamin binding site seems to be located at the frontier between three or more putative K/sup +/ channel subunits which are only accessible from limited regions of the receptor-associated photoprobe. Irradiation of frozen rat brain membranes with high-energy electrons led to a reduction in /sup 125/I-apamin receptor capacity, yielding a target size for the functional binding unit of M/sub r/ 84,000-115,000, which could be constituted by the M/sub r/ 86,000 subunit alone or by the M/sub r/ 86,000 subunit in conjunction with one of the two smaller subunits.

  10. Tamoxifen Resistance: Emerging Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Villegas, Victoria E; Rangel, Nelson; Sánchez, Magda Carolina; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2016-08-19

    17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of breast cancer. As a result, blockade of the E2 signal through either tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors is an important therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, resistance to TAM is the major obstacle in endocrine therapy. This resistance occurs either de novo or is acquired after an initial beneficial response. The underlying mechanisms for TAM resistance are probably multifactorial and remain largely unknown. Considering that breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and patients respond differently to treatment, the molecular analysis of TAM's biological activity could provide the necessary framework to understand the complex effects of this drug in target cells. Moreover, this could explain, at least in part, the development of resistance and indicate an optimal therapeutic option. This review highlights the implications of TAM in breast cancer as well as the role of receptors/signal pathways recently suggested to be involved in the development of TAM resistance. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, Androgen Receptor and Hedgehog signaling pathways are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic indicators for breast cancer, based on their ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in ERα-positive or -negative breast cancer.

  11. Tamoxifen Resistance: Emerging Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Villegas, Victoria E.; Rangel, Nelson; Sánchez, Magda Carolina; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of breast cancer. As a result, blockade of the E2 signal through either tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors is an important therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, resistance to TAM is the major obstacle in endocrine therapy. This resistance occurs either de novo or is acquired after an initial beneficial response. The underlying mechanisms for TAM resistance are probably multifactorial and remain largely unknown. Considering that breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and patients respond differently to treatment, the molecular analysis of TAM’s biological activity could provide the necessary framework to understand the complex effects of this drug in target cells. Moreover, this could explain, at least in part, the development of resistance and indicate an optimal therapeutic option. This review highlights the implications of TAM in breast cancer as well as the role of receptors/signal pathways recently suggested to be involved in the development of TAM resistance. G protein—coupled estrogen receptor, Androgen Receptor and Hedgehog signaling pathways are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic indicators for breast cancer, based on their ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in ERα-positive or -negative breast cancer. PMID:27548161

  12. Molecular size of aquatic humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Wershaw, R. L.; Malcolm, R.L.; Pinckney, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Aquatic humic substances, which account for 30 to 50% of the organic carbon in water, are a principal component of aquatic organic matter. The molecular size of aquatic humic substances, determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, varies from 4.7 to 33 A?? in their radius of gyration, corresponding to a molecular weight range of 500 to greater than 10,000. The aquatic fulvic acid fraction contains substances with molecular weights ranging from 500 to 2000 and is monodisperse, whereas the aquatic humic acid fraction contains substances with molecular weights ranging from 1000 to greater than 10,000 and is generally polydisperse. ?? 1982.

  13. Ion channels: molecular targets of neuroactive insecticides.

    PubMed

    Raymond-Delpech, Valérie; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, Benedict M; Rauh, James J; Sattelle, David B

    2005-11-01

    Many of the insecticides in current use act on molecular targets in the insect nervous system. Recently, our understanding of these targets has improved as a result of the complete sequencing of an insect genome, i.e., Drosophila melanogaster. Here we examine the recent work, drawing on genetics, genomics and physiology, which has provided evidence that specific receptors and ion channels are targeted by distinct chemical classes of insect control agents. The examples discussed include, sodium channels (pyrethroids, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT), dihydropyrazoles and oxadiazines); nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (cartap, spinosad, imidacloprid and related nitromethylenes/nitroguanidines); gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (cyclodienes, gamma-BHC and fipronil) and L-glutamate receptors (avermectins). Finally, we have examined the molecular basis of resistance to these molecules, which in some cases involves mutations in the molecular target, and we also consider the future impact of molecular genetic technologies in our understanding of the actions of neuroactive insecticides.

  14. Conotoxins: Molecular and Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Richard J.

    Marine molluscs known as cone snails produce beautiful shells and a complex array of over 50,000 venom peptides evolved for prey capture and defence. Many of these peptides selectively modulate ion channels and transporters, making them a valuable source of new ligands for studying the role these targets play in normal and disease physiology. A number of conopeptides reduce pain in animal models, and several are now in pre-clinical and clinical development for the treatment of severe pain often associated with diseases such as cancer. Less than 1% of cone snail venom peptides are pharmacologically characterised.

  15. Class-Size Limits Targeted for Cuts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    At a time when policymakers are demanding budget cuts and more innovative approaches to schooling, pressure is building for loosening up constraints on class sizes. After dropping for decades, average class sizes in American schools may be growing again as schools cope with budget shortfalls. Although some educators see the rising numbers as a…

  16. Molecular tweezers targeting transthyretin amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Nelson; Pereira-Henriques, Alda; Attar, Aida; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Gales, Luís; Saraiva, Maria João; Almeida, Maria Rosário

    2014-04-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses comprise a wide spectrum of acquired and hereditary diseases triggered by extracellular deposition of toxic TTR aggregates in various organs. Despite recent advances regarding the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying TTR misfolding and pathogenic self-assembly, there is still no effective therapy for treatment of these fatal disorders. Recently, the "molecular tweezers", CLR01, has been reported to inhibit self-assembly and toxicity of different amyloidogenic proteins in vitro, including TTR, by interfering with hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions known to play an important role in the aggregation process. In addition, CLR01 showed therapeutic effects in animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Here, we assessed the ability of CLR01 to modulate TTR misfolding and aggregation in cell culture and in an animal model. In cell culture assays we found that CLR01 inhibited TTR oligomerization in the conditioned medium and alleviated TTR-induced neurotoxicity by redirecting TTR aggregation into the formation of innocuous assemblies. To determine whether CLR01 was effective in vivo, we tested the compound in mice expressing TTR V30M, a model of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, which recapitulates the main pathological features of the human disease. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses showed a significant decrease in TTR burden in the gastrointestinal tract and the peripheral nervous system in mice treated with CLR01, with a concomitant reduction in aggregate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress response, protein oxidation, and apoptosis. Taken together, our preclinical data suggest that CLR01 is a promising lead compound for development of innovative, disease-modifying therapy for TTR amyloidosis.

  17. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  18. A Targeting Microbubble for Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, James Shue-Min; Sennoga, Charles A.; McConnell, Ellen; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng-Xing; Nourshargh, Sussan; Seddon, John M.; Haskard, Dorian O.; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Microbubbles conjugated with targeting ligands are used as contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging. However, they often contain immunogenic (strept)avidin, which impedes application in humans. Although targeting bubbles not employing the biotin-(strept)avidin conjugation chemistry have been explored, only a few reached the stage of ultrasound imaging in vivo, none were reported/evaluated to show all three of the following properties desired for clinical applications: (i) low degree of non-specific bubble retention in more than one non-reticuloendothelial tissue; (ii) effective for real-time imaging; and (iii) effective for acoustic quantification of molecular targets to a high degree of quantification. Furthermore, disclosures of the compositions and methodologies enabling reproduction of the bubbles are often withheld. Objective To develop and evaluate a targeting microbubble based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry for ultrasound molecular imaging. Methods and Results Microbubbles with a previously unreported generic (non-targeting components) composition were grafted with anti-E-selectin F(ab’)2 using maleimide-thiol conjugation, to produce E-selectin targeting microbubbles. The resulting targeting bubbles showed high specificity to E-selectin in vitro and in vivo. Non-specific bubble retention was minimal in at least three non-reticuloendothelial tissues with inflammation (mouse heart, kidneys, cremaster). The bubbles were effective for real-time ultrasound imaging of E-selectin expression in the inflamed mouse heart and kidneys, using a clinical ultrasound scanner. The acoustic signal intensity of the targeted bubbles retained in the heart correlated strongly with the level of E-selectin expression (|r|≥0.8), demonstrating a high degree of non-invasive molecular quantification. Conclusions Targeting microbubbles for ultrasound molecular imaging, based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry and the generic composition described

  19. The molecular targets of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sameer S; Cantó, Carles

    2015-06-01

    Resveratrol has emerged in recent years as a compound conferring strong protection against metabolic, cardiovascular and other age-related complications, including neurodegeneration and cancer. This has generated the notion that resveratrol treatment acts as a calorie-restriction mimetic, based on the many overlapping health benefits observed upon both interventions in diverse organisms, including yeast, worms, flies and rodents. Though studied for over a decade, the molecular mechanisms governing the therapeutic properties of resveratrol still remain elusive. Elucidating how resveratrol exerts its effects would provide not only new insights in its fundamental biological actions but also new avenues for the design and development of more potent drugs to efficiently manage metabolic disorders. In this review we will cover the most recent advances in the field, with special focus on the metabolic actions of resveratrol and the potential role of SIRT1 and AMPK. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Resveratrol: Challenges in translating pre-clinical findings to improved patient outcomes.

  20. Influence of molecular size on tissue distribution of antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Sharma, Sharad; Walz, Antje C.; Lavé, Thierry; Shah, Dhaval K.

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution coefficients (BC) allow estimation of the tissue concentrations of proteins based on the plasma pharmacokinetics. We have previously established the BC values for monoclonal antibodies. Here, this concept is extended by development of a relationship between protein size and BC values. The relationship was built by deriving the BC values for various antibody fragments of known molecular weight from published biodistribution studies. We found that there exists a simple exponential relationship between molecular weight and BC values that allows the prediction of tissue distribution of proteins based on molecular weight alone. The relationship was validated by a priori predicting BC values of 4 antibody fragments that were not used in building the relationship. The relationship was also used to derive BC50 values for all the tissues, which is the molecular weight increase that would result in 50% reduction in tissue uptake of a protein. The BC50 values for most tissues were found to be ~35 kDa. An ability to estimate tissue distribution of antibody fragments based on the BC vs. molecular size relationship established here may allow better understanding of the biologics concentrations in tissues responsible for efficacy or toxicity. This relationship can also be applied for rational development of new biotherapeutic modalities with optimal biodistribution properties to target (or avoid) specific tissues. PMID:26496429

  1. Influence of molecular size on tissue distribution of antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Sharma, Sharad; Walz, Antje C; Lavé, Thierry; Shah, Dhaval K

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution coefficients (BC) allow estimation of the tissue concentrations of proteins based on the plasma pharmacokinetics. We have previously established the BC values for monoclonal antibodies. Here, this concept is extended by development of a relationship between protein size and BC values. The relationship was built by deriving the BC values for various antibody fragments of known molecular weight from published biodistribution studies. We found that there exists a simple exponential relationship between molecular weight and BC values that allows the prediction of tissue distribution of proteins based on molecular weight alone. The relationship was validated by a priori predicting BC values of 4 antibody fragments that were not used in building the relationship. The relationship was also used to derive BC50 values for all the tissues, which is the molecular weight increase that would result in 50% reduction in tissue uptake of a protein. The BC50 values for most tissues were found to be ~35 kDa. An ability to estimate tissue distribution of antibody fragments based on the BC vs. molecular size relationship established here may allow better understanding of the biologics concentrations in tissues responsible for efficacy or toxicity. This relationship can also be applied for rational development of new biotherapeutic modalities with optimal biodistribution properties to target (or avoid) specific tissues.

  2. [Non oncologic applications of molecular targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Khaled, Wassef; de la Motte Rouge, Thibault; Amirault, Jean-Christophe; Vignot, Stéphane

    2012-10-01

    Significant improvements in the knowledge of cancer biology have permitted the development of new molecular targeted therapies. Meanwhile, a better understanding of the physiology of various non-cancerous diseases has allowed developing these agents in other areas. This review intends to illustrate these perspectives through examples corresponding to different strategies of molecular-targeted therapies : use of a monoclonal antibody binding a receptor (rituximab and rheumatoid arthritis) or a ligand (bevacizumab and age-related macular degeneration), tyrosine kinase inhibitor (imatinib and systemic sclerosis) or inhibitor of cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways (immunosuppressive and antiproliferative effects of mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] inhibitors). Clinical results can draw today what could become molecular medicine of tomorrow.

  3. Experience with block targets of small size

    SciTech Connect

    van den Brandt, B.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; Webler, M. )

    1989-05-05

    The polarized proton and deuteron targets using alcohols doped with porphyrexide are made. This fabrication takes place in a He-3 refrigerator, representing an attractive alternative to the standard beads. A single measurement of the polarization gave the preliminary result of 55%.(AIP)

  4. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This review considers how recent advances in the physiology of ion channels and other potential molecular targets, in conjunction with new information on the genetics of idiopathic epilepsies, can be applied to the search for improved antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Marketed AEDs predominantly target voltage-gated cation channels (the α subunits of voltage-gated Na+ channels and also T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels) or influence GABA-mediated inhibition. Recently, α2–δ voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and the SV2A synaptic vesicle protein have been recognized as likely targets. Genetic studies of familial idiopathic epilepsies have identified numerous genes associated with diverse epilepsy syndromes, including genes encoding Na+ channels and GABAA receptors, which are known AED targets. A strategy based on genes associated with epilepsy in animal models and humans suggests other potential AED targets, including various voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and auxiliary proteins, A- or M-type voltage-gated K+ channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent progress in ion channel research brought about by molecular cloning of the channel subunit proteins and studies in epilepsy models suggest additional targets, including G-protein-coupled receptors, such as GABAB and metabotropic glutamate receptors; hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel subunits, responsible for hyperpolarization-activated current Ih; connexins, which make up gap junctions; and neurotransmitter transporters, particularly plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for GABA and glutamate. New information from the structural characterization of ion channels, along with better understanding of ion channel function, may allow for more selective targeting. For example, Na+ channels underlying persistent Na+ currents or GABAA receptor isoforms responsible for tonic (extrasynaptic) currents represent attractive targets. The growing understanding of the

  5. [Anti-angiogenesis and molecular targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akihiko; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-08-01

    Tumor angiogenesis contributes to the development of tumor progression. Several vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF)-targeted agents, administered either as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy, have been shown to benefit patients with advanced-stage malignancies. In particular, bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that specifically targets VEGF, inhibiting angiogenesis, thereby impeding tumor growth and survival. It is also possible that combined VEGF and the epidermal growth factor (EGFR) pathway blockade could further enhance antitumor efficacy and help prevent resistance to therapy. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown new various molecular targets and the functional characteristics of tumor angiogenesis, which may provide strategies for improving the therapeutic benefit.

  6. Size-varying small target detection for infrared image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Zhu, Ran; Long, Yunli; An, Wei; Zhou, Yiyu

    2015-10-01

    IRST (Infrared Search and Track) has been applied to many military or civil fields such as precise guidance, aerospace, early warning. As a key technique, small target detection based on infrared image plays an important role. However, infrared targets have their own characteristics, such as target size variation, which make the detection work quite difficult. In practical application, the target size may vary due to many reasons, such as optic angle of sensors, imaging distance, environment and so on. For conventional detection methods, it is difficult to detect such size-varying targets, especially when the backgrounds have strong clutters. This paper presents a novel method to detect size-varying infrared targets in a cluttered background. It is easy to find that the target region is salient in infrared images. It means that target region have a signature of discontinuity with its neighboring regions and concentrates in a relatively small region, which can be considered as a homogeneous compact region, and the background is consistent with its neighboring regions. Motivated by the saliency feature and gradient feature, we introduce minimum target intensity (MTI) to measure the dissimilarity between different scales, and use mean gradient to restrict the target scale in a reasonable range. They are integrated to be multiscale MTI filter. The proposed detection method is designed based on multiscale MTI filter. Firstly, salient region is got by morphological low-pass filtering, where the potential target exists in. Secondly, the candidate target regions are extracted by multiscale minimum target intensity filter, which can effectively give the optimal target size. At last, signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) is used to segment targets, which is computed based on optimal scale of candidate targets. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method can achieve both higher detection precision and robustness in complex background.

  7. Molecular Targeted Intervention for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Pant, Shubham; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the worst cancers, with almost uniform lethality. PC risk is associated with westernized diet, tobacco, alcohol, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, and family history of pancreatic cancer. New targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations have yet to provide adequate treatments for patients with advanced cancer. To design better preventive and/or treatment strategies against PC, knowledge of PC pathogenesis at the molecular level is vital. With the advent of genetically modified animals, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology and pathogenesis of PC. Currently, several clinical trials and preclinical evaluations are underway to investigate novel agents that target signaling defects in PC. An important consideration in evaluating novel drugs is determining whether an agent can reach the target in concentrations effective to treat the disease. Recently, we have reported evidence for chemoprevention of PC. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of current updates on molecularly targeted interventions, as well as dietary, phytochemical, immunoregulatory, and microenvironment-based approaches for the development of novel therapeutic and preventive regimens. Special attention is given to prevention and treatment in preclinical genetically engineered mouse studies and human clinical studies. PMID:26266422

  8. Liposarcoma: molecular targets and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Bill, Kate Lynn J; Casadei, Lucia; Prudner, Bethany C; Iwenofu, Hans; Strohecker, Anne M; Pollock, Raphael E

    2016-10-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma and accounts for approximately 20 % of all adult sarcomas. Current treatment modalities (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) all have limitations; therefore, molecularly driven studies are needed to improve the identification and increased understanding of genetic and epigenetic deregulations in LPS if we are to successfully target specific tumorigenic drivers. It can be anticipated that such biology-driven therapeutics will improve treatments by selectively deleting cancer cells while sparing normal tissues. This review will focus on several therapeutically actionable molecular markers identified in well-differentiated LPS and dedifferentiated LPS, highlighting their potential clinical applicability.

  9. Molecular imaging with targeted contrast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Mark; Allroggen, Achim; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound uses targeted microbubbles that are retained in diseased tissue. The resonant properties of these microbubbles produce acoustic signals in an ultrasound field. The microbubbles are targeted to diseased tissue by using certain chemical constituents in the microbubble shell or by attaching disease-specific ligands such as antibodies to the microbubble. In this review, we discuss the applications of this technique to pathological states in the cerebrovascular system including atherosclerosis, tumor angiogenesis, ischemia, intravascular thrombus, and inflammation.

  10. High efficiency diffusion molecular retention tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanyan; Yuan, Hushan; Cho, Hoonsung; Kuruppu, Darshini; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Agarwal, Aayush; Shah, Khalid; Josephson, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR) tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT) injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding) and RAD (control) probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for (111) In(3+)), a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or i.v. methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [(111)In] RGD and [(111)In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [(111)In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by i.v.). The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide), which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters) for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light.

  11. Molecular Pathophysiology of Priapism: Emerging Targets

    PubMed Central

    Anele, Uzoma A.; Morrison, Belinda F.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Priapism is an erectile disorder involving uncontrolled, prolonged penile erection without sexual purpose, which can lead to erectile dysfunction. Ischemic priapism, the most common of the variants, occurs with high prevalence in patients with sickle cell disease. Despite the potentially devastating complications of this condition, management of recurrent priapism episodes historically has commonly involved reactive treatments rather than preventative strategies. Recently, increasing elucidation of the complex molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder, principally involving dysregulation of nitric oxide signaling, has allowed for greater insights and exploration into potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the multiple molecular regulatory pathways implicated in the pathophysiology of priapism. We also identify the roles and mechanisms of molecular effectors in providing the basis for potential future therapies. PMID:25392014

  12. New molecular targets in bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Santini, D; Galluzzo, S; Zoccoli, A; Pantano, F; Fratto, M E; Vincenzi, B; Lombardi, L; Gucciardino, C; Silvestris, N; Riva, E; Rizzo, S; Russo, A; Maiello, E; Colucci, G; Tonini, G

    2010-11-01

    Bone metastases have a major impact on morbidity and on mortality in cancer patients. Despite its clinical relevance, metastasis remains the most poorly elucidated aspect of carcinogenesis. The biological mechanisms leading to bone metastasis establishment have been referred as "vicious circle," a complex network between cancer cells and the bone microenvironment. This review is aimed to underline the new molecular targets in bone metastases management other than bisphosphonates. Different pathways or molecules such as RANK/RANKL/OPG, cathepsin K, endothelin-1, Wnt/DKK1, Src have recently emerged as potential targets and nowadays preclinical and clinical trials are underway. The results from those in the advanced clinical phases are encouraging and underlined the need to design large randomised clinical trials to validate these results in the next future. Targeting the bone by preventing skeletal related events (SREs) and bone metastases has major clinical impact in improving survival in bone metastatic patients and in preventing disease relapse in adjuvant setting.

  13. Molecularly targeted therapies in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Feda; Luderer, Micah; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients will eventually relapse or become refractory to the treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is the resistance to therapy. Novel agents are currently in development for the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM, including immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, cell signaling targeted therapies, and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment. We have previously reviewed in detail the contemporary immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies therapies for MM. Therefore, in this review, we focused on the role of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, including cell signaling targeted therapies (HDAC, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Hsp90, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and cell cycle) and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment (hypoxia, angiogenesis, integrins, CD44, CXCR4, and selectins). Although these novel agents have improved the therapeutic outcomes for MM patients, further development of new therapeutic agents is warranted.

  14. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles.

  15. Molecular Imaging of Immunotherapy Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.; England, Christopher G.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising alternative in the arsenal against cancer by harnessing the power of the immune system to specifically target malignant tissues. As the field of immunotherapy continues to expand, researchers will require newer methods for studying the interactions between the immune system, tumor cells, and immunotherapy agents. Recently, several noninvasive imaging strategies have been used to map the biodistribution of immune checkpoint molecules, monitor the efficacy and potential toxicities of the treatments, and identify patients who are likely to benefit from immunotherapies. In this review, we outline the current applications of noninvasive techniques for the preclinical imaging of immunotherapy targets and suggest future pathways for molecular imaging to contribute to this developing field. PMID:27469363

  16. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM): Molecular insights lead to targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Connie G.; Steagall, Wendy K.; Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Cai, Xiong; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Moses, Marsha; Darling, Thomas; Moss, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Summary LAM is a rare lung disease, found primarily in women of childbearing age, characterized by cystic lung destruction and abdominal tumors (e.g., renal angiomyolipoma, lymphangioleiomyoma). The disease results from proliferation of a neoplastic cell, termed the LAM cell, which has mutations in either of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 or TSC2 genes. Molecular phenotyping of LAM patients resulted in the identification of therapeutic targets for drug trials. Loss of TSC gene function leads to activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and thereby, effects on cell size and number. The involvement of mTOR in LAM pathogenesis is the basis for initiation of therapeutic trials of mTOR inhibitors (e.g., sirolimus). Occurrence of LAM essentially entirely in women is consistent with the hypothesis that anti-estrogen agents might prevent disease progression (e.g., gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues). Levels of urinary matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were elevated in LAM patients, and MMPs were found in LAM lung nodules. In part because of these observations, effects of doxycycline, an anti-MMP, and anti-angiogenic agent, are under investigation. The metastatic properties of LAM cells offer additional potential for targets. Thus, insights into the molecular and biological properties of LAM cells and molecular phenotyping of patients with LAM have led to clinical trials of targeted therapies. Funded by the Intramural Research Program, NIH/NHLBI PMID:20630348

  17. Novel molecular targets for antimalarial chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jana, Snehasis; Paliwal, Jyoti

    2007-07-01

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites is a serious public health problem in the tropical world. Malaria control has relied upon the traditional quinoline, antifolate and artemisinin compounds. Very few new antimalarials were developed in the last quarter of the 20th century. An alarming increase in drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasite poses a significant problem for effective control. Recent advances in our knowledge of parasite biology as well as the availability of the genome sequence provide a wide range of novel targets for drug design. Gene products involved in controlling vital aspects of parasite metabolism and organelle function could be attractive targets. It is expected that the application of functional genomic tools in combination with modern approaches such as structure-based drug design and combinatorial chemistry will lead to the development of effective new drugs against drug-resistant malaria strains. This review discusses novel molecular targets of the malaria parasite available to the drug discovery scientist.

  18. Vascular targeting of nanoparticles for molecular imaging of diseased endothelium.

    PubMed

    Atukorale, Prabhani U; Covarrubias, Gil; Bauer, Lisa; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2016-09-15

    This review seeks to highlight the enormous potential of targeted nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications. Being the closest point-of-contact, circulating nanoparticles can gain direct access to targetable molecular markers of disease that appear on the endothelium. Further, nanoparticles are ideally suitable to vascular targeting due to geometrically enhanced multivalent attachment on the vascular target. This natural synergy between nanoparticles, vascular targeting and molecular imaging can provide new avenues for diagnosis and prognosis of disease with quantitative precision. In addition to the obvious applications of targeting molecular signatures of vascular diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis), deep-tissue diseases often manifest themselves by continuously altering and remodeling their neighboring blood vessels (e.g., cancer). Thus, the remodeled endothelium provides a wide range of targets for nanoparticles and molecular imaging. To demonstrate the potential of molecular imaging, we present a variety of nanoparticles designed for molecular imaging of cancer or atherosclerosis using different imaging modalities.

  19. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D.; Iverson, Nicole M.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T.; Landry, Markita P.; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications. PMID:26742890

  20. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D; Iverson, Nicole M; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T; Landry, Markita P; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S

    2016-01-08

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications.

  1. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D.; Iverson, Nicole M.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T.; Landry, Markita P.; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications.

  2. Apoptosis and Molecular Targeting Therapy in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed; Watari, Hidemichi; AbuAlmaaty, Ali; Ohba, Yusuke; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is the programmed cell death which maintains the healthy survival/death balance in metazoan cells. Defect in apoptosis can cause cancer or autoimmunity, while enhanced apoptosis may cause degenerative diseases. The apoptotic signals contribute into safeguarding the genomic integrity while defective apoptosis may promote carcinogenesis. The apoptotic signals are complicated and they are regulated at several levels. The signals of carcinogenesis modulate the central control points of the apoptotic pathways, including inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). The tumor cells may use some of several molecular mechanisms to suppress apoptosis and acquire resistance to apoptotic agents, for example, by the expression of antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 or by the downregulation or mutation of proapoptotic proteins such as BAX. In this review, we provide the main regulatory molecules that govern the main basic mechanisms, extrinsic and intrinsic, of apoptosis in normal cells. We discuss how carcinogenesis could be developed via defective apoptotic pathways or their convergence. We listed some molecules which could be targeted to stimulate apoptosis in different cancers. Together, we briefly discuss the development of some promising cancer treatment strategies which target apoptotic inhibitors including Bcl-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for apoptosis induction. PMID:25013758

  3. Molecular-Targeted Antitumor Agents 19

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Rui; Mao, Shui-Chun; Morgan, J. Brian; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2009-01-01

    A natural product chemistry-based approach was employed to discover small molecule inhibitors of the important tumor-selective molecular target hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). Bioassay-guided isolation of an active lipid extract of a Saipan collection of the marine sponge Lendenfeldia sp. afforded the terpene-derived furanolipid furospongolide as the primary inhibitor of hypoxia-induced HIF-1 activation (IC50 2.9 μM, T47D breast tumor cells). The active component of the extract also contained one new cytotoxic scalarane sesterterpene and two previously reported scalaranes. Furospongolide blocked the induction of the downstream HIF-1 target secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and was shown to suppress HIF-1 activation by inhibiting the hypoxic induction of HIF-1α protein. Mechanistic studies indicate that furospongolide inhibits HIF-1 activity primarily by suppressing tumor cell respiration via the blockade of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I)-mediated mitochondrial electron transfer. PMID:18989978

  4. Size controlled protein nanoemulsions for active targeting of folate receptor positive cells.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Ana; Nogueira, Eugénia; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Abreu, Ana S; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Härmark, Johan; Hebert, Hans; Guebitz, Georg; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Preto, Ana; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-11-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoemulsions were produced by high pressure homogenization with a tri-block copolymer (Poloxamer 407), which presents a central hydrophobic chain of polyoxypropylene (PPO) and two identical lateral hydrophilic chains of polyethylene glycol (PEG). We observed a linear correlation between tri-block copolymer concentration and size - the use of 5mg/mL of Poloxamer 407 yields nanoemulsions smaller than 100nm. Molecular dynamics and fluorescent tagging of the tri-block copolymer highlight their mechanistic role on the size of emulsions. This novel method enables the fabrication of highly stable albumin emulsions in the nano-size range, highly desirable for controlled drug delivery. Folic Acid (FA)-tagged protein nanoemulsions were shown to promote specific folate receptor (FR)-mediated targeting in FR positive cells. The novel strategy presented here enables the construction of size controlled, functionalized protein-based nanoemulsions with excellent characteristics for active targeting in cancer therapy.

  5. Effect of environmental conditions on radiation target size analyses.

    PubMed

    Kempner, E S; Miller, J H

    1994-02-01

    Target size determinations from radiation inactivation of proteins is dependent on the physical and chemical environment of the sample during radiation exposure. Effects of temperature and physical state have already been described. Buffers, the effects of protein concentration, and the addition of small molecules are examined for several enzymes. Phosphate buffer is found to have major effects on the rate of inactivation of certain, but not all, proteins. The amount of protein in irradiated samples is significant for all enzymes studied; the nature of the specific protein used is unimportant. Neither sucrose nor other glycitols could substitute for protein in target size determinations. Certain small molecules, especially cysteamine, were effective in sparing the need for high protein levels in radiation inactivation studies of four enzyme systems.

  6. Size matters: sequential mutations in tumorigenesis may reflect the stochastic effect of mutagen target sizes.

    PubMed

    Long, Kimberly; Abuelenen, Toaa; Pava, Libia; Bastille, Maya; Blanck, George

    2011-10-01

    We tallied the number of possible mutant amino acids in proteins thought to be inactivated early in tumorigenesis and in proteins thought to be inactivated late in tumorigenesis, respectively. Proteins thought to be inactivated early in tumorigenesis, on average, have a greater number of alternative, mutant possibilities, which raises the possibility that the sequential order of mutations associated with cancer development reflects the random chance, throughout life, of a mutagen inactivating a larger versus a smaller target. The hypothesis that the temporal order of genetic changes in cancer reflects mutagen target sizes leads to novel considerations of 1) the mechanisms of the acquisition of cancer hallmarks and 2) cancer screening strategies.

  7. Determination of Molecular Size and Avogadro's Number: A Student Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandrakis, George C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment for estimating molecular size and Avogadro's number. Uses the diffusion length of iodine in air at 100 degrees Celsius as a function of time, and the change in volume of a small quantity of carbon dioxide as it goes from the solid to the gaseous state. (GA)

  8. Oligogermanes as molecular precursors for germanium(0) nanoparticles: Size control and size-dependent fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Schrick, Aaron C.; Weinert, Charles S.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Catenated germanium compounds are employed as molecular precursors for germanium(0) nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles, and their fluorescence spectra, depend on the number of catenated germanium atoms present in the precursor. - Highlights: • We have used oligogermanes for the size-specific synthesis of germanium(0) nanoparticles. • The size of the nanomaterials obtained depends directly on the degree of catenation present in the oligogermane precursor. • The nanoparticles are shown to exhibit size-dependent fluorescence. • Oligogermanes will function as useful precursors for the synthesis of a variety of nanomaterials. - Abstract: Germanium nanoparticles were synthesized in solution from novel oligogermane molecular precursors. The size of the nanoparticles obtained is directly related to the number of catenated germanium atoms present in the oligogermane precursor and the nanoparticles exhibit size-dependent fluorescence. The germanium nanoparticles were also characterized by TEM, powder XRD, FTIR, EDS and XPS methods. This method appears to be a promising new route for the synthesis of germanium nanoparticles since the size of the materials obtained can be controlled by the choice of the oligogermane used as the precursor.

  9. Radiation inactivation analysis of influenza virus reveals different target sizes for fusion, leakage, and neuraminidase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S.; Jung, C.Y.; Takahashi, M.; Lenard, J.

    1986-10-07

    The size of the functional units responsible for several activities carried out by the influenza virus envelope glycoproteins was determined by radiation inactivation analysis. Neuraminidase activity, which resides in the glycoprotein NA, was inactivated exponentially with an increasing radiation dose, yielding a target size of 94 +/- 5 kilodaltons (kDa), in reasonable agreement with that of the disulfide-bonded dimer (120 kDa). All the other activities studied are properties of the HA glycoprotein and were normalized to the known molecular weight of the neuraminidase dimer. Virus-induced fusion activity was measured by two phospholipid dilution assays: relief of energy transfer between N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)dipalmitoyl-L-alpha- phosphatidylethanolamine (N-NBD-PE) and N-(lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl)-dioleoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylethanolamine (N-Rh-PE) in target liposomes and relief of self-quenching of N-Rh-PE in target liposomes. Radiation inactivation of fusion activity proceeded exponentially with radiation dose, yielding normalized target sizes of 68 +/- 6 kDa by assay i and 70 +/- 4 kDa by assay ii. These values are close to the molecular weight of a single disulfide-bonded (HA1 + HA2) unit (75 kDa), the monomer of the HA trimer. A single monomer is thus inactivated by each radiation event, and each monomer (or some part of it) constitutes a minimal functional unit capable of mediating fusion. Virus-induced leakage of calcein from target liposomes and virus-induced leakage of hemoglobin from erythrocytes (hemolysis) both showed more complex inactivation behavior: a pronounced shoulder was present in both inactivation curves, followed by a steep drop in activity at higher radiation levels.

  10. Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Michael J.; Setola, Vincent; Irwin, John J.; Laggner, Christian; Abbas, Atheir; Hufeisen, Sandra J.; Jensen, Niels H.; Kuijer, Michael B.; Matos, Roberto C.; Tran, Thuy B.; Whaley, Ryan; Glennon, Richard A.; Hert, Jérôme; Thomas, Kelan L.H.; Edwards, Douglas D.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2009-01-01

    Whereas drugs are intended to be selective, at least some bind to several physiologic targets, explaining both side effects and efficacy. As many drug-target combinations exist, it would be useful to explore possible interactions computationally. Here, we compared 3,665 FDA-approved and investigational drugs against hundreds of targets, defining each target by its ligands. Chemical similarities between drugs and ligand sets predicted thousands of unanticipated associations. Thirty were tested experimentally, including the antagonism of the β1 receptor by the transporter inhibitor Prozac, the inhibition of the 5-HT transporter by the ion channel drug Vadilex, and antagonism of the histamine H4 receptor by the enzyme inhibitor Rescriptor. Overall, 23 new drug-target associations were confirmed, five of which were potent (< 100 nM). The physiological relevance of one such, the drug DMT on serotonergic receptors, was confirmed in a knock-out mouse. The chemical similarity approach is systematic and comprehensive, and may suggest side-effects and new indications for many drugs. PMID:19881490

  11. Targets for molecular therapy of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Green, Cheryl L; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-02-01

    Cancers of the skin encompass the first and second most common neoplasms in the United States, epidermal basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively, as well as the melanocytic malignancy, malignant melanoma (MM). Recently identified alterations in the function of specific genes in these cancers provide new potential therapeutic targets. These alterations affect conserved regulators of cellular proliferation and viability, including the Sonic Hedgehog, Ras/Raf, ARF/p53, p16(INK4A)/CDK4/Rb and NF-kappaB pathways. New modalities designed to target these specific proteins may represent promising approaches to therapy of human skin cancers.

  12. Method of assembly of molecular-sized nets and scaffolding

    DOEpatents

    Michl, Josef; Magnera, Thomas F.; David, Donald E.; Harrison, Robin M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and starting materials for forming molecular-sized grids or nets, or other structures based on such grids and nets, by creating molecular links between elementary molecular modules constrained to move in only two directions on an interface or surface by adhesion or bonding to that interface or surface. In the methods of this invention, monomers are employed as the building blocks of grids and more complex structures. Monomers are introduced onto and allowed to adhere or bond to an interface. The connector groups of adjacent adhered monomers are then polymerized with each other to form a regular grid in two dimensions above the interface. Modules that are not bound or adhered to the interface are removed prior to reaction of the connector groups to avoid undesired three-dimensional cross-linking and the formation of non-grid structures. Grids formed by the methods of this invention are useful in a variety of applications, including among others, for separations technology, as masks for forming regular surface structures (i.e., metal deposition) and as templates for three-dimensional molecular-sized structures.

  13. Method of assembly of molecular-sized nets and scaffolding

    DOEpatents

    Michl, J.; Magnera, T.F.; David, D.E.; Harrison, R.M.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention relates to methods and starting materials for forming molecular-sized grids or nets, or other structures based on such grids and nets, by creating molecular links between elementary molecular modules constrained to move in only two directions on an interface or surface by adhesion or bonding to that interface or surface. In the methods of this invention, monomers are employed as the building blocks of grids and more complex structures. Monomers are introduced onto and allowed to adhere or bond to an interface. The connector groups of adjacent adhered monomers are then polymerized with each other to form a regular grid in two dimensions above the interface. Modules that are not bound or adhered to the interface are removed prior to reaction of the connector groups to avoid undesired three-dimensional cross-linking and the formation of non-grid structures. Grids formed by the methods of this invention are useful in a variety of applications, including among others, for separations technology, as masks for forming regular surface structures (i.e., metal deposition) and as templates for three-dimensional molecular-sized structures. 9 figs.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of membrane targeting antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M; Walker, Chelsea; Epand, Raquel F; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2016-05-01

    The bacterial membrane provides a target for antimicrobial peptides. There are two groups of bacteria that have characteristically different surface membranes. One is the Gram-negative bacteria that have an outer membrane rich in lipopolysaccharide. Several antimicrobials have been found to inhibit the synthesis of this lipid, and it is expected that more will be developed. In addition, antimicrobial peptides can bind to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and block passage of solutes between the periplasm and the cell exterior, resulting in bacterial toxicity. In Gram-positive bacteria, the major bacterial lipid component, phosphatidylglycerol can be chemically modified by bacterial enzymes to convert the lipid from anionic to cationic or zwitterionic form. This process leads to increased levels of resistance of the bacteria against polycationic antimicrobial agents. Inhibitors of this enzyme would provide protection against the development of bacterial resistance. There are antimicrobial agents that directly target a component of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes that can act on both Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria. Many of these are cyclic peptides with a rigid binding site capable of binding a lipid component. This binding targets antimicrobial agents to bacteria, rather than being toxic to host cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert.

  15. Size-Minimized Quantum Dots for Molecular and Cellular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Wen, Mary M.; Wang, May D.; Nie, Shuming

    Semiconductor quantum dots, tiny light-emitting particles on thenanometer scale, are emerging as a new class of fluorescent labels for a broad range of molecular and cellular applications. In comparison with organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, they have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tunable light emission, intense signal brightness, resistance to photobleaching, and broadband absorption for simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. Here we report new advances in minimizing the hydrodynamic sizes of quantum dots using multidentate and multifunctional polymer coatings. A key finding is that a linear polymer containing grafted amine and thiol coordinating groups can coat nanocrystals and lead to a highly compact size, exceptional colloidal stability, strong resistance to photobleaching, and high fluorescence quantum yields. This has allowed a new generation of bright and stable quantum dots with small hydrodynamic diameters between 5.6 and 9.7 nm with tunable fluorescence emission from the visible (515 nm) to the near infrared (720 nm). These quantum dots are well suited for molecular and cellular imaging applications in which the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size needs to be minimized. Together with the novel properties of new strain-tunable quantum dots, these findings will be especially useful for multicolor and super-resolution imaging at the single-molecule level.

  16. Molecular targeting in childhood malignancies using nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Noriko; Barisone, Gustavo; Diaz, Elva; Nitin, Nitin; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2012-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a new therapy for childhood malignancies using nanoformulated siRNA targeting Mxd3, a molecule in the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway, which we believe is important for cell survival. We plan to use cancer-specific ligands and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) to carry siRNA. This delivery system will be tested in mouse xenograft models that we developed with primary cancer tissues. Our current focus is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children. We report our progress to date.

  17. Molecular sonography with targeted microbubbles: current investigations and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Misun; Lyshchik, Andrej; Fleischer, Arthur C

    2010-06-01

    Sonography using targeted microbubbles affords a variety of diagnostic and potentially therapeutic clinical applications. It provides a whole new world of functional information at the cellular and molecular level. This information can then be used to diagnose and possibly prevent diseases at early stages as well as devise therapeutic strategies at the molecular level. It is also useful in monitoring tumor response to therapy and devising treatment timing and plans based on the molecular state of an individual's health. Moreover, targeted microbubble-enhanced sonography has several advantages over other imaging modalities, including widespread availability, low cost, fast acquisition times, and lack of radiation risk. These traits are likely to advance it as one of the imaging methods of choice in future clinical trials examining the impact of molecular imaging on treatment outcome. This review describes the fundamental concepts of targeted microbubble-enhanced sonography as well as its potential clinical applications.

  18. Molecular pathways and therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Hensing, Thomas; Simon, George R.; Dennis, Phillip A.; Otterson, Gregory A.; Bueno, Raphael; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Both histologically and molecularly lung cancer is heterogeneous. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the pathways involved in the various types of lung cancer with an emphasis on the clinical implications of the increasing number of actionable molecular targets. It describes the major pathways and molecular alterations implicated in the development and progression of non-small cell lung cancer (adenocarcinoma and squamous cancer), and of small cell carcinoma, emphasizing the molecular alterations comprising the specific blueprints in each group. The approved and investigational targeted therapies as well as the immune therapies, and clinical trials exploring the variety of targeted approaches to treatment of lung cancer are the main focus of this review. PMID:24722523

  19. Twist: a molecular target in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Chen, Han-chun; Zhang, Dianzheng; Fu, Junjiang

    2013-10-01

    Twist, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is involved in the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), which play an essential role in cancer metastasis. Overexpression of Twist or its promoter methylation is a common scenario in metastatic carcinomas. Twist is activated by a variety of signal transduction pathways, including Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Ras, and Wnt signaling. Activated Twist upregulates N-cadherin and downregulates E-cadherin, which are the hallmarks of EMT. Moreover, Twist plays an important role in some physiological processes involved in metastasis, like angiogenesis, invadopodia, extravasation, and chromosomal instability. Twist also protects cancer cells from apoptotic cell death. In addition, Twist is responsible for the stemness of cancer cells and the generation of drug resistance. Recently, targeting Twist has gained significant interests in cancer therapeutics. The inactivation of Twist by small RNA technology or chemotherapeutic approach has been proved successful. Moreover, several inhibitors which are antagonistic to the upstream or downstream molecules of Twist signaling pathways have also been identified. Development of potential treatment strategies by targeting Twist has a great promise in cancer therapeutics.

  20. Temporal precision of interceptive action: differential effects of target size and speed.

    PubMed

    Tresilian, R; Oliver, J; Carroll, J

    2003-02-01

    The duration of movements made to intercept moving targets decreases and movement speed increases when interception requires greater temporal precision. Changes in target size and target speed can have the same effect on required temporal precision, but the response to these changes differs: changes in target speed elicit larger changes in response speed. A possible explanation is that people attempt to strike the target in a central zone that does not vary much with variation in physical target size: the "effective size" of the target is relatively constant over changes in physical size. Three experiments are reported that test this idea. Participants performed two tasks: (1). strike a moving target with a bat moved perpendicular to the path of the target; (2). press on a force transducer when the target was in a location where it could be struck by the bat. Target speed was varied and target size held constant in experiment 1. Target speed and size were co-varied in experiment 2, keeping the required temporal precision constant. Target size was varied and target speed held constant in experiment 3 to give the same temporal precision as experiment 1. Duration of hitting movements decreased and maximum movement speed increased with increases in target speed and/or temporal precision requirements in all experiments. The effects were largest in experiment 1 and smallest in experiment 3. Analysis of a measure of effective target size (standard deviation of strike locations on the target) failed to support the hypothesis that performance differences could be explained in terms of effective size rather than actual physical size. In the pressing task, participants produced greater peak forces and shorter force pulses when the temporal precision required was greater, showing that the response to increasing temporal precision generalizes to different responses. It is concluded that target size and target speed have independent effects on performance.

  1. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  2. SCF(SAP) controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-04-06

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size.

  3. New Molecular Targets of Anticancer Therapy - Current Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Marianna; Muszalska, Izabela; Jelinska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer therapy involves the use of drugs or other substances affecting specific molecular targets that play a part in the development, progression and spread of a given neoplasm. By contrast, the majority of classical chemotherapeutics act on all rapidly proliferating cells, both healthy and cancerous ones. Target anticancer drugs are designed to achieve a particular aim and they usually act cytostatically, not cytotoxically like classical chemotherapeutics. At present, more than 300 biological molecular targets have been identified. The proteins involved in cellular metabolism include (among others) receptor proteins, signal transduction proteins, mRNA thread matrix synthesis proteins participating in neoplastic transformation, cell cycle control proteins, functional and structural proteins. The receptor proteins that are targeted by currently used anticancer drugs comprise the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor(VEGFR). Target anticancer drugs may affect extracellular receptor domains (antibodies) or intracellular receptor domains (tyrosine kinase inhibitors). The blocking of the mRNA thread containing information about the structure of oncogenes (signal transduction proteins) is another molecular target of anticancer drugs. That type of treatment, referred to as antisense therapy, is in clinical trials. When the synthesis of genetic material is disturbed, in most cases the passage to the next cycle phase is blocked. The key proteins responsible for the blockage are cyclines and cycline- dependent kinases (CDK). Clinical trials are focused on natural and synthetic substances capable of blocking various CDKs. The paper discusses the molecular targets and chemical structure of target anticancer drugs that have been approved for and currently applied in antineoplastic therapy together with indications and contraindications for their

  4. The linewidth-size scaling law of molecular gas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgarone, Edith; McKee, Christopher F.

    The origin of the linewidth-size (LWS) scaling law, first noticed by Larson three decades ago and ascribed to turbulence, is still a highly debated issue. Not unexpectedly, its properties depend on the environment and on the line tracer used. When the optically thick 12CO (J=1-0) line is used, a specific medium is sampled: the translucent molecular gas of moderate density that builds up the bulk of the molecular interstellar medium in galaxies like the Milky Way. The sensitivity of the 12CO line to this gas is such that the LWS is found to hold over almost five orders of magnitude in lengthscale, although with a considerable scatter (+/- 0.5 dex). It also appears to split into two regimes, depending on the gas mass surface density: below a given threshold that is proposed to be linked to the galactic structure, it bears the signature of a turbulent cascade, while above it, the scaling law is ascribed to virial balance. Large deviations from the LWS scaling law are observed at small scales where signatures of turbulent intermittency appear. The mass-size scaling law built with the 12CO (J=1-0) line also splits into two regimes. The mass surface density is uniform (also with a large scatter) above lengthscales ~ 10pc and increases with size at smaller scales, following turbulence predictions. The two thresholds define an average gas density n H ~ 300 cm-3.

  5. Molecular pathways and targets in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Beer, Tomasz M.; Evans, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer co-opts a unique set of cellular pathways in its initiation and progression. The heterogeneity of prostate cancers is evident at earlier stages, and has led to rigorous efforts to stratify the localized prostate cancers, so that progression to advanced stages could be predicted based upon salient features of the early disease. The deregulated androgen receptor signaling is undeniably most important in the progression of the majority of prostate tumors. It is perhaps because of the primacy of the androgen receptor governed transcriptional program in prostate epithelium cells that once this program is corrupted, the consequences of the ensuing changes in activity are pleotropic and could contribute to malignancy in multiple ways. Following localized surgical and radiation therapies, 20-40% of patients will relapse and progress, and will be treated with androgen deprivation therapies. The successful development of the new agents that inhibit androgen signaling has changed the progression free survival in hormone resistant disease, but this has not changed the almost ubiquitous development of truly resistant phenotypes in advanced prostate cancer. This review summarizes the current understanding of the molecular pathways involved in localized and metastatic prostate cancer, with an emphasis on the clinical implications of the new knowledge. PMID:25277175

  6. Current status of DILD in molecular targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshinobu; Gemma, Akihiko

    2012-12-01

    Molecular targeted drugs have become the mainstream for cancer therapy, and they have contributed to improving the outcome for cancer patients. On the other hand, molecular targeted drugs are associated with a variety of adverse drug reactions. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) is a typical adverse drug reaction that has been an important problem with regard to safety management during cancer treatment. In the past, there was a lack of detailed and accurate epidemiological data about DILD. However, most of the molecular targeted drugs have been subject to all-case post-marketing surveillance since gefitinib-induced ILD became a concern. These surveillance data present useful information about DILD, such as frequency of adverse events, mortality, and risk factors, and as a result, the epidemiological profile of DILD associated with molecular targeted drugs has become apparent during the past decade. Further, it has been considered that the principal management for DILD is early detection and cessation of the suspected cause. However, ILD associated with everolimus and temsirolimus requires unusual management; i.e., patients with asymptomatic ILD are allowed to continue treatment with everolimus or temsirolimus, and even after symptomatic ILD, both everolimus and temsirolimus are allowed to be readministered after the resolution of ILD. As a result of the collected data, a change has begun in the field of DILD associated with molecular targeted drugs. The features of DILD can differ for each drug, and clinicians should thus keep this information about DILD in mind while treating patients.

  7. Diverse Molecular Targets for Chalcones with Varied Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo; Xing, Chengguo

    2015-01-01

    Natural or synthetic chalcones with different substituents have revealed a variety of biological activities that may benefit human health. The underlying mechanisms of action, particularly with respect to the direct cellular targets and the modes of interaction with the targets, have not been rigorously characterized, which imposes challenges to structure-guided rational development of therapeutic agents or chemical probes with acceptable target-selectivity profile. This review summarizes literature evidence on chalcones’ direct molecular targets in the context of their biological activities. PMID:26798565

  8. The saccadic size-latency phenomenon explored: Proximal target size is a determining factor in the saccade latency.

    PubMed

    De Vries, J P; Azadi, R; Harwood, M R

    2016-12-01

    Saccade latencies are known to increase for targets presented close to fixation. Recently, it was shown that not only target eccentricity, but the size of a proximal saccade target also plays a crucial role: latencies increase rapidly with increasing target size. Interestingly, these latency increases are greater than those typically found for other supra-threshold manipulations of target properties. Here we evaluate to what extent this phenomenon is distinct from known delays in saccade initiation and whether the phenomenon is truly related to the size of a proximal target. In Experiment 1 we focus on the importance of the required amplitude. Employing a saccade adaptation paradigm we find that the required amplitude is not a determining factor. Focusing on the role of size, in Experiment 2, we find that while latency increases are strongest for targets elongated in the direction of the fovea, elongations perpendicular to this direction also lead to an increase in latencies. Finally, in Experiment 3 we verify that the latency increases are driven by the properties of the saccade target rather than visual input in general. Together these experiments provide converging evidence that the current phenomenon is both novel and a consequence of the relation between proximal target size and its eccentricity.

  9. Molecular targets that link dioxin exposure to toxicity phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Wataru; Peterson, Richard E; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2011-10-01

    Many toxicology studies have elucidated health effects associated with exposure to various chemicals, but few have identified the molecular targets that cause specific endpoints of toxicity. Our understanding of the toxicity of dioxins, a group of chemicals capable of causing toxicity at environmentally relevant levels of exposure, is no exception. Dioxins are unique compared to most chemicals that we are exposed to in the environment because they activate a high affinity receptor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), that was identified more than three decades ago. In recent years, several lines of experimental evidence have provided clues for opening the "black box" that contains the molecular mechanisms of dioxin action. These clues have emerged by toxicologists beginning to identify the molecular targets that link AhR signaling to tissue-specific toxicity phenotypes. Endpoints of dioxin toxicity for which downstream molecular targets have begun to be elucidated are observed in developmental or tissue regeneration processes, and include impaired prostate development and hydronephrosis in mouse fetuses and pups, reduced midbrain blood flow and jaw malformation in zebrafish embryos, and impaired fin regeneration in larval and adult zebrafish. Significant progress in identifying molecular targets for dioxin-induced hepatotoxicity in adult mice also has occurred. Misregulation of AhR downstream pathways, such as conversion of arachidonic acid to prostanoids via cyclooxygenase-2, and altered Wnt/β-catenin signaling downregulating Sox9, and signaling by receptors for inflammatory cytokines have been implicated in tissue-specific endpoints of dioxin toxicity. These findings may not only begin to clarify the molecular targets of dioxin action but shed light on new molecular events associated with development and disease.

  10. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) for molecular targeted therapies of tumours.

    PubMed

    Youns, Mahmoud; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Efferth, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Scientific progress in genetics, cell and molecular biology has greatly ameliorated our comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neoplastic transformation and progression. The rapidly advancing identification of molecular targets in human cancers during the last decade has provided an excellent starting point for the development of novel therapeutics. A huge variety of potential molecular targets have been identified, many of which are already in the market for therapeutic purposes. It is now becoming possible to target pathways and/or molecules that are crucial in maintaining the malignant phenotype. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is often considered as alternative or complementary medicine. TCM represents a holistic approach and lacks high-quality scientific evidence on its effectiveness. Therefore, it is frequently regarded with some scepticism by western academic medicine. In this review, we report that application of modern technologies allowed identification of novel molecular targets modulating the anti-tumour activity of natural products derived from TCM. Moreover, we tried to cross the bridge between TCM and Western modern medicine to be able to implement them for the sake of cancer patients.

  11. Molecular Targeted α-Particle Therapy for Oncologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Pandya, Darpan N.; Solingapuram Sai, Kiran Kumar; Mintz, Akiva

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A significant challenge facing traditional cancer therapies is their propensity to significantly harm normal tissue. The recent clinical success of targeting therapies by attaching them to antibodies that are specific to tumor-restricted biomarkers marks a new era of cancer treatments. CONCLUSION In this article, we highlight the recent developments in α-particle therapy that have enabled investigators to exploit this highly potent form of therapy by targeting tumor-restricted molecular biomarkers. PMID:25055256

  12. Identifying Molecular Targets For PTSD Treatment Using Single Prolonged Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0377 TITLE: Identifying Molecular Targets For PTSD Treatment Using Single ...Targets For PTSD Treatment Using Single Prolonged Stress 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0377 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...on Specific Aims 3 and 4 ahead of schedule. 15. SUBJECT TERMS PTSD, Single Prolonged Stress, Neurobiological Mechanisms 16. SECURITY

  13. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-28

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract.

  14. Combining molecular targeted agents with radiation therapy for malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Scaringi, Claudia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Minniti, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The expansion in understanding the molecular biology that characterizes cancer cells has led to the rapid development of new agents to target important molecular pathways associated with aberrant activation or suppression of cellular signal transduction pathways involved in gliomagenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and integrins signaling pathways. The use of antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib and erlotinib, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors temsirolimus and everolimus, and integrin inhibitor cilengitide, in combination with radiation therapy, has been supported by encouraging preclinical data, resulting in a rapid translation into clinical trials. Currently, the majority of published clinical studies on the use of these agents in combination with radiation and cytotoxic therapies have shown only modest survival benefits at best. Tumor heterogeneity and genetic instability may, at least in part, explain the poor results observed with a single-target approach. Much remains to be learned regarding the optimal combination of targeted agents with conventional chemoradiation, including the use of multipathways-targeted therapies, the selection of patients who may benefit from combined treatments based on molecular biomarkers, and the verification of effective blockade of signaling pathways. PMID:23966794

  15. Molecular dynamics study of micelles properties according to their size.

    PubMed

    Lebecque, S; Crowet, J M; Nasir, M N; Deleu, M; Lins, L

    2017-03-01

    Surfactants are molecules able to spontaneously self-assemble to form aggregates with well-defined properties, such as spherical micelles, planar bilayers, cylindrical micelles or vesicles. Micelles have notably several applications in many domains, such as drug delivery or membrane protein solubilization. In this context, the study of micelle formation in relation with the structural and physico-chemical properties of surfactants is of great interest to better control their use in the different application fields. In this work, we use the MD approach developed by Yoshii et al. and extend it to surfactants with different structures. We aim to systematically investigate different micellar properties as a function of the aggregates size by a molecular dynamics approach, to get an insight into the micellar organization and to collect some relevant descriptors about micelle formation. For this, we perform short MD simulations of preformed micelles of various sizes and analyze three parameters for each micelle size, namely the eccentricity of the micelles, the hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface ratio and the hydrophobic tails hydration. If these parameters are known descriptors of micelles, they were not yet studied in this way by MD. We show that eccentricity, used as "validator" parameter, exhibits minimal values when the aggregate size is close to the experimental aggregation number for surfactants that are known to form spherical micelles. This hence indicates that our methodology gives consistent results. The evolution of the two descriptors follows another scheme, with a sharp increase and decrease, respectively, followed by a leveling-off. The aggregate sizes at which this stabilization starts to occur are close to the respective aggregation number of each surfactant. In our approach, we validate the use of these descriptors to follow micelle formation by MD, from "simple" surfactants to more complex structures, like lipopeptides. Our calculations also suggest that

  16. Molecular Targeted Approaches to Cancer Therapy and Prevention Using Chalcones

    PubMed Central

    Jandial, Danielle D.; Blair, Christopher A.; Zhang, Saiyang; Krill, Lauren S.; Zhang, Yan-Bing; Zi, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging paradigm shift in oncology that seeks to emphasize molecularly targeted approaches for cancer prevention and therapy. Chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones), naturally-occurring compounds with widespread distribution in spices, tea, beer, fruits and vegetables, consist of open-chain flavonoids in which the two aromatic rings are joined by a three-carbon α, β-unsaturated carbonyl system. Due to their structural diversity, relative ease of chemical manipulation and reaction of α, β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety with cysteine residues in proteins, some lead chalcones from both natural products and synthesis have been identified in a variety of screening assays for modulating important pathways or molecular targets in cancers. These pathways and targets that are affected by chalcones include MDM2/p53, tubulin, proteasome, NF-kappa B, TRIAL/death receptors and mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathways, cell cycle, STAT3, AP-1, NRF2, AR, ER, PPAR-γ and β-catenin/Wnt. Compared to current cancer targeted therapeutic drugs, chalcones have the advantages of being inexpensive, easily available and less toxic; the ease of synthesis of chalcones from substituted benzaldehydes and acetophenones also makes them an attractive drug scaffold. Therefore, this review is focused on molecular targets of chalcones and their potential implications in cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:24467530

  17. Molecular targeting agents in cancer therapy: science and society.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Asim Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The inception of targeted agents has revolutionized the cancer therapy paradigm, both for physicians and patients. A large number of molecular targeted agents for cancer therapy are currently available for clinical use today. Many more are in making, but there are issues that remain to be resolved for the scientific as well as social community before the recommendation of their widespread use in may clinical scenarios can be done, one such issue being cost and cost effectiveness, others being resistance and lack of sustained efficacy. With the current knowledge about available targeted agents, the growing knowledge of intricate molecular pathways and unfolding of wider spectrum of molecular targets that can really matter in the disease control, calls for only the just use of the agents available now, drug companies need to make a serious attempt to reduce the cost of the agents. Research should focus on agents that show sustained responses in preclinical data. More needs to be done in laboratories and by the pharmaceutical industries, before we can truly claim to have entered a new era of targeted therapy in cancer care.

  18. Molecular Targeted Viral Nanoparticles as Tools for Imaging Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, C.F.; Sourabh, S.; Simpson, E.J.; Steinmetz, N.F.; Luyt, L.G.; Lewis, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) are a novel class of bionanomaterials that harness the natural biocompatibility of viruses for the development of therapeutics, vaccines, and imaging tools. The plant virus, cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), has been successfully engineered to create novel cancer-targeted imaging agents by incorporating fluorescent dyes, polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, and targeting moieties. Using straightforward conjugation strategies, VNPs with high selectivity for cancer-specific molecular targets can be synthesized for in vivo imaging of tumors. Here we describe the synthesis and purification of CPMV-based VNPs, the functionalization of these VNPs using click chemistry, and their use for imaging xenograft tumors in animal models. VNPs decorated with fluorescent dyes, PEG, and targeting ligands can be synthesized in one day, and imaging studies can be performed over hours, days, or weeks, depending on the application. PMID:24243252

  19. Magnetomotive molecular probes for targeted contrast enhancement and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-03-01

    The diagnostic, interrogational, and therapeutic potential of molecular probes is rapidly being investigated and exploited across virtually every biomedical imaging modality. While many types of probes enhance contrast or delivery therapy by static localization to targeted sites, significant potential exists for utilizing dynamic molecular probes. Recent examples include molecular beacons, photoactivatable probes, or controlled switchable drug-releasing particles, to name a few. In this review, we describe a novel class of dynamic molecular probes that rely on the application and control of localized external magnetic fields. These magnetomotive molecular probes can provide optical image contrast through a modulated scattering signal, can interrogate the biomechanical properties of their viscoelastic microenvironment by tracking their underdamped oscillatory step-response to applied fields, and can potentially delivery therapy through nanometer-to-micrometer mechanical displacement or local hyperthermia. This class of magnetomotive agents includes not only magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles, but also new magnetomotive microspheres or nanostructures with embedded iron-oxide agents. In vitro three-dimensional cell assays and in vivo targeting studies in animal tumor models have demonstrated the potential for multimodal detection and imaging, using magnetic resonance imaging for whole-body localization, and magnetomotive optical coherence tomography for high-resolution localization and imaging.

  20. Molecular targets for small-molecule modulators of circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    He, Baokun; Chen, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Circadian clocks are endogenous timing systems that regulate various aspects of mammalian metabolism, physiology and behavior. Traditional chronotherapy refers to the administration of drugs in a defined circadian time window to achieve optimal pharmacokinetic and therapeutic efficacies. In recent years, substantial efforts have been dedicated to developing novel small-molecule modulators of circadian clocks. Methods Here, we review the recent progress in the identification of molecular targets of small-molecule clock modulators and their efficacies in clock-related disorders. Specifically, we examine the clock components and regulatory factors as possible molecular targets of small molecules, and we review several key clock-related disorders as promising venues for testing the preventive/therapeutic efficacies of these small molecules. Finally, we also discuss circadian regulation of drug metabolism. Results Small molecules can modulate the period, phase and/or amplitude of the circadian cycle. Core clock proteins, nuclear hormone receptors, and clock-related kinases and other epigenetic regulators are promising molecular targets for small molecules. Through these targets small molecules exert protective effects against clock-related disorders including the metabolic syndrome, immune disorders, sleep disorders and cancer. Small molecules can also modulate circadian drug metabolism and response to existing therapeutics. Conclusion Small-molecule clock modulators target clock components or diverse cellular pathways that functionally impinge upon the clock. Target identification of new small-molecule modulators will deepen our understanding of key regulatory nodes in the circadian network. Studies of clock modulators will facilitate their therapeutic applications, alone or in combination, for clock-related diseases. PMID:26750111

  1. Application of Monte Carlo Methods in Molecular Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann Siantar, C; Descalle, M-A; DeNardo, G L; Nigg, D W

    2002-02-19

    Targeted radionuclide therapy promises to expand the role of radiation beyond the treatment of localized tumors. This novel form of therapy targets metastatic cancers by combining radioactive isotopes with tumor-seeking molecules such as monoclonal antibodies and custom-designed synthetic agents. Ultimately, like conventional radiotherapy, the effectiveness of targeted radionuclide therapy is limited by the maximum dose that can be given to a critical, normal tissue, such as bone marrow, kidneys, and lungs. Because radionuclide therapy relies on biological delivery of radiation, its optimization and characterization are necessarily different than for conventional radiation therapy. We have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA treatment planning system. This system calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using a set of computed tomography scans to describe the 3D patient anatomy, combined with 2D (planar image) and 3D (SPECT, or single photon emission computed tomography) to describe the time-dependent radiation source. The accuracy of such a dose calculation is limited primarily by the accuracy of the initial radiation source distribution, overlaid on the patient's anatomy. This presentation provides an overview of MINERVA functionality for molecular targeted radiation therapy, and describes early validation and implementation results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. [Advances of molecular targeted therapy in squamous cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Shucai

    2013-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4)-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lung cancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  3. The molecular targets of approved treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Marc; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, three classes of medical therapy were available for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)—prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. With the approval of the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat, an additional drug class has become available targeting a distinct molecular target in the same pathway as PDE5 inhibitors. Treatment recommendations currently include the use of all four drug classes to treat PAH, but there is a lack of comparative data for these therapies. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanistic differences between these agents is critical when making treatment decisions. Combination therapy is often used to treat PAH and it is therefore important that physicians understand how the modes of action of these drugs may interact to work as complementary partners, or potentially with unwanted consequences. Furthermore, different patient phenotypes mean that patients respond differently to treatment; while a certain monotherapy may be adequate for some patients, for others it will be important to consider alternating or combining compounds with different molecular targets. This review describes how the four currently approved drug classes target the complex pathobiology of PAH and will consider the distinct target molecules of each drug class, their modes of action, and review the pivotal clinical trial data supporting their use. It will also discuss the rationale for combining drugs (or not) from the different classes, and review the clinical data from studies on combination therapy. PMID:26219978

  4. Molecular Targets for Treating Cognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gray, John A.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia as deficits are present in the majority of patients, frequently precede the onset of other positive symptoms, persist even with successful treatment of positive symptoms, and account for a significant portion of functional impairment in schizophrenia. While the atypical antipsychotics have produced incremental improvements in the cognitive function of patients with schizophrenia, overall treatment remains inadequate. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in developing novel strategies for treating the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia, focusing on ameliorating impairments in working memory, attention, and social cognition. Here we review various molecular targets that are actively being explored for potential drug discovery efforts in schizophrenia and cognition. These molecular targets include dopamine receptors in the prefrontal cortex, nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, the glutamatergic excitatory synapse, various serotonin receptors, and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system. PMID:17617664

  5. Small sized EGFR1 and HER2 specific bifunctional antibody for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Tian, Caiping; Feng, Song; Fida, Guissi; Zhang, Congying; Ma, Yuxiang; Ai, Guanhua; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Targeting tumors using miniature antibodies is a novel and attractive therapeutic approach, as these biomolecules exhibit low immunogenicity, rapid clearance, and high targeting specificity. However, most of the small-sized antibodies in existence do not exhibit marked anti-tumor effects, which limit their use in targeted cancer immunotherapy. To overcome this difficulty in targeting multiple biomarkers by combination therapies, we designed a new bifunctional antibody, named MaAbNA (multivalent antibody comprised of nanobody and affibody moieties), capable of targeting EGFR1 and HER2, which are widely overexpressed in a variety of tumor types. The small-sized (29 kDa) MaAbNA, which was expressed in E.coli, consists of one anti-EGFR1 nanobody and two anti-HER2 affibodies, and possesses high affinity (KD) for EGFR1 (~4.1 nM) and HER2 (~4.7 nM). In order to enhance its anti-tumor activity, MaAbNA was conjugated with adriamycin (ADM) using a PEG2000 linker, forming a new complex anticancer drug, MaAbNA-PEG2000-ADM. MaAbNA exhibited high inhibitory effects on tumor cells over-expressing both EGFR1 and HER2, but displayed minimal cytotoxicity in cells expressing low levels of EGFR1 and HER2. Moreover, MaAbNA-PEG2000-ADM displayed increased tumoricidal effects than ADM or MaAbNA alone, as well exhibited greater antitumor efficacy than EGFR1 (Cetuximab) and HER2 (Herceptin) antibody drugs. The ability of MaAbNA to regulate expression of downstream oncogenes c-jun, c-fos, c-myc, as well as AEG-1 for therapeutic potential was evaluated by qPCR and western-blot analyses. The antitumor efficacy of MaAbNA and its derivative MaAbNA-PEG2000-ADM were validated in vivo, highlighting the potential for use of MaAbNA as a highly tumor-specific dual molecular imaging probe and targeted cancer therapeutic.

  6. Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    10-1-0422 TITLE: Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early PRINCIPAL...molecular imaging 7 cdrescher@fhcrc.org Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early Page 3...Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early Charles W Drescher, MD, Principle Investigator

  7. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC.

  8. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC. PMID:26755872

  9. Nanobubble-Affibody: Novel ultrasound contrast agents for targeted molecular ultrasound imaging of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengli; Cai, Wenbin; Xu, Lei; Lv, Xiuhua; Qiao, Youbei; Li, Pan; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yunyou

    2015-01-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs), as novel ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have attracted increasing attention in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging for tumors. However, the preparation of uniform-sized NBs is considered to be controversial, and poor tumor selectivity in in vivo imaging has been reported. In this study, we fabricated uniform nano-sized NBs (478.2 ± 29.7 nm with polydispersity index of 0.164 ± 0.044, n = 3) using a thin-film hydration method by controlling the thickness of phospholipid films; we then conjugated the NBs with Affibody molecules to produce nano-sized UCAs referred to as NB-Affibody with specific affinity to human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. NB-Affibody presented good ultrasound enhancement, demonstrating a peak intensity of 104.5 ± 2.1 dB under ultrasound contrast scanning. Ex vivo experiments further confirmed that the NB-Affibody conjugates were capable of targeting HER2-expressing tumor cells in vivo with high affinity. The newly prepared nano-sized NB-Affibody conjugates were observed to be novel targeted UCAs for efficient and safe specific molecular imaging and may have potential applications in early cancer quantitative diagnosis and targeted therapy in the future.

  10. Improving the embryo implantation via novel molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjie; Liang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Zijiang

    2013-07-01

    With the development of modern assisted reproductive technology(ART), the treatment of infertility and the pregnant outcome by ART have been significantly improved. However, implantation failure, particularly the unexplained repeated implantation failure (RIF), is still the unsolved and principal problem to affect the outcome of ART. The completed embryo, the receptive uterus and a series of precisely controlled molecular events between the blastocyst and endometrium are all indispensable for the success of implantation. Thus, deep insight into the molecular mechanisms that impact the endometrial receptivity and embryo implantation is an effective way to improve the implantation rate. Here the novel molecular targets and biomarkers have been reviewed that are reported and proved during more recent years in the aspects of ion channels, aquaporins, long noncoding RNAs and microRNAs, kruppel like factors, metabolism related molecules and the endogenous retroviruses. Evaluation of implantation markers may help clinicians to predict pregnancy outcome and detect occult implantation deficiency. Moreover, these novel molecular targets are expected to apply to the clinical practice from bench to bedside and improve the implantation efficiency in ART and natural conception.

  11. Multimodality molecular imaging--from target description to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Schober, O; Rahbar, K; Riemann, B

    2009-02-01

    This highlight lecture was presented at the closing session of the Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) in Munich on 15 October 2008. The Congress was a great success: there were more than 4,000 participants, and 1,597 abstracts were submitted. Of these, 1,387 were accepted for oral or poster presentation, with a rejection rate of 14%. In this article a choice was made from 100 of the 500 lectures which received the highest scores by the scientific review panel. This article outlines the major findings and trends at the EANM 2008, and is only a brief summary of the large number of outstanding abstracts presented. Among the great number of oral and poster presentations covering nearly all fields of nuclear medicine some headlines have to be defined highlighting the development of nuclear medicine in the 21st century. This review focuses on the increasing impact of molecular and multimodality imaging in the field of nuclear medicine. In addition, the question may be asked as to whether the whole spectrum of nuclear medicine is nothing other than molecular imaging and therapy. Furthermore, molecular imaging will and has to go ahead to multimodality imaging. In view of this background the review was structured according to the single steps of molecular imaging, i.e. from target description to clinical studies. The following topics are addressed: targets, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy, devices and computer science, animals and preclinical evaluations, and patients and clinical evaluations.

  12. Central and Peripheral Molecular Targets for Anti-Obesity Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Michael A.; Lin, Jieru E.; Waldman, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has emerged as one of the principle worldwide health concerns of the modern era, and there exists a tremendous unmet clinical need for safe and effective therapies to combat this global pandemic. The prevalence of obesity and its associated co-morbidities, including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, has focused drug discovery and development on generating effective modalities for the treatment and prevention of obesity. Early efforts in the field of obesity pharmacotherapy centered on agents with indeterminate mechanisms of action producing treatment paradigms characterized by significant off-target effects. During the past two decades, new insights have been made into the physiologic regulation of energy balance and the subordinate central and peripheral circuits coordinating appetite, metabolism, and lipogenesis. These studies have revealed previously unrecognized molecular targets for controlling appetite and managing weight from which has emerged a new wave of targeted pharmacotherapies to prevent and control obesity. PMID:20445536

  13. Antiepileptic drug effects on mood and behavior: molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Piero; Mula, Marco

    2013-03-01

    With almost 100 years of clinical experience, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) remain the mainstay of epilepsy treatment. They suppress epileptic seizures by acting on a variety of mechanisms and molecular targets involved in the regulation of neuronal excitability. These include inhibitory-GABAergic and excitatory-glutamatergic neurotransmission, as well as ion (sodium and calcium) conductance through voltage-gated channels. On the other hand, accruing evidence indicates that these mechanisms and targets are also implicated in the regulation of mood and behavior, which may explain why each AED is associated with specific psychotropic effects. These effects, however, cannot be explained solely on the basis of the known mode of action of each AED, and other mechanisms or targets are likely to be implicated. In this article, we review positive and negative effects of AEDs on mood and behavior, discuss putative underlying mechanisms, and highlight knowledge gaps which should be addressed in future studies.

  14. Quantifying the Ebbinghaus figure effect: target size, context size, and target-context distance determine the presence and direction of the illusion.

    PubMed

    Knol, Hester; Huys, Raoul; Sarrazin, Jean-Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, visual illusions, like the Ebbinghaus figure, have become widespread to investigate functional segregation of the visual system. This segregation reveals itself, so it is claimed, in the insensitivity of movement to optical illusions. This claim, however, faces contradictory results (and interpretations) in the literature. These contradictions may be due to methodological weaknesses in, and differences across studies, some of which may hide a lack of perceptual illusion effects. Indeed, despite the long history of research with the Ebbinghaus figure, standardized configurations to predict the illusion effect are missing. Here, we present a complete geometrical description of the Ebbinghaus figure with three target sizes compatible with Fitts' task. Each trial consisted of a stimulus and an isolated probe. The probe was controlled by the participant's response through a staircase procedure. The participant was asked whether the probe or target appeared bigger. The factors target size, context size, target-context distance, and a control condition resulted in a 3 × 3 × 3+3 factorial design. The results indicate that the illusion magnitude, the perceptual distinctiveness, and the response time depend on the context size, distance, and especially, target size. In 33% of the factor combinations there was no illusion effect. The illusion magnitude ranged from zero to (exceptionally) 10% of the target size. The small (or absent) illusion effects on perception and its possible influence on motor tasks might have been overlooked or misinterpreted in previous studies. Our results provide a basis for the application of the Ebbinghaus figure in psychophysical and motor control studies.

  15. Signal Transduction and Molecular Targets of Selected Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Diet exerts a major influence on the risk for developing cancer and heart disease. Food factors such as flavonoids are alleged to protect cells from premature aging and disease by shielding DNA, proteins, and lipids from oxidative damage. Recent Advances: Our work has focused on clarifying the effects of dietary components on cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth, discovering mechanisms to explain the effects, and identifying the specific molecular targets of these compounds. Our strategy for identifying specific molecular targets of phytochemicals involves the use of supercomputer technology combined with protein crystallography, molecular biology, and experimental laboratory verification. Critical Issues: One of the greatest challenges for scientists is to reduce the accumulation of distortion and half truths reported in the popular media regarding the health benefits of certain foods or food supplements. The use of these is not new, but interest has increased dramatically because of perceived health benefits that are presumably acquired without unpleasant side effects. Flavonoids are touted to exert many beneficial effects in vitro. However, whether they can produce these effects in vivo is disputed. Future Directions: The World Health Organization indicates that one third of all cancer deaths are preventable and that diet is closely linked to prevention. Based on this idea and epidemiological findings, attention has centered on dietary phytochemicals as an effective intervention in cancer development. However, an unequivocal link between diet and cancer has not been established. Thus, identifying cancer preventive dietary agents with specific molecular targets is essential to move forward toward successful cancer prevention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 163–180. PMID:23458437

  16. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-04-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: "uterine cervical cancer", "chemotherapy", and "targeted therapies". Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments offer only

  17. Target-size embracing dimension for sensitive detection of viruses with various sizes and influenza virus strains.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Yi; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Yang, Mei-Lin; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2012-05-15

    The focused ion beam (FIB) technique was employed to precisely fabricate hexagon-like Au nano-rods (fibAu_h) arrays as a surface enhanced Raman scattering - active substrate. A "ring diameter" (D(R)) was created by the convergence of three fibAu_h with respect to the dimension of the target viruses (D(T)), such as adenovirus (Adeno), encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), influenza virus (H1N1) with different sizes. Three influenza A virus strains were also compared. The results indicate that as that with a D(R)/D(T) ratio of around 1, the discrimination ability for detecting the target viruses and SERS mechanism become obvious. The enhanced lightning rod effect surrounding the seized target virus is anticipated if its size and dimension is suitably embraced within three fibAu_h. Hence the as-designed fibAu_h sample with a target-size embracing dimension provides good discrimination ability for distinguishing virus of various sizes or virus strains.

  18. Inter-molecular β-sheet structure facilitates lung-targeting siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jihan; Li, Dong; Wen, Hao; Zheng, Shuquan; Su, Cuicui; Yi, Fan; Wang, Jue; Liang, Zicai; Tang, Tao; Zhou, Demin; Zhang, Li-He; Liang, Dehai; Du, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Size-dependent passive targeting based on the characteristics of tissues is a basic mechanism of drug delivery. While the nanometer-sized particles are efficiently captured by the liver and spleen, the micron-sized particles are most likely entrapped within the lung owing to its unique capillary structure and physiological features. To exploit this property in lung-targeting siRNA delivery, we designed and studied a multi-domain peptide named K-β, which was able to form inter-molecular β-sheet structures. Results showed that K-β peptides and siRNAs formed stable complex particles of 60 nm when mixed together. A critical property of such particles was that, after being intravenously injected into mice, they further associated into loose and micron-sized aggregates, and thus effectively entrapped within the capillaries of the lung, leading to a passive accumulation and gene-silencing. The large size aggregates can dissociate or break down by the shear stress generated by blood flow, alleviating the pulmonary embolism. Besides the lung, siRNA enrichment and targeted gene silencing were also observed in the liver. This drug delivery strategy, together with the low toxicity, biodegradability, and programmability of peptide carriers, show great potentials in vivo applications. PMID:26955887

  19. Inter-molecular β-sheet structure facilitates lung-targeting siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jihan; Li, Dong; Wen, Hao; Zheng, Shuquan; Su, Cuicui; Yi, Fan; Wang, Jue; Liang, Zicai; Tang, Tao; Zhou, Demin; Zhang, Li-He; Liang, Dehai; Du, Quan

    2016-03-01

    Size-dependent passive targeting based on the characteristics of tissues is a basic mechanism of drug delivery. While the nanometer-sized particles are efficiently captured by the liver and spleen, the micron-sized particles are most likely entrapped within the lung owing to its unique capillary structure and physiological features. To exploit this property in lung-targeting siRNA delivery, we designed and studied a multi-domain peptide named K-β, which was able to form inter-molecular β-sheet structures. Results showed that K-β peptides and siRNAs formed stable complex particles of 60 nm when mixed together. A critical property of such particles was that, after being intravenously injected into mice, they further associated into loose and micron-sized aggregates, and thus effectively entrapped within the capillaries of the lung, leading to a passive accumulation and gene-silencing. The large size aggregates can dissociate or break down by the shear stress generated by blood flow, alleviating the pulmonary embolism. Besides the lung, siRNA enrichment and targeted gene silencing were also observed in the liver. This drug delivery strategy, together with the low toxicity, biodegradability, and programmability of peptide carriers, show great potentials in vivo applications.

  20. Targeted agri-environment schemes significantly improve the population size of common farmland bumblebee species.

    PubMed

    Wood, Thomas J; Holland, John M; Hughes, William O H; Goulson, Dave

    2015-04-01

    Changes in agricultural practice across Europe and North America have been associated with range contractions and local extinction of bumblebees (Bombus spp.). A number of agri-environment schemes have been implemented to halt and reverse these declines, predominantly revolving around the provision of additional forage plants. Although it has been demonstrated that these schemes can attract substantial numbers of foraging bumblebees, it remains unclear to what extent they actually increase bumblebee populations. We used standardized transect walks and molecular techniques to compare the size of bumblebee populations between Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) farms implementing pollinator-friendly schemes and Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) control farms. Bumblebee abundance on the transect walks was significantly higher on HLS farms than ELS farms. Molecular analysis suggested maximum foraging ranges of 566 m for Bombus hortorum, 714 m for B. lapidarius, 363 m for B. pascuorum and 799 m for B. terrestris. Substantial differences in maximum foraging range were found within bumblebee species between farm types. Accounting for foraging range differences, B. hortorum (47 vs 13 nests/km(2) ) and B. lapidarius (45 vs 22 nests/km(2) ) were found to nest at significantly greater densities on HLS farms than ELS farms. There were no significant differences between farm type for B. terrestris (88 vs 38 nests/km(2) ) and B. pascuorum (32 vs 39 nests/km(2) ). Across all bumblebee species, HLS management had a significantly positive effect on bumblebee nest density. These results show that targeted agri-environment schemes that increase the availability of suitable forage can significantly increase the size of wild bumblebee populations.

  1. Anti-cancer chalcones: Structural and molecular target perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Asati, Vivek

    2015-06-15

    Chalcone or (E)-1,3-diphenyl-2-propene-1-one scaffold remained a fascination among researchers in the 21st century due to its simple chemistry, ease of synthesis and a wide variety of promising biological activities. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones have shown anti-cancer activity due to their inhibitory potential against various targets namely ABCG2/P-gp/BCRP, 5α-reductase, aromatase, 17-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, HDAC/Situin-1, proteasome, VEGF, VEGFR-2 kinase, MMP-2/9, JAK/STAT signaling pathways, CDC25B, tubulin, cathepsin-K, topoisomerase-II, Wnt, NF-κB, B-Raf and mTOR etc. In this review, a comprehensive study on molecular targets/pathways involved in carcinogenesis, mechanism of actions (MOAs), structure activity relationships (SARs) and patents granted have been highlighted. With the knowledge of molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective anti-cancer chalcones.

  2. Target product selection - where can Molecular Pharming make the difference?

    PubMed

    Paul, Mathew J; Teh, Audrey Y H; Twyman, Richard M; Ma, Julian K-C

    2013-01-01

    Four major developments have taken place in the world of Molecular Pharming recently. In the USA, the DARPA initiative challenged plant biotechnology companies to develop strategies for the large-scale manufacture of influenza vaccines, resulting in a successful Phase I clinical trial; in Europe the Pharma-Planta academic consortium gained regulatory approval for a plant-derived monoclonal antibody and completed a first-in-human phase I clinical trial; the Dutch pharmaceutical company Synthon acquired the assets of Biolex Therapeutics, an established Molecular Pharming company with several clinical candidates produced in their proprietary LEX system based on aquatic plants; and finally, the Israeli biotechnology company Protalix Biotherapeutics won FDA approval for the commercial release of a recombinant form of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase produced in carrot cells, the first plant biotechnology-derived biopharmaceutical in the world approved for the market. Commercial momentum is gathering pace with additional candidates now undergoing or awaiting approval for phase III clinical trials. Filling the product pipeline is vital to establish commercial sustainability, and the selection of appropriate target products for Molecular Pharming will be a critical factor. An interesting feature of the four stories outlined above is that they span the use of very different platform technologies addressing different types of molecules which aim to satisfy distinct market demands. In each case, Molecular Pharming was an economically and technically suitable approach, but this decisionmaking process is not necessarily straightforward. Although the various technologies available to Molecular Pharming are broad ranging and flexible, competing technologies are better established, so there needs to be a compelling reason to move into plants. It is most unlikely that plant biotechnology will be the answer for the whole biologics field. In this article, we discuss the current plant

  3. Optimal target VOI size for accurate 4D coregistration of DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Brian; Mikheev, Artem; Zaim Wadghiri, Youssef; Bertrand, Anne; Novikov, Dmitry; Chandarana, Hersh; Rusinek, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI has emerged as a reliable and diagnostically useful functional imaging technique. DCE protocol typically lasts 3-15 minutes and results in a time series of N volumes. For automated analysis, it is important that volumes acquired at different times be spatially coregistered. We have recently introduced a novel 4D, or volume time series, coregistration tool based on a user-specified target volume of interest (VOI). However, the relationship between coregistration accuracy and target VOI size has not been investigated. In this study, coregistration accuracy was quantitatively measured using various sized target VOIs. Coregistration of 10 DCE-MRI mouse head image sets were performed with various sized VOIs targeting the mouse brain. Accuracy was quantified by measures based on the union and standard deviation of the coregistered volume time series. Coregistration accuracy was determined to improve rapidly as the size of the VOI increased and approached the approximate volume of the target (mouse brain). Further inflation of the VOI beyond the volume of the target (mouse brain) only marginally improved coregistration accuracy. The CPU time needed to accomplish coregistration is a linear function of N that varied gradually with VOI size. From the results of this study, we recommend the optimal size of the VOI to be slightly overinclusive, approximately by 5 voxels, of the target for computationally efficient and accurate coregistration.

  4. Cytoreductive surgery in the era of targeted molecular therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Arun Z.; Adibi, Mehrad; Borregales, Leonardo D.; Karam, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) was regarded standard of care for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in the immunotherapy era. With the advent of targeted molecular therapy (TMT) for the treatment of mRCC, the routine use of CN has been questioned. Up to date evidence continues to suggest that CN remains an integral part of treatment in appropriately selected patients. This review details the original context in which the efficacy of CN was established and rationale for the continued use of cytoreductive surgery in the era of TMT. PMID:26815334

  5. Molecular Targets in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline usually beginning with impairment in the ability to form recent memories. Nonavailability of definitive therapeutic strategy urges developing pharmacological targets based on cell signaling pathways. A great revival of interest in nutraceuticals and adjuvant therapy has been put forward. Tea polyphenols for their multiple health benefits have also attracted the attention of researchers. Tea catechins showed enough potentiality to be used in future as therapeutic targets to provide neuroprotection against AD. This review attempts to present a concise map of different receptor signaling pathways associated with AD with an insight into drug designing based on the proposed signaling pathways, molecular mechanistic details of AD pathogenesis, and a scientific rationale for using tea polyphenols as proposed therapeutic agents in AD.

  6. A robust close-range photogrammetric target extraction algorithm for size and type variant targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyarko, Kofi; Thomas, Clayton; Torres, Gilbert

    2016-05-01

    The Photo-G program conducted by Naval Air Systems Command at the Atlantic Test Range in Patuxent River, Maryland, uses photogrammetric analysis of large amounts of real-world imagery to characterize the motion of objects in a 3-D scene. Current approaches involve several independent processes including target acquisition, target identification, 2-D tracking of image features, and 3-D kinematic state estimation. Each process has its own inherent complications and corresponding degrees of both human intervention and computational complexity. One approach being explored for automated target acquisition relies on exploiting the pixel intensity distributions of photogrammetric targets, which tend to be patterns with bimodal intensity distributions. The bimodal distribution partitioning algorithm utilizes this distribution to automatically deconstruct a video frame into regions of interest (ROI) that are merged and expanded to target boundaries, from which ROI centroids are extracted to mark target acquisition points. This process has proved to be scale, position and orientation invariant, as well as fairly insensitive to global uniform intensity disparities.

  7. Molecular pathogenesis and targeted therapy of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2015-08-01

    Over the past few years, knowledge regarding the molecular pathology of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) has increased substantially, and a number of targeted agents have been tested in clinical trials in this tumor type. For some of these agents there is a strong biological rationale. Among them, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor Everolimus and the antiangiogenic agent Sunitinib have both been approved for the treatment of PNETs. However, there is lack of knowledge regarding biomarkers able to predict their efficacy, and mechanisms of resistance. Other angiogenesis inhibitors, such as Pazopanib, inhibitors of Src, Hedgehog or of PI3K might all be useful in association or sequence with approved agents. On the other hand, the clinical significance, and potential for treatment of the most common mutations occurring in sporadic PNETs, in the MEN-1 gene and in ATRX and DAXX, remains uncertain. The present paper reviews the main molecular changes occurring in PNETs and how they might be linked with treatment options.

  8. Targeting chk2 kinase: molecular interaction maps and therapeutic rationale.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Sordet, Olivier; Rao, V Ashutosh; Zhang, Hongliang; Kohn, Kurt W

    2005-01-01

    Most anticancer drugs presently used clinically target genomic DNA. The selectivity of these anticancer drugs for tumor tissues is probably due to tumor-specific defects suppressing cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair, and enhancing apoptotic response in the tumor. We will review the molecular interactions within the ATM-Chk2 pathway implicating the DNA damage sensor kinases (ATM, ATR and DNA-PK), the adaptor BRCT proteins (Nbs1, Brca1, 53BP1, MDC1) and the effector kinases (Chk2, Chk1, Plk3, JNK, p38). The molecular interaction map convention (MIM) will be used for presenting this molecular network (http://discover.nci.nih.gov/mim/). A characteristic of the ATM-Chk2 pathway is its redundancy. First, ATM and Chk2 phosphorylate common substrates including p53, E2F1, BRCA1, and Chk2 itself, which suggests that Chk2 (also known as CHECK2, Cds1 in fission yeast, and Dmchk2 or Dmnk or Loki in the fruit fly) acts as a relay for ATM and/or as a salvage pathway when ATM is inactivated. Secondly, redundancy is apparent for the substrates, which can be phosphorylated/activated at similar residues by Chk2, Chk1, and the polo kinases (Plk's). Functionally, Chk2 can activate both apoptosis (via p53, E2F1 and PML) and cell cycle checkpoint (via Cdc25A and Cdc25C, p53, and BRCA1). We will review the short list of published Chk2 inhibitors. We will also propose a novel paradigm for screening interfacial inhibitors of Chk2. Chk2 inhibitors might be used to enhance the tumor selectivity of DNA targeted agents in p53-deficient tumors, and for the treatment of tumors whose growth depends on enhanced Chk2 activity.

  9. Radiation inactivation analysis of enzymes. Effect of free radical scavengers on apparent target sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, D.C.; Solomonson, L.P.; Barber, M.J.; McCreery, M.J.; Ness, G.C.

    1987-07-15

    In most cases the apparent target size obtained by radiation inactivation analysis corresponds to the subunit size or to the size of a multimeric complex. In this report, we examined whether the larger than expected target sizes of some enzymes could be due to secondary effects of free radicals. To test this proposal we carried out radiation inactivation analysis on Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, Torula yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, Chlorella vulgaris nitrate reductase, and chicken liver sulfite oxidase in the presence and absence of free radical scavengers (benzoic acid and mannitol). In the presence of free radical scavengers, inactivation curves are shifted toward higher radiation doses. Plots of scavenger concentration versus enzyme activity showed that the protective effect of benzoic acid reached a maximum at 25 mM then declined. Mannitol alone had little effect, but appeared to broaden the maximum protective range of benzoic acid relative to concentration. The apparent target size of the polymerase activity of DNA polymerase I in the presence of free radical scavengers was about 40% of that observed in the absence of these agents. This is considerably less than the minimum polypeptide size and may reflect the actual size of the polymerase functional domain. Similar effects, but of lesser magnitude, were observed for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, nitrate reductase, and sulfite oxidase. These results suggest that secondary damage due to free radicals generated in the local environment as a result of ionizing radiation can influence the apparent target size obtained by this method.

  10. Molecular Pathways: Targeted α-Particle Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Yong, Kwon; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    An α-particle, a 4He nucleus, is exquisitely cytotoxic, and indifferent to many limitations associated with conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The exquisite cytotoxicity of α radiation, the result of its high mean energy deposition (high linear energy transfer, LET) and limited range in tissue, provides for a highly controlled therapeutic modality that can be targeted to selected malignant cells (targeted α-therapy (TAT)) with minimal normal tissue effects. There is a burgeoning interest in the development of TAT that is buoyed by the increasing number of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. The short path length renders α-emitters suitable for treatment and management of minimal disease such as micrometastases or residual tumor after surgical debulking, hematological cancers, infections, and compartmental cancers such as ovarian cancer or neoplastic meningitis. Yet, despite decades of study of high-LET radiation, the mechanistic pathways of the effects of this modality remain not well defined. The modality is effectively presumed to follow a simple therapeutic mechanism centered on catastrophic double strand (ds) DNA breaks without full examination of the actual molecular pathways and targets that are activated that directly impact cell survival or death. This Molecular Pathways article provides an overview of the mechanisms and pathways that are involved in the response to and repair of TAT induced DNA damage as currently understood. Finally, this article highlights the current state of clinical translation of TAT as well as other high-LET radionuclide radiation therapy using α-emitters such as 225Ac, 211At, 213Bi, 212Pb and 223Ra. PMID:23230321

  11. Molecular pathways: targeted α-particle radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Baidoo, Kwamena E; Yong, Kwon; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2013-02-01

    An α-particle, a (4)He nucleus, is exquisitely cytotoxic and indifferent to many limitations associated with conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The exquisite cytotoxicity of α-radiation, the result of its high mean energy deposition [high linear energy transfer (LET)] and limited range in tissue, provides for a highly controlled therapeutic modality that can be targeted to selected malignant cells [targeted α-therapy (TAT)] with minimal normal tissue effects. A burgeoning interest in the development of TAT is buoyed by the increasing number of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. The short path length renders α-emitters suitable for treatment and management of minimal disease such as micrometastases or residual tumor after surgical debulking, hematologic cancers, infections, and compartmental cancers such as ovarian cancer or neoplastic meningitis. Yet, despite decades of study of high LET radiation, the mechanistic pathways of the effects of this modality remain not well defined. The modality is effectively presumed to follow a simple therapeutic mechanism centered on catastrophic double-strand DNA breaks without full examination of the actual molecular pathways and targets that are activated that directly affect cell survival or death. This Molecular Pathways article provides an overview of the mechanisms and pathways that are involved in the response to and repair of TAT-induced DNA damage as currently understood. Finally, this article highlights the current state of clinical translation of TAT as well as other high-LET radionuclide radiation therapy using α-emitters such as (225)Ac, (211)At, (213)Bi, (212)Pb, and (223)Ra.

  12. CD19 as a molecular target in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Stüve, Olaf; Warnke, Clemens; Deason, Krystin; Stangel, Martin; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; von Büdingen, Hans-Christian; Centonze, Diego; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Kappertz, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are the most prevalent neuroinflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). The immunological cascade of these disorders is complex, and the exact spatial and temporal role of different immune cells is not fully understood. Although MS has been considered for many years to be primarily T cell driven, it is well established that B cells and the humoral immune response play an important role in its pathogenesis. This has long been evident from laboratory findings that include the presence of oligoclonal bands in the CSF. In NMO the importance of the humoral immune system appears even more obvious as evidenced by pathogenic antibodies against aquaporin 4 (AQP4). Besides their capacity to mature into antibody-producing plasma cells, B cells are potent antigen presenting cells to T lymphocytes and they can provide soluble factors for cell activation and differentiation to other immune-competent cells. In MS and NMO, there are substantial data from clinical trials that B cell depletion with CD20-directed agents is effective and relatively safe. Plasma cells, which produce antibodies against molecular targets expressed by the host, but which also provide humeral immune responses against pathogens, are not targeted by anti-CD20 therapies. Therefore the depletion of CD19-expressing cells would offer potential advantages with regard to efficacy, but potentially higher risks with regard to infectious complications. This review will outline the rationale for CD19 as a molecular target in CNS autoimmunity. The current stage of drug development is illustrated. Potential safety concerns will be discussed. PMID:24993505

  13. Molecular Pathways: The Necrosome-A Target for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lena; Miller, George

    2017-03-01

    Necroptosis is a caspase-8-independent cell death that requires coactivation of receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3) kinases. The necrosome is a complex consisting of RIP1, RIP3, and Fas-associated protein with death domain leading to activation of the pseudokinase mixed lineage kinase like followed by a rapid plasma membrane rupture and inflammatory response through the release of damage-associated molecular patterns and cytokines. The necrosome has been shown to be relevant in multiple tumor types, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, melanoma, and several hematologic malignancies. Preclinical data suggest that targeting this complex can have differential impact on tumor progression and that the effect of necroptosis on oncogenesis is cell-type and context dependent. The emerging data suggest that targeting the necrosome may lead to immunogenic reprogramming in the tumor microenvironment in multiple tumors and that combining therapies targeting the necrosome with either conventional chemotherapy or immunotherapy may have beneficial effects. Thus, understanding the interplay of necroptotic cell death, transformed cells, and the immune system may enable the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Clin Cancer Res; 23(5); 1132-6. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Targeting Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer: Molecular and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Papandreou, Christos N.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate carcinoma, either co-present with the local adenocarcinoma disease or as a result of transdifferentiation later in time, was described as one major process of emerging resistance to androgen deprivation therapies, and at the clinical level it is consistent with the development of rapidly progressive visceral disease, often in the absence of elevated serum prostate-specific antigen level. Until present, platinum-based chemotherapy has been the only treatment modality, able to produce a fair amount of responses but of short duration. Recently, several efforts for molecular characterization of this lethal phenotype have resulted in identification of novel signaling factors involved in microenvironment interactions, mitosis, and neural reprograming as potential therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical testing of specific inhibitors of these targets, for example, Aurora kinase A inhibitors, in carefully selected patients and exploitation of expression changes of the target before and after manipulation is anticipated to increase the existing data and facilitate therapeutic decision making at this late stage of the disease when hormonal manipulations, even with the newest androgen-directed therapies are no longer feasible. PMID:25699233

  15. Identifying molecular targets of lifestyle modifications in colon cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Derry, Molly M; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    One in four deaths in the United States is cancer-related, and colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. Screening strategies are utilized but have not reduced disease incidence or mortality. In this regard, there is an interest in cancer preventive strategies focusing on lifestyle intervention, where specific etiologic factors involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression could be targeted. For example, exposure to dietary carcinogens, such as nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons influences colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, dietary deficiencies could alter sensitivity to genetic damage and influence carcinogen metabolism contributing to CRC. High alcohol consumption increases the risk of mutations including the fact that acetaldehyde, an ethanol metabolite, is classified as a group 1 carcinogen. Tobacco smoke exposure is also a risk factor for cancer development; approximately 20% of CRCs are associated with smoking. Additionally, obese patients have a higher risk of cancer development, which is further supported by the fact that physical activity decreases CRC risk by 55%. Similarly, chronic inflammatory conditions also increase the risk of CRC development. Moreover, the circadian clock alters digestion and regulates other biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes that could influence CRC. Taken together, colon carcinogenesis involves a number of etiological factors, and therefore, to create effective preventive strategies, molecular targets need to be identified and beleaguered prior to disease progression. With this in mind, the following is a comprehensive review identifying downstream target proteins of the above lifestyle risk factors, which are modulated during colon carcinogenesis and could be targeted for CRC prevention by novel agents including phytochemicals.

  16. Identifying Molecular Targets of Lifestyle Modifications in Colon Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Molly M.; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    One in four deaths in the United States is cancer-related, and colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. Screening strategies are utilized but have not reduced disease incidence or mortality. In this regard, there is an interest in cancer preventive strategies focusing on lifestyle intervention, where specific etiologic factors involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression could be targeted. For example, exposure to dietary carcinogens, such as nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons influences colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, dietary deficiencies could alter sensitivity to genetic damage and influence carcinogen metabolism contributing to CRC. High alcohol consumption increases the risk of mutations including the fact that acetaldehyde, an ethanol metabolite, is classified as a group 1 carcinogen. Tobacco smoke exposure is also a risk factor for cancer development; approximately 20% of CRCs are associated with smoking. Additionally, obese patients have a higher risk of cancer development, which is further supported by the fact that physical activity decreases CRC risk by 55%. Similarly, chronic inflammatory conditions also increase the risk of CRC development. Moreover, the circadian clock alters digestion and regulates other biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes that could influence CRC. Taken together, colon carcinogenesis involves a number of etiological factors, and therefore, to create effective preventive strategies, molecular targets need to be identified and beleaguered prior to disease progression. With this in mind, the following is a comprehensive review identifying downstream target proteins of the above lifestyle risk factors, which are modulated during colon carcinogenesis and could be targeted for CRC prevention by novel agents including phytochemicals. PMID:23675573

  17. Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nuclear Targeting: The Effect of Nanoparticle Size and Nuclear Localization Sequence Density.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Breitinger, Hans G; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-12-07

    Many recently discovered therapeutic proteins exert their main function in the nucleus, thus requiring both efficient uptake and correct intracellular targeting. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted interest as protein delivery vehicles due to their biocompatibility and ability to escape the endosomes offering high potential for nuclear delivery. Molecular entry into the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complexes, the efficiency of which is dependent on NP size and the presence of nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes (S-NPs ≈ 25 nm; L-NP ≈ 150 nm) were formulated, and they were modified with different densities of the octapeptide NLS CPKKKRKV (S-NPs, 0.25, 0.5, 2.0 NLS/nm(2); L-NPs, 0.6, 0.9, 2 NLS/nm(2)). Unmodified and NLS-tagged NPs were evaluated for their protein loading capacity, extent of cell association, cell uptake, cell surface binding, and finally nuclear delivery efficiency in L929 fibroblasts. To avoid errors generated with cell fractionation and nuclear isolation protocols, nuclear delivery was assessed in intact cells utilizing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) fluorometry and microscopy. Although L-NPs showed ≈10-fold increase in protein loading per NP when compared to S-NPs, due to higher cell association and uptake S-NPs showed superior protein delivery. NLS exerts a size and density dependent effect on nanoparticle uptake and surface binding, with a general reduction in NP cell surface binding and an increase in cell uptake with the increase in NLS density (up to 8.4-fold increase in uptake of High-NLS-L-NPs (2 NLS/nm(2)) compared to unmodified L-NPs). However, for nuclear delivery, unmodified S-NPs show higher nuclear localization rates when compared to NLS modified NPs (up to 5-fold by FRET microscopy). For L-NPs an intermediate NLS density (0.9 NLS/nm(2)) seems to provide highest nuclear localization (3.7-fold increase in nuclear delivery compared to High

  18. Motor preparation of manual aiming at a visual target manipulated in size, luminance contrast, and location.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Masami; Imanaka, Kuniyasu

    2007-01-01

    We conducted two experiments to investigate whether the motor preparation of manual aiming to a visual target is affected by either the physical characteristics (size or luminance contrast) or spatial characteristics (location) of the target. Reaction time (RT) of both finger lifting (ie stimulus-detection time) and manual aiming (ie movement-triggering time) to the onset of the target was measured. The difference of RT (DRT) between two tasks (ie the difference of task complexity) was examined to clarify the temporal characteristics of manual aiming per se during visuomotor integration. Results show classical characteristics: RT decreased as either the target size or luminance contrast increased. Furthermore, the task-complexity and target-location factors significantly interacted with each other, where the aiming RT was longer than the finger-lifting RT and the effects of target location on RT differed for each task. However, the task factor did not interact with either the size or luminance-contrast factor, implying that the motor preparation of manual aiming is associated with the spatial characteristics rather than the physical characteristics of the target. Inspection of DRT revealed that the time needed for motor preparation for an ipsilateral target was significantly shorter than that for a contralateral target. This was the case both for the left and for the right hand. Foveal targets required longer processing time, implying a disadvantageous function of motor preparation for the gazed target. The left-hand superiority for the target appearing in the left visual field was also observed. Such lateralised effect and left-hand advantage to the left visual field in manual aiming suggest that visuospatial information processing is activated during the preparation of aiming action, with faster processing in the right hemisphere.

  19. Small, medium, large or supersize? The development and evaluation of interventions targeted at portion size.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, W M; Steenhuis, I H M; Poelman, M P

    2014-07-01

    In the past decades, portion sizes of high-caloric foods and drinks have increased and can be considered an important environmental obesogenic factor. This paper describes a research project in which the feasibility and effectiveness of environmental interventions targeted at portion size was evaluated. The studies that we conducted revealed that portion size labeling, offering a larger variety of portion sizes, and proportional pricing (that is, a comparable price per unit regardless of the size) were considered feasible to implement according to both consumers and point-of-purchase representatives. Studies into the effectiveness of these interventions demonstrated that the impact of portion size labeling on the (intended) consumption of soft drinks was, at most, modest. Furthermore, the introduction of smaller portion sizes of hot meals in worksite cafeterias in addition to the existing size stimulated a moderate number of consumers to replace their large meals by a small meal. Elaborating on these findings, we advocate further research into communication and marketing strategies related to portion size interventions; the development of environmental portion size interventions as well as educational interventions that improve people's ability to deal with a 'super-sized' environment; the implementation of regulation with respect to portion size labeling, and the use of nudges to stimulate consumers to select healthier portion sizes.

  20. Small, medium, large or supersize? The development and evaluation of interventions targeted at portion size

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, W M; Steenhuis, I H M; Poelman, M P

    2014-01-01

    In the past decades, portion sizes of high-caloric foods and drinks have increased and can be considered an important environmental obesogenic factor. This paper describes a research project in which the feasibility and effectiveness of environmental interventions targeted at portion size was evaluated. The studies that we conducted revealed that portion size labeling, offering a larger variety of portion sizes, and proportional pricing (that is, a comparable price per unit regardless of the size) were considered feasible to implement according to both consumers and point-of-purchase representatives. Studies into the effectiveness of these interventions demonstrated that the impact of portion size labeling on the (intended) consumption of soft drinks was, at most, modest. Furthermore, the introduction of smaller portion sizes of hot meals in worksite cafeterias in addition to the existing size stimulated a moderate number of consumers to replace their large meals by a small meal. Elaborating on these findings, we advocate further research into communication and marketing strategies related to portion size interventions; the development of environmental portion size interventions as well as educational interventions that improve people's ability to deal with a ‘super-sized' environment; the implementation of regulation with respect to portion size labeling, and the use of nudges to stimulate consumers to select healthier portion sizes. PMID:25033959

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Elshaer, Sally L.; Eldahshan, Wael S.; Mysona, Barbara A.; El-Remessy, Azza B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in United States. Research indicates an association between oxidative stress and the development of diabetes complications. However, clinical trials with general antioxidants have failed to prove effective in diabetic patients. Mounting evidence from experimental studies that continue to elucidate the damaging effects of oxidative stress and inflammation in both vascular and neural retina suggest its critical role in the pathogenesis of DR. This review will outline the current management of DR as well as present potential experimental therapeutic interventions, focusing on molecules that link oxidative stress to inflammation to provide potential therapeutic targets for treatment or prevention of DR. Understanding the biochemical changes and the molecular events under diabetic conditions could provide new effective therapeutic tools to combat the disease. PMID:25949069

  2. DNA ligase IV as a new molecular target for temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Natsuko; Takahashi, Akihisa; Mori, Eiichiro; Ohnishi, Ken; McKinnon, Peter J.; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2009-10-02

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is a methylating agent used in chemotherapy against glioblastoma. This work was designed to clarify details in repair pathways acting to remove DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by TMZ. Cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts were used which were deficient in DSB repair genes such as homologous recombination repair-related genes X-ray repair cross-complementing group 2 (XRCC2)and radiation sensitive mutant54 (Rad54), non-homologous end joining repair-related gene DNAligase IV (Lig4). Cell sensitivity to drug treatments was assessed using colony forming assays. The most effective molecular target which was correlated with TMZ cell sensitivity was Lig4. In addition, it was found that small interference RNAs (siRNA) for Lig4 efficiently enhanced cell lethality induced by TMZ in human glioblastoma A172 cells. These findings suggest that down regulation of Lig4 might provide a useful tool for cell sensitization during TMZ chemotherapy.

  3. Prostate cancer heterogeneity: Discovering novel molecular targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Massari, Francesco; Iacovelli, Roberto; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Di Nunno, Vincenzo; Giunchi, Francesca; Brunelli, Matteo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) shows a broad spectrum of biological and clinical behavior, which represents the epiphenomenon of an extreme genetic heterogeneity. Recent genomic profiling studies have deeply improved the knowledge of the genomic landscape of localized and metastatic PCa. The AR and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways are the two most frequently altered, representing therefore interestingly targets for therapy. Moreover, somatic or germline aberrations of DNA repair genes (DRGs) have been observed at high frequency, supporting the potential role of platinum derivatives and PARP inhibitors as effective therapeutic strategies. In the future, the identification of driver mutations present at a specific stage of the disease, the classification PCa based on specific molecular alterations, and the selection of the most appropriate therapy based on biomarkers predictors of response represent the foundations for an increasingly more accurate personalized medicine.

  4. Nutraceuticals: Potential for Chondroprotection and Molecular Targeting of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Daniel J.; Choudhury, Marwa; Hirsh, David M.; Hardin, John A.; Cobelli, Neil J.; Sun, Hui B.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals—food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease—offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment. PMID:24284399

  5. Molecular chaperones as rational drug targets for Parkinson's disease therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kalia, S K; Kalia, L V; McLean, P J

    2010-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that is caused, in part, by the loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta of the basal ganglia. The presence of intracellular protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, within the surviving nigral neurons is the defining neuropathological feature of the disease. Accordingly, the identification of specific genes mutated in families with Parkinson's disease and of genetic susceptibility variants for idiopathic Parkinson's disease has implicated abnormalities in proteostasis, or the handling and elimination of misfolded proteins, in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. Protein folding and the refolding of misfolded proteins are regulated by a network of interactive molecules, known as the chaperone system, which is composed of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones. The chaperone system is intimately associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway which are responsible for elimination of misfolded proteins and protein quality control. In addition to their role in proteostasis, some chaperone molecules are involved in the regulation of cell death pathways. Here we review the role of the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, and the cochaperones Hsp40, BAG family members such as BAG5, CHIP and Hip in modulating neuronal death with a focus on dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. We also review current progress in preclinical studies aimed at targetting the chaperone system to prevent neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss potential future chaperone-based therapeutics for the symptomatic treatment and possible disease modification of Parkinson's disease.

  6. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  7. Impedance modulation and feedback corrections in tracking targets of variable size and frequency.

    PubMed

    Selen, Luc P J; van Dieën, Jaap H; Beek, Peter J

    2006-11-01

    Humans are able to adjust the accuracy of their movements to the demands posed by the task at hand. The variability in task execution caused by the inherent noisiness of the neuromuscular system can be tuned to task demands by both feedforward (e.g., impedance modulation) and feedback mechanisms. In this experiment, we studied both mechanisms, using mechanical perturbations to estimate stiffness and damping as indices of impedance modulation and submovement scaling as an index of feedback driven corrections. Eight subjects tracked three differently sized targets (0.0135, 0.0270, and 0.0405 rad) moving at three different frequencies (0.20, 0.25, and 0.33 Hz). Movement variability decreased with both decreasing target size and movement frequency, whereas stiffness and damping increased with decreasing target size, independent of movement frequency. These results are consistent with the theory that mechanical impedance acts as a filter of noisy neuromuscular signals but challenge stochastic theories of motor control that do not account for impedance modulation and only partially for feedback control. Submovements during unperturbed cycles were quantified in terms of their gain, i.e., the slope between their duration and amplitude in the speed profile. Submovement gain decreased with decreasing movement frequency and increasing target size. The results were interpreted to imply that submovement gain is related to observed tracking errors and that those tracking errors are expressed in units of target size. We conclude that impedance and submovement gain modulation contribute additively to tracking accuracy.

  8. Investigations of internal noise levels for different target sizes, contrasts, and noise structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Minah; Choi, Shinkook; Baek, Jongduk

    2014-03-01

    To describe internal noise levels for different target sizes, contrasts, and noise structures, Gaussian targets with four different sizes (i.e., standard deviation of 2,4,6 and 8) and three different noise structures(i.e., white, low-pass, and highpass) were generated. The generated noise images were scaled to have standard deviation of 0.15. For each noise type, target contrasts were adjusted to have the same detectability based on NPW, and the detectability of CHO was calculated accordingly. For human observer study, 3 trained observers performed 2AFC detection tasks, and correction rate, Pc, was calculated for each task. By adding proper internal noise level to numerical observer (i.e., NPW and CHO), detectability of human observer was matched with that of numerical observers. Even though target contrasts were adjusted to have the same detectability of NPW observer, detectability of human observer decreases as the target size increases. The internal noise level varies for different target sizes, contrasts, and noise structures, demonstrating different internal noise levels should be considered in numerical observer to predict the detection performance of human observer.

  9. Smaller Fixation Target Size Is Associated with More Stable Fixation and Less Variance in Threshold Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Kana; Koshiji, Risako; Funaki, Wakana; Shoji, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this randomized observational case control study were to quantify fixation behavior during standard automated perimetry (SAP) with different fixation targets and to evaluate the relationship between fixation behavior and threshold variability at each test point in healthy young participants experienced with perimetry. SAP was performed on the right eyes of 29 participants using the Octopus 900 perimeter, program 32, dynamic strategy. The fixation targets of Point, Cross, and Ring were used for SAP. Fixation behavior was recorded using a wearable eye-tracking glass. All participants underwent SAP twice with each fixation target in a random fashion. Fixation behavior was quantified by calculating the bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA) and the frequency of deviation from the fixation target. The BCEAs (deg2) of Point, Cross, and Ring targets were 1.11, 1.46, and 2.02, respectively. In all cases, BCEA increased significantly with increasing fixation target size (p < 0.05). The logarithmic value of BCEA demonstrated the same tendency (p < 0.05). A positive correlation was identified between fixation behavior and threshold variability for the Point and Cross targets (ρ = 0.413–0.534, p < 0.05). Fixation behavior increased with increasing fixation target size. Moreover, a larger fixation behavior tended to be associated with a higher threshold variability. A small fixation target is recommended during the visual field test. PMID:27829030

  10. Molecular targets of curcumin for cancer therapy: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Kasi, Pandima Devi; Tamilselvam, Rajavel; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Daglia, Maria; Bishayee, Anupam; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, natural edible products have been found to be important therapeutic agents for the treatment of chronic human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegeneration. Curcumin is a well-known diarylheptanoid constituent of turmeric which possesses anticancer effects under both pre-clinical and clinical conditions. Moreover, it is well known that the anticancer effects of curcumin are primarily due to the activation of apoptotic pathways in the cancer cells as well as inhibition of tumor microenvironments like inflammation, angiogenesis, and tumor metastasis. In particular, extensive studies have demonstrated that curcumin targets numerous therapeutically important cancer signaling pathways such as p53, Ras, PI3K, AKT, Wnt-β catenin, mTOR and so on. Clinical studies also suggested that either curcumin alone or as combination with other drugs possess promising anticancer effect in cancer patients without causing any adverse effects. In this article, we critically review the available scientific evidence on the molecular targets of curcumin for the treatment of different types of cancer. In addition, we also discuss its chemistry, sources, bioavailability, and future research directions.

  11. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  12. RNA stabilizing proteins as molecular targets in cardiovascular pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Sahana Suresh; Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Jeyabal, Prince; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan Amirthalingam; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    The stability of mRNA has emerged as a key step in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and function. RNA stabilizing proteins (RSPs) contain several RNA recognition motifs, and selectively bind to Adenylate- and uridylate- Rich Elements in the 3′ untranslated region of several mRNAs leading to altered processing, stability and translation. These post-transcriptional gene regulations play a critical role in cellular homeostasis; therefore act as molecular switch between ‘normal cell’ and ‘disease state’. Many mRNA binding proteins have been discovered to date, which either stabilize (HuR/HuA, HuB, HuC, HuD) or destabilize (AUF1, Tristetraprolin, KSRP) the target transcripts. Although the function of RSPs has been widely studied in cancer biology, its role in cardiovascular pathologies is only beginning to evolve. The current review provides an overall understanding of the potential role of RSP, specifically HuR-mediated mRNA stability in myocardial infarction, hypertension and hypertrophy. Also, the effect of RSPs on various cellular processes including inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, cell-death and proliferation and its relevance to cardiovascular pathophysiological processes is presented. We also discuss the potential clinical implications of RSPs as therapeutic targets in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25801788

  13. Molecular targets in arthritis and recent trends in nanotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to its severity and increasing epidemiology, arthritis needs no description. There are various forms of arthritis most of which are disabling, very painful, and common. In spite of breakthroughs in the field of drug discovery, there is no cure for arthritis that can eliminate the disease permanently and ease the pain. The present review focuses on some of the most successful drugs in arthritis therapy and their side effects. Potential new targets in arthritis therapy such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, osteopontin, and several others have been discussed here, which can lead to refinement of current therapeutic modalities. Mechanisms for different forms of arthritis have been discussed along with the molecules that act as potential biomarkers for arthritis. Due to the difficulty in monitoring the disease progression to detect the advanced manifestations of the diseases, drug-induced cytotoxicity, and problems with drug delivery; nanoparticle therapy has gained the attention of the researchers. The unique properties of nanoparticles make them highly attractive for the design of novel therapeutics or diagnostic agents for arthritis. The review also focuses on the recent trends in nanoformulation development used for arthritis therapy. This review is, therefore, important because it describes the relevance and need for more arthritis research, it brings forth a critical discussion of successful drugs in arthritis and analyses the key molecular targets. The review also identifies several knowledge gaps in the published research so far along with the proposal of new ideas and future directions in arthritis therapy. PMID:26345140

  14. Molecular targets in arthritis and recent trends in nanotherapy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to its severity and increasing epidemiology, arthritis needs no description. There are various forms of arthritis most of which are disabling, very painful, and common. In spite of breakthroughs in the field of drug discovery, there is no cure for arthritis that can eliminate the disease permanently and ease the pain. The present review focuses on some of the most successful drugs in arthritis therapy and their side effects. Potential new targets in arthritis therapy such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, osteopontin, and several others have been discussed here, which can lead to refinement of current therapeutic modalities. Mechanisms for different forms of arthritis have been discussed along with the molecules that act as potential biomarkers for arthritis. Due to the difficulty in monitoring the disease progression to detect the advanced manifestations of the diseases, drug-induced cytotoxicity, and problems with drug delivery; nanoparticle therapy has gained the attention of the researchers. The unique properties of nanoparticles make them highly attractive for the design of novel therapeutics or diagnostic agents for arthritis. The review also focuses on the recent trends in nanoformulation development used for arthritis therapy. This review is, therefore, important because it describes the relevance and need for more arthritis research, it brings forth a critical discussion of successful drugs in arthritis and analyses the key molecular targets. The review also identifies several knowledge gaps in the published research so far along with the proposal of new ideas and future directions in arthritis therapy.

  15. Contact dermatitis: in pursuit of sensitizer's molecular targets through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Sofia; Neves, Bruno; Vitorino, Rui; Domingues, Rosário; Cruz, Maria Teresa; Domingues, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    Protein haptenation, i.e., the modification of proteins by small reactive chemicals, is the key step in the sensitization phase of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Despite the research effort in past decades, the identification of immunogenic hapten-protein complexes that trigger a relevant pathogenic immune response in ACD, as well as the haptenation reaction molecular site, and the elements of a potentially conditioning environment during each of these stages, remain poorly understood. These questions led us to employ a proteomics-based approach to identify modified proteins in the dendritic-like cell line THP-1 sensitized with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), through a combination of 2D-gel electrophoresis, nano-LC and mass spectrometry. A specific set of 39 targeted proteins was identified and comprised proteins from various cellular locations and biological functions. One of FITC targets was identified as MLK, a member of the mixed-lineage kinase family known to act as a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase and to control the activity of specific mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, namely p38 and JNK pathways. Haptenated in the vicinity of its active site, our results point to MLK being a relevant target due to a consistent non-activation at early time points of these pathways upon FITC sensitization in THP-1 cells. Moreover, FITC pre-treatment significantly decrease phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK levels induced upon exposure to a classical activator such as lipopolysaccharide or to the sensitizer 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene. Overall, our data point to specific amino acid residues haptenation within critical proteins as the key step in the subsequent signaling pathways modulation responsible for DC activation and maturation events.

  16. Yeast and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenases: potential problems in target size analysis and evidence for a monomer active unit

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, M.D.; Ferguson-Miller, S.

    1987-06-16

    Yeast and horse alcohol dehydrogenases are commonly used as standards for radiation inactivation analysis of proteins, usually assuming that the minimal functional unit corresponds to the physical size in solution, a tetramer (M/sub r/ = 148,000) and a dimer (M/sub r/ = 80,000), respectively. Results described in this paper demonstrate that molecular weight overestimates may be obtained for the yeast protein as a result of its unusual sensitivity to secondary radiation products. Irradiation in the presence of sulhydryl reagents results in a smaller functional size estimate (67,000 +/- 3000) than that obtained in their absence (128,000 +/- 5000), indicating that some sulfhydryl groups in the enzyme may be particularly susceptible to attack by radiolytic species. Analysis of the horse liver enzyme reveals that although it has structural and functional similarities to the yeast protein, it is not as prone to secondary radiation damage and gives a minimal functional size estimate (33,000 +/= 1000) that most closely corresponds to a monomer. Quantitation of disappearance of the protein from a sodium dodecyl sulfate gel as a function of radiation dose also gives a target size (48,000 +/- 3000) in reasonable agreement with the monomer molecular weight. These results indicate that the individual subunits of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase have independent catalytic capacity and imply that the same may be true for the yeast enzyme.

  17. Minimum radiation force target size for power measurements in focused ultrasonic fields with circular symmetry.

    PubMed

    Beissner, K

    2010-12-01

    The time-averaged ultrasonic power emitted by medical ultrasonic equipment is mostly measured using a radiation force balance, and the question of the necessary target size is of practical importance. The question is answered here by calculations based on a Rayleigh integral algorithm for fields from circular, focusing transducers. This case occurs particularly in the field of high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound. The calculation yields the necessary size of an absorbing target so that the radiation force is 98% of that exerted on an absorber of infinite lateral size, and this as a function of the transducer-to-target distance, of the transducer radius in comparison with the wavelength and of the focus (half-)angle. Several distributions of the transducer vibration amplitude are considered. The Rayleigh integral strictly applies only to planar transducers, but among the amplitude distributions there is also one that allows the simulation of the spherically curved transducer type often found in practice.

  18. Interpretation of size-exclusion chromatography for the determination of molecular-size distribution of human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Christians, S; Schluender, S; van Treel, N D; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-size distribution by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) [1] is used for the quantification of unwanted aggregated forms in therapeutic polyclonal antibodies, referred to as human immunoglobulins (Ig) in the European Pharmacopoeia. Considering not only the requirements of the monographs for human normal Ig (0338, 0918 and 2788) [2-4], but also the general chapter on chromatographic techniques (2.2.46) [5], several chromatographic column types are allowed for performing this test. Although the EDQM knowledge database gives only 2 examples of suitable columns as a guide for the user, these monographs permit the use of columns with different lengths and diameters, and do not prescribe either particle size or pore size, which are considered key characteristics of SEC columns. Therefore, the columns used may differ significantly from each other with regard to peak resolution, potentially resulting in ambiguous peak identity assignment. In some cases, this may even lead to situations where the manufacturer and the Official Medicines Control Laboratory (OMCL) in charge of Official Control Authority Batch Release (OCABR) have differing molecular-size distribution profiles for aggregates of the same batch of Ig, even though both laboratories follow the requirements of the relevant monograph. In the present study, several formally acceptable columns and the peak integration results obtained therewith were compared. A standard size-exclusion column with a length of 60 cm and a particle size of 10 µm typically detects only 3 Ig fractions, namely monomers, dimers and polymers. This column type was among the first reliable HPLC columns on the market for this test and very rapidly became the standard for many pharmaceutical manufacturers and OMCLs for batch release testing. Consequently, the distribution of monomers, dimers and polymers was established as the basis for the interpretation of the results of the molecular-size distribution test in the relevant monographs

  19. Microcavity single virus detection and sizing with molecular sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2 by a spherical microcavity. Mass of this virus is ~6 ag and produces a theoretical resonance shift ~0.25 fm upon adsorbing an individual virus at the equator of the bare microcavity, which is well below the r.m.s background noise of 2 fm. However, detection was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4x105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer. Analytical expressions based on the "reactive sensing principle" are developed to extract the radius of the virus from the measured signals. Estimated limit of detection for these experiments was ~0.4 ag or 240 kDa below the size of all known viruses, largest globular and elongated proteins [Phosphofructokinase (345 kDa) and Fibrinogen (390 kDa), respectively].

  20. Calibration of the human immunoglobulin BRPs for ACA and molecular size (batch 1) and for Fc function and molecular size (batches 1 & 2).

    PubMed

    Sandberg, E; Costanzo, A; Daas, A; Buchheit, K-H

    2012-04-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Preparation batch 3 (BRP3) for Human Immunoglobulin was established in 2005. Stocks of this BRP are dwindling and a replacement batch is needed to serve as working standard in the tests for distribution of molecular size by HPLC, anticomplementary activity (ACA) and Fc function, in accordance with the requirements of the Ph. Eur. monographs Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918). The European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) carried out a project (BSP099) to establish replacement batches for this BRP. The project was run in 2 phases, a prequalification phase (Phase 1) and an international collaborative study (Phase 2) involving 19 laboratories. Three batches of candidate materials of various sizes, Samples A, B and C, were procured from 2 different manufacturers on the European market. Based on the results of the study, Sample A was shown to be suitable as a reference standard for the ACA test and for molecular size determination by HPLC, whereas Samples B and C were demonstrated to be suitable for the Fc function test and for the molecular size determination by HPLC. All 3 BRPs are to be used in conjunction with the monographs Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918). The BRPs were adopted by the Ph. Eur. Commission at its 141st session in November 2011 as official Ph. Eur. Human Immunoglobulin BRPs for ACA and molecular size Batch 1 (Sample A) and Fc function and molecular size Batch 1 and Batch 2 (Samples B and C respectively).

  1. The particle size magnifier closing the gap between measurement of molecules, molecular clusters and aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkilä, Jyri; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Kangasluoma, Juha; Franchin, Alessandro; Sipilä, Mikko; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas; Petäjä, Tuukka

    2013-05-01

    The Particle Size Magnifier lowers the cut-off size of a Condensation Particle Counter even down to about 1 nm in mobility diameter. By scanning the supersaturation also size information of the particles can be gained. We demonstrated that the PSM can detect particles starting from molecular sizes. By combining the data with newly developed mass spectrometric methods particle formation and growth can be followed molecule by molecule.

  2. Relationships between tumor size and curablity for uniformly targeted therapy with beta-emitting radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    O`Donoghue, J.A.; Bardies, M.; Wheldon, T.E. |

    1995-10-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is a new form of radiotherapy that differs in some important respects from external beam irradiation. One of the most important differences is due to the finite range of ionizing beta particles emitted as a result of radionuclide disintegration. The effects of particle range have important implications for the curability of tumors. We used a mathematical model to examine tumor curability and its relationship to tumor size for 22 beta-emitting radionuclides that may have therapeutic potential. The model assumed a uniform distribution of radionuclide throughout. For targeted radionuclide therapy, the relationship between tumor curability and tumor size is different from that for conventional external beam radiotherapy. With targeted radionuclides, there is an optimal tumor size for cure. Tumors smaller than the optimal size are less vulnerable to irradiation from radionuclides because a substantial proportion of the disintegration energy escapes and is deposited outside the tumor volume. We found an optimal tumor size for radiocurability by each of the 22 radionuclides considered. Optimal cure diameters range from less than 1 mm for short-range emitters such as {sup 199}Au and {sup 33}P to several centimeters for long-range emitters such as {sup 90}Y and {sup 188}Re. The energy emitted per disintegration may be used to predict optimal cure size for uniform distributions of radionuclide. 17 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Tea polyphenols, their biological effects and potential molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Milacic, V; Chen, M S; Wan, S B; Lam, W H; Huo, C; Landis-Piwowar, K R; Cui, Q C; Wali, A; Chan, T H; Dou, Q P

    2008-04-01

    Tea is the most popular beverage in the world, second only to water. Tea contains an infusion of the leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant rich in polyphenolic compounds known as catechins, the most abundant of which is (-)-EGCG. Although tea has been consumed for centuries, it has only recently been studied extensively as a health-promoting beverage that may act to prevent a number of chronic diseases and cancers. The results of several investigations indicate that green tea consumption may be of modest benefit in reducing the plasma concentration of cholesterol and preventing atherosclerosis. Additionally, the cancer-preventive effects of green tea are widely supported by results from epidemiological, cell culture, animal and clinical studies. In vitro cell culture studies show that tea polyphenols potently induce apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest in tumor cells but not in their normal cell counterparts. Green tea polyphenols were shown to affect several biological pathways, including growth factor-mediated pathway, the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-dependent pathway, and ubiquitin/proteasome degradation pathways. Various animal studies have revealed that treatment with green tea inhibits tumor incidence and multiplicity in different organ sites such as skin, lung, liver, stomach, mammary gland and colon. Recently, phase I and II clinical trials have been conducted to explore the anticancer effects of green tea in humans. A major challenge of cancer prevention is to integrate new molecular findings into clinical practice. Therefore, identification of more molecular targets and biomarkers for tea polyphenols is essential for improving the design of green tea trials and will greatly assist in a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying its anti-cancer activity.

  4. Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Kissin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I-II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009-2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004-2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs (2009-2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics, when its

  5. Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Kissin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I–III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I–II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009–2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004–2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I–III trials of investigational drugs (2009–2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics

  6. Linked changes in marine dissolved organic carbon molecular size and radiocarbon age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, B. D.; Primeau, F. W.; Beaupré, S. R.; Guilderson, T. P.; Druffel, E. R. M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a major global carbon reservoir, yet its cycling remains poorly understood. Previous work suggests that DOC molecular size and chemical composition can significantly affect its bioavailability. Thus, DOC size and composition may control DOC cycling and radiocarbon age (via Δ14C). Here we show that DOC molecular size is correlated to DOC Δ14C in the Pacific Ocean. Our results, based on a series of increasing molecular size fractions from three depths in the Pacific, show increasing DOC Δ14C with increasing molecular size. We use a size-age distribution model to predict the DOC and Δ14C of ultrafiltered DOC. The model predicts both large and small surface DOC with high Δ14C and a narrow range (200-500 Da) of low Δ14C DOC. Deep model offsets suggest different size distributions and/or Δ14C sources at 670-915 m. Our results suggest that molecular size and composition are linked to DOC reactivity and storage in the ocean.

  7. Corner rounding in EUV photoresist: tuning through molecular weight, PAG size, and development time

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher; Daggett, Joe; Naulleau, Patrick

    2009-12-31

    In this paper, the corner rounding bias of a commercially available extreme ultraviolet photoresist is monitored as molecular weight, photoacid generator (PAG) size, and development time are varied. These experiments show that PAG size influences corner biasing while molecular weight and development time do not. Large PAGs are shown to exhibit less corner biasing, and in some cases, lower corner rounding, than small PAGs. In addition, heavier resist polymers are shown to exhibit less corner rounding than lighter ones.

  8. MRP3: a molecular target for human glioblastoma multiforme immunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is refractory to conventional therapies. To overcome the problem of heterogeneity, more brain tumor markers are required for prognosis and targeted therapy. We have identified and validated a promising molecular therapeutic target that is expressed by GBM: human multidrug-resistance protein 3 (MRP3). Methods We investigated MRP3 by genetic and immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of human gliomas to determine the incidence, distribution, and localization of MRP3 antigens in GBM and their potential correlation with survival. To determine MRP3 mRNA transcript and protein expression levels, we performed quantitative RT-PCR, raising MRP3-specific antibodies, and IHC analysis with biopsies of newly diagnosed GBM patients. We used univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the correlation of RNA expression and IHC of MRP3 with patient survival, with and without adjustment for age, extent of resection, and KPS. Results Real-time PCR results from 67 GBM biopsies indicated that 59/67 (88%) samples highly expressed MRP3 mRNA transcripts, in contrast with minimal expression in normal brain samples. Rabbit polyvalent and murine monoclonal antibodies generated against an extracellular span of MRP3 protein demonstrated reactivity with defined MRP3-expressing cell lines and GBM patient biopsies by Western blotting and FACS analyses, the latter establishing cell surface MRP3 protein expression. IHC evaluation of 46 GBM biopsy samples with anti-MRP3 IgG revealed MRP3 in a primarily membranous and cytoplasmic pattern in 42 (91%) of the 46 samples. Relative RNA expression was a strong predictor of survival for newly diagnosed GBM patients. Hazard of death for GBM patients with high levels of MRP3 RNA expression was 2.71 (95% CI: 1.54-4.80) times that of patients with low/moderate levels (p = 0.002). Conclusions Human GBMs overexpress MRP3 at both mRNA and protein levels, and elevated MRP3 mRNA levels in GBM biopsy samples correlated with a

  9. Chemokine receptors as new molecular targets for antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, F; Vassena, L; Lusso, P

    2004-04-01

    Extraordinary advancements have been made over the past decade in our understanding of the molecular mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry into cells. The external HIV envelope glycoprotein, gp120, sequentially interacts with two cellular receptor molecules, the CD4 glycoprotein and a chemokine receptor, such as CCR5 or CXCR4, leading to the activation of the fusogenic domain of the transmembrane viral glycoprotein, gp41, which changes its conformation to create a hairpin structure that eventually triggers fusion between the viral and cellular membranes. Each of these discrete steps in the viral entry process represents a potential target for new antiviral agents. Current efforts to develop safe and effective HlV entry inhibitors are focused on naturally occurring proteins (e.g., chemokines, antibodies), engineered or modified derivatives of natural proteins (e.g., multimerized soluble CD4, gp41--or chemokine--derived synthetic peptides), as well as small synthetic compounds obtained either by high-throughput screening of large compound libraries or by structure-guided rational design. The recent introduction in therapy of the first fusion inhibitor, the gp41-derived synthetic peptide T20, heralds a new era in the treatment of AIDS, which will hopefully lead to more effective multi-drug regimens with reduced adverse effects for the patients.

  10. Emerging molecular biomarker targets for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Júlia; de Carvalho, Mamede

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects upper (UMN) and lower motor (LMN) neurons. It is associated with a short survival and there is no effective treatment, in spite of a large number of clinical trials. Strong efforts have been made to identify novel disease biomarkers to support diagnosis, provide information on prognosis, to measure disease progression in trials and increase our knowledge on disease pathogenesis. Electromyography by testing the function of the LMN can be used as a biomarker of its dysfunction. A number of electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods have been explored to identify a reliable marker of UMN degeneration. Recently, strong evidence from independent groups, large cohorts of patients and multicenter studies indicate that neurofilaments are very promising diagnostic biomarkers, in particular cerebrospinal fluid and blood levels of phosphoneurofilament heavy chain and neurofilament light chain. Furthermore, their increased levels are associated with poor prognosis. Additional studies have been performed aiming to identify other biomarkers, which alone or in combination with neurofilaments could increase the sensitivity and the specificity of the assays. Emerging molecular marker targets are being discovered, but more studies with standardized methods are required in larger cohorts of ALS patients.

  11. TREK-1 is a novel molecular target in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Voloshyna, Iryna; Besana, Alessandra; Castillo, Mireia; Matos, Tulio; Weinstein, I Bernard; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Robinson, Richard B; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Feinmark, Steven J

    2008-02-15

    TREK-1 is a two-pore domain (K(2P)) potassium channel that carries a leak current that is time- and voltage-independent. Recently, potassium channels have been related to cell proliferation and some K(2P) family channels, such as TASK-3, have been shown to be overexpressed in specific neoplasms. In this study, we addressed the expression of TREK-1 in prostatic tissues and cell lines, and we have found that this potassium channel is highly expressed in prostate cancer but is not expressed in normal prostate nor in benign prostatic hyperplasia. Furthermore, expression of TREK-1 correlates strongly with the grade and the stage of the disease, suggesting a causal link between channel expression and abnormal cell proliferation. In vitro studies showed that TREK-1 is highly expressed in PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines but is not detectable in normal prostate epithelial cells (NPE). In this report, we show that overexpression of TREK-1 in NPE and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells leads to a significant increase in proliferation. Moreover, the increased cell proliferation rate of PC3 cells and TREK-1 overexpressing CHO cells could be reduced when TREK-1 current was reduced by overexpression of a dominant-negative TREK-1 mutant or when cells were exposed to a TREK-1 inhibitor. Taken together, these data suggest that TREK-1 expression is associated with abnormal cell proliferation and may be a novel marker for and a molecular target in prostate cancer.

  12. Visual Feedback and Target Size Effects on Reach-to-Grasp Tasks in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hsiu-Ching; Lee, I-Chen; Lee, I-Ching

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the effects of visual condition and target size during four reach-to-grasp tasks between autistic children and healthy controls. Twenty children with autism and 20 healthy controls participated in the study. Qualisys motion capture system and kinematic measures were used to record movement. Autistic group showed significantly…

  13. Granule size control and targeting in pulsed spray fluid bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Henrik; Liu, Anchang; Räikkönen, Heikki; Hatara, Juha; Antikainen, Osmo; Airaksinen, Sari; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Lou, Honxiang; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2009-07-30

    The primary aim of the study was to investigate the effects of pulsed liquid feed on granule size. The secondary aim was to increase knowledge of this technique in granule size targeting. Pulsed liquid feed refers to the pump changing between on- and off-positions in sequences, called duty cycles. One duty cycle consists of one on- and off-period. The study was performed with a laboratory-scale top-spray fluid bed granulator with duty cycle length and atomization pressure as studied variables. The liquid feed rate, amount and inlet air temperature were constant. The granules were small, indicating that the powder has only undergone ordered mixing, nucleation and early growth. The effect of atomizing pressure on granule size depends on inlet air relative humidity, with premature binder evaporation as a reason. The duty cycle length was of critical importance to the end product attributes, by defining the extent of intermittent drying and rewetting. By varying only the duty cycle length, it was possible to control granule nucleation and growth, with a wider granule size target range in increased relative humidity. The present study confirms that pulsed liquid feed in fluid bed granulation is a useful tool in end product particle size targeting.

  14. Threshold segmentation for PET target volume delineation in radiation treatment planning: the role of target-to-background ratio and target size.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, M; Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Loi, G; Krengli, M; Inglese, E

    2008-04-01

    A multivariable approach was adopted to study the dependence of the percentage threshold [TH(%)] used to define the boundaries of 18F-FDG positive tissue on emission scan duration (ESD) and activity at the start of acquisition (Aacq) for different target sizes and target-to-background (T/B) ratios. An anthropomorphic model, at least for counting rate characteristics, was used to study this dependence in conditions resembling the ones that can be encountered in the clinical studies. An annular ring of water bags of 3 cm thickness was fitted over an International Electro-technical Commission (IEC) phantom in order to obtain counting rates similar to those found in average patients. The scatter fraction of the modified IEC phantom was similar to the mean scatter fraction measured on patients, with a similar scanner. A supplemental set of microhollow spheres was positioned inside the phantom. The NEMA NU 2-2001 scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the IEC phantom to approximate the clinical situation of having activity that extends beyond the scanner field of view. The phantoms were filled with a solution of water and 18F (12 kBq/mL) and the spheres with various T/B ratios of 22.5, 10.3, and 3.6. Sequential imaging was performed to acquire PET images with varying background activity concentrations of about 12, 9, 6.4, 5.3, and 3.1 kBq/mL. The ESD was set to 60, 120, 180, and 240 s/bed. Data were fitted using two distinct multiple linear regression models for sphere ID < or = 10 mm and sphere ID > 10 mm. The fittings of both models were good with an R2 of 0.86 in both cases. Neither ESD nor Aacq resulted as significant predictors of the TH(%). For sphere ID < or =10 mm the target size was the most significant predictor of the TH(%), followed by the T/B ratio, while for sphere ID > 10 mm the explanatory power of the target size and T/B ratio were reversed, the T/B ratio being now the most important predictor of the TH(%). Both the target size and T/B ratio play a

  15. Folate-targeted Polymeric Nanoparticle Formulation of Docetaxel is an Effective Molecularly Targeted Radiosensitizer with Efficacy Dependent on the Timing of Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Michael E.; Copp, Jonathan A.; Karve, Shrirang; Cummings, Natalie D.; Sukumar, Rohit; Li, Chenxi; Napier, Mary E.; Chen, Ronald C.; Cox, Adrienne D.; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) chemotherapeutics hold great potential as radiosensitizers. Their unique properties, such as preferential accumulation in tumors and their ability to target tumors through molecular targeting ligands, are ideally suited for radiosensitization. We aimed to develop a molecularly targeted nanoparticle formulation of docetaxel (Dtxl) and evaluate its property as a radiosensitizer. Using a biodegradable and biocompatible lipid-polymer NP platform and folate as a molecular targeting ligand, we engineered a folate-targeted nanoparticle (FT-NP) formulation of Dtxl. These NPs have sizes of 72±4 nm and surface charges of −42±8 mV. Using folate receptor over-expressing KB cells and folate receptor low HTB-43 cells, we showed folate-mediated intracellular uptake of NPs. In vitro radiosensitization studies initially showed FT-NP is less effective than Dtxl as a radiosensitizer. However, the radiosensitization efficacy is dependent on the timing of radiotherapy. In vitro radiosensitization conducted with irradiation given at the optimal time (24 hours) showed FT-NP Dtxl is as effective as Dtxl. When FT-NP Dtxl is compared to Dtxl and non-targeted nanoparticle (NT-NP) Dtxl in vivo, FT-NP was found to be significantly more effective than Dtxl or NT-NP Dtxl as a radiosensitizer. We also confirmed that radiosensitization is dependent on timing of irradiation in vivo. In summary, FT-NP Dtxl is an effective radiosensitizer in folate-receptor over-expressing tumor cells. Time of irradiation is critical in achieving maximal efficacy with this nanoparticle platform. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first to demonstrate the potential of molecularly targeted NPs as a promising new class of radiosensitizers. PMID:22011071

  16. Experiments for the Undergraduate Laboratory that Illustrate the Size-Exclusion Properties of Zeolite Molecular Sieves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments are presented that demonstrate the size-exclusion properties of zeolites and reveal the reason for naming zeolites "molecular sieves". If an IR spectrometer is available, the adsorption or exclusion of alcohols of varying sizes from dichloromethane or chloroform solutions can be readily demonstrated by monitoring changes in the…

  17. Successful application of virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulations against antimalarial molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Renata Rachide; Costa, Marina dos Santos; Santos, Bianca dos Reis; da Fonseca, Amanda Luisa; Ferreira, Lorena Sales; Chagas, Rafael Cesar Russo; da Silva, Alisson Marques; Varotti, Fernando de Pilla; Taranto, Alex Gutterres

    2016-01-01

    The main challenge in the control of malaria has been the emergence of drug-resistant parasites. The presence of drug-resistant Plasmodium sp. has raised the need for new antimalarial drugs. Molecular modelling techniques have been used as tools to develop new drugs. In this study, we employed virtual screening of a pyrazol derivative (Tx001) against four malaria targets: plasmepsin-IV, plasmepsin-II, falcipain-II, and PfATP6. The receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve (AUC) were established for each molecular target. The AUC values obtained for plasmepsin-IV, plasmepsin-II, and falcipain-II were 0.64, 0.92, and 0.94, respectively. All docking simulations were carried out using AutoDock Vina software. The ligand Tx001 exhibited a better interaction with PfATP6 than with the reference compound (-12.2 versus -6.8 Kcal/mol). The Tx001-PfATP6 complex was submitted to molecular dynamics simulations in vacuum implemented on an NAMD program. The ligand Tx001 docked at the same binding site as thapsigargin, which is a natural inhibitor of PfATP6. Compound TX001 was evaluated in vitro with a P. falciparum strain (W2) and a human cell line (WI-26VA4). Tx001 was discovered to be active against P. falciparum (IC50 = 8.2 µM) and inactive against WI-26VA4 (IC50 > 200 µM). Further ligand optimisation cycles generated new prospects for docking and biological assays. PMID:27982302

  18. Phase equilibrium calculations of ternary liquid mixtures with binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oh, Suk Yung; Bae, Young Chan

    2010-07-15

    The method presented in this paper was developed to predict liquid-liquid equilibria in ternary liquid mixtures by using a combination of a thermodynamic model and molecular dynamics simulations. In general, common classical thermodynamic models have many parameters which are determined by fitting a model with experimental data. This proposed method, however, provides a simple procedure for calculating liquid-liquid equilibria utilizing binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics simulations. This method was applied to mixtures containing water, hydrocarbons, alcohols, chlorides, ketones, acids, and other organic liquids over various temperature ranges. The predicted results agree well with the experimental data without the use of adjustable parameters.

  19. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26750747

  20. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring.

  1. Advances in the Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Saoirse O; Collins, Dearbhaile C; Sundar, Raghav; Popat, Sanjay; Yap, Timothy A

    2017-04-04

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a significant global health challenge and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The traditional 'one-size-fits-all' treatment approach has now evolved into one that involves personalized strategies based on histological and molecular subtypes. The molecular era has revolutionized the treatment of patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 gene aberrations. In the appropriately selected population, anti-tumor agents against these molecular targets can significantly improve progression-free survival. However, the emergence of acquired resistance is inevitable. Novel potent compounds with much improved and rational selectivity profiles, such as third-generation EGFR T790M resistance mutation-specific inhibitors, have been developed and added to the NSCLC armamentarium. To date, attempts to overcome resistance bypass pathways through downstream signaling blockade has had limited success. Furthermore, the majority of patients still do not harbor known driver genetic or epigenetic alterations and/or have no new available treatment options, with chemotherapy remaining their standard of care. Several potentially actionable driver aberrations have recently been identified, with the early clinical development of multiple inhibitors against these promising targets currently in progress. The advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors has led to significant benefit for advanced NSCLC patients with durable responses observed. Further interrogation of the underlying biology of NSCLC, coupled with modern clinical trial designs, is now required to develop novel targeted therapeutics rationally matched with predictive biomarkers of response, so as to further advance NSCLC therapeutics through the next decade.

  2. A molecular receptor targeted, hydroxyapatite nanocrystal based multi-modal contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-03-01

    Multi-modal molecular imaging can significantly improve the potential of non-invasive medical diagnosis by combining basic anatomical descriptions with in-depth phenotypic characteristics of disease. Contrast agents with multifunctional properties that can sense and enhance the signature of specific molecular markers, together with high biocompatibility are essential for combinatorial molecular imaging approaches. Here, we report a multi-modal contrast agent based on hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nHAp), which is engineered to show simultaneous contrast enhancement for three major molecular imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray imaging and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging. Monodispersed nHAp crystals of average size approximately 30 nm and hexagonal crystal structure were in situ doped with multiple rare-earth impurities by a surfactant-free, aqueous wet-chemical method at 100 degrees C. Doping of nHAp with Eu(3+) (3 at%) resulted bright near-infrared fluorescence (700 nm) due to efficient (5)D(0)-(7)F(4) electronic transition and co-doping with Gd(3+) resulted enhanced paramagnetic longitudinal relaxivity (r(1) approximately 12 mM(-1) s(-1)) suitable for T(1) weighted MR imaging together with approximately 80% X-ray attenuation suitable for X-ray contrast imaging. Capability of MF-nHAp to specifically target and enhance the signature of molecular receptors (folate) in cancer cells was realized by carbodiimide grafting of cell-membrane receptor ligand folic acid (FA) on MF-nHAp surface aminized with dendrigraft polymer, polyethyleneimine (PEI). The FA-PEI-MF-nHAp conjugates showed specific aggregation on FR(+ve) cells while leaving the negative control cells untouched. Nanotoxicity evaluation of this multifunctional nHAp carried out on primary human endothelial cells (HUVEC), normal mouse lung fibroblast cell line (L929), human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (KB) and human lung cancer cell line (A549) revealed no apparent toxicity even

  3. Molecular Targeted Therapy in Modern Oncology: Imaging Assessment of Treatment Response and Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; DiPiro, Pamela J.; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Shinagare, Atul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oncology is a rapidly evolving field with a shift toward personalized cancer treatment. The use of therapies targeted to the molecular features of individual tumors and the tumor microenvironment has become much more common. In this review, anti-angiogenic and other molecular targeted therapies are discussed, with a focus on typical and atypical response patterns and imaging manifestations of drug toxicities. PMID:28096716

  4. [Molecular model of anthrax toxin translocation into target-cells].

    PubMed

    Noskov, A N

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is formed from three components: protective antigen (PA), lethal (LF) and edema (EF) factors. PA83 is cleaved by cell surface protease furin to produce a 63-kDa fragment (PA63). PA63 and LF/EF molecules are assembled to anthrax toxin complexes: oligomer PA63 x 7 + LF/EF x 3. Assembly is occurred during of binding with cellular receptor or near surface of target-cell. This toxin complex forms pore and induces receptor-mediated endocytosis. Formed endosome consists extracellular liquid with LF/EF and membrane-associated ferments (H+ and K+/Na+-ATPases) and proteins (receptors and others). H+ concentration is increased into endosome as result of K/Na-ATPase-dependent- activity of H+-ATPase. Difference of potentials (between endosome and intracellular liquid) is increased and LF/EF molecules are moved to pore and bound with PA63-oligomer to PA63 x 7 + LF/EF x 7 and full block pore (ion-selective channel). Endosome is increased in volume and induces increasing of PA63-oligomer pore to.size of effector complex: LF/EF x 7 + PAl7 x 7 = 750 kDa. Effector complex is translocated from endosome to cytosol by means high difference of potentials (H+) and dissociates from PA47 x 7 complex after cleavage of FFD315-sait by intracellular chymotrypsin-like proteases in all 7 molecules PA63. PA47 x 7 complex (strongly fixed in membrane with debris of hydrophobic loops) return into endosome and pore is destroyed. Endosome pH is decreased rapidly and PA47 x 7 complex is destroyed by endosomal/lysosomal proteases. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is ended by endosome recycling in cell-membrane.

  5. A High-Throughput Size Exclusion Chromatography Method to Determine the Molecular Size Distribution of Meningococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imran; Rahman, K. M. Taufiqur; Siraj, S. M. Saad Us; Karim, Mahbubul; Muktadir, Abdul; Maheshwari, Arpan; Kabir, Md Azizul; Nahar, Zebun

    2016-01-01

    Molecular size distribution of meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine is a readily identifiable parameter that directly correlates with the immunogenicity. In this paper, we report a size exclusion chromatography method to determine the molecular size distribution and distribution coefficient value of meningococcal polysaccharide serogroups A, C, W, and Y in meningococcal polysaccharide (ACWY) vaccines. The analyses were performed on a XK16/70 column packed with sepharose CL-4B with six different batches of Ingovax® ACWY, a meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine produced by Incepta Vaccine Ltd., Bangladesh. A quantitative rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay was employed to determine the polysaccharide contents of each serogroup. The calculated distribution coefficient values of serogroups A, C, W, and Y were found to be 0.26 ± 0.16, 0.21 ± 0.11, 0.21 ± 0.11, and 0.14 ± 0.12, respectively, and met the requirements of British Pharmacopeia. The method was proved to be robust for determining the distribution coefficient values which is an obligatory requirement for vaccine lot release. PMID:27688770

  6. Variable size small targets detection using density-based clustering combined with backtracking strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiying; Lin, Yonggui; Xiao, Fangxiong

    2016-10-01

    The series problem of infrared small target detection in heavy clutter is a challenging work in active vision. During different imaging environments the size and gray intensity of target will keep changing which lead to unstable detection. Focus on mining more robust feature of small targets and following the sequential detection framework, we propose a novel research scheme based on density-based clustering and backtracking strategy in this paper. First, point of interest is extracted by the speeded up robust feature (SURF) detector for its better performance in digging features invariant to uniform scaling, orientation and illumination changes. Second, due to the local aggregation property of target trajectory in space, a new proposed density-based clustering method is introduced to segment the target trajectory, so that the target detection problem is transformed into the extract the target trajectory. Then, In order to keep the integral and independence of the trace as much as possible, two factors: percent and are exploited to help deciding the clustering granularity. Later, the backtracking strategy is adopted to search for the target trajectory with pruning function on the basis of the consistence and continuity of the short-time target trajectory in temporal-spatial. Extended experiments show the validity of our method. Compared with the data association methods executed on the huge candidate trajectory space, the time-consuming is reduced obviously. Additional, the feature detection is more stable for the use of SURF and the false alarm suppression rate is superior to most baseline and state-of-arts methods.

  7. Dimethylnitrosamine-demethylase: molecular size-dependence of repression by polynuclear hydrocarbons. Nonhydrocarbon repressors.

    PubMed

    Arcos, J C; Valle, R T; Bryant, G M; Buu-Hoi, N P; Argus, M F

    1976-01-01

    Studies with 58 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons have shown that to repress demethylation of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) in rat liver, the hydrocarbons must satisfy specific requirements of molecular geometry regarding size, shape, and coplanarity. Expressing the molecular size of these planar compounds by the two-dimensional area occupied, the size for maximal repressor activity ranges between about 85 and 150 A2. In addition to being within the correct molecular size range the hydrocarbons must have an elongated-rather than compact-molecular shape; circularly shaped and/or highly symmetrical hydrocarbons, such as coronene, triphenylene, ovalene, and tetrabenzonaphthalene, have very low activity or are inactive, in spite of being in the optimum size range. Coplanarity of the molecule is a critical requirement; thus, the potent carcinogen, 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene, is inactive as repressor of DMN-demethylase synthesis. Two exceptions, fluoranthene and benzol[ghi] fluoranthene, showed significant induction of DMN-demethylase. The molecular size distribution of hydrocarbons that repress the DMN-demethylase shows a mirror-image relationship with respect to the earlier reported molecular size requirement for indcution of azo dye N-demethylase. Compounds other than hydrocarbons also show the mirror-image relationship in the sense that pregnenolene-16alpha-carbonitrile, alpha- and beta-naphthoflavone, and Aroclor 1254 (known to be inducers of various mixed-function oxidases) are strong repressors of DMN-demethylase. Aminoacetonitrile, a strong inhibitor of carcinogenesis by DMN, is also a potent repressor of DMN-demethylase. The enzyme is inhibited by pretreatment of the animals with cobaltous chloride, an inhibitor of the synthesis of cytochrome P-450. Pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile and 3-methylcholanthrene, despite their similarity of action on DMN-demethylase, have different effects on azo reductase, which is repressed by the former and induced by the latter

  8. Analytical performance of molecular beacons on surface immobilized gold nanoparticles of varying size and density.

    PubMed

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-11-25

    The high quenching efficiency of metal nanoparticles has facilitated its use as quenchers in molecular beacons. To optimize this system, a good understanding of the many factors that influence molecular beacon performance is required. In this study, molecular beacon performance was evaluated as a function of gold nanoparticle size and its immobilization characteristics. Gold nanoparticles of 4 nm, 15 nm and 87 nm diameter, were immobilized onto glass slides. Each size regime offered distinctive optical properties for fluorescence quenching of molecular dyes that were conjugated to oligonucleotides that were immobilized to the gold nanoparticles. Rigid double stranded DNA was used as a model to place fluorophores at different distances from the gold nanoparticles. The effect of particle size and also the immobilization density of nanoparticles was evaluated. The 4 nm and 87 nm gold nanoparticles offered the highest sensitivity in terms of the change in fluorescence intensity as a function of distance (3-fold improvement for Cy5). The optical properties of the molecular fluorophore was of significance, with Cy5 offering higher contrast ratios than Cy3 due to the red-shifted emission spectrum relative to the plasmon peak. A high density of gold nanoparticles reduced contrast ratios, indicating preference for a monolayer of immobilized nanoparticles when considering analytical performance. Molecular beacon probes were then used in place of the double stranded oligonucleotides. There was a strong dependence of molecular beacon performance on the length of a linker used for attachment to the nanoparticle surface. The optimal optical performance was obtained with 4 nm gold nanoparticles that were immobilized as monolayers of low density (5.7×10(11)particles cm(-2)) on glass surfaces. These nanoparticle surfaces offered a 2-fold improvement in analytical performance of the molecular beacons when compared to other nanoparticle sizes investigated. The principles developed

  9. Herbal bioactivation, molecular targets and the toxicity relevance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wu; Serag, Erini S; Sneed, Kevin B; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2011-07-15

    There have been increasing reports on the adverse reactions associated with herbal consumption. For many of these adverse reactions, the underlying biochemical mechanisms are unknown, but bioactivation of herbal compounds to generate reactive intermediates have been implicated. This minireview updates our knowledge on metabolic activation of herbal compounds, molecular targets and the toxicity relevance. A number of studies have documented that some herbal compounds can be converted to toxic or even carcinogenic metabolites by Phase I [e.g. cytochrome P450s (CYPs)] and less frequently by Phase II enzymes. For example, aristolochic acids (AAs) in Aristolochia spp, which undergo reduction of the nitro group by hepatic CYP1A1/2 or peroxidases in extrahepatic tissues to generate highly reactive cyclic nitrenium ions. The latter can react with macromolecules (DNA and protein), resulting in activation of H-ras and myc oncogenes and gene mutation in renal cells and finally carcinogenesis of the kidneys. Teucrin A and teuchamaedryn A, two diterpenoids found in germander (Teuchrium chamaedrys) used as an adjuvant to slimming herbal supplements that caused severe hepatotoxicity, are converted by CYP3A4 to reactive epoxide which reacts with proteins such as CYP3A and epoxide hydrolase and inactivate them. Some naturally occurring alkenylbenzenes (e.g. safrole, methyleugenol and estragole) and flavonoids (e.g. quercetin) can undergo bioactivation by sequential 1-hydroxylation and sulfation, resulting in reactive intermediates capable of forming DNA adducts. Extensive pulegone metabolism generated p-cresol that is a glutathione depletory. The hepatotoxicity of kava is possibly due to intracellular glutathione depletion and/or quinone formation. Moreover, several herbal compounds including capsaicin from chili peppers, dially sulfone in garlic, methysticin and dihydromethysticin in kava, oleuropein in olive oil, and resveratrol found in grape seeds are mechanism-based (suicide

  10. The Challenges and the Promise of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Malignant Gliomas1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxiang; Xu, Tao; Jiang, Ying; Xu, Hanchong; Yan, Yong; Fu, Da; Chen, Juxiang

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors and one of the most challenging forms of cancers to treat. Despite advances in conventional treatment, the outcome for patients remains almost universally fatal. This poor prognosis is due to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence after surgical removal. However, over the past decade, molecular targeted therapy has held the promise of transforming the care of malignant glioma patients. Significant progress in understanding the molecular pathology of gliomagenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotypes will open opportunities to rationally develop new molecular targeted therapy options. Recently, therapeutic strategies have focused on targeting pro-growth signaling mediated by receptor tyrosine kinase/RAS/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, proangiogenic pathways, and several other vital intracellular signaling networks, such as proteasome and histone deacetylase. However, several factors such as cross-talk between the altered pathways, intratumoral molecular heterogeneity, and therapeutic resistance of glioma stem cells (GSCs) have limited the activity of single agents. Efforts are ongoing to study in depth the complex molecular biology of glioma, develop novel regimens targeting GSCs, and identify biomarkers to stratify patients with the individualized molecular targeted therapy. Here, we review the molecular alterations relevant to the pathology of malignant glioma, review current advances in clinical targeted trials, and discuss the challenges, controversies, and future directions of molecular targeted therapy. PMID:25810009

  11. Concurrent directional adaptation of reactive saccades and hand movements to target displacements of different size.

    PubMed

    Borisova, Steliana; Bock, Otmar; Grigorova, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    When eye and hand movements are concurrently aimed at double-step targets that call for equal and opposite changes of response direction (-10° for the eyes, +10° for the hand), adaptive recalibration of both motor systems is strongly attenuated; instead, hand but not eye movements are changed by corrective strategies (V. Grigorova et al., 2013a). The authors introduce a complementary paradigm, where double-step targets call for a -10° change of eye and a -30° change for hand movements. If compared to control subjects adapting only the eyes or only the hand, adaptive improvements were comparable for the eyes but were twice as large for the hand; in contrast, eye and hand aftereffects were comparable to those in control subjects. The authors concluded that concurrent exposure of eyes and hand to steps of the same direction but different size facilitated hand strategies, but didn't affect recalibration. This finding together with previous one (V. Grigorova et al., 2013a), suggests that concurrent adaptation of eyes and hand reveals different mechanisms of recalibration for step sign and step size, which are shared by reactive saccades and hand movements. However, hand mostly benefits from strategies provoked by the difference in target step sign and size.

  12. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics of Virus Capsids as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid–protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways. When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Here, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid–drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets. PMID:27128262

  13. Molecular size and solubility conditions of polysilane macromolecules with different topology

    PubMed Central

    Mavrič, Andraž; Badasyan, Artem; Fanetti, Mattia; Valant, Matjaz

    2016-01-01

    Solubility of polysilane macromolecules has so far been a scientific as well as technological problem due to a lack of understanding of their proper molecular size and agglomeration/de-agglomeration conditions. Here we show that, in contrary to previous reports, the polysilane molecules are inherently small enough to be, under right conditions, dissolved. We used a dynamic light scattering and a differential scanning calorimetry to show that even under a dilute regime the polymer molecules are agglomerated at room temperature and undergo de-agglomeration at slightly elevated temperatures of around 40 °C. The de-agglomeration results in formation of stable solutions of the polymer molecules of different topological structure in different organic solvents. We determined the polymer molecular sizes to be around 20 nm, much lower than previously reported. The measured molecular size was confirmed by transmission electron microscope imaging of the individual molecules. PMID:27748444

  14. Threshold size for optimal passive pulmonary targeting and retention of rigid microparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kutscher, Hilliard L.; Chao, Piyun; Deshmukh, Manjeet; Singh, Yashveer; Hu, Peidi; Joseph, Laurie B.; Reimer, David C.; Stein, Stanley; Laskin, Debra L.; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between microparticle (MP) size and lung targeting efficiency, intra-lung distribution and retention time was systematically studied after intravenous administration of rigid fluorescent polystyrene MPs of various sizes (2, 3, 6 and 10μm) to Sprague-Dawley rats. Total fluorescence was assessed and it was found that 2μm and 3μm MPs readily passed through the lung to the liver and spleen while 10μm MPs were completely entrapped in the lung for the one-week duration of the study. Approximately 84% of 6μm MPs that were initially entrapped in the lung were cleared over the next 2 days and 15% were cleared over the remaining 5 days. A Caliper IVIS® 100 small animal imaging system confirmed that 3μm MPs were not retained in the lung but that 6μm and 10μm MPs were widely distributed throughout the lung. Moreover, histologic examination showed MP entrapment in capillaries but not arterioles. These studies suggest that for rigid MPs the optimal size range required to achieve transient but highly efficiently targeting to pulmonary capillaries after IV injection is >6μm but <10μm in rats and that systemic administration of optimally sized MPs may be an efficient alternative to currently used inhalation-based delivery to the lung. PMID:20043961

  15. Molecular Composition and Photochemical Reactivity of Size-Fractionated Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Maizel, Andrew C; Remucal, Christina K

    2017-02-21

    The photochemical production of reactive species, such as triplet dissolved organic matter ((3)DOM) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2), contributes to the degradation of aquatic contaminants and is related to an array of DOM structural characteristics, notably molecular weight. In order to relate DOM molecular weight, optical properties, and reactive species production, Suwannee River (SRFA) and Pony Lake fulvic acid (PLFA) isolates are fractionated by sequential ultrafiltration, and the resultant fractions are evaluated in terms of molecular composition and photochemical reactivity. UV-visible measurements of aromaticity increase with molecular weight in both fulvic acids, while PLFA molecular weight fractions are shown to be structurally similar by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In addition, Bray-Curtis dissimilarity analysis of formulas identified in the isolates and their size fractions reveal that SRFA and PLFA have distinct molecular compositions. Quantum yields of (3)DOM, measured by electron and energy transfer probes, and (1)O2 decreased with molecular weight. Decreasing [(3)DOM]ss with molecular weight is shown to derive from elevated quenching in high molecular weight fractions, rather than increased (3)DOM formation. This work has implications for the photochemistry of waters undergoing natural or engineered treatment processes that alter DOM molecular weight, such as photooxidation and biological degradation.

  16. Targeted Delivery Systems for Molecular Therapy in Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; Li, Fangfei; Wang, Luyao; Li, Defang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Feng; Liang, Chao; Liu, Biao; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; He, Bing; Lu, Jun; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the integral components of bone, including bone matrix, bone mineral and bone cells, give rise to complex disturbances of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis. Non-specific drug delivery using high-dose systemic administration may decrease therapeutic efficacy of drugs and increase the risk of toxic effects in non-skeletal tissues, which remain clinical challenges in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Thus, targeted delivery systems are urgently needed to achieve higher drug delivery efficiency, improve therapeutic efficacy in the targeted cells/tissues, and minimize toxicities in non-targeted cells/tissues. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of different targeting moieties and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in skeletal disorders, and also discuss the advantages, challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation. PMID:27011176

  17. Targeting heat-shock protein 90 with ganetespib for molecularly targeted therapy of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Lu, J; Hua, Y; Zhang, P; Liang, Z; Ruan, L; Lian, C; Shi, H; Chen, K; Tu, Z

    2015-01-01

    -dependent kinase 1 (pCDK1), EGFR and Ki-67 revealed significant differences in ganetespib-treated tumors. Collectively, our data suggest that ganetespib, as a new potent treatment option, can be used for the molecularly targeted therapy of GC patients according to their expression profiles of EGFR. PMID:25590805

  18. Feasibility of using molecular docking-based virtual screening for searching dual target kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shunye; Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2013-04-22

    Multitarget agents have been extensively explored for solving limited efficacies, poor safety, and resistant profiles of an individual target. Theoretical approaches for searching and designing multitarget agents are critically useful. Here, the performance of molecular docking to search dual-target inhibitors for four kinase pairs (CDK2-GSK3B, EGFR-Src, Lck-Src, and Lck-VEGFR2) was assessed. First, the representative structures for each kinase target were chosen by structural clustering of available crystal structures. Next, the performance of molecular docking to distinguish inhibitors from noninhibitors for each individual kinase target was evaluated. The results show that molecular docking-based virtual screening illustrates good capability to find known inhibitors for individual targets, but the prediction accuracy is structurally dependent. Finally, the performance of molecular docking to identify the dual-target kinase inhibitors for four kinase pairs was evaluated. The analyses show that molecular docking successfully filters out most noninhibitors and achieves promising performance for identifying dual-kinase inhibitors for CDK2-GSK3B and Lck-VEGFR2. But a high false-positive rate leads to low enrichment of true dual-target inhibitors in the final list. This study suggests that molecular docking serves as a useful tool in searching inhibitors against dual or even multiple kinase targets, but integration with other virtual screening tools is necessary for achieving better predictions.

  19. On the domain size effect of thermal conductivities from equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuyuan; Ruan, Xiulin

    2017-01-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations with the Green-Kubo formula and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations with the Fourier's Law are two widely used methods for calculating thermal conductivities of materials. It is well known that both methods suffer from domain size effects, especially for NEMD. But the underlying mechanisms and their comparison have not been much quantitatively studied before. In this paper, we investigate their domain size effects by using crystalline silicon at 1000 K, graphene at 300 K, and silicene at 300 K as model material systems. The thermal conductivity of silicon from EMD simulations increases normally with the increasing domain size and converges at a size of around 4 ×4 ×4 nm3 . The converging trend agrees well with the wavelength-accumulated thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivities of graphene and silicene from EMD simulations decrease abnormally with the increasing domain size and converge at a size of around 10 ×10 nm2 . We ascribe the anomalous size effect to the fact that as the domain size increases, the effect of more phonon scattering processes (particularly the flexural phonons) dominates over the effect of more phonon modes contributing to the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivities of the three material systems from NEMD simulations all show normal domain size effects, although their dependences on the domain size differ. The converging trends agree with the mean free path accumulation of thermal conductivity. This study provides new insights that other than some exceptions, the domain size effects of EMD and NEMD are generally associated with wavelength and mean free path accumulations of thermal conductivity, respectively. Since phonon wavelength spans over a much narrower range than mean free path, EMD usually has less significant domain size effect than NEMD.

  20. The effect of target group size on risk judgments and comparative optimism: the more, the riskier.

    PubMed

    Price, Paul C; Smith, Andrew R; Lench, Heather C

    2006-03-01

    In 5 experiments, college students exhibited a group size effect on risk judgments. As the number of individuals in a target group increased, so did participants' judgments of the risk of the average member of the group for a variety of negative life events. This happened regardless of whether the stimuli consisted of photographs of real peers or stick-figure representations of peers. As a result, the degree to which participants exhibited comparative optimism (i.e., judged themselves to be at lower risk than their peers) also increased as the size of the comparison group increased. These results suggest that the typical comparative optimism effect reported so often in the literature might be, at least in part, a group size effect. Additional results include a group size effect on judgments of the likelihood that the average group member will experience positive and neutral events and a group size effect on perceptual judgments of the heights of stick figures. These latter results, in particular, support the existence of a simple, general cognitive mechanism that integrates stimulus numerosity into quantitative judgments about that stimulus.

  1. Molecular pathways: targeting ETS gene fusions in cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Felix Y; Brenner, J Chad; Hussain, Maha; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2014-09-01

    Rearrangements, or gene fusions, involving the ETS family of transcription factors are common driving events in both prostate cancer and Ewing sarcoma. These rearrangements result in pathogenic expression of the ETS genes and trigger activation of transcriptional programs enriched for invasion and other oncogenic features. Although ETS gene fusions represent intriguing therapeutic targets, transcription factors, such as those comprising the ETS family, have been notoriously difficult to target. Recently, preclinical studies have demonstrated an association between ETS gene fusions and components of the DNA damage response pathway, such as PARP1, the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNAPK), and histone deactylase 1 (HDAC1), and have suggested that ETS fusions may confer sensitivity to inhibitors of these DNA repair proteins. In this review, we discuss the role of ETS fusions in cancer, the preclinical rationale for targeting ETS fusions with inhibitors of PARP1, DNAPK, and HDAC1, as well as ongoing clinical trials targeting ETS gene fusions.

  2. Targeted molecular trait stacking in cotton through targeted double-strand break induction

    PubMed Central

    D'Halluin, Kathleen; Vanderstraeten, Chantal; Van Hulle, Jolien; Rosolowska, Joanna; Van Den Brande, Ilse; Pennewaert, Anouk; D'Hont, Kristel; Bossut, Martine; Jantz, Derek; Ruiter, Rene; Broadhvest, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments of tools for targeted genome modification have led to new concepts in how multiple traits can be combined. Targeted genome modification is based on the use of nucleases with tailor-made specificities to introduce a DNA double-strand break (DSB) at specific target loci. A re-engineered meganuclease was designed for specific cleavage of an endogenous target sequence adjacent to a transgenic insect control locus in cotton. The combination of targeted DNA cleavage and homologous recombination–mediated repair made precise targeted insertion of additional trait genes (hppd, epsps) feasible in cotton. Targeted insertion events were recovered at a frequency of about 2% of the independently transformed embryogenic callus lines. We further demonstrated that all trait genes were inherited as a single genetic unit, which will simplify future multiple-trait introgression. PMID:23777410

  3. Molecular Targeted Approaches for Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z.Q.; Saluja, A.K.; Dudeja, V.; Vickers, S.M.; Buchsbaum, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Human pancreatic cancer remains a highly malignant disease with almost similar incidence and mortality despite extensive research. Many targeted therapies are under development. However, clinical investigation showed that single targeted therapies and most combined therapies were not able to improve the prognosis of this disease, even though some of these therapies had excellent anti-tumor effects in pre-clinical models. Cross-talk between cell proliferation signaling pathways may be an important phenomenon in pancreatic cancer, which may result in cancer cell survival even though some pathways are blocked by targeted therapy. Pancreatic cancer may possess different characteristics and targets in different stages of pathogenesis, maintenance and metastasis. Sensitivity to therapy may also vary for cancer cells at different stages. The unique pancreatic cancer structure with abundant stroma creates a tumor microenvironment with hypoxia and low blood perfusion rate, which prevents drug delivery to cancer cells. In this review, the most commonly investigated targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer treatment are discussed. However, how to combine these targeted therapies and/or combine them with chemotherapy to improve the survival rate of pancreatic cancer is still a challenge. Genomic and proteomic studies using pancreatic cancer samples obtained from either biopsy or surgery are recommended to individualize tumor characters and to perform drug sensitivity study in order to design a tailored therapy with minimal side effects. These studies may help to further investigate tumor pathogenesis, maintenance and metastasis to create cellular expression profiles at different stages. Integration of the information obtained needs to be performed from multiple levels and dimensions in order to develop a successful targeted therapy. PMID:21777178

  4. Biodegradability enhancement and detoxification of cork processing wastewater molecular size fractions by ozone.

    PubMed

    Santos, Diana C; Silva, Lúcia; Albuquerque, António; Simões, Rogério; Gomes, Arlindo C

    2013-11-01

    Cork boiling wastewater pollutants were fractionated by sequential use of four ultrafiltration membranes and five fractions were obtained: four retentates (>100, 50-100, 20-50 and 10-20 kDa) and one permeate (<10 kDa); which were used to study the correlation of molecular size with biodegradability and toxicity before and after ozonation. The results show that molecular size is correlated with organic load and restrains biodegradability. The fraction with >100 kDa corresponds to 56% of the organic load and the one with <10 kDa only 8%. The biodegradability of fractions increased 182% with fractions molecular size reduction from >100 to <10 kDa and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was from 3436 to 386 mg L(-1). For biodegradability enhancement the best outcome of ozonation was obtained with compounds having molecular size >20 kDa and range from 5% up to 175% for applied ozone doses to COD ratios between 0.15 and 0.38.

  5. Technology Insight: novel imaging of molecular targets is an emerging area crucial to the development of targeted drugs

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Wolfgang A; Czernin, Johannes; Phelps, Michael E; Herschman, Harvey R

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Targeted drugs hold great promise for the treatment of malignant tumors; however, there are several challenges for efficient evaluation of these drugs in preclinical and clinical studies. These challenges include identifying the ‘correct’, biologically active concentration and dose schedule, selecting the patients likely to benefit from treatment, monitoring inhibition of the target protein or pathway, and assessing the response of the tumor to therapy. Although anatomic imaging will remain important, molecular imaging provides several new opportunities to make the process of drug development more efficient. Various techniques for molecular imaging that enable noninvasive and quantitative imaging are now available in the preclinical and clinical settings, to aid development and evaluation of new drugs for the treatment of cancer. In this Review, we discuss the integration of molecular imaging into the process of drug development and how molecular imaging can address key questions in the preclinical and clinical evaluation of new targeted drugs. Examples include imaging of the expression and inhibition of drug targets, noninvasive tissue pharmacokinetics, and early assessment of the tumor response. PMID:18097456

  6. Dynamic modulation of illusory and physical target size on separate and coordinated eye and hand movements

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Christine M.; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    In everyday behavior, two of the most common visually guided actions—eye and hand movements—can be performed independently, but are often synergistically coupled. In this study, we examine whether the same visual representation is used for different stages of saccades and pointing, namely movement preparation and execution, and whether this usage is consistent between independent and naturalistic coordinated eye and hand movements. To address these questions, we used the Ponzo illusion to dissociate the perceived and physical sizes of visual targets and measured the effects on movement preparation and execution for independent and coordinated saccades and pointing. During independent movements, we demonstrated that both physically and perceptually larger targets produced faster preparation for both effectors. Furthermore, participants who showed a greater influence of the illusion on saccade preparation also showed a greater influence on pointing preparation, suggesting that a shared mechanism involved in preparation across effectors is influenced by illusions. However, only physical but not perceptual target sizes influenced saccade and pointing execution. When pointing was coordinated with saccades, we observed different dynamics: pointing no longer showed modulation from illusory size, while saccades showed illusion modulation for both preparation and execution. Interestingly, in independent and coordinated movements, the illusion modulated saccade preparation more than pointing preparation, with this effect more pronounced during coordination. These results suggest a shared mechanism, dominated by the eyes, may underlie visually guided action preparation across effectors. Furthermore, the influence of illusions on action may operate within such a mechanism, leading to dynamic interactions between action modalities based on task demands. PMID:28362898

  7. Dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles: a versatile platform for targeted molecular imaging, molecular diagnostics, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Tassa, Carlos; Shaw, Stanley Y; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-10-18

    Advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of disease susceptibility coupled with prominent successes for molecular targeted therapies have resulted in an emerging strategy of personalized medicine. This approach envisions risk stratification and therapeutic selection based on an individual's genetic makeup and physiologic state (the latter assessed through cellular or molecular phenotypes). Molecularly targeted nanoparticles can play a key role in this vision through noninvasive assessments of molecular processes and specific cell populations in vivo, sensitive molecular diagnostics, and targeted delivery of therapeutics. A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle with a cross-linked dextran coating, or CLIO, is a powerful and illustrative nanoparticle platform for these applications. These structures and their derivatives support diagnostic imaging by magnetic resonance (MRI), optical, and positron emission tomography (PET) modalities and constitute a versatile platform for conjugation to targeting ligands. A variety of conjugation methods exist to couple the dextran surface to different functional groups; in addition, a robust bioorthogonal [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction between 1,2,4,5-tetrazene (Tz) and trans-cyclooctene (TCO) can conjugate nanoparticles to targeting ligands or label pretargeted cells. The ready availability of conjugation methods has given rise to the synthesis of libraries of small molecule modified nanoparticles, which can then be screened for nanoparticles with specificity for a specific cell type. Since most nanoparticles display their targeting ligands in a multivalent manner, a detailed understanding of the kinetics and affinity of a nanoparticle's interaction with its target (as determined by surface plasmon resonance) can yield functionally important insights into nanoparticle design. In this Account, we review applications of the CLIO platform in several areas relevant to the mission of personalized medicine. We demonstrate

  8. Cervical Cancer: Development of Targeted Therapies Beyond Molecular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Knoff, Jayne; Yang, Benjamin; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical cancer. The integration of HPV genes into the host genome causes the upregulation of E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 and E7 proteins inactivate and degrade tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma, respectively, leading to malignant progression. HPV E6 and E7 antigens are ideal targets for the development of therapies for cervical cancer and precursor lesions because they are constitutively expressed in infected cells and malignant tumors but not in normal cells and they are essential for cell immortalization and transformation. Immunotherapies are being developed to target E6/E7 by eliciting antigen-specific immune responses. siRNA technologies target E6/E7 by modulating the expression of the oncoproteins. Proteasome inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors are being developed to indirectly target E6/E7 by interfering with their oncogenic activities. The ultimate goal for HPV-targeted therapies is the progression through clinical trials to commercialization. PMID:24533233

  9. Development of hierarchical, tunable pore size polymer foams for ICF targets

    DOE PAGES

    Hamilton, Christopher E.; Lee, Matthew Nicholson; Parra-Vasquez, A. Nicholas Gerardo

    2016-08-01

    In this study, one of the great challenges of inertial confinement fusion experiments is poor understanding of the effects of reactant heterogeneity on fusion reactions. The Marble campaign, conceived at Los Alamos National Laboratory, aims to gather new insights into this issue by utilizing target capsules containing polymer foams of variable pore sizes, tunable over an order of magnitude. Here, we describe recent and ongoing progress in the development of CH and CH/CD polymer foams in support of Marble. Hierarchical and tunable pore sizes have been achieved by utilizing a sacrificial porogen template within an open-celled poly(divinylbenzene) or poly(divinylbenzene-co-styrene) aerogelmore » matrix, resulting in low-density foams (~30 mg/ml) with continuous multimodal pore networks.« less

  10. Targeting Triple Negative Breast Cancer with a Small-sized Paramagnetic Nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Varma, Nadimpalli RS; Gang, Zhang Z.; Ewing, James R.; Arbab, Ali S; Ali, Meser M

    2016-01-01

    There is no available targeted therapy or imaging agent for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We developed a small-sized dendrimer-based nanoparticle containing a clinical relevant MRI contrast agent, GdDOTA and a NIR fluorescent dye, DL680. Systemic delivery of dual-modal nanoparticles led to accumulation of the agents in a flank mouse model of TNBC that were detected by both optical and MR imaging. In-vivo fluorescence images, as well as ex-vivo fluorescence images of individual organs, demonstrated that nanoparticles accumulated into tumor selectively. A dual modal strategy resulted in a selective delivery of a small-sized (GdDOTA)42-G4-DL680 dendrimeric agent to TNBC tumors, avoiding other major organs. PMID:28018751

  11. Development of hierarchical, tunable pore size polymer foams for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Christopher E.; Lee, Matthew Nicholson; Parra-Vasquez, A. Nicholas Gerardo

    2016-08-01

    In this study, one of the great challenges of inertial confinement fusion experiments is poor understanding of the effects of reactant heterogeneity on fusion reactions. The Marble campaign, conceived at Los Alamos National Laboratory, aims to gather new insights into this issue by utilizing target capsules containing polymer foams of variable pore sizes, tunable over an order of magnitude. Here, we describe recent and ongoing progress in the development of CH and CH/CD polymer foams in support of Marble. Hierarchical and tunable pore sizes have been achieved by utilizing a sacrificial porogen template within an open-celled poly(divinylbenzene) or poly(divinylbenzene-co-styrene) aerogel matrix, resulting in low-density foams (~30 mg/ml) with continuous multimodal pore networks.

  12. Size Matters: Developing Design Rules to Engineer Nanoparticles for Solid Tumour Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Edward Alexander

    Nanotechnology enables the design of highly customizable platforms for producing minimally invasive and programmable strategies for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Advances in this field have demonstrated that nanoparticles can enhance specificity of anti-cancer agents, respond to tumour-specific cues, and direct the visualization of biological targets in vivo. . Nanoparticles can be synthesized within the 1 to 100 nm range to achieve different electromagnetic properties and specifically interact with biological tissues by tuning their size, shape, and surface chemistry. However, it remains unclear which physicochemical parameters are critical for delivering nanomaterials to the tumour site. With less than 5% of administered nanoparticles reaching the tumour, engineering of nanoparticles for effective delivery to solid tumours remains a critical challenge to cancer nanomedicine. A more comprehensive understanding of the interplay between the nanomaterial physicochemical properties and biological systems is necessary to enhance the efficacy of nanoparticle tumour targeting. This thesis explores how nanoparticle size and functionalization with cancer cell specific agents impact nanoparticle delivery to tumours. Furthermore, this doctoral work (i) discusses how tumour structure evolves with growth, (ii) elucidates how such changes modulate nanoparticle accumulation, and (iii) identifies how the skin serves as a significant off-target site for nanoparticle uptake. This thesis also demonstrates the utility of empirically-derived parametric models, Monte Carlo simulations, and decision matrices for mechanistically understanding and predicting the impact of nanomaterial features and tumour biology on nanoparticle fate in vivo. These topics establish key design considerations to tailor nanoparticles for enhanced tumour targeting. Collectively, the concepts presented herein form a fundamental framework for the development of personalized nanomedicine and nano

  13. Molecular Dynamics Study for Channel Size Dependence of Shear Stress Between Droplet and Wall.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Akinori; Mima, Toshiki; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the channel size dependence of the shear stress between water droplets and solid walls in nm-order channel was analyzed. We considered a several different-sized and highly hydrophobic channel whose macroscopic contact angle was about 150 degrees. We have evaluated the shear stress and the normal pressure by molecular dynamics simulation. Analyzing shear stress and normal pressure based on the macroscopic model, we have discussed the difference between the macroscopic model based on hydrodynamics and the microscopic model. As a result, in the high hydrophobic case, it became clear that the shear stress depends on the channel size due to the large Laplace pressure. Furthermore, in the case that the channel size was less than 50 A, the normal pressure by the molecular simulation didn't agree with the expected value from the Young-Laplace equation. From this study it was clear that molecular simulation is needed when the channel size is less than 40 A.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of protein and lipid targeting to ciliary membranes

    PubMed Central

    Emmer, Brian T.; Maric, Danijela; Engman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Cilia are specialized surface regions of eukaryotic cells that serve a variety of functions, ranging from motility to sensation and to regulation of cell growth and differentiation. The discovery that a number of human diseases, collectively known as ciliopathies, result from defective cilium function has expanded interest in these structures. Among the many properties of cilia, motility and intraflagellar transport have been most extensively studied. The latter is the process by which multiprotein complexes associate with microtubule motors to transport structural subunits along the axoneme to and from the ciliary tip. By contrast, the mechanisms by which membrane proteins and lipids are specifically targeted to the cilium are still largely unknown. In this Commentary, we review the current knowledge of protein and lipid targeting to ciliary membranes and outline important issues for future study. We also integrate this information into a proposed model of how the cell specifically targets proteins and lipids to the specialized membrane of this unique organelle. PMID:20145001

  15. Hydrated nonpolar solute volumes: Interplay between size, Attractiveness, and molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Ashbaugh, Henry S; Barnett, J Wesley; da Silva Moura, Natalia; Houser, Hayden E

    2016-06-01

    A solute's partial molar volume determines its response to pressure, which can result in changes in molecular conformation or assembly state. Computing speed advances have made accurate partial molar volume evaluation in water routine, allowing for the dissection of the molecular factors underlying this significant thermodynamic variable. A recent simulation analysis of the volumes of nonpolar molecular solutes in water reported that the apparent solvent-free border thickness enshrouding these solutes grows with increasing solute size, based on the assumption the solute can be treated as an individual sphere [Biophys. Chem. 161 (2012) 46]. This suggests the solvent dewets these solutes as they grow in size. Via simulations of dewetted repulsive spherical solutes, we show that the border thicknesses of the largest non-polar molecular solutes tend towards that of a repulsive sphere. When attractive interactions are accounted for, however, the spherical solute border thicknesses fall below that of the largest molecular solutes. We demonstrate that if the molecular solutes are treated with atomic detail rather than approximated as an individual sphere, the border thickness variation is minimal. A geometric model is put forward that reproduces the inferred border thickening, indicating the implied dewetting results from a breakdown in the spherical volume approximation.

  16. Indium-111 labeled gold nanoparticles for in-vivo molecular targeting.

    PubMed

    Ng, Quinn K T; Olariu, Cristina I; Yaffee, Marcus; Taelman, Vincent F; Marincek, Nicolas; Krause, Thomas; Meier, Lorenz; Walter, Martin A

    2014-08-01

    The present report describes the synthesis and biological evaluation of a molecular imaging platform based on gold nanoparticles directly labeled with indium-111. The direct labeling approach facilitated radiolabeling with high activities while maintaining excellent stability within the biological environment. The resulting imaging platform exhibited low interference of the radiolabel with targeting molecules, which is highly desirable for in-vivo probe tracking and molecular targeted tumor imaging. The indium-111 labeled gold nanoparticles were synthesized using a simple procedure that allowed stable labeling of the nanoparticle core with various indium-111 activities. Subsequent surface modification of the particle cores with RGD-based ligands at various densities allowed for molecular targeting of the αvß3 integrin in-vitro and for molecular targeted imaging in human melanoma and glioblastoma models in-vivo. The results demonstrate the vast potential of direct labeling with radioisotopes for tracking gold nanoparticles within biological systems.

  17. Target-based drug discovery for human African trypanosomiasis: selection of molecular target and chemical matter.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    Target-based approaches for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) and related parasites can be a valuable route for drug discovery for these diseases. However, care needs to be taken in selection of both the actual drug target and the chemical matter that is developed. In this article, potential criteria to aid target selection are described. Then the physiochemical properties of typical oral drugs are discussed and compared to those of known anti-parasitics.

  18. Diverse molecular targets for therapeutic strategies in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Sun-Ho; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia caused by neurodegenerative process and is tightly related to amyloid β (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles. The lack of early diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic remedy hinders the prevention of increasing population of AD patients every year. In spite of accumulated scientific information, numerous clinical trials for candidate drug targets have failed to be preceded into therapeutic development, therefore, AD-related sufferers including patients and caregivers, are desperate to seek the solution. Also, effective AD intervention is desperately needed to reduce AD-related societal threats to public health. In this review, we summarize various drug targets and strategies in recent preclinical studies and clinical trials for AD therapy: Allopathic treatment, immunotherapy, Aβ production/aggregation modulator, tau-targeting therapy and metabolic targeting. Some has already failed in their clinical trials and the others are still in various stages of investigations, both of which give us valuable information for future research in AD therapeutic development.

  19. Diverse Molecular Targets for Therapeutic Strategies in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sun-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia caused by neurodegenerative process and is tightly related to amyloid β (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles. The lack of early diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic remedy hinders the prevention of increasing population of AD patients every year. In spite of accumulated scientific information, numerous clinical trials for candidate drug targets have failed to be preceded into therapeutic development, therefore, AD-related sufferers including patients and caregivers, are desperate to seek the solution. Also, effective AD intervention is desperately needed to reduce AD-related societal threats to public health. In this review, we summarize various drug targets and strategies in recent preclinical studies and clinical trials for AD therapy: Allopathic treatment, immunotherapy, Aβ production/aggregation modulator, tau-targeting therapy and metabolic targeting. Some has already failed in their clinical trials and the others are still in various stages of investigations, both of which give us valuable information for future research in AD therapeutic development. PMID:25045220

  20. Targeting cancer with small-molecular-weight kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Doriano; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Möbitz, Henrik; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Protein and lipid kinases fulfill essential roles in many signaling pathways that regulate normal cell functions. Deregulation of these kinase activities lead to a variety of pathologies ranging from cancer to inflammatory diseases, diabetes, infectious diseases, cardiovascular disorders, cell growth and survival. 518 protein kinases and about 20 lipid-modifying kinases are encoded by the human genome, and a much larger proportion of additional kinases are present in parasite, bacterial, fungal, and viral genomes that are susceptible to exploitation as drug targets. Since many human diseases result from overactivation of protein and lipid kinases due to mutations and/or overexpression, this enzyme class represents an important target for the pharmaceutical industry. Approximately one third of all protein targets under investigation in the pharmaceutical industry are protein or lipid kinases.The kinase inhibitors that have been launched, thus far, are mainly in oncology indications and are directed against a handful of protein and lipid kinases. With one exception, all of these registered kinase inhibitors are directed toward the ATP-site and display different selectivities, potencies, and pharmacokinetic properties. At present, about 150 kinase-targeted drugs are in clinical development and many more in various stages of preclinical development. Kinase inhibitor drugs that are in clinical trials target all stages of signal transduction from the receptor protein tyrosine kinases that initiate intracellular signaling, through second-messenger-dependent lipid and protein kinases, and protein kinases that regulate the cell cycle.This review provides an insight into protein and lipid kinase drug discovery with respect to achievements, binding modes of inhibitors, and novel avenues for the generation of second-generation kinase inhibitors to treat cancers.

  1. Paclitaxel molecularly imprinted polymer-PEG-folate nanoparticles for targeting anticancer delivery: Characterization and cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi; Darvishi, Behrad; Ishkuh, Fatemeh Azizi; Shahmoradi, Elnaz; Mohammadi, Ali; Javanbakht, Mehran; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize molecularly imprinted polymer-poly ethylene glycol-folic acid (MIP-PEG-FA) nanoparticles for use as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. MIP nanoparticles were synthesized by a mini-emulsion polymerization technique and then PEG-FA was conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles showed high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, 15.6 ± 0.8 and 100%, respectively. The imprinting efficiency of MIPs was evaluated by binding experiments in human serum. Good selective binding and recognition were found in MIP nanoparticles. In vitro drug release studies showed that MIP-PEG-FA have a controlled release of PTX, because of the presence of imprinted sites in the polymeric structure, which makes it is suitable for sustained drug delivery. The drug release from polymeric nanoparticles was indeed higher at acidic pH. The molecular structure of MIP-PEG-FA was confirmed by Hydrogen-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H NMR), Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR), and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) spectroscopy, and their thermal behaviors by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) results showed that nanoparticles have a smooth surface and spherical shape with an average size of 181 nm. MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles showed a greater amount of intracellular uptake in folate receptor-positive cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells) in comparison with the non-folate nanoparticles and free PTX, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 4.9 ± 0.9, 7.4 ± 0.5 and 32.8 ± 3.8 nM, respectively. These results suggest that MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles could be a potentially useful drug carrier for targeting drug delivery to cancer cells.

  2. Identifying Molecular Targets for Chemoprevention in a Rat Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    findings. • Samples of prostate available for molecular analysis by microarray REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: Borowsky, A.D., Dingley, K., Ubick, E...test was applied to each data set for each of the quantitated characteristics. The resulting P values are recorded above each pair of compared data...relationship between GSTk-negative atypical cells and the development of PIN was difficult to estimate. Prostate samples did not show the two

  3. Communication target object recognition for D2D connection with feature size limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Jiheon; Kim, Soochang; Kim, Young-hoon; Lee, Chulhee

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a new concept of device-to-device (D2D) communication, which is called "point-and-link communication" has attracted great attentions due to its intuitive and simple operation. This approach enables user to communicate with target devices without any pre-identification information such as SSIDs, MAC addresses by selecting the target image displayed on the user's own device. In this paper, we present an efficient object matching algorithm that can be applied to look(point)-and-link communications for mobile services. Due to the limited channel bandwidth and low computational power of mobile terminals, the matching algorithm should satisfy low-complexity, low-memory and realtime requirements. To meet these requirements, we propose fast and robust feature extraction by considering the descriptor size and processing time. The proposed algorithm utilizes a HSV color histogram, SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) features and object aspect ratios. To reduce the descriptor size under 300 bytes, a limited number of SIFT key points were chosen as feature points and histograms were binarized while maintaining required performance. Experimental results show the robustness and the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Molecular approaches to target discovery:--evaluating targets for anti-tuberculosis drug discovery programmes.

    PubMed

    Balganesh, T S; Furr, B J A

    2007-06-01

    Selection of appropriate targets for launching antituberculosis drug discovery programmes is challenging. This challenge is magnified by the limited repertoire of 'validated targets' and the paucity of clinically successful drugs. However, continued understanding of the biology of the microbe and its interaction with the host has enabled detailed evaluation of several interesting pathways and novel targets. The value of a target that is suitable for antituberculosis drug discovery needs to be defined not only in the context of its 'essentiality' for survival in vitro but also against a variety of properties relevant to activities in the drug discovery process, e.g.; selectivity, vulnerability, suitability for structural studies, ability to monitor inhibition in whole cells etc. It is also rarely feasible to obtain all the relevant information on the target prior to the launch of a discovery programme. Thus, there is a continuous confidence-building exercise on the validity of a target. Several novel approaches have enabled exploitation of the mycobacterial genome and prioritisation of putative targets; the concept of 'sterilisation' is now being evaluated not only through the availability of structurally diverse probe compounds but also by the ability to characterise metabolic pathways in vivo. The impact of the current knowledge base on the different facets of 'target validation' relevant to antituberculosis drug discovery is discussed in this article with emphasis on developing appropriate matrix systems to prioritise them. The article also discusses the influence of lead generation approaches with specific reference to antibacterial drug discovery.

  5. Testing and improving experimental parameters for the use of low molecular weight targets in array-CGH experiments.

    PubMed

    Stef, Marianne; Simon, Delphine; Burgelin, Ingrid; Guisle, Isabelle; Chevalier, Catherine; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Lacombe, Didier; Léger, Jean; Arveiler, Benoît

    2006-11-01

    Array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has evolved as a useful technique for the detection and characterization of deletions, and, to a lesser extent, of duplications. The resolution of the technique is dictated by the genomic distance between targets spotted on the microarray, and by the targets' sizes. The use of region-specific, high-resolution microarrays is a specific goal when studying regions that are prone to rearrangements, such as those involved in deletion syndromes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the best experimental conditions to be used for array-CGH analysis using low molecular weight (LMW) targets. The parameters tested were: the target concentration, the way LMW targets are prepared (either as linearized plasmids or as purified PCR products), and the way the targets are attached to the array-CGH slide (in a random fashion on amino-silane coated slides, or by one amino-modified end on epoxysilane-coated slides). As a test case, we constructed a microarray harboring LMW targets located in the CREBBP gene, mutations of which cause the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS). From 10 to 15% of RTS patients have a CREBBP deletion. We showed that aminosilane- and epoxysilane-coated slides were equally efficient with targets above 1,000 bp in size. On the other hand, with the smallest targets, especially those below 500 bp, epoxysilane-coated slides were superior to aminosilane-coated slides, which did not allow deletion detection. Use of the high resolution array allowed us to map intragenic breakpoints with precision and to identify a very small deletion and a duplication that were not detected by the currently available techniques for finding CREBBP deletions.

  6. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Michael A; Simon, Elias D; Little, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment.

  7. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Michael A.; Simon, Elias D.; Little, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  8. New molecular targets for the treatment of sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Chiarchiaro, Jared; Chen, Bill B.; Gibson, Kevin F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease typically affecting the lung, lymph nodes, and other organ systems. Evidence suggests that the morbidity and mortality rates for sarcoidosis in the USA are rising, despite widespread use of anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we survey new therapies that target specific inflammatory pathways in other diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and psoriasis) that are similar to pathways relevant to sarcoidosis immunopathogenesis, and therefore, represent potentially new sarcoidosis therapies. Recent findings Immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis has been well elucidated over the past few years. There is abundant evidence for T-cell activation in sarcoidosis leading to activation of both Th1 and Th17 inflammatory cascades. Therapies targeting T-cell activation, Th1 pathways (such as the interleukin-6 inhibitors), Th17 pathway mediators, and others have been Food and Drug Administration approved or under investigation to treat a variety of autoimmune inflammatory diseases, but have not been studied in sarcoidosis. Targeting the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and the ubiquitine proteasome system with new agents may also represent a novel therapeutic option for patients with sarcoidosis. Summary Rising morbidity and mortality rates for patients with sarcoidosis strongly support the need to develop more effective anti-inflammatory therapies to treat chronic disease. PMID:27454074

  9. Size, Albedo, and Taxonomy of the Don Quijote Space Mission Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Alan; Mueller, Michael; Fitzsimmons, Alan

    2006-03-01

    Rendezvous and lander missions are a very effective but very expensive way of investigating Solar-System bodies. The planning, optimization and success of space missions depends crucially on prior remotely-sensed knowledge of target bodies. Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), which are mainly fragments of main-belt asteroids, are seen as important goals for investigation by space missions, mainly due to the role their forebears played in planet formation and the evolution of the Solar System, but also for the pragmatic reason that these objects can collide with the Earth with potentially devastating consequences. The European Space Agency is currently planning the Don Quijote mission to a NEA, which includes a rendezvous (and perhaps a lander) spacecraft and an impactor vehicle. The aim is to study the physical properties of the target asteroid and the effects of the impact on its dynamical state, as a first step in considering realistic mitigation measures against an eventual hazardous NEA. Two potential targets have been selected for the mission, the preferred one being (10302) 1989 ML, which is energetically easier to reach and is possibly a scientifically interesting primitive asteroid. However, due to the ambiguity of available spectral data, it is currently not possible to confidently determine the taxonomic type and mineralogy of this object. Crucially, the albedo is uncertain by a factor of 10, which leads to large uncertainties in the size and mass and hence the planned near-surface operations of Don Quijote. Thermal-infrared observations are urgently required for accurate size and albedo determination. These observations, which can only be carried out by Spitzer and would require only a modest amount of observing time, would enable an accurate diameter to be derived for the first time and the resulting albedo would remove the taxonomic ambiguity. The proposed Spitzer observations are critical for effective mission planning and would greatly increase our

  10. Molecular Size and Weight of Asphaltene and Asphaltene Solubility Fractions from Coals, Crude Oils and Bitumen

    SciTech Connect

    Badre,S.; Goncalves, C.; Norinaga, K.; Gustavson, G.; Mullins, O.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular weight of asphaltenes has been a controversy for several decades. In recent years, several techniques have converged on the size of the fused ring system; indicating that chromophores in virgin crude oil asphaltenes typically have 4-10 fused rings. Consequently, the molecular weight debate is equivalent to determining whether asphaltenes are monomeric (one fused-ring system per molecule) or whether they are polymeric. Time-resolved fluorescence depolarization (FD) is employed here to interrogate the absolute size of asphaltene molecules and to determine the relation of the size of the fused ring system to that of the corresponding molecule. Coal, petroleum and bitumen asphaltenes are compared. Molecular size of coal asphaltenes obtained here by FD-determined rotational diffusion match closely with Taylor-dispersion-derived translational diffusion measurements with UV absorption. Coal asphaltenes are smaller than petroleum asphaltenes. N-methyl pyrrolidinone (NMP) soluble and insoluble fractions are examined. NMP soluble and insoluble fractions of asphaltenes are monomeric. It is suggested that the 'giant' asphaltene molecules reported from SEC studies using NMP as the eluting solvent may actually be the expected flocs of asphaltene which are not soluble in NMP. Data is presented that intramolecular electronic relaxation in asphaltenes does not perturb FD results.

  11. Changes in Molecular Size Distribution of Cellulose during Attack by White Rot and Brown Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Kleman-Leyer, Karen; Agosin, Eduardo; Conner, Anthony H.; Kirk, T. Kent

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of cotton cellulose depolymerization by the brown rot fungus Postia placenta and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium were investigated with solid-state cultures. The degree of polymerization (DP; the average number of glucosyl residues per cellulose molecule) of cellulose removed from soil-block cultures during degradation by P. placenta was first determined viscosimetrically. Changes in molecular size distribution of cellulose attacked by either fungus were then determined by size exclusion chromatography as the tricarbanilate derivative. The first study with P. placenta revealed two phases of depolymerization: a rapid decrease to a DP of approximately 800 and then a slower decrease to a DP of approximately 250. Almost all depolymerization occurred before weight loss. Determination of the molecular size distribution of cellulose during attack by the brown rot fungus revealed single major peaks centered over progressively lower DPs. Cellulose attacked by P. chrysosporium was continuously consumed and showed a different pattern of change in molecular size distribution than cellulose attacked by P. placenta. At first, a broad peak which shifted at a slightly lower average DP appeared, but as attack progressed the peak narrowed and the average DP increased slightly. From these results, it is apparent that the mechanism of cellulose degradation differs fundamentally between brown and white rot fungi, as represented by the species studied here. We conclude that the brown rot fungus cleaved completely through the amorphous regions of the cellulose microfibrils, whereas the white rot fungus attacked the surfaces of the microfibrils, resulting in a progressive erosion. PMID:16348694

  12. Effects of molecular size and chemical factor on plasma gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Motomura, Hideki; Kido, Yugo; Satoh, Susumu; Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of plasma gene transfection, the relationship between transfection efficiency and transferred molecular size was investigated. Molecules with low molecular mass (less than 50 kDa; dye or dye-labeled oligonucleotide) and high molecular mass (more than 1 MDa; plasmid DNA or fragment of plasmid DNA) were transferred to L-929 cells. It was found that the transfection efficiency decreases with increasing in transferred molecular size and also depends on the tertiary structure of transferred molecules. Moreover, it was suggested the transfection mechanism is different between the molecules with low (less than 50 kDa) and high molecular mass (higher than 1 MDa). For the amount of gene transfection after plasma irradiation, which is comparable to that during plasma irradiation, it is shown that H2O2 molecules are the main contributor. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.40 ± 0.22 upon scavenging the H2O2 generated by plasma irradiation using the catalase. On the other hand, when the H2O2 solution is dropped into the cell suspension without plasma irradiation, the transfection efficiency is almost 0%. In these results, it is also suggested that there is a synergetic effect of H2O2 with electrical factors or other reactive species generated by plasma irradiation.

  13. Size and shape of soil humic acids estimated by viscosity and molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Kawahigashi, Masayuki; Sumida, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2005-04-15

    Ultrafiltration fractions of three soil humic acids were characterized by viscometry and high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) in order to estimate shapes and hydrodynamic sizes. Intrinsic viscosities under given solute/solvent/temperature conditions were obtained by extrapolating the concentration dependence of reduced viscosities to zero concentration. Molecular mass (weight average molecular weight (M (w)) and number average molecular weight (M (n))) and hydrodynamic radius (R(H)) were determined by HPSEC using pullulan as calibrant. Values of M (w) and M (n) ranged from 15 to 118 x 10(3) and from 9 to 50 x 10(3) (g mol(-1)), respectively. Polydispersity, as indicated by M (w)/M (n), increased with increasing filter size from 1.5 to 2.4. The hydrodynamic radii (R(H)) ranged between 2.2 and 6.4 nm. For each humic acid, M (w) and [eta] were related. Mark-Houwink coefficients calculated on the basis of the M (w)-[eta] relationships suggested restricted flexible chains for two of the humic acids and a branched structure for the third humic acid. Those structures probably behave as hydrated sphere colloids in a good solvent. Hydrodynamic radii of fractions calculated from [eta] using Einstein's equation, which is applicable to hydrated sphere colloids, ranged from 2.2 to 7.1 nm. These dimensions are fit to the size of nanospaces on and between clay minerals and micropores in soil particle aggregates. On the other hand, the good agreement of R(H) values obtained by applying Einstein's equation with those directly determined by HPSEC suggests that pullulan is a suitable calibrant for estimation of molecular mass and size of humic acids by HPSEC.

  14. Targeted next generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-06

    detection of genetic variants known to confer ciprofloxacin resistance in Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. Sequencing...results demonstrate MIPs capture and amplify targeted regions of interest at significant levels of coverage. Depending on the genetic variant...multiple downstream molecular assays for the detection of targeted genetic regions. TR-16-130 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release

  15. Are Pharmaceuticals with Evolutionary Conserved Molecular Drug Targets More Potent to Cause Toxic Effects in Non-Target Organisms?

    PubMed Central

    Furuhagen, Sara; Fuchs, Anne; Lundström Belleza, Elin; Breitholtz, Magnus; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in a continuous discharge into wastewater and pharmaceuticals and their metabolites are found in the environment. Due to their design towards specific drug targets, pharmaceuticals may be therapeutically active already at low environmental concentrations. Several human drug targets are evolutionary conserved in aquatic organisms, raising concerns about effects of these pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. In this study, we hypothesized that the toxicity of a pharmaceutical towards a non-target invertebrate depends on the presence of the human drug target orthologs in this species. This was tested by assessing toxicity of pharmaceuticals with (miconazole and promethazine) and without (levonorgestrel) identified drug target orthologs in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The toxicity was evaluated using general toxicity endpoints at individual (immobility, reproduction and development), biochemical (RNA and DNA content) and molecular (gene expression) levels. The results provide evidence for higher toxicity of miconazole and promethazine, i.e. the drugs with identified drug target orthologs. At the individual level, miconazole had the lowest effect concentrations for immobility and reproduction (0.3 and 0.022 mg L−1, respectively) followed by promethazine (1.6 and 0.18 mg L−1, respectively). At the biochemical level, individual RNA content was affected by miconazole and promethazine already at 0.0023 and 0.059 mg L−1, respectively. At the molecular level, gene expression for cuticle protein was significantly suppressed by exposure to both miconazole and promethazine; moreover, daphnids exposed to miconazole had significantly lower vitellogenin expression. Levonorgestrel did not have any effects on any endpoints in the concentrations tested. These results highlight the importance of considering drug target conservation in environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals. PMID:25140792

  16. Targeting molecular interactions essential for Plasmodium sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Rodriguez, Joel; Perez-Barreto, Davinia; Ruiz-Reyes, Antonio; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Malaria remains one of the most devastating infectious diseases, killing up to a million people every year. Whereas much progress has been made in understanding the life cycle of the parasite in the human host and in the mosquito vector, significant gaps of knowledge remain. Fertilization of malaria parasites, a process that takes place in the lumen of the mosquito midgut, is poorly understood and the molecular interactions (receptor–ligand) required for Plasmodium fertilization remain elusive. By use of a phage display library, we identified FG1 (Female Gamete peptide 1), a peptide that binds specifically to the surface of female Plasmodium berghei gametes. Importantly, FG1 but not a scrambled version of the peptide, strongly reduces P. berghei oocyst formation by interfering with fertilization. In addition, FG1 also inhibits P. falciparum oocyst formation suggesting that the peptide binds to a molecule on the surface of the female gamete whose structure is conserved. Identification of the molecular interactions disrupted by the FG1 peptide may lead to the development of novel malaria transmission-blocking strategies. PMID:25944054

  17. The molecular basis of targeting protein kinases in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of targeted anticancer therapies with small molecule kinase inhibitors. First, we discuss why a single constitutively active kinase emanating from a variety of aberrant genetic alterations is capable of transforming a normal cell, leading it to acquire the hallmarks of a cancer cell. To draw attention to the fact that kinase inhibition in targeted cancer therapeutics differs from conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, we exploit a conceptual framework explaining why suppressed kinase activity will selectively kill only the so-called oncogene 'addicted' cancer cell, while sparing the healthy cell. Second, we introduce the protein kinase superfamily in light of its common active conformation with precisely positioned structural elements, and the diversified auto-inhibitory conformations among the kinase families. Understanding the detailed activation mechanism of individual kinases is essential to relate the observed oncogenic alterations to the elevated constitutively active state, to identify the mechanism of consequent drug resistance, and to guide the development of the next-generation inhibitors. To clarify the vital importance of structural guidelines in studies of oncogenesis, we explain how somatic mutations in EGFR result in kinase constitutive activation. Third, in addition to the common theme of secondary (acquired) mutations that prevent drug binding from blocking a signaling pathway which is hijacked by the aberrant activated kinase, we discuss scenarios of drug resistance and relapse by compensating lesions that bypass the inactivated pathway in a vertical or horizontal fashion. Collectively, these suggest that the future challenge of cancer therapy with small molecule kinase inhibitors will rely on the discovery of distinct combinations of optimized drugs to target individual subtypes of different cancers.

  18. Condition for the formation of micron-sized dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the condition for the formation of micron-sized grains in dense cores of molecular clouds. This is motivated by the detection of mid-infrared emission from deep inside a number of dense cores, the so-called `coreshine,' which is thought to come from scattering by micron (μm)-sized grains. Based on numerical calculations of coagulation starting from the typical grain-size distribution in the diffuse interstellar medium, we obtain a conservative lower limit to the time t to form μm-sized grains: t/tff > 3(5/S)(nH/105 cm-3)-1/4 (where tff is the free-fall time at hydrogen number density nH in the core and S the enhancement factor of the grain-grain collision cross-section to account for non-compact aggregates). At the typical core density nH = 105 cm-3, it takes at least a few free-fall times to form the μm-sized grains responsible for coreshine. The implication is that those dense cores observed in coreshine are relatively long-lived entities in molecular clouds, rather than dynamically transient objects that last for one free-fall time or less.

  19. Size-dependent Melting Behavior of Iron Nanoparticles by Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Qiang; Yang, Yang; Zhai, Yingteng; Sun, Deyan; Xiang, Hongjun; Gong, Xingao

    2013-03-01

    Due to the finite size effect, nanoparticles own unique physical, chemical, and magnetic properties. Comparing with the bulk materials, the large surface/volume ratio of nanoparticles could lead to more complicate atomic and electronic behavior, thus the thermodynamical properties can be also very rich. In the last a few decades, as one of the fundamental problems in the nano science, the melting behavior of nanoparticles had been widely investigated by numerous experimental and theoretical studies. Using replica-exchange molecular dynamics method (REMD), we have investigated the size dependence of the melting behavior of iron nanoparticles. Comparing to the conventional molecular dynamics (MD), the REMD method is found to be very efficient to determine the melting point, by avoiding the superheating and undercooling phenomena. With accurate determination of the melting point, we find that the melting temperature does not follow linearly with the inverse of size. By incorporating the size dependent thickness of surface liquid layer which is observed in our simulation, we propose a revised liquid skin melting model to describe the size dependent melting temperature. Special Funds for Major State Basic Research, NSFC, MOE, Shanghai Municipality

  20. Radiosensitizers in Pancreatic Cancer – Preclinical and Clinical Exploits with Molecularly Targeted Agents

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Amanda J.; Alcorn, Sara; Narang, Amol; Nugent, Katriana; Wild, Aaron T.; Herman, Joseph M.; Tran, Phuoc T.

    2013-01-01

    There has been an explosion in the number of molecularly targeted agents engineered to inhibit specific molecular pathways driving the tumorigenic phenotype in cancer cells. Some of these molecularly targeted agents have demonstrated robust clinical effects, but few result in meaningful durable responses. Therapeutic radiation is used to treat a majority of cancer patients with recent technologic and pharmacologic enhancements, leading to improvements in the therapeutic ratio for cancer care. Radiotherapy has a very specific role in select cases of postoperative and locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients, but control of metastatic disease still appears to be the major limiting factor behind improvements in cure. Recent rapid autopsy pathologic findings suggest a sub-group of advanced pancreatic cancer patients where death is caused from local disease progression and who would thus benefit from improved local control. One promising approach is to combine molecularly targeted agents with radiotherapy to improve tumor response rates and likelihood of durable local control. We review suggested recommendations on the investigation of molecularly targeted agents as radiosensitizers from preclinical studies to implementation in phase I–II clinical trials. We then discuss a select set of molecularly targeted therapies that we believe show promise as radiosensitizers in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24331186

  1. Communication: Kirkwood-Buff integrals in the thermodynamic limit from small-sized molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes-Huerto, R.; Kremer, K.; Potestio, R.

    2016-10-01

    We present an accurate and efficient method to obtain Kirkwood-Buff (KB) integrals in the thermodynamic limit from small-sized molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing finite size effects into integral equations of statistical mechanics, we derive an analytical expression connecting the KB integrals of the bulk system with the fluctuations of the number of molecules in the corresponding closed system. We validate the method by calculating the activity coefficients of aqueous urea mixtures and the KB integrals of Lennard-Jones fluids. Moreover, our results demonstrate how to identify simulation conditions under which computer simulations reach the thermodynamic limit.

  2. Molecular targeted therapy in the treatment of advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Kumarakulasinghe, Nesaretnam Barr; van Zanwijk, Nico; Soo, Ross A

    2015-04-01

    Historically, patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with chemotherapy alone, but a therapeutic plateau has been reached. Advances in the understanding of molecular genetics have led to the recognition of multiple molecularly distinct subsets of NSCLC. This in turn has led to the development of rationally directed molecular targeted therapy, leading to improved clinical outcomes. Tumour genotyping for EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement has meant chemotherapy is no longer given automatically as first-line treatment but reserved for when patients do not have a 'druggable' driver oncogene. In this review, we will address the current status of clinically relevant driver mutations and emerging new molecular subsets in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and the role of targeted therapy and mechanisms of acquired resistance to targeted therapy.

  3. Molecularly imprinted polymeric micro- and nano-particles for the targeted delivery of active molecules.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imprinting (MI) represents a strategy to introduce a 'molecular memory' in a polymeric system obtaining materials with specific recognition properties. MI particles can be used as drug delivery systems providing a targeted release and thus reducing the side effects. The introduction of molecular recognition properties on a polymeric drug carrier represents a challenge in the development of targeted delivery systems to increase their efficiency. This review will summarize the limited number of drug delivery MI particles described in the literature along with an overview of potential solutions for a larger exploitation of MI particles as targeted drug delivery carriers. Molecularly imprinted drug carriers can be considered interesting candidates to significantly improve the efficiency of a controlled drug treatment.

  4. Targeted Therapy for Acute Autoimmune Myocarditis with Nano-Sized Liposomal FK506 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Takashi; Araki, Ryo; Tsuchida, Shota; Thanikachalam, Punniyakoti V.; Fukuta, Tatsuya; Asai, Tomohiro; Yamato, Masaki; Sanada, Shoji; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asano, Yoshihiro; Asakura, Masanori; Hanawa, Haruo; Hao, Hiroyuki; Oku, Naoto; Takashima, Seiji; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Sakata, Yasushi; Minamino, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are used for the treatment of immune-mediated myocarditis; however, the need to develop a more effective therapeutic approach remains. Nano-sized liposomes may accumulate in and selectively deliver drugs to an inflammatory lesion with enhanced vascular permeability. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of liposomal FK506, an immunosuppressive drug encapsulated within liposomes, and the drug’s effects on cardiac function in a rat experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model. We prepared polyethylene glycol-modified liposomal FK506 (mean diameter: 109.5 ± 4.4 nm). We induced EAM by immunization with porcine myosin and assessed the tissue distribution of the nano-sized beads and liposomal FK506 in this model. After liposomal or free FK506 was administered on days 14 and 17 after immunization, the cytokine expression in the rat hearts along with the histological findings and hemodynamic parameters were determined on day 21. Ex vivo fluorescent imaging revealed that intravenously administered fluorescent-labeled nano-sized beads had accumulated in myocarditic but not normal hearts on day 14 after immunization and thereafter. Compared to the administration of free FK506, FK506 levels were increased in both the plasma and hearts of EAM rats when liposomal FK506 was administered. The administration of liposomal FK506 markedly suppressed the expression of cytokines, such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, and reduced inflammation and fibrosis in the myocardium on day 21 compared to free FK506. The administration of liposomal FK506 also markedly ameliorated cardiac dysfunction on day 21 compared to free FK506. Nano-sized liposomes may be a promising drug delivery system for targeting myocarditic hearts with cardioprotective agents. PMID:27501378

  5. Proteasome as a Molecular Target of Microcystin-LR

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Zhang, Li; Shi, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome degrades proteins in eukaryotic cells. As such, the proteasome is crucial in cell cycle and function. This study proved that microcystin-LR (MC-LR), which is a toxic by-product of algal bloom, can target cellular proteasome and selectively inhibit proteasome trypsin-like (TL) activity. MC-LR at 1 nM can inhibit up to 54% of the purified 20S proteasome TL activity and 43% of the proteasome TL activity in the liver of the cyprinid rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus). Protein degradation was retarded in GFP-CL1-transfected PC-3 cells because MC-LR inhibited the proteasome TL activity. Docking studies indicated that MC-LR blocked the active site of the proteasome β2 subunit; thus, the proteasome TL activity was inhibited. In conclusion, MC-LR can target proteasome, selectively inhibit proteasome TL activity, and retard protein degradation. This study may be used as a reference of future research on the toxic mechanism of MC-LR. PMID:26090622

  6. Molecular pathways: targeting MALT1 paracaspase activity in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fontán, Lorena; Melnick, Ari

    2013-12-15

    MALT1 mediates the activation of NF-κB in response to antigen receptor signaling. MALT1, in association with BCL10 and CARD11, functions as a scaffolding protein to activate the inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK) complex. In addition, MALT1 is a paracaspase that targets key proteins in a feedback loop mediating termination of the NF-κB response, thus promoting activation of NF-κB signaling. Activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCL), which tend to be more resistant to chemotherapy, are often biologically dependent on MALT1 activity. Newly developed MALT1 small-molecule inhibitors suppress the growth of ABC-DLBCLs in vitro and in vivo. This review highlights the recent advances in the normal and disease-related functions of MALT1. Furthermore, recent progress targeting MALT1 proteolytic activity raises the possibility of deploying MALT1 inhibitors for the treatment of B-cell lymphomas and perhaps autoimmune diseases that involve increased B- or T-cell receptor signaling.

  7. Nuclear EGFR as a molecular target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Luthar, Neha; Starr, Megan M; Huppert, Evan J; Wheeler, Deric L

    2013-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been one of the most targeted receptors in the field of oncology. While anti-EGFR inhibitors have demonstrated clinical success in specific cancers, most patients demonstrate either intrinsic or acquired resistance within one year of treatment. Many mechanisms of resistance to EGFR inhibitors have been identified, one of these being attributed to alternatively localized EGFR from the cell membrane into the cell's nucleus. Inside the nucleus, EGFR functions as a co-transcription factor for several genes involved in cell proliferation and angiogenesis, and as a tyrosine kinase to activate and stabilize proliferating cell nuclear antigen and DNA dependent protein kinase. Nuclear localized EGFR is highly associated with disease progression, worse overall survival in numerous cancers, and enhanced resistance to radiation, chemotherapy, and the anti-EGFR therapies gefitinib and cetuximab. In this review the current knowledge of how nuclear EGFR enhances resistance to cancer therapeutics is discussed, in addition to highlighting ways to target nuclear EGFR as an anti-cancer strategy in the future.

  8. Molecular targets of epigenetic regulation and effectors of environmental influences

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Supratim; Cui Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2010-06-15

    The true understanding of what we currently define as epigenetics evolved over time as our knowledge on DNA methylation and chromatin modifications and their effects on gene expression increased. The current explosion of research on epigenetics and the increasing documentation of the effects of various environmental factors on DNA methylation, chromatin modification, as well as on the expression of small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have expanded the scope of research on the etiology of various diseases including cancer. The current review briefly discusses the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic regulation and expands the discussion with examples on the role of environment, such as the immediate environment during development, in inducing epigenetic changes and modulating gene expression.

  9. [Targeted molecular therapy based on advanced cancer stem cell model].

    PubMed

    Hirao, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    Improvement of cell purification and transplantation techniques have contributed to the identification of cell populations known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Although it was hypothesized that tumors are organized as hierarchies of tumor cells that are sustained by rare TICs, like normal tissue stem cells, there are several controversies towards such cancer stem cell model, e.g. reversible change of stem cell like population based on epigenetic changes, clonal genetic evolution and problems in xenotransplantation system. Despite complexity in cancer stem cell models, studies in cancer stem cell field have revealed that there are close relationship between cancer malignancy and stem cell properties, called "stemness". Understanding molecular mechanisms for controlling stemness would contribute to establishment of novel diagnostics or therapeutics for cancer.

  10. Polydiacetylene chromism towards toxic chemical detection via molecular size-dependent selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Donghwan

    Polydiacetylene (PDA) is a pi-conjugated polymer that has unique optical properties. PDA changes color from blue to red when subjected to various stimuli such as mechanical stress, heat, photoirradiation, pH change, and binding of specific ligands. The steric effect induced by those stimuli on PDA headgroup has been investigated to understand the mechanism of PDA chromism and to apply those optical properties to the development of various sensors. In this work, pH chromism of PDA was examined in terms of the effects of the molecular size and acidity of acid analytes with the consideration of the molecular design aspect of diacetylene lipids. The pH level is an important parameter, since a low pH will produce a charge on the amine headgroup of PDA, but this does not necessarily result in PDA chromatic transition from 'blue phase' to 'red phase.' The molecular size of the counter anion was identified as another determinant condition to ensure the perturbation of the ene-yne conjugated backbone of PDA, which produces the chromatic transition. In the molecular design of the sensory diacetylene lipids, the alkyl spacer length between the amine as a receptor and the amide linker was found to strongly affect the degree of PDA chromatic transition. The longer alkyl spacer showed the less chromatic transition. The length of alkyl spacer seems to promote the flexibility of the molecule diminishing the extent of the transfer of the steric effect at PDA headgroup to the conjugated backbone. Finally, PDA chromism dependent on the molecular size of acid analytes was applied to develop the colorimetric detection of diethyl phosphate (DEP), a degraded nerve agent simulant. PDA liposome sensors successfully showed selective chromatic transition with fluorescent emission upon binding of DEP compared to other acid analytes. The molecular size and acidity of acid analytes, and alkyl spacer length have proven to be correlated with PDA chromism. These new findings provide further

  11. [Depression and addiction comorbidity: towards a common molecular target?].

    PubMed

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    The comorbidity of depression and cocaine addiction suggests shared mechanisms and anatomical pathways. Specifically, the limbic structures, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a crucial role in both disorders. P11 (S100A10) is a promising target for manipulating depression and addiction in mice. We summarized the recent genetic and viral strategies used to determine how the titration of p11 levels within the NAc affects hedonic behavior and cocaine reward learning in mice. In particular, p11 in the ChAT+ cells or DRD1+ MSN of the NAc, controls depressive-like behavior or cocaine reward, respectively. Treatments to counter maladaptation of p11 levels in the NAc could provide novel therapeutic opportunities for depression and cocaine addiction in humans.

  12. Promising Molecular Targets and Biomarkers for Male BPH and LUTS

    PubMed Central

    Gharaee-Kermani, Mehrnaz; Macoska, Jill A.

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a major health concern for aging men. BPH is associated with urinary voiding dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), which negatively affects quality of life. Surgical resection and medical approaches have proven effective for improving urinary flow and relieving LUTS, but are not effective for all men and can produce adverse effects that require termination of the therapeutic regimen. Thus, there is a need to explore other therapeutic targets to treat BPH/LUTS. Complicating the treatment of BPH/LUTS is the lack of biomarkers to effectively identify pathobiologies contributing to BPH/LUTS or to gauge successful response to therapy. This review will briefly discuss current knowledge and will highlight new studies that illuminate the pathobiologies contributing to BPH/LUTS; potential new therapeutic strategies for successfully treating BPH/LUTS; and new approaches for better defining these pathobiologies and response to therapeutics through the development of biomarkers and phenotyping strategies. PMID:23913202

  13. Molecular diversity patterns among various phytoplankton size-fractions in West Greenland in late summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elferink, Stephanie; Neuhaus, Stefan; Wohlrab, Sylke; Toebe, Kerstin; Voß, Daniela; Gottschling, Marc; Lundholm, Nina; Krock, Bernd; Koch, Boris P.; Zielinski, Oliver; Cembella, Allan; John, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Arctic regions have experienced pronounced biological and biophysical transformations as a result of global change processes over the last several decades. Current hypotheses propose an elevated impact of those environmental changes on the biodiversity, community composition and metabolic processes of species. The effects on ecosystem function and services, particularly when invasive or toxigenic harmful species become dominant, can be expressed over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales in plankton communities. Our study focused on the comparison of molecular biodiversity of three size-fractions (micro-, nano-, picoplankton) in the coastal pelagic zone of West Greenland and their association with environmental parameters. Molecular diversity was assessed via parallel amplicon sequencing the 28S rRNA hypervariable D1/D2 region. We showed that biodiversity distribution within the area of Uummannaq Fjord, Vaigat Strait and Disko Bay differed markedly within and among size-fractions. In general, we observed a higher diversity within the picoplankton size fraction compared to the nano- and microplankton. In multidimensional scaling analysis, community composition of all three size fractions correlated with cell size, silicate and phosphate, chlorophyll a (chl a) and dinophysistoxin (DTX). Individually, each size fraction community composition also correlated with other different environmental parameters, i.e. temperature and nitrate. We observed a more homogeneous community of the picoplankton across all stations compared to the larger size classes, despite different prevailing environmental conditions of the sampling areas. This suggests that habitat niche occupation for larger-celled species may lead to higher functional trait plasticity expressed as an enhanced range of phenotypes, whereas smaller organisms may compensate for lower potential plasticity with higher diversity. The presence of recently identified toxigenic harmful algal bloom (HAB) species (such

  14. Scrapie prion liposomes and rods exhibit target sizes of 55,000 Da

    SciTech Connect

    Bellinger-Kawahara, C.G.; Kempner, E.; Groth, D.; Gabizon, R.; Prusiner, S.B.

    1988-06-01

    Scrapie is a degenerative neurologic disease in sheep and goats which can be experimentally transmitted to laboratory rodents. Considerable evidence suggests that the scrapie agent is composed largely, if not entirely, of an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc). Inactivation of scrapie prions by ionizing radiation exhibited single-hit kinetics and gave a target size of 55,000 +/- 9000 mol wt. The inactivation profile was independent of the form of the prion. Scrapie agent infectivity in brain homogenates, microsomal fractions, detergent-extracted microsomes, purified amyloid rods, and liposomes exhibited the same inactivation profile. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the infectious particle causing scrapie contains approximately 2 PrPSc molecules.

  15. Biomimetic supercontainers for size-selective electrochemical sensing of molecular ions

    PubMed Central

    Netzer, Nathan L.; Must, Indrek; Qiao, Yupu; Zhang, Shi-Li; Wang, Zhenqiang; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    New ionophores are essential for advancing the art of selective ion sensing. Metal-organic supercontainers (MOSCs), a new family of biomimetic coordination capsules designed using sulfonylcalix[4]arenes as container precursors, are known for their tunable molecular recognition capabilities towards an array of guests. Herein, we demonstrate the use of MOSCs as a new class of size-selective ionophores dedicated to electrochemical sensing of molecular ions. Specifically, a MOSC molecule with its cavities matching the size of methylene blue (MB+), a versatile organic molecule used for bio-recognition, was incorporated into a polymeric mixed-matrix membrane and used as an ion-selective electrode. This MOSC-incorporated electrode showed a near-Nernstian potentiometric response to MB+ in the nano- to micro-molar range. The exceptional size-selectivity was also evident through contrast studies. To demonstrate the practical utility of our approach, a simulated wastewater experiment was conducted using water from the Fyris River (Sweden). It not only showed a near-Nernstian response to MB+ but also revealed a possible method for potentiometric titration of the redox indicator. Our study thus represents a new paradigm for the rational design of ionophores that can rapidly and precisely monitor molecular ions relevant to environmental, biomedical, and other related areas. PMID:28393841

  16. Using solvents with different molecular sizes to investigate the structure of Antheraea pernyi silk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Porter, David; Shao, Zhengzhong

    2013-11-11

    The interaction between silk and polar solvents of different molecular size can be an important tool for understanding the structural features of natural silk; in particular, the disordered regions associated with the key property of mechanical toughness. In this work, we investigate the transitions induced in the tensile performance and structure of as-reeled Antheraea pernyi silks from different silkworms by a range of solvents that can only soften the protein chains in the amorphous regions. The results indicate that polar solvents with different molecular sizes affect the silk to different degrees, and silks with slightly different structures display significantly different tensile performance in the same solvent. The solvent molecular size is quantitatively correlated with the accessible volume in the amorphous regions before and after the yield point, which suggests that the volume accessible to the solvent molecules decreases as the solvent radius increases. Moreover, silks with more ordered structure (less free volume) in the amorphous regions are less sensitive to solvents than those with more disordered structures. However, silks with higher free volume have higher toughness due to the greater strain to failure.

  17. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C.; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods—including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements—and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed. PMID:27589790

  18. Molecular targets in pulmonary fibrosis: the myofibroblast in focus.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Chris J; Chambers, Rachel C

    2007-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is one of a group of interstitial lung diseases that are characterized by excessive matrix deposition and destruction of the normal lung architecture. Long-term survival of IPF patients is poor, with a 5-year survival rate of only 20%. Despite a lack of evidence-based benefit, IPF has historically been treated with corticosteroids and/or cytotoxic agents such as prednisone. Given the poor efficacy of these drugs, novel therapeutic strategies are required for the management of IPF. This demands a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis and progression of this disease. The primary effector cell in fibrosis is the myofibroblast; these cells are highly synthetic for collagen, have a contractile phenotype, and are characterized by the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin stress fibers. They may be derived by activation/proliferation of resident lung fibroblasts, epithelial-mesenchymal differentiation, or recruitment of circulating fibroblastic stem cells (fibrocytes). From a therapeutic viewpoint, interfering with the pathways that lead to myofibroblast expansion should be of considerable benefit in the treatment of IPF. This review will highlight some of the key molecules involved in this process and the clinical trials that have ensued.

  19. Molecular profiling of biliary tract cancer: a target rich disease

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are relatively uncommon orphan tumors that have an aggressive disease course and a poor clinical outcome. Surgery is the only curative treatment, but most patients present with advanced disease and therefore have a limited survival. Gemcitabine and cisplatin based chemotherapy has been the only widely accepted standard systemic therapy regimen in these patients but these tumors can be chemoresistant, further complicating their management. In recent times, there has been considerable research in the genetics of BTC and with the advent of new, advanced technologies like next-generation sequencing (NGS) we are achieving a greater understanding of its disease biology. With the help of NGS, we have now been able to identify actionable mutations such as in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), FGFR2, BRAF and HER2/neu genes for targeted therapeutics and correlate the genetic variations with distinct clinical prognoses. This recent genetic information has the potential to make precision medicine a part of routine clinical practice for the management of BTC patients. PMID:27747093

  20. Present Advances and Future Perspectives of Molecular Targeted Therapy for Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Atik Badshah; Li, Fangfei; Li, Min; He, Bing; He, Xiaojuan; Chen, Guofen; Guo, Baosheng; Li, Defang; Jiang, Feng; Dang, Lei; Zheng, Shaowei; Liang, Chao; Liu, Jin; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a bone cancer mostly occurring in pediatric population. Current treatment regime of surgery and intensive chemotherapy could cure about 60%–75% patients with primary osteosarcoma, however only 15% to 30% can be cured when pulmonary metastasis or relapse has taken place. Hence, novel precise OS-targeting therapies are being developed with the hope of addressing this issue. This review summarizes the current development of molecular mechanisms and targets for osteosarcoma. Therapies that target these mechanisms with updated information on clinical trials are also reviewed. Meanwhile, we further discuss novel therapeutic targets and OS-targeting drug delivery systems. In conclusion, a full insight in OS pathogenesis and OS-targeting strategies would help us explore novel targeted therapies for metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:27058531

  1. Targeted Capture and High-Throughput Sequencing Using Molecular Inversion Probes (MIPs).

    PubMed

    Cantsilieris, Stuart; Stessman, Holly A; Shendure, Jay; Eichler, Evan E

    2017-01-01

    Molecular inversion probes (MIPs) in combination with massively parallel DNA sequencing represent a versatile, yet economical tool for targeted sequencing of genomic DNA. Several thousand genomic targets can be selectively captured using long oligonucleotides containing unique targeting arms and universal linkers. The ability to append sequencing adaptors and sample-specific barcodes allows large-scale pooling and subsequent high-throughput sequencing at relatively low cost per sample. Here, we describe a "wet bench" protocol detailing the capture and subsequent sequencing of >2000 genomic targets from 192 samples, representative of a single lane on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Head and Neck Cancer: How Close to Personalized Targeted Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Worsham, Maria J.; Ali, Haythem; Dragovic, Jadranka; Schweitzer, Vanessa P.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapy in squamous head and neck cancer (HNSCC) continues to make strides and holds much promise. Cetuximab remains the sole FDA-approved molecular targeted therapy available for HNSCC, though there are several new biological agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other pathways in the regulatory approval pipeline. While targeted therapies have the potential to be personalized, their current use in HNSCC is not personalized. This is illustrated for EGFR targeted drugs, where EGFR as a molecular target has yet to be individualized for HNSCC. Future research needs to identify factors that correlate with response (or lack of one) and the underlying genotype-phenotype relationship that dictates this response. Comprehensive exploration of genetic and epigenetic landscapes in HNSCC is opening new frontiers to further enlighten, mechanistically inform, and set a course for eventually translating these discoveries into therapies for patients. This opinion offers a snap shot of the evolution of molecular subytping in HNSCC, its current clinical applicability, as well as new emergent paradigms with implications for controlling this disease in the future. PMID:22873739

  3. Screening for low aquatic bioaccumulation. 1. Lipinski's 'Rule of 5' and molecular size.

    PubMed

    Nendza, M; Müller, M

    2010-07-01

    Aquatic bioconcentration factors are critical in PBT assessment of industrial chemicals under REACH. Reliable indicators based on physico-chemical properties and molecular attributes of chemicals with low bioconcentration potential have been searched to de-prioritize non-accumulative chemicals in order to avoid unnecessary biotests that do not produce risk-relevant information. Developed to screen drug candidates, Lipinski's 'Rule of 5' identifies chemicals with poor oral absorption based on criteria in partitioning, molecular weight and hydrogen bonding. This parameter ensemble has been supplemented with molecular diameter and tested for its adequacy to filter chemicals with low bioconcentration potential. Perhaps (not) surprisingly, the application of the 'Rule of 5' fails to protectively identify non-accumulative compounds because other processes dominate the uptake in aquatic environments as compared with oral absorption. No robust evidence was found for cut-offs in bioconcentration related to molecular size. However, pragmatic thresholds in molecular weight (>650 g mol(-1)) and lipophilicity (log K(OW) < 3 or > 10) have been verified to securely de-prioritize 30-40% of chemicals of low concern with regard to the B criterion.

  4. Nanomolecular HLA-DR10 antibody mimics: A potent system for molecular targeted therapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    DeNardo, Gerald L; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hok, Saphon; Mirick, Gary; DeNardo, Sally J; Corzett, Michele; Sysko, Vladimir; Lehmann, Joerg; Beckett, Laurel; Balhorn, Rod

    2008-12-01

    To mimic the molecular specificity and cell selectivity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) binding while decreasing size, nanomolecules (selective high-affinity ligands; SHALs), based on in silico modeling, have been created to bind to human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR10), a signaling receptor protein upregulated on the malignant B-lymphocytes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. SHALs were synthesized with a biotin or DOTA chelate (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid), using a solid-phase lysine-polyethyleneglycol backbone to link sets of ligands shown previously to bind to HLA-DR10. Using cell-binding and death assays and confocal microscopy, SHAL uptake, residualization, and cytocidal activity were evaluated in HLA-DR10 expressing and nonexpressing live, human lymphoma cell lines. All of the SHALs tested were selective for, and accumulated in, expressing cells. Reflecting binding to HLA-DR10 inside the cells, SHALs having the Ct ligand (3-(2-([3-chloro-5-trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]oxy)-anilino)-3-oxopropanionic acid) residualized in expressing cells greater than 179 times more than accountable by cell-surface membrane HLA-DR10. Confocal microscopy confirmed the intracellular residualization of these SHALs. Importantly, SHALs with a Ct ligand had direct cytocidal activity, similar in potency to that of Lym-1 mAb and rituximab, selectively for HLA-DR10 expressing lymphoma cells and xenografts. The results show that SHALs containing the Ct ligand residualize intracellularly and have cytocidal effects mediated by HLA-DR10. These SHALs have extraordinary potential as novel molecules for the selective targeting of lymphoma and leukemia for molecular therapy and imaging. Further, these SHALs can be used to transport and residualize cytotoxic agents near critical sites inside these malignant cells.

  5. Proteome-wide prediction of targets for aspirin: new insight into the molecular mechanism of aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Besides its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic properties, aspirin is used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and various types of cancer. The multiple activities of aspirin likely involve several molecular targets and pathways rather than a single target. Therefore, systematic identification of these targets of aspirin can help us understand the underlying mechanisms of the activities. In this study, we identified 23 putative targets of aspirin in the human proteome by using binding pocket similarity detecting tool combination with molecular docking, free energy calculation and pathway analysis. These targets have diverse folds and are derived from different protein family. However, they have similar aspirin-binding pockets. The binding free energy with aspirin for newly identified targets is comparable to that for the primary targets. Pathway analysis revealed that the targets were enriched in several pathways such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, Fc epsilon RI signaling and arachidonic acid metabolism, which are strongly involved in inflammation, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, the predicted target profile of aspirin suggests a new explanation for the disease prevention ability of aspirin. Our findings provide a new insight of aspirin and its efficacy of disease prevention in a systematic and global view. PMID:26989626

  6. Radiation Oncology In Vitro: Trends to Improve Radiotherapy through Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Feofanova, Natália; Geraldo, Jony Marques; de Andrade, Lídia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Much has been investigated to improve the beneficial effects of radiotherapy especially in that case where radioresistant behavior is observed. Beyond simple identification of resistant phenotype the discovery and development of specific molecular targets have demonstrated therapeutic potential in cancer treatment including radiotherapy. Alterations on transduction signaling pathway related with MAPK cascade are the main axis in cancer cellular proliferation even as cell migration and invasiveness in irradiated tumor cell lines; then, for that reason, more studies are in course focusing on, among others, DNA damage enhancement, apoptosis stimulation, and growth factors receptor blockages, showing promising in vitro results highlighting molecular targets associated with ionizing radiation as a new radiotherapy strategy to improve clinical outcome. In this review we discuss some of the main molecular targets related with tumor cell proliferation and migration as well as their potential contributions to radiation oncology improvements. PMID:25302298

  7. The Size, Shape, and Albedo of Deep Impact Target 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A'Hearn, Michael; Lisse, Carey; Lisse, C.; Fernandez, Y.; Belton, M.; Groussin, O.; Meech, K.; van Cleve, J.

    2004-02-01

    The Deep Impact mission, the eighth mission in NASA's Discovery Program, will launch on 30 Dec 2004 and will impact the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1 on 4 July 2005. Delivering an impactor to a cometary nucleus and observing the results of the impact is a challenging task. Mission success depends critically on the ability of the DI spacecraft to navigate to the comet. Despite robust targeting algorithms, large uncertainties in size, shape, albedo distribution, and rotational state significantly degrade the probability that the impactor will land in a sunlit portion of the surface that is observable from the flyby. The uncertainties in the size, axial ratio, and rotational state further jeopardize the ability of the flyby spacecraft to point its High Resolution Instrument at the actual impact site with sufficient precision to ensure it is in the field of view. Current estimate of the comet's size using Keck LWS observations are uncertain by 50% and they have provided no information on the distribution of albedo. Although uncertainty in the phasing of the optical lightcurve represents a large part of that error, there is also a significant uncertainty due to the combination of low SNR in the data from Keck and the limited spectral range over which data could be obtained. In order to improve our estimate of the size and shape of the nucleus of Tempel 1, we must obtain data with much higher SNR and with one-hour time resolution over a significant portion of the rotation light curve when the comet is inactive. We must determine whether or not there are large variations in albedo across the surface to order to ensure that the rotational lightcurve from optical data can be used to predict the convex hull of the actual shape. Tempel 1 is available in only one Spitzer viewing widow before it is expected to be close enough to the sun to become active, namely the window from 27 Feb through 29 April 2004, before the first GO observing period, at 3.7 AU from the Sun. The expect

  8. Target-to-background enhancement in multispectral endoscopy with background autofluorescence mitigation for quantitative molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian W.; Girard, Emily J.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging with exogenous probes improves specificity for the detection of diseased tissues by targeting unambiguous molecular signatures. Additionally, increased diagnostic sensitivity is expected with the application of multiple molecular probes. We developed a real-time multispectral fluorescence-reflectance scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) for wide-field molecular imaging of fluorescent dye-labeled molecular probes at nanomolar detection levels. Concurrent multichannel imaging with the wide-field SFE also allows for real-time mitigation of the background autofluorescence (AF) signal, especially when fluorescein, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved dye, is used as the target fluorophore. Quantitative tissue AF was measured for the ex vivo porcine esophagus and murine brain tissues across the visible and near-infrared spectra. AF signals were then transferred to the unit of targeted fluorophore concentration to evaluate the SFE detection sensitivity for sodium fluorescein and cyanine. Next, we demonstrated a real-time AF mitigation algorithm on a tissue phantom, which featured molecular probe targeted cells of high-grade dysplasia on a substrate containing AF species. The target-to-background ratio was enhanced by more than one order of magnitude when applying the real-time AF mitigation algorithm. Furthermore, a quantitative estimate of the fluorescein photodegradation (photobleaching) rate was evaluated and shown to be insignificant under the illumination conditions of SFE. In summary, the multichannel laser-based flexible SFE has demonstrated the capability to provide sufficient detection sensitivity, image contrast, and quantitative target intensity information for detecting small precancerous lesions in vivo.

  9. Target-to-background enhancement in multispectral endoscopy with background autofluorescence mitigation for quantitative molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian W.; Girard, Emily J.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence molecular imaging with exogenous probes improves specificity for the detection of diseased tissues by targeting unambiguous molecular signatures. Additionally, increased diagnostic sensitivity is expected with the application of multiple molecular probes. We developed a real-time multispectral fluorescence-reflectance scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) for wide-field molecular imaging of fluorescent dye-labeled molecular probes at nanomolar detection levels. Concurrent multichannel imaging with the wide-field SFE also allows for real-time mitigation of the background autofluorescence (AF) signal, especially when fluorescein, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved dye, is used as the target fluorophore. Quantitative tissue AF was measured for the ex vivo porcine esophagus and murine brain tissues across the visible and near-infrared spectra. AF signals were then transferred to the unit of targeted fluorophore concentration to evaluate the SFE detection sensitivity for sodium fluorescein and cyanine. Next, we demonstrated a real-time AF mitigation algorithm on a tissue phantom, which featured molecular probe targeted cells of high-grade dysplasia on a substrate containing AF species. The target-to-background ratio was enhanced by more than one order of magnitude when applying the real-time AF mitigation algorithm. Furthermore, a quantitative estimate of the fluorescein photodegradation (photobleaching) rate was evaluated and shown to be insignificant under the illumination conditions of SFE. In summary, the multichannel laser-based flexible SFE has demonstrated the capability to provide sufficient detection sensitivity, image contrast, and quantitative target intensity information for detecting small precancerous lesions in vivo. PMID:25027002

  10. Size-dependent mechanical behavior of nanoscale polymer particles through coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhua; Nagao, Shijo; Odegard, Gregory M; Zhang, Zhiliang; Kristiansen, Helge; He, Jianying

    2013-12-21

    Anisotropic conductive adhesives (ACAs) are promising materials used for producing ultra-thin liquid-crystal displays. Because the mechanical response of polymer particles can have a significant impact in the performance of ACAs, understanding of this apparent size effect is of fundamental importance in the electronics industry. The objective of this research is to use a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model to verify and gain physical insight into the observed size dependence effect in polymer particles. In agreement with experimental studies, the results of this study clearly indicate that there is a strong size effect in spherical polymer particles with diameters approaching the nanometer length scale. The results of the simulations also clearly indicate that the source for the increases in modulus is the increase in relative surface energy for decreasing particle sizes. Finally, the actual contact conditions at the surface of the polymer nanoparticles are shown to be similar to those predicted using Hertz and perfectly plastic contact theory. As ACA thicknesses are reduced in response to reductions in polymer particle size, it is expected that the overall compressive stiffness of the ACA will increase, thus influencing the manufacturing process.

  11. Size-dependent mechanical behavior of nanoscale polymer particles through coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anisotropic conductive adhesives (ACAs) are promising materials used for producing ultra-thin liquid-crystal displays. Because the mechanical response of polymer particles can have a significant impact in the performance of ACAs, understanding of this apparent size effect is of fundamental importance in the electronics industry. The objective of this research is to use a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model to verify and gain physical insight into the observed size dependence effect in polymer particles. In agreement with experimental studies, the results of this study clearly indicate that there is a strong size effect in spherical polymer particles with diameters approaching the nanometer length scale. The results of the simulations also clearly indicate that the source for the increases in modulus is the increase in relative surface energy for decreasing particle sizes. Finally, the actual contact conditions at the surface of the polymer nanoparticles are shown to be similar to those predicted using Hertz and perfectly plastic contact theory. As ACA thicknesses are reduced in response to reductions in polymer particle size, it is expected that the overall compressive stiffness of the ACA will increase, thus influencing the manufacturing process. PMID:24359191

  12. Quencher-free molecular beacon tethering 7-hydroxycoumarin detects targets through protonation/deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Kashida, Hiromu; Yamaguchi, Kyohei; Hara, Yuichi; Asanuma, Hiroyuki

    2012-07-15

    In this study, we synthesized a simple but efficient quencher-free molecular beacon tethering 7-hydroxycoumarin on D-threoninol based on its pK(a) change. The pK(a) of 7-hydroxycoumarin in a single strand was determined as 8.8, whereas that intercalated in the duplex was over 10. This large pK(a) shift (more than 1.2) upon hybridization could be attributed to the anionic and hydrophobic microenvironment inside the DNA duplex. Because 7-hydroxycoumarin quenches its fluorescence upon protonation, the emission intensity of the duplex at pH 8.5 was 1/15 that of the single strand. We applied this quenching mechanism to the preparation of a quencher-free molecular beacon by introducing the dye into the middle of the stem part. In the absence of the target, the stem region formed a duplex and fluorescence was quenched. However, when the target was added, the molecular beacon opened and the dye was deprotonated. As a result, the emission intensity of the molecular beacon with the target was 10 times higher than that without the target. Accordingly, a quencher-free molecular beacon utilizing the pK(a) change was successfully developed.

  13. Molecular Biomarkers for Prediction of Targeted Therapy Response in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Trick or Treat?

    PubMed Central

    Toss, Angela; Venturelli, Marta; Peterle, Chiara; Piacentini, Federico; Cascinu, Stefano; Cortesi, Laura

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the study of genomic alterations and protein expression involved in the pathways of breast cancer carcinogenesis has provided an increasing number of targets for drugs development in the setting of metastatic breast cancer (i.e., trastuzumab, everolimus, palbociclib, etc.) significantly improving the prognosis of this disease. These drugs target specific molecular abnormalities that confer a survival advantage to cancer cells. On these bases, emerging evidence from clinical trials provided increasing proof that the genetic landscape of any tumor may dictate its sensitivity or resistance profile to specific agents and some studies have already showed that tumors treated with therapies matched with their molecular alterations obtain higher objective response rates and longer survival. Predictive molecular biomarkers may optimize the selection of effective therapies, thus reducing treatment costs and side effects. This review offers an overview of the main molecular pathways involved in breast carcinogenesis, the targeted therapies developed to inhibit these pathways, the principal mechanisms of resistance and, finally, the molecular biomarkers that, to date, are demonstrated in clinical trials to predict response/resistance to targeted treatments in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:28054957

  14. Molecular Targets of Omega 3 and Conjugated Linoleic Fatty Acids – “Micromanaging” Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Visioli, Francesco; Giordano, Elena; Nicod, Nathalie Marie; Dávalos, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized de novo by mammals and need to be ingested either with the diet or through the use of supplements/functional foods to ameliorate cardiovascular prognosis. This review focus on the molecular targets of omega 3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid, as paradigmatic molecules that can be exploited both as nutrients and as pharmacological agents, especially as related to cardioprotection. In addition, we indicate novel molecular targets, namely microRNAs that might contribute to the observed biological activities of such essential fatty acids. PMID:22393325

  15. Molecular targets for the treatment of pancreatic cancer: Clinical and experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Tasuku; Yashiro, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Although recent therapeutic developments for patients with pancreatic cancer have provided survival benefits, the outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer remain unsatisfactory. Molecularly targeted cancer therapy has advanced in the past decade with the use of a number of pathways as candidates of therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the molecular features of this refractory disease while focusing on the recent clinical and experimental findings on pancreatic cancer. It also discusses the data supporting current standard clinical outcomes, and offers conclusions that may improve the management of pancreatic cancer in the future. PMID:26811624

  16. Molecularly Targeted Agents as Radiosensitizers in Cancer Therapy—Focus on Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alcorn, Sara; Walker, Amanda J.; Gandhi, Nishant; Narang, Amol; Wild, Aaron T.; Hales, Russell K.; Herman, Joseph M.; Song, Danny Y.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Tran, Phuoc T.

    2013-01-01

    As our understanding of the molecular pathways driving tumorigenesis improves and more druggable targets are identified, we have witnessed a concomitant increase in the development and production of novel molecularly targeted agents. Radiotherapy is commonly used in the treatment of various malignancies with a prominent role in the care of prostate cancer patients, and efforts to improve the therapeutic ratio of radiation by technologic and pharmacologic means have led to important advances in cancer care. One promising approach is to combine molecularly targeted systemic agents with radiotherapy to improve tumor response rates and likelihood of durable control. This review first explores the limitations of preclinical studies as well as barriers to successful implementation of clinical trials with radiosensitizers. Special considerations related to and recommendations for the design of preclinical studies and clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents combined with radiotherapy are provided. We then apply these concepts by reviewing a representative set of targeted therapies that show promise as radiosensitizers in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:23863691

  17. Data Mining FAERS to Analyze Molecular Targets of Drugs Highly Associated with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Keith K; Abernethy, Darrell; Jackson, David

    2015-06-01

    Drug features that are associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) have not been fully characterized. A molecular target analysis of the drugs associated with SJS in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) may contribute to mechanistic insights into SJS pathophysiology. The publicly available version of FAERS was analyzed to identify disproportionality among the molecular targets, metabolizing enzymes, and transporters for drugs associated with SJS. The FAERS in-house version was also analyzed for an internal comparison of the drugs most highly associated with SJS. Cyclooxygenases 1 and 2, carbonic anhydrase 2, and sodium channel 2 alpha were identified as disproportionately associated with SJS. Cytochrome P450 (CYPs) 3A4 and 2C9 are disproportionately represented as metabolizing enzymes of the drugs associated with SJS adverse event reports. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1), organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1), and PEPT2 were also identified and are highly associated with the transport of these drugs. A detailed review of the molecular targets identifies important roles for these targets in immune response. The association with CYP metabolizing enzymes suggests that reactive metabolites and oxidative stress may have a contributory role. Drug transporters may enhance intracellular tissue concentrations and also have vital physiologic roles that impact keratinocyte proliferation and survival. Data mining FAERS may be used to hypothesize mechanisms for adverse drug events by identifying molecular targets that are highly associated with drug-induced adverse events. The information gained may contribute to systems biology disease models.

  18. Molecular Size and Separability Features of Pea Cell Wall Polysaccharides 1

    PubMed Central

    Talbott, Lawrence D.; Ray, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    Relative molecular size distributions of pectic and hemicellulosic polysaccharides of pea (Pisum sativum cv Alaska) third internode primary walls were determined by gel filtration chromatography. Pectic polyuronides have a peak molecular mass of about 1100 kilodaltons, relative to dextran standards. This peak may be partly an aggregate of smaller molecular units, because demonstrable aggregation occurred when samples were concentrated by evaporation. About 86% of the neutral sugars (mostly arabinose and galactose) in the pectin cofractionate with polyuronide in gel filtration chromatography and diethylaminoethyl-cellulose chromatography and appear to be attached covalently to polyuronide chains, probably as constituents of rhamnogalacturonans. However, at least 60% of the wall's arabinan/galactan is not linked covalently to the bulk of its rhamnogalacturonan, either glycosidically or by ester links, but occurs in the hemicellulose fraction, accompanied by negligible uronic acid, and has a peak molecular mass of about 1000 kilodaltons. Xyloglucan, the other principal hemicellulosic polymer, has a peak molecular mass of about 30 kilodaltons (with a secondary, usually minor, peak of approximately 300 kilodaltons) and is mostly not linked glycosidically either to pectic polyuronides or to arabinogalactan. The relatively narrow molecular mass distributions of these polymers suggest mechanisms of co- or postsynthetic control of hemicellulose chain length by the cell. Although the macromolecular features of the mentioned polymers individually agree generally with those shown in the widely disseminated sycamore cell primary wall model, the matrix polymers seem to be associated mostly noncovalently rather than in the covalently interlinked meshwork postulated by that model. Xyloglucan and arabinan/galactan may form tightly and more loosely bound layers, respectively, around the cellulose microfibrils, the outer layer interacting with pectic rhamnogalacturonans that occupy

  19. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    or in combination with each other or with chemo and /or radiotherapy • To explore applications of molecular imaging for targeted therapy and...kinase) with/without radiotherapy for stage III NSCLC to improve the therapeutic ratio (i.e., increase malignant cell cytotoxicity without increasing...radiation therapy); 2) compliance, which is defined to be completion of concurrent chemoradiation and erlotinib/ radiotherapy with no more than minor

  20. Bounds on the Number and Size of Extra Dimensions from Molecular Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salumbides, Edcel John; Schellekens, Bert; Gato-Rivera, Beatriz; Ubachs, Wim

    2015-06-01

    Modern string theories, which seek to produce a consistent description of physics beyond the Standard Model that also includes the gravitational interaction, appear to be most consistent if a large number of dimensions are postulated. For example the mysterious M-theory, which generalizes all consistent versions of superstring theories, require 11 dimensions. We demonstrate that investigations of quantum level energies in simple molecular systems provide a testing ground to constrain the size of compactified extra dimensions, for example those proposed in the ADD [1] and RS scenarios [2]. This is made possible by the recent progress in precision metrology with ultrastable lasers on energy levels in neutral molecular hydrogen (H_2, HD and D_2) [3] and the molecular hydrogen ions (H_2^+, HD^+ and D_2^+) [4]. Comparisons between experiment and quantum electrodynamics calculations for these molecular systems can be interpreted in terms of probing large extra dimensions, under which conditions gravity will become much stronger. Molecules are a probe of space-time geometry at typical distances where chemical bonds are effective, i.e. at length scales of an Å. [1] N. Arkani-Hamed, S. Dimopoulos and G. Dvali, Phys. Lett. B 429, 263 (1998) [2] L. Randall and R. Sundrum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 3370 (1999). [3] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [4] J. C. J. Koelemeij et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 173002 (2007).

  1. Molecular characterization of multivalent bioconjugates by size-exclusion chromatography with multiangle laser light scattering.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Jacob F; Ashton, Randolph S; Rode, Nikhil A; Schaffer, David V; Healy, Kevin E

    2012-09-19

    The degree of substitution and valency of bioconjugate reaction products are often poorly judged or require multiple time- and product-consuming chemical characterization methods. These aspects become critical when analyzing and optimizing the potency of costly polyvalent bioactive conjugates. In this study, size-exclusion chromatography with multiangle laser light scattering was paired with refractive index detection and ultraviolet spectroscopy (SEC-MALS-RI-UV) to characterize the reaction efficiency, degree of substitution, and valency of the products of conjugation of either peptides or proteins to a biopolymer scaffold, i.e., hyaluronic acid (HyA). Molecular characterization was more complete compared to estimates from a protein quantification assay, and exploitation of this method led to more accurate deduction of the molecular structures of polymer bioconjugates. Information obtained using this technique can improve macromolecular engineering design principles and help to better understand multivalent macromolecular interactions in biological systems.

  2. Apparent target size of rat brain benzodiazepine receptor, acetylcholinesterase, and pyruvate kinase is highly influenced by experimental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.; Braestrup, C.

    1988-08-25

    Radiation inactivation is a method to determine the apparent target size of molecules. In this report we examined whether radiation inactivation of various enzymes and brain receptors is influenced by the preparation of samples preceding irradiation. The apparent target sizes of endogenous acetylcholinesterase and pyruvate kinase from rat brain and from rabbit muscle and benzodiazepine receptor from rat brain were investigated in some detail. In addition the target sizes of alcohol dehydrogenase (from yeast and horse liver), beta-galactosidase (from Escherichia coli), lactate dehydrogenase (endogenous from rat brain), and 5-HT2 receptors, acetylcholine muscarine receptors, and (/sup 35/S) butyl bicyclophosphorothionate tertiary binding sites from rat brain were determined. The results show that apparent target sizes are highly influenced by the procedure applied for sample preparation before irradiation. The data indicate that irradiation of frozen whole tissue as opposed to lyophilized tissue or frozen tissue homogenates will estimate the smallest and most relevant functional target size of a receptor or an enzyme.

  3. Molecular and cellular alterations in Down syndrome: toward the identification of targets for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Créau, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome is a complex disease that has challenged molecular and cellular research for more than 50 years. Understanding the molecular bases of morphological, cellular, and functional alterations resulting from the presence of an additional complete chromosome 21 would aid in targeting specific genes and pathways for rescuing some phenotypes. Recently, progress has been made by characterization of brain alterations in mouse models of Down syndrome. This review will highlight the main molecular and cellular findings recently described for these models, particularly with respect to their relationship to Down syndrome phenotypes.

  4. Endothelial cell targeted molecular imaging in tumor angiogenesis: strategies and current status.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Zeng, Yun; Liu, Yanhong; Liu, Gang; Ai, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays crucial roles in tumor growth, progression and metastasis. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of tumor neovasculature is a fundamental prerequisite for effective therapeutic intervention, particularly anti-angiogenic treatment regimens. Emerging molecular imaging techniques now allow recognition of cellular/molecular processes before gross pathological changes, leading to better understanding of fundamental biological processes of tumor angiogenesis. In this review, we will summarize recent progresses on molecular imaging of attractive biochemical epitopes in tumor angiogenesis, especially the endothelial cell targets-based imaging probes.

  5. Size distribution of particle-phase molecular markers during a severe winter pollution episode.

    PubMed

    Kleeman, Michael J; Riddle, Sarah G; Jakober, Chris A

    2008-09-01

    Airborne particulate matter was collected using filter samplers and cascade impactors in six size fractions below 1.8 microm during a severe winter air pollution event at three sites in the Central Valley of California. The smallest size fraction analyzed was 0.056 < Dp <0.1 microm particle diameter, which accounts for the majority of the mass in the ultrafine (PM0.1) size range. Separate samples were collected during the daytime (10 a.m. to 6 p.m. PST) and nighttime (8 p.m. to 8 a.m. PST) to characterize diurnal patterns. Each sample was extracted with organic solvents and analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry for molecular markers that can be used for size-resolved source apportionment calculations. Colocated impactor and filter measurements were highly correlated (R8 > 0.8) for retene, benzo[ghi]flouranthene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[e]pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, coronene, MW302 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), 17beta(H)-21alpha(H)-30-norhopane, 17alpha(H)-21beta(H)-hopane, alphabetabeta-20R-C29-ethylcholestane, levoglucosan, and cholesterol. Of these compounds, levoglucosan was present in the highest concentration (60-2080 ng m(-3)) followed by cholesterol (6-35 ng m(-3)), PAHs (2-38 ng m(-3)), and hopanes and steranes (0-2 ng m(-3)). Nighttime concentrations were higher than daytime concentrations in all cases. Organic compound size distributions were generally similar to the total carbon size distributions during the nighttime but showed greater variability during the daytime. This may reflect the dominance of fresh emission in the stagnant surface layer during the evening hours and the presence of aged organic aerosol at the surface during the daytime when the atmosphere is better mixed. All of the measured organic compound particle size distributions had a single mode that peaked somewhere between 0.18 and 0.56 microm, but the width of each distribution

  6. Effects of Atomistic Domain Size on Hybrid Lattice Boltzmann-Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Dense Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, A.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    We present a convergence study for a hybrid Lattice Boltzmann-Molecular Dynamics model for the simulation of dense liquids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The velocity field from the atomistic domain is introduced as forcing terms to the Lattice Boltzmann model of the continuum while the mean field of the continuum imposes mean field conditions for the atomistic domain. In the present paper we investigate the effect of varying the size of the atomistic subdomain in simulations of two dimensional flows of liquid argon past carbon nanotubes and assess the efficiency of the method.

  7. Communication: Molecular simulation study of kaolinite intercalation with realistic layer size

    SciTech Connect

    Ható, Zoltán; Kristóf, Tamás; Rutkai, Gábor; Vrabec, Jadran

    2014-09-07

    Intercalation phenomena of kaolinite in aqueous potassium acetate and in hexyl-amine solutions are studied by large scale molecular dynamics simulations. The simulated kaolinite particle is constructed from ∼6.5 × 10{sup 6} atoms, producing a particle size of ∼100 nm × 100 nm × 10 nm. The simulation with potassium acetate results in a stable kaolinite-potassium acetate complex, with a basal spacing that is in close agreement with experimental data. The simulation with hexyl-amine shows signs of the experimentally observed delamination of kaolinite (the initial phase of the formation of nanoscrolls from the external layers)

  8. Molecular size of different neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Barhanin, J; Schmid, A; Lombet, A; Wheeler, K P; Lazdunski, M; Ellory, J C

    1983-01-25

    Measurements were made of the molecular sizes of two distinct receptors on the Na+ channel in rat brain synaptosomes that are specific for different neurotoxins. Radiation inactivation of the binding of radiolabeled derivatives of the toxins was consistent with Mr = 260,000 for the tetrodotoxin receptor and Mr = 266,000 for the receptor specific for two scorpion toxins, toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus and toxin gamma from Tityus serrulatus serrulatus. Covalent cross-linking of the latter to its receptor similarly indicated Mr = 270,000. It seems most likely that these two distinct receptors reside on the same molecule.

  9. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  10. Determination of molecular weight of heparin by size exclusion chromatography with universal calibration.

    PubMed

    Guo, X; Condra, M; Kimura, K; Berth, G; Dautzenberg, H; Dubin, P L

    2003-01-01

    The molecular weight (MW) of heparin can be accurately determined by size exclusion chromatography using "universal calibration." A universal calibration curve was constructed for Superose 12 with standard pullulan samples and verified using characterized ficoll fractions. This calibration yielded the correct MW of heparin as determined by light scattering, when the ionic strength of the mobile phase was maintained over 1.0M. Sodium poly(styrenesulfonate) samples were not suitable standards because of adsorption at high salt concentration and repulsion from the packing material at low ionic strength. The extraordinarily high charge density of heparin leads to the need for high salt concentration to screen such repulsions.

  11. Fault diagnosis engineering in molecular signaling networks: an overview and applications in target discovery.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Ali; Emamian, Effat S

    2010-05-01

    Fault diagnosis engineering is a key component of modern industrial facilities and complex systems, and has gone through considerable developments in the past few decades. In this paper, the principles and concepts of molecular fault diagnosis engineering are reviewed. In this area, molecular intracellular networks are considered as complex systems that may fail to function, due to the presence of some faulty molecules. Dysfunction of the system due to the presence of a single or multiple molecules can ultimately lead to the transition from the normal state to the disease state. It is the goal of molecular fault diagnosis engineering to identify the critical components of molecular networks, i.e., those whose dysfunction can interrupt the function of the entire network. The results of the fault analysis of several signaling networks are discussed, and possible connections of the findings with some complex human diseases are examined. Implications of molecular fault diagnosis engineering for target discovery and drug development are outlined as well.

  12. Determination of nanoparticle size distribution together with density or molecular weight by 2D analytical ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Randy P.; Kim, Jin Young; Qian, Huifeng; Jin, Rongchao; Mehenni, Hakim; Stellacci, Francesco; Bakr, Osman M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles are finding many research and industrial applications, yet their characterization remains a challenge. Their cores are often polydisperse and coated by a stabilizing shell that varies in size and composition. No single technique can characterize both the size distribution and the nature of the shell. Advances in analytical ultracentrifugation allow for the extraction of the sedimentation (s) and diffusion coefficients (D). Here we report an approach to transform the s and D distributions of nanoparticles in solution into precise molecular weight (M), density (ρP) and particle diameter (dp) distributions. M for mixtures of discrete nanocrystals is found within 4% of the known quantities. The accuracy and the density information we achieve on nanoparticles are unparalleled. A single experimental run is sufficient for full nanoparticle characterization, without the need for standards or other auxiliary measurements. We believe that our method is of general applicability and we discuss its limitations. PMID:21654635

  13. Finite-size dependence of the bridge function extracted from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumketner, A.; Hiwatari, Y.

    2001-06-01

    The bridge function for liquid sodium at T=373 K is obtained by using the mean spherical approximation to extrapolate the pair distribution function (PDF), calculated in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, beyond the half simulation box length for two sizes of the MD system. The bridge function is found to strongly depend on the total number of particles used in the simulation cell. This dependency leads to a spurious maximum of the static structure factor at long wavelengths, obtained from the reference hypernetted-chain approximation (RHNC) with the MD system used as a reference system (RHNC-MD). A simple self-consistent procedure, proposed to account for the finite-size effects in the bridge function, allows one to efficiently correct the RHNC-MD static structure factor for all unphysical manifestations.

  14. Melting Properties of Medium-Sized Silicon Nanoclusters: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haipeng; Xu, Runfeng; Bi, Zetong; Shen, Xiaopeng; Han, Kui

    2016-11-01

    The structures and melting properties of the medium-sized silicon nanoclusters have been comparatively studied using the molecular dynamics method. Structural and thermodynamic parameters are used to characterize the melting properties of the clusters. The size dependence of the melting temperature of silicon nanoclusters is determined using the computation results. Different from the homogeneous melting of bulk silicon, melting of silicon nanoparticles proceeds over a finite temperature range due to surface effects, which shows the heterogeneous melting of nanoclusters. We found that the melting starts at the cluster surface and progressively shifts into the core region. This study provides a fundamental perspective on the melting behaviors of semiconductor silicon nanoclusters at the atomistic level.

  15. Photofragmentation and vibrational relaxation of size-selected clusters ions : Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douady, J.; Gervais, B.; Jacquet, E.; Zanuttini, D.; Giglio, E.

    2009-11-01

    We present non-adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of size-selected Na2+ Arn (n=6-11-17) cluster. Their electronic structure is obtained from an accurate 1-electron model using core polarization pseudopotentials. We follow the dynamics of two specific photoexcitation processes (X2 Σ+g → A2Σ+u) and (X2 Σ+g → B2 Πu) during the first 10 ps. We identify a variety of processes in these clusters, such as dissociation of the Na2+ chromophore, solvation of the Na+ fragment as Na+ Arp and the recombination to the ground state of the Na2+ Arp with an important solvent evaporation. These processes depend significantly on the transition and on the isomer. We discuss these processes as a function of the cluster size.

  16. Attenuating the size and molecular carrier capabilities of polyacrylate nanoparticles by a hydrophobic fluorine effect.

    PubMed

    Labruère, Raphaël; Turos, Edward

    2012-08-15

    This study investigates the effect of introducing alkyl chain fluorination on the properties of polyacrylate nanoparticles prepared in aqueous solution by emulsion polymerization. For this, 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (1) and methyl trifluoroacrylate (2) were tested as monomers as a means to prepare fluorinated polyacrylate nanoparticles to evaluate how side chain fluorination may affect nanoparticle size and drug carrier properties. Our results show that as fluorine content within the polyacrylate matrix increases, the size of the nanoparticle systematically diminishes, from 45 nm (for nanoparticles containing no fluoroacrylate) to ~7 nm (for nanoparticles constructed solely of fluoroacrylate). We also observe that as fluoroacrylate content and hydrophobicity increases, the nanoparticles decrease their ability to incorporate lipophilic molecules during the process of emulsification. These findings have meaningful implications in the implementation of fluorinated nanoparticles in molecular delivery.

  17. Continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” on 5A zeolite for distinguishing small organic molecules by size

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-09-11

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. Lastly, this novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation.

  18. Continuously Adjustable, Molecular-Sieving “Gate” on 5A Zeolite for Distinguishing Small Organic Molecules by Size

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. This novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation. PMID:26358480

  19. Continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” on 5A zeolite for distinguishing small organic molecules by size

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; ...

    2015-09-11

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences weremore » effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. Lastly, this novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation.« less

  20. Finite-size effects on molecular dynamics interfacial thermal-resistance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the role of finite size effects on the determination of interfacial thermal resistance between two solids characterized by high phonon mean free paths. In particular, we will show that a direct, heat source-sink method leads to strong size effect, associated with ballistic phonon transport to and from, and specular reflections at the simulation domain boundary. Lack of proper account for these effects can lead to incorrect predictions about the role of interfacial bonding and structure on interfacial thermal resistance. We also show that the finite size effect can be dramatically reduced by introduction of rough external boundaries leading to diffuse phonon scattering, as explicitly demonstrated by phonon wave-packet simulations. Finally, we demonstrate that when careful considerations are given to the effects associated with the finite heat capacity of the simulation domains and phonon scattering from the external surfaces, a size-independent interfacial resistance can be properly extracted from the time integral of the correlation function of heat power across the interface. Our work demonstrates that reliable and consistent values of the interfacial thermal resistance can be obtained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium methods with a relatively small computational cost.

  1. Molecular configuration and glomerular size selectivity in healthy and nephrotic humans.

    PubMed

    Blouch, K; Deen, W M; Fauvel, J P; Bialek, J; Derby, G; Myers, B D

    1997-09-01

    We studied eight healthy volunteers and eight nephrotic subjects to compare the glomerular sieving coefficients (theta) of dextran, a linear polymer of glucopyranose, with those of Ficoll, a spherical polysucrose. Over a molecular radius (rs) interval of 20-70 A, theta for a given Ficoll was uniformly lower than corresponding theta for a dextran of equivalent rs. For each macromolecular species, the theta of molecules with rs > 50 A was selectively enhanced in nephrotic vs. healthy subjects. Analysis of either dextran or Ficoll sieving curves with pore theory revealed the glomerular barrier to have a bimodal pore size distribution: a lower mode of restrictive pores with a lognormal distribution of radii and an upper mode of large shuntlike pores. Nephrotics differed from controls in that the lower mode was broadened and shifted to pores of smaller mean size, but the prominence of shuntlike pores was enhanced by an order of magnitude. Both the mean radius of restrictive pores and the magnitude of the shunt pathway were substantially smaller when estimated from Ficoll than dextran sieving. We interpret the more realistic values for pore parameters derived from Ficoll than dextran sieving to indicate 1) that the normal glomerular barrier prevents albuminuria by virtue of a combination of both charge- and size-selective properties and 2) that a combined impairment of both barrier charge selectivity and size selectively are required to account for the observed level and composition of proteinuria in our nephrotic subjects.

  2. Innovative molecular targeted agents in hepatocellular carcinoma: new gladiators on the arena.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Jose; Dockx, Yanina; Vonghia, Luisa; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Rasschaert, Marika; Francque, Sven; Peeters, Marc; Rolfo, Christian

    2017-02-14

    Treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma remains a challenge, with discouraging results in terms of survival. Following the approval of the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib, a large number of molecular targeted agents have been tested, but many have failed to demonstrate significant efficacy in clinical trials. However, the deeper knowledge in HCC pathogenesis achieved through the years has enabled us to explore new targetable pathways as well as biomarkers that could lead to treatment personalization. In this review, we provide a comprehensive update of the most recent data regarding new drugs under investigation -some like regorafenib, very close to its approval- and new possible targets for future treatments.

  3. A combined molecular docking-based and pharmacophore-based target prediction strategy with a probabilistic fusion method for target ranking.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Bo; Yang, Ling-Ling; Xu, Yong; Wang, Wen-Jing; Li, Lin-Li; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2013-07-01

    Herein, a combined molecular docking-based and pharmacophore-based target prediction strategy is presented, in which a probabilistic fusion method is suggested for target ranking. Establishment and validation of the combined strategy are described. A target database, termed TargetDB, was firstly constructed, which contains 1105 drug targets. Based on TargetDB, the molecular docking-based target prediction and pharmacophore-based target prediction protocols were established. A probabilistic fusion method was then developed by constructing probability assignment curves (PACs) against a set of selected targets. Finally the workflow for the combined molecular docking-based and pharmacophore-based target prediction strategy was established. Evaluations of the performance of the combined strategy were carried out against a set of structurally different single-target compounds and a well-known multi-target drug, 4H-tamoxifen, which results showed that the combined strategy consistently outperformed the sole use of docking-based and pharmacophore-based methods. Overall, this investigation provides a possible way for improving the accuracy of in silico target prediction and a method for target ranking.

  4. Molecular approach to find target(s) for oligoclonal bands in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rand, K.; Houck, H.; Denslow, N.; Heilman, K.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Oligoclonal bands are a characteristic finding in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis, yet their target antigen(s) remain unknown. The objective was to determine whether a filamentous phage peptide library could be employed to allow the oligoclonal bands to select their own target epitopes.
METHODS—CSF IgG antibody from 14 patients with multiple sclerosis and 14 controls was used to select individual phage clones from a bacteriophage library containing≈4 × 107 different hexamers expressed on its surface pIII protein. The amino acid sequence selected was deduced by sequencing the DNA of the genetically engineered insert.
RESULTS—In general, after three rounds of selection, CSF from both patients with multiple sclerosis and controls selected one to two consistent peptide motifs. Five out of 14 patients with multiple sclerosis, and one control, selected the amino acid sequence motif, RRPFF. Given 20 possible amino acids per position, the likelihood of five patients selecting the same linear five amino acid sequence is at most 1.6 × 10-13, corrected for the number of clones sequenced. A GenBank computer search showed that this sequence is found in the Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen (EBNA-1), and a heat shock protein αB crystallin. Human serum antibodies to a synthetic peptide containing RRPFF were virtually exclusively found in patients with prior infection by Epstein-Barr virus. Other studies have suggested a relation between Epstein-Barr virus infection and multiple sclerosis, including nearly 100% Epstein-Barr virus seropositivity among patients with multiple sclerosis and increased concentrations of antibody to EBNA in CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis. By antigen specific immunoblotting, antibodies to the RRPFF motif in the CSF were shown to correspond to a subset of oligoclonal bands in the CSF from the same patient.
CONCLUSION—This study shows that phage epitope display libraries may be used to select amino acid

  5. Multispectral excitation based multiple fluorescent targets resolving in fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan; Guang, Huizhi; Pu, Huangsheng; Zhang, Jiulou; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can visualize biological activities at cellular and molecular levels in vivo, and has been extensively used in drug delivery and tumor detection research of small animals. The ill-posedness of the FMT inverse problem makes it difficult to reconstruct and resolve multiple adjacent fluorescent targets that have different functional features but are labeled with the same fluorochrome. An algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) for multispectral excited FMT is proposed to resolve multiple fluorescent targets in this study. Fluorescent targets are excited by multispectral excitation, and the three-dimensional distribution of fluorescent yields under the excitation spectrum is reconstructed by an iterative Tikhonov regularization algorithm. Subsequently, multiple fluorescent targets are resolved from mixed fluorescence signals by employing ICA. Simulations were performed and the results demonstrate that multiple adjacent fluorescent targets can be resolved if the number of excitation wavelengths is not smaller than that of fluorescent targets with different concentrations. The algorithm obtains both independent components that provide spatial information of different fluorescent targets and spectral courses that reflect variation trends of fluorescent yields along with the excitation spectrum. By using this method, it is possible to visualize the metabolism status of drugs in different structure organs, and quantitatively depict the variation trends of fluorescent yields of each functional organ under the excitation spectrum. This method may provide a pattern for tumor detection, drug delivery and treatment monitoring in vivo.

  6. Preparation of actinide targets by molecular plating for Coulomb excitation studies at ATLAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J. P.

    1998-11-18

    Molecular plating is now routinely used to prepare sources and targets of actinide elements. Although the technique is simple and fairly reproducible, because of the radioactive nature of the target it is very useful to record various parameters in the preparation of such targets. At Argonne, {approximately}200 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} thick targets of Pu and Cm were required for Coulomb Excitation (COULEX) Studies with the Argonne-Notre Dame BGO gamma ray facility and later with the GAMMASPHERE. These targets were plated on 50 mg/cm{sup 2} Au backing and were covered with 150 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} Au foil. Targets of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 244}Pu and {sup 248}Cm were prepared by dissolving the material in isopropyl alcohol and electroplating the actinide ions by applying 600 volts. The amount of these materials on the target was determined by alpha particle counting and gamma ray counting. Details of the molecular plating and counting will be discussed.

  7. RYP1 gene as a target for molecular diagnosis of histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Guedes, Glaucia Morgana de Melo; Riello, Giovanna Barbosa; Ribeiro, Joyce Fonteles; Alencar, Lucas Pereira; Bandeira, Silviane Praciano; Castelo-Branco, Débora Souza Collares Maia; Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Freire, Janaína Maria Maia; Mesquita, Jacó Ricarte Lima de; Camargo, Zoilo Pires de; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2016-11-01

    This study analyzed the RYP1 gene as a target for the molecular diagnosis of histoplasmosis. This assay detected fungal DNA in 13/13 blood samples from HIV/AIDS-patients with histoplasmosis. Therefore, the detection of RYP1 gene in whole blood sample is a quick and sensitive test to diagnose histoplasmosis.

  8. Targeting CYP51 for drug design by the contributions of molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Vitor W; Santos, Taísa F; Terra, Luciana; Santana, Marcos V; Castro, Helena C; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Abreu, Paula A

    2017-02-01

    CYP51 is an enzyme of sterol biosynthesis pathway present in animals, plants, protozoa and fungi. This enzyme is described as an important drug target that is still of interest. Therefore, in this work, we reviewed the structure and function of CYP51 and explored the molecular modeling approaches for the development of new antifungal and antiprotozoans that target this enzyme. Crystallographic structures of CYP51 of some organisms have already been described in the literature, which enable the construction of homology models of other organisms' enzymes and molecular docking studies of new ligands. The binding mode and interactions of some new series of azoles with antifungal or antiprotozoan activities has been studied and showed important residues of the active site. Molecular modeling is an important tool to be explored for the discovery and optimization of CYP51 inhibitors with better activities, pharmacokinetics, and toxicological profiles.

  9. Targeting the molecular chaperone SlyD to inhibit bacterial growth with a small molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Balbach, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are essential molecules for cell growth, whereby they maintain protein homeostasis. Because of their central cellular function, bacterial chaperones might be potential candidates for drug targets. Antimicrobial resistance is currently one of the greatest threats to human health, with gram-negative bacteria being of major concern. We found that a Cu2+ complex readily crosses the bacterial cell wall and inhibits SlyD, which is a molecular chaperone, cis/trans peptidyl prolyl isomerise (PPIase) and involved in various other metabolic pathways. The Cu2+ complex binds to the active sites of SlyD, which suppresses its PPIase and chaperone activities. Significant cell growth retardation could be observed for pathogenic bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). We anticipate that rational development of drugs targeting molecular chaperones might help in future control of pathogenic bacterial growth, in an era of rapidly increasing antibiotic resistance. PMID:28176839

  10. A Bayesian Target Predictor Method based on Molecular Pairing Energies estimation.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Antoni; Canals, Vincent; Rosselló, Josep L

    2017-03-06

    Virtual screening (VS) is applied in the early drug discovery phases for the quick inspection of huge molecular databases to identify those compounds that most likely bind to a given drug target. In this context, there is the necessity of the use of compact molecular models for database screening and precise target prediction in reasonable times. In this work we present a new compact energy-based model that is tested for its application to Virtual Screening and target prediction. The model can be used to quickly identify active compounds in huge databases based on the estimation of the molecule's pairing energies. The greatest molecular polar regions along with its geometrical distribution are considered by using a short set of smart energy vectors. The model is tested using similarity searches within the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD) database. The results obtained are considerably better than previously published models. As a Target prediction methodology we propose the use of a Bayesian Classifier that uses a combination of different active compounds to build an energy-dependent probability distribution function for each target.

  11. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  12. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  13. A Bayesian Target Predictor Method based on Molecular Pairing Energies estimation

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Antoni; Canals, Vincent; Rosselló, Josep L.

    2017-01-01

    Virtual screening (VS) is applied in the early drug discovery phases for the quick inspection of huge molecular databases to identify those compounds that most likely bind to a given drug target. In this context, there is the necessity of the use of compact molecular models for database screening and precise target prediction in reasonable times. In this work we present a new compact energy-based model that is tested for its application to Virtual Screening and target prediction. The model can be used to quickly identify active compounds in huge databases based on the estimation of the molecule’s pairing energies. The greatest molecular polar regions along with its geometrical distribution are considered by using a short set of smart energy vectors. The model is tested using similarity searches within the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD) database. The results obtained are considerably better than previously published models. As a Target prediction methodology we propose the use of a Bayesian Classifier that uses a combination of different active compounds to build an energy-dependent probability distribution function for each target. PMID:28263323

  14. A Bayesian Target Predictor Method based on Molecular Pairing Energies estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Antoni; Canals, Vincent; Rosselló, Josep L.

    2017-03-01

    Virtual screening (VS) is applied in the early drug discovery phases for the quick inspection of huge molecular databases to identify those compounds that most likely bind to a given drug target. In this context, there is the necessity of the use of compact molecular models for database screening and precise target prediction in reasonable times. In this work we present a new compact energy-based model that is tested for its application to Virtual Screening and target prediction. The model can be used to quickly identify active compounds in huge databases based on the estimation of the molecule’s pairing energies. The greatest molecular polar regions along with its geometrical distribution are considered by using a short set of smart energy vectors. The model is tested using similarity searches within the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD) database. The results obtained are considerably better than previously published models. As a Target prediction methodology we propose the use of a Bayesian Classifier that uses a combination of different active compounds to build an energy-dependent probability distribution function for each target.

  15. Phase and Size Controllable Synthesis of NaYbF4 Nanocrystals in Oleic Acid/ Ionic Liquid Two-Phase System for Targeted Fluorescent Imaging of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Liyuan; He, Meng; Ma, Jiebing; Tang, Wei; Gao, Guo; He, Rong; Su, Haichuan; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-01-01

    Upconversion nanocrystals with small size and strong fluorescent signals own great potential in applications such as biomolecule-labeling, in vivo tracking and molecular imaging. Herein we reported that NaYbF4: 25%Gd, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals with small size and strong fluorescent signals were controllably synthesized by oleic acid (OA)/ ionic liquid (IL) two-phase system for targeted fluorescent imaging of gastric cancer in vivo. The optimal synthesis condition of NaYbF4: 25%Gd, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals by OA/IL two-phase system was established, adding more metal ion such as Na+ ion could facilitate the size control and crystal-phase transition, more importantly, markedly enhancing fluorescent intensity of beta-phase nanocrystals compared with traditional methods. Alpha-phase NaYbF4, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals with less than 10nm in diameter and beta-phase NaYbF4: 25%Gd, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals with 30 nm or so in diameter and strong fluorescent signals were obtained, these synthesized nanocrystals exhibited very low cytotoxicity. Folic acid-conjugated silica-modified beta-phase NaYbF4: 25%Gd, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals were prepared, could actively target gastric cancer tissues implanted into nude mice in vivo, and realized targeted fluorescent imaging. Folic acid-conjugated silica-modified NaYbF4: 25%Gd, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals show great potential in applications such as targeted near infared radiation fluorescent imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and targeted therapy of gastric cancer in the near future. PMID:23471455

  16. Biogeography of soil organic matter molecular structure across multiple soil size fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, C. L.; Neff, J.

    2009-12-01

    Recent work suggests that there is a common soil decomposition sequence whereby plant inputs are metabolized into a physiologically constrained set of compounds originating from microbes that may persist in soil over relatively long time-scales. Plant inputs tend to be found in coarse particulate fractions (>180 μm) with relatively fast turnover times, while microbially derived compounds tend to accrue in the finer silt + clay fractions (<53 μm) with relatively long turnover times. To investigate whether a common decomposition sequence exists, we used pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (py-GC/MS) to characterize the molecular structure of soil organic matter (SOM) in three size fractions (590-180 μm, 180-53 μm, and <53 μm), using soils sampled from multiple biomes (alpine tundra, sub-alpine forest, boreal forest, temperate coniferous, temperate deciduous, dry desert/savannah, and tropical forest). We hypothesized that: 1) regardless of biome, fractions >180 μm would be chemically similar, and would be characterized by lignin and other plant-derived compounds; and 2) fractions <53 μm would also be similar across biomes but would be dominated by microbially-derived compounds like polysaccharides. Across all biomes, we found that there was significantly less lignin in <53 μm fractions compared to >180 μm fractions (p<0.0001), providing some support for the idea that plant material is not incorporated into soil C pools with relatively long turnover times. However, a principal components analysis (PCA) showed that the >180 μm coarse particulate fractions also contained compounds associated with microbial origins, indicating that microbial C is not limited to <53 μm size fractions. The PCA also revealed that samples within each of the three size fractions did not cluster together (i.e. they did not share a common molecular structure), but we did note that: 1) cold alpine and sub-alpine sites were unique and chemically similar; and 2) tropical

  17. Fast molecular beacon hybridization in organic solvents with improved target specificity.

    PubMed

    Dave, Neeshma; Liu, Juewen

    2010-12-02

    DNA hybridization is of tremendous importance in biology, bionanotechnology, and biophysics. Molecular beacons are engineered DNA hairpins with a fluorophore and a quencher labeled on each of the two ends. A target DNA can open the hairpin to give an increased fluorescence signal. To date, the majority of molecular beacon detections have been performed only in aqueous buffers. We describe herein DNA detection in nine different organic solvents, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol, varying each up to 75% (v/v). In comparison with detection in water, the detection in organic solvents showed several important features. First, the molecular beacon hybridizes to its target DNA in the presence of all nine solvents up to a certain percentage. Second, the rate of this hybridization was significantly faster in most organic solvents compared with water. For example, in 56% ethanol, the beacon showed a 70-fold rate enhancement. Third, the ability of the molecular beacon to discriminate single-base mismatch is still maintained. Lastly, the DNA melting temperature in the organic solvents showed a solvent concentration-dependent decrease. This study suggests that molecular beacons can be used for applications where organic solvents must be involved or organic solvents can be intentionally added to improve the molecular beacon performance.

  18. Development and validation of a molecular size distribution method for polysaccharide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Clément, G; Dierick, J-F; Lenfant, C; Giffroy, D

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the molecular size distribution of vaccine products by high performance size exclusion chromatography coupled to refractive index detection is important during the manufacturing process. Partial elution of high molecular weight compounds in the void volume of the chromatographic column is responsible for variation in the results obtained with a reference method using a TSK G5000PWXL chromatographic column. GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines has developed an alternative method relying on the selection of a different chromatographic column with a wider separation range and the generation of a dextran calibration curve to determine the optimal molecular weight cut-off values for all tested products. Validation of this method was performed according to The International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The new method detected product degradation with the same sensitivity as that observed for the reference method. All validation parameters were within the pre-specified range. Precision (relative standard deviation (RSD) of mean values) was < 5 per cent (intra-assay) and < 10 per cent (inter-assay). Sample recovery was > 70 per cent for all polysaccharide conjugates and for the Haemophilus influenzae type B final container vaccine. All results obtained for robustness met the acceptance criteria defined in the validation protocol (≤ 2 times (RSD) or ≤ 2 per cent difference between the modified and the reference parameter value if RSD = 0 per cent). The new method was shown to be a suitable quality control method for the release and stability follow-up of polysaccharide-containing vaccines. The new method gave comparable results to the reference method, but with less intra- and inter-assay variability.

  19. Microbubble mediated sonoporation of cells in suspension: clonogenic viability and influence of molecular size on uptake.

    PubMed

    Karshafian, Raffi; Samac, Sanya; Bevan, Peter D; Burns, Peter N

    2010-06-01

    This work investigates whether the application of sonoporation is limited by the size of a macromolecule being delivered and by the ability of cells to proliferate following uptake. KHT-C cells in suspension were exposed to variations in ultrasound pressure (0-570 kPa) and microbubble shell-type (lipid and protein) at fixed settings of 500 kHz centre frequency, 32 micros pulse duration, 3 kHz pulse repetition frequency and 2 min insonation. Reversible permeability (P(R)), defined as the number of cells stained with FITC-dextran and unstained with propidium iodide (i.e., PI-viable), was measured with flow cytometry for marker molecules ranging from 10 kDa to 2 MDa in size. Viable permeability (P(V)) defined as the number of permeabilised cells that maintained their ability to proliferate, was measured by clonogenic assay. Comparable intracellular delivery of all sizes of molecules was achieved, indicating that intracellular delivery of common therapeutic drugs may not be limited by molecular size. Maximum P(R)'s of 80% (at 10 kDa) and 55% (at 10 kDa) were achieved with lipid coated bubbles at 3.3% v/v and protein coated bubbles at 6.7% v/v concentrations. The PI-viability was approximately 80% at 570 kPa in both cases. The maximum P(V) achieved with both agents was 22%, while inducing a lower overall clonogenic viability with the lipid (39%) compared to the protein (56%) shelled bubbles. This study demonstrates that large macromolecules, up to 2 MDa in size, can be delivered with high efficiency to cells which undergo reversible permeabilisation, maintaining long-term viability in approximately half of the cells.

  20. The importance of molecular markers for diagnosis and selection of targeted treatments in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Tobin, N P; Foukakis, T; De Petris, L; Bergh, J

    2015-12-01

    The past 30 years have seen the introduction of a number of cancer therapies with the aim of restricting the growth and spread of primary and metastatic tumours. A shared commonality among these therapies is their targeting of various aspects of the cancer hallmarks, that is traits that are essential to successful tumour propagation and dissemination. The evolution of molecular-scale technology has been central to the identification of new cancer targets, and it is not a coincidence that improved therapies have emerged at the same time as gene expression arrays and DNA sequencing have enhanced our understanding of cancer genetics. Modern tumour pathology is now viewed at the molecular level ranging from IHC biomarkers, to gene signature classifiers and gene mutations, all of which provide crucial information about which patients will respond to targeted therapy regimens. In this review, we briefly discuss the general types of targeted therapies used in a clinical setting and provide a short background on immunohistochemical, gene expression and DNA sequencing technologies, before focusing on three tumour types: breast, lung and colorectal cancers. For each of these cancer types, we provide a background to the disease along with an overview of the current standard therapies and then focus on the relevant targeted therapies and the pathways they inhibit. Finally, we highlight several strategies that are pivotal to the successful development of targeted anti-cancer drugs.

  1. Molecular determinants of plaque size as an indicator of dengue virus attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Kenneth Choon Meng; Tang, Choon Kit; Norton, Diana Catherine; Gan, Esther Shuyi; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Sun, Bo; Syenina, Ayesa; Yousuf, Amjad; Ong, Xin Mei; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Cheung, Yin Bun; Gubler, Duane J; Davidson, Andrew; St John, Ashley Lauren; Sessions, October Michael; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2016-01-01

    The development of live viral vaccines relies on empirically derived phenotypic criteria, especially small plaque sizes, to indicate attenuation. However, while some candidate vaccines successfully translated into licensed applications, others have failed safety trials, placing vaccine development on a hit-or-miss trajectory. We examined the determinants of small plaque phenotype in two dengue virus (DENV) vaccine candidates, DENV-3 PGMK30FRhL3, which produced acute febrile illness in vaccine recipients, and DENV-2 PDK53, which has a good clinical safety profile. The reasons behind the failure of PGMK30FRhL3 during phase 1 clinical trial, despite meeting the empirically derived criteria of attenuation, have never been systematically investigated. Using in vitro, in vivo and functional genomics approaches, we examined infections by the vaccine and wild-type DENVs, in order to ascertain the different determinants of plaque size. We show that PGMK30FRhL3 produces small plaques on BHK-21 cells due to its slow in vitro growth rate. In contrast, PDK53 replicates rapidly, but is unable to evade antiviral responses that constrain its spread hence also giving rise to small plaques. Therefore, at least two different molecular mechanisms govern the plaque phenotype; determining which mechanism operates to constrain plaque size may be more informative on the safety of live-attenuated vaccines. PMID:27185466

  2. Analysis of Molecular Diffusion by First-Passage Time Variance Identifies the Size of Confinement Zones

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Vishaal; Carrero, Gustavo; Golan, David E.; de Vries, Gerda; Cairo, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    The diffusion of receptors within the two-dimensional environment of the plasma membrane is a complex process. Although certain components diffuse according to a random walk model (Brownian diffusion), an overwhelming body of work has found that membrane diffusion is nonideal (anomalous diffusion). One of the most powerful methods for studying membrane diffusion is single particle tracking (SPT), which records the trajectory of a label attached to a membrane component of interest. One of the outstanding problems in SPT is the analysis of data to identify the presence of heterogeneity. We have adapted a first-passage time (FPT) algorithm, originally developed for the interpretation of animal movement, for the analysis of SPT data. We discuss the general application of the FPT analysis to molecular diffusion, and use simulations to test the method against data containing known regions of confinement. We conclude that FPT can be used to identify the presence and size of confinement within trajectories of the receptor LFA-1, and these results are consistent with previous reports on the size of LFA-1 clusters. The analysis of trajectory data for cell surface receptors by FPT provides a robust method to determine the presence and size of confined regions of diffusion. PMID:21402028

  3. Molecular beacons with a homo-DNA stem: improving target selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Crey-Desbiolles, Caroline; Ahn, Dae-Ro; Leumann, Christian J.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are stem–loop DNA probes used for identifying and reporting the presence and localization of nucleic acid targets in vitro and in vivo via target-dependent dequenching of fluorescence. A drawback of conventional MB design is present in the stem sequence that is necessary to keep the MBs in a closed conformation in the absence of a target, but that can participate in target binding in the open (target-on) conformation, giving rise to the possibility of false-positive results. In order to circumvent these problems, we designed MBs in which the stem was replaced by an orthogonal DNA analog that does not cross-pair with natural nucleic acids. Homo-DNA seemed to be specially suited, as it forms stable adenine-adenine base pairs of the reversed Hoogsteen type, potentially reducing the number of necessary building blocks for stem design to one. We found that MBs in which the stem part was replaced by homo-adenylate residues can easily be synthesized using conventional automated DNA synthesis. As conventional MBs, such hybrid MBs show cooperative hairpin to coil transitions in the absence of a DNA target, indicating stable homo-DNA base pair formation in the closed conformation. Furthermore, our results show that the homo-adenylate stem is excluded from DNA target binding, which leads to a significant increase in target binding selectivity. PMID:15879349

  4. Molecularly self-assembled nucleic acid nanoparticles for targeted in vivo siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyukjin; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K. R.; Chen, Yi; Love, Kevin T.; Park, Angela I.; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D.; Sehgal, Alfica; Querbes, William; Zurenko, Christopher S.; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Peng, Chang G.; Charisse, Klaus; Borodovsky, Anna; Manoharan, Muthiah; Donahoe, Jessica S.; Truelove, Jessica; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2012-06-01

    Nanoparticles are used for delivering therapeutics into cells. However, size, shape, surface chemistry and the presentation of targeting ligands on the surface of nanoparticles can affect circulation half-life and biodistribution, cell-specific internalization, excretion, toxicity and efficacy. A variety of materials have been explored for delivering small interfering RNAs (siRNAs)--a therapeutic agent that suppresses the expression of targeted genes. However, conventional delivery nanoparticles such as liposomes and polymeric systems are heterogeneous in size, composition and surface chemistry, and this can lead to suboptimal performance, a lack of tissue specificity and potential toxicity. Here, we show that self-assembled DNA tetrahedral nanoparticles with a well-defined size can deliver siRNAs into cells and silence target genes in tumours. Monodisperse nanoparticles are prepared through the self-assembly of complementary DNA strands. Because the DNA strands are easily programmable, the size of the nanoparticles and the spatial orientation and density of cancer-targeting ligands (such as peptides and folate) on the nanoparticle surface can be controlled precisely. We show that at least three folate molecules per nanoparticle are required for optimal delivery of the siRNAs into cells and, gene silencing occurs only when the ligands are in the appropriate spatial orientation. In vivo, these nanoparticles showed a longer blood circulation time (t1/2 ~ 24.2 min) than the parent siRNA (t1/2 ~ 6 min).

  5. Molecularly self-assembled nucleic acid nanoparticles for targeted in vivo siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyukjin; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K R; Chen, Yi; Love, Kevin T; Park, Angela I; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Sehgal, Alfica; Querbes, William; Zurenko, Christopher S; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Peng, Chang G; Charisse, Klaus; Borodovsky, Anna; Manoharan, Muthiah; Donahoe, Jessica S; Truelove, Jessica; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-06-03

    Nanoparticles are used for delivering therapeutics into cells. However, size, shape, surface chemistry and the presentation of targeting ligands on the surface of nanoparticles can affect circulation half-life and biodistribution, cell-specific internalization, excretion, toxicity and efficacy. A variety of materials have been explored for delivering small interfering RNAs (siRNAs)--a therapeutic agent that suppresses the expression of targeted genes. However, conventional delivery nanoparticles such as liposomes and polymeric systems are heterogeneous in size, composition and surface chemistry, and this can lead to suboptimal performance, a lack of tissue specificity and potential toxicity. Here, we show that self-assembled DNA tetrahedral nanoparticles with a well-defined size can deliver siRNAs into cells and silence target genes in tumours. Monodisperse nanoparticles are prepared through the self-assembly of complementary DNA strands. Because the DNA strands are easily programmable, the size of the nanoparticles and the spatial orientation and density of cancer-targeting ligands (such as peptides and folate) on the nanoparticle surface can be controlled precisely. We show that at least three folate molecules per nanoparticle are required for optimal delivery of the siRNAs into cells and, gene silencing occurs only when the ligands are in the appropriate spatial orientation. In vivo, these nanoparticles showed a longer blood circulation time (t(1/2) ≈ 24.2 min) than the parent siRNA (t(1/2) ≈ 6 min).

  6. Molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ANTONELLI, GIOVANNA; LIBRA, MASSIMO; PANEBIANCO, VINCENZO; RUSSO, ALESSIA ERIKA; VITALE, FELICE VITO; COLINA, PAOLO; D'ANGELO, ALESSANDRO; ROSSELLO, ROSALBA; FERRAÙ, FRANCESCO

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in men and women. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, >50% of patients are >65 years old. Through an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lung oncogenesis, molecular-targeted approaches have become an essential element for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. As the toxicity profiles of the techniques are definitely more favorable compared with chemotherapy, they are particularly attractive for use in elderly patients, who are potentially more susceptible to the toxicity of systemic oncological therapies. However, studies on the activity of molecular-targeted agents in this aged patient setting are much more limited compared with those in their younger counterparts. In the present review, the literature on molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC is discussed. It is concluded that bevacizumab should be reserved only for highly select elderly patients with advanced NSCLC when the clinician deems it useful in the face of acceptable toxicities. In elderly patients with advanced epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive NSCLC, erlotinib and gefitinib appear to repeat the same favorable performance as that documented on a larger scale in the overall population of patients with activating mutations. A good toxicity profile is also confirmed for active molecules on different pathways, such as crizotinib. PMID:26870160

  7. Molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Giovanna; Libra, Massimo; Panebianco, Vincenzo; Russo, Alessia Erika; Vitale, Felice Vito; Colina, Paolo; D'Angelo, Alessandro; Rossello, Rosalba; Ferraù, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in men and women. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, >50% of patients are >65 years old. Through an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lung oncogenesis, molecular-targeted approaches have become an essential element for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. As the toxicity profiles of the techniques are definitely more favorable compared with chemotherapy, they are particularly attractive for use in elderly patients, who are potentially more susceptible to the toxicity of systemic oncological therapies. However, studies on the activity of molecular-targeted agents in this aged patient setting are much more limited compared with those in their younger counterparts. In the present review, the literature on molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC is discussed. It is concluded that bevacizumab should be reserved only for highly select elderly patients with advanced NSCLC when the clinician deems it useful in the face of acceptable toxicities. In elderly patients with advanced epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive NSCLC, erlotinib and gefitinib appear to repeat the same favorable performance as that documented on a larger scale in the overall population of patients with activating mutations. A good toxicity profile is also confirmed for active molecules on different pathways, such as crizotinib.

  8. Does size matter? Study of performance of pseudo-ELISAs based on molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles prepared for analytes of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, C; Canfarotta, F; Chianella, I; Pereira, E; Moczko, E; Esen, C; Guerreiro, A; Piletska, E; Whitcombe, M J; Piletsky, S A

    2016-02-21

    The aim of this work is to evaluate whether the size of the analyte used as template for the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) can affect their performance in pseudo-enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (pseudo-ELISAs). Successful demonstration of a nanoMIPs-based pseudo-ELISA for vancomycin (1449.3 g mol(-1)) was demonstrated earlier. In the present investigation, the following analytes were selected: horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 44 kDa), cytochrome C (Cyt C, 12 kDa) biotin (244.31 g mol(-1)) and melamine (126.12 g mol(-1)). NanoMIPs with a similar composition for all analytes were synthesised by persulfate-initiated polymerisation in water. In addition, core-shell nanoMIPs coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and imprinted for melamine were produced in organics and tested. The polymerisation of the nanoparticles was done using a solid-phase approach with the correspondent template immobilised on glass beads. The performance of the nanoMIPs used as replacement for antibodies in direct pseudo-ELISA (for the enzymes) and competitive pseudo-ELISA for the smaller analytes was investigated. For the competitive mode we rely on competition for the binding to the nanoparticles between free analyte and corresponding analyte-HRP conjugate. The results revealed that the best performances were obtained for nanoMIPs synthesised in aqueous media for the larger analytes. In addition, this approach was successful for biotin but completely failed for the smallest template melamine. This problem was solved using nanoMIP prepared by UV polymerisation in an organic media with a PEG shell. This study demonstrates that the preparation of nanoMIP by solid-phase approach can produce material with high affinity and potential to replace antibodies in ELISA tests for both large and small analytes. This makes this technology versatile and applicable to practically any target analyte and diagnostic field.

  9. Pore size dependent molecular adsorption of cationic dye in biomass derived hierarchically porous carbon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Ji, Tuo; Mu, Liwen; Shi, Yijun; Wang, Huaiyuan; Zhu, Jiahua

    2017-03-08

    Hierarchically porous carbon adsorbents were successfully fabricated from different biomass resources (softwood, hardwood, bamboo and cotton) by a facile two-step process, i.e. carbonization in nitrogen and thermal oxidation in air. Without involving any toxic/corrosive chemicals, large surface area of up to 890 m(2)/g was achieved, which is comparable to commercial activated carbon. The porous carbons with various surface area and pore size were used as adsorbents to investigate the pore size dependent adsorption phenomenon. Based on the density functional theory, effective (E-SSA) and ineffective surface area (InE-SSA) was calculated considering the geometry of used probing adsorbate. It was demonstrated that the adsorption capacity strongly depends on E-SSA instead of total surface area. Moreover, a regression model was developed to quantify the adsorption capacities contributed from E-SSA and InE-SSA, respectively. The applicability of this model has been verified by satisfactory prediction results on porous carbons prepared in this work as well as commercial activated carbon. Revealing the pore size dependent adsorption behavior in these biomass derived porous carbon adsorbents will help to design more effective materials (either from biomass or other carbon resources) targeting to specific adsorption applications.

  10. In vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging of breast carcinoma with folate receptor-targeted indocyanine green nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huina; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Riqiang; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Yan, Meng; Chen, Jingqin; Cai, Lintao; Song, Liang

    2014-11-06

    As an optical-acoustic hybrid imaging technology, photoacoustic imaging uniquely combines the advantages of rich optical contrast with high ultrasonic resolution in depth, opening up many new possibilities not attainable with conventional pure optical imaging technologies. To perform photoacoustic molecular imaging, optically absorbing exogenous contrast agents are needed to enhance the signals from specifically targeted disease activity. In this work, we designed and developed folate receptor targeted, indocyanine green dye doped poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) lipid nanoparticles (FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs) for molecular photoacoustic imaging of tumor. The fabricated FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs exhibited good aqueous stability, a high folate-receptor targeting efficiency, and remarkable optical absorption in near-infrared wavelengths, providing excellent photoacoustic signals in vitro. Furthermore, after intravenous administration of FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinomas showed significantly enhanced photoacoustic signals in vivo in the tumor regions, compared with those using non-targeted ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs. Given the existing wide clinical use of ICG and PLGA, the developed FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, in conjunction with photoacoustic imaging technology, offer a great potential to be translated into the clinic for non-ionizing molecular imaging of breast cancer in vivo.

  11. Determination of phytate in high molecular weight, charged organic matrices by two-dimensional size exclusion-ion chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-dimensional chromatography method for analyzing anionic targets (specifically phytate) in complex matrices is described. Prior to quantification by anion exchange chromatography, the sample matrix was prepared by size exclusion chromatography, which removed the majority of matrix complexities....

  12. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  13. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  14. Systems Toxicology of Male Reproductive Development: Profiling 774 Chemicals for Molecular Targets and Adverse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Maxwell C.K.; Phuong, Jimmy; Baker, Nancy C.; Sipes, Nisha S.; Klinefelter, Gary R.; Martin, Matthew T.; McLaurin, Keith W.; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Darney, Sally Perreault; Judson, Richard S.; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trends in male reproductive health have been reported for increased rates of testicular germ cell tumors, low semen quality, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias, which have been associated with prenatal environmental chemical exposure based on human and animal studies. Objective: In the present study we aimed to identify significant correlations between environmental chemicals, molecular targets, and adverse outcomes across a broad chemical landscape with emphasis on developmental toxicity of the male reproductive system. Methods: We used U.S. EPA’s animal study database (ToxRefDB) and a comprehensive literature analysis to identify 774 chemicals that have been evaluated for adverse effects on male reproductive parameters, and then used U.S. EPA’s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB) to profile their bioactivity across approximately 800 molecular and cellular features. Results: A phenotypic hierarchy of testicular atrophy, sperm effects, tumors, and malformations, a composite resembling the human testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) hypothesis, was observed in 281 chemicals. A subset of 54 chemicals with male developmental consequences had in vitro bioactivity on molecular targets that could be condensed into 156 gene annotations in a bipartite network. Conclusion: Computational modeling of available in vivo and in vitro data for chemicals that produce adverse effects on male reproductive end points revealed a phenotypic hierarchy across animal studies consistent with the human TDS hypothesis. We confirmed the known role of estrogen and androgen signaling pathways in rodent TDS, and importantly, broadened the list of molecular targets to include retinoic acid signaling, vascular remodeling proteins, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and cytochrome P450s. Citation: Leung MC, Phuong J, Baker NC, Sipes NS, Klinefelter GR, Martin MT, McLaurin KW, Setzer RW, Darney SP, Judson RS, Knudsen TB. 2016. Systems toxicology of male

  15. Ultrasound molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis with a neuropilin-1-targeted microbubble.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Tam, Sarah; Ingham, Elizabeth S; Mahakian, Lisa M; Lai, Chun-Yen; Tumbale, Spencer K; Teesalu, Tambet; Hubbard, Neil E; Borowsky, Alexander D; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging has great potential to impact early disease diagnosis, evaluation of disease progression and the development of target-specific therapy. In this paper, two neuropilin-1 (NRP) targeted peptides, CRPPR and ATWLPPR, were conjugated onto the surface of lipid microbubbles (MBs) to evaluate molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis in a breast cancer model. Development of a molecular imaging agent using CRPPR has particular importance due to the previously demonstrated internalizing capability of this and similar ligands. In vitro, CRPPR MBs bound to an NRP-expressing cell line 2.6 and 15.6 times more than ATWLPPR MBs and non-targeted (NT) MBs, respectively, and the binding was inhibited by pretreating the cells with an NRP antibody. In vivo, the backscattered intensity within the tumor, relative to nearby vasculature, increased over time during the ∼6 min circulation of the CRPPR-targeted contrast agents providing high contrast images of angiogenic tumors. Approximately 67% of the initial signal from CRPPR MBs remained bound after the majority of circulating MBs had cleared (8 min), 8 and 4.5 times greater than ATWLPPR and NT MBs, respectively. Finally, at 7-21 days after the first injection, we found that CRPPR MBs cleared faster from circulation and tumor accumulation was reduced likely due to a complement-mediated recognition of the targeted microbubble and a decrease in angiogenic vasculature, respectively. In summary, we find that CRPPR MBs specifically bind to NRP-expressing cells and provide an effective new agent for molecular imaging of angiogenesis.

  16. Molecular Targeted Drugs and Biomarkers in NSCLC, the Evolving Role of Individualized Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Domvri, Kalliopi; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Browning, Robert F.; Li, Qiang; Turner, J. Francis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Tsiouda, Theodora; Freitag, Lutz; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer first line treatment has been directed from the non-specific cytotoxic doublet chemotherapy to the molecular targeted. The major limitation of the targeted therapies still remains the small number of patients positive to gene mutations. Furthermore, the differentiation between second line and maintenance therapy has not been fully clarified and differs in the clinical practice between cancer centers. The authors present a segregation between maintenance treatment and second line and present a possible definition for the term “maintenance” treatment. In addition, cancer cell evolution induces mutations and therefore either targeted therapies or non-specific chemotherapy drugs in many patients become ineffective. In the present work pathways such as epidermal growth factor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, met proto-oncogene and PI3K are extensively presented and correlated with current chemotherapy treatment. Future, perspectives for targeted treatment are presented based on the current publications and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:24312144

  17. Size does matter - Determination of the critical molecular size for the uptake of chemicals across the chorion of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Pelka, Katharina E; Henn, Kirsten; Keck, Andreas; Sapel, Benjamin; Braunbeck, Thomas

    2016-12-21

    In order to identify the upper limits of the molecular size of chemicals to cross the chorion of zebrafish, Danio rerio, differently sized, non-toxic and chemically inert polyethylene glycols (PEGs; 2000-12,000Da) were applied at concentrations (9.76mM) high enough to provoke osmotic pressure. Whereas small PEGs were expected to be able to cross the chorion, restricted uptake of large PEGs was hypothesized to result in shrinkage of the chorion. Due to a slow, but gradual uptake of PEGs over time, molecular size-dependent equilibration in conjunction with a regain of the spherical chorion shape was observed. Thus, the size of molecules able to cross the chorion could be narrowed down precisely to ≤4000Da, and the time-dependency of the movement across the chorion could be described. To account for associated alterations in embryonic development, fish embryo toxicity tests (FETs) according to OECD test guideline 236 (OECD, 2013) were performed with special emphasis to changes in chorion shape. FETs revealed clear-cut size-effects: the higher the actual molecular weight (=size) of the PEG, the more effects (both acutely toxic and sublethal) were found. No effects were seen with PEGs of 2000 and 3000Da. In contrast, PEG 8000 and PEG 12,000 were found to be most toxic with LC50 values of 16.05 and 16.40g/L, respectively. Likewise, the extent of chorion shrinkage due to increased osmotic pressure strictly depended on PEG molecular weight and duration of exposure. A reflux of water and PEG molecules into the chorion and a resulting re-shaping of the chorion could only be observed for eggs exposed to PEGs ≤4000Da. Results clearly indicate a barrier function of the zebrafish chorion for molecules larger than 3000 to 4,000Da.

  18. Molecular Pathways: Aspirin and Wnt Signaling—A Molecularly Targeted Approach to Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish K.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory properties of aspirin have resulted in its widespread use as an analgesic, anti-pyretic, and cardioprotective agent. Beyond these applications, multiple observational studies and randomized controlled trials have demonstrated a chemopreventative role for aspirin, particularly in the development of colorectal neoplasia. Given the critical importance of Wnt dysregulation in colorectal carcinogenesis, the interplay between aspirin and canonical Wnt signaling has become a focus of investigation. These studies have illuminated our understanding of the anti-cancer mechanisms of aspirin, yielding the identification of potential biomarkers for which aspirin's chemopreventative efficacy can be safely optimized into routine clinical practice and providing leads into the discovery of novel preventive and therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarize key experimental and clinical studies of this interaction, as well as highlight future strategies to advance their clinical translation. PMID:25501125

  19. Targeted systemic gene therapy and molecular imaging of cancer contribution of the vascular-targeted AAVP vector.

    PubMed

    Hajitou, Amin

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy and molecular-genetic imaging have faced a major problem: the lack of an efficient systemic gene delivery vector. Unquestionably, eukaryotic viruses have been the vectors of choice for gene delivery to mammalian cells; however, they have had limited success in systemic gene therapy. This is mainly due to undesired uptake by the liver and reticuloendothelial system, broad tropism for mammalian cells causing toxicity, and their immunogenicity. On the other hand, prokaryotic viruses such as bacteriophage (phage) have no tropism for mammalian cells, but can be engineered to deliver genes to these cells. However, phage-based vectors have inherently been considered poor vectors for mammalian cells. We have reported a new generation of vascular-targeted systemic hybrid prokaryotic-eukaryotic vectors as chimeras between an adeno-associated virus (AAV) and targeted bacteriophage (termed AAV/phage; AAVP). In this hybrid vector, the targeted bacteriophage serves as a shuttle to deliver the AAV transgene cassette inserted in an intergenomic region of the phage DNA genome. As a proof of concept, we assessed the in vivo efficacy of vector in animal models of cancer by displaying on the phage capsid the cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD-4C) ligand that binds to alphav integrin receptors specifically expressed on the angiogenic blood vessels of tumors. The ligand-directed vector was able to specifically deliver imaging and therapeutic transgenes to tumors in mice, rats, and dogs while sparing the normal organs. This chapter reviews some gene transfer strategies and the potential of the vascular-targeted AAVP vector for enhancing the effectiveness of existing systemic gene delivery and genetic-imaging technologies.

  20. Cavitation-free CW laser ablation from a solid target to synthesize low size-dispersed Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kabashin, Andrei V; Kucherik, Alexei; Ryabchikov, Yury; Kutrovskaya, Stella; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Arakelyan, Sergei; Itina, Tatiana

    2017-02-27

    Continuous wave (CW) radiation from Yb-fiber laser (central wave length is 1064 nm, power 1-200 W) is used to initiate ablation of material Au target in deionized water and synthesize bare (unprotected) Au nanoparticles. We show that the formed nanoparticles present a single low-size-dispersed population with the mean size of the order of 10 nm, which contrasts to previously reported data on dual populations of nanoparticles during pulsed laser ablation in liquids. The lacking second population of nanoparticles is explained by the absence of cavitation-related mechanism of material ablation, which typically takes place under pulsed laser action on a solid target in liquid ambience, and this supposition is confirmed by plume visualization tests. We also observe a gradual growth of mean nanoparticles size from 8-10 to 20-25 nm under the increase of laser power for 532 nm pumping wavelength, while for 1064 nm pumping wavelength the mean size 8-10 nm is independent of radiation power. The growth of the nanoparticles observed for 532 nm wavelength is attributed to the enhanced target melting and splashing followed by an additional heating due to an efficient excitation of plasmons over Au nanoparticles. Bare, low-size-dispersed Au nanoparticles are of importance for a variety of applications, including biomedicine, catalysis, photovoltaics etc., whereas the employment of CW radiation for nanomaterial production promises an improvement of cost-efficiency of this technology.

  1. Antagonistic molecular interactions of photosynthetic pigments with molecular disease targets: a new approach to treat AD and ALS.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, R Navanietha; Kumari, S S Sreeja; Mukhopadhyay, Sudit Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are progressive neurodegenerative diseases that affect the neurons in the brain and the spinal cord. Neuroinflamation and apoptosis are key players in the progressive damage of the neurons in AD and ALS. Currently, there is no drug to offer complete cure for both these diseases. Riluzole is the only available drug that can prolong the life time of the ALS patients for nearly 3 months. Molecules that offer good HIT to the molecular targets of ALS will help to treat AD and ALS patients. P53 kinase receptor (4AT3), EphA4 (3CKH) and histone deacetylase (3SFF) are the promising disease targets of AD and ALS. This paper discusses on a new approach to combat neurodegenerative diseases using photosynthetic pigments. The docking studies were performed with the Autodock Vina algorithm to predict the binding of the natural pigments such as β carotene, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, phycoerythrin and phycocyanin on these targets. The β carotene, phycoerythrin and phycocyanin had higher binding energies indicating the antagonistic activity to the disease targets. These pigments serve as a potential therapeutic molecule to treat neuroinflammation and apoptosis in the AD and ALS patients.

  2. Apocrine carcinoma of the breast: A brief update on the molecular features and targetable biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Vranic, Semir; Feldman, Rebecca; Gatalica, Zoran

    2017-01-01

    Apocrine carcinoma of the breast is a rare, primary breast cancer characterized by the apocrine morphology, estrogen receptor-negative and androgen receptor-positive profile with a frequent overexpression of Her-2/neu protein (~30%). Apart from the Her-2/neu target, advanced and/or metastatic apocrine carcinomas have limited treatment options. In this review, we briefly describe and discuss the molecular features and new theranostic biomarkers for this rare mammary malignancy. The importance of comprehensive profiling is highlighted due to synergistic and potentially antagonistic molecular events in the individual patients. PMID:28027454

  3. Cellular Entry and Nuclear Targeting By a Highly Anionic Molecular Umbrella

    PubMed Central

    Mehiri, Mohamed; Jing, Bingwen; Ringhoff, Danielle; Janout, Vaclav; Cassimeris, Lynne; Regen, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    A fluorescently-labeled, persulfated molecular umbrella (1) has been synthesized from cholic acid, lysine, spermine and Coumarin 343 and found capable of entering live HeLa cells. The distribution of 1 throughout the cytoplasm and the nucleus was diffuse and punctate, respectively. This finding, together with its ability to cross liposomal membranes by passive diffusion, suggests that passive diffusion plays a significant role in the ability of 1 to enter cells. The fact that 1 is concentrated at the nucleus raises the possibility that molecular umbrellas of this type could be used for the nuclear targeting of drugs. PMID:18681467

  4. Locally targeted delivery of a micron-size radiation therapy source using temperature-sensitive hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y; Seol, DR; Mohapatra, S; Sunderland, JJ; Schultz, MK; Domann, FE; Lim, TH

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To propose a novel radiotherapy (RT) delivery modality—locally targeted delivery of micro-size level RT sources using temperature-sensitive hydroGEL (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two FDA-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as a radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-Saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and three with RT-Saline. A SPECT and a CT scan were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 hours after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL over the control datasets was determined by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results RT-GEL was successfully injected to the tumor using 30-gauge needles. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-Saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% (44%) at 24 hours (48 hour) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%) for RT-Saline. SPECT-CT fused images of RT-Saline show considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2,886%, 261% and 262% of RT-GEL at the 0, 24 and 48 hour marks, respectively). Conclusion RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity 170% (200%) than that of RT-Saline 24 hour (48 hour) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the kidneys. The preliminary data of RT-GEL as a delivery modality of a radiation source to a local tumor is promising. PMID:24495593

  5. Locally Targeted Delivery of a Micron-Size Radiation Therapy Source Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogel

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yusung; Seol, Dong Rim; Mohapatra, Sucheta; Sunderland, John J.; Schultz, Michael K.; Domann, Frederick E.; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To propose a novel radiation therapy (RT) delivery modality: locally targeted delivery of micron-size RT sources by using temperature-sensitive hydrogel (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials: Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two US Food and Drug Administration-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as the radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and 3 with RT-saline. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT scans were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 h after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL was determined by comparison with that of the control datasets by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results: RT-GEL was successfully injected into the tumor by using a 30-gauge needle. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% at 24 h (44% at 48 h, respectively) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%, respectively) for RT-saline. Fused SPECT-CT images of RT-saline showed considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2886%, 261%, and 262% of RT-GEL at 0, 24, and 48 h, respectively). Conclusions: RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity: 170% (200%, respectively), than that of RT-saline at 24 h (48 h, respectively) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the

  6. Ionic size effects to molecular solvation energy and to ion current across a channel resulted from the nonuniform size-modified PNP equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yu; Tu, Bin; Lu, Benzhuo

    2014-05-01

    Ionic finite size can impose considerable effects to both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of a solvated molecular system, such as the solvation energy, ionic concentration, and transport in a channel. As discussed in our former work [B. Lu and Y. C. Zhou, Biophys. J. 100, 2475 (2011)], a class of size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) models can be uniformly studied through the general nonuniform size-modified PNP (SMPNP) equations deduced from the extended free energy functional of Borukhov et al. [I. Borukhov, D. Andelman, and H. Orland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 435 (1997)] This work focuses on the nonuniform size effects to molecular solvation energy and to ion current across a channel for real biomolecular systems. The main contributions are: (1) we prove that for solvation energy calculation with nonuniform size effects (through equilibrium SMPNP simulation), there exists a simplified approximation formulation which is the same as the widely used one in PB community. This approximate form avoids integration over the whole domain and makes energy calculations convenient. (2) Numerical calculations show that ionic size effects tend to negate the solvation effects, which indicates that a higher molecular solvation energy (lower absolute value) is to be predicted when ionic size effects are considered. For both calculations on a protein and a DNA fragment systems in a 0.5M 1:1 ionic solution, a difference about 10 kcal/mol in solvation energies is found between the PB and the SMPNP predictions. Moreover, it is observed that the solvation energy decreases as ionic strength increases, which behavior is similar as those predicted by the traditional PB equation (without size effect) and by the uniform size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation. (3) Nonequilibrium SMPNP simulations of ion permeation through a gramicidin A channel show that the ionic size effects lead to reduced ion current inside the channel compared with the results

  7. Molecular dynamics study of size, temperature and strain rate effects on mechanical properties of gold nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yong; Chen, J. K.

    2009-05-01

    Temperature and extremely-high strain rate effects on mechanical properties of different-size gold nanofilms are investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. The numerical results clearly show a temperature softening effect on the material strength and Young’s modulus and demonstrate a critical film thickness that characterizes a transition from “smaller is softer” to “smaller is stronger”. It is also found that a higher strain rate yields a higher strength, whereas the modulus is much less sensitive to the loading rate. In addition, the Young’s modulus and strength of nanofilms studied are approximately 50%-60% smaller and 50-90 times higher than those of bulk gold, respectively. This suggests that the use of the mechanical properties of a bulk material in a continuum-based approach might be inadequate for the accurate prediction of the thermomechanical response for gold nanofilms caused by ultrashort-pulsed laser heating.

  8. Fully anharmonic IR and Raman spectra of medium-size molecular systems: accuracy and interpretation†

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Computation of full infrared (IR) and Raman spectra (including absolute intensities and transition energies) for medium- and large-sized molecular systems beyond the harmonic approximation is one of the most interesting challenges of contemporary computational chemistry. Contrary to common beliefs, low-order perturbation theory is able to deliver results of high accuracy (actually often better than those issuing from current direct dynamics approaches) provided that anharmonic resonances are properly managed. This perspective sketches the recent developments in our research group toward the development a robust and user-friendly virtual spectrometer rooted into the second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) and usable also by non-specialists essentially as a black-box procedure. Several examples are explicitly worked out in order to illustrate the features of our computational tool together with the most important ongoing developments. PMID:24346191

  9. Characterization of landfill leachates by molecular size distribution, biodegradability, and inert chemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Míriam C S; Ferreira, Cynthia F A; Lange, Liséte Celina; Aquino, Sérgio F

    2009-05-01

    This work presents results from a detailed characterization of landfill leachates of different ages from a landfill in a major Brazilian city. This characterization consists of determining the molecular size distribution and the inert chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the biodegradability of both aerobic and anaerobic processes. Results show that leachate with a high COD concentration leachate has low biodegradability. A significant fraction of the COD is not characterized as protein, carbohydrate, or lipids, which reinforces the hypothesis that the remaining fraction was present in all leachate fractions (less than 1 kDa; between 1 and 10 kDa; between 10 and 100 kDa; and greater than 100 kDa) and is refractory. These results suggest that leachates with such characteristics require treatment systems that use physical-chemical processes as a pre- or post-treatment step to biological processes.

  10. Functionality in Electrospun Nanofibrous Membranes Based on Fiber's Size, Surface Area, and Molecular Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Tanioka, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile method for forming continuous thin fibers based on an electrohydrodynamic process. This method has the following advantages: (i) the ability to produce thin fibers with diameters in the micrometer and nanometer ranges; (ii) one-step forming of the two- or three-dimensional nanofiber network assemblies (nanofibrous membranes); and (iii) applicability for a broad spectrum of molecules, such as synthetic and biological polymers and polymerless sol-gel systems. Electrospun nanofibrous membranes have received significant attention in terms of their practical applications. The major advantages of nanofibers or nanofibrous membranes are the functionalities based on their nanoscaled-size, highly specific surface area, and highly molecular orientation. These functionalities of the nanofibrous membranes can be controlled by their fiber diameter, surface chemistry and topology, and internal structure of the nanofibers. This report focuses on our studies and describes fundamental aspects and applications of electrospun nanofibrous membranes. PMID:24957735

  11. Mito-DCA: a mitochondria targeted molecular scaffold for efficacious delivery of metabolic modulator dichloroacetate.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rakesh K; Marrache, Sean; Harn, Donald A; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-05-16

    Tumor growth is fueled by the use of glycolysis, which normal cells use only in the scarcity of oxygen. Glycolysis makes tumor cells resistant to normal death processes. Targeting this unique tumor metabolism can provide an alternative strategy to selectively destroy the tumor, leaving normal tissue unharmed. The orphan drug dichloroacetate (DCA) is a mitochondrial kinase inhibitor that has the ability to show such characteristics. However, its molecular form shows poor uptake and bioavailability and limited ability to reach its target mitochondria. Here, we describe a targeted molecular scaffold for construction of a multiple DCA loaded compound, Mito-DCA, with three orders of magnitude enhanced potency and cancer cell specificity compared to DCA. Incorporation of a lipophilic triphenylphosphonium cation through a biodegradable linker in Mito-DCA allowed for mitochondria targeting. Mito-DCA did not show any significant metabolic effects toward normal cells but tumor cells with dysfunctional mitochondria were affected by Mito-DCA, which caused a switch from glycolysis to glucose oxidation and subsequent cell death via apoptosis. Effective delivery of DCA to the mitochondria resulted in significant reduction in lactate levels and played important roles in modulating dendritic cell (DC) phenotype evidenced by secretion of interleukin-12 from DCs upon activation with tumor antigens from Mito-DCA treated cancer cells. Targeting mitochondrial metabolic inhibitors to the mitochondria could lead to induction of an efficient antitumor immune response, thus introducing the concept of combining glycolysis inhibition with immune system to destroy tumor.

  12. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced or metastatic chordoma patients: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lebellec, Loïc; Aubert, Sébastien; Zaïri, Fahed; Ryckewaert, Thomas; Chauffert, Bruno; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Chordomas, derived from undifferentiated notochordal remnants, represent less than 4% of bone primary tumors. Despite surgery followed by radiotherapy, local and metastatic relapses are frequent. In case of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas, medical treatment is frequently discussed. While chemotherapy is ineffective, it would appear that some molecular targeted therapies, in particular imatinib, could slow down the tumor growth in case-reports, retrospective series, and phase I or II trials. Nineteen publications, between January 1990 and September 2014, have been found describing the activity of these targeted therapies. A systematic analysis of these publications shows that the best objective response with targeted therapies was stabilization in 52 to 69% of chordomas. Given the indolent course of advanced chordoma and because of the absence of randomized trial, the level of evidence to treat chordomas with molecular therapy is low (level III), whatever the drug. Furthermore, we could not draw firm conclusion on the activity of imatinib. Other putative targets have also been described. Therefore, further clinical trials are expected, especially with these targets. Nevertheless, it seems essential, in those future studies, to consider the naturally slow course of the disease.

  13. Self-assembled nanoplatform for targeted delivery of chemotherapy agents via affinity-regulated molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Park, Spencer; Kang, Sungkwon; Veach, Alexander J; Vedvyas, Yogindra; Zarnegar, Rasa; Kim, Ju-Young; Jin, Moonsoo M

    2010-10-01

    Site-specific delivery of drugs while minimizing unwanted distribution has been one of the pursued goals in cancer therapy. In this endeavor, we have developed targeted polymeric nanoparticles called amphiphilic urethane acrylate nonionomer (UAN) for encapsulation of diverse water-insoluble drugs and diagnostic agents, as well as for simple and reproducible surface conjugation of targeting ligands. Using monoclonal antibodies or lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) I domain engineered for varying affinities to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, we were able to deliver UAN nanoparticles to human cancer cells with the efficiency dependent on the strength of the molecular interactions and the degree of ICAM-1 expression on cell surface. Compared to non-specific uptake of free drugs, targeted delivery of UAN nanoparticles carrying equal amount of drugs produced more potent cytotoxicity. Notably, without the targeting ligands attached, UAN nanoparticles were largely precluded from non-specific uptake by the cells, resulting in much lower toxicity. The versatility of our UAN nanoparticles in both payload encapsulation and presentation of targeting ligands may facilitate developing a robust platform for evaluating various combinations of cancer drugs and molecular interactions toward developing effective cancer therapy formulations.

  14. Molecular Structure of Amyloid Fibrils Controls the Relationship between Fibrillar Size and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Jin; Savtchenko, Regina; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2011-01-01

    Background According to the prevailing view, soluble oligomers or small fibrillar fragments are considered to be the most toxic species in prion diseases. To test this hypothesis, two conformationally different amyloid states were produced from the same highly pure recombinant full-length prion protein (rPrP). The cytotoxic potential of intact fibrils and fibrillar fragments generated by sonication from these two states was tested using cultured cells. Methodology/Principal Findings For one amyloid state, fibril fragmentation was found to enhance its cytotoxic potential, whereas for another amyloid state formed within the same amino acid sequence, the fragmented fibrils were found to be substantially less toxic than the intact fibrils. Consistent with the previous studies, the toxic effects were more pronounced for cell cultures expressing normal isoform of the prion protein (PrPC) at high levels confirming that cytotoxicity was in part PrPC-dependent. Silencing of PrPC expression by small hairpin RNAs designed to silence expression of human PrPC (shRNA-PrPC) deminished the deleterious effects of the two amyloid states to a different extent, suggesting that the role of PrPC-mediated and PrPC-independent mechanisms depends on the structure of the aggregates. Conclusions/Significance This work provides a direct illustration that the relationship between an amyloid's physical dimension and its toxic potential is not unidirectional but is controlled by the molecular structure of prion protein (PrP) molecules within aggregated states. Depending on the structure, a decrease in size of amyloid fibrils can either enhance or abolish their cytotoxic effect. Regardless of the molecular structure or size of PrP aggregates, silencing of PrPC expression can be exploited to reduce their deleterious effects. PMID:21625461

  15. Molecular Simulations of Hydrogen Bond Cluster Size and Reorientation Dynamics in Liquid and Glassy Azole Systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinfang; Harvey, Jacob A; Greco, Katharine V; Auerbach, Scott M

    2016-10-06

    We simulated the dynamics of azole groups (pyrazole, imidazole, 1,2,3-triazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and tetrazole) as neat liquids and tethered via linkers to aliphatic backbones to determine how tethering and varying functional groups affect hydrogen bond networks and reorientation dynamics, both factors which are thought to influence proton conduction. We used the DL_Poly_2 molecular dynamics code with the GAFF force field to simulate tethered systems over the temperature range 200-900 K and the corresponding neat liquids under liquid state temperatures at standard pressure. We computed hydrogen bond cluster sizes; orientational order parameters; orientational correlation functions associated with functional groups, linkers, and backbones; time scales; and activation energies associated with orientational randomization. All tethered systems exhibit a liquid to glassy-solid transition upon cooling from 600 to 500 K, as evidenced by orientational order parameters and correlation functions. Tethering the azoles was generally found to produce hydrogen bond cluster sizes similar to those in untethered liquids and hydrogen bond lifetimes longer than those in liquids. The simulated rates of functional group reorientation decreased dramatically upon tethering. The activation energies associated with orientational randomization agree well with NMR data for tethered imidazole systems at lower temperatures and for tethered 1,2,3-triazole systems at both low- and high-temperature ranges. Overall, our simulations corroborate the notion that tethering functional groups dramatically slows the process of reorientation. We found a linear correlation between gas-phase hydrogen bond energies and tethered functional group reorientation barriers for all azoles except for imidazole, which acts as an outlier because of both atomic charges and molecular structure.

  16. MOLECULARLY TARGETED THERAPIES IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER ANNUAL UPDATE 2014

    PubMed Central

    Morgensztern, Daniel; Campo, Meghan J.; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Doebele, Robert C.; Garon, Edward; Gerber, David E.; Goldberg, Sarah B.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Heist, Rebecca; Hensing, Thomas; Horn, Leora; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Rudin, Charles M.; Salgia, Ravi; Sequist, Lecia; Shaw, Alice T.; Simon, George R.; Somaiah, Neeta; Spigel, David R.; Wrangle, John; Johnson, David; Herbst, Roy S.; Bunn, Paul; Govindan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant advances in the understanding of the biology and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) over the past few years. A number of molecularly targeted agents are in the clinic or in development for patients with advanced NSCLC (Table 1). We are beginning to understand the mechanisms of acquired resistance following exposure to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with oncogene addicted NSCLC. The advent of next generation sequencing has enabled to study comprehensively genomic alterations in lung cancer. Finally, early results from immune checkpoint inhibitors are very encouraging. This review summarizes recent advances in the area of cancer genomics, targeted therapies and immunotherapy. PMID:25535693

  17. Improving gemcitabine-mediated radiosensitization using molecularly targeted therapy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Meredith A.; Parsels, Leslie A.; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2009-01-01

    In the last three decades gemcitabine has progressed from the status of a laboratory cytotoxic drug to a standard clinical chemotherapeutic agent and a potent radiation sensitizer. In an effort to improve the efficacy of gemcitabine, additional chemotherapeutic agents have been combined with gemcitabine (both with and without radiation) but with toxicity proving to be a major limitation. Therefore, the integration of molecularly targeted agents, which potentially produce less toxicity than standard chemotherapy, with gemcitabine-radiation is a promising strategy for improving chemoradiation. Two of the most promising targets, described in this review, for improving the efficacy of gemcitabine-radiation are EGFR and Chk1. PMID:18980967

  18. Genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity of epithelial ovarian cancer and the clinical implications for molecular targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Huimin; Cao, Dongyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Shen, Keng

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynaecological malignancy, and tumoural heterogeneity (TH) has been blamed for treatment failure. The genomic and epigenomic atlas of EOC varies significantly with tumour histotype, grade, stage, sensitivity to chemotherapy and prognosis. Rapidly accumulating knowledge about the genetic and epigenetic events that control TH in EOC has facilitated the development of molecular-targeted therapy. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, designed to target homologous recombination, are poised to change how breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA)-related ovarian cancer is treated. Epigenetic treatment regimens being tested in clinical or preclinical studies could provide promising novel treatment approaches and hope for improving patient survival.

  19. A Computational Study of the Energy Dissipation Through an Acrylic Target Impacted by Various Size FSP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    the ballistic impact of 0.22-cal and 0.15-cal fragment simulating projectiles (FSP) into a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) target, which was a Plexiglas...ballistic impact of 0.22-cal and 0.15-cal fragment simulating projectiles (FSP) into a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) target, which was a Plexiglas G

  20. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force.

    PubMed

    Vu, Huong T; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-08-12

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F)-dependent velocity [P(v)] and run length [P(n)] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P(n) and P(v) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F, P(v) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v, which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  1. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Huong T.; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F )-dependent velocity [P (v )] and run length [P (n )] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P (n ) and P (v ) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F , P (v ) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v , which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  2. The linewidth-size scaling law of molecular gas in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgarone, Edith G.; McKee, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    The origin of the linewidth-size (LWS) scaling law, first noticed by Larson three decades ago and ascribed to turbulence, is still a highly debated issue. Not unexpectedly, its properties depend on the environment and on the line tracer used.When the optically thick 12CO (J=1-0) line is used, a specific medium is sampled: the translucent molecular gas of moderate density that builds up the bulk of the molecular interstellar medium in galaxies like ours. The sensitivity of the 12CO line to this gas is such that the LWS is found to hold over almost five orders of magnitude in lengthscale, although with a considerable scatter (1 dex). It reveals an invariant of the cascade, the specific kinetic energy tranfer rate. It also appears to split into two regimes, depending on the gas mass surface density: below a given threshold that is proposed to be linked to the galactic dynamics, it bears the signature of a turbulent cascade, while above that threshold, the scaling law is ascribed to virial balance between turbulent energy and gravity. Large deviations from the scaling law are observed at small scales where signatures of turbulent intermittency may be present.

  3. Molecular size of benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain in situ: evidence for a functional dimer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, A.; Iversen, L. L.

    1982-02-01

    Benzodiazepine tranquillizers such as diazepam and chlordiazepoxide interact with high-affinity binding sites in nervous tissue1,2. The correlation between the affinities of various benzodiazepines for these sites with their clinical potencies and activity in behavioural and electrophysiological tests in animals suggests that the sites represent the functional `receptor' whereby benzodiazepines exert their effects3. The intimate involvement of benzodiazepines with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and chloride channels raised the possibility that the benzodiazepine binding site (BDZ-R) may be a protein in the GABA receptor-effector complex4,5. GABA agonists enhance the affinity of BDZ-R for benzodiazepines6, although BDZ-R is distinct from the GABA receptor itself3. However, electrophysiological evidence suggests that the action of benzodiazepines is chloride channel, rather than receptor, directed7-10. Several attempts have been made to measure the molecular weight (Mr) of BDZ-R after solubilization from brain membranes: treatment with 1% Triton X-100 followed by assay of binding activity in solute fractions separated according to molecular weight suggested11 a value of ~200,000, photoaffinity labelling of BDZ-R with 3H-flunitrazepam (3H-FNZ) followed by more rigorous solubilization and gel chromatography indicated12,13 an apparent Mr of ~55,000 and a third approach14 a value of ~100,000. The measured molecular weight seems to depend critically on the solubilization procedure used. Chang et al.15 recently described the use of radiation inactivation to determine the size of BDZ-R in situ in calf brain membranes, and estimated a Mr, of 216,000. We have also used this approach; the results reported here indicate a Mr of between 90,000 and 100,000, but this is reduced to 60,000-63,000 in membranes pretreated with GABA, suggesting the disaggregation of a normally dimeric form.

  4. Targeted disruption of TGFBI in mice reveals its role in regulating bone mass and bone size through periosteal bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongrun; Wergedal, Jon E; Zhao, Yongliang; Mohan, Subburaman

    2012-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta induced (TGFBI) and periostin are two closely related proteins in structure as well as in function. A previous study found that periostin positively regulates bone size. Here, we hypothesize that TGFBI has a similar function in bone development. To test this hypothesis, we employed TGFBI-deficient mice, which were generated by targeted disruption of the TGFBI gene. We bred these mice with C57BL/6J mice to generate homozygous TGFBI-deficient (TGFBI(-/-)) mice and homozygous wild-type littermates. All mice were raised to 12 weeks of age. Bone mass parameters were determined by PIXImus and micro-CT, bone strength parameters by three-point bending, and bone formation and resorption parameters by histomorphometry. We found that targeted disruption of TGFBI led to reduced body size, bone mass, bone size, and bone strength. This indicates that, like periostin, TGFBI also positively regulates bone size and that changes in bone size affect bone strength. Furthermore, there was also a significant decrease in periosteal, but not endosteal, bone formation rate of cortical bone in TGFBI(-/-) mice, suggesting that the observed effect of TGFBI on bone mass and bone size was largely caused by the effect of TGFBI on periosteal bone formation.

  5. Molecularly targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma - a drug development crisis?

    PubMed Central

    Thillai, Kiruthikah; Ross, Paul; Sarker, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fastest growing cause of cancer related death globally. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only drug proven to improve outcomes in patients with advanced disease offering modest survival benefit. Although comprehensive genomic mapping has improved understanding of the genetic aberrations in hepatocellular cancer (HCC), this knowledge has not yet impacted clinical care. The last few years have seen the failure of several first and second line phase III clinical trials of novel molecularly targeted therapies, warranting a change in the way new therapies are investigated in HCC. Potential reasons for these failures include clinical and molecular heterogeneity, trial design and a lack of biomarkers. This review discusses the current crisis in HCC drug development and how we should learn from recent trial failures to develop a more effective personalised treatment paradigm for patients with HCC. PMID:26909132

  6. Development of molecular targeted drugs for advanced thyroid cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takami, Hiroshi; Ito, Koichi; Sugino, Kiminori

    2014-01-01

    Up until now there have been no promising drugs for the treatment of advanced thyroid cancer, but the development of novel therapeutic agents is now anticipated as a result of the advent of molecular targeted drugs that inhibit tumor growth signals or angiogenesis. Against a background in which the development of numerous molecular targeted drugs for advanced thyroid cancer is being pursued worldwide, the development of sorafenib, vandetanib, and lenvatinib is currently also under way in Japan. All three of these compounds are undergoing phase 3 trials or have been approved abroad, and because they are in the final stage of development in Japan, they are expected to be introduced in clinical settings in the near future. After they have been introduced, it will be necessary to understand the differences between these compounds and to administer them to patients appropriately.

  7. De novo synthesis of a narrow size distribution low-molecular-weight heparin

    PubMed Central

    Chandarajoti, Kasemsiri; Xu, Yongmei; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Key, Nigel S; Pawlinski, Rafal; Liu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Heparin, a commonly used anticoagulant drug, is a mixture of highly sulfated polysaccharides with various molecular weights (MWs). The unique sulfation pattern dictates the anticoagulant activity of heparin. Commercial heparins are categorized into three forms according to their average MW: unfractionated heparin (UFH, MWavg 14,000), low-MW heparin (LMWH, MWavg 3500–6500) and the synthetic pentasaccharide (fondaparinux, MW 1508.3). UFH is isolated from porcine intestine while LMWH is derived from UFH by various methods of depolymerization, which generate a wide range of oligosaccharide chain lengths. Different degradation methods result in structurally distinct LMWH products, displaying different pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties. In this report, we utilized a chemoenzymatic method to synthesize LMWH with the emphasis on controlling the size distribution of the oligosaccharides. A tetrasaccharide primer and a controlled enzyme-based polymerization were employed to build a narrow size oligosaccharide backbone. The oligosaccharide backbones were further modified by a series of sulfation and epimerization steps in order to obtain a full anticoagulation activity. Determination of the anticoagulation activity in vitro and ex vivo indicated that the synthetic LMWH has higher potency than enoxaparin, a commercial LMWH drug in clinical usage. PMID:24626379

  8. De novo synthesis of a narrow size distribution low-molecular-weight heparin.

    PubMed

    Chandarajoti, Kasemsiri; Xu, Yongmei; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Key, Nigel S; Pawlinski, Rafal; Liu, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Heparin, a commonly used anticoagulant drug, is a mixture of highly sulfated polysaccharides with various molecular weights (MWs). The unique sulfation pattern dictates the anticoagulant activity of heparin. Commercial heparins are categorized into three forms according to their average MW: unfractionated heparin (UFH, MWavg 14,000), low-MW heparin (LMWH, MWavg 3500-6500) and the synthetic pentasaccharide (fondaparinux, MW 1508.3). UFH is isolated from porcine intestine while LMWH is derived from UFH by various methods of depolymerization, which generate a wide range of oligosaccharide chain lengths. Different degradation methods result in structurally distinct LMWH products, displaying different pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties. In this report, we utilized a chemoenzymatic method to synthesize LMWH with the emphasis on controlling the size distribution of the oligosaccharides. A tetrasaccharide primer and a controlled enzyme-based polymerization were employed to build a narrow size oligosaccharide backbone. The oligosaccharide backbones were further modified by a series of sulfation and epimerization steps in order to obtain a full anticoagulation activity. Determination of the anticoagulation activity in vitro and ex vivo indicated that the synthetic LMWH has higher potency than enoxaparin, a commercial LMWH drug in clinical usage.

  9. Molecularly-Targeted Gold-Based Nanoparticles for Cancer Imaging and Near-Infrared Photothermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Emily Shannon

    2011-12-01

    This thesis advances the use of nanoparticles as multifunctional agents for molecularly-targeted cancer imaging and photothermal therapy. Cancer mortality has remained relatively unchanged for several decades, indicating a significant need for improvements in care. Researchers are evaluating strategies incorporating nanoparticles as exogenous energy absorbers to deliver heat capable of inducing cell death selectively to tumors, sparing normal tissue. Molecular targeting of nanoparticles is predicted to improve photothermal therapy by enhancing tumor retention. This hypothesis is evaluated with two types of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles utilized, silica-gold nanoshells and gold-gold sulfide nanoparticles, can convert light energy into heat to damage cancerous cells. For in vivo applications nanoparticles are usually coated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to increase blood circulation time. Here, heterobifunctional PEG links nanoparticles to targeting agents (antibodies and growth factors) to provide cell-specific binding. This approach is evaluated through a series of experiments. In vitro, antibody-coated nanoparticles can bind breast carcinoma cells expressing the targeted receptor and act as contrast agents for multiphoton microscopy prior to inducing cell death via photoablation. Furthermore, antibody-coated nanoparticles can bind tissue ex vivo at levels corresponding to receptor expression, suggesting they should bind their target even in the complex biological milieu. This is evaluated by comparing the accumulation of antibody-coated and PEG-coated nanoparticles in subcutaneous glioma tumors in mice. Contrary to expectations, antibody targeting did not yield more nanoparticles within tumors. Nevertheless, these studies established the sensitivity of glioma to photothermal therapy; mice treated with PEG-coated nanoshells experienced 57% complete tumor regression versus no regression in control mice. Subsequent experiments employed intracranial tumors to

  10. A comparative modeling and molecular docking study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fakhar, Zeynab; Naiker, Suhashni; Alves, Claudio N; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lameira, Jeronimo; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2016-11-01

    An alarming rise of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and the continuous high global morbidity of tuberculosis have reinvigorated the need to identify novel targets to combat the disease. The enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan in M. tuberculosis are essential and noteworthy therapeutic targets. In this study, the biochemical function and homology modeling of MurI, MurG, MraY, DapE, DapA, Alr, and Ddl enzymes of the CDC1551 M. tuberculosis strain involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan cell wall are reported. Generation of the 3D structures was achieved with Modeller 9.13. To assess the structural quality of the obtained homology modeled targets, the models were validated using PROCHECK, PDBsum, QMEAN, and ERRAT scores. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate root mean square deviation (RMSD) and radius of gyration (Rg) of MurI and MurG target proteins and their corresponding templates. For further model validation, RMSD and Rg for selected targets/templates were investigated to compare the close proximity of their dynamic behavior in terms of protein stability and average distances. To identify the potential binding mode required for molecular docking, binding site information of all modeled targets was obtained using two prediction algorithms. A docking study was performed for MurI to determine the potential mode of interaction between the inhibitor and the active site residues. This study presents the first accounts of the 3D structural information for the selected M. tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  11. Solvent-Responsive Molecularly Imprinted Nanogels for Targeted Protein Analysis in MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bertolla, Maddalena; Cenci, Lucia; Anesi, Andrea; Ambrosi, Emmanuele; Tagliaro, Franco; Vanzetti, Lia; Guella, Graziano; Bossi, Alessandra Maria

    2017-03-01

    Molecular imprinted poly(acrylamido)-derivative nanogels have shown their selectivity to bind the protein human serum transferrin (HTR) and also showed their capability for instantaneous solvent-induced modification upon the addition of acetonitrile. Integrated to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass analysis the HTR-imprinted solvent-responsive nanogels permitted the determination of HTR straight from serum and offered novel perspectives in targeted protein analysis.

  12. Fluorescence microscopy studies of a peripheral-benzodiazepine-receptor-targeted molecular probe for brain tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura; Vernier, P. Thomas; Manning, H. Charles; Salemi, Sarah; Li, Aimin; Craft, Cheryl M.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2003-10-01

    This study investigates the potential of a new multi-modal lanthanide chelate complex for specifically targeting brain tumor cells. We report here results from ongoing studies of up-take, sub-cellular localization and binding specificity of this new molecular imaging probe. Fluorescence microscopy investigations in living rat C6 glioma tumor cells demonstrate that the new imaging agent has affinity for glioma cells and binds to mitochondria.

  13. NCCN Task Force Report: Optimizing Treatment of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma With Molecular Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Gary R.; Carducci, Michael A.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Esper, Peg; Jonasch, Eric; Kumar, Rashmi; Margolin, Kim A.; Michaelson, M. Dror; Motzer, Robert J.; Pili, Roberto; Roethke, Susan; Srinivas, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been substantially improved with administration of the currently available molecularly targeted therapies. However, proper selection of therapy and management of toxicities remain challenging. NCCN convened a multidisciplinary task force panel to address the clinical issues associated with these therapies in attempt to help practicing oncologists optimize patient outcomes. This report summarizes the background data presented at the task force meeting and the ensuing discussion. PMID:21335444

  14. NanoCluster Beacon - A New Molecular Probe for Homogeneous Detection of Nucleic Acid Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    requires only a single preparation step (i.e. nanocluster formation on NC probes), but because there is no need to remove excess silver ions or...Oligonucleotide-templated nanoclusters consisting of a few atoms of silver (DNA/Ag NCs) have been made into a new molecular probe that “lights up...upon target DNA binding, termed a NanoCluster Beacon (NCB). We discovered that interactions between silver nanoclusters and a proximal, guanine- rich

  15. Is molecular size a discriminating factor in hyaluronan interaction with human cells?

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Antonella; Stellavato, Antonietta; Corsuto, Luisana; Diana, Paola; Filosa, Rosanna; La Gatta, Annalisa; De Rosa, Mario; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2017-02-10

    Nowadays there is a great interest in investigating the effect of particular hyaluronan fragments in the biomedical field and in cosmeceutical applications. Literature has reported that very low molecular weight HA (Mw<5kDa) has an inflammatory effect, whilst HA ranging from 15 to 250 has shown controversial effects. This work aims to give better elucidation on the correlation between the different sized HA fragments and their biological functions. In this respect, a simple and effective degradation strategy is used to obtain several HA fragments. Also, an hydrodynamic and structural characterization was performed in order to obtain samples suitable to evaluate cellular response. In particular an in vitro scratch test in time lapse experiments was used to study the effect of HA fragments, ranging from 1800 to 6kDa on wound dermal reparation based on human keratinocytes. All high and low Mw HA used in this study allowed for faster wound closure compared to the un-treated cells, except for 6kDa that, on the contrary, prevented repair. In addition, TGF-β 1, TNFα and IL-6, representative biomarkers of the inflammation phase occurring in wound healing process, were quantified by RT-PCR. A general up-regulation trend of these biomarkers was found with the HA molecular weight reduction. LHA6kDa was the only treatment that induced a major inflammatory response (over 30 fold increase respect to control) confirming the recent literature outcomes. IL-6 protein level evaluated through ELISA assay corroborated the previous results. Furthermore, activation of key HA receptors, such as CD44, RHAMM, TLR4, with respect to hyaluronan size, was evaluated, at transcriptional level showing selective recognition by HA 1800, 1400, 500 for CD44, whilst the lower Mw fragments activated TLR-4 moderately at 50 and 15kDa. An increase to "alarm" level was found for 6kDa fragments. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed this data. The present research work demonstrated that the diverse pharma

  16. Effects of Microbubble Size on Ultrasound-Induced Transdermal Delivery of High-Molecular-Weight Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Ho, Hsin-Chiao; Lin, Yi-Chun; Chen, Hang-Kang; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2015-01-01

    The transdermal delivery of a wide range of high-molecular-weight drugs is limited by the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis representing a significant barrier to penetration across the skin. This study first determined the different effects of different-size ultrasound (US) contrast agents and microbubbles (MBs) for enhancing the transdermal delivery of high-molecular-weight drugs. The effects of US-mediated different-size (1.4, 2.1, and 3.5 μm) MBs (as a contrast agent) and ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate (VC-IP) on enhancing skin transdermal delivery were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that at a power density of 3 W/cm2 the penetration depth in group US combined with 3.5-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+3.5) was 34% and 14% higher than those in groups US combined with 1.4-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+1.4) and US combined with 2.1-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+2.1), respectively, for the agarose phantoms, while the corresponding increases for pigskin were 37% and 19%.In terms of the skin permeation of VC-IP, the VC-IP concentration in group U+3.5 was 23% and 10% higher in than those in groups U+1.4 and U+2.1, respectively. The whitening effect (luminosity index) of mice skin in group U+3.5 had increased (significantly) by 28% after 1 week, by 34% after 2 weeks, and tended to stabilize after 3 weeks (45%) in C57BL/6J mice over a 4-week experimental period. The results obtained in this study indicate that combining US with MBs of different sizes can produce different degrees of skin permeability so as to enhance the delivery of VC-IP to inhibit melanogenesis, without damaging the skin in mice. PMID:26390051

  17. New Developments in Salivary Gland Pathology: Clinically Useful Ancillary Testing and New Potentially Targetable Molecular Alterations.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Christopher C; Schmitt, Alessandra C; Little, James L; Magliocca, Kelly R

    2017-03-01

    Accurate diagnosis of salivary gland tumors can be challenging because of the many diagnostic entities, the sometimes extensive morphologic overlap, and the rarity of most tumor types. Ancillary testing is beginning to ameliorate some of these challenges through access to newer immunohistochemical stains and fluorescence in situ hybridization probes, which can limit differential diagnostic considerations in some cases. These ancillary testing strategies are especially useful in small biopsy samples, including aspiration cytology. Molecular techniques are also expanding our understanding of salivary gland tumor pathology and are helping to identify potential targets that may improve treatment for some of these tumors. Here, we summarize the clinical use of new immunohistochemical markers in our practice and review the current understanding of chromosomal rearrangements in salivary gland tumor pathology, emphasizing the prospects for exploiting molecular alterations in salivary gland tumors for diagnosis and targeted therapy. We find that immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization are powerful tools toward the diagnosis of salivary gland tumors, especially when used in a systematic manner based on morphologic differential-diagnostic considerations. As new targeted therapies emerge, it will become increasingly vital to incorporate appropriate molecular testing into the pathologic evaluation of salivary gland cancers.

  18. A potential molecular target for morphological defects of fetal alcohol syndrome: Kir2.1.

    PubMed

    Bates, Emily A

    2013-06-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a developmental disorder that affects up to 0.2% of births. FASD comprises severe cognitive and structural birth defects including cleft lip/palate, small jaw, wide-set eyes, dental abnormalities, digit abnormalities, small head, and short stature. Strict counseling guidelines stress abstaining from alcohol during pregnancy, but the prevalence of FASD persists. The lack of a convincing molecular target has hindered FASD research and treatment. Interestingly, mutations in an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, Kir2.1, cause a similar constellation of birth defects as in FASD. In other words, FASD phenocopies the traits conveyed by Kir2.1 mutations. Furthermore, alcohol directly binds to and modulates Kir2.1. Substantial evidence now suggests that alcohol targets Kir2.1 to cause the birth defects associated with FASD. This review compiles clinical, genetic, biochemical, electrophysiological, and molecular evidence that identifies Kir2.1 as a molecular target for FASD development and possibly therapeutic treatment.

  19. Recent advances in developing molecular tools for targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2015-01-01

    Various biological molecules naturally existing in diversified species including fungi, bacteria, and bacteriophage have functionalities for DNA binding and processing. The biological molecules have been recently actively engineered for use in customized genome editing of mammalian cells as the molecule-encoding DNA sequence information and the underlying mechanisms how the molecules work are unveiled. Excitingly, multiple novel methods based on the newly constructed artificial molecular tools have enabled modifications of specific endogenous genetic elements in the genome context at efficiencies that are much higher than that of the conventional homologous recombination based methods. This minireview introduces the most recently spotlighted molecular genome engineering tools with their key features and ongoing modifications for better performance. Such ongoing efforts have mainly focused on the removal of the inherent DNA sequence recognition rigidity from the original molecular platforms, the addition of newly tailored targeting functions into the engineered molecules, and the enhancement of their targeting specificity. Effective targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells will enable not only sophisticated genetic studies in the context of the genome, but also widely-applicable universal therapeutics based on the pinpointing and correction of the disease-causing genetic elements within the genome in the near future.

  20. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3-Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bachawal, Sunitha V; Jensen, Kristin C; Wilson, Katheryne E; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T-cell coregulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor, and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an IHC analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients.

  1. CFTR chloride channel is a molecular target of the natural cancer preventive agent resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Yu, B O; Sui, Yujie; Zhang, Yaofang; Wang, Xue; Hou, Shuguang; Ma, Tonghui; Yang, Hong

    2013-09-01

    The naturally occurring polyphenol compound resveratrol (RES) has been receiving wide attention because of its variety of health benefits and favourable biological activities. Previous studies have shown that RES could induce intestinal chloride secretion in mouse jejunum and stimulate cAMP-dependent Cl- secretion in T84, primary cultured murine nasal septal and human sinonasal epithelial cells, but the precise molecular target is not clear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that RES may stimulate the activity of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. Using cell-based fluorescent assays, transepithelial short-circuit current measurements and excised inside-out patch-clamp analysis; we found that RES dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl- channel activities, which was reversed by CFTR inhibitors CFTR(inh)-172 and GlyH101. Transepithelial Cl- secretion by CFTR-expressing FRT cells was stimulated by RES with half maximal concentration -80 microM. Intracellular cAMP content was not elevated by RES in FRT cells. Excised inside-out patch-clamp analysis indicated that RES significantly increased the chloride currents of CFTR. In ex vivo studies, RES stimulated the transmucosal chloride current of rat colon by short-circuit current assay. These data suggested that CFTR is a molecular target of RES. Our findings add a new molecular target to RES, and RES may represent a novel class of therapeutic lead compounds in treating CFTR-related diseases including CF and habitual constipation.

  2. Role for the propofol hydroxyl in anesthetic protein target molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Woll, Kellie A; Weiser, Brian P; Liang, Qiansheng; Meng, Tao; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Pinch, Benika; Dailey, William P; Gao, Wei Dong; Covarrubias, Manuel; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2015-06-17

    Propofol is a widely used intravenous general anesthetic. We synthesized 2-fluoro-1,3-diisopropylbenzene, a compound that we call "fropofol", to directly assess the significance of the propofol 1-hydroxyl for pharmacologically relevant molecular recognition in vitro and for anesthetic efficacy in vivo. Compared to propofol, fropofol had a similar molecular volume and only a small increase in hydrophobicity. Isothermal titration calorimetry and competition assays revealed that fropofol had higher affinity for a protein site governed largely by van der Waals interactions. Within another protein model containing hydrogen bond interactions, propofol demonstrated higher affinity. In vivo, fropofol demonstrated no anesthetic efficacy, but at high concentrations produced excitatory activity in tadpoles and mice; fropofol also antagonized propofol-induced hypnosis. In a propofol protein target that contributes to hypnosis, α1β2γ2L GABAA receptors, fropofol demonstrated no significant effect alone or on propofol positive allosteric modulation of the ion channel, suggesting an additional requirement for the 1-hydroxyl within synaptic GABAA receptor site(s). However, fropofol caused similar adverse cardiovascular effects as propofol by a dose-dependent depression of myocardial contractility. Our results directly implicate the propofol 1-hydroxyl as contributing to molecular recognition within protein targets leading to hypnosis, but not necessarily within protein targets leading to side effects of the drug.

  3. From molecular classification to targeted therapeutics: the changing face of systemic therapy in metastatic gastroesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian; Kelly, Ronan J

    2015-01-01

    Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1) or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician's therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  4. High molecular weight chitosan derivative polymeric micelles encapsulating superparamagnetic iron oxide for tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunbin; Lin, Zuan Tao; Chen, Yanmei; Wang, He; Deng, Ya Li; Le, D Elizabeth; Bin, Jianguo; Li, Meiyu; Liao, Yulin; Liu, Yili; Jiang, Gangbiao; Bin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents based on chitosan derivatives have great potential for diagnosing diseases. However, stable tumor-targeted MRI contrast agents using micelles prepared from high molecular weight chitosan derivatives are seldom reported. In this study, we developed a novel tumor-targeted MRI vehicle via superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) encapsulated in self-aggregating polymeric folate-conjugated N-palmitoyl chitosan (FAPLCS) micelles. The tumor-targeting ability of FAPLCS/SPIONs was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. The results of dynamic light scattering experiments showed that the micelles had a relatively narrow size distribution (136.60±3.90 nm) and excellent stability. FAPLCS/SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility in cellular toxicity tests. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that FAPLCS/SPIONs bound specifically to folate receptor-positive HeLa cells, and that FAPLCS/SPIONs accumulated predominantly in established HeLa-derived tumors in mice. The signal intensities of T2-weighted images in established HeLa-derived tumors were reduced dramatically after intravenous micelle administration. Our study indicates that FAPLCS/SPION micelles can potentially serve as safe and effective MRI contrast agents for detecting tumors that overexpress folate receptors.

  5. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  6. Changes in the molecular-size distribution of insoluble celluloses by the action of recombinant Cellulomonas fimi cellulases.

    PubMed Central

    Kleman-Leyer, K M; Gilkes, N R; Miller, R C; Kirk, T K

    1994-01-01

    Specific patterns of attacks of cotton, bacterial cellulose and bacterial microcrystalline cellulose (BMCC) by recombinant cellulases of Cellulomonas fimi were investigated. Molecular-size distributions of the celluloses were determined by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography. Chromatography of cotton and bacterial celluloses revealed single major peaks centered over progressively lower molecular-mass positions during attack by endoglucanase CenA. In advanced stages, a second peak appeared at very low average size (approx. 11 glucosyl units); ultimate weight losses were approximately 30%. The isolated catalytic domain of CenA, p30, gave results very similar to those with complete CenA. CenA did not effectively depolymerize or solubilize BMCC significantly. Molecular-size distributions of cotton and bacterial cellulose incubated with endoglucanases CenB or CenD exhibited one major peak regardless of incubation time; low-molecular-mass fragments did not accumulate. Weight losses were 40 and 35% respectively. The single peak shifted to lower-molecular-mass positions as incubation continued, but high-molecular-mass material persisted. CenB and CenD readily attacked and solubilized BMCC (approx. 70%). We conclude that CenA attacks cellulose by preferentially cleaving completely through the cellulose microfibrils at the amorphous sites, and much more slowly by degrading the crystalline surfaces. Conversely, CenB and CenD cleave the amorphous regions much less efficiently while vigorously degrading the surfaces of the crystalline regions of the microfibrils. PMID:8092998

  7. Human search with a limited field of view: effects of scan speed, aperture size, and target conspicuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Toet, Alexander; Bijl, Piet

    2013-04-01

    We investigate how human visual search performance with field of view (FOV) restrictions depends on scan speed, zoom factor, target location, and conspicuity. First, observers search a FOV that moves at a constant speed along a predefined path over a visual search scene (the field of regard, or FOR), and we measure the effects of scan speed, zoom factor, FOV size, target location, and conspicuity on search performance (detection time and probability). Then observers search either visual or thermal scenes by freely moving a joystick-controlled FOV over the FOR, while freely selecting the zoom factor in some conditions, and we measure the effects of the scan path characteristics and the use of different strategies on search performance. Search performance depends on the effective FOV size (the area where targets are expected to occur), but is largely independent of the display area. Both for visual and thermal imagery, various search performance measures correlate with target conspicuity. The results of both experiments suggest that observers can optimize their performance by adjusting their scanning behavior both to their visual limitations and to the expected target conspicuity. We present the outlines of a simple search model based on these current findings.

  8. Molecular Targeted Therapies for the Treatment of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis: Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Jin Wook; Keam, Bhumsuk

    2016-07-05

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is the multifocal seeding of cerebrospinal fluid and leptomeninges by malignant cells. The incidence of LMC is approximately 5% in patients with malignant tumors overall and the rate is increasing due to increasing survival time of cancer patients. Eradication of the disease is not yet possible, so the treatment goals of LMC are to improve neurologic symptoms and to prolong survival. A standard treatment for LMC has not been established due to low incidences of LMC, the rapidly progressing nature of the disease, heterogeneous populations with LMC, and a lack of randomized clinical trial results. Treatment options for LMC include intrathecal chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, but the prognoses remain poor with a median survival of <3 months. Recently, molecular targeted agents have been applied in the clinic and have shown groundbreaking results in specific patient groups epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy or an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor in lung cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-directed therapy in breast cancer, and CD20-targeted therapy in B cell lymphoma). Moreover, there are results indicating that the use of these agents under proper dose and administration routes can be effective for managing LMC. In this article, we review molecular targeted agents for managing LMC.

  9. Magnetic trapping with simultaneous photoacoustic detection of molecularly targeted rare circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been widely used in molecular imaging to detect diseased cells by targeting them with nanoparticle-based contrast agents. However, the sensitivity and specificity are easily degraded because contrast agent signals can be masked by the background. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging uses a new type of multifunctional composite particle combining an optically absorptive gold nanorod core and magnetic nanospheres, which can potentially accumulate and concentrate targeted cells while simultaneously enhancing their specific contrast compared to background signals. In this study, HeLa cells molecularly targeted using nanocomposites with folic acid mimicking targeted rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were circulated at a 6 ml/min flow rate for trapping and imaging studies. Preliminary results show that the cells accumulate rapidly in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system. The sensitivity of the current system can reach up to 1 cell/ml in clear water. By manipulating the trapped cells magnetically, the specificity of detecting cells in highly absorptive ink solution can be enhanced with 16.98 dB background suppression by applying motion filtering on PA signals to remove unwanted background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results appear promising for future preclinical studies on a small animal model and ultimate clinical detection of rare CTCs in the vasculature.

  10. Dependable and Efficient Clinical Molecular Diagnosis of Chinese RP Patient with Targeted Exon Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaobei; Dou, Hongliang; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Ningning; Zhang, Jinlu; Zhang, Huirong; Li, Genlin; Ma, Zhizhong

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common inherited retinal disease. It is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, which is why it is particularly challenging to diagnose. The aim of this study was to establish a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach for the comprehensive, rapid, and cost-effective clinical molecular diagnosis of RP. A specific hereditary eye disease enrichment panel (HEDEP) based on exome capture technology was used to collect the protein coding regions of 371 targeted hereditary eye disease genes, followed by high-throughput sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform. From a cohort of 34 Chinese RP families, 13 families were successfully diagnosed; thus, the method achieves a diagnostic rate of approximately 40%. Of 16 pathogenic mutations identified, 11 were novel. Our study demonstrates that targeted capture sequencing offers a rapid and effective method for the molecular diagnosis of RP, which helps to provide a more accurate clinical diagnosis and paves the way for genetic counseling, family planning, and future gene-targeted treatment. PMID:26496393

  11. Molecular Targeted Therapies for the Treatment of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Jin Wook; Keam, Bhumsuk

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is the multifocal seeding of cerebrospinal fluid and leptomeninges by malignant cells. The incidence of LMC is approximately 5% in patients with malignant tumors overall and the rate is increasing due to increasing survival time of cancer patients. Eradication of the disease is not yet possible, so the treatment goals of LMC are to improve neurologic symptoms and to prolong survival. A standard treatment for LMC has not been established due to low incidences of LMC, the rapidly progressing nature of the disease, heterogeneous populations with LMC, and a lack of randomized clinical trial results. Treatment options for LMC include intrathecal chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, but the prognoses remain poor with a median survival of <3 months. Recently, molecular targeted agents have been applied in the clinic and have shown groundbreaking results in specific patient groups epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy or an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor in lung cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-directed therapy in breast cancer, and CD20-targeted therapy in B cell lymphoma). Moreover, there are results indicating that the use of these agents under proper dose and administration routes can be effective for managing LMC. In this article, we review molecular targeted agents for managing LMC. PMID:27399673

  12. Dependable and Efficient Clinical Molecular Diagnosis of Chinese RP Patient with Targeted Exon Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liping; Cui, Hui; Yin, Xiaobei; Dou, Hongliang; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Ningning; Zhang, Jinlu; Zhang, Huirong; Li, Genlin; Ma, Zhizhong

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common inherited retinal disease. It is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, which is why it is particularly challenging to diagnose. The aim of this study was to establish a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach for the comprehensive, rapid, and cost-effective clinical molecular diagnosis of RP. A specific hereditary eye disease enrichment panel (HEDEP) based on exome capture technology was used to collect the protein coding regions of 371 targeted hereditary eye disease genes, followed by high-throughput sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform. From a cohort of 34 Chinese RP families, 13 families were successfully diagnosed; thus, the method achieves a diagnostic rate of approximately 40%. Of 16 pathogenic mutations identified, 11 were novel. Our study demonstrates that targeted capture sequencing offers a rapid and effective method for the molecular diagnosis of RP, which helps to provide a more accurate clinical diagnosis and paves the way for genetic counseling, family planning, and future gene-targeted treatment.

  13. Gastric cancer in the era of molecularly targeted agents: current drug development strategies.

    PubMed

    Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias

    2009-07-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide with approximately one million cases diagnosed annually. Despite considerable improvements in surgical techniques, innovations in clinical diagnostics and the development of new chemotherapy regimens, the clinical outcome for patients with advanced gastric cancer and cancer of the GEJ is generally poor with 5-year survival rates ranging between 5 and 15%. The understanding of cancer relevant events has resulted in new therapeutic strategies, particularly in developing of new molecular targeted agents. These agents have the ability to target a variety of cancer relevant receptors and downstream pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), the c-Met pathway, cell-cycle pathways, and down-stream signalling pathways such as the Akt-PI3k-mTOR pathway. In the era of new molecularly targeted agents this review focuses on recent developments of targeting relevant pathways involved in gastric cancer and cancer of the GEJ.

  14. Molecularly targeted therapies for advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Soley; Rocha-Lima, Caio M

    2013-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States. Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy has been a standard for patients with advanced stage disease. Improvements in overall survival and quality of life have been modest. Improved knowledge of the aberrant molecular signaling pathways found in NSCLC has led to the development of biomarkers with associated targeted therapeutics, thus changing the treatment paradigm for many NSCLC patients. In this review, we present a summary of many of the currently investigated biologic targets in NSCLC, discuss their current clinical trial status, and also discuss the potential for development of other targeted agents. PMID:23696960

  15. Stopping cancer in its tracks: using small molecular inhibitors to target glioblastoma migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Austin K; Li, Jing; Adamson, David C

    2012-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents one of the most common aggressive types of primary brain tumors. Despite advances in surgical resection, novel neuroimaging procedures, and the most recent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival after diagnosis is about 12-14 months. Targeting migrating GBM cells is a key research strategy in the fight against this devastating cancer. Though the vast majority of the primary tumor focus can be surgically resected, these migrating cells are responsible for its universal recurrence. Numerous strategies and technologies are being explored to target migrating glioma cells, with small molecular inhibitors as one of the most commonly studied. Small molecule inhibitors, such as protein kinase inhibitors, phosphorylation site inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and antisense oligonucleotides show promise in slowing the progression of this disease. A better understanding of these small molecule inhibitors and how they target various extra- and intracellular signaling pathways may eventually lead to a cure for GBM.

  16. Novel molecular and cellular therapeutic targets in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Seif, Alix E.; Reid, Gregor S. D.; Teachey, David T.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2010-01-01

    While the outcome for pediatric patients with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) or lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has improved dramatically, patients often suffer from therapeutic sequelae. Additionally, despite intensified treatment, the prognosis remains dismal for patients with refractory or relapsed disease. Thus, novel biologically targeted treatment approaches are needed. These targets can be identified by understanding how a loss of lymphocyte homeostasis can result in LPD or ALL. Herein, we review potential molecular and cellular therapeutic strategies that (i) target key signaling networks (e.g., PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK/STAT, Notch1, and SRC kinase family-containing pathways) which regulate lymphocyte growth, survival, and function; (ii) block the interaction of ALL cells with stromal cells or lymphoid growth factors secreted by the bone marrow microenvironment; or (iii) stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:18716718

  17. Vimentin as a potential molecular target in cancer therapy Or Vimentin, an overview and its potential as a molecular target for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Satelli, Arun; Li, Shulin

    2011-01-01

    Vimentin, a major constituent of the intermediate filament (IF) family of proteins, is ubiquitously expressed in normal mesenchymal cells and is known to maintain cellular integrity and provide resistance against stress. Increased vimentin expression has been reported in various epithelial cancers including prostate cancer, gastrointestinal tumors, CNS tumors, breast cancer, malignant melanoma, lung cancer and other types of cancers. Vimentin's over-expression in cancer correlates well with increased tumor growth, invasion and poor prognosis; however, the role of vimentin in cancer progression remains obscure. In the recent years, vimentin has gained much importance as a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Although EMT is associated with a number of tumorigenic events, the role of vimentin in the underlying events mediating these processes remains unknown. Though majority of the literature findings indicate a future significance of vimentin as a biomarker for different cancers with clinical relevance, more research in to the molecular aspects will be crucial to particularly evaluate the function of vimentin in the process of tumorigenesis. By virtue of its over-expression in a large number of cancers and its role in mediating various tumorigenic events, vimentin serves as an attractive target for cancer therapy. Further, research directed toward elucidating the role of vimentin in various signaling pathways would open up new approaches for the development of promising therapeutic agents. This review summarizes the expression and functions of vimentin in cancers and also suggests some directions toward future cancer therapy utilizing vimentin as a potential target. PMID:21637948

  18. Using target population specification, effect size, and reach to estimate and compare the population impact of two PTSD preventive interventions.

    PubMed

    Zatzick, Douglas F; Koepsell, Thomas; Rivara, Frederick P

    2009-01-01

    The population impact of a preventive intervention depends on two factors: what proportion of the full population at risk receives the intervention and how large a reduction in risk occurs among those who receive it. We sought to illustrate how information from a cognitive behavioral psychotherapy (CBT) trial and stepped collaborative care (CC) trial could be used to estimate the population impact of two contrasting approaches to PTSD prevention. We first specified trauma center target populations represented by participants in each trial. Patient characteristics were compared, as were effect size and reach indices and population-level reductions in PTSD incidence. The CBT trial demonstrated a larger effect size (50% PTSD prevention), but minimal reach (27/10,000), while the CC trial demonstrated a smaller effect size (7% PTSD prevention) but greater reach (1762/10,000). Modeling of the population impact suggested that a 9.5-fold greater cumulative reduction in the incidence of PTSD would result from the dissemination of the CC broad reach prevention strategy. A reciprocal relationship between effect size and reach was evident in these two trials. By specifying a target population, effect size and reach could be combined to project the overall population impact of each PTSD prevention approach.

  19. In vivo single molecular imaging and sentinel node navigation by nanotechnology for molecular targeting drug-delivery systems and tailor-made medicine.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Motohiro; Tada, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Hideo; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuu; Ishida, Takanori; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2008-01-01

    The recent advances in nanotechnology have a great potential to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases. Nanomaterials for medical applications are expected to grasp pharmacokinetics and the toxicity for application to medical treatment on the aspect of safety of the nanomaterials and nanodevices. We describe a generation of CdSe nanoparticles [quantum dots (QDs)] conjugated with monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (Trastuzumab), for single molecular in vivo imaging of breast cancer cells. We established a high-resolution in vivo 3D microscopic system for a novel imaging method at the molecular level. The cancer cells expressing HER2 protein were visualized by the nanoparticles in vivo at subcellular resolution, suggesting future utilization of the system in medical applications to improve drug-delivery systems to target the primary and metastatic tumors for made-to-order treatment. We also describe sentinel node navigation using fluorescent nanoparticles for breast cancer surgery in experimental model, which have shown the potential to be an alternative to existing tracers in the detection of the sentinel node if we select the appropriate particle size and wavelength. Future innovation in cancer imaging by nanotechnology and novel measurement technology will provide great improvement, not only in the clinical field but also in basic medical science for the development of medicine.

  20. The roles of juvenile hormone, insulin/target of rapamycin, and ecydsone signaling in regulating body size in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mirth, Christen Kerry; Shingleton, Alexander William

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how organisms regulate their body size has interested biologists for decades. Recent work has shown that both insulin/target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling and the steroid hormone ecdysone act to regulate rates of growth and the duration of the growth period in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our recent work has uncovered a third level of interaction, whereby juvenile hormone (JH) regulates levels of both ecdysone and insulin/TOR signaling to control growth rates. These studies highlight a complex network of interactions involved in regulating body and organ size. PMID:26842847

  1. Molecular Mass Characterization of Glycosaminoglycans with Different Degrees of Sulfation in Bioengineered Heparin Process by Size Exclusion Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Fuming; Dordick, Jonathan S; Linhardt, Robert J

    2012-10-01

    Different degrees of glycosaminoglycan sulfation result in their different charge densities. The charge density differences impact their migration behavior in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography, two of the most common methods for determining relative molecular masses of polysaccharides. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using commercially available heparin oligosaccharides as calibrants for measuring the relative molecular masses of intermediates in a bioengineered heparin process that have different levels of sulfation. A size exclusion chromatography method was established that eliminates this charge density effect and allows the determination of relative molecular mass using a single calibration curve with heparin oligosaccharides calibrants. This is accomplished by overcoming the electrostatic interaction between the glycosaminoglycans and size exclusion chromatography stationary phase using high ionic strength mobile phase.

  2. Influence of the apparent molecular size of aquatic humic substances on colour removal by coagulation and filtration.

    PubMed

    Rigobello, Eliane Sloboda; Dantas, Angela Di Bernardo; Di Bernardo, Luiz; Vieira, Eny Maria

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to verify the influence of the apparent molecular size of aquatic humic substances (AHSs) on the effectiveness of coagulation with aluminium sulphate and ferric chloride. Coagulation-filtration tests using the jar test and bench-scale sand filters were carried out with water samples having a true colour of approximately 100 Hazen units and prepared with AHSs of different molecular sizes. Stability diagrams are presented showing regions of > or = 90% and > or = 95% apparent colour removal delineated for each water sample using plots of total metal ion concentration (Al3+ and Fe3+) versus coagulation pH. To achieve the same degree of colour removal, the water samples with smaller apparent molecular sizes and a higher percentage of fulvic acids required higher dosages of both aluminium sulphate and ferric chloride.

  3. Collaborative study to establish human immunoglobulin BRP batch 3 and human immunoglobulin (molecular size) BRP batch 1.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, E; Daas, A; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2006-11-01

    A study was carried out by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines (EDQM) as part of the joint Biological Standardisation Programme of the Council of Europe and the European Commission with the aim to establish replacement batches of the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) human immunoglobulin Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) batch 2. Twenty-eight laboratories participated in this study. The suitability of the candidate reference preparations to serve as working references in the tests for distribution of the molecular size, anticomplementary activity and Fc function, in accordance with the specifications of the Ph. Eur. monographs Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918), Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Anti-T lymphocyte immunoglobulin for human use, animal (1928) was demonstrated. The candidates were therefore established as human immunoglobulin BRP batch 3 and Human immunoglobulin (molecular size) BRP batch 1. The prescribed use of the latter BRP is limited to the test for distribution of molecular size.

  4. Influence of Molecular Size on the Retention of Polymeric Nanocarrier Diagnostic Agents in Breast Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yashveer; Gao, Dayuan; Gu, Zichao; Li, Shike; Rivera, Kristia A.; Stein, Stanley; Love, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of nanocarrier molecular size and shape on breast duct retention in normal rats using a non-invasive optical imaging method. Methods Fluorescein-labeled PEG nanocarriers of different molecular weights and shapes (linear, two-arm, four-arm, and eight-arm) were intraductally administered (50 nmol) to female Sprague-Dawley rats. Whole body images were obtained non-invasively. Fluorescence intensities (i.e., amount remaining in duct) were plotted against time to estimate the nanocarrier ductal retention half-lives (t1/2). Plasma samples were taken and the pharmacokinetics (Tmax, Cmax) of absorbed nanocarriers was also assessed. Results The t1/2 of linear 12, 20, 30, 40, and two-arm 60 kDa nanocarriers were 6.7 ± 0.9, 16.1 ± 4.1, 16.6 ± 3.4, 21.5 ± 2.7, and 19.5 ± 6.1 h, whereas the four-arm 20, 40, and eight-arm 20 kDa had t1/2 of 9.0 ± 0.5, 11.5 ± 1.9, and 12.6 ± 3.0 h. The t1/2 of unconjugated fluorescein was significantly lower (14.5 ± 1.4 min). The Tmax for 12, 40, 60 kDa nanocarriers were 1, 24, and 32 h, respectively, and only 30 min for fluorescein. Conclusions Since normal breast ducts are highly permeable, the use of nanocarriers may be helpful in prolonging ductal retention of diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. PMID:22569800

  5. Comprehensive molecular characterization of salivary duct carcinoma reveals actionable targets and similarity to apocrine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalin, Martin G.; Desrichard, Alexis; Katabi, Nora; Makarov, Vladimir; Walsh, Logan A.; Lee, Ken-Wing; Wang, Qingguo; Armenia, Joshua; West, Lyndsay; Dogan, Snjezana; Wang, Lu; Ramaswami, Deepa; Ho, Alan L.; Ganly, Ian; Solit, David B.; Berger, Michael F.; Schultz, Nikolaus D.; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Morris, Luc G.T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) is an aggressive salivary malignancy which is resistant to chemotherapy and has high mortality rates. We investigated the molecular landscape of SDC, focusing on genetic alterations and gene expression profiles. Experimental Design We performed whole-exome sequencing, RNA sequencing and immunohistochemical analyses in 16 SDC tumors, and examined selected alterations via targeted sequencing of 410 genes in a second cohort of 15 SDCs. Results SDCs harbored a higher mutational burden than many other salivary carcinomas (1.7 mutations/megabase). The most frequent genetic alterations were mutations in TP53 (55%), HRAS (23%), PIK3CA (23%), and amplification of ERBB2 (35%). Most (74%) tumors had alterations in either MAP kinase (BRAF/HRAS/NF1) genes or ERBB2. Potentially targetable alterations based on supportive clinical evidence were present in 61% of tumors. Androgen receptor (AR) was overexpressed in 75%; several potential resistance mechanisms to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were identified, including the AR-V7 splice variant (present in 50%, often at low ratios compared to full length AR) and FOXA1 mutations (10%). Consensus clustering and pathway analyses in transcriptome data revealed striking similarities between SDC and molecular apocrine breast cancer. Conclusions This study illuminates the landscape of genetic alterations and gene expression programs in SDC, identifying numerous molecular targets and potential determinants of response to AR antagonism. This has relevance for emerging clinical studies of ADT and other targeted therapies in SDC. The similarities between SDC and apocrine breast cancer indicate that clinical data in breast cancer may generate useful hypotheses for SDC. PMID:27103403

  6. Peptide targeted tripod macrocyclic Gd(III) chelates for cancer molecular MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Wu, Xueming; Kresak, Adam; Griswold, Mark; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2013-10-01

    Rational design and develop of targeted contrast agents binding to cancer-related proteins will achieve more accurate cancer diagnosis and prognosis by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. CREKA is a tumor-homing pentapeptide (Cys-Arg-Glu-Lys-Ala) specifically homes to fibrin-fibronectin complexes abundantly expressed in tumor microenvironment. In this study, we developed and evaluated a CREKA peptide targeted multiplexed Gd-MR probe (CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)3) for MR imaging of breast tumors. CREKA and azide bearing Gd(III) was attached to a maleimide-functional trialkyne scaffold via thiol-maleimide and azide-alkyne click chemistry, respectively. CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)3 has a well-defined structure with a molecular weight of 2914 Da. The T1 relaxivity of CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)3 is 8.06 mM(-1) s(-1) per Gd (24.18 mM(-1) s(-1) per molecule) at room temperature and 3 T. Fluorescence imaging showed high binding specificity of CREKA to a 4T1 breast tumor model in mice while it was not found for the scrambled CREKA (CERAK). The CREKA peptide-targeted contrast agent resulted in greater contrast enhancement than the corresponding CERAK agent and the commercialized contrast agent ProHance(®) in tumor at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg in female athymic mice bearing 4T1 breast carcinoma xenograft. This small molecular contrast agent was easily excreted from body after imaging indicated low toxicity. The targeted MRI contrast agent has a potential for specific cancer molecular imaging with MRI.

  7. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with an Integrin Targeted Microbubble Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher R.; Hu, Xiaowen; Tlaxca, Jose; Decleves, Anne-Emilie; Houghtaling, Robert; Sharma, Kumar; Lawrence, Michael; Ferrara, Katherine; Rychak, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Ultrasound molecular imaging is an emerging technique for sensitive detection of intravascular targets. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis has strong potential for both clinical use and as a research tool in tumor biology and the development of anti-angiogenic therapies. Our objective is to develop a robust microbubble (MB) ultrasound contrast agent platform to which targeting ligands can be conjugated by biocompatible, covalent conjugation chemistry, and to develop a pure low mechanical index imaging processing method and corresponding quantifying method. The microbubbles and the imaging methods were evaluated in a mouse model of breast cancer in vivo. Materials and Methods We utilized a cyclic RGD (cRGD) pentapeptide containing a terminal cysteine group conjugated to the surface of MB bearing pyridyldithio-propionate (PDP) for targeting αvβ3 integrins. As negative controls, MB without a ligand or MB bearing a scrambled sequence (cRAD) were prepared. To enable characterization of peptides bound to MB surfaces, the cRGD peptide was labeled with FITC and detected by plate fluorometry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy. Targeted adhesion of cRGD-MB was demonstrated in an in vitro flow adhesion assay against recombinant murine αvβ3 integrin protein and αvβ3 integrin-expressing endothelial cells (bEnd.3). The specificity of cRGD-MB for αvβ3 integrin was demonstrated by treating bEnd.3 EC with a blocking antibody. A murine model of mammary carcinoma was used to assess targeted adhesion and ultrasound molecular imaging in vivo. The targeted microbubbles were visualized using a low mechanical index contrast imaging pulse sequence, and quantified by intensity normalization and two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis, Results The cRGD ligand concentration on the MB surface was ~8.2 × 106 molecules/MB. At a wall shear stress of 1.0 dynes/cm2, cRGD-MB exhibited 5-fold higher adhesion to immobilized recombinant αvβ3 integrin

  8. Specific binding of molecularly targeted agents to pancreas tumors and impact on observed optical contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hextrum, Shannon K.; Pardesi, Omar; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-02-01

    In optical imaging it is thought that optimum tumor contrast can be achieved with the use of small-labeled molecular tracers that have high affinity to their targets and fast clearance rates from the blood stream and healthy tissues. An example of this is fluorescently tagged EGF to monitor the molecular activity of tumors, such as pancreatic cancer. Extensive fluorescence contrast analysis for fluorescence molecular tomography has been performed on the AsPC-1 pancreas tumor, grown orthotopically in mice; yet, the binding dynamics of the EGF-fluorescent agent in vivo is not completely known. The bulk pancreatic tumor displays 3:1 contrast relative to the normal pancreas at long times after injection; however, even higher levels of fluorescence in the liver, kidney and intestine suggest that molecular specificity for the tumor may be low. Mice were administered a fluorescently labeled EGF agent and were sacrificed at various time points post-injection. To analyze the amount of specific binding at each time point frozen tissue samples were fluorescently imaged, washed with saline to remove the interstitially distributed contrast agent, and then imaged again. This technique demonstrated that approximately ~10% of the molecular target was firmly bound to the cell, while 90% was mobile or unbound. This low binding ratio suggests that the contrast observed is from inherent properties of the tumor (i.e. enhanced permeability and retention effect) and not from specific bound contrast as previously anticipated. The use of EGF contrast agents in MRI-guided fluorescence tomography and the impact of low binding specificity are discussed.

  9. Evaluating Three Programs Using a School Effectiveness Model: Direct Instruction, Target Teach, and Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Value-added models, which rate schools for effectiveness while taking into account the poverty and other socioeconomic status of the students, are generating increased interest. This paper describes the use of one such model to evaluate whether school ratings changed when three new programs were introduced: the "Target Teach" curriculum…

  10. Target-protecting dumbbell molecular probe against exonucleases digestion for sensitive detection of ATP and streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyang; Liu, Yucheng; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a versatile dumbbell molecular (DM) probe was designed and employed in the sensitively homogeneous bioassay. In the presence of target molecule, the DM probe was protected from the digestion of exonucleases. Subsequently, the protected DM probe specifically bound to the intercalation dye and resulted in obvious fluorescence signal which was used to determine the target molecule in return. This design allows specific and versatile detection of diverse targets with easy operation and no sophisticated fluorescence labeling. Integrating the idea of target-protecting DM probe with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) involved ligation reaction, the DM probe with 5'-end phosphorylation was successfully constructed for ATP detection, and the limitation of detection was found to be 4.8 pM. Thanks to its excellent selectivity and sensitivity, this sensing strategy was used to detect ATP spiked in human serum as well as cellular ATP. Moreover, the proposed strategy was also applied in the visual detection of ATP in droplet-based microfluidic platform with satisfactory results. Similarly, combining the principle of target-protecting DM probe with streptavidin (SA)-biotin interaction, the DM probe with 3'-end biotinylation was developed for selective and sensitive SA determination, which demonstrated the robustness and versatility of this design.

  11. HER2 Targeted Molecular MR Imaging Using a De Novo Designed Protein Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jingjuan; Li, Shunyi; Wei, Lixia; Jiang, Jie; Long, Robert; Mao, Hui; Wei, Ling; Wang, Liya; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J.

    2011-01-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively assess disease biomarkers has been hampered by the lack of desired contrast agents with high relaxivity, targeting capability, and optimized pharmacokinetics. We have developed a novel MR imaging probe targeting to HER2, a biomarker for various cancer types and a drug target for anti-cancer therapies. This multimodal HER20targeted MR imaging probe integrates a de novo designed protein contrast agent with a high affinity HER2 affibody and a near IR fluorescent dye. Our probe can differentially monitor tumors with different expression levels of HER2 in both human cell lines and xenograft mice models. In addition to its 100-fold higher dose efficiency compared to clinically approved non-targeting contrast agent DTPA, our developed agent also exhibits advantages in crossing the endothelial boundary, tissue distribution, and tumor tissue retention over reported contrast agents as demonstrated by even distribution of the imaging probe across the entire tumor mass. This contrast agent will provide a powerful tool for quantitative assessment of molecular markers, and improved resolution for diagnosis, prognosis and drug discovery. PMID:21455310

  12. Treatment of lung adenocarcinoma by molecular-targeted therapy and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Motonobu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kono, Koji; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Kohno, Takashi

    2017-03-09

    Lung adenocarcinoma (LADC) is a cancer treatable using targeted therapies against driver gene aberrations. EGFR mutations and ALK fusions are frequent gene aberrations in LADC, and personalized therapies against those aberrations have become a standard therapy. These targeted therapies have shown significant positive efficacy and tolerable toxicity compared to conventional chemotherapy, so it is necessary to identify additional druggable genetic aberrations. Other than EGFR mutations and ALK fusions, mutations in KRAS, HER2, and BRAF, and driver fusions involving RET and ROS1, have also been identified in LADC. Interestingly, the frequency of driver gene aberrations differs according to ethnicity, sex, and smoking, which leads to differences in treatment efficacy. To date, several molecular-targeted drugs against driver genes have been developed, and several clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy. However, targeted therapies against driver-gene-negative cases have not yet been well developed. Efforts to identify a new druggable target for such cases are currently underway. Furthermore, immune checkpoint blockade therapy might be effective for driver-negative cases, especially those with accumulated mutations.

  13. Site-targeted acoustic contrast agent detects molecular expression of tissue factor after balloon angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher S.; Abendschein, Dana R.; Scherrer, David E.; Scott, Michael J.; Marsh, Jon N.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2000-04-01

    Complex molecular signaling heralds the early stages of pathologies such as angiogenesis, inflammation, and cellular responses to mechanically damaged coronary arteries after balloon angioplasty. In previous studies, we have demonstrated acoustic enhancement of blood clot morphology with the use of a nongaseous, ligand-targeted acoustic nanoparticle emulsion delivered to areas of thrombosis both in vitro and in vivo. In this paper, we characterize the early expression of tissue factor which contributes to subsequent arterial restenosis. Tissue factor is a 42kd glycoprotein responsible for blood coagulation but also plays a well-described role in cancer metastasis, angiogenesis, and vascular restenosis. This study was designed to determine whether the targeted contrast agent could localize tissue factor expressed within the wall of balloon-injured arteries. Both carotid arteries of five pigs (20 kg) were injured using an 8 X 20 mm angioplasty balloon. The carotids were treated in situ with a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle emulsion covalently complexed to either specific anti-tissue factor polyclonal F(ab) fragments (treatment) or non-specific IgG F(ab) fragments (control). Intravascular ultrasound (30 MHz) images of the arteries were obtained before and after exposure to the emulsions. Tissue- factor targeted ultrasonic contrast agent acoustically enhanced the subintima and media at the site of balloon- induced injury compared with control contrast arteries (p less than 0.05). Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of increased tissue factor at the sites of acoustic enhancement. Binding of the targeted agents was demonstrated in vitro by scanning electron microscope images of cultured smooth muscle cells that constitutively express tissue factor. This study demonstrates the concept of molecular imaging and localization of carotid arteries' tissue factor in vivo using a new, nanoparticulate emulsion. Enhancement of the visualization of the molecular

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Anti-cancer Activities of β-elemene: Targeting Hallmarks of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shiyu; Ling, Chunhua; Li, Wei; Jiang, Hongxin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Jiang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Increasing knowledge on the hallmark characteristics of cancer and tumor pharmacology has promoted the introduction of phytochemicals, such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in cancer therapy, which modulate numerous molecular targets and exert anticancer activities. β-elemene, an active and non-toxic compound isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Rhizoma Zedoariae, has been explored as a potent anti-cancer agent against multiple cancers in extensive clinical trials and experimental research in vivo and in vitro. β-elemene exerts therapeutic potential via modulation of core hallmark capabilities of cancer by suppressing proliferative signaling, such as MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, inducing cell death, up-regulating growth suppressors, deactivating invasion and metastasis and interacting replicative immortality and attenuating angiogenesis. Recent studies have significantly improved our understanding of anti-cancer activities and underlying molecular mechanisms of this Chinese medicine. This review presents these novel findings regarding the unique properties of β-elemene as an agent for cancer treatment, with an emphasis on multi-targeting biological and molecular regulation.

  15. Cell signalling in insulin secretion: the molecular targets of ATP, cAMP and sulfonylurea.

    PubMed

    Seino, S

    2012-08-01

    Clarification of the molecular mechanisms of insulin secretion is crucial for understanding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of diabetes and for development of novel therapeutic strategies for the disease. Insulin secretion is regulated by various intracellular signals generated by nutrients and hormonal and neural inputs. In addition, a variety of glucose-lowering drugs including sulfonylureas, glinide-derivatives, and incretin-related drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are used for glycaemic control by targeting beta cell signalling for improved insulin secretion. There has been a remarkable increase in our understanding of the basis of beta cell signalling over the past two decades following the application of molecular biology, gene technology, electrophysiology and bioimaging to beta cell research. This review discusses cell signalling in insulin secretion, focusing on the molecular targets of ATP, cAMP and sulfonylurea, an essential metabolic signal in glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS), a critical signal in the potentiation of GIIS, and the commonly used glucose-lowering drug, respectively.

  16. Cytoprotective Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP-1 As a Novel Molecular Target in Localized and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leav, Irwin; Plescia, Janet; Goel, Hira Lal; Li, Jing; Jiang, Zhong; Cohen, Ronald J.; Languino, Lucia R.; Altieri, Dario C.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones of the heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) family promote cell survival, but the molecular requirements of this pathway in tumor progression are not understood. Here, we show that a mitochondria-localized Hsp90 chaperone, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein-1 (TRAP-1), is abundantly and ubiquitously expressed in human high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, Gleason grades 3 through 5 prostatic adenocarcinomas, and metastatic prostate cancer, but largely undetectable in normal prostate or benign prostatic hyperplasia in vivo. Prostate lesions formed in genetic models of the disease, including the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate and mice carrying prostate-specific deletion of the phosphatase tensin homolog tumor suppressor (Ptenpc−/−), also exhibit high levels of TRAP-1. Expression of TRAP-1 in nontransformed prostatic epithelial BPH-1 cells inhibited cell death, whereas silencing of TRAP-1 in androgen-independent PC3 or DU145 prostate cancer cells by small interfering RNA enhanced apoptosis. Targeting TRAP-1 with a novel class of mitochondria-directed Hsp90 inhibitors, ie, Gamitrinibs, caused rapid and complete killing of androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancer, but not BPH-1 cells, whereas reintroduction of TRAP-1 in BPH-1 cells conferred sensitivity to Gamitrinib-induced cell death. These data identify TRAP-1 as a novel mitochondrial survival factor differentially expressed in localized and metastatic prostate cancer compared with normal prostate. Targeting this pathway with Gamitrinibs could be explored as novel molecular therapy in patients with advanced prostate cancer. PMID:19948822

  17. Communication: Understanding molecular representations in machine learning: The role of uniqueness and target similarity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2016-10-28

    The predictive accuracy of Machine Learning (ML) models of molecular properties depends on the choice of the molecular representation. Inspired by the postulates of quantum mechanics, we introduce a hierarchy of representations which meet uniqueness and target similarity criteria. To systematically control target similarity, we simply rely on interatomic many body expansions, as implemented in universal force-fields, including Bonding, Angular (BA), and higher order terms. Addition of higher order contributions systematically increases similarity to the true potential energy and predictive accuracy of the resulting ML models. We report numerical evidence for the performance of BAML models trained on molecular properties pre-calculated at electron-correlated and density functional theory level of theory for thousands of small organic molecules. Properties studied include enthalpies and free energies of atomization, heat capacity, zero-point vibrational energies, dipole-moment, polarizability, HOMO/LUMO energies and gap, ionization potential, electron affinity, and electronic excitations. After training, BAML predicts energies or electronic properties of out-of-sample molecules with unprecedented accuracy and speed.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy, General Preventive Strategies, and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Safi, Sher Zaman; Kumar, Selva; Ismail, Ikram Shah Bin

    2014-01-01

    The growing number of people with diabetes worldwide suggests that diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) will continue to be sight threatening factors. The pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy is a widespread cause of visual impairment in the world and a range of hyperglycemia-linked pathways have been implicated in the initiation and progression of this condition. Despite understanding the polyol pathway flux, activation of protein kinase C (KPC) isoforms, increased hexosamine pathway flux, and increased advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation, pathogenic mechanisms underlying diabetes induced vision loss are not fully understood. The purpose of this paper is to review molecular mechanisms that regulate cell survival and apoptosis of retinal cells and discuss new and exciting therapeutic targets with comparison to the old and inefficient preventive strategies. This review highlights the recent advancements in understanding hyperglycemia-induced biochemical and molecular alterations, systemic metabolic factors, and aberrant activation of signaling cascades that ultimately lead to activation of a number of transcription factors causing functional and structural damage to retinal cells. It also reviews the established interventions and emerging molecular targets to avert diabetic retinopathy and its associated risk factors. PMID:25105142

  19. Communication: Understanding molecular representations in machine learning: The role of uniqueness and target similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bing; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2016-10-01

    The predictive accuracy of Machine Learning (ML) models of molecular properties depends on the choice of the molecular representation. Inspired by the postulates of quantum mechanics, we introduce a hierarchy of representations which meet uniqueness and target similarity criteria. To systematically control target similarity, we simply rely on interatomic many body expansions, as implemented in universal force-fields, including Bonding, Angular (BA), and higher order terms. Addition of higher order contributions systematically increases similarity to the true potential energy and predictive accuracy of the resulting ML models. We report numerical evidence for the performance of BAML models trained on molecular properties pre-calculated at electron-correlated and density functional theory level of theory for thousands of small organic molecules. Properties studied include enthalpies and free energies of atomization, heat capacity, zero-point vibrational energies, dipole-moment, polarizability, HOMO/LUMO energies and gap, ionization potential, electron affinity, and electronic excitations. After training, BAML predicts energies or electronic properties of out-of-sample molecules with unprecedented accuracy and speed.

  20. Systems Toxicology of Male Reproductive Development: Profiling 774 Chemicals for Molecular Targets and Adverse Outcomes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Trends in male reproductive health have been reported for increased rates of testicular germ cell tumors, low semen quality, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias, which have been associated with prenatal environmental chemical exposure based on human and animal studies.Objective: In the present study we aimed to identify significant correlations between environmental chemicals, molecular targets, and adverse outcomes across a broad chemical landscape with emphasis on developmental toxicity of the male reproductive system.Methods: We used U.S. EPA??s animal study database (ToxRefDB) and a comprehensive literature analysis to identify 774 chemicals that have been evaluated for adverse effects on male reproductive parameters, and then used U.S. EPA??s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB) to profile their bioactivity across approximately 800 molecular and cellular features. Results: A phenotypic hierarchy of testicular atrophy, sperm effects, tumors, and malformations, a composite resembling the human testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) hypothesis, was observed in 281 chemicals. A subset of 54 chemicals with male developmental consequences had in vitro bioactivity on molecular targets that could be condensed into 156 gene annotations in a bipartite network. Conclusion: Computational modeling of available in vivo and in vitro data for chemicals that produce adverse effects on male reproductive end points revealed a phenotypic hierarch

  1. Searching for life on Mars: selection of molecular targets for ESA's aurora ExoMars mission.

    PubMed

    Parnell, John; Cullen, David; Sims, Mark R; Bowden, Stephen; Cockell, Charles S; Court, Richard; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Gaubert, Francois; Grant, William; Parro, Victor; Rohmer, Michel; Sephton, Mark; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Steele, Andrew; Toporski, Jan; Vago, Jorge

    2007-08-01

    The European Space Agency's ExoMars mission will seek evidence of organic compounds of biological and non-biological origin at the martian surface. One of the instruments in the Pasteur payload may be a Life Marker Chip that utilizes an immunoassay approach to detect specific organic molecules or classes of molecules. Therefore, it is necessary to define and prioritize specific molecular targets for antibody development. Target compounds have been selected to represent meteoritic input, fossil organic matter, extant (living, recently dead) organic matter, and contamination. Once organic molecules are detected on Mars, further information is likely to derive from the detailed distribution of compounds rather than from single molecular identification. This will include concentration gradients beneath the surface and gradients from generic to specific compounds. The choice of biomarkers is informed by terrestrial biology but is wide ranging, and nonterrestrial biology may be evident from unexpected molecular distributions. One of the most important requirements is to sample where irradiation and oxidation are minimized, either by drilling or by using naturally excavated exposures. Analyzing regolith samples will allow for the search of both extant and fossil biomarkers, but sequential extraction would be required to optimize the analysis of each of these in turn.

  2. Molecular phylogeny and genome size evolution of the genus Betula (Betulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nian; McAllister, Hugh A.; Bartlett, Paul R.; Buggs, Richard J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Betula L. (birch) is a genus of approx. 60 species, subspecies or varieties with a wide distribution in the northern hemisphere, of ecological and economic importance. A new classification of Betula has recently been proposed based on morphological characters. This classification differs somewhat from previously published molecular phylogenies, which may be due to factors such as convergent evolution, hybridization, incomplete taxon sampling or misidentification of samples. While chromosome counts have been made for many species, few have had their genome size measured. The aim of this study is to produce a new phylogenetic and genome size analysis of the genus. Methods Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were sequenced for 76 Betula samples verified by taxonomic experts, representing approx. 60 taxa, of which approx. 24 taxa have not been included in previous phylogenetic analyses. A further 49 samples from other collections were also sequenced, and 108 ITS sequences were downloaded from GenBank. Phylogenetic trees were built for these sequences. The genome sizes of 103 accessions representing nearly all described species were estimated using flow cytometry. Key Results As expected for a gene tree of a genus where hybridization and allopolyploidy occur, the ITS tree shows clustering, but not resolved monophyly, for the morphological subgenera recently proposed. Most sections show some clustering, but species of the dwarf section Apterocaryon are unusually scattered. Betula corylifolia (subgenus Nipponobetula) unexpectedly clusters with species of subgenus Aspera. Unexpected placements are also found for B. maximowicziana, B. bomiensis, B. nigra and B. grossa. Biogeographical disjunctions were found within Betula between Europe and North America, and also disjunctions between North-east and South-west Asia. The 2C-values for Betula ranged from 0·88 to 5·33 pg, and polyploids are scattered widely throughout the

  3. Molecular simulations of PEGylated lipids at interfaces: size selective dispersion of nanoscale objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Vierros, Sampsa; van Tassel, Paul R.; Määttä, Jukka

    2015-03-01

    Phospholipids and phospholipid derivatives offer efficient, noncovalent functionalization and dispersion of hydrophobic objects, e.g. therapeutic molecules and nanoparticles including carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, the relation of lipid aggregates in bulk solution and in the presence of the object, and the resulting dispersion remain important questions. We employ here molecular dynamics simulations to explore PEGylated lipid aggregates at interfaces and the resulting dispersion efficiency. By varying lipid and substrate curvature, and the PEG chain length, we find 1) lipid-CNT and PEGylated lipid-CNT aggregation behavior consistent with recent experiments, 2) the assembled morphology to vary from micellar-like to tubular coating (phospholipids) and micellar to monolayer-like (PEGylated lipids) with the transition depending on lipid curvature and for PEGylated lipids also on the PEG chain length and CNT diameter, 3) aggregation morphology dependent CNT dispersion ability, and 4) good agreement between simulation and scaling theories of a brush-type PEG. Finally, we discuss the implications to size-selective separation of hydrophobic particles and experimental observations.

  4. Size effect on cold-welding of gold nanowires investigated using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Da; Fang, Te-Hua; Wu, Chung-Chin

    2016-03-01

    The size effect on the cold-welding mechanism and mechanical properties of Au nanowires (NWs) in head-to-head contact are studied using molecular dynamics simulations based on the second-moment approximation of the many-body tight-binding potential. The results are discussed in terms of atomic trajectories, slip vectors, stress, radial distribution function, and weld strength ratio. Simulation results show that during the cold-welding process, a few disordered atoms/defects in the jointing area rearrange themselves and transform into a face-centered cubic crystalline structure. With an increase in contact between the two NWs, dislocations gradually form on the (111) slip plane and then on a twin plane, leading to an increase in the lateral deformation of 4-nm-wide NWs. The effect of structural instability increases with decreasing NW width, making the alignment of the two NWs more difficult. The elongation ability of the welded NWs increases with increasing NW width. Smaller NWs have better weld strength.

  5. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Bertrand; Hermanson, Ola

    2010-05-01

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  6. Ultrapotent vinblastines in which added molecular complexity further disrupts the target tubulin dimer–dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Daniel W.; Lukesh, John C.; Brody, Daniel M.; Brütsch, Manuela M.; Boger, Dale L.

    2016-01-01

    Approaches to improving the biological properties of natural products typically strive to modify their structures to identify the essential pharmacophore, or make functional group changes to improve biological target affinity or functional activity, change physical properties, enhance stability, or introduce conformational constraints. Aside from accessible semisynthetic modifications of existing functional groups, rarely does one consider using chemical synthesis to add molecular complexity to the natural product. In part, this may be attributed to the added challenge intrinsic in the synthesis of an even more complex compound. Herein, we report synthetically derived, structurally more complex vinblastines inaccessible from the natural product itself that are a stunning 100-fold more active (IC50 values, 50–75 pM vs. 7 nM; HCT116), and that are now accessible because of advances in the total synthesis of the natural product. The newly discovered ultrapotent vinblastines, which may look highly unusual upon first inspection, bind tubulin with much higher affinity and likely further disrupt the tubulin head-to-tail α/β dimer–dimer interaction by virtue of the strategic placement of an added conformationally well-defined, rigid, and extended C20′ urea along the adjacent continuing protein–protein interface. In this case, the added molecular complexity was used to markedly enhance target binding and functional biological activity (100-fold), and likely represents a general approach to improving the properties of other natural products targeting a protein–protein interaction. PMID:27512044

  7. Revealing potential molecular targets bridging colitis and colorectal cancer based on multidimensional integration strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongfei; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Xishan; Fan, Huihui; Wang, Guiyu; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation may play a vital role in the pathogenesis of inflammation-associated tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms bridging ulcerative colitis (UC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) remain unclear. Here, we integrated multidimensional interaction resources, including gene expression profiling, protein-protein interactions (PPIs), transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation data, and virus-host interactions, to tentatively explore potential molecular targets that functionally link UC and CRC at a systematic level. In this work, by deciphering the overlapping genes, crosstalking genes and pivotal regulators of both UC- and CRC-associated functional module pairs, we revealed a variety of genes (including FOS and DUSP1, etc.), transcription factors (including SMAD3 and ETS1, etc.) and miRNAs (including miR-155 and miR-196b, etc.) that may have the potential to complete the connections between UC and CRC. Interestingly, further analyses of the virus-host interaction network demonstrated that several virus proteins (including EBNA-LP of EBV and protein E7 of HPV) frequently inter-connected to UC- and CRC-associated module pairs with their validated targets significantly enriched in both modules of the host. Together, our results suggested that multidimensional integration strategy provides a novel approach to discover potential molecular targets that bridge the connections between UC and CRC, which could also be extensively applied to studies on other inflammation-related cancers. PMID:26461477

  8. Molecular signature of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: an insight from genotype to phenotype and challenges for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ibrahim H; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; O’Reilly, Eileen M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains one of the most clinically challenging cancers despite an in-depth characterization of the molecular underpinnings and biology of this disease. Recent whole-genome-wide studies have elucidated the diverse and complex genetic alterations which generate a unique oncogenic signature for an individual pancreatic cancer patient and which may explain diverse disease behavior in a clinical setting. Areas covered In this review article, we discuss the key oncogenic pathways of pancreatic cancer including RAS-MAPK, PI3KCA and TGF-β signaling, as well as the impact of these pathways on the disease behavior and their potential targetability. The role of tumor suppressors particularly BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and their role in pancreatic cancer treatment are elaborated upon. We further review recent genomic studies and their impact on future pancreatic cancer treatment. Expert opinion Targeted therapies inhibiting pro-survival pathways have limited impact on pancreatic cancer outcomes. Activation of pro-apoptotic pathways along with suppression of cancer-stem-related pathways may reverse treatment resistance in pancreatic cancer. While targeted therapy or a ‘precision medicine’ approach in pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains an elusive challenge for the majority of patients, there is a real sense of optimism that the strides made in understanding the molecular underpinnings of this disease will translate into improved outcomes. PMID:26439702

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi Invasion into Host Cells: A Complex Molecular Targets Interplay.

    PubMed

    Campo, Vanessa Leiria; Martins-Teixeira, Maristela Braga; Carvalho, Ivone

    2016-01-01

    Chagas' disease is still a worldwide threat, with estimated from 6 to 7 million infected people, mainly in Latin America. Despite all efforts, especially from international consortia (DNDi, NMTrypI), to develop an innovative therapeutic strategy against this disease, no candidate has achieved full requirements for clinical use yet. In this review, we point out the general molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in T. cruzi cell invasion and elucidate the roles of specific parasite and host targets in the progress of Chagas' disease. Among these molecular targets are Gp85/transsialidase, mucins, cruzipain and oligopeptidase B, found in parasite cell surface, and Galectin-3 and Toll-like receptors present in host cells. Thus, the deep understanding of their interplay and involvement on T. cruzi host cell adhesion, invasion and evasion from host immune may expand the chances for discovering new therapeutic agents against this neglected disease. Additionally, these targets may represent a remarkable strategy to block parasite invasion in the early stages of infection.

  10. Targeted next-generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Christopher P.; Koehler, Jeffrey W.; Minogue, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is an epidemic of increasing magnitude requiring rapid identification and profiling for appropriate and timely therapeutic measures and containment strategies. In this context, ciprofloxacin is part of the first-line of countermeasures against numerous high consequence bacteria. Significant resistance can occur via single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and deletions within ciprofloxacin targeted genes. Ideally, use of ciprofloxacin would be prefaced with AR determination to avoid overuse or misuse of the antibiotic. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of a panel of 44 single-stranded molecular inversion probes (MIPs) coupled to next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the detection of genetic variants known to confer ciprofloxacin resistance in Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. Sequencing results demonstrate MIPs capture and amplify targeted regions of interest at significant levels of coverage. Depending on the genetic variant, limits of detection (LOD) for high-throughput pooled sequencing ranged from approximately 300–1800 input genome copies. LODs increased 10-fold in the presence of contaminating human genome DNA. In addition, we show that MIPs can be used as an enrichment step with high resolution melt (HRM) real-time PCR which is a sensitive assay with a rapid time-to-answer. Overall, this technology is a multiplexable upfront enrichment applicable with multiple downstream molecular assays for the detection of targeted genetic regions. PMID:27174456

  11. STAT3 Inhibition by Microtubule-Targeted Drugs: Dual Molecular Effects of Chemotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Chaudhury, Mousumi; Frank, David A.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapies, it is necessary to identify molecular targets that are essential to a tumor cell but dispensable in a normal cell. Increasing evidence indicates that the transcription factor STAT3, which regulates the expression of genes controlling proliferation, survival, and self-renewal, constitutes such a target. Recently it has been found that STAT3 can associate with the cytoskeleton. Since many of the tumors in which STAT3 is activated, such as breast cancer and ovarian cancer, are responsive to drugs that target microtubules, we examined the effect of these compounds on STAT3. We found that microtubule stabilizers, such as paclitaxel, or microtubule inhibitors, such as vinorelbine, decrease the activating tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 in tumor cells and inhibit the expression of STAT3 target genes. Paclitaxel decreases the association between STAT3 and microtubules, and appears to decrease STAT3 phosphorylation through induction of a negative feedback regulator. The cytotoxic activity of paclitaxel in breast cancer cell lines correlates with its ability to decrease STAT3 phosphorylation. However, consistent with the necessity for expression of a negative regulator, treatment of resistant MDA-MB-231 cells with the DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine restores the ability of paclitaxel to block STAT3-dependent gene expression. Finally, the combination of paclitaxel and agents that directly target STAT3 has beneficial effects in killing STAT3-dependent cell lines. Thus, microtubule-targeted agents may exert some of their effects by inhibiting STAT3, and understanding this interaction may be important for optimizing rational targeted cancer therapies. PMID:21949561

  12. Molecular valves for controlling gas phase transport made from discrete ångström-sized pores in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luda; Drahushuk, Lee W; Cantley, Lauren; Koenig, Steven P; Liu, Xinghui; Pellegrino, John; Strano, Michael S; Bunch, J Scott

    2015-09-01

    An ability to precisely regulate the quantity and location of molecular flux is of value in applications such as nanoscale three-dimensional printing, catalysis and sensor design. Barrier materials containing pores with molecular dimensions have previously been used to manipulate molecular compositions in the gas phase, but have so far been unable to offer controlled gas transport through individual pores. Here, we show that gas flux through discrete ångström-sized pores in monolayer graphene can be detected and then controlled using nanometre-sized gold clusters, which are formed on the surface of the graphene and can migrate and partially block a pore. In samples without gold clusters, we observe stochastic switching of the magnitude of the gas permeance, which we attribute to molecular rearrangements of the pore. Our molecular valves could be used, for example, to develop unique approaches to molecular synthesis that are based on the controllable switching of a molecular gas flux, reminiscent of ion channels in biological cell membranes and solid-state nanopores.

  13. Effect of PLGA NP size on efficiency to target traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Luis J; Stammes, Marieke A; Que, Ivo; van Beek, Ermond R; Knol-Blankevoort, Vicky T; Snoeks, Thomas J A; Chan, Alan; Kaijzel, Eric L; Löwik, Clemens W G M

    2016-02-10

    Necrotic cell death occurs exclusively under pathological conditions, such as ischemic diseases. Necrosis imaging is of diagnostic value and enables early measurement of treatment efficiency in ischemic patients. Here we explored the targeted delivery of particles, with diameters of approximately 100nm, 200nm and 800nm, consisting of a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticle (NP) core coated with a polyethylene glycol-lipid (PEG) layer. Targeted delivery was facilitated by coupling the amino end group of the polyethylene glycol-layer to 800CW imaging agent, which specifically binds to intracellular proteins of cells that have lost membrane integrity, thus revealing the extent of the damaged area. We found that smaller NPs (100nm), with an appropriate coating, diffuse throughout the traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. Optical imaging revealed that smaller (100-nm) PEG-coated NPs carrying 800CW penetrated deeper into the mouse brain than large 800CW containing NPs (800nm). The importance of the 800CW as a ligand to target the necrotic tissue was further confirmed in living mice. The ability to achieve brain penetration with smaller NPs is expected to allow more uniform, longer-lasting, and effective delivery of drugs within the brain, and may find application in the treatment of stroke, brain tumors, neuroinflammation, and other brain diseases where the blood-brain barrier is compromised or where local delivery strategies are feasible.

  14. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-02-01

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au25 clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au+ ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of ~5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f7/2~83.97 eV and Au 4f5/2~87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size ~1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size ~8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at ~674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 µg ml-1. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR+ve oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au25 clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the potential of using

  15. Herb-target interaction network analysis helps to disclose molecular mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hao; Ruan, Hao; Ouyang, Qi; Lai, Luhua

    2016-01-01

    Though many studies have been performed to elucidate molecular mechanism of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) by identifying protein-compound interactions, no systematic analysis at herb level was reported. TCMs are prescribed by herbs and all compounds from a certain herb should be considered as a whole, thus studies at herb level may provide comprehensive understanding of TCMs. Here, we proposed a computational strategy to study molecular mechanism of TCM at herb level and used it to analyze a TCM anti-HIV formula. Herb-target network analysis was carried out between 17 HIV-related proteins and SH formula as well as three control groups based on systematic docking. Inhibitory herbs were identified and active compounds enrichment was found to contribute to the therapeutic effectiveness of herbs. Our study demonstrates that computational analysis of TCMs at herb level can catch the rationale of TCM formulation and serve as guidance for novel TCM formula design. PMID:27833111

  16. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases associated with molecular-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Akihiko

    2009-02-01

    Little was known about drug-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD) when acute ILD-type events developed in several Japanese patients treated with gefitinib. A better understanding of drug-induced ILD is required, including more reliable data about the incidence of events associated with different treatments and identification of the risk factors for this type of ILD. Recent advances in imaging, molecular examination, and pathology have been used in postmarketing surveillance studies designed and conducted by an independent academic team to define the risk and to increase the amount of evidence about ILD related to various molecularly targeted anticancer agents. These studies may shed light on the underlying mechanisms of drug-induced ILD and appropriate evidence-based strategies that can be used to prevent or manage these events.

  17. Precision Medicine for Molecularly Targeted Agents and Immunotherapies in Early-Phase Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Juanita; Harris, Sam; Roda, Desam; Yap, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Precision medicine in oncology promises the matching of genomic, molecular, and clinical data with underlying mechanisms of a range of novel anticancer therapeutics to develop more rational and effective antitumor strategies in a timely manner. However, despite the remarkable progress made in the understanding of novel drivers of different oncogenic processes, success rates for the approval of oncology drugs remain low with substantial fiscal consequences. In this article, we focus on how recent rapid innovations in technology have brought greater clarity to the biological and clinical complexities of different cancers and advanced the development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in clinical trials. We discuss the key challenges of identifying and validating predictive biomarkers of response and resistance using both tumor and surrogate tissues, as well as the hurdles associated with intratumor heterogeneity. Finally, we outline evolving strategies employed in early-phase trial designs that incorporate omics-based technologies. PMID:26609214

  18. Molecular targets of dietary agents for prevention and therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Shishodia, Shishir

    2006-05-14

    While fruits and vegetables are recommended for prevention of cancer and other diseases, their active ingredients (at the molecular level) and their mechanisms of action less well understood. Extensive research during the last half century has identified various molecular targets that can potentially be used not only for the prevention of cancer but also for treatment. However, lack of success with targeted monotherapy resulting from bypass mechanisms has forced researchers to employ either combination therapy or agents that interfere with multiple cell-signaling pathways. In this review, we present evidence that numerous agents identified from fruits and vegetables can interfere with several cell-signaling pathways. The agents include curcumin (turmeric), resveratrol (red grapes, peanuts and berries), genistein (soybean), diallyl sulfide (allium), S-allyl cysteine (allium), allicin (garlic), lycopene (tomato), capsaicin (red chilli), diosgenin (fenugreek), 6-gingerol (ginger), ellagic acid (pomegranate), ursolic acid (apple, pears, prunes), silymarin (milk thistle), anethol (anise, camphor, and fennel), catechins (green tea), eugenol (cloves), indole-3-carbinol (cruciferous vegetables), limonene (citrus fruits), beta carotene (carrots), and dietary fiber. For instance, the cell-signaling pathways inhibited by curcumin alone include NF-kappaB, AP-1, STAT3, Akt, Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), caspases, PARP, IKK, EGFR, HER2, JNK, MAPK, COX2, and 5-LOX. The active principle identified in fruit and vegetables and the molecular targets modulated may be the basis for how these dietary agents not only prevent but also treat cancer and other diseases. This work reaffirms what Hippocrates said 25 centuries ago, let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

  19. Calculation of molecular weights of humic substances from colligative data: Application to aquatic humus and its molecular size fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, J. H.; Perdue, E. M.

    1981-11-01

    A rigorous mathematical expression for the dependence of colligative properties on acid dissociation of water soluble humic substances is presented. New data for number average molecular weights of a river derived humic material and its gel permeation Chromatographic fractions are compared with M¯n values obtained by a reevaluation of previously published experimental observations on soil and water fulvic acids. The results reveal a remarkable similarity of fulvic acids from widely different sources with respect to number-average molecular weight.

  20. pH-activated size reduction of large compound nanoparticles for in vivo nucleus-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanbin; Li, Chunyan; Li, Fuyou; Chen, Daoyong

    2016-04-01

    Nucleus-targeted drug delivery is a promising strategy for anticancer therapy, but in vivo nucleus-targeted drug delivery has been challenging. Limited by the channel size of the nucleopore, vehicles that enter the nucleus via the nucleopore actively should be small and decorated with nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, the small vehicle size may promote leakage of vehicles into normal tissues, and the positively-charged NLS can lead to strong non-specific interactions in vivo. In the present study, we demonstrate an in vivo nucleus-targeted drug delivery using large compound nanoparticles with detachable PEG shell. The nanoparticles are composed of PEG-benzoic imine-oligo-l-lysine/iridium(III) metallodrug complex and formed in a kinetically-controlled fashion. Under physiological conditions (pH 7.4), the nanoparticles are large (ca. 150 nm) and protected by an inert PEG shell. When internalized into intracellular acidic endo/lysosomes of cancer cells, the nanoparticles dissociate into smaller ones (ca. 40 nm) and the PEG chains detach due to the cleavage of the benzoic imine bond at low pH. The small nanoparticles, with exposure of the oligo-l-lysine after the detachment of the PEG shield, then translocate into the nucleus via the nucleopore due to the small size and nuclear localization ability of the oligo-l-lysine. Importantly, the small particles could significantly release the contained drug into the nucleus, leading to ca. 20-fold higher cytotoxicity compared to the native drug in vitro. Further in vivo application of the nucleus-targeting nano-system in a nude-mice model showed significant tumor inhibition and remarkable life-span elongation.

  1. Feature long axis size and local luminance contrast determine ship target acquisition performance: strong evidence for the TOD case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Piet; Toet, Alexander; Kooi, Frank L.

    2016-10-01

    Visual images of a civilian target ship on a sea background were produced using a CAD model. The total set consisted of 264 images and included 3 different color schemes, 2 ship viewing aspects, 5 sun illumination conditions, 2 sea reflection values, 2 ship positions with respect to the horizon and 3 values of atmospheric contrast reduction. In a perception experiment, the images were presented on a display in a long darkened corridor. Observers were asked to indicate the range at which they were able to detect the ship and classify the following 5 ship elements: accommodation, funnel, hull, mast, and hat above the bridge. This resulted in a total of 1584 Target Acquisition (TA) range estimates for two observers. Next, the ship contour, ship elements and corresponding TA ranges were analyzed applying several feature size and contrast measures. Most data coincide on a contrast versus angular size plot using (1) the long axis as characteristic ship/ship feature size and (2) local Weber contrast as characteristic ship/ship feature contrast. Finally, the data were compared with a variety of visual performance functions assumed to be representative for Target Acquisition: the TOD (Triangle Orientation Discrimination), MRC (Minimum Resolvable Contrast), CTF (Contrast Threshold Function), TTP (Targeting Task Performance) metric and circular disc detection data for the unaided eye (Blackwell). The results provide strong evidence for the TOD case: both position and slope of the TOD curve match the ship detection and classification data without any free parameter. In contrast, the MRC and CTF are too steep, the TTP and disc detection curves are too shallow and all these curves need an overall scaling factor in order to coincide with the ship and ship feature recognition data.

  2. Sodium modulates opioid receptors through a membrane component different from G-proteins. Demonstration by target size analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, S.; Costa, T.; Herz, A.

    1988-07-25

    The target size for opioid receptor binding was studied after manipulations known to affect the interactions between receptor and GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins). Addition of GTP or its analogs to the binding reaction, exposure of intact cells to pertussis toxin prior to irradiation, or treatment of irradiated membranes with N-ethylmaleimide did not change the target size (approximately equal to 100 kDa) for opioid receptors in NG 108-15 cells and rat brain. These data suggest that the 100-kDa species does not include an active subunit of a G-protein or alternatively that GTP does not promote the dissociation of the receptor-G-protein complex. The presence of Na+ (100 mM) in the radioligand binding assay induced a biphasic decay curve for agonist binding and a flattening of the monoexponential decay curve for a partial agonist. In both cases the effect was explained by an irradiation-induced loss of the low affinity state of the opioid receptor produced by the addition of Na+. This suggests that an allosteric inhibitor that mediates the effect of sodium on the receptor is destroyed at low doses of irradiation, leaving receptors which are no longer regulated by sodium. The effect of Na+ on target size was slightly increased by the simultaneous addition of GTP but was not altered by pertussis toxin treatment. Thus, the sodium unit is distinct from G-proteins and may represent a new component of the opioid receptor complex. Assuming a simple bimolecular model of one Na+ unit/receptor, the size of this inhibitor can be measured as 168 kDa.

  3. Molecular Design of Bisphosphonate-Modified Proteins for Efficient Bone Targeting In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sano, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Makiya; Hanzawa, Keiko; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2015-01-01

    To establish a rational molecular design for bisphosphonate (BP)-modified proteins for efficient bone targeting, a pharmacokinetic study was performed using a series of alendronate (ALN), a nitrogen-containing BP, modified proteins with various molecular weights and varying degrees of modification. Four proteins with different molecular weight—yeast glutathione reductase (GR; MW: 112,000 Da), bovine serum albumin (BSA; MW: 67,000 Da), recombinant human superoxide dismutase (SOD; MW: 32,000 Da), and chicken egg white lysozyme (LZM; MW: 14,000 Da)—were modified with ALN to obtain ALN-modified proteins. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the tissue distribution of the ALN-modified and unmodified proteins was performed after radiolabeling them with indium-111 (111In) by using a bifunctional chelating agent. Calculation of tissue uptake clearances revealed that the bone uptake clearances of 111In-ALN-modified proteins were proportional to the degree of ALN modification. 111In-GR-ALN and BSA-ALN, the two high-molecular-weight proteins, efficiently accumulated in bones, regardless of the degree of ALN modification. Approximately 36 and 34% of the dose, respectively, was calculated to be delivered to the bones. In contrast, the maximum amounts taken up by bone were 18 and 13% of the dose for 111In-SOD-ALN(32) and LZM-ALN(9), respectively, because of their high renal clearance. 111In-SOD modified with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and ALN (111In-PEG-SOD-ALN) was efficiently delivered to the bone. Approximately 36% of the dose was estimated to be delivered to the bones. In an experimental bone metastasis mouse model, treatment with PEG-SOD-ALN significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in the bone of the mice. These results indicate that the combination of PEG and ALN modification is a promising approach for efficient bone targeting of proteins with a high total-body clearance. PMID:26287482

  4. The Killer Fly Hunger Games: Target Size and Speed Predict Decision to Pursuit.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Trevor J; Knowles, Katie; Barlow, Laura; Tapia, Gervasio; Nordström, Karin; Olberg, Robert M; Gonzalez-Bellido, Paloma T

    2015-09-01

    Predatory animals have evolved to optimally detect their prey using exquisite sensory systems such as vision, olfaction and hearing. It may not be so surprising that vertebrates, with large central nervous systems, excel at predatory behaviors. More striking is the fact that many tiny insects, with their miniscule brains and scaled down nerve cords, are also ferocious, highly successful predators. For predation, it is important to determine whether a prey is suitable before initiating pursuit. This is paramount since pursuing a prey that is too large to capture, subdue or dispatch will generate a substantial metabolic cost (in the form of muscle output) without any chance of metabolic gain (in the form of food). In addition, during all pursuits, the predator breaks its potential camouflage and thus runs the risk of becoming prey itself. Many insects use their eyes to initially detect and subsequently pursue prey. Dragonflies, which are extremely efficient predators, therefore have huge eyes with relatively high spatial resolution that allow efficient prey size estimation before initiating pursuit. However, much smaller insects, such as killer flies, also visualize and successfully pursue prey. This is an impressive behavior since the small size of the killer fly naturally limits the neural capacity and also the spatial resolution provided by the compound eye. Despite this, we here show that killer flies efficiently pursue natural (Drosophila melanogaster) and artificial (beads) prey. The natural pursuits are initiated at a distance of 7.9 ± 2.9 cm, which we show is too far away to allow for distance estimation using binocular disparities. Moreover, we show that rather than estimating absolute prey size prior to launching the attack, as dragonflies do, killer flies attack with high probability when the ratio of the prey's subtended retinal velocity and retinal size is 0.37. We also show that killer flies will respond to a stimulus of an angular size that is smaller

  5. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czulak, J.; Guerreiro, A.; Metran, K.; Canfarotta, F.; Goddard, A.; Cowan, R. H.; Trochimczuk, A. W.; Piletsky, S.

    2016-05-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates.Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike

  6. Immunohistochemical detection of a potential molecular therapeutic target for canine hemangiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    ADACHI, Mami; HOSHINO, Yuki; IZUMI, Yusuke; TAKAGI, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a progressive malignant neoplasm of dogs for which there is currently no effective treatment. A recent study suggested that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), the PI3K/Akt/m-TOR and MAPK pathways are all activated in canine and human HSA. The aim of the present study was to investigate the overexpression of these proteins by immunohistochemistry in canine splenic HSA to identify potential molecular therapeutic targets. A total of 10 splenic HSAs and two normal splenic samples surgically resected from dogs were sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological diagnosis or analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The expression of RTKs, c-kit, VEGFR-2 and PDGFR-2, as well as PI3K/Akt/m-TOR and MEK was higher in canine splenic HSAs compared to normal spleens. These proteins may therefore be potential therapeutic targets in canine splenic HSA. PMID:26685984

  7. High-resolution crystal structure reveals molecular details of target recognition by bacitracin

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacitracin is a metalloantibiotic agent that is widely used as a medicine and feed additive. It interferes with bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding undecaprenyl-pyrophosphate, a lipid carrier that serves as a critical intermediate in cell wall production. Despite bacitracin’s broad use, the molecular details of its target recognition have not been elucidated. Here we report a crystal structure for the ternary complex of bacitracin A, zinc, and a geranyl-pyrophosphate ligand at a resolution of 1.1 Å. The antibiotic forms a compact structure that completely envelopes the ligand’s pyrophosphate group, together with flanking zinc and sodium ions. The complex adopts a highly amphipathic conformation that offers clues to antibiotic function in the context of bacterial membranes. Bacitracin’s efficient sequestration of its target represents a previously unseen mode for the recognition of lipid pyrophosphates, and suggests new directions for the design of next-generation antimicrobial agents. PMID:23940351

  8. Copper-coated laser-fusion targets using molecular-beam levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Rocke, M.J.

    1981-09-08

    A series of diagnostic experiments at the Shiva laser fusion facility required targets of glass microspheres coated with 1.5 to 3.0 ..mu..m of copper. Previous batch coating efforts using vibration techniques gave poor results due to microsphere sticking and vacuum welding. Molecular Beam Levitation (MBL) represented a noncontact method to produce a sputtered copper coating on a single glassmicrosphere. The coating specifications that were achieved resulted in a copper layer up to 3 ..mu..m thick with the allowance of a maximum variation of 10 nm in surface finish and thickness. These techniques developed with the MBL may be applied to sputter coat many soft metals for fusion target applications.

  9. Liquid alkanes with targeted molecular weights from biomass-derived carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    West, Ryan M; Liu, Zhen Y; Peter, Maximilian; Dumesic, James A

    2008-01-01

    Liquid transportation fuels must burn cleanly and have high energy densities, criteria that are currently fulfilled by petroleum, a non-renewable resource, the combustion of which leads to increasing levels of atmospheric CO(2). An attractive approach for the production of transportation fuels from renewable biomass resources is to convert carbohydrates into alkanes with targeted molecular weights, such as C(8)-C(15) for jet-fuel applications. Targeted n-alkanes can be produced directly from fructose by an integrated process involving first the dehydration of this C(6) sugar to form 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, followed by controlled formation of C-C bonds with acetone to form C(9) and C(15) compounds, and completed by hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation reactions to form the corresponding n-alkanes. Analogous reactions are demonstrated starting with 5-methylfurfural or 2-furaldehyde, with the latter leading to C(8) and C(13) n-alkanes.

  10. Inflammatory therapeutic targets in coronary atherosclerosis—from molecular biology to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Fabian; Domschke, Gabriele; Erbel, Christian; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Katus, Hugo A.; Gleissner, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. Over the past two decades, it has been clearly recognized that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Accumulating data from animal experiments have supported this hypothesis, however, clinical applications making use of this knowledge remain scarce. In spite of optimal interventional and medical therapy, the risk for recurrent myocardial infarction remains by about 20% over 3 years after acute coronary syndromes, novel therapies to prevent atherogenesis or treat atherosclerosis are urgently needed. This review summarizes selected potential molecular inflammatory targets that may be of clinical relevance. We also review recent and ongoing clinical trails that target inflammatory processes aiming at preventing adverse cardiovascular events. Overall, it seems surprising that translation of basic science into clinical practice has not been a great success. In conclusion, we propose to focus on specific efforts that promote translational science in order to improve outcome and prognosis of patients suffering from atherosclerosis. PMID:25484870

  11. Molecular pathways: targeting the kinase effectors of RHO-family GTPases.

    PubMed

    Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Rawat, Sonali J; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    RHO GTPases, members of the RAS superfamily of small GTPases, are adhesion and growth factor-activated molecular switches that play important roles in tumor development and progression. When activated, RHO-family GTPases such as RAC1, CDC42, and RHOA, transmit signals by recruiting a variety of effector proteins, including the protein kinases PAK, ACK, MLK, MRCK, and ROCK. Genetically induced loss of RHO function impedes transformation by a number of oncogenic stimuli, leading to an interest in developing small-molecule inhibitors that either target RHO GTPases directly, or that target their downstream protein kinase effectors. Although inhibitors of RHO GTPases and their downstream signaling kinases have not yet been widely adopted for clinical use, their potential value as cancer therapeutics continues to facilitate pharmaceutical research and development and is a promising therapeutic strategy.

  12. Receptor-targeted recombinant adenovirus conglomerates: a novel molecular conjugate vector with improved expression characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenberger, P; Hunt, J D; Robert, E; Theodossiou, C; Kolls, J K

    1997-01-01

    To develop improved strategies for gene transfer to hematopoietic cells, we have explored targeted gene transfer using molecular conjugate vectors (MCVs). MCVs are constructed by condensing plasmid DNA containing the gene of interest with polylysine (PL), PL linked to a replication-incompetent adenovirus (endosomolytic agent), and PL linked to streptavidin for targeting with biotinylated ligands. In this report, we compare gene transfer to K562 cells by using the previously described transferrin-targeted MCV (Trans-MCV) to a novel transferrin-targeted MCV. In the novel MCV, the transferred gene (luciferase) is in the genome of recombinant replication-incompetent adenovirus (recMCV), which also acts as the endosomolytic agent. The level of luciferase gene expression was fivefold higher in K562 cells transfected with Trans-recMCV than in cells transfected with Trans-MCV. Furthermore, targeted transfection with recMCV resulted in prolonged luciferase expression that declined 14 to 20 days after transfection, in comparison with Trans-MCV, where luciferase expression declined by 4 to 8 days. Moreover, targeted transfection of K562 cells with the Trans-recMCV resulted in persistent luciferase gene expression for 6 months. Analysis of luciferase gene expression in K562 single-cell clones that were subcloned 5 weeks after transfection with Trans-recMCV showed that 35 to 50% of the single-cell clones had intermediate to high levels of luciferase gene expression that was stable for 6 months, with the remaining clones showing low or no luciferase gene expression. Stable gene expression was associated with integration of adenovirus sequences into genomic DNA. PMID:9343214

  13. Anticancer efficacy of the metabolic blocker 3-bromopyruvate: specific molecular targeting.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram; Kunjithapatham, Rani; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    The anticancer efficacy of the pyruvate analog 3-bromopyruvate has been demonstrated in multiple tumor models. The chief principle underlying the antitumor effects of 3-bromopyruvate is its ability to effectively target the energy metabolism of cancer cells. Biochemically, the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has been identified as the primary target of 3-bromopyruvate. Its inhibition results in the depletion of intracellular ATP, causing cell death. Several reports have also demonstrated that in addition to GAPDH inhibition, the induction of cellular stress also contributes to 3-bromopyruvate treatment-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that 3-bromopyruvate is taken up selectively by tumor cells via the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) that are frequently overexpressed in cancer cells (for the export of lactate produced during aerobic glycolysis). The preferential uptake of 3-bromopyruvate via MCTs facilitates selective targeting of tumor cells while leaving healthy and non-malignant tissue untouched. Taken together, the specificity of molecular (GAPDH) targeting and selective uptake by tumor cells, underscore the potential of 3-bromopyruvate as a potent and promising anticancer agent. In this review, we highlight the mechanistic characteristics of 3-bromopyruvate and discuss its potential for translation into the clinic.

  14. Targeting MKK3 as a novel anticancer strategy: molecular mechanisms and therapeutical implications

    PubMed Central

    Baldari, S; Ubertini, V; Garufi, A; D'Orazi, G; Bossi, G

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MAP2K3, MKK3) is a member of the dual specificity protein kinase group that belongs to the MAP kinase kinase family. This kinase is activated by mitogenic or stress-inducing stimuli and participates in the MAP kinase-mediated signaling cascade, leading to cell proliferation and survival. Several studies highlighted a critical role for MKK3 in tumor progression and invasion, and we previously identified MKK3 as transcriptional target of mutant (mut) p53 to sustain cell proliferation and survival, thus rendering MKK3 a promising target for anticancer therapies. Here, we found that targeting MKK3 with RNA interference, in both wild-type (wt) and mutp53-carrying cells, induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy that, respectively, contributed to stabilize wtp53 and degrade mutp53. MKK3 depletion reduced cancer cell proliferation and viability, whereas no significant effects were observed in normal cellular context. Noteworthy, MKK3 depletion in combination with chemotherapeutic agents increased tumor cell response to the drugs, in both wtp53 and mutp53 cancer cells, as demonstrated by enhanced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and reduced clonogenic ability in vitro. In addition, MKK3 depletion reduced tumor growth and improved biological response to chemotherapeutic in vivo. The overall results indicate MKK3 as a novel promising molecular target for the development of more efficient anticancer treatments in both wtp53- and mutp53-carrying tumors. PMID:25633290

  15. Molecular Inversion Probes for targeted resequencing in non-model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Niedzicka, M.; Fijarczyk, A.; Dudek, K.; Stuglik, M.; Babik, W.

    2016-01-01

    Applications that require resequencing of hundreds or thousands of predefined genomic regions in numerous samples are common in studies of non-model organisms. However few approaches at the scale intermediate between multiplex PCR and sequence capture methods are available. Here we explored the utility of Molecular Inversion Probes (MIPs) for the medium-scale targeted resequencing in a non-model system. Markers targeting 112 bp of exonic sequence were designed from transcriptome of Lissotriton newts. We assessed performance of 248 MIP markers in a sample of 85 individuals. Among the 234 (94.4%) successfully amplified markers 80% had median coverage within one order of magnitude, indicating relatively uniform performance; coverage uniformity across individuals was also high. In the analysis of polymorphism and segregation within family, 77% of 248 tested MIPs were confirmed as single copy Mendelian markers. Genotyping concordance assessed using replicate samples exceeded 99%. MIP markers for targeted resequencing have a number of advantages: high specificity, high multiplexing level, low sample requirement, straightforward laboratory protocol, no need for preparation of genomic libraries and no ascertainment bias. We conclude that MIP markers provide an effective solution for resequencing targets of tens or hundreds of kb in any organism and in a large number of samples. PMID:27046329

  16. Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase is the molecular target of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    van Beek, E; Pieterman, E; Cohen, L; Löwik, C; Papapoulos, S

    1999-10-14

    Bisphosphonates (Bps), inhibitors of osteoclastic bone resorption, are used in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Recent evidence indicated that farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase and/or isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) isomerase is the intracellular target(s) of bisphosphonate action. To examine which enzyme is specifically affected, we determined the effect of different Bps on incorporation of [(14)C]mevalonate (MVA), [(14)C]IPP, and [(14)C]dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) into polyisoprenyl pyrophosphates in a homogenate of bovine brain. HPLC analysis revealed that the three intermediates were incorporated into FPP and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). In contrast to clodronate, the nitrogen-containing Bps (NBps), alendronate, risedronate, olpadronate, and ibandronate, completely blocked FPP and GGPP formation and induced in incubations with [(14)C]MVA a 3- to 5-fold increase in incorporation of label into IPP and/or DMAPP. Using a method that could distinguish DMAPP from IPP on basis of their difference in stability in acid, we found that none of the NBps affected the conversion of [(14)C]IPP into DMAPP, catalyzed by IPP isomerase, excluding this enzyme as target of NBp action. On the basis of these and our previous findings, we conclude that none of the enzymes up- or downstream of FPP synthase are affected by NBps, and FPP synthase is, therefore, the exclusive molecular target of NBp action.

  17. Molecular Platform for Design and Synthesis of Targeted Dual-Modality Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a versatile dendritic structure based platform for construction of targeted dual-modality imaging probes. The platform contains multiple copies of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) branching out from a 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N′,N″-triacetic acid (NOTA) core. The specific coordination chemistries of the NOTA and DOTA moieties offer specific loading of 68/67Ga3+ and Gd3+, respectively, into a common molecular scaffold. The platform also contains three amino groups which can potentiate targeted dual-modality imaging of PET/MRI or SPECT/MRI (PET: positron emission tomography; SPECT: single photon emission computed tomography; MRI: magnetic resonance imaging) when further functionalized by targeting vectors of interest. To validate this design concept, a bimetallic complex was synthesized with six peripheral Gd-DOTA units and one Ga-NOTA core at the center, whose ion T1 relaxivity per gadolinium atom was measured to be 15.99 mM–1 s–1 at 20 MHz. Further, the bimetallic agent demonstrated its anticipated in vivo stability, tissue distribution, and pharmacokinetic profile when labeled with 67Ga. When conjugated with a model targeting peptide sequence, the trivalent construct was able to visualize tumors in a mouse xenograft model by both PET and MRI via a single dose injection. PMID:25615011

  18. Dosimetric Verification by Using the ArcCHECK System and 3DVH Software for Various Target Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin Ho; Shin, Hun-Joo; Kay, Chul Seung; Son, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the usefulness of the 3DVH software with an ArcCHECK 3D diode array detector in newly designed plans with various target sizes. Methods The isocenter dose was measured with an ion-chamber and was compared with the planned and 3DVH predicted doses. The 2D gamma passing rates were evaluated at the diode level by using the ArcCHECK detector. The 3D gamma passing rates for specific regions of interest (ROIs) were also evaluated by using the 3DVH software. Several dose-volume histograms (DVH)-based predicted metrics for all structures were also obtained by using the 3DVH software. Results The isocenter dose deviation was <1% in all plans except in the case of a 1 cm target. Besides the gamma passing rate at the diode level, the 3D gamma passing rate for specific ROIs tended to decrease with increasing target size; this was more noticeable when a more stringent gamma criterion was applied. No correlation was found with the gamma passing rates and the DVH-based metrics especially in the ROI with high-dose gradients. Conclusions Delivery quality assurance by using 3DVH and ArcCHECK can provide substantial information through a simple and easy approach, although the accuracy of this system should be judged cautiously. PMID:25807544

  19. A database of frequency distributions of energy depositions in small-size targets by electrons and ions.

    PubMed

    Nikjoo, H; Uehara, S; Emfietzoglou, D; Pinsky, L

    2011-02-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) is an average quantity, which cannot display the stochastics of the interactions of radiation tracks in the target volume. For this reason, microdosimetry distributions have been defined to overcome the LET shortcomings. In this paper, model calculations of frequency distributions for energy depositions in nanometre size targets, diameters 1-100 nm, and for a 1 μm diameter wall-less TEPC, for electrons, protons, alpha particles and carbon ions are reported. Frequency distributions for energy depositions in small-size targets with dimensions similar to those of biological molecules are useful for modelling and calculations of DNA damage. Monte Carlo track structure codes KURBUC and PITS99 were used to generate tracks of primary electrons 10 eV to 1 MeV, and ions 1 keV µm(-1) to 300 MeV µm(-1) energies. Distribution of absolute frequencies of energy depositions in volumes with diameters of 1-100 nm randomly positioned in unit density water irradiated with 1 Gy of the given radiation was obtained. Data are presented for frequency of energy depositions and microdosimetry quantities including mean lineal energy, dose mean lineal energy, frequency mean specific energy and dose mean specific energy. The modelling and calculations presented in this work are useful for characterisation of the quality of radiation beam in biophysical studies and in radiation therapy.

  20. Invariance of molecular charge transport upon changes of extended molecule size and several related issues

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary As a sanity test for the theoretical method employed, studies on (steady-state) charge transport through molecular devices usually confine themselves to check whether the method in question satisfies the charge conservation. Another important test of the theory’s correctness is to check that the computed current does not depend on the choice of the central region (also referred to as the “extended molecule”). This work addresses this issue and demonstrates that the relevant transport and transport-related properties are indeed invariant upon changing the size of the extended molecule, when the embedded molecule can be described within a general single-particle picture (namely, a second-quantized Hamiltonian bilinear in the creation and annihilation operators). It is also demonstrates that the invariance of nonequilibrium properties is exhibited by the exact results but not by those computed approximately within ubiquitous wide- and flat-band limits (WBL and FBL, respectively). To exemplify the limitations of the latter, the phenomenon of negative differential resistance (NDR) is considered. It is shown that the exactly computed current may exhibit a substantial NDR, while the NDR effect is absent or drastically suppressed within the WBL and FBL approximations. The analysis done in conjunction with the WBLs and FBLs reveals why general studies on nonequilibrium properties require a more elaborate theoretical than studies on linear response properties (e.g., ohmic conductance and thermopower) at zero temperature. Furthermore, examples are presented that demonstrate that treating parts of electrodes adjacent to the embedded molecule and the remaining semi-infinite electrodes at different levels of theory (which is exactly what most NEGF-DFT approaches do) is a procedure that yields spurious structures in nonlinear ranges of current–voltage curves. PMID:27335734

  1. Molecular size evolution of oligomers in organic aerosols collected in urban atmospheres and generated in a smog chamber.

    PubMed

    Kalberer, Markus; Sax, Mirjam; Samburova, Vera

    2006-10-01

    Only a minor fraction of the total organic aerosol mass can be resolved on a molecular level. High molecular weight compounds in organic aerosols have recently gained much attention because this class of compound potentially explains a major fraction of the unexplained organic aerosol mass. These compounds have been identified with different mass spectrometric methods, and compounds with molecular masses up to 1000 Da are found in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from aromatic and terpene precursors in smog chamber experiments. Here, we apply matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to SOA particles from two biogenic precursors, alpha-pinene and isoprene. Similar oligomer patterns are found in these two SOA systems, but also in SOA from trimethylbenzene, an anthropogenic SOA precursor. However, different maxima molecular sizes were measured for these three SOA systems. While oligomers in alpha-pinene and isoprene have sizes mostly below 600-700 Da, they grow up to about 1000 Da in trimethylbenzene-SOA. The final molecular size of the oligomers is reached early during the particle aging process, whereas other particle properties related to aging, such as the overall acid concentration or the oligomer concentration, increase continuously over a much longer time scale. This kinetic behavior of the oligomer molecular size growth can be explained by a chain growth kinetic regime. Similar oligomer mass patterns were measured in aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol samples (measured with the same technique). Distinct differences between summer and winter were observed. In summer a few single mass peaks were measured with much higher intensity than in winter, pointing to a possible difference in the formation processes of these compounds in winter and summer.

  2. Target preparation for milligram sized 14C samples and data evaluation for AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andree, Michael; Beer, Jürg; Oeschger, Hans; Bonani, G.; Hofmann, H. J.; Morenzoni, E.; Nessi, M.; Suter, M.; Wölfli, W.

    1984-11-01

    Our preparation technique produces in a glow-discharge an amorphous carbon deposit on a copper substrate. The process starts with 1.6 cm 3 CO 2 STP (900 μg carbon) which is reduced over hot zinc to CO and subsequently cracked in the discharge. The yield of the process is typically 80%. With these targets in the Zürich ion source ion currents up to 20 μA are obtained. The background of samples prepared with this technique is presently around 30 ka (2.5% MODERN). The precision after half an hour measuring time for a modern sample is 0.7% and 2.7% for a three half-lives old sample, including the errors of the background and the NBS oxalic acid measurement. The method we use to correct for the background of the preparation and the accelerator as well as for the fractionation in the accelerator is presented.

  3. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP.

    PubMed

    Czulak, J; Guerreiro, A; Metran, K; Canfarotta, F; Goddard, A; Cowan, R H; Trochimczuk, A W; Piletsky, S

    2016-06-07

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates.

  4. Molecular targets of Chinese herbs: a clinical study of hepatoma based on network pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Wang, Xiao-dong; Niu, Yang-yang; Duan, Dan-dan; Yang, Xue; Hao, Jian; Zhu, Cui-hong; Chen, Dan; Wang, Ke-xin; Qin, Xue-mei; Wu, Xiong-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat tumors for years and has been demonstrated to be effective. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of herbs remain unclear. This study aims to ascertain molecular targets of herbs prolonging survival time of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on network pharmacology, and to establish a research method for accurate treatment of TCM. The survival benefit of TCM treatment with Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) was proved by Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis among 288 patients. The correlation between herbs and survival time was performed by bivariate correlation analysis. Network pharmacology method was utilized to construct the active ingredient-target networks of herbs that were responsible for the beneficial effects against HCC. Cox regression analysis showed CHM was an independent favorable prognostic factor. The median survival time was 13 months and the 5-year overall survival rates were 2.61% in the TCM group, while there were 6 months, 0 in the non-TCM group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that 8 herbs closely associated with prognosis. Network pharmacology analysis revealed that the 8 herbs regulated multiple HCC relative genes, among which the genes affected proliferation (KRAS, AKT2, MAPK), metastasis (SRC, MMP), angiogenesis (PTGS2) and apoptosis (CASP3) etc. PMID:27143508

  5. Molecular targets of Chinese herbs: a clinical study of hepatoma based on network pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Niu, Yang-Yang; Duan, Dan-Dan; Yang, Xue; Hao, Jian; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Chen, Dan; Wang, Ke-Xin; Qin, Xue-Mei; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-05-04

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat tumors for years and has been demonstrated to be effective. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of herbs remain unclear. This study aims to ascertain molecular targets of herbs prolonging survival time of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on network pharmacology, and to establish a research method for accurate treatment of TCM. The survival benefit of TCM treatment with Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) was proved by Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis among 288 patients. The correlation between herbs and survival time was performed by bivariate correlation analysis. Network pharmacology method was utilized to construct the active ingredient-target networks of herbs that were responsible for the beneficial effects against HCC. Cox regression analysis showed CHM was an independent favorable prognostic factor. The median survival time was 13 months and the 5-year overall survival rates were 2.61% in the TCM group, while there were 6 months, 0 in the non-TCM group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that 8 herbs closely associated with prognosis. Network pharmacology analysis revealed that the 8 herbs regulated multiple HCC relative genes, among which the genes affected proliferation (KRAS, AKT2, MAPK), metastasis (SRC, MMP), angiogenesis (PTGS2) and apoptosis (CASP3) etc.

  6. Atheroprotective Effects and Molecular Targets of Tanshinones Derived From Herbal Medicine Danshen.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian; Little, Peter J; Xu, Suowen

    2017-02-16

    Medicinal plant-derived bioactive compounds modulate multiple therapeutic targets in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), rendering herb-derived phytochemicals effective against one of the major CVDs-atherosclerosis. Danshen (Salvia milthiorriza Bunge) is a Chinese medicine that has been used in cardio- and cerebro-vascular therapeutic remedies in Asian countries for many years. Emerging evidence from cellular, animal, and clinical studies suggests that major lipophilic tanshinones from Danshen can treat atherosclerotic CVDs. In this review, we highlight recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of tanshinones in treating atherosclerosis, ranging from endothelial dysfunction to chronic inflammation. We also overview new molecular targets of tanshinones, including endothelial nitric oxide synthase, AMP-activated protein kinase, ABC transporter A1, heme oxygenase 1, soluble epoxide hydrolase, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, estrogen receptor, and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. Thus, this review provides a new perspective for advancing our understanding of the "ancient" herb Danshen from "modern" biomedical perspectives, supporting the possibility of exploiting tanshinones and derivatives as effective therapeutics against atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

  7. Development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Adam; Bhosle, Jaishree; Abdelraouf, Fatma; Popat, Sanjay; O'Brien, Mary; Yap, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a smoking-induced malignancy with multiple toxin-associated mutations, which accounts for 15% of all lung cancers. It remains a clinical challenge with a rapid doubling time, early dissemination and poor prognosis. Despite multiple clinical trials in SCLC, platinum-based chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment in the first line advanced disease setting; good initial responses are nevertheless inevitably followed by disease relapse and survival ultimately remains poor. There are currently no molecularly targeted agents licenced for use in SCLC. Advances in sequencing the cancer genome and other high-throughput profiling technologies have identified aberrant pathways and mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. Novel anti-tumour therapeutics that impact these putative targets are now being developed and investigated in SCLC. In this review, we discuss novel anti-tumour agents assessed in SCLC with reference to the complex molecular mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. We focus on novel DNA damage response inhibitors, immune checkpoint modulators and antibody-drug conjugates that have shown promise in SCLC, and which may potentially transform treatment strategies in this disease. Finally, we envision the future management of SCLC and propose a biomarker-driven translational treatment paradigm for SCLC that incorporates next generation sequencing studies with patient tumours, circulating plasma DNA and functional imaging. Such modern strategies have the potential to transform the management and improve patient outcomes in SCLC.

  8. [Interstitial lung disease associated with chemotherapy and molecularly-targeted drug: diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshinobu; Gemma, Akihiko

    2011-12-01

    A number of anticancer drugs, especially molecularly-targeted drugs, have been developed every year. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease(DILD)is a common adverse event associated with molecularly-targeted drugs, and it is therefore important to obtain information about the DILD risks of each drug. Recently, all-case surveillance of new drugs have been carried out frequently as post-marketing surveillance. This allows one to understand the accurate status of DILD, such as its incidence rate and prognosis. The diagnosis of DILD is often difficult because there is no specific diagnostic approach. It is necessary to distinguish DILD from various other diseases including infectious disease, cancer progression, congestive heart failure, etc. Among those, respiratory infection is an important disease in the differential diagnosis of DILD, because patients receiving anticancer drugs are likely to be susceptible to infection. As for the treatment of DILD, the general rule is the discontinuation of the offending drug, and if necessary, the administration of corticosteroid is indicated. However, an exceptional treatment is required for DILD caused by mTOR inhibitor, for which we must take account of the adequate management.

  9. Computer-aided Molecular Design of Compounds Targeting Histone Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Federico; Del Rio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidences show that epigenetic mechanisms play crucial roles in the genesis and progression of many physiopathological processes. As a result, research in epigenetic grew at a fast pace in the last decade. In particular, the study of histone post-translational modifications encountered an extraordinary progression and many modifications have been characterized and associated to fundamental biological processes and pathological conditions. Histone modifications are the catalytic result of a large set of enzyme families that operate covalent modifications on specific residues at the histone tails. Taken together, these modifications elicit a complex and concerted processing that greatly contribute to the chromatin remodeling and may drive different pathological conditions, especially cancer. For this reason, several epigenetic targets are currently under validation for drug discovery purposes and different academic and industrial programs have been already launched to produce the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes. In this scenario, computer-aided molecular design techniques are offering important tools, mainly as a consequence of the increasing structural information available for these targets. In this mini-review we will briefly discuss the most common types of known histone modifications and the corresponding operating enzymes by emphasizing the computer-aided molecular design approaches that can be of use to speed-up the efforts to generate new pharmaceutically relevant compounds. PMID:26082827

  10. An Overview on the Marine Neurotoxin, Saxitoxin: Genetics, Molecular Targets, Methods of Detection and Ecological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cusick, Kathleen D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Marine neurotoxins are natural products produced by phytoplankton and select species of invertebrates and fish. These compounds interact with voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels and modulate the flux of these ions into various cell types. This review provides a summary of marine neurotoxins, including their structures, molecular targets and pharmacologies. Saxitoxin and its derivatives, collectively referred to as paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), are unique among neurotoxins in that they are found in both marine and freshwater environments by organisms inhabiting two kingdoms of life. Prokaryotic cyanobacteria are responsible for PST production in freshwater systems, while eukaryotic dinoflagellates are the main producers in marine waters. Bioaccumulation by filter-feeding bivalves and fish and subsequent transfer through the food web results in the potentially fatal human illnesses, paralytic shellfish poisoning and saxitoxin pufferfish poisoning. These illnesses are a result of saxitoxin’s ability to bind to the voltage-gated sodium channel, blocking the passage of nerve impulses and leading to death via respiratory paralysis. Recent advances in saxitoxin research are discussed, including the molecular biology of toxin synthesis, new protein targets, association with metal-binding motifs and methods of detection. The eco-evolutionary role(s) PSTs may serve for phytoplankton species that produce them are also discussed. PMID:23535394

  11. Molecular targets and oxidative stress biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex and heterogeneous tumor with multiple genetic aberrations. Several molecular pathways involved in the regulation of proliferation and cell death are implicated in the hepatocarcinogenesis. The major etiological factors for HCC are both hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). Continuous oxidative stress, which results from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by environmental factors or cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, has recently been associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. On the other hand, a distinctive pathological hallmark of HCC is a dramatic down-regulation of oxido-reductive enzymes that constitute the most important free radical scavenger systems represented by catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib represents the most promising target agent that has undergone extensive investigation up to phase III clinical trials in patients with advanced HCC. The combination with other target-based agents could potentiate the clinical benefits obtained by sorafenib alone. In fact, a phase II multicenter study has demonstrated that the combination between sorafenib and octreotide LAR (So.LAR protocol) was active and well tolerated in advanced HCC patients. The detection of molecular factors predictive of response to anti-cancer agents such as sorafenib and the identification of mechanisms of resistance to anti-cancer agents may probably represent the direction to improve the treatment of HCC. PMID:21985599

  12. ATP synthase: a molecular therapeutic drug target for antimicrobial and antitumor peptides.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Okafor, Florence; Azim, Sofiya; Laughlin, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    In this review we discuss the role of ATP synthase as a molecular drug target for natural and synthetic antimicrobial/ antitumor peptides. We start with an introduction of the universal nature of the ATP synthase enzyme and its role as a biological nanomotor. Significant structural features required for catalytic activity and motor functions of ATP synthase are described. Relevant details regarding the presence of ATP synthase on the surface of several animal cell types, where it is associated with multiple cellular processes making it a potential drug target with respect to antimicrobial peptides and other inhibitors such as dietary polyphenols, is also reviewed. ATP synthase is known to have about twelve discrete inhibitor binding sites including peptides and other inhibitors located at the interface of α/β subunits on the F(1) sector of the enzyme. Molecular interaction of peptides at the β DEELSEED site on ATP synthase is discussed with specific examples. An inhibitory effect of other natural/synthetic inhibitors on ATP is highlighted to explore the therapeutic roles played by peptides and other inhibitors. Lastly, the effect of peptides on the inhibition of the Escherichia coli model system through their action on ATP synthase is presented.

  13. Molecular Targets of Naturopathy in Cancer Research: Bridge to Modern Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aamir; Ginnebaugh, Kevin R.; Li, Yiwei; Padhye, Subhash B.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of naturopathy (defined as the practice of medicine for the treatment of human diseases with natural agents) in human cancer is beginning to be appreciated, as documented by renewed interest in nutraceutical research, the natural anticancer agents of dietary origin. Because of their pleiotropic effects and the ability to modulate multiple signaling pathways, which is a good attribute of natural agents, nutraceuticals have frequently been demonstrated to re-sensitize drug-resistant cancers. The effectiveness of nutraceuticals can be further enhanced if the tools for the relative assessment of their molecular targets are readily available. Such information can be critical for determining their most effective uses. Here, we discuss the anticancer potential of nutraceuticals and the associated challenges that have interfered with their translational potential as a naturopathic approach for the management of cancers. In the years to come, an efficient screening and assessment of molecular targets will be the key to make rapid progress in the area of drug design and discovery, especially focusing on evidence-based development of naturopathy for the treatment of human malignancies. PMID:25569626

  14. [Economic Loss of Remaining Contents in Molecular Target Drug Preparation and the Simulation for Cost Saving].

    PubMed

    Usami, Eiseki; Kimura, Michio; Fukuoka, Tomohiro; Okada, Kazutomo; Yoshimura, Tomoaki

    2016-06-01

    While preparing an anticancer drug, even if it is an expensive molecular target drug, the remainder is not divided and saved for use in other patients; instead, it is discarded, resulting in waste of medical resources. In this study, we examined the economic loss in terms of medical costs by calculating the discarded amounts of 12 commonly used molecular target drugs at Ogaki Municipal Hospital, Japan between January 2012 and December 2014. We found, on average, that drugs valued at ¥ 52,593,182 were discarded annually. In particular, the discarded amounts of relatively expensive drugs, such as bevacizumab, bortezomib, and rituximab, were valued at ¥ 16,646,300, ¥ 15,866,289, and ¥ 8,401,324, respectively. Among these, the average amount of waste per administration of bortezomib was particularly expensive, at a cost of ¥ 67,325. Bortezomib is a commonly used treatment, resulting in excessive cumulative discarded cost. In an effort to save cost, we should consider using small capacity standard injections. Development of a simulation that used the remaining drug contents from only 1 day showed that bevacizumab alone accounts for an average cost saving of ¥1 2,542,191(75.3%) per year. This study suggests that effectively utilizing the remaining drug contents would ensure efficient use of medical resources, thereby reducing economic losses.

  15. An overview on the marine neurotoxin, saxitoxin: genetics, molecular targets, methods of detection and ecological functions.

    PubMed

    Cusick, Kathleen D; Sayler, Gary S

    2013-03-27

    Marine neurotoxins are natural products produced by phytoplankton and select species of invertebrates and fish. These compounds interact with voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels and modulate the flux of these ions into various cell types. This review provides a summary of marine neurotoxins, including their structures, molecular targets and pharmacologies. Saxitoxin and its derivatives, collectively referred to as paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), are unique among neurotoxins in that they are found in both marine and freshwater environments by organisms inhabiting two kingdoms of life. Prokaryotic cyanobacteria are responsible for PST production in freshwater systems, while eukaryotic dinoflagellates are the main producers in marine waters. Bioaccumulation by filter-feeding bivalves and fish and subsequent transfer through the food web results in the potentially fatal human illnesses, paralytic shellfish poisoning and saxitoxin pufferfish poisoning. These illnesses are a result of saxitoxin's ability to bind to the voltage-gated sodium channel, blocking the passage of nerve impulses and leading to death via respiratory paralysis. Recent advances in saxitoxin research are discussed, including the molecular biology of toxin synthesis, new protein targets, association with metal-binding motifs and methods of detection. The eco-evolutionary role(s) PSTs may serve for phytoplankton species that produce them are also discussed.

  16. A novel immunomodulatory and molecularly targeted strategy for refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Mary F.; Buryanek, Jamie; Janku, Filip; Younes, Anas; Hong, David

    2014-01-01

    Although Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) was one of the first human cancers to be cured by chemotherapy, no new agents other than brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®, CD 30 directed antibody drug conjugate) have received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for HL since 1977. Subsets of young adult patients with HL continue to relapse, even after stem cell transplantation, warranting new approaches. Against this background, we report a dramatic response in a young patient with advanced HL refractory to the standard treatment who responded to the combination of a pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (vorinostat, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, SAHA) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor therapy (sirolimus,rapamume). In-depth immunohistochemical and morphoproteomic analyses of this exceptional responder to targeted therapy have yielded potential insights into the biology of advanced HL. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is a commonly activated pathway in multiple tumor types including HL. The patient was treated using therapy based on mechanistic in vitro data demonstrating that combined histone deacetylase (HDAC) and mTOR inhibition act together on this pathway, resulting in inhibition of reciprocal feedback networks, leading to better anti-proliferative activity. The in vivo response signature from this patient's tissue sample sheds light on immune dysregulation in HL. We describe the response signature achieved from targeting immune dysregulation in addition to targeting the key oncogenic PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. We also expand on the role of rapamycin analogs in oncology. This study supports a role for an immune-type pathogenesis that is amenable to immune modulating targeted therapy in refractory HL. Significance: We report an exceptional responder to molecularly targeted and immune modulator therapy in advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma. The morphoproteomic/morphometric findings in this “unusual responder” patient's relapsed HL that correlate best, as a response

  17. Molecular targets for cancer therapy in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Polivka, Jiri; Janku, Filip

    2014-05-01

    Aberrations in various cellular signaling pathways are instrumental in regulating cellular metabolism, tumor development, growth, proliferation, metastasis and cytoskeletal reorganization. The fundamental cellular signaling cascade involved in these processes, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase-B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR), closely related to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, is a crucial and intensively explored intracellular signaling pathway in tumorigenesis. Various activating mutations in oncogenes together with the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes are found in diverse malignancies across almost all members of the pathway. Substantial progress in uncovering PI3K/AKT/mTOR alterations and their roles in tumorigenesis has enabled the development of novel targeted molecules with potential for developing efficacious anticancer treatment. Two approved anticancer drugs, everolimus and temsirolimus, exemplify targeted inhibition of PI3K/AKT/mTOR in the clinic and many others are in preclinical development as well as being tested in early clinical trials for many different types of cancer. This review focuses on targeted PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling from the perspective of novel molecular targets for cancer therapy found in key pathway members and their corresponding experimental therapeutic agents. Various aberrant prognostic and predictive biomarkers are also discussed and examples are given. Novel approaches to PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibition together with a better understanding of prognostic and predictive markers have the potential to significantly improve the future care of cancer patients in the current era of personalized cancer medicine.

  18. Revealing praziquantel molecular targets using mass spectrometry imaging: an expeditious approach applied to Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mônica Siqueira; de Oliveira, Rosimeire Nunes; de Oliveira, Diogo Noin; Esteves, Cibele Zanardi; Allegretti, Silmara Marques; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos

    2015-05-01

    Finding specific molecular targets and the mechanism of action of praziquantel in the treatment of schistosomiasis remains a challenging task. Our efforts were focused on obtaining further information on worm composition before and after exposure to praziquantel in the treatment of schistosomiasis to elucidate the potential sites of action of this drug. Evidence indicates that the lipid bilayer is changed by treatment with praziquantel. Following this rationale, we employed a mass spectrometry imaging-based approach that helped to characterise lipids in specific locations, which are directly involved in the biochemical pathways of the BH strain of Schistosoma mansoni, as well as differentiating the molecular response that each worm sex presents in vivo. Our findings demonstrated significant differences between the chemical markers found in adult worms before and after praziquantel exposure, especially in phospholipids, which were predominantly identified as chemical markers in all samples. Results also indicate that distinct molecular pathways in both male and female worms could be differentially affected by praziquantel treatment. These data shine new light on the mechanism of action of praziquantel, taking a further step towards its full understanding.

  19. Molecular and biochemical characterization of methionine aminopeptidase of Babesia bovis as a potent drug target.

    PubMed

    Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; Ishizaki, Takahiro; Guswanto, Azirwan; Takemae, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-05-15

    Aminopeptidases are increasingly being investigated as therapeutic targets in various diseases. In this study, we cloned, expressed, and biochemically characterized a member of the methionine aminopeptidase (MAP) family from Babesia bovis (B. bovis) to develop a potential molecular drug target. Recombinant B. bovis MAP (rBvMAP) was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) as a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion protein, and we found that it was antigenic. An antiserum against the rBvMAP protein was generated in mice, and then a native B. bovis MAP was identified in B. bovis by Western blot assay. Further, an immunolocalization assay showed that MAP is present in the cytoplasm of the B. bovis merozoite. Analysis of the biochemical properties of rBvMAP revealed that it was enzymatically active, with optimum activity at pH 7.5. Enhanced enzymatic activity was observed in the presence of divalent manganese cations and was effectively inhibited by a metal chelator, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Moreover, the enzymatic activity of BvMAP was inhibited by amastatin and bestatin as inhibitors of MAP (MAPi) in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, MAPi was also found to significantly inhibit the growth of Babesia parasites both in vitro and in vivo; additionally, they induced high levels of cytokines and immunoglobulin (IgG) titers in the host. Therefore, our results suggest that BvMAP is a molecular target of amastatin and bestatin, and those inhibitors may be drug candidates for the treatment of babesiosis, though more studies are required to confirm this.

  20. Size Does Matter: Why Polyploid Tumor Cells are Critical Drug Targets in the War on Cancer.

    PubMed

    Coward, Jermaine; Harding, Angus

    2014-01-01

    Tumor evolution presents a formidable obstacle that currently prevents the development of truly curative treatments for cancer. In this perspective, we advocate for the hypothesis that tumor cells with significantly elevated genomic content (polyploid tumor cells) facilitate rapid tumor evolution and the acquisition of therapy resistance in multiple incurable cancers. We appeal to studies conducted in yeast, cancer models, and cancer patients, which all converge on the hypothesis that polyploidy enables large phenotypic leaps, providing access to many different therapy-resistant phenotypes. We develop a flow-cytometry based method for quantifying the prevalence of polyploid tumor cells, and show the frequency of these cells in patient tumors may be higher than is generally appreciated. We then present recent studies identifying promising new therapeutic strategies that could be used to specifically target polyploid tumor cells in cancer patients. We argue that these therapeutic approaches should be incorporated into new treatment strategies aimed at blocking tumor evolution by killing the highly evolvable, therapy-resistant polyploid cell subpopulations, thus helping to maintain patient tumors in a drug sensitive state.

  1. Live imaging and modeling of inner nuclear membrane targeting reveals its molecular requirements in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Boni, Andrea; Politi, Antonio Z.; Strnad, Petr; Xiang, Wanqing; Hossain, M. Julius

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins is essential for nuclear architecture and function, yet its mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we established a new reporter that allows real-time imaging of membrane protein transport from the ER to the INM using Lamin B receptor and Lap2β as model INM proteins. These reporters allowed us to characterize the kinetics of INM targeting and establish a mathematical model of this process and enabled us to probe its molecular requirements in an RNA interference screen of 96 candidate genes. Modeling of the phenotypes of genes involved in transport of these INM proteins predicted that it critically depended on the number and permeability of nuclear pores and the availability of nuclear binding sites, but was unaffected by depletion of most transport receptors. These predictions were confirmed with targeted validation experiments on the functional requirements of nucleoporins and nuclear lamins. Collectively, our data support a diffusion retention model of INM protein transport in mammalian cells. PMID:26056140

  2. Anticipated classes of new medications and molecular targets for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Nicholas W.; Archer, Stephen L.; DeFelice, Albert; Evans, Steven; Fiszman, Monica; Martin, Thomas; Saulnier, Muriel; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Schermuly, Ralph; Stewart, Duncan; Truebel, Hubert; Walker, Gennyne; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a life-limiting condition with a major impact on the ability to lead a normal life. Although existing therapies may improve the outlook in some patients there remains a major unmet need to develop more effective therapies in this condition. There have been significant advances in our understanding of the genetic, cell and molecular basis of PAH over