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Sample records for molecular target size

  1. A low molecular weight artificial RNA of unique size with multiple probe target regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitulle, C.; Dsouza, L.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Artificial RNAs (aRNAs) containing novel sequence segments embedded in a deletion mutant of Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA have previously been shown to be expressed from a plasmid borne growth rate regulated promoter in E. coli. These aRNAs accumulate to high levels and their detection is a promising tool for studies in molecular microbial ecology and in environmental monitoring. Herein a new construct is described which illustrates the versatility of detection that is possible with aRNAs. This 3xPen aRNA construct carries a 72 nucleotide insert with three copies of a unique 17 base probe target sequence. This aRNA is 160 nucleotides in length and again accumulates to high levels in the E. coli cytoplasm without incorporating into ribosomes. The 3xPen aRNA illustrates two improvements in detection. First, by appropriate selection of insert size, we obtained an aRNA which provides a unique and hence, easily quantifiable peak, on a high resolution gel profile of low molecular weight RNAs. Second, the existence of multiple probe targets results in a nearly commensurate increase in signal when detection is by hybridization. These aRNAs are naturally amplified and carry sequence segments that are not found in known rRNA sequences. It thus may be possible to detect them directly. An experimental step involving RT-PCR or PCR amplification of the gene could therefore be avoided.

  2. Molecular target sizes of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in liver and cerebellum.

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, D L; Potter, B V; Taylor, C W

    1990-01-01

    Ins(1,4,5)P3 is the intracellular messenger that mediates the effects of many cell-surface receptors on intracellular Ca2+ stores. Although radioligand-binding studies have identified high-affinity Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding sites in many tissues, these have not yet been convincingly shown to be the receptors that mediate Ca2+ mobilization, nor is it clear whether there are differences in these binding sites between tissues. Here we report that Ins(1,4,5)P3 binds to a single class of high-affinity sites in both permeabilized hepatocytes (KD = 7.8 +/- 1.1 nM) and cerebellar membranes (KD = 6.5 +/- 2.4 nM), and provide evidence that these are unlikely to reflect binding to either of the enzymes known to metabolize Ins(1,4,5)P3. Furthermore, the rank order of potency of synthetic inositol phosphate analogues in displacing specifically bound Ins(1,4,5)P3 is the same as their rank order of potency in stimulating mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores, suggesting that the Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding site may be the physiological receptor. Radiation inactivation of the Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding sites of liver and cerebellum reveals that they have similar molecular target sizes: 257 +/- 36 kDa in liver and 258 +/- 20 kDa in cerebellum. We conclude that an Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding protein with a molecular target size of about 260 kDa is probably the receptor that mediates Ca2+ mobilization in hepatocytes, and our limited data provide no evidence to distinguish this from the cerebellar Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding protein. PMID:2154187

  3. Molecular target size of the vanilloid (capsaicin) receptor in pig dorsal root ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Szallasi, A.; Blumberg, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The size of the vanilloid receptor was examined by high-energy radiation inactivation analysis of the binding of ({sup 3}H)resiniferatoxin to pig dorsal root ganglion membranes; it was found to be 270 {plus minus} 25 kDa. This value most likely represents the size of a receptor complex rather than of an individual subunit. Other ligand-gated cation channel complexes have reported molecular weights in this range, e.g. 300 kDa for the acetylcholine receptor.

  4. Small Molecular-Sized Artesunate Attenuates Ocular Neovascularization via VEGFR2, PKCα, and PDGFR Targets.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yao; Yuan, Yongguang; Qian, Xiaobing; Huang, Zhen; Yang, Wei; Lin, Leilei; Zheng, Qishan; Li, Yujie; He, Huining; Gao, Qianying

    2016-08-02

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in many ocular diseases. Large molecular weight anti- vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein drugs, such as Avastin and Lucentis, have saved the vision of millions. However, approximately 20-30% of patients respond poorly to anti-VEGF treatment. We found that artesunate (ART), a small molecular derivative of artemisinin, had a significant inhibitory effect on ocular NV by downregulating the expression of VEGFR2, PKCα, and PDGFR. ART significantly inhibited retinal NV in rabbits and macular edema in monkeys with greater anterior chamber penetrability and more durable efficacy than Avastin. Our pilot study showed that intravitreal injection of 80 μg ART significantly inhibited iris and corneal NV in a severe retinal detachment case. Our results suggest that ART might be a potential persistent small-molecule drug to manage ocular NV via multi-targets.

  5. Small Molecular-Sized Artesunate Attenuates Ocular Neovascularization via VEGFR2, PKCα, and PDGFR Targets

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Yao; Yuan, Yongguang; Qian, Xiaobing; Huang, Zhen; Yang, Wei; Lin, Leilei; Zheng, Qishan; Li, Yujie; He, Huining; Gao, Qianying

    2016-01-01

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in many ocular diseases. Large molecular weight anti- vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein drugs, such as Avastin and Lucentis, have saved the vision of millions. However, approximately 20–30% of patients respond poorly to anti-VEGF treatment. We found that artesunate (ART), a small molecular derivative of artemisinin, had a significant inhibitory effect on ocular NV by downregulating the expression of VEGFR2, PKCα, and PDGFR. ART significantly inhibited retinal NV in rabbits and macular edema in monkeys with greater anterior chamber penetrability and more durable efficacy than Avastin. Our pilot study showed that intravitreal injection of 80 μg ART significantly inhibited iris and corneal NV in a severe retinal detachment case. Our results suggest that ART might be a potential persistent small-molecule drug to manage ocular NV via multi-targets. PMID:27480521

  6. Molecular Targeting of CEACAM6 Using Antibody Probes of Different Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Murad, Yanal M.; Gao, Haokao; Hu, Shuo; Guo, Ning; Jacobson, Orit; Nguyen, Thanh-Dung; Zhang, Jianbing; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    Carcinocinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is overexpressed in a number of human malignancies, especially in pancreatic cancer. It has been demonstrated that CEACAM6 is a potential target for monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy with a safe therapeutic index. Here, we labeled three anti-CEACAM6 antibodies of different sizes, including a single-domain antibody 2A3 (16 kDa), a heavy chain antibody 2A3-mFc (80 kDa) and a full length antibody 9A6 (150 kDa), with 64Cu to image CEACAM6 expression in a xenografted pancreatic tumor model. For positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, the tumor mice were intravenously injected with 64Cu-DOTA-antibodies and static scans were obtained at 5 min, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h post-injection (p.i.). All three antibodies showed strong CEACAM6 binding. Ex vivo immunostaining on tumor sections at 24 h after Ab injection demonstrated specific tumor targeting of both 2A3-mFc and 9A6. 64Cu-DOTA-2A3 showed fast BxPC3 tumor uptake and rapid whole-body clearance. At 24 h p.i., the tumor uptakes were 98.2 ± 6.12 %ID/g for 64Cu-DOTA-2A3-mFc and 57.8 ± 3.73 %ID/g for 64Cu-DOTA-9A6, respectively. Compared with the full length antibody 9A6, the heavy chain antibody 2A3-mFc showed higher tumor uptake, lower liver uptake and shorter circulation half-life. All the data supported that the heavy chain antibody 2A3-mFc is superior to the single domain antibody and the full-length antibody with regard to tumor detection and pharmacokinetics, which has great potential to be developed for CEACAM6-targeted pancreatic cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:22568933

  7. Molecular and cellular targets.

    PubMed

    Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2006-06-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion, and progression stages and each stage may be a possible target for chemopreventive agents. A significant outcome of these investigations on the elucidation of molecular and cellular mechanisms is the explication of signal transduction pathways induced by tumor promoters in cancer development. The current belief today is that cancer may be prevented or treated by targeting specific cancer genes, signaling proteins, and transcription factors. The molecular mechanisms explaining how normal cells undergo neoplastic transformation induced by tumor promoters are rapidly being clarified. Accumulating research evidence suggests that many of dietary factors, including tea compounds, may be used alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer. The potential advantage of many natural or dietary compounds seems to focus on their potent anticancer activity combined with low toxicity and very few adverse side effects. This review summarizes some of our recent work regarding the effects of the various tea components on signal transduction pathways involved in neoplastic cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:16688728

  8. Molecular and Cellular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression stages and each stage may be a possible target for chemopreventive agents. A significant outcome of these investigations on the elucidation of molecular and cellular mechanisms is the explication of signal transduction pathways induced by tumor promoters in cancer development. The current belief today is that cancer may be prevented or treated by targeting specific cancer genes, signaling proteins and transcription factors. The molecular mechanisms explaining how normal cells undergo neoplastic transformation induced by tumor promoters are rapidly being clarified. Accumulating research evidence suggests that many of dietary factors, including tea compounds, may be used alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer. The potential advantage of many natural or dietary compounds seems to focus on their potent anticancer activity combined with low toxicity and very few adverse side effects. This review summarizes some of our recent work regarding the effects of the various tea components on signal transduction pathways involved in neoplastic cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:16688728

  9. Molecular Size and Raoult's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    1985-01-01

    The concept of an ideal solution is ordinarily introduced in freshman chemistry by means of Raoult's Law, which states that the vapor pressure of a volatile component of a solution is proportional to its mole fraction. The relationship of this law to molecular size is discussed. (JN)

  10. Targeted molecular imaging in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yang, David J; Kim, E Edmund; Inoue, Tomio

    2006-01-01

    Improvement of scintigraphic tumor imaging is extensively determined by the development of more tumor specific radiopharmaceuticals. Thus, to improve the differential diagnosis, prognosis, planning and monitoring of cancer treatment, several functional pharmaceuticals have been developed. Application of molecular targets for cancer imaging, therapy and prevention using generator-produced isotopes is the major focus of ongoing research projects. Radionuclide imaging modalities (positron emission tomography, PET; single photon emission computed tomography, SPECT) are diagnostic cross-sectional imaging techniques that map the location and concentration of radionuclide-labeled radiotracers. 99mTc- and 68Ga-labeled agents using ethylenedicysteine (EC) as a chelator were synthesized and their potential uses to assess tumor targets were evaluated. 99mTc (t1/2 = 6 hr, 140 keV) is used for SPECT and 68Ga (t1/2 = 68 min, 511 keV) for PET. Molecular targets labeled with Tc-99m and Ga-68 can be utilized for prediction of therapeutic response, monitoring tumor response to treatment and differential diagnosis. Molecular targets for oncological research in (1) cell apoptosis, (2) gene and nucleic acid-based approach, (3) angiogenesis (4) tumor hypoxia, and (5) metabolic imaging are discussed. Numerous imaging ligands in these categories have been developed and evaluated in animals and humans. Molecular targets were imaged and their potential to redirect optimal cancer diagnosis and therapeutics were demonstrated. PMID:16485568

  11. Hepatotoxicity of molecular targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sałek-Zań, Agata

    2014-01-01

    A constant increase in occurrence of neoplasms is observed; hence new methods of therapy are being intensively researched. One of the methods of antineoplastic treatment is molecular targeted therapy, which aims to influence individual processes occurring in cells. Using this type of medications is associated with unwanted effects resulting from the treatment. Liver damage is a major adverse effect diagnosed during targeted therapy. Drug-induced liver damage can occur as necrosis of hepatocytes, cholestatic liver damage and cirrhosis. Hepatotoxicity is evaluated on the basis of International Consensus Criteria. Susceptibility of the liver to injury is connected not only with toxicity of the used medications but also with metastasis, coexistence of viral infections or other chronic diseases as well as the patient's age. It has been proven that in most cases the liver injury is caused by treatment with multikinase inhibitors, in particular tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ordered the inclusion of additional labels – so-called “black box warnings” – indicating increased risk of liver injury when treating with pazopanib, sunitinib, lapatinib and regorafenib. A meta-analysis published in 2013 showed that treating neoplastic patients with tyrosine kinase inhibitors can increase the risk of drug-induced liver damage at least twofold. Below the mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury and hepatotoxic effects of molecular targeted therapy are described. PMID:26034384

  12. Nanomedicine: Sizing up targets with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchin, Rod

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticles have many potential medical applications but their behaviour in the body is poorly understood. New studies in mice show that particles that don't have targeting molecules attached can selectively enter certain organs solely on the basis of their charge and size.

  13. Design of Targeted Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Carolyn J.; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Khaw, Ban-An; Shokeen, Monica; Wooley, Karen L.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging relies on the development of sensitive and specific probes coupled with imaging hardware and software to provide information about the molecular status of a disease and its response to therapy, which are important aspects of disease management. As genomic and proteomic information from a variety of cardiovascular diseases becomes available, new cellular and molecular targets will provide an imaging readout of fundamental disease processes. A review of the development and application of several cardiovascular probes is presented here. Strategies for labeling cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles enable monitoring of the delivery of stem cell therapies. Small molecules and biologics (e.g., proteins and antibodies) with high affinity and specificity for cell surface receptors or cellular proteins as well as enzyme substrates or inhibitors may be labeled with single-photon–emitting or positron-emitting isotopes for nuclear molecular imaging applications. Labeling of bispecific antibodies with single-photon–emitting isotopes coupled with a pretargeting strategy may be used to enhance signal accumulation in small lesions. Emerging nanomaterials will provide platforms that have various sizes and structures and that may be used to develop multimeric, multimodal molecular imaging agents to probe one or more targets simultaneously. These platforms may be chemically manipulated to afford molecules with specific targeting and clearance properties. These examples of molecular imaging probes are characteristic of the multidisciplinary nature of the extraction of advanced biochemical information that will enhance diagnostic evaluation and drug development and predict clinical outcomes, fulfilling the promise of personalized medicine and improved patient care. PMID:20395345

  14. Molecular structure of rat brain apamin receptor: differential photoaffinity labeling of putative K/sup +/ channel subunits and target size analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Seagar, M.J.; Labbe-Jullie, C.; Granier, C.; Goll, A.; Glossmann, H.; Rietschoten, J.V.; Couraud, F.

    1986-07-01

    Two photoreactive apamin derivatives were prepared with an aryl azide group coupled at different positions on the neurotoxin molecule. These ligands were used to identify membrane components in the environment of the neuronal binding site that is associated with a Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/ channel. /sup 125/I-(..cap alpha..-ANPAA-Cys/sub 1/)apamin labeled a single M/sub r/ 86,000 chain in cultured neurons whereas two bands corresponding to M/sub r/ 86,000 and 59,000 were detected in synaptic membrane preparations, suggesting that the M/sub r/ 59,000 polypeptide may be a degradation product. Randomly modified /sup 125/I-ANPAA-apamin gave a cross-linking profile equivalent to the sum of those obtained with the two defined derivatives. The apamin binding site seems to be located at the frontier between three or more putative K/sup +/ channel subunits which are only accessible from limited regions of the receptor-associated photoprobe. Irradiation of frozen rat brain membranes with high-energy electrons led to a reduction in /sup 125/I-apamin receptor capacity, yielding a target size for the functional binding unit of M/sub r/ 84,000-115,000, which could be constituted by the M/sub r/ 86,000 subunit alone or by the M/sub r/ 86,000 subunit in conjunction with one of the two smaller subunits.

  15. Tamoxifen Resistance: Emerging Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Villegas, Victoria E; Rangel, Nelson; Sánchez, Magda Carolina; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of breast cancer. As a result, blockade of the E2 signal through either tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors is an important therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, resistance to TAM is the major obstacle in endocrine therapy. This resistance occurs either de novo or is acquired after an initial beneficial response. The underlying mechanisms for TAM resistance are probably multifactorial and remain largely unknown. Considering that breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and patients respond differently to treatment, the molecular analysis of TAM's biological activity could provide the necessary framework to understand the complex effects of this drug in target cells. Moreover, this could explain, at least in part, the development of resistance and indicate an optimal therapeutic option. This review highlights the implications of TAM in breast cancer as well as the role of receptors/signal pathways recently suggested to be involved in the development of TAM resistance. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, Androgen Receptor and Hedgehog signaling pathways are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic indicators for breast cancer, based on their ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in ERα-positive or -negative breast cancer. PMID:27548161

  16. Tamoxifen Resistance: Emerging Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Villegas, Victoria E.; Rangel, Nelson; Sánchez, Magda Carolina; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of breast cancer. As a result, blockade of the E2 signal through either tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors is an important therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, resistance to TAM is the major obstacle in endocrine therapy. This resistance occurs either de novo or is acquired after an initial beneficial response. The underlying mechanisms for TAM resistance are probably multifactorial and remain largely unknown. Considering that breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and patients respond differently to treatment, the molecular analysis of TAM’s biological activity could provide the necessary framework to understand the complex effects of this drug in target cells. Moreover, this could explain, at least in part, the development of resistance and indicate an optimal therapeutic option. This review highlights the implications of TAM in breast cancer as well as the role of receptors/signal pathways recently suggested to be involved in the development of TAM resistance. G protein—coupled estrogen receptor, Androgen Receptor and Hedgehog signaling pathways are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic indicators for breast cancer, based on their ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in ERα-positive or -negative breast cancer. PMID:27548161

  17. Ovarian cancer: emerging molecular-targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sourbier, Carole

    2012-01-01

    With about 22,000 new cases estimated in 2012 in the US and 15,500 related deaths, ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and aggressive disease. Even though most of patients are sensitive to chemotherapy treatment following surgery, recurring disease is almost always lethal, and only about 30% of the women affected will be cured. Thanks to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer malignancy, new therapeutic options with molecular-targeted agents have become available. This review discusses the rationale behind molecular-targeted therapies and examines how newly identified molecular targets may enhance personalized therapies for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:22807625

  18. Molecular targets of luteolin in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many food-derived phytochemical compounds and their derivatives represent a cornucopia of new anticancer compounds. Despite extensive study of luteolin, the literature has no information on the exact mechanisms or molecular targets through which it deters cancer progression. This review discusses existing data on luteolin’s anticancer activities and then offers possible explanations for and molecular targets of its cancer-preventive action. Luteolin prevents tumor development largely by inactivating several signals and transcription pathways essential for cancer cells. This review also offers insights into the molecular mechanisms and targets through which luteolin either prevents cancer or mediates cancer cell death. PMID:25714651

  19. Molecularly targeted therapies for recurrent glioblastoma: current and future targets

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Darryl; Magill, Stephen T.; Aghi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Object Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and diffusely infiltrative primary brain tumor. Recurrence is expected and is extremely difficult to treat. Over the past decade, the accumulation of knowledge regarding the molecular and genetic profile of glioblastoma has led to numerous molecularly targeted therapies. This article aims to review the literature and highlight the mechanisms and efficacies of molecularly targeted therapies for recurrent glioblastoma. Methods A systematic search was performed with the phrase “(name of particular agent) and glioblastoma” as a search term in PubMed to identify all articles published up until 2014 that included this phrase in the title and/or abstract. The references of systematic reviews were also reviewed for additional sources. The review included clinical studies that comprised at least 20 patients and reported results for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma with molecular targeted therapies. Results A total of 42 articles were included in this review. In the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, various targeted therapies have been tested over the past 10–15 years. The targets of interest include epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, Ras pathway, protein kinase C, mammalian target of rapamycin, histone acetylation, and integrins. Unfortunately, the clinical responses to most available targeted therapies are modest at best. Radiographic responses generally range in the realm of 5%–20%. Progression-free survival at 6 months and overall survival were also modest with the majority of studies reporting a 10%–20% 6-month progression-free survival and 5- to 8-month overall survival. There have been several clinical trials evaluating the use of combination therapy for molecularly targeted treatments. In general, the outcomes for combination therapy tend to be superior to single-agent therapy, regardless of the specific agent studied

  20. Presynaptic Molecular Determinants of Quantal Size

    PubMed Central

    Takamori, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The quantal hypothesis for the release of neurotransmitters at the chemical synapse has gained wide acceptance since it was first worked out at the motor endplate in frog skeletal muscle in the 1950’s. Considering the morphological identification of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at the nerve terminals that appeared to be homogeneous in size, the hypothesis proposed that signal transduction at synapses is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters packed in SVs that are individually uniform in size; the amount of transmitter in a synaptic vesicle is called a quantum. Although quantal size—the amplitude of the postsynaptic response elicited by the release of neurotransmitters from a single vesicle—clearly depends on the number and sensitivity of the postsynaptic receptors, accumulating evidence has also indicated that the amount of neurotransmitters stored in SVs can be altered by various presynaptic factors. Here, I provide an overview of the concepts and underlying presynaptic molecular underpinnings that may regulate quantal size. PMID:26903855

  1. Conotoxins: Molecular and Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Richard J.

    Marine molluscs known as cone snails produce beautiful shells and a complex array of over 50,000 venom peptides evolved for prey capture and defence. Many of these peptides selectively modulate ion channels and transporters, making them a valuable source of new ligands for studying the role these targets play in normal and disease physiology. A number of conopeptides reduce pain in animal models, and several are now in pre-clinical and clinical development for the treatment of severe pain often associated with diseases such as cancer. Less than 1% of cone snail venom peptides are pharmacologically characterised.

  2. Molecular tweezers targeting transthyretin amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Nelson; Pereira-Henriques, Alda; Attar, Aida; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Gales, Luís; Saraiva, Maria João; Almeida, Maria Rosário

    2014-04-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses comprise a wide spectrum of acquired and hereditary diseases triggered by extracellular deposition of toxic TTR aggregates in various organs. Despite recent advances regarding the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying TTR misfolding and pathogenic self-assembly, there is still no effective therapy for treatment of these fatal disorders. Recently, the "molecular tweezers", CLR01, has been reported to inhibit self-assembly and toxicity of different amyloidogenic proteins in vitro, including TTR, by interfering with hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions known to play an important role in the aggregation process. In addition, CLR01 showed therapeutic effects in animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Here, we assessed the ability of CLR01 to modulate TTR misfolding and aggregation in cell culture and in an animal model. In cell culture assays we found that CLR01 inhibited TTR oligomerization in the conditioned medium and alleviated TTR-induced neurotoxicity by redirecting TTR aggregation into the formation of innocuous assemblies. To determine whether CLR01 was effective in vivo, we tested the compound in mice expressing TTR V30M, a model of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, which recapitulates the main pathological features of the human disease. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses showed a significant decrease in TTR burden in the gastrointestinal tract and the peripheral nervous system in mice treated with CLR01, with a concomitant reduction in aggregate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress response, protein oxidation, and apoptosis. Taken together, our preclinical data suggest that CLR01 is a promising lead compound for development of innovative, disease-modifying therapy for TTR amyloidosis.

  3. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  4. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  5. A Targeting Microbubble for Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, James Shue-Min; Sennoga, Charles A.; McConnell, Ellen; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng-Xing; Nourshargh, Sussan; Seddon, John M.; Haskard, Dorian O.; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Microbubbles conjugated with targeting ligands are used as contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging. However, they often contain immunogenic (strept)avidin, which impedes application in humans. Although targeting bubbles not employing the biotin-(strept)avidin conjugation chemistry have been explored, only a few reached the stage of ultrasound imaging in vivo, none were reported/evaluated to show all three of the following properties desired for clinical applications: (i) low degree of non-specific bubble retention in more than one non-reticuloendothelial tissue; (ii) effective for real-time imaging; and (iii) effective for acoustic quantification of molecular targets to a high degree of quantification. Furthermore, disclosures of the compositions and methodologies enabling reproduction of the bubbles are often withheld. Objective To develop and evaluate a targeting microbubble based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry for ultrasound molecular imaging. Methods and Results Microbubbles with a previously unreported generic (non-targeting components) composition were grafted with anti-E-selectin F(ab’)2 using maleimide-thiol conjugation, to produce E-selectin targeting microbubbles. The resulting targeting bubbles showed high specificity to E-selectin in vitro and in vivo. Non-specific bubble retention was minimal in at least three non-reticuloendothelial tissues with inflammation (mouse heart, kidneys, cremaster). The bubbles were effective for real-time ultrasound imaging of E-selectin expression in the inflamed mouse heart and kidneys, using a clinical ultrasound scanner. The acoustic signal intensity of the targeted bubbles retained in the heart correlated strongly with the level of E-selectin expression (|r|≥0.8), demonstrating a high degree of non-invasive molecular quantification. Conclusions Targeting microbubbles for ultrasound molecular imaging, based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry and the generic composition described

  6. The molecular targets of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sameer S; Cantó, Carles

    2015-06-01

    Resveratrol has emerged in recent years as a compound conferring strong protection against metabolic, cardiovascular and other age-related complications, including neurodegeneration and cancer. This has generated the notion that resveratrol treatment acts as a calorie-restriction mimetic, based on the many overlapping health benefits observed upon both interventions in diverse organisms, including yeast, worms, flies and rodents. Though studied for over a decade, the molecular mechanisms governing the therapeutic properties of resveratrol still remain elusive. Elucidating how resveratrol exerts its effects would provide not only new insights in its fundamental biological actions but also new avenues for the design and development of more potent drugs to efficiently manage metabolic disorders. In this review we will cover the most recent advances in the field, with special focus on the metabolic actions of resveratrol and the potential role of SIRT1 and AMPK. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Resveratrol: Challenges in translating pre-clinical findings to improved patient outcomes.

  7. [Molecular based targets and endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, St; Ananiev, J; Ivanova, K; Velev, V; Todorova, M; Gulubova, M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the rate of spread of endometrial carcinoma, especially in the postmenopausal period. Along with routine diagnostic methods, giving information on the location and progression of the disease, there are some morphological methods determining very accurately the correlations in the development of this type of cancer and his prognosis. Moreover--in recent years, the accumulated information about the molecular profile of this type of cancer made it possible to implement a number of new drugs against the so-called molecular therapy -'targets' in the neoplastic process. Significant proportion of cases show response rates, it is more hope in the development of more successful formulas and target -based therapy. In this review, we present and discuss the role of certain molecular markers as potential indicators of prognosis and development, as well as determining the target treatment of endometrial carcinoma.

  8. [Molecular based targets and endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, St; Ananiev, J; Ivanova, K; Velev, V; Todorova, M; Gulubova, M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the rate of spread of endometrial carcinoma, especially in the postmenopausal period. Along with routine diagnostic methods, giving information on the location and progression of the disease, there are some morphological methods determining very accurately the correlations in the development of this type of cancer and his prognosis. Moreover--in recent years, the accumulated information about the molecular profile of this type of cancer made it possible to implement a number of new drugs against the so-called molecular therapy -'targets' in the neoplastic process. Significant proportion of cases show response rates, it is more hope in the development of more successful formulas and target -based therapy. In this review, we present and discuss the role of certain molecular markers as potential indicators of prognosis and development, as well as determining the target treatment of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:25909140

  9. Influence of molecular size on tissue distribution of antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Sharma, Sharad; Walz, Antje C.; Lavé, Thierry; Shah, Dhaval K.

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution coefficients (BC) allow estimation of the tissue concentrations of proteins based on the plasma pharmacokinetics. We have previously established the BC values for monoclonal antibodies. Here, this concept is extended by development of a relationship between protein size and BC values. The relationship was built by deriving the BC values for various antibody fragments of known molecular weight from published biodistribution studies. We found that there exists a simple exponential relationship between molecular weight and BC values that allows the prediction of tissue distribution of proteins based on molecular weight alone. The relationship was validated by a priori predicting BC values of 4 antibody fragments that were not used in building the relationship. The relationship was also used to derive BC50 values for all the tissues, which is the molecular weight increase that would result in 50% reduction in tissue uptake of a protein. The BC50 values for most tissues were found to be ~35 kDa. An ability to estimate tissue distribution of antibody fragments based on the BC vs. molecular size relationship established here may allow better understanding of the biologics concentrations in tissues responsible for efficacy or toxicity. This relationship can also be applied for rational development of new biotherapeutic modalities with optimal biodistribution properties to target (or avoid) specific tissues. PMID:26496429

  10. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This review considers how recent advances in the physiology of ion channels and other potential molecular targets, in conjunction with new information on the genetics of idiopathic epilepsies, can be applied to the search for improved antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Marketed AEDs predominantly target voltage-gated cation channels (the α subunits of voltage-gated Na+ channels and also T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels) or influence GABA-mediated inhibition. Recently, α2–δ voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and the SV2A synaptic vesicle protein have been recognized as likely targets. Genetic studies of familial idiopathic epilepsies have identified numerous genes associated with diverse epilepsy syndromes, including genes encoding Na+ channels and GABAA receptors, which are known AED targets. A strategy based on genes associated with epilepsy in animal models and humans suggests other potential AED targets, including various voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and auxiliary proteins, A- or M-type voltage-gated K+ channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent progress in ion channel research brought about by molecular cloning of the channel subunit proteins and studies in epilepsy models suggest additional targets, including G-protein-coupled receptors, such as GABAB and metabotropic glutamate receptors; hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel subunits, responsible for hyperpolarization-activated current Ih; connexins, which make up gap junctions; and neurotransmitter transporters, particularly plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for GABA and glutamate. New information from the structural characterization of ion channels, along with better understanding of ion channel function, may allow for more selective targeting. For example, Na+ channels underlying persistent Na+ currents or GABAA receptor isoforms responsible for tonic (extrasynaptic) currents represent attractive targets. The growing understanding of the

  11. Experience with block targets of small size

    SciTech Connect

    van den Brandt, B.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; Webler, M. )

    1989-05-05

    The polarized proton and deuteron targets using alcohols doped with porphyrexide are made. This fabrication takes place in a He-3 refrigerator, representing an attractive alternative to the standard beads. A single measurement of the polarization gave the preliminary result of 55%.(AIP)

  12. Molecular Targeted Intervention for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Pant, Shubham; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the worst cancers, with almost uniform lethality. PC risk is associated with westernized diet, tobacco, alcohol, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, and family history of pancreatic cancer. New targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations have yet to provide adequate treatments for patients with advanced cancer. To design better preventive and/or treatment strategies against PC, knowledge of PC pathogenesis at the molecular level is vital. With the advent of genetically modified animals, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology and pathogenesis of PC. Currently, several clinical trials and preclinical evaluations are underway to investigate novel agents that target signaling defects in PC. An important consideration in evaluating novel drugs is determining whether an agent can reach the target in concentrations effective to treat the disease. Recently, we have reported evidence for chemoprevention of PC. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of current updates on molecularly targeted interventions, as well as dietary, phytochemical, immunoregulatory, and microenvironment-based approaches for the development of novel therapeutic and preventive regimens. Special attention is given to prevention and treatment in preclinical genetically engineered mouse studies and human clinical studies. PMID:26266422

  13. Size-varying small target detection for infrared image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Zhu, Ran; Long, Yunli; An, Wei; Zhou, Yiyu

    2015-10-01

    IRST (Infrared Search and Track) has been applied to many military or civil fields such as precise guidance, aerospace, early warning. As a key technique, small target detection based on infrared image plays an important role. However, infrared targets have their own characteristics, such as target size variation, which make the detection work quite difficult. In practical application, the target size may vary due to many reasons, such as optic angle of sensors, imaging distance, environment and so on. For conventional detection methods, it is difficult to detect such size-varying targets, especially when the backgrounds have strong clutters. This paper presents a novel method to detect size-varying infrared targets in a cluttered background. It is easy to find that the target region is salient in infrared images. It means that target region have a signature of discontinuity with its neighboring regions and concentrates in a relatively small region, which can be considered as a homogeneous compact region, and the background is consistent with its neighboring regions. Motivated by the saliency feature and gradient feature, we introduce minimum target intensity (MTI) to measure the dissimilarity between different scales, and use mean gradient to restrict the target scale in a reasonable range. They are integrated to be multiscale MTI filter. The proposed detection method is designed based on multiscale MTI filter. Firstly, salient region is got by morphological low-pass filtering, where the potential target exists in. Secondly, the candidate target regions are extracted by multiscale minimum target intensity filter, which can effectively give the optimal target size. At last, signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) is used to segment targets, which is computed based on optimal scale of candidate targets. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method can achieve both higher detection precision and robustness in complex background.

  14. Molecular Pathophysiology of Priapism: Emerging Targets

    PubMed Central

    Anele, Uzoma A.; Morrison, Belinda F.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Priapism is an erectile disorder involving uncontrolled, prolonged penile erection without sexual purpose, which can lead to erectile dysfunction. Ischemic priapism, the most common of the variants, occurs with high prevalence in patients with sickle cell disease. Despite the potentially devastating complications of this condition, management of recurrent priapism episodes historically has commonly involved reactive treatments rather than preventative strategies. Recently, increasing elucidation of the complex molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder, principally involving dysregulation of nitric oxide signaling, has allowed for greater insights and exploration into potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the multiple molecular regulatory pathways implicated in the pathophysiology of priapism. We also identify the roles and mechanisms of molecular effectors in providing the basis for potential future therapies. PMID:25392014

  15. [Molecular alterations in melanoma and targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Mourah, Samia; Lebbé, Céleste

    2014-12-01

    Melanoma is a skin cancer whose incidence is increasing steadily. The recent discovery of frequent and recurrent genetic alterations in cutaneous melanoma allowed a molecular classification of tumors into distinct subgroups, and paved the way for targeted therapy. Several signaling pathways are involved in the progression of this disease with oncogenic mutations affecting signaling pathways: MAPK, PI3K, cAMP and cyclin D1/CDK4. In each of these pathways, several potential therapeutic targets have been identified and specific inhibitors have already been developed and have shown clinical efficacy. The use of these inhibitors is often conditioned by tumors genotyping. In France, melanomas genotyping is supported by the platforms of the National Cancer Institute (INCA), which implemented a national program ensuring access to innovation for personalized medicine. The identification of new targets in melanoma supplies a very active dynamic development of innovative molecules contributing to changing the therapeutic landscape of this pathology.

  16. [Molecular alterations in melanoma and targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Mourah, Samia; Lebbé, Céleste

    2014-12-01

    Melanoma is a skin cancer whose incidence is increasing steadily. The recent discovery of frequent and recurrent genetic alterations in cutaneous melanoma allowed a molecular classification of tumors into distinct subgroups, and paved the way for targeted therapy. Several signaling pathways are involved in the progression of this disease with oncogenic mutations affecting signaling pathways: MAPK, PI3K, cAMP and cyclin D1/CDK4. In each of these pathways, several potential therapeutic targets have been identified and specific inhibitors have already been developed and have shown clinical efficacy. The use of these inhibitors is often conditioned by tumors genotyping. In France, melanomas genotyping is supported by the platforms of the National Cancer Institute (INCA), which implemented a national program ensuring access to innovation for personalized medicine. The identification of new targets in melanoma supplies a very active dynamic development of innovative molecules contributing to changing the therapeutic landscape of this pathology. PMID:25776766

  17. Molecular size and molecular size distribution affecting traditional balsamic vinegar aging.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Pasquale Massimiliano; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-08-27

    A first attempt at a semiquantitative study of molecular weight (MW) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) in cooked grape must and traditional balsamic vinegar (TBV) with increasing well-defined age was performed by high-performance liquid size exclusion chromatography (SEC) using dual detection, that is, differential refractive index (DRI) and absorbance (UV-vis) based detectors. With this aim, MW and MWD, including number- and weight-average MW and polydispersity, were determined with respect to a secondary standard and then analyzed. All investigated vinegar samples were recognized as compositionally and structurally heterogeneous blends of copolymers (melanoidins) spreading over a wide range of molecular sizes: the relative MW ranged from 2 to >2000 kDa. The extent of the polymerization reactions was in agreement with the TBV browning kinetics. MWD parameters varied asymptotically toward either upper or lower limits during aging, reflecting a nonequilibrium status of the balance between polymerization and depolymerization reactions in TBV. MWD parameters were proposed as potential aging markers of TBV. PMID:18656930

  18. Molecular targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although medical treatment has been shown to improve quality of life and prolong survival, no significant progress has been made in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) within the last two decades. Thus, the optimum standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for AGC remains debatable, and most responses to chemotherapy are partial and of short duration; the median survival is approximately 7 to 11 months, and survival at 2 years is exceptionally > 10%. Recently, remarkable progress in tumor biology has led to the development of new agents that target critical aspects of oncogenic pathways. For AGC, many molecular targeting agents have been evaluated in international randomized studies, and trastuzumab, an anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibody, has shown antitumor activity against HER-2-positive AGC. However, this benefit is limited to only ~20% of patients with AGC (patients with HER-2-positive AGC). Therefore, there remains a critical need for both the development of more effective agents and the identification of molecular predictive and prognostic markers to select those patients who will benefit most from specific chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies. PMID:23525404

  19. Effects of Target Size and Test Distance on Stereoacuity.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yo; Fujimura, Fusako; Handa, Tomoya; Shoji, Nobuyuki; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Target size and test distance effects on stereoacuity were investigated in 24 subjects using a three-dimensional monitor. Examination 1: Target Size Effects. The test distance was 2.5 m for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes were 59.58 ± 14.86, 47.66 ± 13.71, 41.25 ± 15.95, and 39.41 ± 15.52 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity was significantly worse with a 0.1° target than with 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes (P = 0.03, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, resp.). Examination 2: Test Distance Effects. Test distances of 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 m were investigated for a 0.5° target size; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values at 2.5 m, 5.0 m, and 7.5 m test distances were 44.91 ± 16.16, 34.83 ± 10.84, and 24.75 ± 7.27 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity at a 7.5 m distance was significantly better than at distances of 2.5 m and 5.0 m (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.02, resp.). Stereoacuity at a 5.0 m distance was significantly better than at 2.5 m (P = 0.04). Stereoacuity should be estimated by both parallax and other elements, including test distance and target size. PMID:27635256

  20. Effects of Target Size and Test Distance on Stereoacuity

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Tomoya; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Target size and test distance effects on stereoacuity were investigated in 24 subjects using a three-dimensional monitor. Examination 1: Target Size Effects. The test distance was 2.5 m for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes were 59.58 ± 14.86, 47.66 ± 13.71, 41.25 ± 15.95, and 39.41 ± 15.52 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity was significantly worse with a 0.1° target than with 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes (P = 0.03, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, resp.). Examination 2: Test Distance Effects. Test distances of 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 m were investigated for a 0.5° target size; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values at 2.5 m, 5.0 m, and 7.5 m test distances were 44.91 ± 16.16, 34.83 ± 10.84, and 24.75 ± 7.27 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity at a 7.5 m distance was significantly better than at distances of 2.5 m and 5.0 m (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.02, resp.). Stereoacuity at a 5.0 m distance was significantly better than at 2.5 m (P = 0.04). Stereoacuity should be estimated by both parallax and other elements, including test distance and target size.

  1. Effects of Target Size and Test Distance on Stereoacuity

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Tomoya; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Target size and test distance effects on stereoacuity were investigated in 24 subjects using a three-dimensional monitor. Examination 1: Target Size Effects. The test distance was 2.5 m for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes were 59.58 ± 14.86, 47.66 ± 13.71, 41.25 ± 15.95, and 39.41 ± 15.52 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity was significantly worse with a 0.1° target than with 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes (P = 0.03, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, resp.). Examination 2: Test Distance Effects. Test distances of 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 m were investigated for a 0.5° target size; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values at 2.5 m, 5.0 m, and 7.5 m test distances were 44.91 ± 16.16, 34.83 ± 10.84, and 24.75 ± 7.27 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity at a 7.5 m distance was significantly better than at distances of 2.5 m and 5.0 m (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.02, resp.). Stereoacuity at a 5.0 m distance was significantly better than at 2.5 m (P = 0.04). Stereoacuity should be estimated by both parallax and other elements, including test distance and target size. PMID:27635256

  2. Large mutational target size for rapid emergence of bacterial persistence

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Hany S.; Harris, Kendra; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity displayed by a clonal bacterial population permits a small fraction of cells to survive prolonged exposure to antibiotics. Although first described over 60 y ago, the molecular mechanisms underlying this behavior, termed persistence, remain largely unknown. To systematically explore the genetic basis of persistence, we selected a library of transposon-mutagenized Escherichia coli cells for survival to multiple rounds of lethal ampicillin exposure. Application of microarray-based genetic footprinting revealed a large number of loci that drastically elevate persistence frequency through null mutations and domain disruptions. In one case, the C-terminal disruption of methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetG) results in a 10,000-fold higher persistence frequency than wild type. We discovered a mechanism by which null mutations in transketolase A (tktA) and glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) dehydrogenase (glpD) increase persistence through metabolic flux alterations that increase intracellular levels of the growth-inhibitory metabolite methylglyoxal. Systematic double-mutant analyses revealed the genetic network context in which such persistent mutants function. Our findings reveal a large mutational target size for increasing persistence frequency, which has fundamental implications for the emergence of antibiotic tolerance in the clinical setting. PMID:22802628

  3. Boswellic acids: biological actions and molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Poeckel, Daniel; Werz, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Gum resin extracts of Boswellia species have been traditionally applied in folk medicine for centuries to treat various chronic inflammatory diseases, and experimental data from animal models and studies with human subjects confirmed the potential of B. spec extracts for the treatment of not only inflammation but also of cancer. Analysis of the ingredients of these extracts revealed that the pentacyclic triterpenes boswellic acids (BAs) possess biological activities and appear to be responsible for the respective pharmacological actions. Approaches in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological effects of BAs identified 5-lipoxygenase, human leukocyte elastase, toposiomerase I and II, as well as IkappaB kinases as molecular targets of BAs. Moreover, it was shown that depending on the cell type and the structure of the BAs, the compounds differentially interfere with signal transduction pathways including Ca(2+/-) and MAPK signaling in various blood cells, related to functional cellular processes important for inflammatory reactions and tumor growth. This review summarizes the biological actions of BAs on the cellular and molecular level and attempts to put the data into perspective of the beneficial effects manifested in animal studies and trials with human subjects related to inflammation and cancer.

  4. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles. PMID:21087645

  5. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles.

  6. Potential molecular targets for Ewing's sarcoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Jully, Babu; Rajkumar, Thangarajan

    2012-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) is a highly malignant tumor of children and young adults. Modern therapy for Ewing's sarcoma combines high-dose chemotherapy for systemic control of disease, with advanced surgical and/or radiation therapeutic approaches for local control. Despite optimal management, the cure rate for localized disease is only approximately 70%, whereas the cure rate for metastatic disease at presentation is less than 30%. Patients who experience long-term disease-free survival are at risk for significant side-effects of therapy, including infertility, limb dysfunction and an increased risk for second malignancies. The identification of new targets for innovative therapeutic approaches is, therefore, strongly needed for its treatment. Many new pharmaceutical agents have been tested in early phases of clinical trials in ES patients who have recurrent disease. While some agents led to partial response or stable disease, the percentages of drugs eliciting responses or causing an overall effect have been minimal. Furthermore, of the new pharmaceuticals being introduced to clinical practice, the most effective agents also have dose-limiting toxicities. Novel approaches are needed to minimize non-specific toxicity, both for patients with recurrence and at diagnosis. This report presents an overview of the potential molecular targets in ES and highlights the possibility that they may serve as therapeutic targets for the disease. Although additional investigations are required before most of these approaches can be assessed in the clinic, they provide a great deal of hope for patients with Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:23580819

  7. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D; Iverson, Nicole M; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T; Landry, Markita P; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications. PMID:26742890

  8. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D.; Iverson, Nicole M.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T.; Landry, Markita P.; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications. PMID:26742890

  9. Improving Sensitivity in Ultrasound Molecular Imaging by Tailoring Contrast Agent Size Distribution: In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, Jason E.; Gessner, Ryan; Miles, Iman; Dayton, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging with ultrasound relies on microbubble contrast agents (MCAs) selectively adhering to a ligand-specific target. Prior studies have shown that only small quantities of microbubbles are retained at their target sites, therefore, enhancing contrast sensitivity to low concentrations of microbubbles is essential to improve molecular imaging techniques. In order to assess the effect of MCA diameter on imaging sensitivity, perfusion and molecular imaging studies were performed with microbubbles of varying size distributions. To assess signal improvement and MCA circulation time as a function of size and concentration, blood perfusion was imaged in rat kidneys using nontargeted size-sorted MCAs with a Siemens Sequoia ultrasound system (Siemans, Mountain View, CA) in cadence pulse sequencing (CPS) mode. Molecular imaging sensitivity improvements were studied with size-sorted αvβ3-targeted bubbles in both fibrosarcoma and R3230 rat tumor models. In perfusion imaging studies, video intensity and contrast persistence was ≈8 times and ≈3 times greater respectively, for “sorted 3-micron” MCAs (diameter, 3.3 ± 1.95 μm) when compared to “unsorted” MCAs (diameter, 0.9 ± 0.45 μm) at low concentrations. In targeted experiments, application of sorted 3-micron MCAs resulted in a ≈20 times video intensity increase over unsorted populations. Tailoring size-distributions results in substantial imaging sensitivity improvement over unsorted populations, which is essential in maximizing sensitivity to small numbers of MCAs for molecular imaging. PMID:20236606

  10. Treatment planning for molecular targeted radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Siantar, Christine Hartmann; Vetter, Kai; DeNardo, Gerald L; DeNardo, Sally J

    2002-06-01

    Molecular targeted radionuclide therapy promises to expand the usefulness of radiation to successfully treat widespread cancer. The unique properties of radioactive tags make it possible to plan treatments by predicting the radiation absorbed dose to both tumors and normal organs, using a pre-treatment test dose of radiopharmaceutical. This requires a combination of quantitative, high-resolution, radiation-detection hardware and computerized dose-estimation software, and would ideally include biological dose-response data in order to translate radiation absorbed dose into biological effects. Data derived from conventional (external beam) radiation therapy suggests that accurate assessment of the radiation absorbed dose in dose-limiting normal organs could substantially improve the observed clinical response for current agents used in a myeloablative regimen, enabling higher levels of tumor control at lower tumor-to-normal tissue therapeutic indices. Treatment planning based on current radiation detection and simulations technology is sufficient to impact on clinical response. The incorporation of new imaging methods, combined with patient-specific radiation transport simulations, promises to provide unprecedented levels of resolution and quantitative accuracy, which are likely to increase the impact of treatment planning in targeted radionuclide therapy. PMID:12136519

  11. Molecular genetic determinants of human brain size.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2006-07-01

    Cognitive skills such as tool use, syntactical languages, and self-awareness differentiate humans from other primates. The underlying basis for this cognitive difference has been widely associated with a high encephalization quotient and an anatomically distinct, exceptionally large cerebral cortex. Investigations on congenital microcephaly had revealed several genes that affect mammalian brain size when mutated. At least four of these, microcephalin (MCPH1), abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated (ASPM), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulatory associated protein 2 (CDK5RAP2), and centromere-associated protein J (CENPJ) are known to have undergone significant positive selection in the great apes and human lineages during primate evolution. MCPH1 and ASPM both have very young single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes associated with modern humans, and these genes are presumably still evolving in Homo sapiens. Microcephalin has a role in DNA damage response and regulation of cell cycle checkpoints. The other known microcephaly-associated genes encode microtubule-associated centrosomal proteins that might regulate neural progenitor cell division and cell number. Recent reports have also unveiled a previously unknown function of ephrins and Eph in the regulation of neural progenitor cell death with a consequential effect on brain size. Understanding the mechanism for developmental control of brain organogenesis by these genes, and others such as FOXP2, shall provide fresh perspectives on the evolution of human intelligence. PMID:16716254

  12. Molecular genetic determinants of human brain size.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2006-07-01

    Cognitive skills such as tool use, syntactical languages, and self-awareness differentiate humans from other primates. The underlying basis for this cognitive difference has been widely associated with a high encephalization quotient and an anatomically distinct, exceptionally large cerebral cortex. Investigations on congenital microcephaly had revealed several genes that affect mammalian brain size when mutated. At least four of these, microcephalin (MCPH1), abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated (ASPM), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulatory associated protein 2 (CDK5RAP2), and centromere-associated protein J (CENPJ) are known to have undergone significant positive selection in the great apes and human lineages during primate evolution. MCPH1 and ASPM both have very young single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes associated with modern humans, and these genes are presumably still evolving in Homo sapiens. Microcephalin has a role in DNA damage response and regulation of cell cycle checkpoints. The other known microcephaly-associated genes encode microtubule-associated centrosomal proteins that might regulate neural progenitor cell division and cell number. Recent reports have also unveiled a previously unknown function of ephrins and Eph in the regulation of neural progenitor cell death with a consequential effect on brain size. Understanding the mechanism for developmental control of brain organogenesis by these genes, and others such as FOXP2, shall provide fresh perspectives on the evolution of human intelligence.

  13. Asteroid collisions: Target size effects and resultant velocity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Eileen V.

    1993-03-01

    To study the dynamic fragmentation of rock to simulate asteroid collisions, we use a 2-D, continuum damage numerical hydrocode which models two-body impacts. This hydrocode monitors stress wave propagation and interaction within the target body, and includes a physical model for the formation and growth of cracks in rock. With this algorithm we have successfully reproduced fragment size distributions and mean ejecta speeds from laboratory impact experiments using basalt, and weak and strong mortar as target materials. Using the hydrocode, we have determined that the energy needed to fracture a body has a much stronger dependence on target size than predicted from most scaling theories. In addition, velocity distributions obtained indicate that mean ejecta speeds resulting from large-body collisions do not exceed escape velocities.

  14. Visual-size molecular recognition based on gels.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tao; Fang, Weiwei; Sun, Zheming

    2013-10-01

    Since their discovery, stimuli-responsive organogels have garnered considerable and increasing attention from a broad range of research fields. In consideration of an one-dimensional ordered relay in anisotropic phase, the assembled gel networks can amplify various properties of the functional moieties possessed by the gelator molecules. Recently, substantial efforts have been focused on the development of facile, straightforward, and low-cost molecular recognition approaches by using nanostructured gel matrices as visual sensing platforms. In this research news, the recent progresses in macroscopic or visual-size molecular recognition for a number of homologues, isomers, and anions, as well as extremely challenging chiral enantiomers, using polymer and molecular gels are reviewed. Several strategies--including guest molecular competition, hydrogen-bonding blocking, and metal-coordination--for visual discrimination are included. Finally, the future trends and potential application in facile visual-size molecular recognition based on organogel matrices are highlighted. PMID:24089348

  15. Size-Controlled Synthesis of Porphyrinic Metal-Organic Framework and Functionalization for Targeted Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Jiang, Qin; Feng, Dawei; Mao, Lanqun; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2016-03-16

    The understanding of nanomaterials for targeted cancer therapy is of great importance as physical parameters of nanomaterials have been shown to be strong determinants that can promote cellular responses. However, there have been rare platforms that can vastly tune the core of nanoparticles at a molecular level despite various nanomaterials employed in such studies. Here we show targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) with Zr(IV)-based porphyrinic metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles. Through a bottom-up approach, the size of MOF nanoparticles was precisely tuned in a broad range with a designed functional motif, built upon selection of building blocks of the MOF. In particular, molecular properties of the porphyrinic linker are maintained in the MOF nanoparticles regardless of their sizes. Therefore, size-dependent cellular uptake and ensuing PDT allowed for screening of the optimal size of MOF nanoparticles for PDT while MOF nanoparticle formulation of the photosensitizer showed better PDT efficacy than that of its small molecule. Additionally, Zr6 clusters in the MOF enabled an active targeting modality through postsynthetic modification, giving even more enhanced PDT efficacy. Together with our finding of size controllability covering a broad range in the nano regime, we envision that MOFs can be a promising nanoplatform by adopting advanced small molecule systems into the tunable framework with room for postsynthetic modification. PMID:26894555

  16. Molecular mechanism of size control in development and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolong; Xu, Tian

    2011-01-01

    How multicellular organisms control their size is a fundamental question that fascinated generations of biologists. In the past 10 years, tremendous progress has been made toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying size control. Original studies from Drosophila showed that in addition to extrinsic nutritional and hormonal cues, intrinsic mechanisms also play important roles in the control of organ size during development. Several novel signaling pathways such as insulin and Hippo-LATS signaling pathways have been identified that control organ size by regulating cell size and/or cell number through modulation of cell growth, cell division, and cell death. Later studies using mammalian cell and mouse models also demonstrated that the signaling pathways identified in flies are also conserved in mammals. Significantly, recent studies showed that dysregulation of size control plays important roles in the development of many human diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and hypertrophy. PMID:21483452

  17. The shape and size of crowding for moving targets.

    PubMed

    Bex, Peter J; Dakin, Steven C; Simmers, Anita J

    2003-12-01

    Our ability to identify alphanumeric characters can be impaired by the presence of nearby features, especially when the target is presented in the peripheral visual field, a phenomenon is known as crowding. We measured the effects of motion on acuity and on the spatial extent of crowding. In line with many previous studies, acuity decreased and crowding increased with eccentricity. Acuity also decreased for moving targets, but the absolute size of crowding zones remained relatively invariant of speed at each eccentricity. The two-dimensional shape of crowding zones was measured with a single flanking element on each side of the target. Crowding zones were elongated radially about central vision, relative to tangential zones, and were also asymmetrical: a more peripheral flanking element crowded more effectively than a more foveal one; and a flanking element that moved ahead of the target crowded more effectively than one that trailed behind it. These results reveal asymmetrical space-time dependent regions of visual integration that are radially organised about central vision.

  18. The shape and size of crowding for moving targets.

    PubMed

    Bex, Peter J; Dakin, Steven C; Simmers, Anita J

    2003-12-01

    Our ability to identify alphanumeric characters can be impaired by the presence of nearby features, especially when the target is presented in the peripheral visual field, a phenomenon is known as crowding. We measured the effects of motion on acuity and on the spatial extent of crowding. In line with many previous studies, acuity decreased and crowding increased with eccentricity. Acuity also decreased for moving targets, but the absolute size of crowding zones remained relatively invariant of speed at each eccentricity. The two-dimensional shape of crowding zones was measured with a single flanking element on each side of the target. Crowding zones were elongated radially about central vision, relative to tangential zones, and were also asymmetrical: a more peripheral flanking element crowded more effectively than a more foveal one; and a flanking element that moved ahead of the target crowded more effectively than one that trailed behind it. These results reveal asymmetrical space-time dependent regions of visual integration that are radially organised about central vision. PMID:14568377

  19. Comprehensive transcriptomic analysis of molecularly targeted drugs in cancer for target pathway evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mashima, Tetsuo; Ushijima, Masaru; Matsuura, Masaaki; Tsukahara, Satomi; Kunimasa, Kazuhiro; Furuno, Aki; Saito, Sakae; Kitamura, Masami; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Dan, Shingo; Yamori, Takao; Tomida, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a rational and promising strategy for the treatment of advanced cancer. For the development of clinical agents targeting oncogenic signaling pathways, it is important to define the specificity of compounds to the target molecular pathway. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis is an unbiased approach to evaluate the compound mode of action, but it is still unknown whether the analysis could be widely applicable to classify molecularly targeted anticancer agents. We comprehensively obtained and analyzed 129 transcriptomic datasets of cancer cells treated with 83 anticancer drugs or related agents, covering most clinically used, molecularly targeted drugs alongside promising inhibitors of molecular cancer targets. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis revealed that compounds targeting similar target molecules or pathways were clustered together. These results confirmed that the gene signatures of these drugs reflected their modes of action. Of note, inhibitors of oncogenic kinase pathways formed a large unique cluster, showing that these agents affect a shared molecular pathway distinct from classical antitumor agents and other classes of agents. The gene signature analysis further classified kinome-targeting agents depending on their target signaling pathways, and we identified target pathway-selective signature gene sets. The gene expression analysis was also valuable in uncovering unexpected target pathways of some anticancer agents. These results indicate that comprehensive transcriptomic analysis with our database (http://scads.jfcr.or.jp/db/cs/) is a powerful strategy to validate and re-evaluate the target pathways of anticancer compounds. PMID:25911996

  20. Molecular targeting of the lymphovascular system for imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Schöder, Heiko; Glass, Edwin C; Pecking, Alain P; Harness, Jay K; Wallace, Anne M; Hirnle, Peter; Alberini, Jean L; Vilain, Didier; Larson, Steven M; Hoh, Carl K; Vera, David R

    2006-06-01

    Progress toward targeting cancer cells is a multi-disciplinary endeavor. In addition to the surgical and oncology specialties, radiologists collaborate with mathematicians, computer scientists, and physicists, in a constant effort to incrementally improve upon the current imaging modalities. Recently, radiologists have formed collaborations with molecular biologists and chemists in order to develop molecular agents that target cancer cells via receptor-substrate or specific physiochemical interactions. In this review, we summarize selected efforts toward molecular targeting of the lymphovascular system. Standard imaging modalities, positron emission tomography, single photon emission tomography, and ultrasound, are reviewed as well as, the targeted introduction of substances for endolymphatic therapy. We also review the current status of sentinel lymph node mapping with radiocolloids and the application of molecular targeting for the development of a radiopharmaceutical specifically designed for sentinel lymph node mapping.

  1. Determination of Molecular Size and Avogadro's Number: A Student Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandrakis, George C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment for estimating molecular size and Avogadro's number. Uses the diffusion length of iodine in air at 100 degrees Celsius as a function of time, and the change in volume of a small quantity of carbon dioxide as it goes from the solid to the gaseous state. (GA)

  2. Target size matters: target errors contribute to the generalization of implicit visuomotor learning.

    PubMed

    Reichenthal, Maayan; Avraham, Guy; Karniel, Amir; Shmuelof, Lior

    2016-08-01

    The process of sensorimotor adaptation is considered to be driven by errors. While sensory prediction errors, defined as the difference between the planned and the actual movement of the cursor, drive implicit learning processes, target errors (e.g., the distance of the cursor from the target) are thought to drive explicit learning mechanisms. This distinction was mainly studied in the context of arm reaching tasks where the position and the size of the target were constant. We hypothesize that in a dynamic reaching environment, where subjects have to hit moving targets and the targets' dynamic characteristics affect task success, implicit processes will benefit from target errors as well. We examine the effect of target errors on learning of an unnoticed perturbation during unconstrained reaching movements. Subjects played a Pong game, in which they had to hit a moving ball by moving a paddle controlled by their hand. During the game, the movement of the paddle was gradually rotated with respect to the hand, reaching a final rotation of 25°. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: The high-target error group played the Pong with a small ball, and the low-target error group played with a big ball. Before and after the Pong game, subjects performed open-loop reaching movements toward static targets with no visual feedback. While both groups adapted to the rotation, the postrotation reaching movements were directionally biased only in the small-ball group. This result provides evidence that implicit adaptation is sensitive to target errors.

  3. Targets for molecular therapy of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Green, Cheryl L; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-02-01

    Cancers of the skin encompass the first and second most common neoplasms in the United States, epidermal basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively, as well as the melanocytic malignancy, malignant melanoma (MM). Recently identified alterations in the function of specific genes in these cancers provide new potential therapeutic targets. These alterations affect conserved regulators of cellular proliferation and viability, including the Sonic Hedgehog, Ras/Raf, ARF/p53, p16(INK4A)/CDK4/Rb and NF-kappaB pathways. New modalities designed to target these specific proteins may represent promising approaches to therapy of human skin cancers.

  4. Sample size calculations for clinical trials targeting tauopathies: A new potential disease target

    PubMed Central

    Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Machulda, Mary M.; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Weigand, Stephen D.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Spychalla, Anthony J.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Disease-modifying therapies are being developed to target tau pathology, and should, therefore, be tested in primary tauopathies. We propose that progressive apraxia of speech should be considered one such target group. In this study, we investigate potential neuroimaging and clinical outcome measures for progressive apraxia of speech and determine sample size estimates for clinical trials. We prospectively recruited 24 patients with progressive apraxia of speech who underwent two serial MRI with an interval of approximately two years. Detailed speech and language assessments included the Apraxia of Speech Rating Scale (ASRS) and Motor Speech Disorders (MSD) severity scale. Rates of ventricular expansion and rates of whole brain, striatal and midbrain atrophy were calculated. Atrophy rates across 38 cortical regions were also calculated and the regions that best differentiated patients from controls were selected. Sample size estimates required to power placebo-controlled treatment trials were calculated. The smallest sample size estimates were obtained with rates of atrophy of the precentral gyrus and supplementary motor area, with both measures requiring less than 50 subjects per arm to detect a 25% treatment effect with 80% power. These measures outperformed the other regional and global MRI measures and the clinical scales. Regional rates of cortical atrophy therefore provide the best outcome measures in progressive apraxia of speech. The small sample size estimates demonstrate feasibility for including progressive apraxia of speech in future clinical treatment trials targeting tau. PMID:26076744

  5. Molecular Pharming: future targets and aspirations.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mathew; van Dolleweerd, Craig; Drake, Pascal M W; Reljic, Rajko; Thangaraj, Harry; Barbi, Tommaso; Stylianou, Elena; Pepponi, Ilaria; Both, Leonard; Hehle, Verena; Madeira, Luisa; Inchakalody, Varghese; Ho, Sammy; Guerra, Thais; Ma, Julian K-C

    2011-03-01

    Molecular Pharming represents an unprecedented opportunity to manufacture affordable modern medicines and make these available at a global scale. The area of greatest potential is in the prevention of infectious diseases, particular in underdeveloped countries where access to medicines and vaccines has historically been limited. This is why, at St. George's, we focus on diseases such as HIV, TB and rabies, and aim to develop production strategies that are simple and potentially easy to transfer to developing countries.

  6. Molecular Pharming: future targets and aspirations.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mathew; van Dolleweerd, Craig; Drake, Pascal M W; Reljic, Rajko; Thangaraj, Harry; Barbi, Tommaso; Stylianou, Elena; Pepponi, Ilaria; Both, Leonard; Hehle, Verena; Madeira, Luisa; Inchakalody, Varghese; Ho, Sammy; Guerra, Thais; Ma, Julian K-C

    2011-03-01

    Molecular Pharming represents an unprecedented opportunity to manufacture affordable modern medicines and make these available at a global scale. The area of greatest potential is in the prevention of infectious diseases, particular in underdeveloped countries where access to medicines and vaccines has historically been limited. This is why, at St. George's, we focus on diseases such as HIV, TB and rabies, and aim to develop production strategies that are simple and potentially easy to transfer to developing countries. PMID:21368584

  7. Oligogermanes as molecular precursors for germanium(0) nanoparticles: Size control and size-dependent fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Schrick, Aaron C.; Weinert, Charles S.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Catenated germanium compounds are employed as molecular precursors for germanium(0) nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles, and their fluorescence spectra, depend on the number of catenated germanium atoms present in the precursor. - Highlights: • We have used oligogermanes for the size-specific synthesis of germanium(0) nanoparticles. • The size of the nanomaterials obtained depends directly on the degree of catenation present in the oligogermane precursor. • The nanoparticles are shown to exhibit size-dependent fluorescence. • Oligogermanes will function as useful precursors for the synthesis of a variety of nanomaterials. - Abstract: Germanium nanoparticles were synthesized in solution from novel oligogermane molecular precursors. The size of the nanoparticles obtained is directly related to the number of catenated germanium atoms present in the oligogermane precursor and the nanoparticles exhibit size-dependent fluorescence. The germanium nanoparticles were also characterized by TEM, powder XRD, FTIR, EDS and XPS methods. This method appears to be a promising new route for the synthesis of germanium nanoparticles since the size of the materials obtained can be controlled by the choice of the oligogermane used as the precursor.

  8. New Molecular Targets in Mantle Cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Samir; Weniger, Marc A.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a malignancy of mature B cells characterized by aberrant expression of cyclin D1 due to the translocation t(11;14). Epigenomic and genomic lesions in pathways regulating B-cell activation, cell cycle progression, protein homeostasis, DNA damage response, cell proliferation and apoptosis contribute to its pathogenesis. While patients typically respond to first-line chemotherapy, relapse is the rule resulting in a median survival of 5–7 years. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR appears as a key pathway in the pathogenesis and can be targeted with small molecules. Most experience is with mTOR inhibitors of the rapamycin class. Second-generation mTOR inhibitors and the PI3K inhibitor CAL-101 are novel options to more effectively target this pathway. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibition by PCI-32765 has promising activity and indicates immunoreceptor signaling as a novel therapeutic target. Up to 50% of relapsed patients respond to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib suggesting that MCL may be particularly sensitive to disruption of protein homeostasis and/or induction of oxidative stress. Recent work has focused on elucidating the mechanism of bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity and the development of second-generation proteasome inhibitors. DNA hypomethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors effect epigenetic de-repression of aberrantly silenced genes. These epigenetic pharmaceuticals and HSP90 inhibitors can synergize with proteasome inhibitors. Finally, BH3 mimetics are emerging as tools to sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy. Participation in clinical trials offers patients a chance to benefit from these advances and is essential to maintain the momentum of progress. Innovative trial designs may be needed to expedite the clinical development of these targeted agents. PMID:21945517

  9. Molecular mechanisms of membrane targeting antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M; Walker, Chelsea; Epand, Raquel F; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2016-05-01

    The bacterial membrane provides a target for antimicrobial peptides. There are two groups of bacteria that have characteristically different surface membranes. One is the Gram-negative bacteria that have an outer membrane rich in lipopolysaccharide. Several antimicrobials have been found to inhibit the synthesis of this lipid, and it is expected that more will be developed. In addition, antimicrobial peptides can bind to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and block passage of solutes between the periplasm and the cell exterior, resulting in bacterial toxicity. In Gram-positive bacteria, the major bacterial lipid component, phosphatidylglycerol can be chemically modified by bacterial enzymes to convert the lipid from anionic to cationic or zwitterionic form. This process leads to increased levels of resistance of the bacteria against polycationic antimicrobial agents. Inhibitors of this enzyme would provide protection against the development of bacterial resistance. There are antimicrobial agents that directly target a component of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes that can act on both Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria. Many of these are cyclic peptides with a rigid binding site capable of binding a lipid component. This binding targets antimicrobial agents to bacteria, rather than being toxic to host cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert.

  10. Radiation inactivation analysis of influenza virus reveals different target sizes for fusion, leakage, and neuraminidase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S.; Jung, C.Y.; Takahashi, M.; Lenard, J.

    1986-10-07

    The size of the functional units responsible for several activities carried out by the influenza virus envelope glycoproteins was determined by radiation inactivation analysis. Neuraminidase activity, which resides in the glycoprotein NA, was inactivated exponentially with an increasing radiation dose, yielding a target size of 94 +/- 5 kilodaltons (kDa), in reasonable agreement with that of the disulfide-bonded dimer (120 kDa). All the other activities studied are properties of the HA glycoprotein and were normalized to the known molecular weight of the neuraminidase dimer. Virus-induced fusion activity was measured by two phospholipid dilution assays: relief of energy transfer between N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)dipalmitoyl-L-alpha- phosphatidylethanolamine (N-NBD-PE) and N-(lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl)-dioleoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylethanolamine (N-Rh-PE) in target liposomes and relief of self-quenching of N-Rh-PE in target liposomes. Radiation inactivation of fusion activity proceeded exponentially with radiation dose, yielding normalized target sizes of 68 +/- 6 kDa by assay i and 70 +/- 4 kDa by assay ii. These values are close to the molecular weight of a single disulfide-bonded (HA1 + HA2) unit (75 kDa), the monomer of the HA trimer. A single monomer is thus inactivated by each radiation event, and each monomer (or some part of it) constitutes a minimal functional unit capable of mediating fusion. Virus-induced leakage of calcein from target liposomes and virus-induced leakage of hemoglobin from erythrocytes (hemolysis) both showed more complex inactivation behavior: a pronounced shoulder was present in both inactivation curves, followed by a steep drop in activity at higher radiation levels.

  11. Molecular Targeted Approaches in Mantle Cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Weniger, Marc A.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a malignancy of mature B cells characterized by the translocation t(11;14) that leads to aberrant expression of cyclin D1. Response to first-line chemotherapy is good but most patients relapse resulting in a median survival of 5-7 years. The important PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can be targeted with small molecules. mTOR inhibitors have clinical activity and temsirolimus has been approved in Europe. Second generation mTOR inhibitors and the PI3K inhibitor CAL-101 offer additional means to target the pathway. Promising results with the BTK inhibitor PCI-32765 suggest that B-cell receptor signaling could play a role. For unknown reasons, MCL appears to be particularly sensitive to disruption of protein homeostasis. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib achieves responses in up to 50% of relapsed patients. Much work has been done in elucidating the mechanism of its cytotoxicity, its incorporation into combination therapies, and the development of second generation proteasome inhibitors. Deacetylase and HSP90 inhibitors are also promising classes of drugs that can synergize with proteasome inhibitors. Finally, BH3 mimetics are emerging as tools to sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy. Participation in clinical trials offers patients an immediate chance to benefit from these advances and is essential to maintain the momentum of progress. PMID:21782064

  12. Twist: a molecular target in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Chen, Han-chun; Zhang, Dianzheng; Fu, Junjiang

    2013-10-01

    Twist, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is involved in the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), which play an essential role in cancer metastasis. Overexpression of Twist or its promoter methylation is a common scenario in metastatic carcinomas. Twist is activated by a variety of signal transduction pathways, including Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Ras, and Wnt signaling. Activated Twist upregulates N-cadherin and downregulates E-cadherin, which are the hallmarks of EMT. Moreover, Twist plays an important role in some physiological processes involved in metastasis, like angiogenesis, invadopodia, extravasation, and chromosomal instability. Twist also protects cancer cells from apoptotic cell death. In addition, Twist is responsible for the stemness of cancer cells and the generation of drug resistance. Recently, targeting Twist has gained significant interests in cancer therapeutics. The inactivation of Twist by small RNA technology or chemotherapeutic approach has been proved successful. Moreover, several inhibitors which are antagonistic to the upstream or downstream molecules of Twist signaling pathways have also been identified. Development of potential treatment strategies by targeting Twist has a great promise in cancer therapeutics.

  13. Adipocyte transdifferentiation and its molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Sujith; Gupta, Abhishek; Beg, Muheeb; Shankar, Kripa; Srivastava, Ankita; Varshney, Salil; Kumar, Durgesh; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth

    2014-06-01

    According to the World Health Organization obesity is defined as the excessive accumulation of fat, which increases risk of other metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, etc. There are two types of adipose tissue, white and brown adipose tissue (BAT) and the latter has recently gathered interest of the scientific community. Discovery of BAT has opened avenues for a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic syndrome. BAT utilizes accumulated fatty acids for energy expenditure; hence it is seen as one of the possible alternates to the current treatment. Moreover, browning of white adipocyte on exposure to cold, as well as with some of the pharmacological agents presents exciting outcomes and indicates the feasibility of transdifferentiation. A better understanding of molecular pathways and differentiation factors, those that play a key role in transdifferentiation are of extreme importance in designing novel strategies for the treatment of obesity and associated metabolic disorders. PMID:25130315

  14. Method of assembly of molecular-sized nets and scaffolding

    DOEpatents

    Michl, Josef; Magnera, Thomas F.; David, Donald E.; Harrison, Robin M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and starting materials for forming molecular-sized grids or nets, or other structures based on such grids and nets, by creating molecular links between elementary molecular modules constrained to move in only two directions on an interface or surface by adhesion or bonding to that interface or surface. In the methods of this invention, monomers are employed as the building blocks of grids and more complex structures. Monomers are introduced onto and allowed to adhere or bond to an interface. The connector groups of adjacent adhered monomers are then polymerized with each other to form a regular grid in two dimensions above the interface. Modules that are not bound or adhered to the interface are removed prior to reaction of the connector groups to avoid undesired three-dimensional cross-linking and the formation of non-grid structures. Grids formed by the methods of this invention are useful in a variety of applications, including among others, for separations technology, as masks for forming regular surface structures (i.e., metal deposition) and as templates for three-dimensional molecular-sized structures.

  15. Method of assembly of molecular-sized nets and scaffolding

    DOEpatents

    Michl, J.; Magnera, T.F.; David, D.E.; Harrison, R.M.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention relates to methods and starting materials for forming molecular-sized grids or nets, or other structures based on such grids and nets, by creating molecular links between elementary molecular modules constrained to move in only two directions on an interface or surface by adhesion or bonding to that interface or surface. In the methods of this invention, monomers are employed as the building blocks of grids and more complex structures. Monomers are introduced onto and allowed to adhere or bond to an interface. The connector groups of adjacent adhered monomers are then polymerized with each other to form a regular grid in two dimensions above the interface. Modules that are not bound or adhered to the interface are removed prior to reaction of the connector groups to avoid undesired three-dimensional cross-linking and the formation of non-grid structures. Grids formed by the methods of this invention are useful in a variety of applications, including among others, for separations technology, as masks for forming regular surface structures (i.e., metal deposition) and as templates for three-dimensional molecular-sized structures. 9 figs.

  16. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  17. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J.; Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-06-28

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ≈50 fs, 800 nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (≈90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (≈10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  18. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhijin; Yu, Dexin; Wang, Shaojie; Zhang, Na; Ma, Chunhong; Lu, Zaijun

    2009-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid-polyethylene glycol/gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA) nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA-PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd-DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was -12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed ( r = 0.987). The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd-DTPA. PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular targeted imaging contrast agent.

  19. Bone defects: molecular and cellular therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Desiderio, Vincenzo; Tirino, Virginia; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Paino, Francesca

    2014-06-01

    Bone defects are one of the most serious pathologies that need tissue regeneration therapies. Studies on mesenchymal stem cells are changing the way we treat bone diseases. MSCs have been used for the treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta, hypophosphatasia, osteonecrosis of the femoral head, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. In this context, it is becoming ever more clear that the future of therapies will be based on the use of stem cells. In this concise review, we highlight the importance of the use of MSCs in bone diseases, focusing on the role of histone deacetylases and Wnt pathways involved in osteogenesis. A better understanding of MSC biology and osteogenesis is needed in order to develop new and targeted therapeutic strategies for the treatment of bone diseases/disorders.

  20. Size-Minimized Quantum Dots for Molecular and Cellular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Wen, Mary M.; Wang, May D.; Nie, Shuming

    Semiconductor quantum dots, tiny light-emitting particles on thenanometer scale, are emerging as a new class of fluorescent labels for a broad range of molecular and cellular applications. In comparison with organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, they have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tunable light emission, intense signal brightness, resistance to photobleaching, and broadband absorption for simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. Here we report new advances in minimizing the hydrodynamic sizes of quantum dots using multidentate and multifunctional polymer coatings. A key finding is that a linear polymer containing grafted amine and thiol coordinating groups can coat nanocrystals and lead to a highly compact size, exceptional colloidal stability, strong resistance to photobleaching, and high fluorescence quantum yields. This has allowed a new generation of bright and stable quantum dots with small hydrodynamic diameters between 5.6 and 9.7 nm with tunable fluorescence emission from the visible (515 nm) to the near infrared (720 nm). These quantum dots are well suited for molecular and cellular imaging applications in which the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size needs to be minimized. Together with the novel properties of new strain-tunable quantum dots, these findings will be especially useful for multicolor and super-resolution imaging at the single-molecule level.

  1. Molecular targets of aspirin and cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, L; Ai, G; Spitale, R C; Bhat, G J

    2014-07-01

    Salicylates from plant sources have been used for centuries by different cultures to treat a variety of ailments such as inflammation, fever and pain. A chemical derivative of salicylic acid, aspirin, was synthesised and mass produced by the end of the 19th century and is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Its cardioprotective properties are well established; however, recent evidence shows that it can also act as a chemopreventive agent. Its antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory actions occur through the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. The precise mechanisms leading to its anticancer effects are not clearly established, although multiple mechanisms affecting enzyme activity, transcription factors, cellular signalling and mitochondrial functions have been proposed. This review presents a brief account of the major COX-dependent and independent pathways described in connection with aspirin's anticancer effects. Aspirin's unique ability to acetylate biomolecules besides COX has not been thoroughly investigated nor have all the targets of its primary metabolite, salicylic acid been identified. Recent reports on the ability of aspirin to acetylate multiple cellular proteins warrant a comprehensive study to investigate the role of this posttranslational modification in its anticancer effects. In this review, we also raise the intriguing possibility that aspirin may interact and acetylate cellular molecules such as RNA, and metabolites such as CoA, leading to a change in their function. Research in this area will provide a greater understanding of the mechanisms of action of this drug. PMID:24874482

  2. Diverse Molecular Targets for Chalcones with Varied Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo; Xing, Chengguo

    2015-01-01

    Natural or synthetic chalcones with different substituents have revealed a variety of biological activities that may benefit human health. The underlying mechanisms of action, particularly with respect to the direct cellular targets and the modes of interaction with the targets, have not been rigorously characterized, which imposes challenges to structure-guided rational development of therapeutic agents or chemical probes with acceptable target-selectivity profile. This review summarizes literature evidence on chalcones’ direct molecular targets in the context of their biological activities. PMID:26798565

  3. MOLECULAR TARGETS AND MECHANISMS FOR ETHANOL ACTION IN GLYCINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Daya I.; Trudell, James R.; Crawford, Daniel K.; Alkana, Ronald L.; Davies, Daryl L.

    2010-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are recognized as the primary mediators of neuronal inhibition in the spinal cord, brain stem and higher brain regions known to be sensitive to ethanol. Building evidence supports the notion that ethanol acting on GlyRs causes at least a subset of its behavioral effects and may be involved in modulating ethanol intake. For over two decades, GlyRs have been studied at the molecular level as targets for ethanol action. Despite the advances in understanding the effects of ethanol in vivo and in vitro, the precise molecular sites and mechanisms of action for ethanol in ligand-gated ion channels in general, and in GlyRs specifically, are just now starting to become understood. The present review focuses on advances in our knowledge produced by using molecular biology, pressure antagonism, electrophysiology and molecular modeling strategies over the last two decades to probe, identify and model the initial molecular sites and mechanisms of ethanol action in GlyRs. The molecular targets on the GlyR are covered on a global perspective, which includes the intracellular, transmembrane and extracellular domains. The latter has received increasing attention in recent years. Recent molecular models of the sites of ethanol action in GlyRs and their implications to our understanding of possible mechanism of ethanol action and novel targets for drug development in GlyRs are discussed. PMID:20399807

  4. SCF(SAP) controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-04-06

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size.

  5. SCF(SAP) controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size. PMID:27048938

  6. SCFSAP controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size. PMID:27048938

  7. Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Novel Molecular Targets in Carcinogenesis for Future Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bertino, Gaetano; Demma, Shirin; Ardiri, Annalisa; Proiti, Maria; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Toro, Adriana; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Bertino, Nicoletta; Malaguarnera, Michele; Malaguarnera, Mariano; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common and lethal malignant tumors worldwide. Over the past 15 years, the incidence of HCC has more than doubled. Due to late diagnosis and/or advanced underlying liver cirrhosis, only limited treatment options with marginal clinical benefit are available in up to 70% of patients. During the last decades, no effective conventional cytotoxic systemic therapy was available contributing to the dismal prognosis in patients with HCC. A better knowledge of molecular hepatocarcinogenesis provides today the opportunity for targeted therapy. Materials and Methods. A search of the literature was made using cancer literature, the PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science (WOS) database for the following keywords: “hepatocellular carcinoma,” “molecular hepatocarcinogenesis,” “targeted therapy,” and “immunotherapy.” Discussion and Conclusion. Treatment decisions are complex and dependent upon tumor staging, presence of portal hypertension, and the underlying degree of liver dysfunction. The knowledge of molecular hepatocarcinogenesis broadened the horizon for patients with advanced HCC. During the last years, several molecular targeted agents have been evaluated in clinical trials in advanced HCC. In the future, new therapeutic options will be represented by a blend of immunotherapy-like vaccines and T-cell modulators, supplemented by molecularly targeted inhibitors of tumor signaling pathways. PMID:25089265

  8. [Molecular targeted drugs for soft tissue sarcoma and neuroendocrine tumor].

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke

    2015-08-01

    Both the soft tissue sarcomas and the neuroendocrine tumors are rare diseases. Therefore the recruiting of these patients was more difficult than other cancer species, and the development of the new therapy for these diseases did not readily advance. However, the identification of driver molecules for each sub-type enabled us to the development of the molecular targeted drugs. As for the GIST, several TKIs are used, but in late years it is found that susceptibility of TKIs varies according to difference in second mutation. In this chapter, the molecular target drug for the soft tissue sarcoma and the neuroendocrine tumor is reviewed. PMID:26281696

  9. Molecular targeted agents for gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Takashi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2012-04-01

    Despite recent improvements in surgical techniques and chemotherapy, advanced cancers of the stomach and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) continue to have poor clinical outcomes. However, molecules intimately related to cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis have been studied as candidates for molecular targeted agents. Target molecules, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and P13k/Akt/mTor pathway, as well as the insulin-like growth factor receptor, c-Met pathways, fibroblast growth factor receptor, and other pathways are considered to be promising candidates for molecular targeted therapy for gastric and GEJ cancer. In this review we focus on the recent developments in targeting relevant pathways in these types of cancer.

  10. Molecular Targeted α-Particle Therapy for Oncologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Pandya, Darpan N.; Solingapuram Sai, Kiran Kumar; Mintz, Akiva

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A significant challenge facing traditional cancer therapies is their propensity to significantly harm normal tissue. The recent clinical success of targeting therapies by attaching them to antibodies that are specific to tumor-restricted biomarkers marks a new era of cancer treatments. CONCLUSION In this article, we highlight the recent developments in α-particle therapy that have enabled investigators to exploit this highly potent form of therapy by targeting tumor-restricted molecular biomarkers. PMID:25055256

  11. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  12. Size effects in molecular dynamics thermal conductivity predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellan, D. P.; Landry, E. S.; Turney, J. E.; McGaughey, A. J. H.; Amon, C. H.

    2010-06-01

    We predict the bulk thermal conductivity of Lennard-Jones argon and Stillinger-Weber silicon using the Green-Kubo (GK) and direct methods in classical molecular dynamics simulations. While system-size-independent thermal conductivities can be obtained with less than 1000 atoms for both materials using the GK method, the linear extrapolation procedure [Schelling , Phys. Rev. B 65, 144306 (2002)] must be applied to direct method results for multiple system sizes. We find that applying the linear extrapolation procedure in a manner consistent with previous researchers can lead to an underprediction of the GK thermal conductivity (e.g., by a factor of 2.5 for Stillinger-Weber silicon at a temperature of 500 K). To understand this discrepancy, we perform lattice dynamics calculations to predict phonon properties and from these, length-dependent thermal conductivities. From these results, we find that the linear extrapolation procedure is only accurate when the minimum system size used in the direct method simulations is comparable to the largest mean-free paths of the phonons that dominate the thermal transport. This condition has not typically been satisfied in previous works. To aid in future studies, we present a simple metric for determining if the system sizes used in direct method simulations are sufficiently large so that the linear extrapolation procedure can accurately predict the bulk thermal conductivity.

  13. Phytodegradation of Ethanolamines by Cyperus alternifolius: Effect of Molecular Size.

    PubMed

    Dolphen, R; Thiravetyan, P

    2015-01-01

    Our screening of plants showed that Cyperus alternifolius (Umbrella papyrus) had the highest efficiency removal in real wastewater containing monoethanolamine-higher than Echinodorus cordifolius (Creeping Burrhead), Thalia geniculata (Alligator Flag), Acorus calamus (Sweet Flag), and Dracaena sanderiana (Lucky Bamboo). Therefore, this research studied the degradation of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA) by C. alternifolius. Plants could degrade TEA into DEA, then into MEA, and then further into acetic acid. The accumulation of ethanolamines was found mainly in plant stems, which had the highest biomass. This demonstrated that the molecular size is closely related to a diffusion coefficient that affects the removal rate through plant bodies. A smaller molecular weight-MEA (MW = 61.08 g mol(-1))-was taken up the fastest, followed by DEA (MW = 105.14 g mol(-1)) and TEA (MW = 149.19 g mol(-1)), the highest molecular weight. The plants' toxicity when exposed to ethanolamines elucidated that MEA had the highest toxicity, followed by DEA and TEA. In addition, the application of C. alternifolius in monoethanolamine-contaminated wastewater revealed that plant could completely uptake MEA at day 5 from an initial MEA concentration of 18 mM. The result indicated that C. alternifolius has the potential to remove ethanolamines and can be applied to ethanolamine-contaminated wastewater. PMID:25976882

  14. Phytodegradation of Ethanolamines by Cyperus alternifolius: Effect of Molecular Size.

    PubMed

    Dolphen, R; Thiravetyan, P

    2015-01-01

    Our screening of plants showed that Cyperus alternifolius (Umbrella papyrus) had the highest efficiency removal in real wastewater containing monoethanolamine-higher than Echinodorus cordifolius (Creeping Burrhead), Thalia geniculata (Alligator Flag), Acorus calamus (Sweet Flag), and Dracaena sanderiana (Lucky Bamboo). Therefore, this research studied the degradation of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA) by C. alternifolius. Plants could degrade TEA into DEA, then into MEA, and then further into acetic acid. The accumulation of ethanolamines was found mainly in plant stems, which had the highest biomass. This demonstrated that the molecular size is closely related to a diffusion coefficient that affects the removal rate through plant bodies. A smaller molecular weight-MEA (MW = 61.08 g mol(-1))-was taken up the fastest, followed by DEA (MW = 105.14 g mol(-1)) and TEA (MW = 149.19 g mol(-1)), the highest molecular weight. The plants' toxicity when exposed to ethanolamines elucidated that MEA had the highest toxicity, followed by DEA and TEA. In addition, the application of C. alternifolius in monoethanolamine-contaminated wastewater revealed that plant could completely uptake MEA at day 5 from an initial MEA concentration of 18 mM. The result indicated that C. alternifolius has the potential to remove ethanolamines and can be applied to ethanolamine-contaminated wastewater.

  15. Molecular targeting agents in cancer therapy: science and society.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Asim Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The inception of targeted agents has revolutionized the cancer therapy paradigm, both for physicians and patients. A large number of molecular targeted agents for cancer therapy are currently available for clinical use today. Many more are in making, but there are issues that remain to be resolved for the scientific as well as social community before the recommendation of their widespread use in may clinical scenarios can be done, one such issue being cost and cost effectiveness, others being resistance and lack of sustained efficacy. With the current knowledge about available targeted agents, the growing knowledge of intricate molecular pathways and unfolding of wider spectrum of molecular targets that can really matter in the disease control, calls for only the just use of the agents available now, drug companies need to make a serious attempt to reduce the cost of the agents. Research should focus on agents that show sustained responses in preclinical data. More needs to be done in laboratories and by the pharmaceutical industries, before we can truly claim to have entered a new era of targeted therapy in cancer care.

  16. Molecular Targeted Approaches to Cancer Therapy and Prevention Using Chalcones

    PubMed Central

    Jandial, Danielle D.; Blair, Christopher A.; Zhang, Saiyang; Krill, Lauren S.; Zhang, Yan-Bing; Zi, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging paradigm shift in oncology that seeks to emphasize molecularly targeted approaches for cancer prevention and therapy. Chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones), naturally-occurring compounds with widespread distribution in spices, tea, beer, fruits and vegetables, consist of open-chain flavonoids in which the two aromatic rings are joined by a three-carbon α, β-unsaturated carbonyl system. Due to their structural diversity, relative ease of chemical manipulation and reaction of α, β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety with cysteine residues in proteins, some lead chalcones from both natural products and synthesis have been identified in a variety of screening assays for modulating important pathways or molecular targets in cancers. These pathways and targets that are affected by chalcones include MDM2/p53, tubulin, proteasome, NF-kappa B, TRIAL/death receptors and mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathways, cell cycle, STAT3, AP-1, NRF2, AR, ER, PPAR-γ and β-catenin/Wnt. Compared to current cancer targeted therapeutic drugs, chalcones have the advantages of being inexpensive, easily available and less toxic; the ease of synthesis of chalcones from substituted benzaldehydes and acetophenones also makes them an attractive drug scaffold. Therefore, this review is focused on molecular targets of chalcones and their potential implications in cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:24467530

  17. [The development history and future perspective of molecularly targeted therapy].

    PubMed

    Mizuki, Masao; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2014-06-01

    The origin of molecularly targeted drugs dates back to 'magic bullet' theory proposed by Paul Ehrlich. The success of Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia realized that small molecules inhibiting ATP binding can become specific inhibitors for the relevant kinases. Subsequently, a number of kinase inhibitors which targets various signal transduction molecules, are in the clinical field or under development. The clinical success of antibody therapeutics has been achieved by the genetic engineering which makes human-mouse chimeric, humanized or human antibody. To augment the therapeutic effects of antibody, radioisotope-conjugate antibody and antibody-drug conjugate have come to the clinical field. In the near future, we have to develop the combination therapy of molecularly targeted drugs and also inhibitors for epigenetic and transcriptional regulators.

  18. [Molecular targeting agents for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Nozomu

    2012-10-01

    The combination of fluoropyrimidine and platinum with or without epirubicin or docetaxel has been regarded as standard chemotherapy for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients. Recently, trastuzumab with conventional chemotherapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor(HER)2 positive gastric cancer patients was proved to be effective in terms of survival benefit and has become one of standard treatment options. Other molecular target agents, such as HER1, HER2, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met, fibroblast growth factor and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors were and are being evaluated in clinical trials. However, no agents other than trastuzumab have shown clear survival benefit. The predictive biomarker seems to be necessary for developing new molecular targeting agents for gastric cancer with heterogeneity.

  19. MR Molecular Imaging of Tumor Vasculature and Vascular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Arvind P.; Penet, Marie-France; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis and the ability of cancer cells to induce neovasculature continue to be a fascinating area of research. As the delivery network that provides substrates and nutrients, as well as chemotherapeutic agents to cancer cells, but allows cancer cells to disseminate, the tumor vasculature is richly primed with targets and mechanisms that can be exploited for cancer cure or control. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of tumor vasculature, and the heterogeneity of response to targeting, make noninvasive imaging essential for understanding the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis, tracking vascular targeting, and detecting the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapies. With its noninvasive characteristics, exquisite spatial resolution and range of applications, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have provided a wealth of functional and molecular information on tumor vasculature in applications spanning from “bench to bedside”. The integration of molecular biology and chemistry to design novel imaging probes ensures the continued evolution of the molecular capabilities of MRI. In this review, we have focused on developments in the characterization of tumor vasculature with functional and molecular MRI. PMID:20807600

  20. Molecularly targeted therapies for malignant glioma: rationale for combinatorial strategies

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Nikhil G; Pollack, Ian F

    2010-01-01

    Median survival of patients with malignant glioma (MG) from time of diagnosis is approximately 1 year, despite surgery, irradiation and conventional chemotherapy. Improving patient outcome relies on our ability to develop more effective therapies that are directed against the unique molecular aberrations within a patient’s tumor. Such molecularly targeted therapies may provide novel treatments that are more effective than conventional chemotherapeutics. Recently developed therapeutic strategies have focused on targeting several core glioma signaling pathways, including pathways mediated by growth-factors, PI3K/Akt/PTEN/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK and other vital pathways. However, given the molecular diversity, heterogeneity and diverging and converging signaling pathways associated with MG, it is unlikely that any single agent will have efficacy in more than a subset of tumors. Overcoming these therapeutic barriers will require multiple agents that can simultaneously inhibit these processes, providing a rationale for combination therapies. This review summarizes the currently implemented single-agent and combination molecularly targeted therapies for MG. PMID:19951140

  1. The Proteasome Is a Molecular Target of Environmental Toxic Organotins

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guoqing; Chen, Di; Zhai, Guangshu; Chen, Marina S.; Cui, Qiuzhi Cindy; Zhou, Qunfang; He, Bin; Dou, Q. Ping; Jiang, Guibin

    2009-01-01

    Background Because of the vital importance of the proteasome pathway, chemicals affecting proteasome activity could disrupt essential cellular processes. Although the toxicity of organotins to both invertebrates and vertebrates is well known, the essential cellular target of organotins has not been well identified. We hypothesize that the proteasome is a molecular target of environmental toxic organotins. Objectives Our goal was to test the above hypothesis by investigating whether organotins could inhibit the activity of purified and cellular proteasomes and, if so, the involved molecular mechanisms and downstream events. Results We found that some toxic organotins [e.g., triphenyltin (TPT)] can potently and preferentially inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasomes and human breast cancer cellular 26S proteasomes. Direct binding of tin atoms to cellular proteasomes is responsible for the observed irreversible inhibition. Inhibition of cellular proteasomes by TPT in several human cell lines results in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and natural proteasome target proteins, accompanied by induction of cell death. Conclusions The proteasome is one of the molecular targets of environmental toxic organotins in human cells, and proteasome inhibition by organotins contributes to their cellular toxicity. PMID:19337512

  2. Molecular Targeted Viral Nanoparticles as Tools for Imaging Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, C.F.; Sourabh, S.; Simpson, E.J.; Steinmetz, N.F.; Luyt, L.G.; Lewis, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) are a novel class of bionanomaterials that harness the natural biocompatibility of viruses for the development of therapeutics, vaccines, and imaging tools. The plant virus, cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), has been successfully engineered to create novel cancer-targeted imaging agents by incorporating fluorescent dyes, polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, and targeting moieties. Using straightforward conjugation strategies, VNPs with high selectivity for cancer-specific molecular targets can be synthesized for in vivo imaging of tumors. Here we describe the synthesis and purification of CPMV-based VNPs, the functionalization of these VNPs using click chemistry, and their use for imaging xenograft tumors in animal models. VNPs decorated with fluorescent dyes, PEG, and targeting ligands can be synthesized in one day, and imaging studies can be performed over hours, days, or weeks, depending on the application. PMID:24243252

  3. Hedonic judgments of chemical compounds are correlated with molecular size.

    PubMed

    Zarzo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Different psychophysical works have reported that, when a wide range of odors is assessed, the hedonic dimension is the most salient. Hence, pleasantness is the most basic attribute of odor perception. Recent studies suggest that the molecular size of a given odorant is positively correlated with its hedonic character. This correlation was confirmed in the present study, but further basic molecular features affecting pleasantness were identified by means of multiple linear regression for the compounds contained in five chemical sets. For three of them, hedonic judgments are available in the literature. For a further two chemical sets, hedonic scores were estimated from odor character descriptions based on numerical profiles. Generally speaking, fairly similar equations were obtained for the prediction of hedonic judgments in the five chemical sets, with R(2) values ranging from 0.46 to 0.71. The results suggest that larger molecules containing oxygen are more likely to be perceived as pleasant, while the opposite applies to carboxylic acids and sulfur compounds.

  4. Hedonic Judgments of Chemical Compounds Are Correlated with Molecular Size

    PubMed Central

    Zarzo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Different psychophysical works have reported that, when a wide range of odors is assessed, the hedonic dimension is the most salient. Hence, pleasantness is the most basic attribute of odor perception. Recent studies suggest that the molecular size of a given odorant is positively correlated with its hedonic character. This correlation was confirmed in the present study, but further basic molecular features affecting pleasantness were identified by means of multiple linear regression for the compounds contained in five chemical sets. For three of them, hedonic judgments are available in the literature. For a further two chemical sets, hedonic scores were estimated from odor character descriptions based on numerical profiles. Generally speaking, fairly similar equations were obtained for the prediction of hedonic judgments in the five chemical sets, with R2 values ranging from 0.46 to 0.71. The results suggest that larger molecules containing oxygen are more likely to be perceived as pleasant, while the opposite applies to carboxylic acids and sulfur compounds. PMID:22163815

  5. The molecular targets of approved treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Marc; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, three classes of medical therapy were available for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)—prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. With the approval of the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat, an additional drug class has become available targeting a distinct molecular target in the same pathway as PDE5 inhibitors. Treatment recommendations currently include the use of all four drug classes to treat PAH, but there is a lack of comparative data for these therapies. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanistic differences between these agents is critical when making treatment decisions. Combination therapy is often used to treat PAH and it is therefore important that physicians understand how the modes of action of these drugs may interact to work as complementary partners, or potentially with unwanted consequences. Furthermore, different patient phenotypes mean that patients respond differently to treatment; while a certain monotherapy may be adequate for some patients, for others it will be important to consider alternating or combining compounds with different molecular targets. This review describes how the four currently approved drug classes target the complex pathobiology of PAH and will consider the distinct target molecules of each drug class, their modes of action, and review the pivotal clinical trial data supporting their use. It will also discuss the rationale for combining drugs (or not) from the different classes, and review the clinical data from studies on combination therapy. PMID:26219978

  6. Application of Monte Carlo Methods in Molecular Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann Siantar, C; Descalle, M-A; DeNardo, G L; Nigg, D W

    2002-02-19

    Targeted radionuclide therapy promises to expand the role of radiation beyond the treatment of localized tumors. This novel form of therapy targets metastatic cancers by combining radioactive isotopes with tumor-seeking molecules such as monoclonal antibodies and custom-designed synthetic agents. Ultimately, like conventional radiotherapy, the effectiveness of targeted radionuclide therapy is limited by the maximum dose that can be given to a critical, normal tissue, such as bone marrow, kidneys, and lungs. Because radionuclide therapy relies on biological delivery of radiation, its optimization and characterization are necessarily different than for conventional radiation therapy. We have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA treatment planning system. This system calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using a set of computed tomography scans to describe the 3D patient anatomy, combined with 2D (planar image) and 3D (SPECT, or single photon emission computed tomography) to describe the time-dependent radiation source. The accuracy of such a dose calculation is limited primarily by the accuracy of the initial radiation source distribution, overlaid on the patient's anatomy. This presentation provides an overview of MINERVA functionality for molecular targeted radiation therapy, and describes early validation and implementation results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Lead sulfide near-infrared quantum dot bioconjugates for targeted molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiantang; Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Fu, Kun; Lewinski, Nastassja; Drezek, Rebekah A

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report the use of lead sulfide quantum dot (PbS QD) bioconjugates as near infrared (NIR) contrast agents for targeted molecular imaging with expanded emission wavelengths beyond 1000 nm. The red-shifted emission band, coupled with the small particle size, which will facilitate clearance, both afford PbS QDs unique properties for noninvasive, high resolution in vivo NIR imaging applications. We have performed imaging experiments at the molecular level using surface-modified PbS NIR QDs, together with our lab-built NIR imaging system. This novel instrumentation and fluorescent contrast agent have enabled us to study the relatively unexplored NIR biomedical imaging spectral region of 900-1200 nm. Preliminary experimental results indicate that PbS-QD/antibody bioconjugates are promising candidates for targeted NIR molecular imaging and future in vivo NIR tissue imaging applications.

  8. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC. PMID:26755872

  9. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC. PMID:26755872

  10. Molecular targeted therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenting; Yang, Zhen; Lu, Nonghua

    2016-01-04

    Despite the global decline in the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer, it remains one of the most common malignant tumors of the digestive system. Although surgical resection is the preferred treatment for gastric cancer, chemotherapy is the preferred treatment for recurrent and advanced gastric cancer patients who are not candidates for reoperation. The short overall survival and lack of a standard chemotherapy regimen make it important to identify novel treatment modalities for gastric cancer. Within the field of tumor biology, molecular targeted therapy has attracted substantial attention to improve the specificity of anti-cancer efficacy and significantly reduce non-selective resistance and toxicity. Multiple clinical studies have confirmed that molecular targeted therapy acts on various mechanisms of gastric cancer, such as the regulation of epidermal growth factor, angiogenesis, immuno-checkpoint blockade, the cell cycle, cell apoptosis, key enzymes, c-Met, mTOR signaling and insulin-like growth factor receptors, to exert a stronger anti-tumor effect. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that underlie molecular targeted therapies will provide new insights into gastric cancer treatment.

  11. Nanomedicine strategies for molecular targets with MRI and optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Caruthers, Shelton D; Chen, Junjie; Winter, Patrick M; SenPan, Angana; Schmieder, Anne H; Wickline, Samuel A

    2010-01-01

    The science of ‘theranostics’ plays a crucial role in personalized medicine, which represents the future of patient management. Over the last decade an increasing research effort has focused on the development of nanoparticle-based molecular-imaging and drug-delivery approaches, emerging as a multidisciplinary field that shows promise in understanding the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of a disease at a molecular level. The potential of nanometer-sized agents for early detection, diagnosis and personalized treatment of diseases is extraordinary. They have found applications in almost all clinically relevant biomedical imaging modality. In this review, a number of these approaches will be presented with a particular emphasis on MRI and optical imaging-based techniques. We have discussed both established molecular-imaging approaches and recently developed innovative strategies, highlighting the seminal studies and a number of successful examples of theranostic nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cardiovascular and cancer therapy. PMID:20485473

  12. Nanobubble-Affibody: Novel ultrasound contrast agents for targeted molecular ultrasound imaging of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengli; Cai, Wenbin; Xu, Lei; Lv, Xiuhua; Qiao, Youbei; Li, Pan; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yunyou

    2015-01-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs), as novel ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have attracted increasing attention in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging for tumors. However, the preparation of uniform-sized NBs is considered to be controversial, and poor tumor selectivity in in vivo imaging has been reported. In this study, we fabricated uniform nano-sized NBs (478.2 ± 29.7 nm with polydispersity index of 0.164 ± 0.044, n = 3) using a thin-film hydration method by controlling the thickness of phospholipid films; we then conjugated the NBs with Affibody molecules to produce nano-sized UCAs referred to as NB-Affibody with specific affinity to human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. NB-Affibody presented good ultrasound enhancement, demonstrating a peak intensity of 104.5 ± 2.1 dB under ultrasound contrast scanning. Ex vivo experiments further confirmed that the NB-Affibody conjugates were capable of targeting HER2-expressing tumor cells in vivo with high affinity. The newly prepared nano-sized NB-Affibody conjugates were observed to be novel targeted UCAs for efficient and safe specific molecular imaging and may have potential applications in early cancer quantitative diagnosis and targeted therapy in the future.

  13. Emerging Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Castration Refractory Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jesal C.; Maughan, Benjamin L.; Agarwal, Archana M.; Batten, Julia A.; Zhang, Tian Y.; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with medical or surgical castration is the mainstay of therapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. However, despite initial responses, almost all men eventually develop castration refractory metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) and die of their disease. Over the last decade, it has been recognized that despite the failure of ADT, most prostate cancers maintain some dependence on androgen and/or androgen receptor (AR) signaling for proliferation. Furthermore, androgen independent molecular pathways have been identified as drivers of continued progression of CRPC. Subsequently, drugs have been developed targeting these pathways, many of which have received regulatory approval. Agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, orteronel (TAK-700), and ARN-509 target androgen signaling. Sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, and tasquinimod augment immune-mediated tumor killing. Agents targeting classic tumorogenesis pathways including vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, insulin like growth factor-1, tumor suppressor, and those which regulate apoptosis and cell cycles are currently being developed. This paper aims to focus on emerging molecular pathways underlying progression of CRPC, and the drugs targeting these pathways, which have recently been approved or have reached advanced stages of development in either phase II or phase III clinical trials. PMID:23819055

  14. Molecular mechanisms for vascular complications of targeted cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Srila; Miller, Kenneth B; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2016-10-01

    Molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment by improving both quality of life and survival in cancer patients. However, many of these drugs are associated with cardiovascular toxicities that are sometimes dose-limiting. Moreover, the long-term cardiovascular consequences of these drugs, some of which are used chronically, are not yet known. Although the scope and mechanisms of the cardiac toxicities are better defined, the mechanisms for vascular toxicities are only beginning to be elucidated. This review summarizes what is known about the vascular adverse events associated with three classes of novel anti-cancer therapies: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors, breakpoint cluster-Abelson (BCR-ABL) kinase inhibitors used to treat chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) and immunomodulatory agents (IMiDs) used in myeloma therapeutics. Three of the best described vascular toxicities are reviewed including hypertension, increased risk of acute cardiovascular ischaemic events and arteriovenous thrombosis. The available data regarding the mechanism by which each therapy causes vascular complication are summarized. When data are limited, potential mechanisms are inferred from the known effects of inhibiting each target on vascular cell function and disease. Enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms of vascular side effects of targeted cancer therapy is necessary to effectively manage cancer patients and to design safer targeted cancer therapies for the future. PMID:27612952

  15. Central and Peripheral Molecular Targets for Anti-Obesity Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Michael A.; Lin, Jieru E.; Waldman, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has emerged as one of the principle worldwide health concerns of the modern era, and there exists a tremendous unmet clinical need for safe and effective therapies to combat this global pandemic. The prevalence of obesity and its associated co-morbidities, including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, has focused drug discovery and development on generating effective modalities for the treatment and prevention of obesity. Early efforts in the field of obesity pharmacotherapy centered on agents with indeterminate mechanisms of action producing treatment paradigms characterized by significant off-target effects. During the past two decades, new insights have been made into the physiologic regulation of energy balance and the subordinate central and peripheral circuits coordinating appetite, metabolism, and lipogenesis. These studies have revealed previously unrecognized molecular targets for controlling appetite and managing weight from which has emerged a new wave of targeted pharmacotherapies to prevent and control obesity. PMID:20445536

  16. Size dependence of cavity volume: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisha; Dubins, David N; Pomès, Régis; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2012-02-01

    Partial molar volume, V°, has been used as a tool to sample solute hydration for decades. The efficacy of volumetric investigations of hydration depends on our ability to reliably discriminate between the cavity, V(C), and interaction, V(I), contributions to the partial molar volume. The cavity volume, V(C), consists of the intrinsic volume, V(M), of a solute molecule and the thermal volume, V(T), with the latter representing the volume of the effective void created around the solute. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with the Kirkwood-Buff theory to compute the partial molar volumes for organic solutes of varying sizes in water. We perform our computations using the Lennard-Jones and Coulombic pair potentials as well as truncated potentials which contain only the Lennard-Jones but not the Coulombic contribution. The partial molar volume computed with the Lennard-Jones potentials in the absence of the Coulombic term nearly coincides with the cavity volume, V(C). We determine the thermal volume, V(T), for each compound by subtracting its van der Waals volume, V(W), from V(C). Finally, we apply the spherical approximation of solute geometry to evaluate the thickness of the thermal volume, δ. Our results reveal an increase in the thickness of thermal volume, δ, with an increase in the size of the solute. This finding may be related to dewetting of large nonpolar solutes and the concomitant increase in the compressibility of water of hydration. PMID:22133917

  17. Molecular Targets for Radiation Oncology in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Languino, Lucia R.; Lian, Jane; Stein, Gary; Blute, Michael; FitzGerald, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent selected developments of the molecular science of prostate cancer (PrCa) biology and radiation oncology are reviewed. We present potential targets for molecular integration treatment strategies with radiation therapy (RT), and highlight potential strategies for molecular treatment in combination with RT for patient care. We provide a synopsis of the information to date regarding molecular biology of PrCa, and potential integrated research strategy for improved treatment of PrCa. Many patients with early-stage disease at presentation can be treated effectively with androgen ablation treatment, surgery, or RT. However, a significant portion of men are diagnosed with advanced stage/high-risk disease and these patients progress despite curative therapeutic intervention. Unfortunately, management options for these patients are limited and are not always successful including treatment for hormone refractory disease. In this review, we focus on molecules of extracellular matrix component, apoptosis, androgen receptor, RUNX, and DNA methylation. Expanding our knowledge of the molecular biology of PrCa will permit the development of novel treatment strategies integrated with RT to improve patient outcome PMID:22645712

  18. Non-linear molecular pattern classification using molecular beacons with multiple targets.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Hee; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Tai Hyun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2013-12-01

    In vitro pattern classification has been highlighted as an important future application of DNA computing. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of linear classifiers using DNA-based molecular computing. However, complex tasks require non-linear classification capability. Here we design a molecular beacon that can interact with multiple targets and experimentally shows that its fluorescent signals form a complex radial-basis function, enabling it to be used as a building block for non-linear molecular classification in vitro. The proposed method was successfully applied to solving artificial and real-world classification problems: XOR and microRNA expression patterns.

  19. Small sized EGFR1 and HER2 specific bifunctional antibody for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Tian, Caiping; Feng, Song; Fida, Guissi; Zhang, Congying; Ma, Yuxiang; Ai, Guanhua; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Targeting tumors using miniature antibodies is a novel and attractive therapeutic approach, as these biomolecules exhibit low immunogenicity, rapid clearance, and high targeting specificity. However, most of the small-sized antibodies in existence do not exhibit marked anti-tumor effects, which limit their use in targeted cancer immunotherapy. To overcome this difficulty in targeting multiple biomarkers by combination therapies, we designed a new bifunctional antibody, named MaAbNA (multivalent antibody comprised of nanobody and affibody moieties), capable of targeting EGFR1 and HER2, which are widely overexpressed in a variety of tumor types. The small-sized (29 kDa) MaAbNA, which was expressed in E.coli, consists of one anti-EGFR1 nanobody and two anti-HER2 affibodies, and possesses high affinity (KD) for EGFR1 (~4.1 nM) and HER2 (~4.7 nM). In order to enhance its anti-tumor activity, MaAbNA was conjugated with adriamycin (ADM) using a PEG2000 linker, forming a new complex anticancer drug, MaAbNA-PEG2000-ADM. MaAbNA exhibited high inhibitory effects on tumor cells over-expressing both EGFR1 and HER2, but displayed minimal cytotoxicity in cells expressing low levels of EGFR1 and HER2. Moreover, MaAbNA-PEG2000-ADM displayed increased tumoricidal effects than ADM or MaAbNA alone, as well exhibited greater antitumor efficacy than EGFR1 (Cetuximab) and HER2 (Herceptin) antibody drugs. The ability of MaAbNA to regulate expression of downstream oncogenes c-jun, c-fos, c-myc, as well as AEG-1 for therapeutic potential was evaluated by qPCR and western-blot analyses. The antitumor efficacy of MaAbNA and its derivative MaAbNA-PEG2000-ADM were validated in vivo, highlighting the potential for use of MaAbNA as a highly tumor-specific dual molecular imaging probe and targeted cancer therapeutic. PMID:25699098

  20. Small Sized EGFR1 and HER2 Specific Bifunctional Antibody for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Li; Tian, Caiping; Feng, Song; Fida, Guissi; Zhang, Congying; Ma, Yuxiang; Ai, Guanhua; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Targeting tumors using miniature antibodies is a novel and attractive therapeutic approach, as these biomolecules exhibit low immunogenicity, rapid clearance, and high targeting specificity. However, most of the small-sized antibodies in existence do not exhibit marked anti-tumor effects, which limit their use in targeted cancer immunotherapy. To overcome this difficulty in targeting multiple biomarkers by combination therapies, we designed a new bifunctional antibody, named MaAbNA (multivalent antibody comprised of nanobody and affibody moieties), capable of targeting EGFR1 and HER2, which are widely overexpressed in a variety of tumor types. The small-sized (29 kDa) MaAbNA, which was expressed in E.coli, consists of one anti-EGFR1 nanobody and two anti-HER2 affibodies, and possesses high affinity (KD) for EGFR1 (~4.1 nM) and HER2 (~4.7 nM). In order to enhance its anti-tumor activity, MaAbNA was conjugated with adriamycin (ADM) using a PEG2000 linker, forming a new complex anticancer drug, MaAbNA-PEG2000-ADM. MaAbNA exhibited high inhibitory effects on tumor cells over-expressing both EGFR1 and HER2, but displayed minimal cytotoxicity in cells expressing low levels of EGFR1 and HER2. Moreover, MaAbNA-PEG2000-ADM displayed increased tumoricidal effects than ADM or MaAbNA alone, as well exhibited greater antitumor efficacy than EGFR1 (Cetuximab) and HER2 (Herceptin) antibody drugs. The ability of MaAbNA to regulate expression of downstream oncogenes c-jun, c-fos, c-myc, as well as AEG-1 for therapeutic potential was evaluated by qPCR and western-blot analyses. The antitumor efficacy of MaAbNA and its derivative MaAbNA-PEG2000-ADM were validated in vivo, highlighting the potential for use of MaAbNA as a highly tumor-specific dual molecular imaging probe and targeted cancer therapeutic. PMID:25699098

  1. Hitting the target: where do molecularly targeted therapies fit in the treatment scheduling of neuroendocrine tumours?

    PubMed

    Karpathakis, Anna; Caplin, Martyn; Thirlwell, Christina

    2012-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are a rare and heterogeneous group of tumours whose incidence is increasing and their prevalence is now greater than that of any other upper gastrointestinal tumour. Diagnosis can be challenging, and up to 25% of patients present with metastatic disease. Following the recent FDA approval of two new molecularly targeted therapies for the treatment of advanced pancreatic NETs (pNETs), the first in 25 years, we review all systemic therapies and suggest where these newer targeted therapies fit in the treatment schedule for these challenging tumours. Clinical trial data relating to the routine use of sunitinib and everolimus in low-intermediate-grade pNETs are summarised alongside newer molecularly targeted agents undergoing clinical assessment in NETs. We particularly focus on the challenge of optimal scheduling of molecularly targeted treatments around existing systemic and localised treatment such as chemotherapy or radiotargeted therapy. We also discuss application of current evidence to subgroups of patients who have not so far been directly addressed such as those with poorer performance status or patients receiving radical surgery who may benefit from adjuvant treatment.

  2. XUV spectroscopy of laser plasma from molecular coated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanyan, Valeri O.; Nersisyan, Gagik T.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1999-12-01

    Metal targets covered by micrometer layers of metal- phthalocyanines or fullerenes are studied here. An increase in XUV yield due to the optimized absorption of the laser field is reported. Effects of high-temperature plasma rapid expansion (velocity about 106 cm/s) were observed. Moderate power nanosecond and picosecond neodymium lasers are used to produce an incident intensity of 1011 to 1013 W/cm2 on the targets. The plasma electron density was measured by fitting observed spectral profiles to the theoretical profiles. Collisional, Doppler, and Stark broadening mechanisms were considered in the calculations. Our measurement technique permits us to determine the electron density and temperature dependence on distances from the target surface from 1 mm (where Ne approximately equals 1018 cm-3 and Te approximately equals 14 eV are measured for aluminum plasma) up to approximately 5 mm (where Ne molecular coated targets is greater by a factor of approximately 1.5 than measured from bulk solid metal targets.

  3. XUV spectroscopy of laser plasma from molecular coated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanyan, Valeri O.; Nersisyan, Gagik T.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1999-10-01

    Metal targets covered by micrometer layers of metal- phthalocyanines are studied here. An increase in EUV yield due to optimized absorption of the laser field is reported. Effects of high-temperature plasma rapid expansion (velocity about 106 cm/s) were observed. Moderate power nanosecond and picosecond neodymium lasers are used to product an incident intensity of 1011 to 1013 W/cm2 on the targets. The plasma electron density was measured by fitting observed spectral profiles to theoretical profiles. Collisional, Doppler, and Stark broadening mechanisms were considered in the calculations. Our measurement technique makes it possible to determine the electron density and temperature dependence on distances from the target surface from 1 mm (where Ne equals 2.0 (+/- 0.5)1018 cm-3 and Te equals 14 eV are measured for aluminum plasma) up to approximately 5 mm (where Ne molecular coated targets is greater by a factor of approximately 1.5 than measured from bulk solid metal targets.

  4. Overcoming the Barrier on Time Step Size in Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Molecular Liquids.

    PubMed

    Omelyan, Igor P; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2012-01-10

    We propose and validate a new multiscale technique, the extrapolative isokinetic Nóse-Hoover chain orientational (EINO) motion multiple time step algorithm for rigid interaction site models of molecular liquids. It nontrivially combines the multiple time step decomposition operator method with a specific extrapolation of intermolecular interactions, complemented by an extended isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain approach in the presence of translational and orientational degrees of freedom. The EINO algorithm obviates the limitations on time step size in molecular dynamics simulations. While the best existing multistep algorithms can advance from a 5 fs single step to a maximum 100 fs outer step, we show on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P water that our EINO technique overcomes this barrier. Specifically, we have achieved giant time steps on the order of 500 fs up to 5 ps, which now become available in the study of equilibrium and conformational properties of molecular liquids without a loss of stability and accuracy.

  5. Review: Molecular pathology in adult high-grade gliomas: from molecular diagnostics to target therapies

    PubMed Central

    Masui, K.; Cloughesy, T. F.; Mischel, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    The classification of malignant gliomas is moving from a morphology-based guide to a system built on molecular criteria. The development of a genomic landscape for gliomas and a better understanding of its functional consequences have led to the development of internally consistent molecular classifiers. However, development of a biologically insightful classification to guide therapy is still a work in progress. Response to targeted treatments is based not only on the presence of drugable targets, but rather on the molecular circuitry of the cells. Further, tumours are heterogeneous and change and adapt in response to drugs. Therefore, the challenge of developing molecular classifiers that provide meaningful ways to stratify patients for therapy remains a major challenge for the field. In this review, we examine the potential role of MGMT methylation, IDH1/2 mutations, 1p/19q deletions, aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor and PI3K pathways, abnormal p53/Rb pathways, cancer stem-cell markers and microRNAs as prognostic and predictive molecular markers in the setting of adult high-grade gliomas and we outline the clinically relevant subtypes of glioblastoma with genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic integrated analyses. Furthermore, we describe how these advances, especially in epidermal growth factor receptor/PI3K/mTOR signalling pathway, affect our approaches towards targeted therapy, raising new challenges and identifying new leads. PMID:22098029

  6. Quantifying the Ebbinghaus figure effect: target size, context size, and target-context distance determine the presence and direction of the illusion

    PubMed Central

    Knol, Hester; Huys, Raoul; Sarrazin, Jean-Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, visual illusions, like the Ebbinghaus figure, have become widespread to investigate functional segregation of the visual system. This segregation reveals itself, so it is claimed, in the insensitivity of movement to optical illusions. This claim, however, faces contradictory results (and interpretations) in the literature. These contradictions may be due to methodological weaknesses in, and differences across studies, some of which may hide a lack of perceptual illusion effects. Indeed, despite the long history of research with the Ebbinghaus figure, standardized configurations to predict the illusion effect are missing. Here, we present a complete geometrical description of the Ebbinghaus figure with three target sizes compatible with Fitts' task. Each trial consisted of a stimulus and an isolated probe. The probe was controlled by the participant's response through a staircase procedure. The participant was asked whether the probe or target appeared bigger. The factors target size, context size, target-context distance, and a control condition resulted in a 3 × 3 × 3+3 factorial design. The results indicate that the illusion magnitude, the perceptual distinctiveness, and the response time depend on the context size, distance, and especially, target size. In 33% of the factor combinations there was no illusion effect. The illusion magnitude ranged from zero to (exceptionally) 10% of the target size. The small (or absent) illusion effects on perception and its possible influence on motor tasks might have been overlooked or misinterpreted in previous studies. Our results provide a basis for the application of the Ebbinghaus figure in psychophysical and motor control studies. PMID:26583002

  7. Quantifying the Ebbinghaus figure effect: target size, context size, and target-context distance determine the presence and direction of the illusion.

    PubMed

    Knol, Hester; Huys, Raoul; Sarrazin, Jean-Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, visual illusions, like the Ebbinghaus figure, have become widespread to investigate functional segregation of the visual system. This segregation reveals itself, so it is claimed, in the insensitivity of movement to optical illusions. This claim, however, faces contradictory results (and interpretations) in the literature. These contradictions may be due to methodological weaknesses in, and differences across studies, some of which may hide a lack of perceptual illusion effects. Indeed, despite the long history of research with the Ebbinghaus figure, standardized configurations to predict the illusion effect are missing. Here, we present a complete geometrical description of the Ebbinghaus figure with three target sizes compatible with Fitts' task. Each trial consisted of a stimulus and an isolated probe. The probe was controlled by the participant's response through a staircase procedure. The participant was asked whether the probe or target appeared bigger. The factors target size, context size, target-context distance, and a control condition resulted in a 3 × 3 × 3+3 factorial design. The results indicate that the illusion magnitude, the perceptual distinctiveness, and the response time depend on the context size, distance, and especially, target size. In 33% of the factor combinations there was no illusion effect. The illusion magnitude ranged from zero to (exceptionally) 10% of the target size. The small (or absent) illusion effects on perception and its possible influence on motor tasks might have been overlooked or misinterpreted in previous studies. Our results provide a basis for the application of the Ebbinghaus figure in psychophysical and motor control studies. PMID:26583002

  8. Target product selection - where can Molecular Pharming make the difference?

    PubMed

    Paul, Mathew J; Teh, Audrey Y H; Twyman, Richard M; Ma, Julian K-C

    2013-01-01

    Four major developments have taken place in the world of Molecular Pharming recently. In the USA, the DARPA initiative challenged plant biotechnology companies to develop strategies for the large-scale manufacture of influenza vaccines, resulting in a successful Phase I clinical trial; in Europe the Pharma-Planta academic consortium gained regulatory approval for a plant-derived monoclonal antibody and completed a first-in-human phase I clinical trial; the Dutch pharmaceutical company Synthon acquired the assets of Biolex Therapeutics, an established Molecular Pharming company with several clinical candidates produced in their proprietary LEX system based on aquatic plants; and finally, the Israeli biotechnology company Protalix Biotherapeutics won FDA approval for the commercial release of a recombinant form of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase produced in carrot cells, the first plant biotechnology-derived biopharmaceutical in the world approved for the market. Commercial momentum is gathering pace with additional candidates now undergoing or awaiting approval for phase III clinical trials. Filling the product pipeline is vital to establish commercial sustainability, and the selection of appropriate target products for Molecular Pharming will be a critical factor. An interesting feature of the four stories outlined above is that they span the use of very different platform technologies addressing different types of molecules which aim to satisfy distinct market demands. In each case, Molecular Pharming was an economically and technically suitable approach, but this decisionmaking process is not necessarily straightforward. Although the various technologies available to Molecular Pharming are broad ranging and flexible, competing technologies are better established, so there needs to be a compelling reason to move into plants. It is most unlikely that plant biotechnology will be the answer for the whole biologics field. In this article, we discuss the current plant

  9. Target product selection - where can Molecular Pharming make the difference?

    PubMed

    Paul, Mathew J; Teh, Audrey Y H; Twyman, Richard M; Ma, Julian K-C

    2013-01-01

    Four major developments have taken place in the world of Molecular Pharming recently. In the USA, the DARPA initiative challenged plant biotechnology companies to develop strategies for the large-scale manufacture of influenza vaccines, resulting in a successful Phase I clinical trial; in Europe the Pharma-Planta academic consortium gained regulatory approval for a plant-derived monoclonal antibody and completed a first-in-human phase I clinical trial; the Dutch pharmaceutical company Synthon acquired the assets of Biolex Therapeutics, an established Molecular Pharming company with several clinical candidates produced in their proprietary LEX system based on aquatic plants; and finally, the Israeli biotechnology company Protalix Biotherapeutics won FDA approval for the commercial release of a recombinant form of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase produced in carrot cells, the first plant biotechnology-derived biopharmaceutical in the world approved for the market. Commercial momentum is gathering pace with additional candidates now undergoing or awaiting approval for phase III clinical trials. Filling the product pipeline is vital to establish commercial sustainability, and the selection of appropriate target products for Molecular Pharming will be a critical factor. An interesting feature of the four stories outlined above is that they span the use of very different platform technologies addressing different types of molecules which aim to satisfy distinct market demands. In each case, Molecular Pharming was an economically and technically suitable approach, but this decisionmaking process is not necessarily straightforward. Although the various technologies available to Molecular Pharming are broad ranging and flexible, competing technologies are better established, so there needs to be a compelling reason to move into plants. It is most unlikely that plant biotechnology will be the answer for the whole biologics field. In this article, we discuss the current plant

  10. 48 CFR 52.219-21 - Small Business Size Representation for Targeted Industry Categories Under the Small Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Representation for Targeted Industry Categories Under the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program....219-21 Small Business Size Representation for Targeted Industry Categories Under the Small Business... Size Representation for Targeted Industry Categories Under the Small Business...

  11. Inter-molecular β-sheet structure facilitates lung-targeting siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jihan; Li, Dong; Wen, Hao; Zheng, Shuquan; Su, Cuicui; Yi, Fan; Wang, Jue; Liang, Zicai; Tang, Tao; Zhou, Demin; Zhang, Li-He; Liang, Dehai; Du, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Size-dependent passive targeting based on the characteristics of tissues is a basic mechanism of drug delivery. While the nanometer-sized particles are efficiently captured by the liver and spleen, the micron-sized particles are most likely entrapped within the lung owing to its unique capillary structure and physiological features. To exploit this property in lung-targeting siRNA delivery, we designed and studied a multi-domain peptide named K-β, which was able to form inter-molecular β-sheet structures. Results showed that K-β peptides and siRNAs formed stable complex particles of 60 nm when mixed together. A critical property of such particles was that, after being intravenously injected into mice, they further associated into loose and micron-sized aggregates, and thus effectively entrapped within the capillaries of the lung, leading to a passive accumulation and gene-silencing. The large size aggregates can dissociate or break down by the shear stress generated by blood flow, alleviating the pulmonary embolism. Besides the lung, siRNA enrichment and targeted gene silencing were also observed in the liver. This drug delivery strategy, together with the low toxicity, biodegradability, and programmability of peptide carriers, show great potentials in vivo applications. PMID:26955887

  12. Inter-molecular β-sheet structure facilitates lung-targeting siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jihan; Li, Dong; Wen, Hao; Zheng, Shuquan; Su, Cuicui; Yi, Fan; Wang, Jue; Liang, Zicai; Tang, Tao; Zhou, Demin; Zhang, Li-He; Liang, Dehai; Du, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Size-dependent passive targeting based on the characteristics of tissues is a basic mechanism of drug delivery. While the nanometer-sized particles are efficiently captured by the liver and spleen, the micron-sized particles are most likely entrapped within the lung owing to its unique capillary structure and physiological features. To exploit this property in lung-targeting siRNA delivery, we designed and studied a multi-domain peptide named K-β, which was able to form inter-molecular β-sheet structures. Results showed that K-β peptides and siRNAs formed stable complex particles of 60 nm when mixed together. A critical property of such particles was that, after being intravenously injected into mice, they further associated into loose and micron-sized aggregates, and thus effectively entrapped within the capillaries of the lung, leading to a passive accumulation and gene-silencing. The large size aggregates can dissociate or break down by the shear stress generated by blood flow, alleviating the pulmonary embolism. Besides the lung, siRNA enrichment and targeted gene silencing were also observed in the liver. This drug delivery strategy, together with the low toxicity, biodegradability, and programmability of peptide carriers, show great potentials in vivo applications. PMID:26955887

  13. Escorts Take the Lead: Molecular Chaperones as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dumaine; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2011-01-01

    The functional and physiological diversity of transmembrane receptors results from factors that influence the pharmacology, signaling, and trafficking of these receptors. Receptor mutations and other modifications may lead to misfolding, intracellular retention, and ineffective signaling of transmembrane receptors. The importance of such mutations is highlighted by the fact that various diseases have been linked to mutations that lead to ineffective signaling of these receptors, resulting from the retention of receptors in intracellular compartments. Studies focused on understanding the regulation of trafficking and cell surface expression of newly synthesized receptors have highlighted molecular chaperones as key regulators of receptor maturation and sorting. In this chapter, we discuss the functions of molecular chaperones in the regulation of seven-transmembrane-containing G-protein-coupled receptor function and trafficking and explore ways in which chaperones can serve as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:20691961

  14. Magnetized Target Fusion With Centimeter-Size Liner

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D

    2005-07-21

    The author concentrates on the version of magnetized target fusion (MTF) that involves 3D implosions of a wall-confined plasma with the density in the compressed state {approx} 10{sup 21}-10{sup 22} cm{sup -3}. Possible plasma configurations suitable for this approach are identified. The main physics issues are outlined (equilibrium, stability, transport, plasma-liner interaction, etc). Specific parameters of the experiment reaching the plasma Q{approx}1 are presented (Q is the ratio of the fusion yield to the energy delivered to the plasma). It is emphasized that there exists a synergy between the physics and technology of MTF and dense Z-pinches (DZP). Specific areas include the particle and heat transport in a high-beta plasma, plasma-liner interaction, liner stability, stand-off problem for the power source, reaching a rep-rate regime in the energy-producing reactor, etc. Possible use of existing pulsed-power facilities for addressing these issues is discussed.

  15. Cytoreductive surgery in the era of targeted molecular therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Arun Z.; Adibi, Mehrad; Borregales, Leonardo D.; Karam, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) was regarded standard of care for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in the immunotherapy era. With the advent of targeted molecular therapy (TMT) for the treatment of mRCC, the routine use of CN has been questioned. Up to date evidence continues to suggest that CN remains an integral part of treatment in appropriately selected patients. This review details the original context in which the efficacy of CN was established and rationale for the continued use of cytoreductive surgery in the era of TMT. PMID:26815334

  16. Evolving molecular targets in the treatment of nonmalignant gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Katzka, D A; Loftus, E V; Camilleri, M

    2012-09-01

    Novel treatments for gastrointestinal (GI) diseases are based on molecular targets. Novel pharmacologic and biological agents with greater selectivity and specificity are being developed for a variety of epithelial diseases, including eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), celiac disease, short bowel syndrome (SBS), and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). Motility and secretory agents are being developed for gastroparesis, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional constipation, and diarrhea. Here we focus on data from clinical trials involving validated pharmacodynamic or patient response outcomes. PMID:22828717

  17. Molecular Targets in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline usually beginning with impairment in the ability to form recent memories. Nonavailability of definitive therapeutic strategy urges developing pharmacological targets based on cell signaling pathways. A great revival of interest in nutraceuticals and adjuvant therapy has been put forward. Tea polyphenols for their multiple health benefits have also attracted the attention of researchers. Tea catechins showed enough potentiality to be used in future as therapeutic targets to provide neuroprotection against AD. This review attempts to present a concise map of different receptor signaling pathways associated with AD with an insight into drug designing based on the proposed signaling pathways, molecular mechanistic details of AD pathogenesis, and a scientific rationale for using tea polyphenols as proposed therapeutic agents in AD. PMID:26665008

  18. Molecular Targets in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline usually beginning with impairment in the ability to form recent memories. Nonavailability of definitive therapeutic strategy urges developing pharmacological targets based on cell signaling pathways. A great revival of interest in nutraceuticals and adjuvant therapy has been put forward. Tea polyphenols for their multiple health benefits have also attracted the attention of researchers. Tea catechins showed enough potentiality to be used in future as therapeutic targets to provide neuroprotection against AD. This review attempts to present a concise map of different receptor signaling pathways associated with AD with an insight into drug designing based on the proposed signaling pathways, molecular mechanistic details of AD pathogenesis, and a scientific rationale for using tea polyphenols as proposed therapeutic agents in AD.

  19. Molecular Targets in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline usually beginning with impairment in the ability to form recent memories. Nonavailability of definitive therapeutic strategy urges developing pharmacological targets based on cell signaling pathways. A great revival of interest in nutraceuticals and adjuvant therapy has been put forward. Tea polyphenols for their multiple health benefits have also attracted the attention of researchers. Tea catechins showed enough potentiality to be used in future as therapeutic targets to provide neuroprotection against AD. This review attempts to present a concise map of different receptor signaling pathways associated with AD with an insight into drug designing based on the proposed signaling pathways, molecular mechanistic details of AD pathogenesis, and a scientific rationale for using tea polyphenols as proposed therapeutic agents in AD. PMID:26665008

  20. Enhanced sensitivity carbon nanotubes as targeted photoacoustic molecular imaging agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Zerda, Adam; Liu, Zhuang; Zavaleta, Cristina; Bodapati, Sunil; Teed, Robert; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Ma, Te-Jen; Oralkan, Omer; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Dai, Hongjie; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2009-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging of living subjects offers high spatial resolution at increased tissue depths compared to purely optical imaging techniques. We have recently shown that intravenously injected single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be used as targeted photoacoustic imaging agents in living mice using RGD peptides to target αvβ3 integrins. We have now developed a new targeted photoacoustic imaging agent based on SWNTs and Indocyanine Green (SWNT-ICG) with absorption peak at 780nm. The photoacoustic signal of the new imaging agent is enhanced by ~20 times as compared to plain SWNTs. The particles are synthesized from SWNT-RGD that noncovalently attach to multiple ICG molecules through pi-pi stacking interactions. Negative control particles had RAD peptide instead of RGD. We measured the serum stability of the particles and verified that the RGD/RAD conjugation did not alter the particle's absorbance spectrum. Finally, through cell uptake studies with U87MG cells we verified that the particles bind selectively to αvβ3 integrin. In conclusion, the extremely high absorption of the SWNT-ICG particles shows great promise for high sensitivity photoacoustic imaging of molecular targets in-vivo. This work lays the foundations for future in-vivo studies that will use the SWNT-ICG particles as imaging agents administered systemically.

  1. Target-size embracing dimension for sensitive detection of viruses with various sizes and influenza virus strains.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Yi; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Yang, Mei-Lin; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2012-05-15

    The focused ion beam (FIB) technique was employed to precisely fabricate hexagon-like Au nano-rods (fibAu_h) arrays as a surface enhanced Raman scattering - active substrate. A "ring diameter" (D(R)) was created by the convergence of three fibAu_h with respect to the dimension of the target viruses (D(T)), such as adenovirus (Adeno), encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), influenza virus (H1N1) with different sizes. Three influenza A virus strains were also compared. The results indicate that as that with a D(R)/D(T) ratio of around 1, the discrimination ability for detecting the target viruses and SERS mechanism become obvious. The enhanced lightning rod effect surrounding the seized target virus is anticipated if its size and dimension is suitably embraced within three fibAu_h. Hence the as-designed fibAu_h sample with a target-size embracing dimension provides good discrimination ability for distinguishing virus of various sizes or virus strains.

  2. Targeted agri-environment schemes significantly improve the population size of common farmland bumblebee species.

    PubMed

    Wood, Thomas J; Holland, John M; Hughes, William O H; Goulson, Dave

    2015-04-01

    Changes in agricultural practice across Europe and North America have been associated with range contractions and local extinction of bumblebees (Bombus spp.). A number of agri-environment schemes have been implemented to halt and reverse these declines, predominantly revolving around the provision of additional forage plants. Although it has been demonstrated that these schemes can attract substantial numbers of foraging bumblebees, it remains unclear to what extent they actually increase bumblebee populations. We used standardized transect walks and molecular techniques to compare the size of bumblebee populations between Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) farms implementing pollinator-friendly schemes and Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) control farms. Bumblebee abundance on the transect walks was significantly higher on HLS farms than ELS farms. Molecular analysis suggested maximum foraging ranges of 566 m for Bombus hortorum, 714 m for B. lapidarius, 363 m for B. pascuorum and 799 m for B. terrestris. Substantial differences in maximum foraging range were found within bumblebee species between farm types. Accounting for foraging range differences, B. hortorum (47 vs 13 nests/km(2) ) and B. lapidarius (45 vs 22 nests/km(2) ) were found to nest at significantly greater densities on HLS farms than ELS farms. There were no significant differences between farm type for B. terrestris (88 vs 38 nests/km(2) ) and B. pascuorum (32 vs 39 nests/km(2) ). Across all bumblebee species, HLS management had a significantly positive effect on bumblebee nest density. These results show that targeted agri-environment schemes that increase the availability of suitable forage can significantly increase the size of wild bumblebee populations.

  3. Targeted agri-environment schemes significantly improve the population size of common farmland bumblebee species.

    PubMed

    Wood, Thomas J; Holland, John M; Hughes, William O H; Goulson, Dave

    2015-04-01

    Changes in agricultural practice across Europe and North America have been associated with range contractions and local extinction of bumblebees (Bombus spp.). A number of agri-environment schemes have been implemented to halt and reverse these declines, predominantly revolving around the provision of additional forage plants. Although it has been demonstrated that these schemes can attract substantial numbers of foraging bumblebees, it remains unclear to what extent they actually increase bumblebee populations. We used standardized transect walks and molecular techniques to compare the size of bumblebee populations between Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) farms implementing pollinator-friendly schemes and Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) control farms. Bumblebee abundance on the transect walks was significantly higher on HLS farms than ELS farms. Molecular analysis suggested maximum foraging ranges of 566 m for Bombus hortorum, 714 m for B. lapidarius, 363 m for B. pascuorum and 799 m for B. terrestris. Substantial differences in maximum foraging range were found within bumblebee species between farm types. Accounting for foraging range differences, B. hortorum (47 vs 13 nests/km(2) ) and B. lapidarius (45 vs 22 nests/km(2) ) were found to nest at significantly greater densities on HLS farms than ELS farms. There were no significant differences between farm type for B. terrestris (88 vs 38 nests/km(2) ) and B. pascuorum (32 vs 39 nests/km(2) ). Across all bumblebee species, HLS management had a significantly positive effect on bumblebee nest density. These results show that targeted agri-environment schemes that increase the availability of suitable forage can significantly increase the size of wild bumblebee populations. PMID:25753513

  4. Molecular Targeted Therapies Using Botanicals for Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nagi; Chornokur, Ganna

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the large number of botanicals demonstrating promise as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, most have failed to prove effectiveness in clinical trials. Critical requirements for moving botanical agents to recommendation for clinical use include adopting a systematic, molecular-target based approach and utilizing the same ethical and rigorous methods that are used to evaluate other pharmacological agents. Preliminary data on a mechanistic rationale for chemoprevention activity as observed from epidemiological, in vitro and preclinical studies, phase I data of safety in suitable cohorts, duration of intervention based on time to progression of pre-neoplastic disease to cancer and using a valid panel of biomarkers representing the hypothesized carcinogenesis pathway for measuring efficacy must inform the design of clinical trials. Botanicals have been shown to influence multiple biochemical and molecular cascades that inhibit mutagenesis, proliferation, induce apoptosis, suppress the formation and growth of human cancers, thus modulating several hallmarks of carcinogenesis. These agents appear promising in their potential to make a dramatic impact in cancer prevention and treatment, with a significantly superior safety profile than most agents evaluated to date. The goal of this paper is to provide models of translational research based on the current evidence of promising botanicals with a specific focus on targeted therapies for PCa chemoprevention. PMID:24527269

  5. [Bioinformatics of tumor molecular targets from big data].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinyan; Yu, Yingyan

    2015-01-01

    The big data from high throughput research disclosed 4V features: volume of data, variety of data, value for deep mining, and velocity of processing speed. Regarding the whole genome sequencing for human sample, at average 30x of coverage, a total of 100 GB of original data (compression FASTQ format) could be produced. Replying to the binary BAM format, a total of 150 GB data could be produced. In the analysis of high throughput data, we need to combine both clinical information and pathological features. In addition, the data sources of medical research involved in ethical and privacy of patients. At present, the costs are gradually cheaper. For example, a whole genome sequencing by Illumina X Ten with 30x coverage costs about 10,000 RMB, and RNA-seq costs 5000 RMB for a single sample. Therefore, cancer genome research provides opportunities for discovery of molecular targets, but also brings enormous challenges on the data integration and utilization. This article introduces methodologies for high throughput data analysis and processing, and explains possible application on molecular target discovery. PMID:25656022

  6. Disease-specific target gene expression profiling of molecular imaging probes: database development and clinical validation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lawrence Wing-Chi; Ngo, Connie Hiu-Ching; Wang, Fengfeng; Zhao, Moss Y; Zhao, Mengying; Law, Helen Ka-Wai; Wong, Sze Chuen Cesar; Yung, Benjamin Yat-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging probes can target abnormal gene expression patterns in patients and allow early diagnosis of disease. For selecting a suitable imaging probe, the current Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD) provides descriptive and qualitative information on imaging probe characteristics and properties. However, MICAD does not support linkage with the expression profiles of target genes. The proposed Disease-specific Imaging Probe Profiling (DIPP) database quantitatively archives and presents the gene expression profiles of targets across different diseases, anatomic regions, and subcellular locations, providing an objective reference for selecting imaging probes. The DIPP database was validated with a clinical positron emission tomography (PET) study on lung cancer and an in vitro study on neuroendocrine cancer. The retrieved records show that choline kinase beta and glucose transporters were positively and significantly associated with lung cancer among the targets of 11C-choline and [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG), respectively. Their significant overexpressions corresponded to the findings that the uptake rate of FDG increased with tumor size but that of 11C-choline remained constant. Validated with the in vitro study, the expression profiles of disease-associated targets can indicate the eligibility of patients for clinical trials of the treatment probe. A Web search tool of the DIPP database is available at http://www.polyu.edu.hk/bmi/dipp/. PMID:25022454

  7. Optimal target VOI size for accurate 4D coregistration of DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Brian; Mikheev, Artem; Zaim Wadghiri, Youssef; Bertrand, Anne; Novikov, Dmitry; Chandarana, Hersh; Rusinek, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI has emerged as a reliable and diagnostically useful functional imaging technique. DCE protocol typically lasts 3-15 minutes and results in a time series of N volumes. For automated analysis, it is important that volumes acquired at different times be spatially coregistered. We have recently introduced a novel 4D, or volume time series, coregistration tool based on a user-specified target volume of interest (VOI). However, the relationship between coregistration accuracy and target VOI size has not been investigated. In this study, coregistration accuracy was quantitatively measured using various sized target VOIs. Coregistration of 10 DCE-MRI mouse head image sets were performed with various sized VOIs targeting the mouse brain. Accuracy was quantified by measures based on the union and standard deviation of the coregistered volume time series. Coregistration accuracy was determined to improve rapidly as the size of the VOI increased and approached the approximate volume of the target (mouse brain). Further inflation of the VOI beyond the volume of the target (mouse brain) only marginally improved coregistration accuracy. The CPU time needed to accomplish coregistration is a linear function of N that varied gradually with VOI size. From the results of this study, we recommend the optimal size of the VOI to be slightly overinclusive, approximately by 5 voxels, of the target for computationally efficient and accurate coregistration.

  8. Molecular Pathways: Targeted α-Particle Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Yong, Kwon; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    An α-particle, a 4He nucleus, is exquisitely cytotoxic, and indifferent to many limitations associated with conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The exquisite cytotoxicity of α radiation, the result of its high mean energy deposition (high linear energy transfer, LET) and limited range in tissue, provides for a highly controlled therapeutic modality that can be targeted to selected malignant cells (targeted α-therapy (TAT)) with minimal normal tissue effects. There is a burgeoning interest in the development of TAT that is buoyed by the increasing number of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. The short path length renders α-emitters suitable for treatment and management of minimal disease such as micrometastases or residual tumor after surgical debulking, hematological cancers, infections, and compartmental cancers such as ovarian cancer or neoplastic meningitis. Yet, despite decades of study of high-LET radiation, the mechanistic pathways of the effects of this modality remain not well defined. The modality is effectively presumed to follow a simple therapeutic mechanism centered on catastrophic double strand (ds) DNA breaks without full examination of the actual molecular pathways and targets that are activated that directly impact cell survival or death. This Molecular Pathways article provides an overview of the mechanisms and pathways that are involved in the response to and repair of TAT induced DNA damage as currently understood. Finally, this article highlights the current state of clinical translation of TAT as well as other high-LET radionuclide radiation therapy using α-emitters such as 225Ac, 211At, 213Bi, 212Pb and 223Ra. PMID:23230321

  9. A robust close-range photogrammetric target extraction algorithm for size and type variant targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyarko, Kofi; Thomas, Clayton; Torres, Gilbert

    2016-05-01

    The Photo-G program conducted by Naval Air Systems Command at the Atlantic Test Range in Patuxent River, Maryland, uses photogrammetric analysis of large amounts of real-world imagery to characterize the motion of objects in a 3-D scene. Current approaches involve several independent processes including target acquisition, target identification, 2-D tracking of image features, and 3-D kinematic state estimation. Each process has its own inherent complications and corresponding degrees of both human intervention and computational complexity. One approach being explored for automated target acquisition relies on exploiting the pixel intensity distributions of photogrammetric targets, which tend to be patterns with bimodal intensity distributions. The bimodal distribution partitioning algorithm utilizes this distribution to automatically deconstruct a video frame into regions of interest (ROI) that are merged and expanded to target boundaries, from which ROI centroids are extracted to mark target acquisition points. This process has proved to be scale, position and orientation invariant, as well as fairly insensitive to global uniform intensity disparities.

  10. A targeted molecular probe for colorectal cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attramadal, T.; Bjerke, R.; Indrevoll, B.; Moestue, S.; Rogstad, A.; Bendiksen, R.; Healey, A.; Johannesen, E.

    2008-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death. Morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs can be reduced if the disease can be detected at an early stage. Screening is a viable approach as there is a clear link to risk factors such as age. We have developed a fluorescent contrast agent for use during colonoscopy. The agent is administered intravenously and is targeted to an early stage molecular marker for colorectal cancer. The agent consists of a targeting section comprising a peptide, and a fluorescent reporter molecule. Clinical imaging of the agent is to be performed with a far red fluorescence imaging channel (635 nm excitation/660-700 nm emission) as an adjunct to white light colonoscopy. Preclinical proof of mechanism results are presented. The compound has a K d of ~3nM. Two human xenograft tumour models were used. Tumour cells were implanted and grown subcutaneously in nude mice. Imaging using a fluorescence reflectance imaging system and quantitative biodistribution studies were performed. Substances tested include the targeted agent, and a scrambled sequence of the peptide (no binding) used as a negative control. Competition studies were also performed by co-administration of 180 times excess unlabelled peptide. Positive imaging contrast was shown in the tumours, with a clear relationship to expression levels (confirmed with quantitative biodistribution data). There was a significant difference between the positive and negative control substances, and a significant reduction in contrast in the competition experiment.

  11. Targeting Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer: Molecular and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Papandreou, Christos N.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate carcinoma, either co-present with the local adenocarcinoma disease or as a result of transdifferentiation later in time, was described as one major process of emerging resistance to androgen deprivation therapies, and at the clinical level it is consistent with the development of rapidly progressive visceral disease, often in the absence of elevated serum prostate-specific antigen level. Until present, platinum-based chemotherapy has been the only treatment modality, able to produce a fair amount of responses but of short duration. Recently, several efforts for molecular characterization of this lethal phenotype have resulted in identification of novel signaling factors involved in microenvironment interactions, mitosis, and neural reprograming as potential therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical testing of specific inhibitors of these targets, for example, Aurora kinase A inhibitors, in carefully selected patients and exploitation of expression changes of the target before and after manipulation is anticipated to increase the existing data and facilitate therapeutic decision making at this late stage of the disease when hormonal manipulations, even with the newest androgen-directed therapies are no longer feasible. PMID:25699233

  12. Rational approaches to design of therapeutics targeting molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Klasa, R J; List, A F; Cheson, B D

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces novel therapeutic strategies focusing on a molecular marker relevant to a particular hematologic malignancy. Four different approaches targeting specific molecules in unique pathways will be presented. The common theme will be rational target selection in a strategy that has reached the early phase of human clinical trial in one malignancy, but with a much broader potential applicability to the technology. In Section I Dr. Richard Klasa presents preclinical data on the use of antisense oligonucleotides directed at the bcl-2 gene message to specifically downregulate Bcl-2 protein expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and render the cells more susceptible to the induction of apoptosis. In Section II Dr. Alan List reviews the targeting of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor in anti-angiogenesis strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In Section III Dr. Bruce Cheson describes recent progress in inhibiting cell cycle progression by selectively disrupting cyclin D1 with structurally unique compounds such as flavopiridol in mantle cell lymphoma as well as describing a new class of agents that affect proteasome degradation pathways.

  13. Dominant luminescence is not due to quantum confinement in molecular-sized silicon carbide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Beke, David; Szekrényes, Zsolt; Czigány, Zsolt; Kamarás, Katalin; Gali, Ádám

    2015-07-01

    Molecular-sized colloid silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles are very promising candidates to realize bioinert non-perturbative fluorescent nanoparticles for in vivo bioimaging. Furthermore, SiC nanoparticles with engineered vacancy-related emission centres may realize magneto-optical probes operating at nanoscale resolution. Understanding the nature of molecular-sized SiC nanoparticle emission is essential for further applications. Here we report an efficient and simple method to produce a relatively narrow size distribution of water soluble molecular-sized SiC nanoparticles. The tight control of their size distribution makes it possible to demonstrate a switching mechanism in the luminescence correlated with particle size. We show that molecular-sized SiC nanoparticles of 1-3 nm show a relatively strong and broad surface related luminescence whilst the larger ones exhibit a relatively weak band edge and structural defect luminescence with no evidence of quantum confinement effect. PMID:26055555

  14. Identification of Molecular Targets for Predicting Colon Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yansheng; Zhang, Jun; Li, Li; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Yong; Teng, Zhaowei; Wu, Feihu

    2016-01-01

    Background Colon adenocarcinoma mostly happens at the junction of the rectum and is a common gastrointestinal malignancy. Accumulated evidence has indicated that colon adenocarcinoma develops by genetic alterations and is a complicated disease. The aim of this study was to screen differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) and genes with diagnostic and prognostic potentials in colon adenocarcinoma. Material/Methods In this study we screened DEMs and their target genes (DEGs) between 100 colon adenocarcinoma and normal samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database by using the DEseq toolkit in Bioconductor. Then Go enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis were performed on the selected differential genes by use of the DAVID online tool. A regulation network of miRNA-gene was constructed and analyzed by Cytoscape. Finally, we performed ROC analysis of 8 miRNAs and ROC curves were drawn. Results A total of 159 DEMs and 1921 DEGs were screened, and 1881 pairs of miRNA-target genes with significant negative correlations were also obtained. A regulatory network of miRNA-gene, including 60 cancer-related genes and 47 miRNAs, was successfully constructed. In addition, 5 clusters with several miRNAs regulating a set of target genes simultaneously were identified through cluster analysis. There were 8 miRNAs involved in these 5 clusters, and these miRNAs could serve as molecular biomarkers to distinguish colon adenocarcinoma and normal samples indicated by ROC analysis. Conclusions The identified 8 miRNAs were closely associated with colon adenocarcinoma, which may have great clinical value as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and provide new ideas for targeted therapy. PMID:26868022

  15. Identifying Molecular Targets of Lifestyle Modifications in Colon Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Molly M.; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    One in four deaths in the United States is cancer-related, and colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. Screening strategies are utilized but have not reduced disease incidence or mortality. In this regard, there is an interest in cancer preventive strategies focusing on lifestyle intervention, where specific etiologic factors involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression could be targeted. For example, exposure to dietary carcinogens, such as nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons influences colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, dietary deficiencies could alter sensitivity to genetic damage and influence carcinogen metabolism contributing to CRC. High alcohol consumption increases the risk of mutations including the fact that acetaldehyde, an ethanol metabolite, is classified as a group 1 carcinogen. Tobacco smoke exposure is also a risk factor for cancer development; approximately 20% of CRCs are associated with smoking. Additionally, obese patients have a higher risk of cancer development, which is further supported by the fact that physical activity decreases CRC risk by 55%. Similarly, chronic inflammatory conditions also increase the risk of CRC development. Moreover, the circadian clock alters digestion and regulates other biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes that could influence CRC. Taken together, colon carcinogenesis involves a number of etiological factors, and therefore, to create effective preventive strategies, molecular targets need to be identified and beleaguered prior to disease progression. With this in mind, the following is a comprehensive review identifying downstream target proteins of the above lifestyle risk factors, which are modulated during colon carcinogenesis and could be targeted for CRC prevention by novel agents including phytochemicals. PMID:23675573

  16. Molecular Approach to Targeted Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sherbet, Gajanan V

    2016-01-01

    The development and evolution of targeted therapy to any disease require the identification of targets amenable to treatment of patients. Here the pathogenetic signalling systems involved in multiple sclerosis are scrutinised to locate nodes of deregulation and dysfunction in order to devise strategies of drug development for targeted intervention. Oliogoclonal bands (OCB) are isoelectric focusing profiles of immunoglobulins synthesised in the central nervous system. OCBs enable the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis with high sensitivity and specificity and are related to the course of the disease and progression. The OCB patterns can be linked with the expression of angiogenic molecular species. Angiogenic signalling which has also been implicated in demyelination provides the option of using angiogenesis inhibitors in disease control. The PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt axis has emerged with a key role in myelination with its demonstrable links with mTOR mediated transcription of downstream target genes. Inflammatory signals and innate and acquired immunity from the activation of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) responsive genes are considered. NF-κB signalling could be implicated in myelination. The transcription factor STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) and the EBV (Epstein- Barr virus) transcription factor BZLF1 contributing significantly to the disease process are a major environmental factor linked to MS. EBV can activate TGF (transforming growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) signalling. EBV microRNAs are reviewed as signalling mediators of pathogenesis. Stem cell transplantation therapy has lately gained much credence, so the current status of mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell therapy is reviewed with emphasis on the differential expression immune-related genes and operation of signalling systems.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Elshaer, Sally L.; Eldahshan, Wael S.; Mysona, Barbara A.; El-Remessy, Azza B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in United States. Research indicates an association between oxidative stress and the development of diabetes complications. However, clinical trials with general antioxidants have failed to prove effective in diabetic patients. Mounting evidence from experimental studies that continue to elucidate the damaging effects of oxidative stress and inflammation in both vascular and neural retina suggest its critical role in the pathogenesis of DR. This review will outline the current management of DR as well as present potential experimental therapeutic interventions, focusing on molecules that link oxidative stress to inflammation to provide potential therapeutic targets for treatment or prevention of DR. Understanding the biochemical changes and the molecular events under diabetic conditions could provide new effective therapeutic tools to combat the disease. PMID:25949069

  18. Radiation inactivation analysis of enzymes. Effect of free radical scavengers on apparent target sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, D.C.; Solomonson, L.P.; Barber, M.J.; McCreery, M.J.; Ness, G.C.

    1987-07-15

    In most cases the apparent target size obtained by radiation inactivation analysis corresponds to the subunit size or to the size of a multimeric complex. In this report, we examined whether the larger than expected target sizes of some enzymes could be due to secondary effects of free radicals. To test this proposal we carried out radiation inactivation analysis on Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, Torula yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, Chlorella vulgaris nitrate reductase, and chicken liver sulfite oxidase in the presence and absence of free radical scavengers (benzoic acid and mannitol). In the presence of free radical scavengers, inactivation curves are shifted toward higher radiation doses. Plots of scavenger concentration versus enzyme activity showed that the protective effect of benzoic acid reached a maximum at 25 mM then declined. Mannitol alone had little effect, but appeared to broaden the maximum protective range of benzoic acid relative to concentration. The apparent target size of the polymerase activity of DNA polymerase I in the presence of free radical scavengers was about 40% of that observed in the absence of these agents. This is considerably less than the minimum polypeptide size and may reflect the actual size of the polymerase functional domain. Similar effects, but of lesser magnitude, were observed for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, nitrate reductase, and sulfite oxidase. These results suggest that secondary damage due to free radicals generated in the local environment as a result of ionizing radiation can influence the apparent target size obtained by this method.

  19. Nutraceuticals: Potential for Chondroprotection and Molecular Targeting of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Daniel J.; Choudhury, Marwa; Hirsh, David M.; Hardin, John A.; Cobelli, Neil J.; Sun, Hui B.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals—food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease—offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment. PMID:24284399

  20. Nutraceuticals: potential for chondroprotection and molecular targeting of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Leong, Daniel J; Choudhury, Marwa; Hirsh, David M; Hardin, John A; Cobelli, Neil J; Sun, Hui B

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals-food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease-offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment. PMID:24284399

  1. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  2. Molecular mechanisms and proposed targets for selected anticancer gold compounds.

    PubMed

    Casini, Angela; Messori, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, gold compounds constitute a family of very promising experimental agents for cancer treatment. Indeed, several gold(I) and gold(III) compounds were shown to manifest outstanding antiproliferative properties in vitro against selected human tumor cell lines and some of them performed remarkably well even in tumor models in vivo. Notably, the peculiar chemical properties of the gold centre impart innovative pharmacological profiles to gold-based metallodrugs most likely in relation to novel molecular mechanisms. The precise mechanisms through which cytotoxic gold compounds produce their biological effects are still largely unknown. Within this frame, the major aim of this review is to define the possible modes of action and the most probable biomolecular targets for a few representative gold compounds on which extensive biochemical and cellular data have been gathered. In particular, we will focus on auranofin and analogues, on gold(III) porphyrins and gold(III) dithiocarbamates. For these three families markedly distinct molecular mechanisms were recently invoked: a direct mitochondrial mechanism involving thioredoxin reductase inhibition in the case of the gold(I) complexes, the influence on some apoptotic proteins--i.e. MAPKs and Bcl-2--for gold(III) porphyrins, and the proteasome inhibition for gold(III) dithiocarbamates. In a few cases the distinct mechanisms may overlap. The general perspectives for the development of new gold compounds as effective anticancer agents with innovative modes of action are critically discussed. PMID:22039866

  3. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  4. Molecular targets in arthritis and recent trends in nanotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to its severity and increasing epidemiology, arthritis needs no description. There are various forms of arthritis most of which are disabling, very painful, and common. In spite of breakthroughs in the field of drug discovery, there is no cure for arthritis that can eliminate the disease permanently and ease the pain. The present review focuses on some of the most successful drugs in arthritis therapy and their side effects. Potential new targets in arthritis therapy such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, osteopontin, and several others have been discussed here, which can lead to refinement of current therapeutic modalities. Mechanisms for different forms of arthritis have been discussed along with the molecules that act as potential biomarkers for arthritis. Due to the difficulty in monitoring the disease progression to detect the advanced manifestations of the diseases, drug-induced cytotoxicity, and problems with drug delivery; nanoparticle therapy has gained the attention of the researchers. The unique properties of nanoparticles make them highly attractive for the design of novel therapeutics or diagnostic agents for arthritis. The review also focuses on the recent trends in nanoformulation development used for arthritis therapy. This review is, therefore, important because it describes the relevance and need for more arthritis research, it brings forth a critical discussion of successful drugs in arthritis and analyses the key molecular targets. The review also identifies several knowledge gaps in the published research so far along with the proposal of new ideas and future directions in arthritis therapy. PMID:26345140

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of size segregation in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, Jason A. C.; Herrmann, Hans J.; Pöschel, Thorsten; Sokołowski, Stefan

    1996-01-01

    We report the first three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of particle segregation by shaking. Two different containers are considered: one cylindrical and another with periodic boundary conditions. The dependence of the time evolution of a test particle inside the material is studied as a function of the shaking frequency and amplitude, damping coefficients, and dispersivity.

  6. Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nuclear Targeting: The Effect of Nanoparticle Size and Nuclear Localization Sequence Density.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Breitinger, Hans G; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-12-01

    Many recently discovered therapeutic proteins exert their main function in the nucleus, thus requiring both efficient uptake and correct intracellular targeting. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted interest as protein delivery vehicles due to their biocompatibility and ability to escape the endosomes offering high potential for nuclear delivery. Molecular entry into the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complexes, the efficiency of which is dependent on NP size and the presence of nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes (S-NPs ≈ 25 nm; L-NP ≈ 150 nm) were formulated, and they were modified with different densities of the octapeptide NLS CPKKKRKV (S-NPs, 0.25, 0.5, 2.0 NLS/nm(2); L-NPs, 0.6, 0.9, 2 NLS/nm(2)). Unmodified and NLS-tagged NPs were evaluated for their protein loading capacity, extent of cell association, cell uptake, cell surface binding, and finally nuclear delivery efficiency in L929 fibroblasts. To avoid errors generated with cell fractionation and nuclear isolation protocols, nuclear delivery was assessed in intact cells utilizing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) fluorometry and microscopy. Although L-NPs showed ≈10-fold increase in protein loading per NP when compared to S-NPs, due to higher cell association and uptake S-NPs showed superior protein delivery. NLS exerts a size and density dependent effect on nanoparticle uptake and surface binding, with a general reduction in NP cell surface binding and an increase in cell uptake with the increase in NLS density (up to 8.4-fold increase in uptake of High-NLS-L-NPs (2 NLS/nm(2)) compared to unmodified L-NPs). However, for nuclear delivery, unmodified S-NPs show higher nuclear localization rates when compared to NLS modified NPs (up to 5-fold by FRET microscopy). For L-NPs an intermediate NLS density (0.9 NLS/nm(2)) seems to provide highest nuclear localization (3.7-fold increase in nuclear delivery compared to High

  7. Size Matters: Molecular Weight Specificity of Hyaluronan Effects in Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Cyphert, Jaime M.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan signaling properties are unique among other biologically active molecules, that they are apparently not influenced by postsynthetic molecular modification, but by hyaluronan fragment size. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the generation of hyaluronan fragments of different size and size-dependent differences in hyaluronan signaling as well as their downstream biological effects. PMID:26448754

  8. Small, medium, large or supersize? The development and evaluation of interventions targeted at portion size

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, W M; Steenhuis, I H M; Poelman, M P

    2014-01-01

    In the past decades, portion sizes of high-caloric foods and drinks have increased and can be considered an important environmental obesogenic factor. This paper describes a research project in which the feasibility and effectiveness of environmental interventions targeted at portion size was evaluated. The studies that we conducted revealed that portion size labeling, offering a larger variety of portion sizes, and proportional pricing (that is, a comparable price per unit regardless of the size) were considered feasible to implement according to both consumers and point-of-purchase representatives. Studies into the effectiveness of these interventions demonstrated that the impact of portion size labeling on the (intended) consumption of soft drinks was, at most, modest. Furthermore, the introduction of smaller portion sizes of hot meals in worksite cafeterias in addition to the existing size stimulated a moderate number of consumers to replace their large meals by a small meal. Elaborating on these findings, we advocate further research into communication and marketing strategies related to portion size interventions; the development of environmental portion size interventions as well as educational interventions that improve people's ability to deal with a ‘super-sized' environment; the implementation of regulation with respect to portion size labeling, and the use of nudges to stimulate consumers to select healthier portion sizes. PMID:25033959

  9. Developer molecular size dependence of pattern formation of polymer type electron beam resists with various molecular weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Tomohiro; Asada, Hironori; Kishimura, Yukiko; Ochiai, Shunsuke; Hoshino, Ryoichi; Kawata, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    The sensitivity and the resolution are affected by not only the nature of the resist such as a chemical structure and a molecular weight but also the developing process such as a developer molecular size. Exposure characteristics of positive-tone polymer resists having various molecular weights (Mw's) ranging from 60 k to 500 k are investigated using different ester solvents as a developer. The line-and-space (L/S) patterns are exposed by the electron beam writing system with an acceleration voltage of 50 kV and the samples are developed by amyl acetate, hexyl acetate and heptyl acetate. The pattern shape becomes better and the surface of the resist also becomes smoother with increasing developer molecular size, though the exposure dose required for the formation of the L/S pattern increases. The dose margin of pattern formation is also wider in all the resists having the different molecular weights. The dissolution in the unexposed portions of the 60k-Mw resist for heptyl acetate is reduced significantly compared with those for amyl acetate and hexyl acetate. The improvement of the pattern shape and the increasing of dose margin are remarkable in the low molecular weight resist. The 3σ of line width roughness tends to be smaller in the higher molecular weight resist and with the larger molecular size developer. Exposure experiment of the 35 nm pitch pattern using the 500k-Mw resist developed at the room temperature is presented.

  10. Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Kissin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I-II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009-2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004-2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs (2009-2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics, when its

  11. Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Kissin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I–III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I–II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009–2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004–2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I–III trials of investigational drugs (2009–2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics

  12. Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Kissin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I-II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009-2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004-2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs (2009-2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics, when its

  13. Biomolecular computation with molecular beacons for quantitative analysis of target nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee-Woong; Lee, Seung Hwan; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Yoo, Suk-In; Park, Tai Hyun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2013-01-01

    Molecular beacons are efficient and useful tools for quantitative detection of specific target nucleic acids. Thanks to their simple protocol, molecular beacons have great potential as substrates for biomolecular computing. Here we present a molecular beacon-based biomolecular computing method for quantitative detection and analysis of target nucleic acids. Whereas the conventional quantitative assays using fluorescent dyes have been designed for single target detection or multiplexed detection, the proposed method enables us not only to detect multiple targets but also to compute their quantitative information by weighted-sum of the targets. The detection and computation are performed on a molecular level simultaneously, and the outputs are detected as fluorescence signals. Experimental results show the feasibility and effectiveness of our weighted detection and linear combination method using molecular beacons. Our method can serve as a primitive operation of molecular pattern analysis, and we demonstrate successful binary classifications of molecular patterns made of synthetic oligonucleotide DNA molecules.

  14. Microcavity single virus detection and sizing with molecular sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2 by a spherical microcavity. Mass of this virus is ~6 ag and produces a theoretical resonance shift ~0.25 fm upon adsorbing an individual virus at the equator of the bare microcavity, which is well below the r.m.s background noise of 2 fm. However, detection was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4x105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer. Analytical expressions based on the "reactive sensing principle" are developed to extract the radius of the virus from the measured signals. Estimated limit of detection for these experiments was ~0.4 ag or 240 kDa below the size of all known viruses, largest globular and elongated proteins [Phosphofructokinase (345 kDa) and Fibrinogen (390 kDa), respectively].

  15. Interpretation of size-exclusion chromatography for the determination of molecular-size distribution of human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Christians, S; Schluender, S; van Treel, N D; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-size distribution by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) [1] is used for the quantification of unwanted aggregated forms in therapeutic polyclonal antibodies, referred to as human immunoglobulins (Ig) in the European Pharmacopoeia. Considering not only the requirements of the monographs for human normal Ig (0338, 0918 and 2788) [2-4], but also the general chapter on chromatographic techniques (2.2.46) [5], several chromatographic column types are allowed for performing this test. Although the EDQM knowledge database gives only 2 examples of suitable columns as a guide for the user, these monographs permit the use of columns with different lengths and diameters, and do not prescribe either particle size or pore size, which are considered key characteristics of SEC columns. Therefore, the columns used may differ significantly from each other with regard to peak resolution, potentially resulting in ambiguous peak identity assignment. In some cases, this may even lead to situations where the manufacturer and the Official Medicines Control Laboratory (OMCL) in charge of Official Control Authority Batch Release (OCABR) have differing molecular-size distribution profiles for aggregates of the same batch of Ig, even though both laboratories follow the requirements of the relevant monograph. In the present study, several formally acceptable columns and the peak integration results obtained therewith were compared. A standard size-exclusion column with a length of 60 cm and a particle size of 10 µm typically detects only 3 Ig fractions, namely monomers, dimers and polymers. This column type was among the first reliable HPLC columns on the market for this test and very rapidly became the standard for many pharmaceutical manufacturers and OMCLs for batch release testing. Consequently, the distribution of monomers, dimers and polymers was established as the basis for the interpretation of the results of the molecular-size distribution test in the relevant monographs

  16. Interpretation of size-exclusion chromatography for the determination of molecular-size distribution of human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Christians, S; Schluender, S; van Treel, N D; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-size distribution by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) [1] is used for the quantification of unwanted aggregated forms in therapeutic polyclonal antibodies, referred to as human immunoglobulins (Ig) in the European Pharmacopoeia. Considering not only the requirements of the monographs for human normal Ig (0338, 0918 and 2788) [2-4], but also the general chapter on chromatographic techniques (2.2.46) [5], several chromatographic column types are allowed for performing this test. Although the EDQM knowledge database gives only 2 examples of suitable columns as a guide for the user, these monographs permit the use of columns with different lengths and diameters, and do not prescribe either particle size or pore size, which are considered key characteristics of SEC columns. Therefore, the columns used may differ significantly from each other with regard to peak resolution, potentially resulting in ambiguous peak identity assignment. In some cases, this may even lead to situations where the manufacturer and the Official Medicines Control Laboratory (OMCL) in charge of Official Control Authority Batch Release (OCABR) have differing molecular-size distribution profiles for aggregates of the same batch of Ig, even though both laboratories follow the requirements of the relevant monograph. In the present study, several formally acceptable columns and the peak integration results obtained therewith were compared. A standard size-exclusion column with a length of 60 cm and a particle size of 10 µm typically detects only 3 Ig fractions, namely monomers, dimers and polymers. This column type was among the first reliable HPLC columns on the market for this test and very rapidly became the standard for many pharmaceutical manufacturers and OMCLs for batch release testing. Consequently, the distribution of monomers, dimers and polymers was established as the basis for the interpretation of the results of the molecular-size distribution test in the relevant monographs

  17. Targeting KIT in Melanoma: A Paradigm of Molecular Medicine and Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, Scott E.; Davies, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite multiple clinical trials utilizing a spectrum of therapeutic modalities, melanoma remains a disease with dismal outcomes in patients with advanced disease. However, it is now clear that melanoma is not a single entity, but can be molecularly divided into subtypes that generally correspond to the anatomical location of the primary melanoma. Melanomas from acral lentiginous, mucosal, and chronic sun-damaged sites frequently harbor activating mutations and/or increased copy number in the KIT tyrosine kinase receptor gene, which are very rare in the more common cutaneous tumors. Multiple case reports and early observations from clinical trials suggest that targeting mutant KIT with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is efficacious in KIT mutant melanoma. This review recounts what is known about the role of KIT in melanocyte maturation, our current understanding of KIT genetic aberrations in melanoma, and how this knowledge is being translated into clinical oncology. PMID:20457136

  18. Adrenaline and noradrenaline: protectors against oxidative stress or molecular targets?

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Diduk, Ruslán; Galano, Annia

    2015-02-26

    Density functional theory was used to investigate the potential role of neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline regarding oxidative stress. It is predicted that they can be efficient as free radical scavengers both in lipid and aqueous media, with the main reaction mechanism being the hydrogen transfer and the sequential proton loss electron transfer, respectively. Despite the polarity of the environment, adrenaline and noradrenaline react with (•)OOH faster than Trolox, which suggests that they are better peroxyl radical scavengers than the reference compound. Both catecholamines are also proposed to be capable of efficiently inhibiting the oxidative stress induced by copper(II)-ascorbate mixtures, and the (•)OH production via Haber-Weiss reaction, albeit the effects on the later are only partial. They exert such beneficial effects by sequestering Cu(II) ions. In summary, these catecholamines can be capable of reducing oxidative stress, by scavenging free radicals and by sequestering metal ions. However, at the same time they might lose their functions in the process due to the associated structural modifications. Consequently, adrenaline and noradrenaline can be considered as both protectors and molecular targets of oxidative stress. Fortunately, under the proper conditions, both catecholamines can be regenerated to their original form so their functions are restored.

  19. Adrenaline and noradrenaline: protectors against oxidative stress or molecular targets?

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Diduk, Ruslán; Galano, Annia

    2015-02-26

    Density functional theory was used to investigate the potential role of neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline regarding oxidative stress. It is predicted that they can be efficient as free radical scavengers both in lipid and aqueous media, with the main reaction mechanism being the hydrogen transfer and the sequential proton loss electron transfer, respectively. Despite the polarity of the environment, adrenaline and noradrenaline react with (•)OOH faster than Trolox, which suggests that they are better peroxyl radical scavengers than the reference compound. Both catecholamines are also proposed to be capable of efficiently inhibiting the oxidative stress induced by copper(II)-ascorbate mixtures, and the (•)OH production via Haber-Weiss reaction, albeit the effects on the later are only partial. They exert such beneficial effects by sequestering Cu(II) ions. In summary, these catecholamines can be capable of reducing oxidative stress, by scavenging free radicals and by sequestering metal ions. However, at the same time they might lose their functions in the process due to the associated structural modifications. Consequently, adrenaline and noradrenaline can be considered as both protectors and molecular targets of oxidative stress. Fortunately, under the proper conditions, both catecholamines can be regenerated to their original form so their functions are restored. PMID:25646569

  20. Linked changes in marine dissolved organic carbon molecular size and radiocarbon age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, B. D.; Primeau, F. W.; Beaupré, S. R.; Guilderson, T. P.; Druffel, E. R. M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a major global carbon reservoir, yet its cycling remains poorly understood. Previous work suggests that DOC molecular size and chemical composition can significantly affect its bioavailability. Thus, DOC size and composition may control DOC cycling and radiocarbon age (via Δ14C). Here we show that DOC molecular size is correlated to DOC Δ14C in the Pacific Ocean. Our results, based on a series of increasing molecular size fractions from three depths in the Pacific, show increasing DOC Δ14C with increasing molecular size. We use a size-age distribution model to predict the DOC and Δ14C of ultrafiltered DOC. The model predicts both large and small surface DOC with high Δ14C and a narrow range (200-500 Da) of low Δ14C DOC. Deep model offsets suggest different size distributions and/or Δ14C sources at 670-915 m. Our results suggest that molecular size and composition are linked to DOC reactivity and storage in the ocean.

  1. Relationships between tumor size and curablity for uniformly targeted therapy with beta-emitting radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    O`Donoghue, J.A.; Bardies, M.; Wheldon, T.E. |

    1995-10-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is a new form of radiotherapy that differs in some important respects from external beam irradiation. One of the most important differences is due to the finite range of ionizing beta particles emitted as a result of radionuclide disintegration. The effects of particle range have important implications for the curability of tumors. We used a mathematical model to examine tumor curability and its relationship to tumor size for 22 beta-emitting radionuclides that may have therapeutic potential. The model assumed a uniform distribution of radionuclide throughout. For targeted radionuclide therapy, the relationship between tumor curability and tumor size is different from that for conventional external beam radiotherapy. With targeted radionuclides, there is an optimal tumor size for cure. Tumors smaller than the optimal size are less vulnerable to irradiation from radionuclides because a substantial proportion of the disintegration energy escapes and is deposited outside the tumor volume. We found an optimal tumor size for radiocurability by each of the 22 radionuclides considered. Optimal cure diameters range from less than 1 mm for short-range emitters such as {sup 199}Au and {sup 33}P to several centimeters for long-range emitters such as {sup 90}Y and {sup 188}Re. The energy emitted per disintegration may be used to predict optimal cure size for uniform distributions of radionuclide. 17 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Oncologist’s/haematologist’s view on the roles of pathologists for molecular targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Ulrich; Von Bubnoff, Nikolas; Peschel, Christian; Duyster, Justus

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In the past two decades there has been a tremendous increase in the understanding of the molecular basis of human malignancies. In a variety of neoplasms, specific molecular markers became part of disease classifications and are now routinely used to define specific entities. Molecular analyses discriminate prognostic groups, guide differential treatment strategies and identify targets for molecular defined cancer therapy. A battery of new drugs has been developed to specifically inhibit oncogenic pathways. For an increasing number of solid and haematological malignancies, the availability of molecular targeted drugs has fundamentally changed treatment algorithms. However, the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic impact of selected molecular markers is still limited in many cases. After all, the success of a molecular targeted therapy is clearly determined by the significance of the targeted structure for the biology of cancer and the ability of the malignant cell to evade specific inhibition. PMID:20158573

  3. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26750747

  4. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring.

  5. Wnt signaling and hepatocarcinogenesis: molecular targets for the development of innovative anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Pez, Floriane; Lopez, Anaïs; Kim, Miran; Wands, Jack R; Caron de Fromentel, Claude; Merle, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer death worldwide. HCC can be cured by radical therapies if early diagnosis is done while the tumor has remained of small size. Unfortunately, diagnosis is commonly late when the tumor has grown and spread. Thus, palliative approaches are usually applied such as transarterial intrahepatic chemoembolization and sorafenib, an anti-angiogenic agent and MAP kinase inhibitor. This latter is the only targeted therapy that has shown significant, although moderate, efficiency in some individuals with advanced HCC. This highlights the need to develop other targeted therapies, and to this goal, to identify more and more pathways as potential targets. The Wnt pathway is a key component of a physiological process involved in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Activation of this pathway occurs when a Wnt ligand binds to a Frizzled (FZD) receptor at the cell membrane. Two different Wnt signaling cascades have been identified, called non-canonical and canonical pathways, the latter involving the β-catenin protein. Deregulation of the Wnt pathway is an early event in hepatocarcinogenesis and has been associated with an aggressive HCC phenotype, since it is implicated both in cell survival, proliferation, migration and invasion. Thus, component proteins identified in this pathway are potential candidates of pharmacological intervention. This review focuses on the characteristics and functions of the molecular targets of the Wnt signaling cascade and how they may be manipulated to achieve anti-tumor effects. PMID:23835194

  6. Retinal proteins modified by 4-hydroxynonenal: identification of molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Kapphahn, Rebecca J; Giwa, Babatomiwa M; Berg, Kristin M; Roehrich, Heidi; Feng, Xiao; Olsen, Timothy W; Ferrington, Deborah A

    2006-07-01

    The reactive aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), is a product of lipid peroxidation that can covalently modify and inactivate proteins. Previously, we reported increased HNE modification of select retinal proteins resolved by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis in aged Fisher 344 x Brown Norway rats (Louie, J.L., Kapphahn, R.J., Ferrington, D.A., 2002. Proteasome function and protein oxidation in the aged retina. Exp. Eye Res. 75, 271-284). In the current study, quantitative assessment of HNE molar content using slot blot immunoassays showed HNE content is increased 30% in aged rat retina. In contrast, there was no age-related difference in HNE content in individual spots resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis suggesting the increased modification is likely on membrane proteins that are missing on 2D gels. The HNE-immunoreactive proteins resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. These proteins are involved in metabolism, chaperone function, and fatty acid transport. Proteins that were frequently modified and had the highest molar content of HNE included triosephosphate isomerase, alpha enolase, heat shock cognate 70 and betaB2 crystallin. Immunochemical detection of HNE adducts on retinal sections showed greater immune reaction in ganglion cells, photoreceptor inner segment, and the inner plexiform layer. Identification of HNE modified proteins in two alternative model systems, human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture (ARPE19) and human donor eyes, indicated that triosephosphate isomerase and alpha enolase are generally modified. These results identify a common subset of proteins that contain HNE adducts and suggest that select retinal proteins are molecular targets for HNE modification. PMID:16530755

  7. Molecular diversity of riverine alkaline-extractable sediment organic matter and its linkages with spectral indicators and molecular size distributions.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Chen, Meilian; Park, Jae-Eun; Hur, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have been conducted to examine the spatial heterogeneity of riverine sediment organic matter (SOM) at the molecular level. The present study explored the chemical and molecular heterogeneity of alkaline-extractable SOM from riverine sediments via multiple analytical tools including molecular composition, absorption and fluorescence spectra, and molecular size distributions. The riverine SOM revealed complex and diverse characteristics, exhibiting a great number of non-redundant formulas and high spatial variations. The molecular diversity was more pronounced for the sediments affected by a higher degree of anthropogenic activities. Unlike the cases of aquatic dissolved organic matter, highly-unsaturated structures with oxygen (HUSO) of SOM were more associated with the spectral and size features of humic-like (or terrestrial) substances than aromatic molecules were, cautioning the interpretation of the SOM molecules responsible for apparent indicators. Noting that a higher detection rate (DR) produces fewer common molecules, the common molecules of 23 different SOMs were determined at a reasonable DR value of 0.35, which accounted for a small portion (5.8%) of all detected molecules. They were mainly CHO compounds (>98%), which positively correlated with spectral indicators of biological production. Despite the low abundance, however, the ratios of aromatic to aliphatic substances could be indexed to classify the common molecules into several geochemical molecular groups with different degrees of the associations with the apparent spectral and size indicators.

  8. Controllable Self-Assembly of RNA Tetrahedrons with Precise Shape and Size for Cancer Targeting.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Kaiming; Pi, Fengmei; Guo, Sijin; Shlyakhtenko, Luda; Chiu, Wah; Shu, Dan; Guo, Peixuan

    2016-09-01

    RNA tetrahedral nanoparticles with two different sizes are successfully assembled by a one-pot bottom-up approach with high efficiency and thermal stability. The reported design principles can be extended to construct higher-order polyhedral RNA architectures for various applications such as targeted cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:27322097

  9. Visual Feedback and Target Size Effects on Reach-to-Grasp Tasks in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hsiu-Ching; Lee, I-Chen; Lee, I-Ching

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the effects of visual condition and target size during four reach-to-grasp tasks between autistic children and healthy controls. Twenty children with autism and 20 healthy controls participated in the study. Qualisys motion capture system and kinematic measures were used to record movement. Autistic group showed significantly…

  10. Phase equilibrium calculations of ternary liquid mixtures with binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oh, Suk Yung; Bae, Young Chan

    2010-07-15

    The method presented in this paper was developed to predict liquid-liquid equilibria in ternary liquid mixtures by using a combination of a thermodynamic model and molecular dynamics simulations. In general, common classical thermodynamic models have many parameters which are determined by fitting a model with experimental data. This proposed method, however, provides a simple procedure for calculating liquid-liquid equilibria utilizing binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics simulations. This method was applied to mixtures containing water, hydrocarbons, alcohols, chlorides, ketones, acids, and other organic liquids over various temperature ranges. The predicted results agree well with the experimental data without the use of adjustable parameters.

  11. Experiments for the Undergraduate Laboratory that Illustrate the Size-Exclusion Properties of Zeolite Molecular Sieves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments are presented that demonstrate the size-exclusion properties of zeolites and reveal the reason for naming zeolites "molecular sieves". If an IR spectrometer is available, the adsorption or exclusion of alcohols of varying sizes from dichloromethane or chloroform solutions can be readily demonstrated by monitoring changes in the…

  12. Pointing to a target from an upright standing position: anticipatory postural adjustments are modulated by the size of the target in humans.

    PubMed

    Bonnetblanc, François; Martin, Olivier; Teasdale, Normand

    2004-04-01

    To examine the influence of the target size onto postural EMG activity, eight subjects performed, from a standing position, rapid and accurate pointings to a target located within reach. The target size was varied across blocks of trials. Hand movement time increased when the target size was decreased. Interestingly, the magnitude of the integrated EMG activity of lower limb muscles (TAi, TFLc, RFi) decreased with a decreasing target size, while that of the erector spinae increased. The effects were observed as early as 200 ms before the hand movement onset. When standing, these early commands could influence the control of the hand during the acceleration phase. The target size was specified within the postural command before any hand movement took place suggesting the characteristics of the pointing task were integrated in a feedforward manner. PMID:15039111

  13. Effect of sputtering target's grain size on the sputtering yield, particle size and coercivity (Hc) of Ni and Ni20Al thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, M.; Sajuri, Z.; Yunas, J.; Syarif, J.

    2016-02-01

    Researches on magnetic thin films concentrated mainly on optimizing the sputtering parameters to obtain the desired thin film's properties. However, the effect of the sputtering target's properties towards the thin film's properties is not well established. This study is focused on analysing the effect of sputtering target's grain size towards the sputtering yield, particle size and the magnetic coercivity (Hc) of thin film. Two sets of sputtering targets; pure Ni (magnetic) and Ni20Al (at.%) (non-magnetic) were prepared. Each target has 2 sets of samples with different grain sizes; (a) 30 to 50μm and (b) 80 to 100μm. Thin films from each target were sputtered onto glass substrates under fixed sputtering parameters. The initial results suggested that the sputtering target's grain size has significant effect on the thin film's sputtering yield, particle size and Hc. Sputtering target with smaller grain size has 12% (pure Ni) to 60% (Ni20Al) higher sputtering yield, which produces thin films with smaller particle size and larger Hc value. These initial findings provides a basis for further magnetic thin film research, particularly for the seed layer in hard disk drive (HDD) media, where seed layer with smaller particle size is essential in reducing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  14. The Challenges and the Promise of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Malignant Gliomas1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxiang; Xu, Tao; Jiang, Ying; Xu, Hanchong; Yan, Yong; Fu, Da; Chen, Juxiang

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors and one of the most challenging forms of cancers to treat. Despite advances in conventional treatment, the outcome for patients remains almost universally fatal. This poor prognosis is due to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence after surgical removal. However, over the past decade, molecular targeted therapy has held the promise of transforming the care of malignant glioma patients. Significant progress in understanding the molecular pathology of gliomagenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotypes will open opportunities to rationally develop new molecular targeted therapy options. Recently, therapeutic strategies have focused on targeting pro-growth signaling mediated by receptor tyrosine kinase/RAS/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, proangiogenic pathways, and several other vital intracellular signaling networks, such as proteasome and histone deacetylase. However, several factors such as cross-talk between the altered pathways, intratumoral molecular heterogeneity, and therapeutic resistance of glioma stem cells (GSCs) have limited the activity of single agents. Efforts are ongoing to study in depth the complex molecular biology of glioma, develop novel regimens targeting GSCs, and identify biomarkers to stratify patients with the individualized molecular targeted therapy. Here, we review the molecular alterations relevant to the pathology of malignant glioma, review current advances in clinical targeted trials, and discuss the challenges, controversies, and future directions of molecular targeted therapy. PMID:25810009

  15. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics of Virus Capsids as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid–protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways. When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Here, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid–drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets. PMID:27128262

  16. A High-Throughput Size Exclusion Chromatography Method to Determine the Molecular Size Distribution of Meningococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Rahman, K M Taufiqur; Siraj, S M Saad Us; Karim, Mahbubul; Muktadir, Abdul; Maheshwari, Arpan; Kabir, Md Azizul; Nahar, Zebun; Ahasan, Mohammad Mainul

    2016-01-01

    Molecular size distribution of meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine is a readily identifiable parameter that directly correlates with the immunogenicity. In this paper, we report a size exclusion chromatography method to determine the molecular size distribution and distribution coefficient value of meningococcal polysaccharide serogroups A, C, W, and Y in meningococcal polysaccharide (ACWY) vaccines. The analyses were performed on a XK16/70 column packed with sepharose CL-4B with six different batches of Ingovax® ACWY, a meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine produced by Incepta Vaccine Ltd., Bangladesh. A quantitative rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay was employed to determine the polysaccharide contents of each serogroup. The calculated distribution coefficient values of serogroups A, C, W, and Y were found to be 0.26 ± 0.16, 0.21 ± 0.11, 0.21 ± 0.11, and 0.14 ± 0.12, respectively, and met the requirements of British Pharmacopeia. The method was proved to be robust for determining the distribution coefficient values which is an obligatory requirement for vaccine lot release. PMID:27688770

  17. A High-Throughput Size Exclusion Chromatography Method to Determine the Molecular Size Distribution of Meningococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imran; Rahman, K. M. Taufiqur; Siraj, S. M. Saad Us; Karim, Mahbubul; Muktadir, Abdul; Maheshwari, Arpan; Kabir, Md Azizul; Nahar, Zebun

    2016-01-01

    Molecular size distribution of meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine is a readily identifiable parameter that directly correlates with the immunogenicity. In this paper, we report a size exclusion chromatography method to determine the molecular size distribution and distribution coefficient value of meningococcal polysaccharide serogroups A, C, W, and Y in meningococcal polysaccharide (ACWY) vaccines. The analyses were performed on a XK16/70 column packed with sepharose CL-4B with six different batches of Ingovax® ACWY, a meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine produced by Incepta Vaccine Ltd., Bangladesh. A quantitative rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay was employed to determine the polysaccharide contents of each serogroup. The calculated distribution coefficient values of serogroups A, C, W, and Y were found to be 0.26 ± 0.16, 0.21 ± 0.11, 0.21 ± 0.11, and 0.14 ± 0.12, respectively, and met the requirements of British Pharmacopeia. The method was proved to be robust for determining the distribution coefficient values which is an obligatory requirement for vaccine lot release.

  18. A High-Throughput Size Exclusion Chromatography Method to Determine the Molecular Size Distribution of Meningococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imran; Rahman, K. M. Taufiqur; Siraj, S. M. Saad Us; Karim, Mahbubul; Muktadir, Abdul; Maheshwari, Arpan; Kabir, Md Azizul; Nahar, Zebun

    2016-01-01

    Molecular size distribution of meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine is a readily identifiable parameter that directly correlates with the immunogenicity. In this paper, we report a size exclusion chromatography method to determine the molecular size distribution and distribution coefficient value of meningococcal polysaccharide serogroups A, C, W, and Y in meningococcal polysaccharide (ACWY) vaccines. The analyses were performed on a XK16/70 column packed with sepharose CL-4B with six different batches of Ingovax® ACWY, a meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine produced by Incepta Vaccine Ltd., Bangladesh. A quantitative rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay was employed to determine the polysaccharide contents of each serogroup. The calculated distribution coefficient values of serogroups A, C, W, and Y were found to be 0.26 ± 0.16, 0.21 ± 0.11, 0.21 ± 0.11, and 0.14 ± 0.12, respectively, and met the requirements of British Pharmacopeia. The method was proved to be robust for determining the distribution coefficient values which is an obligatory requirement for vaccine lot release. PMID:27688770

  19. Analytical performance of molecular beacons on surface immobilized gold nanoparticles of varying size and density.

    PubMed

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-11-25

    The high quenching efficiency of metal nanoparticles has facilitated its use as quenchers in molecular beacons. To optimize this system, a good understanding of the many factors that influence molecular beacon performance is required. In this study, molecular beacon performance was evaluated as a function of gold nanoparticle size and its immobilization characteristics. Gold nanoparticles of 4 nm, 15 nm and 87 nm diameter, were immobilized onto glass slides. Each size regime offered distinctive optical properties for fluorescence quenching of molecular dyes that were conjugated to oligonucleotides that were immobilized to the gold nanoparticles. Rigid double stranded DNA was used as a model to place fluorophores at different distances from the gold nanoparticles. The effect of particle size and also the immobilization density of nanoparticles was evaluated. The 4 nm and 87 nm gold nanoparticles offered the highest sensitivity in terms of the change in fluorescence intensity as a function of distance (3-fold improvement for Cy5). The optical properties of the molecular fluorophore was of significance, with Cy5 offering higher contrast ratios than Cy3 due to the red-shifted emission spectrum relative to the plasmon peak. A high density of gold nanoparticles reduced contrast ratios, indicating preference for a monolayer of immobilized nanoparticles when considering analytical performance. Molecular beacon probes were then used in place of the double stranded oligonucleotides. There was a strong dependence of molecular beacon performance on the length of a linker used for attachment to the nanoparticle surface. The optimal optical performance was obtained with 4 nm gold nanoparticles that were immobilized as monolayers of low density (5.7×10(11)particles cm(-2)) on glass surfaces. These nanoparticle surfaces offered a 2-fold improvement in analytical performance of the molecular beacons when compared to other nanoparticle sizes investigated. The principles developed

  20. Should Blood Pressure Targets After Lacunar Stroke Vary by Body Size? The SPS3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Leslie A.; White, Carole L.; Pergola, Pablo E.; Hart, Robert G.; Benavente, Oscar R.; Hill, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is unknown whether the physiological impact of a given blood pressure (BP) varies by body size. We explored interactions between higher vs. lower systolic BP (SBP) targets and anthropometric measures (body mass index (BMI), body surface area (BSA), height, weight) and recurrent stroke and death in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) Trial. METHODS Patients with recent magnetic resonance imaging-proven lacunar infarcts were randomized to 2 BP targets (130–149mm Hg vs. <130) in a prospective, open-label, blinded end-point design. Time to outcome was evaluated with Cox proportional hazard models and compared between targets. We examined multiplicative interactions between each anthropometric measure and target and mean difference in achieved BP 1 year after randomization between BP groups by quartile. We also computed rates of recurrent stroke and death by quartiles of anthropometrics. RESULTS Three thousand and twenty patients were followed over a mean of 3.7 (SD 2.0) years. Mean age was 63; 63% were male. Mean height was 167 (SD 11) cm, weight 81 (18) kg, BMI 29 (5.9) kg/m2, and BSA 1.9 (0.25) m2. Achieved BP at 1 year was comparable between quartiles for each anthropometric measurement. We found no consistent interactions between BP target and anthropometrics for either outcome, nor were there any significant associations between hazard of stroke or death when assessed by BMI, BSA, height, or weight. CONCLUSIONS We found no interactions between BP target groups and quartiles of anthropometrics for rates of stroke and death in SPS3. There is no evidence at this time supporting body size-based modifications to current BP targets for secondary prevention after lacunar stroke. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION Trial Number NCT00059306 PMID:25452300

  1. Targeted Delivery Systems for Molecular Therapy in Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; Li, Fangfei; Wang, Luyao; Li, Defang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Feng; Liang, Chao; Liu, Biao; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; He, Bing; Lu, Jun; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the integral components of bone, including bone matrix, bone mineral and bone cells, give rise to complex disturbances of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis. Non-specific drug delivery using high-dose systemic administration may decrease therapeutic efficacy of drugs and increase the risk of toxic effects in non-skeletal tissues, which remain clinical challenges in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Thus, targeted delivery systems are urgently needed to achieve higher drug delivery efficiency, improve therapeutic efficacy in the targeted cells/tissues, and minimize toxicities in non-targeted cells/tissues. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of different targeting moieties and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in skeletal disorders, and also discuss the advantages, challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation. PMID:27011176

  2. Targeting heat-shock protein 90 with ganetespib for molecularly targeted therapy of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Lu, J; Hua, Y; Zhang, P; Liang, Z; Ruan, L; Lian, C; Shi, H; Chen, K; Tu, Z

    2015-01-01

    -dependent kinase 1 (pCDK1), EGFR and Ki-67 revealed significant differences in ganetespib-treated tumors. Collectively, our data suggest that ganetespib, as a new potent treatment option, can be used for the molecularly targeted therapy of GC patients according to their expression profiles of EGFR. PMID:25590805

  3. Effects of target size on the comparison of photon and charged particle dose distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.H.; Frankel, K.A.; Tjoa, T.; Lyman, J.T.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Levy, R.P.

    1989-12-01

    The work presented here is part of an ongoing project to quantify and evaluate the differences in the use of different radiation types and irradiation geometries in radiosurgery. We are examining dose distributions for photons using the Gamma Knife'' and the linear accelerator arc methods, as well as different species of charged particles from protons to neon ions. A number of different factors need to be studied to accurately compare the different modalities such as target size, shape and location, the irradiation geometry, and biological response. This presentation focuses on target size, which has a large effect on the dose distributions in normal tissue surrounding the lesion. This work concentrates on dose distributions found in radiosurgery, as opposed to those usually found in radiotherapy. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Some effects of Field Of View (FOV) and target size on lateral tracking at hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breul, H. T.

    1981-01-01

    An exploratory flight-simulator experiment examined the gross effects of several factors potentially important to the design of a visual display system for aiding VTOL pilots in the difficult task of landing on a small sea-control ship. Field of view (FOV) and target size were the primary variables examined for a lateral tracking task in a full motion 5 degree-of-freedom hover simulation. The mean absolute value of tracking error was used to measure tracking performance, and cross spectral transfer function analysis was performed to determine the pilot's ability to generate good open-loop transfer function characteristics as a function of the experimental variables. It was found that FOV and target size can have a large effect on the pilot's ability to generate open-loop gain, and on his tracking performance.

  5. Size-exclusion chromatography of ultrahigh molecular weight methylcellulose ethers and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ethers for reliable molecular weight distribution characterization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfu; Shen, Hongwei; Lyons, John W; Sammler, Robert L; Brackhagen, Meinolf; Meunier, David M

    2016-03-15

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and differential refractive index (DRI) detectors was employed for determination of the molecular weight distributions (MWD) of methylcellulose ethers (MC) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ethers (HPMC) having weight-average molecular weights (Mw) ranging from 20 to more than 1,000kg/mol. In comparison to previous work involving right-angle light scattering (RALS) and a viscometer for MWD characterization of MC and HPMC, MALLS yields more reliable molecular weight for materials having weight-average molecular weights (Mw) exceeding about 300kg/mol. A non-ideal SEC separation was observed for cellulose ethers with Mw>800kg/mol, and was manifested by upward divergence of logM vs. elution volume (EV) at larger elution volume at typical SEC flow rate such as 1.0mL/min. As such, the number-average molecular weight (Mn) determined for the sample was erroneously large and polydispersity (Mw/Mn) was erroneously small. This non-ideality resulting in the late elution of high molecular weight chains could be due to the elongation of polymer chains when experimental conditions yield Deborah numbers (De) exceeding 0.5. Non-idealities were eliminated when sufficiently low flow rates were used. Thus, using carefully selected experimental conditions, SEC coupled with MALLS and DRI can provide reliable MWD characterization of MC and HPMC covering the entire ranges of compositions and molecular weights of commercial interest. PMID:26794765

  6. Size-exclusion chromatography of ultrahigh molecular weight methylcellulose ethers and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ethers for reliable molecular weight distribution characterization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfu; Shen, Hongwei; Lyons, John W; Sammler, Robert L; Brackhagen, Meinolf; Meunier, David M

    2016-03-15

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and differential refractive index (DRI) detectors was employed for determination of the molecular weight distributions (MWD) of methylcellulose ethers (MC) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ethers (HPMC) having weight-average molecular weights (Mw) ranging from 20 to more than 1,000kg/mol. In comparison to previous work involving right-angle light scattering (RALS) and a viscometer for MWD characterization of MC and HPMC, MALLS yields more reliable molecular weight for materials having weight-average molecular weights (Mw) exceeding about 300kg/mol. A non-ideal SEC separation was observed for cellulose ethers with Mw>800kg/mol, and was manifested by upward divergence of logM vs. elution volume (EV) at larger elution volume at typical SEC flow rate such as 1.0mL/min. As such, the number-average molecular weight (Mn) determined for the sample was erroneously large and polydispersity (Mw/Mn) was erroneously small. This non-ideality resulting in the late elution of high molecular weight chains could be due to the elongation of polymer chains when experimental conditions yield Deborah numbers (De) exceeding 0.5. Non-idealities were eliminated when sufficiently low flow rates were used. Thus, using carefully selected experimental conditions, SEC coupled with MALLS and DRI can provide reliable MWD characterization of MC and HPMC covering the entire ranges of compositions and molecular weights of commercial interest.

  7. Target discrimination by surface-immobilized molecular beacons designed to detect Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Akhilesh; Flinchbaugh, James; Ayoubi, Patricia; Olah, Glenn A; Malayer, Jerry R

    2004-02-15

    A molecular beacon (MB) array was designed based on unique regions of the 16S rRNA of the bacterium Francisella tularensis. Nucleic acid molecular beacons undergo a spontaneous fluorogenic conformational change when they hybridize to specific complementary targets. The array was printed on aldehyde glass or hydrogel slides and evaluated for functioning in presence of complementary oligonucleotide sequences, single-nucleotide mismatch sequences and multiple nucleotide mismatch sequences. Discriminating true target from mismatched targets was found to be dependent on type, number, and location of mismatches within the beacon (i.e. located in the stem or loop regions). Optimal conditions for molecular beacon deposition, and target hybridization were determined for oligonucleotide target mismatch discrimination. The beacon array was stable upon recharging by exposure to an alkaline solution, and repeatedly used. In addition, performance of the beacon array biosensor was compared with molecular beacons in homogeneous solution.

  8. Hybridization of 2'-O-methyl and 2'-deoxy molecular beacons to RNA and DNA targets.

    PubMed

    Tsourkas, Andrew; Behlke, Mark A; Bao, Gang

    2002-12-01

    Molecular beacons are stem-loop hairpin oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorescent dye at one end and a fluorescence quencher at the other end; they can differentiate between bound and unbound probes in homogeneous hybridization assays with a high signal-to-background ratio and enhanced specificity compared with linear oligonucleotide probes. However, in performing cellular imaging and quantification of gene expression, degradation of unmodified molecular beacons by endogenous nucleases can significantly limit the detection sensitivity, and results in fluorescence signals unrelated to probe/target hybridization. To substantially reduce nuclease degradation of molecular beacons, it is possible to protect the probe by substituting 2'-O-methyl RNA for DNA. Here we report the analysis of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of 2'-O-methyl and 2'-deoxy molecular beacons in the presence of RNA and DNA targets. We found that in terms of molecular beacon/target duplex stability, 2'-O-methyl/RNA > 2'-deoxy/RNA > 2'-deoxy/DNA > 2'-O-methyl/DNA. The improved stability of the 2'-O-methyl/RNA duplex was accompanied by a slightly reduced specificity compared with the duplex of 2'-deoxy molecular beacons and RNA targets. However, the 2'-O-methyl molecular beacons hybridized to RNA more quickly than 2'-deoxy molecular beacons. For the pairs tested, the 2'-deoxy-beacon/DNA-target duplex showed the fastest hybridization kinetics. These findings have significant implications for the design and application of molecular beacons.

  9. Hybridization of 2'-O-methyl and 2'-deoxy molecular beacons to RNA and DNA targets.

    PubMed

    Tsourkas, Andrew; Behlke, Mark A; Bao, Gang

    2003-03-15

    Molecular beacons are stem-loop hairpin oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorescent dye at one end and a fluorescence quencher at the other end; they can differentiate between bound and unbound probes in homogeneous hybridization assays with a high signal-to-background ratio and enhanced specificity compared with linear oligonucleotide probes. However, in performing cellular imaging and quantification of gene expression, degradation of unmodified molecular beacons by endogenous nucleases can significantly limit the detection sensitivity, and results in fluorescence signals unrelated to probe/target hybridization. To substantially reduce nuclease degradation of molecular beacons, it is possible to protect the probe by substituting 2'-O-methyl RNA for DNA. Here we report the analysis of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of 2'-O-methyl and 2'-deoxy molecular beacons in the presence of RNA and DNA targets. We found that in terms of molecular beacon/target duplex stability, 2'-O-methyl/RNA > 2'-deoxy/RNA > 2'-deoxy/DNA > 2'-O-methyl/DNA. The improved stability of the 2'-O-methyl/RNA duplex was accompanied by a slightly reduced specificity compared with the duplex of 2'-deoxy molecular beacons and RNA targets. However, the 2'-O-methyl molecular beacons hybridized to RNA more quickly than 2'-deoxy molecular beacons. For the pairs tested, the 2'-deoxy-beacon/DNA-target duplex showed the fastest hybridization kinetics. These findings have significant implications for the design and application of molecular beacons.

  10. Electron Beam-Target Interaction and Spot Size Stabilization in Flash X-Ray Radiography*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.

    1999-11-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydro-Test (DARHT) facility is one of the most important capabilities in science based stockpile stewardship program of the US Department of Energy. DARHT uses an intense relativistic electron beam (20 MeV, 2-4 kA) to provide the necessary dose and a very small radiation spot size ( 1 mm) to achieve the desired optical resolution. Linear induction accelerator technology and electron beam diode technology can produce beams with the desirable characteristics. However, the high current densities at the converter target will cause strong nonlinear effects, which can adversely influence the radiographic performance. Over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, intense space charge fields of the electron beam will extract positively charged ions from the vaporized target. These ions will partially neutralize the electron beam, reducing its Coulomb self-repulsive force. Initially the beam will pinch near the target, giving a favorable reduction in spot size but possibly degrading the beam quality. The ion column will then propagate upstream, moving the location of the pinch away from the target. The beam will pinch on axis and expand, producing a progressive increase in spot size as the pinch migrates upstream. This phenomenon can severely degrade resolution. In multiple-pulse applications where longer time scale phenomena become important, the expanding plasma plume of the vaporized target material can cause disruption of subsequent electron beam pulses. In this study, we investigate the physics of beam transport and explore methods for mitigating the undesirable effects. Theoretical models have been developed and validated against available experimental data from the Los Alamos Integrated Test Stand (ITS). It is shown that ion propagation can be suppressed by applying a negative bias potential to the target. The ions then become trapped in the target vicinity and actually reduce the spot size rather than increasing it due to the additional ion

  11. Feasibility of using molecular docking-based virtual screening for searching dual target kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shunye; Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2013-04-22

    Multitarget agents have been extensively explored for solving limited efficacies, poor safety, and resistant profiles of an individual target. Theoretical approaches for searching and designing multitarget agents are critically useful. Here, the performance of molecular docking to search dual-target inhibitors for four kinase pairs (CDK2-GSK3B, EGFR-Src, Lck-Src, and Lck-VEGFR2) was assessed. First, the representative structures for each kinase target were chosen by structural clustering of available crystal structures. Next, the performance of molecular docking to distinguish inhibitors from noninhibitors for each individual kinase target was evaluated. The results show that molecular docking-based virtual screening illustrates good capability to find known inhibitors for individual targets, but the prediction accuracy is structurally dependent. Finally, the performance of molecular docking to identify the dual-target kinase inhibitors for four kinase pairs was evaluated. The analyses show that molecular docking successfully filters out most noninhibitors and achieves promising performance for identifying dual-kinase inhibitors for CDK2-GSK3B and Lck-VEGFR2. But a high false-positive rate leads to low enrichment of true dual-target inhibitors in the final list. This study suggests that molecular docking serves as a useful tool in searching inhibitors against dual or even multiple kinase targets, but integration with other virtual screening tools is necessary for achieving better predictions.

  12. Molecular size and solubility conditions of polysilane macromolecules with different topology

    PubMed Central

    Mavrič, Andraž; Badasyan, Artem; Fanetti, Mattia; Valant, Matjaz

    2016-01-01

    Solubility of polysilane macromolecules has so far been a scientific as well as technological problem due to a lack of understanding of their proper molecular size and agglomeration/de-agglomeration conditions. Here we show that, in contrary to previous reports, the polysilane molecules are inherently small enough to be, under right conditions, dissolved. We used a dynamic light scattering and a differential scanning calorimetry to show that even under a dilute regime the polymer molecules are agglomerated at room temperature and undergo de-agglomeration at slightly elevated temperatures of around 40 °C. The de-agglomeration results in formation of stable solutions of the polymer molecules of different topological structure in different organic solvents. We determined the polymer molecular sizes to be around 20 nm, much lower than previously reported. The measured molecular size was confirmed by transmission electron microscope imaging of the individual molecules. PMID:27748444

  13. Molecular pathways: targeting ETS gene fusions in cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Felix Y; Brenner, J Chad; Hussain, Maha; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2014-09-01

    Rearrangements, or gene fusions, involving the ETS family of transcription factors are common driving events in both prostate cancer and Ewing sarcoma. These rearrangements result in pathogenic expression of the ETS genes and trigger activation of transcriptional programs enriched for invasion and other oncogenic features. Although ETS gene fusions represent intriguing therapeutic targets, transcription factors, such as those comprising the ETS family, have been notoriously difficult to target. Recently, preclinical studies have demonstrated an association between ETS gene fusions and components of the DNA damage response pathway, such as PARP1, the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNAPK), and histone deactylase 1 (HDAC1), and have suggested that ETS fusions may confer sensitivity to inhibitors of these DNA repair proteins. In this review, we discuss the role of ETS fusions in cancer, the preclinical rationale for targeting ETS fusions with inhibitors of PARP1, DNAPK, and HDAC1, as well as ongoing clinical trials targeting ETS gene fusions.

  14. Threshold size for optimal passive pulmonary targeting and retention of rigid microparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kutscher, Hilliard L.; Chao, Piyun; Deshmukh, Manjeet; Singh, Yashveer; Hu, Peidi; Joseph, Laurie B.; Reimer, David C.; Stein, Stanley; Laskin, Debra L.; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between microparticle (MP) size and lung targeting efficiency, intra-lung distribution and retention time was systematically studied after intravenous administration of rigid fluorescent polystyrene MPs of various sizes (2, 3, 6 and 10μm) to Sprague-Dawley rats. Total fluorescence was assessed and it was found that 2μm and 3μm MPs readily passed through the lung to the liver and spleen while 10μm MPs were completely entrapped in the lung for the one-week duration of the study. Approximately 84% of 6μm MPs that were initially entrapped in the lung were cleared over the next 2 days and 15% were cleared over the remaining 5 days. A Caliper IVIS® 100 small animal imaging system confirmed that 3μm MPs were not retained in the lung but that 6μm and 10μm MPs were widely distributed throughout the lung. Moreover, histologic examination showed MP entrapment in capillaries but not arterioles. These studies suggest that for rigid MPs the optimal size range required to achieve transient but highly efficiently targeting to pulmonary capillaries after IV injection is >6μm but <10μm in rats and that systemic administration of optimally sized MPs may be an efficient alternative to currently used inhalation-based delivery to the lung. PMID:20043961

  15. Alignment of absolute and relative molecular size specifications for a polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PNEUMOVAX 23).

    PubMed

    MacNair, John E; Desai, Tejal; Teyral, Jennifer; Abeygunawardana, Chitrananda; Hennessey, John P

    2005-03-01

    An approach was developed to align release and end-expiry specifications for molecular size for the polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PNEUMOVAX 23). Each of the 23 polysaccharide components of the vaccine was separately subjected to ultrasonication to produce a series of preparations of decreasing weight-average molecular mass (Mw). These size-reduced polysaccharides were analysed as monovalent solutions by high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and refractive index (RI) detection to measure their Mw. These samples were also analysed by HPSEC with rate nephelometry (RN) detection to measure their relative molecular size (r-MS). The data from the two molecular size measurements established a correlation between Mw and r-MS. For each polysaccharide component of the vaccine, this correlation permits the direct alignment of the r-MS specification in the final formulated product with the Mw specification for the monovalent polysaccharide preparation. The alignment of specifications provides a high level of assurance that the quality control of the final vaccine product is consistent with that of the polysaccharide starting materials.

  16. Time-dependent Gas-liquid Interaction in Molecular-sized Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yueting; Li, Penghui; Qiao, Yu; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Different from a bulk phase, a gas nanophase can have a significant effect on liquid motion. Herein we report a series of experimental results on molecular behaviors of water in a zeolite β of molecular-sized nanopores. If sufficient time is provided, the confined water molecules can be “locked” inside a nanopore; otherwise, gas nanophase provides a driving force for water “outflow”. This is due to the difficult molecular site exchanges and the relatively slow gas-liquid diffusion in the nanoenvironment. Depending on the loading rate, the zeolite β/water system may exhibit either liquid-spring or energy-absorber characteristics. PMID:25293525

  17. Time-dependent gas-liquid interaction in molecular-sized nanopores.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yueting; Li, Penghui; Qiao, Yu; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Different from a bulk phase, a gas nanophase can have a significant effect on liquid motion. Herein we report a series of experimental results on molecular behaviors of water in a zeolite β of molecular-sized nanopores. If sufficient time is provided, the confined water molecules can be "locked" inside a nanopore; otherwise, gas nanophase provides a driving force for water "outflow". This is due to the difficult molecular site exchanges and the relatively slow gas-liquid diffusion in the nanoenvironment. Depending on the loading rate, the zeolite β/water system may exhibit either liquid-spring or energy-absorber characteristics. PMID:25293525

  18. Cervical Cancer: Development of Targeted Therapies Beyond Molecular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Knoff, Jayne; Yang, Benjamin; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical cancer. The integration of HPV genes into the host genome causes the upregulation of E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 and E7 proteins inactivate and degrade tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma, respectively, leading to malignant progression. HPV E6 and E7 antigens are ideal targets for the development of therapies for cervical cancer and precursor lesions because they are constitutively expressed in infected cells and malignant tumors but not in normal cells and they are essential for cell immortalization and transformation. Immunotherapies are being developed to target E6/E7 by eliciting antigen-specific immune responses. siRNA technologies target E6/E7 by modulating the expression of the oncoproteins. Proteasome inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors are being developed to indirectly target E6/E7 by interfering with their oncogenic activities. The ultimate goal for HPV-targeted therapies is the progression through clinical trials to commercialization. PMID:24533233

  19. RET-targeting molecular stratified non-small-cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in lung cancer genomics have successfully characterized therapeutic targets of lung cancer. RET fusion gene products are among the newest target molecules for lung adenocarcinoma. Preclinical findings and preliminary reports regarding potential tumor control by RET-targeting multi-kinase inhibitors encourage further clinical trials. The infrequent prevalence of RET fusion gene-positive cases may be a major obstacle hindering the development of RET-targeted therapy. Thus, it is necessary to recruit appropriate participants for trials to develop an efficient RET fusion gene detection system to achieve targeted therapy for lung adenocarcinomas stratified by this molecular target. PMID:25806272

  20. Indium-111 labeled gold nanoparticles for in-vivo molecular targeting.

    PubMed

    Ng, Quinn K T; Olariu, Cristina I; Yaffee, Marcus; Taelman, Vincent F; Marincek, Nicolas; Krause, Thomas; Meier, Lorenz; Walter, Martin A

    2014-08-01

    The present report describes the synthesis and biological evaluation of a molecular imaging platform based on gold nanoparticles directly labeled with indium-111. The direct labeling approach facilitated radiolabeling with high activities while maintaining excellent stability within the biological environment. The resulting imaging platform exhibited low interference of the radiolabel with targeting molecules, which is highly desirable for in-vivo probe tracking and molecular targeted tumor imaging. The indium-111 labeled gold nanoparticles were synthesized using a simple procedure that allowed stable labeling of the nanoparticle core with various indium-111 activities. Subsequent surface modification of the particle cores with RGD-based ligands at various densities allowed for molecular targeting of the αvß3 integrin in-vitro and for molecular targeted imaging in human melanoma and glioblastoma models in-vivo. The results demonstrate the vast potential of direct labeling with radioisotopes for tracking gold nanoparticles within biological systems.

  1. TNNI3K, a novel cardiac-specific kinase, emerging as a molecular target for the treatment of cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Hind; Ahmad, Firdos; Parikh, Shan; Force, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (AHD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. In patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), timely and effective myocardial reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the primary treatment of choice to minimize the ischemic injury and limit MI size. However, reperfusion can itself promote cardiomyocyte death which leads to cardiac dysfunction via reperfusion injury. The molecular mechanisms of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are not completely understood and new drug targets are needed. Recently we reported that cardiac troponin I-interacting protein kinase (TNNI3K), a cardiomyocyte-specific kinase, promotes I/R injury via profound oxidative stress, thereby promoting cardiomyocyte death. By using novel genetic animal models and newly developed small-molecule TNNI3K inhibitors, we demonstrate that TNNI3K-mediated I/R injury occurs through impaired mitochondrial function and is in part dependent on p38 MAPK. Herein we discuss the emerging role of TNNI3K as a promising new drug target to limit the I/R-induced myocardial injury. We will also examine the underlying mechanisms that drive the profoundly reduced infarct size in mice in which TNNI3K is specifically deleted in cardiomyocytes. Since TNNI3K is a cardiac-specific kinase, it could be an ideal molecular target since inhibiting it would have little or no effect on other organ systems, a serious problem associated with the use of kinase inhibitors targeting kinases that are more widely expressed. PMID:24899531

  2. Diverse Molecular Targets for Therapeutic Strategies in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sun-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia caused by neurodegenerative process and is tightly related to amyloid β (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles. The lack of early diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic remedy hinders the prevention of increasing population of AD patients every year. In spite of accumulated scientific information, numerous clinical trials for candidate drug targets have failed to be preceded into therapeutic development, therefore, AD-related sufferers including patients and caregivers, are desperate to seek the solution. Also, effective AD intervention is desperately needed to reduce AD-related societal threats to public health. In this review, we summarize various drug targets and strategies in recent preclinical studies and clinical trials for AD therapy: Allopathic treatment, immunotherapy, Aβ production/aggregation modulator, tau-targeting therapy and metabolic targeting. Some has already failed in their clinical trials and the others are still in various stages of investigations, both of which give us valuable information for future research in AD therapeutic development. PMID:25045220

  3. Anti-VEGF molecular targeted therapies in common solid malignancies: comprehensive update for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Fairchild, Alexandra; Krajewski, Katherine M; Nishino, Mizuki; Howard, Stephanie A; Baheti, Akshay D; Rosenthal, Michael H; Jagannathan, Jyothi P; Shinagare, Atul B; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential component of the growth and dissemination of solid malignancies and is mediated by several proangiogenic factors. The most widely studied proangiogenic factor is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). A major class of molecular targeted therapies (MTTs) inhibit the VEGF axis and are referred to as antiangiogenic MTTs. There are two main types of anti-VEGF MTTs: drugs targeting circulating VEGF and drugs interfering with the activity of the VEGF receptors. The cancers against which antiangiogenic MTTs have had the greatest effect are gliomas, non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. These cancers respond to antiangiogenic MTTs in a different way than they respond to conventional chemotherapy. Instead of the traditional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), each of these cancers therefore requires its own individualized treatment response criteria (TRC). Examples of individualized TRC include the Response Assessment in Neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria for gliomas, modified RECIST for hepatocellular carcinoma, and Morphology, Attenuation, Size, and Structure (MASS) criteria for renal cell carcinoma. Furthermore, antiangiogenic MTTs have a unique spectrum of class-specific and drug-specific toxic effects, some of which can be detected at imaging. Increasing use of antiangiogenic MTTs in clinical practice necessitates that radiologists be aware of these drugs, their response patterns, and TRC as well as their toxic effect profiles.

  4. Targeting cancer with small-molecular-weight kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Doriano; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Möbitz, Henrik; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Protein and lipid kinases fulfill essential roles in many signaling pathways that regulate normal cell functions. Deregulation of these kinase activities lead to a variety of pathologies ranging from cancer to inflammatory diseases, diabetes, infectious diseases, cardiovascular disorders, cell growth and survival. 518 protein kinases and about 20 lipid-modifying kinases are encoded by the human genome, and a much larger proportion of additional kinases are present in parasite, bacterial, fungal, and viral genomes that are susceptible to exploitation as drug targets. Since many human diseases result from overactivation of protein and lipid kinases due to mutations and/or overexpression, this enzyme class represents an important target for the pharmaceutical industry. Approximately one third of all protein targets under investigation in the pharmaceutical industry are protein or lipid kinases.The kinase inhibitors that have been launched, thus far, are mainly in oncology indications and are directed against a handful of protein and lipid kinases. With one exception, all of these registered kinase inhibitors are directed toward the ATP-site and display different selectivities, potencies, and pharmacokinetic properties. At present, about 150 kinase-targeted drugs are in clinical development and many more in various stages of preclinical development. Kinase inhibitor drugs that are in clinical trials target all stages of signal transduction from the receptor protein tyrosine kinases that initiate intracellular signaling, through second-messenger-dependent lipid and protein kinases, and protein kinases that regulate the cell cycle.This review provides an insight into protein and lipid kinase drug discovery with respect to achievements, binding modes of inhibitors, and novel avenues for the generation of second-generation kinase inhibitors to treat cancers.

  5. Imaging of Isotopically Enhanced Molecular Targeting Agents Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quong, J N

    2004-02-19

    The goal of this project is to develop experimental and computational protocols to use SIMS to image the chemical composition of biological samples, focusing on optimizing sample preparation protocols and developing multivariate data analysis methods. Our results on sample preparation, molecular imaging, and multivariate analysis have been presented at several meeting abstracts (UCRL151797ABS, UCRL151797ABSREV1, UCRL151426ABS, UCRL201277, UCRL154757). A refereed paper describing our results for sample preparation and molecular imaging of various endogenous biomolecules as well as the mutagen PhIP has been accepted for publication (UCRL-JC-151797). We are also preparing two additional papers describing our multivariate analysis methods to analyze spectral data. As these papers have not been submitted, their content is included in this final report.

  6. Biodegradability enhancement and detoxification of cork processing wastewater molecular size fractions by ozone.

    PubMed

    Santos, Diana C; Silva, Lúcia; Albuquerque, António; Simões, Rogério; Gomes, Arlindo C

    2013-11-01

    Cork boiling wastewater pollutants were fractionated by sequential use of four ultrafiltration membranes and five fractions were obtained: four retentates (>100, 50-100, 20-50 and 10-20 kDa) and one permeate (<10 kDa); which were used to study the correlation of molecular size with biodegradability and toxicity before and after ozonation. The results show that molecular size is correlated with organic load and restrains biodegradability. The fraction with >100 kDa corresponds to 56% of the organic load and the one with <10 kDa only 8%. The biodegradability of fractions increased 182% with fractions molecular size reduction from >100 to <10 kDa and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was from 3436 to 386 mg L(-1). For biodegradability enhancement the best outcome of ozonation was obtained with compounds having molecular size >20 kDa and range from 5% up to 175% for applied ozone doses to COD ratios between 0.15 and 0.38.

  7. Pentameric models as alternative molecular targets for the design of new antiaggregant agents.

    PubMed

    Barrera Guisasola, Exequiel E; Gutierrez, Lucas J; Andujar, Sebastián A; Angelina, Emilio; Rodríguez, Ana M; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2016-01-01

    The structure-based drug design has been an extremely useful technique used for searching and developing of new therapeutic agents in various biological systems. In the case of AD, this approach has been difficult to implement. Among other several causes, the main problem might be the lack of a specific stable and reliable molecular target. In this paper the results obtained using a pentameric amyloid beta (Aβ) model as a molecular target are discussed. Our MD simulations have shown that this system is relatively structured and stable, displaying a lightly conformational flexibility during 2.0 μs of simulation time. This study allowed us to distinguish characteristic structural features in specific regions of the pentamer which should be taken into account when choosing this model as a molecular target. This represents a clear advantage compared to the monomer or dimer models which are highly flexible structures with large numbers of possible conformers. Using this pentameric model we performed two types of studies usually carried out on a molecular target: a virtual screening and the design on structural basis of new mimetic peptides with antiaggregant properties. Our results indicate that this pentameric model might be a good molecular target for these particular studies of molecular modeling. Details about the predictive power of our virtual screening as well as about the molecular interactions that stabilize the mimetic peptide-pentamer Aβ complexes are discussed in this paper.

  8. Molecular targets of androgen signaling that characterize skeletal muscle recovery and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    MacKrell, James G.; Yaden, Benjamin C.; Bullock, Heather; Chen, Keyue; Shetler, Pamela; Bryant, Henry U.; Krishnan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    The high regenerative capacity of adult skeletal muscle relies on a self-renewing depot of adult stem cells, termed muscle satellite cells (MSCs). Androgens, known mediators of overall body composition and specifically skeletal muscle mass, have been shown to regulate MSCs. The possible overlapping function of androgen regulation of muscle growth and MSC activation has not been carefully investigated with regards to muscle regeneration.Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine coinciding androgen-mediated genetic changes in an in vitro MSC model and clinically relevant in vivo models. A gene signature was established via microarray analysis for androgen-mediated MSC engagement and highlighted several markers including follistatin (FST), IGF-1, C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In an in vivo muscle atrophy model, androgen re-supplementation significantly increased muscle size and expression of IGF-1, FST, and HGF, while significantly decreasing expression of GR. Biphasic gene expression profiles over the 7-day re-supplementation period identifed temporal androgen regulation of molecular targets involved in satellite cell engagement into myogenesis. In a muscle injury model, removal of androgens resulted in delayed muscle recovery and regeneration. Modifications in the androgen signaling gene signature, along with reduced Pax7 and MyoD expression, suggested that limited MSC activation and increased inflammation contributed to the delayed regeneration. However, enhanced MSC activation in the androgen-deplete mouse injury model was driven by an androgen receptor (AR) agonist. These results provide novel in vitro and in vivo evidence describing molecular targets of androgen signaling, while also increasing support for translational use of AR agonists in skeletal muscle recovery and regeneration. PMID:26457071

  9. Paclitaxel molecularly imprinted polymer-PEG-folate nanoparticles for targeting anticancer delivery: Characterization and cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi; Darvishi, Behrad; Ishkuh, Fatemeh Azizi; Shahmoradi, Elnaz; Mohammadi, Ali; Javanbakht, Mehran; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize molecularly imprinted polymer-poly ethylene glycol-folic acid (MIP-PEG-FA) nanoparticles for use as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. MIP nanoparticles were synthesized by a mini-emulsion polymerization technique and then PEG-FA was conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles showed high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, 15.6 ± 0.8 and 100%, respectively. The imprinting efficiency of MIPs was evaluated by binding experiments in human serum. Good selective binding and recognition were found in MIP nanoparticles. In vitro drug release studies showed that MIP-PEG-FA have a controlled release of PTX, because of the presence of imprinted sites in the polymeric structure, which makes it is suitable for sustained drug delivery. The drug release from polymeric nanoparticles was indeed higher at acidic pH. The molecular structure of MIP-PEG-FA was confirmed by Hydrogen-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H NMR), Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR), and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) spectroscopy, and their thermal behaviors by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) results showed that nanoparticles have a smooth surface and spherical shape with an average size of 181 nm. MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles showed a greater amount of intracellular uptake in folate receptor-positive cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells) in comparison with the non-folate nanoparticles and free PTX, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 4.9 ± 0.9, 7.4 ± 0.5 and 32.8 ± 3.8 nM, respectively. These results suggest that MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles could be a potentially useful drug carrier for targeting drug delivery to cancer cells. PMID:26952466

  10. The rate of DNA evolution: effects of body size and temperature on the molecular clock.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; Allen, Andrew P; West, Geoffrey B; Brown, James H

    2005-01-01

    Observations that rates of molecular evolution vary widely within and among lineages have cast doubts on the existence of a single "molecular clock." Differences in the timing of evolutionary events estimated from genetic and fossil evidence have raised further questions about the accuracy of molecular clocks. Here, we present a model of nucleotide substitution that combines theory on metabolic rate with the now-classic neutral theory of molecular evolution. The model quantitatively predicts rate heterogeneity and may reconcile differences in molecular- and fossil-estimated dates of evolutionary events. Model predictions are supported by extensive data from mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. By accounting for the effects of body size and temperature on metabolic rate, this model explains heterogeneity in rates of nucleotide substitution in different genes, taxa, and thermal environments. This model also suggests that there is indeed a single molecular clock, as originally proposed by Zuckerkandl and Pauling [Zuckerkandl, E. & Pauling, L. (1965) in Evolving Genes and Proteins, eds. Bryson, V. & Vogel, H. J. (Academic, New York), pp. 97-166], but that it "ticks" at a constant substitution rate per unit of mass-specific metabolic energy rather than per unit of time. This model therefore links energy flux and genetic change. More generally, the model suggests that body size and temperature combine to control the overall rate of evolution through their effects on metabolism.

  11. Hydrated nonpolar solute volumes: Interplay between size, Attractiveness, and molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Ashbaugh, Henry S; Barnett, J Wesley; da Silva Moura, Natalia; Houser, Hayden E

    2016-06-01

    A solute's partial molar volume determines its response to pressure, which can result in changes in molecular conformation or assembly state. Computing speed advances have made accurate partial molar volume evaluation in water routine, allowing for the dissection of the molecular factors underlying this significant thermodynamic variable. A recent simulation analysis of the volumes of nonpolar molecular solutes in water reported that the apparent solvent-free border thickness enshrouding these solutes grows with increasing solute size, based on the assumption the solute can be treated as an individual sphere [Biophys. Chem. 161 (2012) 46]. This suggests the solvent dewets these solutes as they grow in size. Via simulations of dewetted repulsive spherical solutes, we show that the border thicknesses of the largest non-polar molecular solutes tend towards that of a repulsive sphere. When attractive interactions are accounted for, however, the spherical solute border thicknesses fall below that of the largest molecular solutes. We demonstrate that if the molecular solutes are treated with atomic detail rather than approximated as an individual sphere, the border thickness variation is minimal. A geometric model is put forward that reproduces the inferred border thickening, indicating the implied dewetting results from a breakdown in the spherical volume approximation. PMID:27058292

  12. Novel molecular targets in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crispín, JoséC; Tsokos, George C.

    2009-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of biochemical abnormalities which include altered expression of key signaling molecules, heightened calcium responses, and skewed expression of transcription factors. These defects are involved in the altered behavior of SLE T cells and are probably central in the disease pathogenesis. The aim of this communication is to review the defects that have been consistently documented in SLE T cells, highlighting molecules and pathways that represent therapeutic targets. PMID:18190888

  13. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Michael A; Simon, Elias D; Little, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  14. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Michael A.; Simon, Elias D.; Little, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  15. Effects of window size and shape on accuracy of subpixel centroid estimation of target images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.

    1993-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for increasing the accuracy of subpixel centroid estimation of (nearly) point target images in cases where the signal-to-noise ratio is low and the signal amplitude and shape vary from frame to frame. In the algorithm, the centroid is calculated over a data window that is matched in width to the image distribution. Fourier analysis is used to explain the dependency of the centroid estimate on the size of the data window, and simulation and experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effects of window size for two different noise models. The effects of window shape were also investigated for uniform and Gaussian-shaped windows. The new algorithm was developed to improve the dynamic range of a close-range photogrammetric tracking system that provides feedback for control of a large gap magnetic suspension system (LGMSS).

  16. Size Matters: Developing Design Rules to Engineer Nanoparticles for Solid Tumour Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Edward Alexander

    Nanotechnology enables the design of highly customizable platforms for producing minimally invasive and programmable strategies for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Advances in this field have demonstrated that nanoparticles can enhance specificity of anti-cancer agents, respond to tumour-specific cues, and direct the visualization of biological targets in vivo. . Nanoparticles can be synthesized within the 1 to 100 nm range to achieve different electromagnetic properties and specifically interact with biological tissues by tuning their size, shape, and surface chemistry. However, it remains unclear which physicochemical parameters are critical for delivering nanomaterials to the tumour site. With less than 5% of administered nanoparticles reaching the tumour, engineering of nanoparticles for effective delivery to solid tumours remains a critical challenge to cancer nanomedicine. A more comprehensive understanding of the interplay between the nanomaterial physicochemical properties and biological systems is necessary to enhance the efficacy of nanoparticle tumour targeting. This thesis explores how nanoparticle size and functionalization with cancer cell specific agents impact nanoparticle delivery to tumours. Furthermore, this doctoral work (i) discusses how tumour structure evolves with growth, (ii) elucidates how such changes modulate nanoparticle accumulation, and (iii) identifies how the skin serves as a significant off-target site for nanoparticle uptake. This thesis also demonstrates the utility of empirically-derived parametric models, Monte Carlo simulations, and decision matrices for mechanistically understanding and predicting the impact of nanomaterial features and tumour biology on nanoparticle fate in vivo. These topics establish key design considerations to tailor nanoparticles for enhanced tumour targeting. Collectively, the concepts presented herein form a fundamental framework for the development of personalized nanomedicine and nano

  17. Targeting molecular hydrogen to mitochondria: barriers and gateways.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2015-04-01

    Although the administration of molecular hydrogen (H2, dihydrogen) has been recognized as an effective innovative therapeutic procedure in biomedicine, H2 cellular kinetics and utilization seems to be less understood. In particular, mitochondrial barriers might impact on H2 use in mitochondria-related diseases and conditions. Double-membrane organization of mitochondria and large membrane potential are important elements of mitochondrial stability that control the transport of the molecule into and out of the organelle. In this perspective paper, we advanced possible obstacles and advantages for H2 delivery to mitochondria.

  18. Targeting molecular hydrogen to mitochondria: barriers and gateways.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2015-04-01

    Although the administration of molecular hydrogen (H2, dihydrogen) has been recognized as an effective innovative therapeutic procedure in biomedicine, H2 cellular kinetics and utilization seems to be less understood. In particular, mitochondrial barriers might impact on H2 use in mitochondria-related diseases and conditions. Double-membrane organization of mitochondria and large membrane potential are important elements of mitochondrial stability that control the transport of the molecule into and out of the organelle. In this perspective paper, we advanced possible obstacles and advantages for H2 delivery to mitochondria. PMID:25720951

  19. Joint detection and tracking of size-varying infrared targets based on block-wise sparse decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Lin, Zaiping; Long, Yunli; An, Wei; Zhou, Yiyu

    2016-05-01

    The high variability of target size makes small target detection in Infrared Search and Track (IRST) a challenging task. A joint detection and tracking method based on block-wise sparse decomposition is proposed to address this problem. For detection, the infrared image is divided into overlapped blocks, and each block is weighted on the local image complexity and target existence probabilities. Target-background decomposition is solved by block-wise inexact augmented Lagrange multipliers. For tracking, label multi-Bernoulli (LMB) tracker tracks multiple targets taking the result of single-frame detection as input, and provides corresponding target existence probabilities for detection. Unlike fixed-size methods, the proposed method can accommodate size-varying targets, due to no special assumption for the size and shape of small targets. Because of exact decomposition, classical target measurements are extended and additional direction information is provided to improve tracking performance. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively suppress background clutters, detect and track size-varying targets in infrared images.

  20. Targeting molecular interactions essential for Plasmodium sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Rodriguez, Joel; Perez-Barreto, Davinia; Ruiz-Reyes, Antonio; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Malaria remains one of the most devastating infectious diseases, killing up to a million people every year. Whereas much progress has been made in understanding the life cycle of the parasite in the human host and in the mosquito vector, significant gaps of knowledge remain. Fertilization of malaria parasites, a process that takes place in the lumen of the mosquito midgut, is poorly understood and the molecular interactions (receptor–ligand) required for Plasmodium fertilization remain elusive. By use of a phage display library, we identified FG1 (Female Gamete peptide 1), a peptide that binds specifically to the surface of female Plasmodium berghei gametes. Importantly, FG1 but not a scrambled version of the peptide, strongly reduces P. berghei oocyst formation by interfering with fertilization. In addition, FG1 also inhibits P. falciparum oocyst formation suggesting that the peptide binds to a molecule on the surface of the female gamete whose structure is conserved. Identification of the molecular interactions disrupted by the FG1 peptide may lead to the development of novel malaria transmission-blocking strategies. PMID:25944054

  1. Are pharmaceuticals with evolutionary conserved molecular drug targets more potent to cause toxic effects in non-target organisms?

    PubMed

    Furuhagen, Sara; Fuchs, Anne; Lundström Belleza, Elin; Breitholtz, Magnus; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in a continuous discharge into wastewater and pharmaceuticals and their metabolites are found in the environment. Due to their design towards specific drug targets, pharmaceuticals may be therapeutically active already at low environmental concentrations. Several human drug targets are evolutionary conserved in aquatic organisms, raising concerns about effects of these pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. In this study, we hypothesized that the toxicity of a pharmaceutical towards a non-target invertebrate depends on the presence of the human drug target orthologs in this species. This was tested by assessing toxicity of pharmaceuticals with (miconazole and promethazine) and without (levonorgestrel) identified drug target orthologs in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The toxicity was evaluated using general toxicity endpoints at individual (immobility, reproduction and development), biochemical (RNA and DNA content) and molecular (gene expression) levels. The results provide evidence for higher toxicity of miconazole and promethazine, i.e. the drugs with identified drug target orthologs. At the individual level, miconazole had the lowest effect concentrations for immobility and reproduction (0.3 and 0.022 mg L-1, respectively) followed by promethazine (1.6 and 0.18 mg L-1, respectively). At the biochemical level, individual RNA content was affected by miconazole and promethazine already at 0.0023 and 0.059 mg L-1, respectively. At the molecular level, gene expression for cuticle protein was significantly suppressed by exposure to both miconazole and promethazine; moreover, daphnids exposed to miconazole had significantly lower vitellogenin expression. Levonorgestrel did not have any effects on any endpoints in the concentrations tested. These results highlight the importance of considering drug target conservation in environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals.

  2. The molecular basis of targeting protein kinases in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of targeted anticancer therapies with small molecule kinase inhibitors. First, we discuss why a single constitutively active kinase emanating from a variety of aberrant genetic alterations is capable of transforming a normal cell, leading it to acquire the hallmarks of a cancer cell. To draw attention to the fact that kinase inhibition in targeted cancer therapeutics differs from conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, we exploit a conceptual framework explaining why suppressed kinase activity will selectively kill only the so-called oncogene 'addicted' cancer cell, while sparing the healthy cell. Second, we introduce the protein kinase superfamily in light of its common active conformation with precisely positioned structural elements, and the diversified auto-inhibitory conformations among the kinase families. Understanding the detailed activation mechanism of individual kinases is essential to relate the observed oncogenic alterations to the elevated constitutively active state, to identify the mechanism of consequent drug resistance, and to guide the development of the next-generation inhibitors. To clarify the vital importance of structural guidelines in studies of oncogenesis, we explain how somatic mutations in EGFR result in kinase constitutive activation. Third, in addition to the common theme of secondary (acquired) mutations that prevent drug binding from blocking a signaling pathway which is hijacked by the aberrant activated kinase, we discuss scenarios of drug resistance and relapse by compensating lesions that bypass the inactivated pathway in a vertical or horizontal fashion. Collectively, these suggest that the future challenge of cancer therapy with small molecule kinase inhibitors will rely on the discovery of distinct combinations of optimized drugs to target individual subtypes of different cancers.

  3. Metastatic cancer stem cells: new molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Leirós, G J; Balañá, M E

    2011-11-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, predicts that a small subpopulation of cancer cells that possess "stem-like" characteristics, are responsible for initiating and maintaining cancer growth. According to the CSC model the many cell populations found in a tumour might represent diverse stages of differentiation. From the cellular point of view metastasis is considered a highly inefficient process and only a subset of tumour cells is capable of successfully traversing the entire metastatic cascade and eventually re-initiates tumour growth at distant sites. Some similar features of both normal and malignant stem cells suggest that CSCs are not only responsible for tumorigenesis, but also for metastases. The CSC theory proposes that the ability of a tumour to metastasize is an inherent property of a subset of CSCs. The similar biological characteristics shared by normal stem cells (NSCs) and CSCs mainly implicate self-renewal and differentiation potential, survival ability, niche-specific microenvironment requirements and specific homing to metastatic sites and may have important implications in terms of new approaches to cancer therapy in the metastatic setting. There are several agents targeting many of these CSC features that have shown to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. Although clinical trials results are still preliminary and continue under investigation, these new therapies are very promising. The identification of new therapeutic targets and drugs based on CSC model constitutes a great challenge. PMID:21470128

  4. ROS1 Kinase Inhibitors for Molecular-Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Al-Sanea, M M; Abdelazem, A Z; Park, B S; Yoo, K H; Sim, T; Kwon, Y J; Lee, S H

    2016-01-01

    ROS1 is a pivotal transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine kinase which regulates several cellular processes like apoptosis, survival, differentiation, proliferation, cell migration, and transformation. There is increasing evidence supporting that ROS1 plays an important role in different malignancies including glioblastoma, colorectal cancer, gastric adenocarcinoma, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, ovarian cancer, angiosarcoma, and non small cell lung cancer; thus, ROS1 has become a potential drug discovery target. ROS1 shares about 49% sequence homology with ALK primary structure; therefore, wide range of ALK kinase inhibitors have shown in vitro inhibitory activity against ROS1 kinase. After Crizotinib approval by FDA for the management of ALK-rearranged lung cancer, ROS1-positive tumors have been focused. Although significant advancements have been achieved in understanding ROS1 function and its signaling pathways plus recent discovery of small molecules modulating ROS1 protein, a vital need of medicinal chemistry efforts is still required to produce selective and potent ROS1 inhibitors as an important therapeutic strategy for different human malignancies. This review focuses on the current knowledge about different scaffolds targeting ROS1 rearrangements, methods to synthesis, and some biological data about the most potent compounds that have delivered various scaffold structures. PMID:26438251

  5. Metastatic cancer stem cells: new molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Leirós, G J; Balañá, M E

    2011-11-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, predicts that a small subpopulation of cancer cells that possess "stem-like" characteristics, are responsible for initiating and maintaining cancer growth. According to the CSC model the many cell populations found in a tumour might represent diverse stages of differentiation. From the cellular point of view metastasis is considered a highly inefficient process and only a subset of tumour cells is capable of successfully traversing the entire metastatic cascade and eventually re-initiates tumour growth at distant sites. Some similar features of both normal and malignant stem cells suggest that CSCs are not only responsible for tumorigenesis, but also for metastases. The CSC theory proposes that the ability of a tumour to metastasize is an inherent property of a subset of CSCs. The similar biological characteristics shared by normal stem cells (NSCs) and CSCs mainly implicate self-renewal and differentiation potential, survival ability, niche-specific microenvironment requirements and specific homing to metastatic sites and may have important implications in terms of new approaches to cancer therapy in the metastatic setting. There are several agents targeting many of these CSC features that have shown to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. Although clinical trials results are still preliminary and continue under investigation, these new therapies are very promising. The identification of new therapeutic targets and drugs based on CSC model constitutes a great challenge.

  6. Proteasome as a Molecular Target of Microcystin-LR

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Zhang, Li; Shi, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome degrades proteins in eukaryotic cells. As such, the proteasome is crucial in cell cycle and function. This study proved that microcystin-LR (MC-LR), which is a toxic by-product of algal bloom, can target cellular proteasome and selectively inhibit proteasome trypsin-like (TL) activity. MC-LR at 1 nM can inhibit up to 54% of the purified 20S proteasome TL activity and 43% of the proteasome TL activity in the liver of the cyprinid rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus). Protein degradation was retarded in GFP-CL1-transfected PC-3 cells because MC-LR inhibited the proteasome TL activity. Docking studies indicated that MC-LR blocked the active site of the proteasome β2 subunit; thus, the proteasome TL activity was inhibited. In conclusion, MC-LR can target proteasome, selectively inhibit proteasome TL activity, and retard protein degradation. This study may be used as a reference of future research on the toxic mechanism of MC-LR. PMID:26090622

  7. Molecular Pathways: Targeting Diacylglycerol Kinase Alpha in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Purow, Benjamin

    2015-11-15

    Lipid kinases have largely been neglected as targets in cancer, and an increasing number of reports suggest diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKα) may be one with promising therapeutic potential. DGKα is one of 10 DGK family members that convert diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PA), and both DAG and PA are critical lipid second messengers in the plasma membrane. A host of important oncogenic proteins and pathways affect cancer cells in part through DGKα, including the c-Met and VEGF receptors. Others partially mediate the effects of DGKα inhibition in cancer, such as mTOR and HIF-1α. DGKα inhibition can directly impair cancer cell viability, inhibits angiogenesis, and notably may also boost T-cell activation and enhance cancer immunotherapies. Although two structurally similar inhibitors of DGKα were established decades ago, they have seen minimal in vivo usage, and it is unlikely that either of these older DGKα inhibitors will have utility for cancer. An abandoned compound that also inhibits serotonin receptors may have more translational potential as a DGKα inhibitor, but more potent and specific DGKα inhibitors are sorely needed. Other DGK family members may also provide therapeutic targets in cancer, but require further investigation.

  8. Advances in molecular imaging: targeted optical contrast agents for cancer diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Hellebust, Anne; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three decades, our understanding of the molecular changes associated with cancer development and progression has advanced greatly. This has led to new cancer therapeutics targeted against specific molecular pathways; such therapies show great promise to reduce mortality, in part by enabling physicians to tailor therapy for patients based on a molecular profile of their tumor. Unfortunately, the tools for definitive cancer diagnosis – light microscopic examination of biopsied tissue stained with nonspecific dyes – remain focused on the analysis of tissue ex vivo. There is an important need for new clinical tools to support the molecular diagnosis of cancer. Optical molecular imaging is emerging as a technique to help meet this need. Targeted, optically active contrast agents can specifically label extra-and intracellular biomarkers of cancer. Optical images can be acquired in real time with high spatial resolution to image-specific molecular targets, while still providing morphologic context. This article reviews recent advances in optical molecular imaging, highlighting the advances in technology required to improve early cancer detection, guide selection of targeted therapy and rapidly evaluate therapeutic efficacy. PMID:22385200

  9. Molecular Targets and Emerging Therapeutic Options for Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Heather; Ike, Chiemeka; Parma, Jennifer; Masand, Ramya P.; Mach, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyosarcoma (uLMS) is an aggressive malignancy characterized by its early metastasis, high rates of recurrence, and poor prognosis. Multiple obstacles complicate the clinical management of uLMS. These include the fact that most uLMS are typically identified only after a woman has undergone hysterectomy or myomectomy, the limited efficacy of adjuvant therapy for early stage disease, and the poor response of metastatic disease to current treatments. Here, we discuss recent insights into the molecular basis of uLMS and discuss emerging options for its clinical management. Particular attention is given to the biologic basis of these strategies with the goal of understanding the rationale motivating their use. PMID:27721667

  10. Molecular targets of epigenetic regulation and effectors of environmental influences

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Supratim; Cui Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2010-06-15

    The true understanding of what we currently define as epigenetics evolved over time as our knowledge on DNA methylation and chromatin modifications and their effects on gene expression increased. The current explosion of research on epigenetics and the increasing documentation of the effects of various environmental factors on DNA methylation, chromatin modification, as well as on the expression of small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have expanded the scope of research on the etiology of various diseases including cancer. The current review briefly discusses the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic regulation and expands the discussion with examples on the role of environment, such as the immediate environment during development, in inducing epigenetic changes and modulating gene expression.

  11. Changes in Molecular Size Distribution of Cellulose during Attack by White Rot and Brown Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Kleman-Leyer, Karen; Agosin, Eduardo; Conner, Anthony H.; Kirk, T. Kent

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of cotton cellulose depolymerization by the brown rot fungus Postia placenta and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium were investigated with solid-state cultures. The degree of polymerization (DP; the average number of glucosyl residues per cellulose molecule) of cellulose removed from soil-block cultures during degradation by P. placenta was first determined viscosimetrically. Changes in molecular size distribution of cellulose attacked by either fungus were then determined by size exclusion chromatography as the tricarbanilate derivative. The first study with P. placenta revealed two phases of depolymerization: a rapid decrease to a DP of approximately 800 and then a slower decrease to a DP of approximately 250. Almost all depolymerization occurred before weight loss. Determination of the molecular size distribution of cellulose during attack by the brown rot fungus revealed single major peaks centered over progressively lower DPs. Cellulose attacked by P. chrysosporium was continuously consumed and showed a different pattern of change in molecular size distribution than cellulose attacked by P. placenta. At first, a broad peak which shifted at a slightly lower average DP appeared, but as attack progressed the peak narrowed and the average DP increased slightly. From these results, it is apparent that the mechanism of cellulose degradation differs fundamentally between brown and white rot fungi, as represented by the species studied here. We conclude that the brown rot fungus cleaved completely through the amorphous regions of the cellulose microfibrils, whereas the white rot fungus attacked the surfaces of the microfibrils, resulting in a progressive erosion. PMID:16348694

  12. Molecular Size and Weight of Asphaltene and Asphaltene Solubility Fractions from Coals, Crude Oils and Bitumen

    SciTech Connect

    Badre,S.; Goncalves, C.; Norinaga, K.; Gustavson, G.; Mullins, O.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular weight of asphaltenes has been a controversy for several decades. In recent years, several techniques have converged on the size of the fused ring system; indicating that chromophores in virgin crude oil asphaltenes typically have 4-10 fused rings. Consequently, the molecular weight debate is equivalent to determining whether asphaltenes are monomeric (one fused-ring system per molecule) or whether they are polymeric. Time-resolved fluorescence depolarization (FD) is employed here to interrogate the absolute size of asphaltene molecules and to determine the relation of the size of the fused ring system to that of the corresponding molecule. Coal, petroleum and bitumen asphaltenes are compared. Molecular size of coal asphaltenes obtained here by FD-determined rotational diffusion match closely with Taylor-dispersion-derived translational diffusion measurements with UV absorption. Coal asphaltenes are smaller than petroleum asphaltenes. N-methyl pyrrolidinone (NMP) soluble and insoluble fractions are examined. NMP soluble and insoluble fractions of asphaltenes are monomeric. It is suggested that the 'giant' asphaltene molecules reported from SEC studies using NMP as the eluting solvent may actually be the expected flocs of asphaltene which are not soluble in NMP. Data is presented that intramolecular electronic relaxation in asphaltenes does not perturb FD results.

  13. Communication target object recognition for D2D connection with feature size limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Jiheon; Kim, Soochang; Kim, Young-hoon; Lee, Chulhee

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a new concept of device-to-device (D2D) communication, which is called "point-and-link communication" has attracted great attentions due to its intuitive and simple operation. This approach enables user to communicate with target devices without any pre-identification information such as SSIDs, MAC addresses by selecting the target image displayed on the user's own device. In this paper, we present an efficient object matching algorithm that can be applied to look(point)-and-link communications for mobile services. Due to the limited channel bandwidth and low computational power of mobile terminals, the matching algorithm should satisfy low-complexity, low-memory and realtime requirements. To meet these requirements, we propose fast and robust feature extraction by considering the descriptor size and processing time. The proposed algorithm utilizes a HSV color histogram, SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) features and object aspect ratios. To reduce the descriptor size under 300 bytes, a limited number of SIFT key points were chosen as feature points and histograms were binarized while maintaining required performance. Experimental results show the robustness and the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  14. Effects of molecular size and chemical factor on plasma gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Motomura, Hideki; Kido, Yugo; Satoh, Susumu; Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of plasma gene transfection, the relationship between transfection efficiency and transferred molecular size was investigated. Molecules with low molecular mass (less than 50 kDa; dye or dye-labeled oligonucleotide) and high molecular mass (more than 1 MDa; plasmid DNA or fragment of plasmid DNA) were transferred to L-929 cells. It was found that the transfection efficiency decreases with increasing in transferred molecular size and also depends on the tertiary structure of transferred molecules. Moreover, it was suggested the transfection mechanism is different between the molecules with low (less than 50 kDa) and high molecular mass (higher than 1 MDa). For the amount of gene transfection after plasma irradiation, which is comparable to that during plasma irradiation, it is shown that H2O2 molecules are the main contributor. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.40 ± 0.22 upon scavenging the H2O2 generated by plasma irradiation using the catalase. On the other hand, when the H2O2 solution is dropped into the cell suspension without plasma irradiation, the transfection efficiency is almost 0%. In these results, it is also suggested that there is a synergetic effect of H2O2 with electrical factors or other reactive species generated by plasma irradiation.

  15. Controlling size and uniformity of molecularly imprinted nanoparticles using auxiliary template.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyong; Ye, Lei

    2012-06-01

    Molecularly imprinted nanomaterials are gaining substantial importance. As a simple and efficient synthetic method, precipitation polymerization has been used to prepare uniform molecularly imprinted microspheres for numerous template compounds. Despite of its general applicability, the difficulty of obtaining uniform particles for some difficult templates by precipitation polymerization has been reported. In this work, we attempted to produce uniform atrazine-imprinted nanoparticles using propranolol as an auxiliary template under standard precipitation polymerization condition. When propranolol was added in the prepolymerization mixture for atrazine imprinting, it displayed a significant effect on particle size and size distribution of atrazine-imprinted polymers. The molecular binding characteristics of the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanoparticles were found to be dependent on the relative ratios of the two templates. Under an optimal template propranolol-atrazine ratio of 1:3 mol/mol, very uniform imprinted nanoparticles (d(H)  = 106 nm) with a polydispersity index of 0.07 were obtained. The loading of the auxiliary template (propranolol) could be reduced to as low as 5% without sacrificing the uniformity of the MIP nanoparticles. The uniform MIP nanoparticles could be easily encapsulated into polyethylene terephthalate nanofibers using a simple electrospinning technique. The composite nanofibers containing the MIP nanoparticles maintained specific molecular binding capability for both atrazine and propranolol.

  16. Curcumin: a Polyphenol with Molecular Targets for Cancer Control.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Naqvi, Syeda Tahira Qousain; Muhammad, Syed Aun

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, is a polyphenol from Curcuma longa (turmeric plant), is a polyphenol that belongs to the ginger family which has long been used in Ayurveda medicines to treat various diseases such as asthma, anorexia, coughing, hepatic diseases, diabetes, heart diseases, wound healing and Alzheimer's. Various studies have shown that curcumin has anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, hepatoprotective, thrombosuppressive, cardio protective, anti-arthritic, chemo preventive and anti-carcinogenic activities. It may suppress both initiation and progression stages of cancer. Anticancer activity of curcumin is due to negative regulation of inflammatory cytokines, transcription factors, protein kinases, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oncogenes. This review focuses on the different targets of curcumin to treat cancer. PMID:27356682

  17. [Depression and addiction comorbidity: towards a common molecular target?].

    PubMed

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    The comorbidity of depression and cocaine addiction suggests shared mechanisms and anatomical pathways. Specifically, the limbic structures, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a crucial role in both disorders. P11 (S100A10) is a promising target for manipulating depression and addiction in mice. We summarized the recent genetic and viral strategies used to determine how the titration of p11 levels within the NAc affects hedonic behavior and cocaine reward learning in mice. In particular, p11 in the ChAT+ cells or DRD1+ MSN of the NAc, controls depressive-like behavior or cocaine reward, respectively. Treatments to counter maladaptation of p11 levels in the NAc could provide novel therapeutic opportunities for depression and cocaine addiction in humans.

  18. [Depression and addiction comorbidity: towards a common molecular target?].

    PubMed

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    The comorbidity of depression and cocaine addiction suggests shared mechanisms and anatomical pathways. Specifically, the limbic structures, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a crucial role in both disorders. P11 (S100A10) is a promising target for manipulating depression and addiction in mice. We summarized the recent genetic and viral strategies used to determine how the titration of p11 levels within the NAc affects hedonic behavior and cocaine reward learning in mice. In particular, p11 in the ChAT+ cells or DRD1+ MSN of the NAc, controls depressive-like behavior or cocaine reward, respectively. Treatments to counter maladaptation of p11 levels in the NAc could provide novel therapeutic opportunities for depression and cocaine addiction in humans. PMID:26059306

  19. Matricellular proteins: new molecular targets to prevent heart failure.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko

    2012-08-01

    Matricellular proteins are highly expressed in reparative responses to pressure and volume overload, ischemia, oxidative stress after myocardial injury, and modulate the inflammatory and fibrotic process in ventricular remodeling, which leads to cardiac dysfunction and eventually overt heart failure. Generally, matricellular proteins loosen strong adhesion of cardiomyocytes to extracellular matrix, which would help cells to move for rearrangement and allow inflammatory cells and capillary vessels to spread during tissue remodeling. Among matricellular proteins, osteopontin (OPN) and tenascin-C (TN-C) are de-adhesion proteins and upregulate the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases. These matricellular proteins could be key molecules to diagnose cardiac remodeling and also might be targets for the prevention of adverse ventricular remodeling. This review provides an overview of the role of matricellular proteins such as OPN and TN-C in cardiac function and remodeling, as determined by both in basic and in clinical studies.

  20. Promising Molecular Targets and Biomarkers for Male BPH and LUTS

    PubMed Central

    Gharaee-Kermani, Mehrnaz; Macoska, Jill A.

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a major health concern for aging men. BPH is associated with urinary voiding dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), which negatively affects quality of life. Surgical resection and medical approaches have proven effective for improving urinary flow and relieving LUTS, but are not effective for all men and can produce adverse effects that require termination of the therapeutic regimen. Thus, there is a need to explore other therapeutic targets to treat BPH/LUTS. Complicating the treatment of BPH/LUTS is the lack of biomarkers to effectively identify pathobiologies contributing to BPH/LUTS or to gauge successful response to therapy. This review will briefly discuss current knowledge and will highlight new studies that illuminate the pathobiologies contributing to BPH/LUTS; potential new therapeutic strategies for successfully treating BPH/LUTS; and new approaches for better defining these pathobiologies and response to therapeutics through the development of biomarkers and phenotyping strategies. PMID:23913202

  1. A Molecularly Targeted Theranostic Probe for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenxue; Bardhan, Rizia; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Pautler, Robia G.; Halas, Naomi J.; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family has been implicated in ovarian cancer because of its participation in signaling pathway regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival. Currently, effective diagnostic and therapeutic schemes are lacking for treating ovarian cancer and consequently ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate. While HER2 receptor expression does not usually affect the survival rates of ovarian cancer to the same extent as in breast cancer, it can be employed as a docking site for directed nanotherapies in cases with de novo or acquired chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we have exploited a novel gold nanoshell-based complex (nanocomplex) for targeting, dual modal imaging, and photothermal therapy of HER2 overexpressing and drug resistant ovarian cancer OVCAR3 cells in vitro. The nanocomplexes are engineered to simultaneously provide contrast as fluorescence optical imaging probe and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent. Both immunofluorescence staining and MRI successfully demonstrate that nanocomplex-anti-HER2 conjugates specifically bind to OVCAR3 cells as opposed to the control, MDA-MB-231 cells, which have low HER2 expression. In addition, nanocomplexes targeted to OVCAR3 cells, when irradiated with near infrared (NIR) laser result in selective destruction of cancer cells through photothermal ablation. We also demonstrate that NIR light therapy and the nanocomplexes by themselves are non-cytotoxic in vitro. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a successful integration of dual modal bioimaging with photothermal cancer therapy for treatment of ovarian cancer. Based on their efficacy in vitro, these nanocomplexes are highly promising for image guided photo-thermal therapy of ovarian cancer as well as other HER2 overexpressing cancers. PMID:20371708

  2. Size, Albedo, and Taxonomy of the Don Quijote Space Mission Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Alan; Mueller, Michael; Fitzsimmons, Alan

    2006-03-01

    Rendezvous and lander missions are a very effective but very expensive way of investigating Solar-System bodies. The planning, optimization and success of space missions depends crucially on prior remotely-sensed knowledge of target bodies. Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), which are mainly fragments of main-belt asteroids, are seen as important goals for investigation by space missions, mainly due to the role their forebears played in planet formation and the evolution of the Solar System, but also for the pragmatic reason that these objects can collide with the Earth with potentially devastating consequences. The European Space Agency is currently planning the Don Quijote mission to a NEA, which includes a rendezvous (and perhaps a lander) spacecraft and an impactor vehicle. The aim is to study the physical properties of the target asteroid and the effects of the impact on its dynamical state, as a first step in considering realistic mitigation measures against an eventual hazardous NEA. Two potential targets have been selected for the mission, the preferred one being (10302) 1989 ML, which is energetically easier to reach and is possibly a scientifically interesting primitive asteroid. However, due to the ambiguity of available spectral data, it is currently not possible to confidently determine the taxonomic type and mineralogy of this object. Crucially, the albedo is uncertain by a factor of 10, which leads to large uncertainties in the size and mass and hence the planned near-surface operations of Don Quijote. Thermal-infrared observations are urgently required for accurate size and albedo determination. These observations, which can only be carried out by Spitzer and would require only a modest amount of observing time, would enable an accurate diameter to be derived for the first time and the resulting albedo would remove the taxonomic ambiguity. The proposed Spitzer observations are critical for effective mission planning and would greatly increase our

  3. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-08-29

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods-including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements-and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed.

  4. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods-including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements-and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed. PMID:27589790

  5. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C.; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods—including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements—and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed. PMID:27589790

  6. [The quality practice of molecular-genetic testing in the era of molecular target therapy in chronic myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Hayato; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Masukawa, Atsuko; Asai, Satomi

    2012-10-01

    The advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as molecular target therapy has resulted in a marked change in the laboratory process for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of chronic myelogenous leukemia. This includes defining the molecular typing of BCR-ABL1 to establish the diagnosis, a quantitative and/or high quality assay for minimal residual disease to evaluate the molecular response, and mutation analysis and chromosomal examination to assess its resistance to inhibitors. These processes should be used where appropriate for each patient. In the ongoing development and clinical use of novel agents for treatment of the leukemia, the quality assurance of each process of molecular-genetic testing, such as specimen handling, measurement, and reporting, has become increasingly important in the quality care of patients.

  7. Communication: Kirkwood-Buff integrals in the thermodynamic limit from small-sized molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes-Huerto, R.; Kremer, K.; Potestio, R.

    2016-10-01

    We present an accurate and efficient method to obtain Kirkwood-Buff (KB) integrals in the thermodynamic limit from small-sized molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing finite size effects into integral equations of statistical mechanics, we derive an analytical expression connecting the KB integrals of the bulk system with the fluctuations of the number of molecules in the corresponding closed system. We validate the method by calculating the activity coefficients of aqueous urea mixtures and the KB integrals of Lennard-Jones fluids. Moreover, our results demonstrate how to identify simulation conditions under which computer simulations reach the thermodynamic limit.

  8. Molecular Communication Model for Targeted Drug Delivery in Multiple Disease Sites With Diversely Expressed Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A K; Malekian, Reza; Maharaj, B T Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery (TDD) for disease therapy using liposomes as nanocarriers has received extensive attention in the literature. The liposome's ability to incorporate capabilities such as long circulation, stimuli responsiveness, and targeting characteristics, makes it a versatile nanocarrier. Timely drug release at the targeted site requires that trigger stimuli such as pH, light, and enzymes be uniquely overexpressed at the targeted site. However, in some cases, the targeted sites may not express trigger stimuli significantly, hence, achieving effective TDD at those sites is challenging. In this paper, we present a molecular communication-based TDD model for the delivery of therapeutic drugs to multiple sites that may or may not express trigger stimuli. The nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver models for the molecular communication system are presented. Here, the nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver are injected into the targeted body system's blood network. The compartmental pharmacokinetics model is employed to model the transportation of these therapeutic nanocarriers to the targeted sites where they are meant to anchor before the delivery process commences. We also provide analytical expressions for the delivered drug concentration. The effectiveness of the proposed model is investigated for drug delivery on tissue surfaces. Results show that the effectiveness of the proposed molecular communication-based TDD depends on parameters such as the total transmitter volume capacity, the receiver radius, the diffusion characteristic of the microenvironment of the targeted sites, and the concentration of the enzymes associated with the nanotransmitter and the nanoreceiver designs.

  9. Molecular profiling of biliary tract cancer: a target rich disease

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are relatively uncommon orphan tumors that have an aggressive disease course and a poor clinical outcome. Surgery is the only curative treatment, but most patients present with advanced disease and therefore have a limited survival. Gemcitabine and cisplatin based chemotherapy has been the only widely accepted standard systemic therapy regimen in these patients but these tumors can be chemoresistant, further complicating their management. In recent times, there has been considerable research in the genetics of BTC and with the advent of new, advanced technologies like next-generation sequencing (NGS) we are achieving a greater understanding of its disease biology. With the help of NGS, we have now been able to identify actionable mutations such as in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), FGFR2, BRAF and HER2/neu genes for targeted therapeutics and correlate the genetic variations with distinct clinical prognoses. This recent genetic information has the potential to make precision medicine a part of routine clinical practice for the management of BTC patients. PMID:27747093

  10. Genotoxicants Target Distinct Molecular Networks in Neonatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kisby, Glen E.; Olivas, Antoinette; Standley, Melissa; Lu, Xinfang; Pattee, Patrick; O’Malley, Jean; Li, Xiaorong; Muniz, Juan; Nagalla, Srinavasa R.

    2006-01-01

    Background Exposure of the brain to environmental agents during critical periods of neuronal development is considered a key factor underlying many neurologic disorders. Objectives In this study we examined the influence of genotoxicants on cerebellar function during early development by measuring global gene expression changes. Methods We measured global gene expression in immature cerebellar neurons (i.e., granule cells) after treatment with two distinct alkylating agents, methylazoxymethanol (MAM) and nitrogen mustard (HN2). Granule cell cultures were treated for 24 hr with MAM (10–1,000 μM) or HN2 (0.1–20 μM) and examined for cell viability, DNA damage, and markers of apoptosis. Results Neuronal viability was significantly reduced (p < 0.01) at concentrations > 500 μM for MAM and > 1.0 μM for HN2; this correlated with an increase in both DNA damage and markers of apoptosis. Neuronal cultures treated with sublethal concentrations of MAM (100 μM) or HN2 (1.0 μM) were then examined for gene expression using large-scale mouse cDNA microarrays (27,648). Gene expression results revealed that a) global gene expression was predominantly up-regulated by both genotoxicants; b) the number of down-regulated genes was approximately 3-fold greater for HN2 than for MAM; and c) distinct classes of molecules were influenced by MAM (i.e, neuronal differentiation, the stress and immune response, and signal transduction) and HN2 (i.e, protein synthesis and apoptosis). Conclusions These studies demonstrate that individual genotoxicants induce distinct gene expression signatures. Further study of these molecular networks may explain the variable response of the developing brain to different types of environmental genotoxicants. PMID:17107856

  11. Size and molecular flexibility of sugars determine the storage stability of freeze-dried proteins.

    PubMed

    Tonnis, W F; Mensink, M A; de Jager, A; van der Voort Maarschalk, K; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2015-03-01

    Protein-based biopharmaceuticals are generally produced as aqueous solutions and stored refrigerated to obtain sufficient shelf life. Alternatively, proteins may be freeze-dried in the presence of sugars to allow storage stability at ambient conditions for prolonged periods. However, to act as a stabilizer, these sugars should remain in the glassy state during storage. This requires a sufficiently high glass transition temperature (Tg). Furthermore, the sugars should be able to replace the hydrogen bonds between the protein and water during drying. Frequently used disaccharides are characterized by a relatively low Tg, rendering them sensitive to plasticizing effects of residual water, which strongly reduces the Tg values of the formulation. Larger sugars generally have higher Tgs, but it is assumed that these sugars are limited in their ability to interact with the protein due to steric hindrance. In this paper, the size and molecular flexibility of sugars was related to their ability to stabilize proteins. Four diverse proteins varying in size from 6 kDa to 540 kDa were freeze-dried in the presence of different sugars varying in size and molecular flexibility. Subsequently, the different samples were subjected to an accelerated stability test. Using protein specific assays and intrinsic fluorescence, stability of the proteins was monitored. It was found that the smallest sugar (disaccharide trehalose) best preserved the proteins, but also that the Tg of the formulations was only just high enough to maintain sufficient vitrification. When trehalose-based formulations are exposed to high relative humidities, water uptake by the product reduces the Tgs too much. In that respect, sugars with higher Tgs are desired. Addition of polysaccharide dextran 70 kDa to trehalose greatly increased the Tg of the formulation. Moreover, this combination also improved the stability of the proteins compared to dextran only formulations. The molecularly flexible oligosaccharide

  12. Present Advances and Future Perspectives of Molecular Targeted Therapy for Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Atik Badshah; Li, Fangfei; Li, Min; He, Bing; He, Xiaojuan; Chen, Guofen; Guo, Baosheng; Li, Defang; Jiang, Feng; Dang, Lei; Zheng, Shaowei; Liang, Chao; Liu, Jin; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a bone cancer mostly occurring in pediatric population. Current treatment regime of surgery and intensive chemotherapy could cure about 60%–75% patients with primary osteosarcoma, however only 15% to 30% can be cured when pulmonary metastasis or relapse has taken place. Hence, novel precise OS-targeting therapies are being developed with the hope of addressing this issue. This review summarizes the current development of molecular mechanisms and targets for osteosarcoma. Therapies that target these mechanisms with updated information on clinical trials are also reviewed. Meanwhile, we further discuss novel therapeutic targets and OS-targeting drug delivery systems. In conclusion, a full insight in OS pathogenesis and OS-targeting strategies would help us explore novel targeted therapies for metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:27058531

  13. Adsorption of phenolics on activated carbon--impact of pore size and molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuli; Sorial, George A

    2004-05-01

    The impact of pore size of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) on adsorption capacity and on the potential for oligomerization of phenolic compounds on the surface of ACFs in the presence of molecular oxygen has been investigated in this study. Compared with granular activated carbon (GAC), ACFs have unique pore size distributions, suitable to be used to elucidate the effect of pore structure on adsorption. Adsorption isotherm data were collected for o-cresol and 2-ethylphenol on four ACFs (ACC-10, ACC-15, ACC-20, and ACC-25) with different micropore volumes and BET surface area and on one type of GAC bituminous base. These isotherms were collected under anoxic (absence of molecular oxygen) and oxic (presence of molecular oxygen) conditions. No significant impact of the presence of molecular oxygen on adsorption capacity was noted for ACC-10. ACC-10 has an average pore width of 19.2 A and total pore volume of 0.43 cm3g(-1). On the other hand, for the remaining ACFs, which have larger average pore width and larger pore volume, significant increase in the adsorptive capacity had been observed when molecular oxygen was present. The GAC gave the greatest difference between anoxic and oxic conditions when compared to all the ACFs studied. Binary adsorption of o-cresol and 2-ethylphenol on ACFs with the least pore size (ACC-10) also showed no significant differences between oxic and anoxic environment. The binary system under both anoxic and oxic conditions was well predicted by the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST).

  14. Targeted Therapy for Acute Autoimmune Myocarditis with Nano-Sized Liposomal FK506 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Takashi; Araki, Ryo; Tsuchida, Shota; Thanikachalam, Punniyakoti V.; Fukuta, Tatsuya; Asai, Tomohiro; Yamato, Masaki; Sanada, Shoji; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asano, Yoshihiro; Asakura, Masanori; Hanawa, Haruo; Hao, Hiroyuki; Oku, Naoto; Takashima, Seiji; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Sakata, Yasushi; Minamino, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are used for the treatment of immune-mediated myocarditis; however, the need to develop a more effective therapeutic approach remains. Nano-sized liposomes may accumulate in and selectively deliver drugs to an inflammatory lesion with enhanced vascular permeability. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of liposomal FK506, an immunosuppressive drug encapsulated within liposomes, and the drug’s effects on cardiac function in a rat experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model. We prepared polyethylene glycol-modified liposomal FK506 (mean diameter: 109.5 ± 4.4 nm). We induced EAM by immunization with porcine myosin and assessed the tissue distribution of the nano-sized beads and liposomal FK506 in this model. After liposomal or free FK506 was administered on days 14 and 17 after immunization, the cytokine expression in the rat hearts along with the histological findings and hemodynamic parameters were determined on day 21. Ex vivo fluorescent imaging revealed that intravenously administered fluorescent-labeled nano-sized beads had accumulated in myocarditic but not normal hearts on day 14 after immunization and thereafter. Compared to the administration of free FK506, FK506 levels were increased in both the plasma and hearts of EAM rats when liposomal FK506 was administered. The administration of liposomal FK506 markedly suppressed the expression of cytokines, such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, and reduced inflammation and fibrosis in the myocardium on day 21 compared to free FK506. The administration of liposomal FK506 also markedly ameliorated cardiac dysfunction on day 21 compared to free FK506. Nano-sized liposomes may be a promising drug delivery system for targeting myocarditic hearts with cardioprotective agents. PMID:27501378

  15. Molecular Characterization of Head and Neck Cancer: How Close to Personalized Targeted Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Worsham, Maria J.; Ali, Haythem; Dragovic, Jadranka; Schweitzer, Vanessa P.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapy in squamous head and neck cancer (HNSCC) continues to make strides and holds much promise. Cetuximab remains the sole FDA-approved molecular targeted therapy available for HNSCC, though there are several new biological agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other pathways in the regulatory approval pipeline. While targeted therapies have the potential to be personalized, their current use in HNSCC is not personalized. This is illustrated for EGFR targeted drugs, where EGFR as a molecular target has yet to be individualized for HNSCC. Future research needs to identify factors that correlate with response (or lack of one) and the underlying genotype-phenotype relationship that dictates this response. Comprehensive exploration of genetic and epigenetic landscapes in HNSCC is opening new frontiers to further enlighten, mechanistically inform, and set a course for eventually translating these discoveries into therapies for patients. This opinion offers a snap shot of the evolution of molecular subytping in HNSCC, its current clinical applicability, as well as new emergent paradigms with implications for controlling this disease in the future. PMID:22873739

  16. In vivo molecular imaging using nanomaterials: general in vivo characteristics of nano-sized reagents and applications for cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Lauren T; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2010-10-01

    Nanoparticles present a new collection of contrast agents for the field of in vivo molecular imaging. This review focuses on promising molecular imaging probes for optical and magnetic resonance imaging based on four representative nanomaterial(s) platforms: quantum dots, upconversion phosphors, superparamagnetic iron oxides, and dendrimer-based agents. Quantum dots are extremely efficient fluorescent nanoparticles with size-tunable emission properties, enabling high sensitivity and greater depth penetration. Their heavy metal composition and long retention in the body, however, pose concerns for clinical translational applications. Upconversion phosphors generate excellent signal-to-background contrast because they emit light with higher energy than the excitation photons and autofluorescence signals. For MRI, iron oxide particles also generate excellent signal and have been used in liver imaging and for cell tracking studies. As they are metabolized through endogenous iron salvage pathways, they have already been introduced as clinical contrast agents. Lastly, dendrimers, a 'soft' nanoparticle, can be used as a structural basis for the attachment of small molecule imaging agents and/or targeting groups. This array of nanoparticles should offer insights into the uses and potentials of nanoparticles for the molecular imaging.

  17. The kinetic mechanism of Human Thymidine Phosphorylase - a molecular target for cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Deves, Candida; Rostirolla, Diana Carolina; Martinelli, Leonardo Kras Borges; Bizarro, Cristiano Valim; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; Basso, Luiz Augusto

    2014-03-01

    Human Thymidine Phosphorylase (HTP), also known as the platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) or gliostatin, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of thymidine (dThd) to thymine and 2-deoxy-α-d-ribose-1-phosphate (2dR1P). HTP is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway involved in dThd homeostasis in cells. HTP is a target for anticancer drug development as its enzymatic activity promotes angiogenesis. Here, we describe cloning, expression, and purification to homogeneity of recombinant TYMP-encoded HTP. Peptide fingerprinting and the molecular mass value of the homogenous protein confirmed its identity as HTP assessed by mass spectrometry. Size exclusion chromatography showed that HTP is a dimer in solution. Kinetic studies revealed that HTP displayed substrate inhibition for dThd. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies suggest that HTP catalysis follows a rapid-equilibrium random bi-bi kinetic mechanism. ITC measurements also showed that dThd and Pi binding are favorable processes. The pH-rate profiles indicated that maximal enzyme activity was achieved at low pH values. Functional groups with apparent pK values of 5.2 and 9.0 are involved in dThd binding and groups with pK values of 6.1 and 7.8 are involved in phosphate binding. PMID:24407036

  18. Scrapie prion liposomes and rods exhibit target sizes of 55,000 Da

    SciTech Connect

    Bellinger-Kawahara, C.G.; Kempner, E.; Groth, D.; Gabizon, R.; Prusiner, S.B.

    1988-06-01

    Scrapie is a degenerative neurologic disease in sheep and goats which can be experimentally transmitted to laboratory rodents. Considerable evidence suggests that the scrapie agent is composed largely, if not entirely, of an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc). Inactivation of scrapie prions by ionizing radiation exhibited single-hit kinetics and gave a target size of 55,000 +/- 9000 mol wt. The inactivation profile was independent of the form of the prion. Scrapie agent infectivity in brain homogenates, microsomal fractions, detergent-extracted microsomes, purified amyloid rods, and liposomes exhibited the same inactivation profile. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the infectious particle causing scrapie contains approximately 2 PrPSc molecules.

  19. Determination of phytate in high molecular weight, charged organic matrices by two-dimensional size exclusion-ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Kyle R; Slingsby, Rosanne; Bryant, Ray B

    2016-08-15

    A two-dimensional chromatography method for analyzing phytate or other ionic targets in matrices containing high molecular weight, charged organic species is described. Prior to quantification by anion exchange chromatography, the sample matrix was prepared by size exclusion chromatography, which removed the majority of the matrix. Quantification of phytate on the AS11-HC was sensitive (0.25µM, 0.17mg/l) and reproducible (4.6% RSD) allowing this method to provide baseline separation of phytate from a manure extract within 14min. The method is simple, requiring only sample filtering, reproducible (between-run variation 5% RSD) and linear from 0.38 to 76µM (0.25-50mg/l). The method is suitable for routine determination of phytate in high organic matrices such as manure extracts.

  20. Proteome-wide prediction of targets for aspirin: new insight into the molecular mechanism of aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Besides its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic properties, aspirin is used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and various types of cancer. The multiple activities of aspirin likely involve several molecular targets and pathways rather than a single target. Therefore, systematic identification of these targets of aspirin can help us understand the underlying mechanisms of the activities. In this study, we identified 23 putative targets of aspirin in the human proteome by using binding pocket similarity detecting tool combination with molecular docking, free energy calculation and pathway analysis. These targets have diverse folds and are derived from different protein family. However, they have similar aspirin-binding pockets. The binding free energy with aspirin for newly identified targets is comparable to that for the primary targets. Pathway analysis revealed that the targets were enriched in several pathways such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, Fc epsilon RI signaling and arachidonic acid metabolism, which are strongly involved in inflammation, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, the predicted target profile of aspirin suggests a new explanation for the disease prevention ability of aspirin. Our findings provide a new insight of aspirin and its efficacy of disease prevention in a systematic and global view. PMID:26989626

  1. Unmixing multiple adjacent fluorescent targets with multispectral excited fluorescence molecular tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Guang, Huizhi; Pu, Huangsheng; Zhang, Jiulou; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-06-20

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can visualize biological activities at cellular and molecular levels in vivo, and has been extensively used in drug delivery and tumor detection research of small animals. The ill-posedness of the FMT inverse problem makes it difficult to reconstruct and unmix multiple adjacent fluorescent targets that have different functional features but are labeled with the same fluorochrome. A method based on independent component analysis for multispectral excited FMT was proposed in our previous study. It showed that double fluorescent targets with certain edge-to-edge distance (EED) could be unmixed by the method. In this study, the situation is promoted to unmix multiple adjacent fluorescent targets (i.e., more than two fluorescent targets and EED=0). Phantom experiments on the resolving ability of the proposed algorithm demonstrate that the algorithm performs well in unmixing multiple adjacent fluorescent targets in both lateral and axial directions. And also, we recovered the locational information of each independent fluorescent target and described the variable trends of the corresponding fluorescent targets under the excitation spectrum. This method is capable of unmixing multiple fluorescent targets with small EED but labeled with the same fluorochrome, and may be used in imaging of nonspecific probe targeting and metabolism of drugs. PMID:27409108

  2. Proteome-wide prediction of targets for aspirin: new insight into the molecular mechanism of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Besides its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic properties, aspirin is used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and various types of cancer. The multiple activities of aspirin likely involve several molecular targets and pathways rather than a single target. Therefore, systematic identification of these targets of aspirin can help us understand the underlying mechanisms of the activities. In this study, we identified 23 putative targets of aspirin in the human proteome by using binding pocket similarity detecting tool combination with molecular docking, free energy calculation and pathway analysis. These targets have diverse folds and are derived from different protein family. However, they have similar aspirin-binding pockets. The binding free energy with aspirin for newly identified targets is comparable to that for the primary targets. Pathway analysis revealed that the targets were enriched in several pathways such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, Fc epsilon RI signaling and arachidonic acid metabolism, which are strongly involved in inflammation, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, the predicted target profile of aspirin suggests a new explanation for the disease prevention ability of aspirin. Our findings provide a new insight of aspirin and its efficacy of disease prevention in a systematic and global view. PMID:26989626

  3. DNAzyme molecular beacon probes for target-induced signal-amplifying colorimetric detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rongzhan; Li, Taihua; Lee, Soo Suk; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2011-01-15

    A novel DNAzyme molecular beacon (DNAzymeMB) strategy was developed for target-induced signal-amplifying colorimetric detection of target nucleic acids. The DNAzymeMB, which exhibits peroxidase activity in its free hairpin structure, was engineered to form a catalytically inactive hybrid through hybridization with a blocker DNA. The presence of target DNA leads to dissociation of the DNAzymeMB from the inactive hybrid through hybridization with the blocker DNA. This process results in recovery of the catalytically active DNAzymeMB, which can catalyze a colorimetric reaction that signals the presence of the target DNA. In addition, a primer was rationally designed to anneal to the blocker DNA of the blocker/target DNA duplex and displace the bound target DNA during the extension reaction. The released target DNA triggers the next cycle involving hybridization with blocker DNA, DNAzymeMB dissociation, primer extension, and target displacement. This unique amplifying strategy leads to the generation of multiple numbers of active DNAzymeMB molecules from a single target molecule and gives a detection limit down to 1 pM, a value that is nearly 3 or 5 orders of magnitude lower than those of previously reported DNAzyme molecular beacon-based DNA detection methods.

  4. Molecular Target Approaches in Head and Neck Cancer: EGFR and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Paul M.; Wheeler, Deric L.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 50,000 new cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) will be diagnosed in the United States (US) in 2009. Whereas the gradual decline in smoking rates in the US is a highly favorable trend, future global HNSCC incidence will likely reflect the increased marketing and penetration of tobacco products across several of our most populous countries. Although modern surgery, radiation and conventional chemotherapy strategies for HNSCC continue to provide gradual improvement in outcome, the first molecular targeting approach to demonstrate a survival advantage for HNSCC patients has recently emerged in the context of EGFR biology. The scientific background and current challenges accompanying this recent advance are described in this article as are several additional promising molecular targets for HNSCC. There is cautious anticipation that the logical advancement of molecular targeting agents in conjunction with radiation may afford increased cure rates and diminished normal tissue toxicity profiles for HNSCC patients over the years to come. PMID:19028347

  5. Molecular behavior of DNA in a cell-sized compartment coated by lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Tsutomu; Fujimoto, Rie; Shimobayashi, Shunsuke F.; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Takagi, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    The behavior of long DNA molecules in a cell-sized confined space was investigated. We prepared water-in-oil droplets covered by phospholipids, which mimic the inner space of a cell, following the encapsulation of DNA molecules with unfolded coil and folded globule conformations. Microscopic observation revealed that the adsorption of coiled DNA onto the membrane surface depended on the size of the vesicular space. Globular DNA showed a cell-size-dependent unfolding transition after adsorption on the membrane. Furthermore, when DNA interacted with a two-phase membrane surface, DNA selectively adsorbed on the membrane phase, such as an ordered or disordered phase, depending on its conformation. We discuss the mechanism of these trends by considering the free energy of DNA together with a polyamine in the solution. The free energy of our model was consistent with the present experimental data. The cooperative interaction of DNA and polyamines with a membrane surface leads to the size-dependent behavior of molecular systems in a small space. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the physical mechanism of molecular events and reactions inside a cell.

  6. Synthetic molecular machines and polymer/monomer size switches that operate through dynamic and non-dynamic covalent changes.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Adrian-Mihail; Ramírez, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The present chapter is focused on how synthetic molecular machines (e.g. shuttles, switches and molecular motors) and size switches (conversions between polymers and their units, i.e., conversions between relatively large and small molecules) can function through covalent changes. Amongst the interesting examples of devices herein presented are molecular motors and size switches based on dynamic covalent chemistry which is an area of constitutional dynamic chemistry. PMID:22169959

  7. Target-to-background enhancement in multispectral endoscopy with background autofluorescence mitigation for quantitative molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian W.; Girard, Emily J.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging with exogenous probes improves specificity for the detection of diseased tissues by targeting unambiguous molecular signatures. Additionally, increased diagnostic sensitivity is expected with the application of multiple molecular probes. We developed a real-time multispectral fluorescence-reflectance scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) for wide-field molecular imaging of fluorescent dye-labeled molecular probes at nanomolar detection levels. Concurrent multichannel imaging with the wide-field SFE also allows for real-time mitigation of the background autofluorescence (AF) signal, especially when fluorescein, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved dye, is used as the target fluorophore. Quantitative tissue AF was measured for the ex vivo porcine esophagus and murine brain tissues across the visible and near-infrared spectra. AF signals were then transferred to the unit of targeted fluorophore concentration to evaluate the SFE detection sensitivity for sodium fluorescein and cyanine. Next, we demonstrated a real-time AF mitigation algorithm on a tissue phantom, which featured molecular probe targeted cells of high-grade dysplasia on a substrate containing AF species. The target-to-background ratio was enhanced by more than one order of magnitude when applying the real-time AF mitigation algorithm. Furthermore, a quantitative estimate of the fluorescein photodegradation (photobleaching) rate was evaluated and shown to be insignificant under the illumination conditions of SFE. In summary, the multichannel laser-based flexible SFE has demonstrated the capability to provide sufficient detection sensitivity, image contrast, and quantitative target intensity information for detecting small precancerous lesions in vivo.

  8. Quencher-free molecular beacon tethering 7-hydroxycoumarin detects targets through protonation/deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Kashida, Hiromu; Yamaguchi, Kyohei; Hara, Yuichi; Asanuma, Hiroyuki

    2012-07-15

    In this study, we synthesized a simple but efficient quencher-free molecular beacon tethering 7-hydroxycoumarin on D-threoninol based on its pK(a) change. The pK(a) of 7-hydroxycoumarin in a single strand was determined as 8.8, whereas that intercalated in the duplex was over 10. This large pK(a) shift (more than 1.2) upon hybridization could be attributed to the anionic and hydrophobic microenvironment inside the DNA duplex. Because 7-hydroxycoumarin quenches its fluorescence upon protonation, the emission intensity of the duplex at pH 8.5 was 1/15 that of the single strand. We applied this quenching mechanism to the preparation of a quencher-free molecular beacon by introducing the dye into the middle of the stem part. In the absence of the target, the stem region formed a duplex and fluorescence was quenched. However, when the target was added, the molecular beacon opened and the dye was deprotonated. As a result, the emission intensity of the molecular beacon with the target was 10 times higher than that without the target. Accordingly, a quencher-free molecular beacon utilizing the pK(a) change was successfully developed.

  9. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced gastric cancer: does tumor histology matter?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hilda

    2013-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disease which may be divided into subgroups based on histological, anatomical, epidemiological and molecular classifications. Distinct molecular drivers and tumor biology, and thus different treatment targets and predictive biomarkers, may be implicated in each subtype. However, there is little evidence in the literature regarding the correlation among these different classifications, and particularly the molecular aberrations present in each subtype. In this review, we approach advanced gastric cancer (AGC) by presenting aberrant molecular pathways and their potential therapeutic targets in gastric cancer according to histological and anatomical classification, dividing gastric cancer into proximal nondiffuse, distal nondiffuse and diffuse disease. Several pathways are involved predominantly, although not exclusively, in different subtypes. This may help to explain the disappointing results of many published AGC trials in which study populations were heterogeneous regardless of clinicopathological characteristics of the primary tumor. Histological and anatomical classification may provide insights into tumor biology and facilitate selection of an enriched patient population for targeted agents in future studies and in the clinic. However, some molecular pathways implicated in gastric cancer have not been studied in correlation with histological or anatomical subtypes. Further studies are necessary to confirm the suggestion that such classification may predict tumor biology and facilitate selection of an enriched patient population for targeted agents in future studies and in the clinic. PMID:23320047

  10. Clinical applications of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for molecular imaging and targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Trung D; Caruthers, Shelton D; Hughes, Michael; Marsh, John N; Cyrus, Tillmann; Winter, Patrick M; Neubauer, Anne M; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2007-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a novel tool that has allowed non-invasive diagnostic imaging to transition from gross anatomical description to identification of specific tissue epitopes and observation of biological processes at the cellular level. This technique has been confined to the field of nuclear imaging; however, recent advances in nanotechnology have extended this research to include ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The exploitation of nanotechnology for MR and US molecular imaging has generated several candidate contrast agents. One multimodality platform, targeted perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticles, is useful for noninvasive detection with US and MR, targeted drug delivery, and quantification. PMID:18203420

  11. Molecular targets for the treatment of pancreatic cancer: Clinical and experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Tasuku; Yashiro, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Although recent therapeutic developments for patients with pancreatic cancer have provided survival benefits, the outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer remain unsatisfactory. Molecularly targeted cancer therapy has advanced in the past decade with the use of a number of pathways as candidates of therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the molecular features of this refractory disease while focusing on the recent clinical and experimental findings on pancreatic cancer. It also discusses the data supporting current standard clinical outcomes, and offers conclusions that may improve the management of pancreatic cancer in the future. PMID:26811624

  12. Confirming an integrated pathology of diabetes and its complications by molecular biomarker-target network analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zide; Zhang, Yingying; Gai, Fengchun; Wang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Despite ongoing research into diabetes and its complications, the underlying molecular associations remain to be elucidated. The systematic identification of molecular interactions in associated diseases may be approached using a network analysis strategy. The biomarker-target interrelated molecules associated with diabetes and its complications were identified via the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD); the Search Tool for Recurring Instances of Neighboring Genes was utilized for network construction. Functional enrichment analysis was performed with Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software to investigate connections between diabetes and its complications. A total of 142 (including 122 biomarkers, 10 therapeutic targets and 10 overlapping molecules) biomarker-target interrelated molecules associated with diabetes and its complications were identified via the CTD database, and analysis of the network yielded 1,087 biological processes and fifteen Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways with significant P‑values. Various critical aspects of the networks were examined in the present study: a) Intermolecular horizontal and vertical combinations in biomarkers and therapeutic targets associated with diabetes and its complicationb) network topology properties associated with molecular pathological responsec) contribution of key molecules to integrated regulation; and d) crosstalk between multiple pathways. Based on a multi-dimensional analysis, it was concluded that the integrated molecular pathological development of diabetes and its complications does not proceed randomly, which suggests a requirement for integrated, multi-target intervention. PMID:27430657

  13. Molecularly Targeted Agents as Radiosensitizers in Cancer Therapy—Focus on Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alcorn, Sara; Walker, Amanda J.; Gandhi, Nishant; Narang, Amol; Wild, Aaron T.; Hales, Russell K.; Herman, Joseph M.; Song, Danny Y.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Tran, Phuoc T.

    2013-01-01

    As our understanding of the molecular pathways driving tumorigenesis improves and more druggable targets are identified, we have witnessed a concomitant increase in the development and production of novel molecularly targeted agents. Radiotherapy is commonly used in the treatment of various malignancies with a prominent role in the care of prostate cancer patients, and efforts to improve the therapeutic ratio of radiation by technologic and pharmacologic means have led to important advances in cancer care. One promising approach is to combine molecularly targeted systemic agents with radiotherapy to improve tumor response rates and likelihood of durable control. This review first explores the limitations of preclinical studies as well as barriers to successful implementation of clinical trials with radiosensitizers. Special considerations related to and recommendations for the design of preclinical studies and clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents combined with radiotherapy are provided. We then apply these concepts by reviewing a representative set of targeted therapies that show promise as radiosensitizers in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:23863691

  14. Capillary electrophoresis and fluorescence studies on molecular beacon-based variable length oligonucleotide target discrimination.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Akhilesh; Zhang, Minquan; Goad, David; Olah, Glenn; Malayer, Jerry R; El-Rassi, Ziad

    2003-01-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are oligonucleotide probes having a compact hairpin structure, with a fluorophore attached to one end and a quencher molecule attached to the other end. In its native state, the fluorophore is quenched by virtue of its proximity to the quencher molecule. Upon hybridization with its complementary oligonucleotide target, fluorescence is elicited due to a conformational change that results in separation of the fluorophore and quencher molecule. The present study describes the hybridization interaction of an MB to various complementary target sequences. The effects of temperature and length of complementary target sequences on hybridization were investigated using capillary electrophoresis and solution-based fluorescence techniques. Hybridization efficiency was dependent on the ability of the target sequences to destabilize the stem region by binding directly to the stem region. Optimal hybridization occurred between 40 and 50 degrees C for all targets tested, with the true target forming a more stable hybrid complex.

  15. Targeted molecular therapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Daisuke; Fooshee, David R.; Zhao, Mei; Andrews, Genevieve A.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Galer, Chad; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Morrow, Phuong Khanh H.; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    Background We investigated the effects of vandetanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), alone and in combination with paclitaxel in an orthotopic mouse model of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods The in vitro effects of vandetanib (ZACTIMA™) were assessed in two HNSCC cell lines on cell growth, apoptosis, and receptor and downstream signaling morecule expression and phosphorylation levels. We assessed in vivo effects of vandetanib and/or paclitaxel by measuring tumor cell apoptosis, endothelial cell apoptosis, microvessel density, tumor size, and animal survival. Results In vitro, vandetanib inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream targets in HNSCC cells and inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of HNSCC cells and extended survival and inhibited tumor growth in nude mice orthotopically injected with human HNSCC. Conclusion Vandetanib has the potential to be a novel molecular targeted therapy for HNSCC. PMID:20629091

  16. Targeted PRINT Hydrogels: The Role of Nanoparticle Size and Ligand Density on Cell Association, Biodistribution, and Tumor Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Kevin G; Perry, Jillian L; Kim, Dongwook; Luft, J Christopher; Liu, Rihe; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-10-14

    In this Letter, we varied targeting ligand density of an EGFR binding affibody on the surface of two different hydrogel PRINT nanoparticles (80 nm × 320 and 55 nm × 60 nm) and monitored effects on target-cell association, off-target phagocytic uptake, biodistribution, and tumor accumulation. Interestingly, variations in ligand density only significantly altered in vitro internalization rates for the 80 nm × 320 nm particle. However, in vivo, both particle sizes experienced significant changes in biodistribution and pharmacokinetics as a function of ligand density. Overall, nanoparticle size and passive accumulation were the dominant factors eliciting tumor sequestration. PMID:26389971

  17. Molecular and Cellular Alterations in Down Syndrome: Toward the Identification of Targets for Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Créau, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome is a complex disease that has challenged molecular and cellular research for more than 50 years. Understanding the molecular bases of morphological, cellular, and functional alterations resulting from the presence of an additional complete chromosome 21 would aid in targeting specific genes and pathways for rescuing some phenotypes. Recently, progress has been made by characterization of brain alterations in mouse models of Down syndrome. This review will highlight the main molecular and cellular findings recently described for these models, particularly with respect to their relationship to Down syndrome phenotypes. PMID:22848846

  18. Molecular targets in heart failure gene therapy: current controversies and translational perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kairouz, Victor; Lipskaia, Larissa; Hajjar, Roger J; Chemaly, Elie R

    2012-04-01

    Use of gene therapy for heart failure is gaining momentum as a result of the recent successful completion of phase II of the Calcium Upregulation by Percutaneous Administration of Gene Therapy in Cardiac Disease (CUPID) trial, which showed clinical safety and efficacy of an adeno-associated viral vector expressing sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2a). Resorting to gene therapy allows the manipulation of molecular targets not presently amenable to pharmacologic modulation. This short review focuses on the molecular targets of heart failure gene therapy that have demonstrated translational potential. At present, most of these targets are related to calcium handling in the cardiomyocyte. They include SERCA2a, phospholamban, S100A1, ryanodine receptor, and the inhibitor of the protein phosphatase 1. Other targets related to cAMP signaling are reviewed, such as adenylyl cyclase. MicroRNAs are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and convenient vectors for gene therapy, particularly in heart disease. We propose a discussion of recent advances and controversies in key molecular targets of heart failure gene therapy.

  19. Tuning the size and optical properties in molecular nano/microcrystals: manifestation of hierarchical interactions.

    PubMed

    Patra, A; Hebalkar, N; Sreedhar, B; Sarkar, M; Samanta, A; Radhakrishnan, T P

    2006-05-01

    Intermolecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, dipolar and van der Waals, occurring in molecular crystals cover a range of magnitudes. As the crystal evolves from a relatively softer state in the nanoscopic size regime to a harder one in the microcrystalline and bulk solid state, the impact of the hierarchy of intermolecular interactions can be expected to emerge in a progressive fashion. The strongest interactions alone would be manifested at small sizes; as the crystal grows, the effect of the weaker ones will be added on, with the bulk crystals exhibiting the cumulative impact of the different interactions. We demonstrate this phenomenon through investigations of the solution, colloid, and solid state of a novel zwitterionic molecule based on the diaminodicyanoquinodimethane framework. A reprecipitation-digestion protocol is developed for the fabrication of nano/microcrystals of varying sizes. Microscopic and spectroscopic characterizations reveal tuning of the size and optical properties of this material. The optical absorption of the colloidal particles evolves with size towards that of the bulk solid, the emission showing a steady enhancement of intensity. Crystallographic investigations coupled with semiempirical computations provide a viable model to describe the range of observations in terms of the gradual accumulation of hierarchical intermolecular interactions.

  20. Plant pharming of a full-sized, tumour-targeting antibody using different expression strategies.

    PubMed

    Villani, Maria Elena; Morgun, Bogdan; Brunetti, Patrizia; Marusic, Carla; Lombardi, Raffaele; Pisoni, Ivan; Bacci, Camilla; Desiderio, Angiola; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this work were to obtain a human antibody against the tumour-associated antigen tenascin-C (TNC) and to compare the yield and quality of plant-produced antibody in either stable transgenics or using a transient expression system. To this end, the characterization of a full-sized human immunoglobulin G (IgG) [monoclonal antibody H10 (mAb H10)], derived from a selected single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and produced in plants, is presented. The human mAb gene was engineered for plant expression, and Nicotiana tabacum transgenic lines expressing both heavy (HC) and light (LC) chain were obtained and evaluated for antibody expression levels, in vivo assembly and functionality. Affinity-purified H10 from transgenics (yield, 0.6-1.1 mg/kg fresh weight) revealed that more than 90% of HC was specifically degraded, leading to the formation of functional antigen-binding fragments (Fab). Consequently, H10 was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants through an Agrobacterium-mediated gene-transfer system. Moreover, the use of the p19 silencing suppressor gene from artichoke mottled crinkle virus raised antibody expression levels by an order of magnitude (yields of purified H10, 50-100 mg/kg fresh weight). Approximately 75% of purified protein consisted of full-sized antibody functionally binding to TNC (K(D) = 14 nm), and immunohistochemical analysis on tumour tissues revealed specific accumulation around tumour blood vessels. The data indicate that the purification yields of mAb H10, using a transient expression system boosted by the p19 silencing suppressor, are exceptionally high when compared with the results reported previously, providing a technique for the over-expression of anticancer mAbs by a rapid, cost-effective, molecular farming approach.

  1. Plant pharming of a full-sized, tumour-targeting antibody using different expression strategies.

    PubMed

    Villani, Maria Elena; Morgun, Bogdan; Brunetti, Patrizia; Marusic, Carla; Lombardi, Raffaele; Pisoni, Ivan; Bacci, Camilla; Desiderio, Angiola; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this work were to obtain a human antibody against the tumour-associated antigen tenascin-C (TNC) and to compare the yield and quality of plant-produced antibody in either stable transgenics or using a transient expression system. To this end, the characterization of a full-sized human immunoglobulin G (IgG) [monoclonal antibody H10 (mAb H10)], derived from a selected single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and produced in plants, is presented. The human mAb gene was engineered for plant expression, and Nicotiana tabacum transgenic lines expressing both heavy (HC) and light (LC) chain were obtained and evaluated for antibody expression levels, in vivo assembly and functionality. Affinity-purified H10 from transgenics (yield, 0.6-1.1 mg/kg fresh weight) revealed that more than 90% of HC was specifically degraded, leading to the formation of functional antigen-binding fragments (Fab). Consequently, H10 was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants through an Agrobacterium-mediated gene-transfer system. Moreover, the use of the p19 silencing suppressor gene from artichoke mottled crinkle virus raised antibody expression levels by an order of magnitude (yields of purified H10, 50-100 mg/kg fresh weight). Approximately 75% of purified protein consisted of full-sized antibody functionally binding to TNC (K(D) = 14 nm), and immunohistochemical analysis on tumour tissues revealed specific accumulation around tumour blood vessels. The data indicate that the purification yields of mAb H10, using a transient expression system boosted by the p19 silencing suppressor, are exceptionally high when compared with the results reported previously, providing a technique for the over-expression of anticancer mAbs by a rapid, cost-effective, molecular farming approach. PMID:18793269

  2. Investigating the correlations among the chemical structures, bioactivity profiles and molecular targets of small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tiejun; Wang, Yanli; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Most of the previous data mining studies based on the NCI-60 dataset, due to its intrinsic cell-based nature, can hardly provide insights into the molecular targets for screened compounds. On the other hand, the abundant information of the compound–target associations in PubChem can offer extensive experimental evidence of molecular targets for tested compounds. Therefore, by taking advantages of the data from both public repositories, one may investigate the correlations between the bioactivity profiles of small molecules from the NCI-60 dataset (cellular level) and their patterns of interactions with relevant protein targets from PubChem (molecular level) simultaneously. Results: We investigated a set of 37 small molecules by providing links among their bioactivity profiles, protein targets and chemical structures. Hierarchical clustering of compounds was carried out based on their bioactivity profiles. We found that compounds were clustered into groups with similar mode of actions, which strongly correlated with chemical structures. Furthermore, we observed that compounds similar in bioactivity profiles also shared similar patterns of interactions with relevant protein targets, especially when chemical structures were related. The current work presents a new strategy for combining and data mining the NCI-60 dataset and PubChem. This analysis shows that bioactivity profile comparison can provide insights into the mode of actions at the molecular level, thus will facilitate the knowledge-based discovery of novel compounds with desired pharmacological properties. Availability: The bioactivity profiling data and the target annotation information are publicly available in the PubChem BioAssay database (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubchem/Bioassay/). Contact: ywang@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; bryant@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20947527

  3. A combined molecular docking-based and pharmacophore-based target prediction strategy with a probabilistic fusion method for target ranking.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Bo; Yang, Ling-Ling; Xu, Yong; Wang, Wen-Jing; Li, Lin-Li; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2013-07-01

    Herein, a combined molecular docking-based and pharmacophore-based target prediction strategy is presented, in which a probabilistic fusion method is suggested for target ranking. Establishment and validation of the combined strategy are described. A target database, termed TargetDB, was firstly constructed, which contains 1105 drug targets. Based on TargetDB, the molecular docking-based target prediction and pharmacophore-based target prediction protocols were established. A probabilistic fusion method was then developed by constructing probability assignment curves (PACs) against a set of selected targets. Finally the workflow for the combined molecular docking-based and pharmacophore-based target prediction strategy was established. Evaluations of the performance of the combined strategy were carried out against a set of structurally different single-target compounds and a well-known multi-target drug, 4H-tamoxifen, which results showed that the combined strategy consistently outperformed the sole use of docking-based and pharmacophore-based methods. Overall, this investigation provides a possible way for improving the accuracy of in silico target prediction and a method for target ranking.

  4. Multispectral excitation based multiple fluorescent targets resolving in fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan; Guang, Huizhi; Pu, Huangsheng; Zhang, Jiulou; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can visualize biological activities at cellular and molecular levels in vivo, and has been extensively used in drug delivery and tumor detection research of small animals. The ill-posedness of the FMT inverse problem makes it difficult to reconstruct and resolve multiple adjacent fluorescent targets that have different functional features but are labeled with the same fluorochrome. An algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) for multispectral excited FMT is proposed to resolve multiple fluorescent targets in this study. Fluorescent targets are excited by multispectral excitation, and the three-dimensional distribution of fluorescent yields under the excitation spectrum is reconstructed by an iterative Tikhonov regularization algorithm. Subsequently, multiple fluorescent targets are resolved from mixed fluorescence signals by employing ICA. Simulations were performed and the results demonstrate that multiple adjacent fluorescent targets can be resolved if the number of excitation wavelengths is not smaller than that of fluorescent targets with different concentrations. The algorithm obtains both independent components that provide spatial information of different fluorescent targets and spectral courses that reflect variation trends of fluorescent yields along with the excitation spectrum. By using this method, it is possible to visualize the metabolism status of drugs in different structure organs, and quantitatively depict the variation trends of fluorescent yields of each functional organ under the excitation spectrum. This method may provide a pattern for tumor detection, drug delivery and treatment monitoring in vivo.

  5. Glycidol-modified gels for molecular-sieve chromatography. Surface hydrophilization and pore size reduction.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, K O

    1987-11-01

    Divinyl sulfone-crosslinked agarose gels were made hydrophilic by coupling glycidol to the agarose chains. The concentration of glycidol in the reaction mixture determines the pore size of the gels (the glycidol molecules probably form polymers, the degree of polymerization increasing with the glycidol concentration). Gels prepared with moderate glycidol concentrations are still porous enough to be used for separation of proteins and peptides. Gels with a high degree of glycidol polymerization are suited for desalting of low-molecular-weight compounds, for instance peptides.

  6. Communication: Molecular simulation study of kaolinite intercalation with realistic layer size

    SciTech Connect

    Ható, Zoltán; Kristóf, Tamás; Rutkai, Gábor; Vrabec, Jadran

    2014-09-07

    Intercalation phenomena of kaolinite in aqueous potassium acetate and in hexyl-amine solutions are studied by large scale molecular dynamics simulations. The simulated kaolinite particle is constructed from ∼6.5 × 10{sup 6} atoms, producing a particle size of ∼100 nm × 100 nm × 10 nm. The simulation with potassium acetate results in a stable kaolinite-potassium acetate complex, with a basal spacing that is in close agreement with experimental data. The simulation with hexyl-amine shows signs of the experimentally observed delamination of kaolinite (the initial phase of the formation of nanoscrolls from the external layers)

  7. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhi; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-12

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  8. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  9. Regulating the Rate of Molecular Self-Assembly for Targeting Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Xu, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Besides tight and specific ligand-receptor interactions, the rate regulation of the formation of molecular assemblies is one of fundamental features of cells. But the latter receives little exploration for developing anticancer therapeutics. Here we show that a simple molecular design of the substrates of phosphatases-tailoring the number of phosphates on peptidic substrates-is able to regulate the rate of molecular self-assembly of the enzyme reaction product. Such a rate regulation allows selective inhibition of osteosarcoma cells over hepatocytes, which promises to target cancer cells in a specific organ. Moreover, our result reveals that the direct measurement of the rate of the self-assembly in a cell-based assay provides precise assessment of the cell targeting capability of self-assembly. This work, as the first report establishing rate regulation of a multiple-step process to inhibit cells selectively, illustrates a fundamentally new approach for controlling the fate of cells.

  10. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  11. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  12. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  13. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  14. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-05-05

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  15. Repeat Size Determination by Two Molecular Rulers in the Type I-E CRISPR Array.

    PubMed

    Goren, Moran G; Doron, Shany; Globus, Rea; Amitai, Gil; Sorek, Rotem; Qimron, Udi

    2016-09-13

    Prokaryotic adaptive immune systems are composed of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. These systems adapt to new threats by integrating short nucleic acids, termed spacers, into the CRISPR array. The functional motifs in the repeat and the mechanism by which a constant repeat size is maintained are still elusive. Here, through a series of mutations within the repeat of the CRISPR-Cas type I-E, we identify motifs that are crucial for adaptation and show that they serve as anchor sites for two molecular rulers determining the size of the new repeat. Adaptation products from various repeat mutants support a model in which two motifs in the repeat bind to two different sites in the adaptation complex that are 8 and 16 bp away from the active site. This model significantly extends our understanding of the adaptation process and broadens the scope of its applications. PMID:27626652

  16. Attenuating the size and molecular carrier capabilities of polyacrylate nanoparticles by a hydrophobic fluorine effect.

    PubMed

    Labruère, Raphaël; Turos, Edward

    2012-08-15

    This study investigates the effect of introducing alkyl chain fluorination on the properties of polyacrylate nanoparticles prepared in aqueous solution by emulsion polymerization. For this, 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (1) and methyl trifluoroacrylate (2) were tested as monomers as a means to prepare fluorinated polyacrylate nanoparticles to evaluate how side chain fluorination may affect nanoparticle size and drug carrier properties. Our results show that as fluorine content within the polyacrylate matrix increases, the size of the nanoparticle systematically diminishes, from 45 nm (for nanoparticles containing no fluoroacrylate) to ~7 nm (for nanoparticles constructed solely of fluoroacrylate). We also observe that as fluoroacrylate content and hydrophobicity increases, the nanoparticles decrease their ability to incorporate lipophilic molecules during the process of emulsification. These findings have meaningful implications in the implementation of fluorinated nanoparticles in molecular delivery.

  17. Continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” on 5A zeolite for distinguishing small organic molecules by size

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-09-11

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences weremore » effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. Lastly, this novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation.« less

  18. Continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” on 5A zeolite for distinguishing small organic molecules by size

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-09-11

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. Lastly, this novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation.

  19. Continuously Adjustable, Molecular-Sieving “Gate” on 5A Zeolite for Distinguishing Small Organic Molecules by Size

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. This novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation. PMID:26358480

  20. Apparent target size of rat brain benzodiazepine receptor, acetylcholinesterase, and pyruvate kinase is highly influenced by experimental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.; Braestrup, C.

    1988-08-25

    Radiation inactivation is a method to determine the apparent target size of molecules. In this report we examined whether radiation inactivation of various enzymes and brain receptors is influenced by the preparation of samples preceding irradiation. The apparent target sizes of endogenous acetylcholinesterase and pyruvate kinase from rat brain and from rabbit muscle and benzodiazepine receptor from rat brain were investigated in some detail. In addition the target sizes of alcohol dehydrogenase (from yeast and horse liver), beta-galactosidase (from Escherichia coli), lactate dehydrogenase (endogenous from rat brain), and 5-HT2 receptors, acetylcholine muscarine receptors, and (/sup 35/S) butyl bicyclophosphorothionate tertiary binding sites from rat brain were determined. The results show that apparent target sizes are highly influenced by the procedure applied for sample preparation before irradiation. The data indicate that irradiation of frozen whole tissue as opposed to lyophilized tissue or frozen tissue homogenates will estimate the smallest and most relevant functional target size of a receptor or an enzyme.

  1. Fast molecular beacon hybridization in organic solvents with improved target specificity.

    PubMed

    Dave, Neeshma; Liu, Juewen

    2010-12-01

    DNA hybridization is of tremendous importance in biology, bionanotechnology, and biophysics. Molecular beacons are engineered DNA hairpins with a fluorophore and a quencher labeled on each of the two ends. A target DNA can open the hairpin to give an increased fluorescence signal. To date, the majority of molecular beacon detections have been performed only in aqueous buffers. We describe herein DNA detection in nine different organic solvents, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol, varying each up to 75% (v/v). In comparison with detection in water, the detection in organic solvents showed several important features. First, the molecular beacon hybridizes to its target DNA in the presence of all nine solvents up to a certain percentage. Second, the rate of this hybridization was significantly faster in most organic solvents compared with water. For example, in 56% ethanol, the beacon showed a 70-fold rate enhancement. Third, the ability of the molecular beacon to discriminate single-base mismatch is still maintained. Lastly, the DNA melting temperature in the organic solvents showed a solvent concentration-dependent decrease. This study suggests that molecular beacons can be used for applications where organic solvents must be involved or organic solvents can be intentionally added to improve the molecular beacon performance.

  2. Finite-size effects on molecular dynamics interfacial thermal-resistance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the role of finite size effects on the determination of interfacial thermal resistance between two solids characterized by high phonon mean free paths. In particular, we will show that a direct, heat source-sink method leads to strong size effect, associated with ballistic phonon transport to and from, and specular reflections at the simulation domain boundary. Lack of proper account for these effects can lead to incorrect predictions about the role of interfacial bonding and structure on interfacial thermal resistance. We also show that the finite size effect can be dramatically reduced by introduction of rough external boundaries leading to diffuse phonon scattering, as explicitly demonstrated by phonon wave-packet simulations. Finally, we demonstrate that when careful considerations are given to the effects associated with the finite heat capacity of the simulation domains and phonon scattering from the external surfaces, a size-independent interfacial resistance can be properly extracted from the time integral of the correlation function of heat power across the interface. Our work demonstrates that reliable and consistent values of the interfacial thermal resistance can be obtained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium methods with a relatively small computational cost.

  3. Choice of pore size can introduce artefacts when filtering picoeukaryotes for molecular biodiversity studies.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Nikolaj; Daugbjerg, Niels; Richardson, Katherine

    2013-05-01

    Published results of studies based on samples size fractionated by sequential filtration (e.g. 0.2-3 μm) indicate that many ciliate, dinoflagellate and rhizarian phylotypes are found among marine picoeukaryotes. This is somewhat surprising as these protists are typically known as being large organisms (often >10 μm) and no picoplanktonic species have so far been identified. Here, the abundances of ciliate and dinoflagellate phylotypes in published molecular studies of picoeukaryotes are shown to correlate negatively with the pore size chosen for the end filter in the sequential filtrations (i.e. the filter used to collect the microbial biomass). This suggests that extracellular DNA adhering to small particles may be the source of ciliate and dinoflagellate phylotypes in picoplanktonic size fractions. This hypothesis was confirmed using real-time qPCR, which revealed significantly less dinoflagellate 18S rDNA in a 0.8-3-μm size fraction compared to 0.2-3 μm. On average, the abundance of putative extracellular phylotypes decreased by 84-89 % when a 0.8- μm end filter was used rather than a 0.2-μm end filter. A 0.8-μm filter is, however, not sufficient to retain all picoeukaryotic cells. Thus, selection of filter pore size involves a trade-off between avoiding artefacts generated by extracellular DNA and sampling the entire picoeukaryotic community. In contrast to ciliate and dinoflagellate phylotypes, rhizarian phylotypes in the picoplankton size range do not display a pattern consistent with an extracellular origin. This is likely due to the documented existence of picoplanktonic swarmer cells within this group.

  4. The importance of molecular markers for diagnosis and selection of targeted treatments in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Tobin, N P; Foukakis, T; De Petris, L; Bergh, J

    2015-12-01

    The past 30 years have seen the introduction of a number of cancer therapies with the aim of restricting the growth and spread of primary and metastatic tumours. A shared commonality among these therapies is their targeting of various aspects of the cancer hallmarks, that is traits that are essential to successful tumour propagation and dissemination. The evolution of molecular-scale technology has been central to the identification of new cancer targets, and it is not a coincidence that improved therapies have emerged at the same time as gene expression arrays and DNA sequencing have enhanced our understanding of cancer genetics. Modern tumour pathology is now viewed at the molecular level ranging from IHC biomarkers, to gene signature classifiers and gene mutations, all of which provide crucial information about which patients will respond to targeted therapy regimens. In this review, we briefly discuss the general types of targeted therapies used in a clinical setting and provide a short background on immunohistochemical, gene expression and DNA sequencing technologies, before focusing on three tumour types: breast, lung and colorectal cancers. For each of these cancer types, we provide a background to the disease along with an overview of the current standard therapies and then focus on the relevant targeted therapies and the pathways they inhibit. Finally, we highlight several strategies that are pivotal to the successful development of targeted anti-cancer drugs.

  5. Targeting the age-related occurrence, removal, and accumulation of molecular damage by hormesis.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2010-06-01

    Strategies for testing and developing effective means of intervention, prevention, and modulation of aging incorporate means to minimize the occurrence and accumulation of molecular damage, to reduce molecular heterogeneity, and to evaluate the relevance of the type and extent of damage with respect to its role in aging and age-related diseases. One such approach is that of mild stress-induced hormesis, which stimulates maintenance and repair systems and strengthens the homeodynamic space of cells and organisms. Hormesis through mild heat shock, natural and synthetic hormetins, and other stressors brings about several antiaging effects in human fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and telomerase-immortalized bone marrow stem cells. Depending on the cell type, these antiaging hormetic effects include extension of replicative life span, enhanced proteasomal activities, increased chaperone levels, and improved wound healing, angiogenesis, and differentiation. The main molecular pathways for achieving such hormetic effects are through targeting the processes for the repair and removal of molecular damage, which can slow aging.

  6. Immobilization of aptamer-based molecular beacons onto optically-encoded micro-sized beads.

    PubMed

    Jun, Bong-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Rho, Chul; Byun, Jang-Woong; Kim, Yo Han; Kang, Homan; Kim, Jong-Ho; Kang, Taegyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a method for the novel immobilization of aptamer-based molecular beacons (apta-beacons) onto optically-encoded micro-sized beads (apta-beacon beads). To immobilize apta-beacons onto flourescently-encoded micro-sized beads, core-shell type beads containing a fluorescent dye-encoded core and apta beacon-coupled shell were prepared. The fluorescent dye-encoded beads were prepared from TentaGel resins by coupling RITC to the amino groups of the core region, after partial protection of amino groups with Fmoc-OSu in a diffusion-controlled manner. After deprotection of the Fmoc-amino groups, FITC-coupled molecular beacons (MBs) were immobilized to the beads together with a quencher by covelent bonding. Briefly, aspartic acid (Asp) was coupled to the shell part of the beads. Then, the quencher was coupled to the N-terminal amino group of Asp and the MBs were coupled to the side chain carboxyl group. In a model study, thrombin was directly detected using this apta-beacon bead method. The thrombin-bound apta-beacon beads were easily recognized by the appearance of fluorescence without any further labeling step.

  7. Biogeography of soil organic matter molecular structure across multiple soil size fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, C. L.; Neff, J.

    2009-12-01

    Recent work suggests that there is a common soil decomposition sequence whereby plant inputs are metabolized into a physiologically constrained set of compounds originating from microbes that may persist in soil over relatively long time-scales. Plant inputs tend to be found in coarse particulate fractions (>180 μm) with relatively fast turnover times, while microbially derived compounds tend to accrue in the finer silt + clay fractions (<53 μm) with relatively long turnover times. To investigate whether a common decomposition sequence exists, we used pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (py-GC/MS) to characterize the molecular structure of soil organic matter (SOM) in three size fractions (590-180 μm, 180-53 μm, and <53 μm), using soils sampled from multiple biomes (alpine tundra, sub-alpine forest, boreal forest, temperate coniferous, temperate deciduous, dry desert/savannah, and tropical forest). We hypothesized that: 1) regardless of biome, fractions >180 μm would be chemically similar, and would be characterized by lignin and other plant-derived compounds; and 2) fractions <53 μm would also be similar across biomes but would be dominated by microbially-derived compounds like polysaccharides. Across all biomes, we found that there was significantly less lignin in <53 μm fractions compared to >180 μm fractions (p<0.0001), providing some support for the idea that plant material is not incorporated into soil C pools with relatively long turnover times. However, a principal components analysis (PCA) showed that the >180 μm coarse particulate fractions also contained compounds associated with microbial origins, indicating that microbial C is not limited to <53 μm size fractions. The PCA also revealed that samples within each of the three size fractions did not cluster together (i.e. they did not share a common molecular structure), but we did note that: 1) cold alpine and sub-alpine sites were unique and chemically similar; and 2) tropical

  8. Molecular weight distribution characterization of hydrophobe-modified hydroxyethyl cellulose by size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfu; Meunier, David M; Partain, Emmett M

    2014-09-12

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) of hydrophobe-modified hydroxyethyl cellulose (HmHEC) is challenging because polymer chains are not isolated in solution due to association of hydrophobic groups and hydrophobic interaction with column packing materials. An approach to neutralize these hydrophobic interactions was developed by adding β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) to the aqueous eluent. SEC mass recovery, especially for the higher molecular weight chains, increased with increasing concentration of β-CD in the eluent. A β-CD concentration of 0.75wt% in the eluent was determined to be optimal for the HmHEC polymers studied. These conditions enabled precise determinations of apparent molecular weight distributions exhibiting less than 2% relative standard deviation in the measured weight-average molecular weight (MW) for five injections on three studied samples and showed no significant differences in MW determined on two different days. The developed technology was shown to be very robust for characterizing HmHEC having MW from 500kg/mol to 2000kg/mol, and it can be potentially applied to other hydrophobe-modified polymers.

  9. Septic acute kidney injury: molecular mechanisms and the importance of stratification and targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Eric D; Kellum, John A; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients is sepsis. However, the molecular pathways and mechanisms that mediate septic AKI are not well defined. Experiments performed over the past 20 years suggest that there are profound differences in the pathogenesis between septic and ischemic AKI. Septic AKI often occurs independently of hypoperfusion, and is mediated by a concomitant pro- and anti-inflammatory state that is activated in response to various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as endotoxin, as well as damage-associated molecular patterns. These molecular patterns are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) found in the kidney, and effectuate downstream inflammatory pathways. Additionally, apoptosis has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of septic AKI. However, targeted therapies designed to mitigate the above aspects of the inflammatory state, TLR-related pathways, and apoptosis have failed to show significant clinical benefit. This failure is likely due to the protean nature of septic AKI, whereby different patients present at different points along the immunologic spectrum. While one patient may benefit from targeted therapy at one end of the spectrum, another patient at the other end may be harmed by the same therapy. We propose that a next important step in septic AKI research will be to identify where patients lie on the immunologic spectrum in order to appropriately target therapies at the inflammatory cascade, TLRs, and possibly apoptosis. PMID:25575158

  10. Molecular Approaches to Studying Microbial Communities: Targeting the 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Kazumasa; Ogawa, Midori; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Saito, Mitsumasa

    2016-09-01

    Culture-independent methods to detect microorganisms have been developed in parallel with traditional culture-based methods ever since the classification of bacteria based on 16S rRNA gene sequences was advocated in the 1970s. The development and the prevalence of culture-independent molecular technologies have provided revolutionary progress in microbial studies. The development of these technologies contributes significantly to the research of microorganisms that cannot be detected by traditional methods such as culture-dependent methods.Many molecular methods targeting the 16S rRNA gene, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), quantitative PCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), clone library analysis, and next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technologies, have been applied to various microbial studies. Notably, the advent of NGS technologies enabled a large-scale research of the bacterial community. Many recent studies using the NGS technologies have revealed that a larger number of bacteria and taxa than previously thought inhabit various parts of the human body and various places on the earth. The principles and characteristics of each molecular method are different, and each method possesses individual advantages; for example target specificity, comprehensiveness, rapidness, and cost efficiency. Therefore it is important that the methods used in studies are suitable for the objective and materials. Herein, we highlights molecular approaches targeting the 16S rRNA gene in bacterial community analysis, and focuses on the advantages and limitations of each technology. PMID:27627970

  11. [Molecular biological foundation of targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Lai, Chong; Teng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing. Radical cure by surgery can only be achieved in patients with early stage tumors. How to precisely use antineoplastic agents after surgery is an important problem to be solved. Most metastatic RCCs are pathologically identified as clear cell RCC (ccRCC), thus to develop agents targeting ccRCC is critical. Most clinically available targeted therapies are based on targeting some spots in specific pathways; or based on targeting new anti-tumor mechanisms, such as programmed death-1(PD-1), antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) and stem cells. There is still no targeted therapy having definite effect to most RCC patients. Only von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway so far has been confirmed to be related to ccRCC development and progression; the inactivation of VHL gene causes many significant downstream gene changes. The key proteins involved in VHL pathway may be potential therapeutic targets for ccRCC. In this article, we review the current progress of targeted therapy for RCC, focus on the molecular characteristics of ccRCC, its relation to VHL pathway, the potential therapeutic targets and future clinical application for metastatic ccRCC. PMID:27045248

  12. Development and validation of a molecular size distribution method for polysaccharide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Clément, G; Dierick, J-F; Lenfant, C; Giffroy, D

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the molecular size distribution of vaccine products by high performance size exclusion chromatography coupled to refractive index detection is important during the manufacturing process. Partial elution of high molecular weight compounds in the void volume of the chromatographic column is responsible for variation in the results obtained with a reference method using a TSK G5000PWXL chromatographic column. GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines has developed an alternative method relying on the selection of a different chromatographic column with a wider separation range and the generation of a dextran calibration curve to determine the optimal molecular weight cut-off values for all tested products. Validation of this method was performed according to The International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The new method detected product degradation with the same sensitivity as that observed for the reference method. All validation parameters were within the pre-specified range. Precision (relative standard deviation (RSD) of mean values) was < 5 per cent (intra-assay) and < 10 per cent (inter-assay). Sample recovery was > 70 per cent for all polysaccharide conjugates and for the Haemophilus influenzae type B final container vaccine. All results obtained for robustness met the acceptance criteria defined in the validation protocol (≤ 2 times (RSD) or ≤ 2 per cent difference between the modified and the reference parameter value if RSD = 0 per cent). The new method was shown to be a suitable quality control method for the release and stability follow-up of polysaccharide-containing vaccines. The new method gave comparable results to the reference method, but with less intra- and inter-assay variability. PMID:25655242

  13. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  14. Pharmacophore Modeling and Molecular Docking Studies on Pinus roxburghii as a Target for Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Pawan; Lal Khokra, Sukhbir; Rana, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    The present study attempts to establish a relationship between ethnopharmacological claims and bioactive constituents present in Pinus roxburghii against all possible targets for diabetes through molecular docking and to develop a pharmacophore model for the active target. The process of molecular docking involves study of different bonding modes of one ligand with active cavities of target receptors protein tyrosine phosphatase 1-beta (PTP-1β), dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), aldose reductase (AR), and insulin receptor (IR) with help of docking software Molegro virtual docker (MVD). From the results of docking score values on different receptors for antidiabetic activity, it is observed that constituents, namely, secoisoresinol, pinoresinol, and cedeodarin, showed the best docking results on almost all the receptors, while the most significant results were observed on AR. Then, LigandScout was applied to develop a pharmacophore model for active target. LigandScout revealed that 2 hydrogen bond donors pointing towards Tyr 48 and His 110 are a major requirement of the pharmacophore generated. In our molecular docking studies, the active constituent, secoisoresinol, has also shown hydrogen bonding with His 110 residue which is a part of the pharmacophore. The docking results have given better insights into the development of better aldose reductase inhibitor so as to treat diabetes related secondary complications. PMID:25114678

  15. Pharmacophore Modeling and Molecular Docking Studies on Pinus roxburghii as a Target for Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Pawan; Lal Khokra, Sukhbir; Rana, A C; Kaushik, Dhirender

    2014-01-01

    The present study attempts to establish a relationship between ethnopharmacological claims and bioactive constituents present in Pinus roxburghii against all possible targets for diabetes through molecular docking and to develop a pharmacophore model for the active target. The process of molecular docking involves study of different bonding modes of one ligand with active cavities of target receptors protein tyrosine phosphatase 1-beta (PTP-1β), dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), aldose reductase (AR), and insulin receptor (IR) with help of docking software Molegro virtual docker (MVD). From the results of docking score values on different receptors for antidiabetic activity, it is observed that constituents, namely, secoisoresinol, pinoresinol, and cedeodarin, showed the best docking results on almost all the receptors, while the most significant results were observed on AR. Then, LigandScout was applied to develop a pharmacophore model for active target. LigandScout revealed that 2 hydrogen bond donors pointing towards Tyr 48 and His 110 are a major requirement of the pharmacophore generated. In our molecular docking studies, the active constituent, secoisoresinol, has also shown hydrogen bonding with His 110 residue which is a part of the pharmacophore. The docking results have given better insights into the development of better aldose reductase inhibitor so as to treat diabetes related secondary complications. PMID:25114678

  16. In vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging of breast carcinoma with folate receptor-targeted indocyanine green nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huina; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Riqiang; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Yan, Meng; Chen, Jingqin; Cai, Lintao; Song, Liang

    2014-11-01

    As an optical-acoustic hybrid imaging technology, photoacoustic imaging uniquely combines the advantages of rich optical contrast with high ultrasonic resolution in depth, opening up many new possibilities not attainable with conventional pure optical imaging technologies. To perform photoacoustic molecular imaging, optically absorbing exogenous contrast agents are needed to enhance the signals from specifically targeted disease activity. In this work, we designed and developed folate receptor targeted, indocyanine green dye doped poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) lipid nanoparticles (FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs) for molecular photoacoustic imaging of tumor. The fabricated FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs exhibited good aqueous stability, a high folate-receptor targeting efficiency, and remarkable optical absorption in near-infrared wavelengths, providing excellent photoacoustic signals in vitro. Furthermore, after intravenous administration of FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinomas showed significantly enhanced photoacoustic signals in vivo in the tumor regions, compared with those using non-targeted ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs. Given the existing wide clinical use of ICG and PLGA, the developed FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, in conjunction with photoacoustic imaging technology, offer a great potential to be translated into the clinic for non-ionizing molecular imaging of breast cancer in vivo.

  17. In vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging of breast carcinoma with folate receptor-targeted indocyanine green nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huina; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Riqiang; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Yan, Meng; Chen, Jingqin; Cai, Lintao; Song, Liang

    2014-11-01

    As an optical-acoustic hybrid imaging technology, photoacoustic imaging uniquely combines the advantages of rich optical contrast with high ultrasonic resolution in depth, opening up many new possibilities not attainable with conventional pure optical imaging technologies. To perform photoacoustic molecular imaging, optically absorbing exogenous contrast agents are needed to enhance the signals from specifically targeted disease activity. In this work, we designed and developed folate receptor targeted, indocyanine green dye doped poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) lipid nanoparticles (FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs) for molecular photoacoustic imaging of tumor. The fabricated FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs exhibited good aqueous stability, a high folate-receptor targeting efficiency, and remarkable optical absorption in near-infrared wavelengths, providing excellent photoacoustic signals in vitro. Furthermore, after intravenous administration of FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinomas showed significantly enhanced photoacoustic signals in vivo in the tumor regions, compared with those using non-targeted ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs. Given the existing wide clinical use of ICG and PLGA, the developed FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, in conjunction with photoacoustic imaging technology, offer a great potential to be translated into the clinic for non-ionizing molecular imaging of breast cancer in vivo.

  18. Systems Toxicology of Male Reproductive Development: Profiling 774 Chemicals for Molecular Targets and Adverse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Maxwell C.K.; Phuong, Jimmy; Baker, Nancy C.; Sipes, Nisha S.; Klinefelter, Gary R.; Martin, Matthew T.; McLaurin, Keith W.; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Darney, Sally Perreault; Judson, Richard S.; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trends in male reproductive health have been reported for increased rates of testicular germ cell tumors, low semen quality, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias, which have been associated with prenatal environmental chemical exposure based on human and animal studies. Objective: In the present study we aimed to identify significant correlations between environmental chemicals, molecular targets, and adverse outcomes across a broad chemical landscape with emphasis on developmental toxicity of the male reproductive system. Methods: We used U.S. EPA’s animal study database (ToxRefDB) and a comprehensive literature analysis to identify 774 chemicals that have been evaluated for adverse effects on male reproductive parameters, and then used U.S. EPA’s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB) to profile their bioactivity across approximately 800 molecular and cellular features. Results: A phenotypic hierarchy of testicular atrophy, sperm effects, tumors, and malformations, a composite resembling the human testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) hypothesis, was observed in 281 chemicals. A subset of 54 chemicals with male developmental consequences had in vitro bioactivity on molecular targets that could be condensed into 156 gene annotations in a bipartite network. Conclusion: Computational modeling of available in vivo and in vitro data for chemicals that produce adverse effects on male reproductive end points revealed a phenotypic hierarchy across animal studies consistent with the human TDS hypothesis. We confirmed the known role of estrogen and androgen signaling pathways in rodent TDS, and importantly, broadened the list of molecular targets to include retinoic acid signaling, vascular remodeling proteins, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and cytochrome P450s. Citation: Leung MC, Phuong J, Baker NC, Sipes NS, Klinefelter GR, Martin MT, McLaurin KW, Setzer RW, Darney SP, Judson RS, Knudsen TB. 2016. Systems toxicology of male

  19. Exogenous Molecular Probes for Targeted Imaging in Cancer: Focus on Multi-modal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Bishnu P.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in our healthcare system. Molecular imaging is an emerging methodology for the early detection of cancer, guidance of therapy, and monitoring of response. The development of new instruments and exogenous molecular probes that can be labeled for multi-modality imaging is critical to this process. Today, molecular imaging is at a crossroad, and new targeted imaging agents are expected to broadly expand our ability to detect and manage cancer. This integrated imaging strategy will permit clinicians to not only localize lesions within the body but also to manage their therapy by visualizing the expression and activity of specific molecules. This information is expected to have a major impact on drug development and understanding of basic cancer biology. At this time, a number of molecular probes have been developed by conjugating various labels to affinity ligands for targeting in different imaging modalities. This review will describe the current status of exogenous molecular probes for optical, scintigraphic, MRI and ultrasound imaging platforms. Furthermore, we will also shed light on how these techniques can be used synergistically in multi-modal platforms and how these techniques are being employed in current research. PMID:22180839

  20. Toxins and derivatives in molecular pharmaceutics: Drug delivery and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Li, Chong; Wei, Xiaoli; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-08-01

    Protein and peptide toxins offer an invaluable source for the development of actively targeted drug delivery systems. They avidly bind to a variety of cognate receptors, some of which are expressed or even up-regulated in diseased tissues and biological barriers. Protein and peptide toxins or their derivatives can act as ligands to facilitate tissue- or organ-specific accumulation of therapeutics. Some toxins have evolved from a relatively small number of structural frameworks that are particularly suitable for addressing the crucial issues of potency and stability, making them an instrumental source of leads and templates for targeted therapy. The focus of this review is on protein and peptide toxins for the development of targeted drug delivery systems and molecular therapies. We summarize disease- and biological barrier-related toxin receptors, as well as targeted drug delivery strategies inspired by those receptors. The design of new therapeutics based on protein and peptide toxins is also discussed.

  1. There is no universal molecular clock for invertebrates, but rate variation does not scale with body size.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica A; Welch, John J; Woolfit, Megan; Bromham, Lindell

    2006-05-01

    The existence of a universal molecular clock has been called into question by observations that substitution rates vary widely between lineages. However, increasing empirical evidence for the systematic effects of different life history traits on the rate of molecular evolution has raised hopes that rate variation may be predictable, potentially allowing the "correction" of the molecular clock. One such example is the body size trend observed in vertebrates; smaller species tend to have faster rates of molecular evolution. This effect has led to the proposal of general predictive models correcting for rate heterogeneity and has also been invoked to explain discrepancies between molecular and paleontological dates for explosive radiations in the fossil record. Yet, there have been no tests of an effect in any nonvertebrate taxa. In this study, we have tested the generality of the body size effect by surveying a wide range of invertebrate metazoan lineages. DNA sequences and body size data were collected from the literature for 330 species across five phyla. Phylogenetic comparative methods were used to investigate a relationship between average body size and substitution rate at both interspecies and interfamily comparison levels. We demonstrate significant rate variation in all phyla and most genes examined, implying a strict molecular clock cannot be assumed for the Metazoa. Furthermore, we find no evidence of any influence of body size on invertebrate substitution rates. We conclude that the vertebrate body size effect is a special case, which cannot be simply extrapolated to the rest of the animal kingdom.

  2. Targeted Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics: Elucidating double proton transfer in formic acid dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Doltsinis, Nikos L.; Marx, Dominik

    2005-02-01

    The targeted molecular dynamics method, making possible the study of rare events, has been assessed in the framework of Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics. As a test case, we have studied the staggered-eclipsed rotation of ethane. The technique has subsequently been applied to investigate the nature of double proton transfer in formic acid dimer. The latter is found to follow a concerted transfer mechanism involving an essentially planar transition state. A "funnel-like region" of the potential energy surface is identified, where floppy intermolecular modes stiffen upon approaching the transition state.

  3. Molecular determinants of plaque size as an indicator of dengue virus attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Kenneth Choon Meng; Tang, Choon Kit; Norton, Diana Catherine; Gan, Esther Shuyi; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Sun, Bo; Syenina, Ayesa; Yousuf, Amjad; Ong, Xin Mei; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Cheung, Yin Bun; Gubler, Duane J; Davidson, Andrew; St John, Ashley Lauren; Sessions, October Michael; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2016-01-01

    The development of live viral vaccines relies on empirically derived phenotypic criteria, especially small plaque sizes, to indicate attenuation. However, while some candidate vaccines successfully translated into licensed applications, others have failed safety trials, placing vaccine development on a hit-or-miss trajectory. We examined the determinants of small plaque phenotype in two dengue virus (DENV) vaccine candidates, DENV-3 PGMK30FRhL3, which produced acute febrile illness in vaccine recipients, and DENV-2 PDK53, which has a good clinical safety profile. The reasons behind the failure of PGMK30FRhL3 during phase 1 clinical trial, despite meeting the empirically derived criteria of attenuation, have never been systematically investigated. Using in vitro, in vivo and functional genomics approaches, we examined infections by the vaccine and wild-type DENVs, in order to ascertain the different determinants of plaque size. We show that PGMK30FRhL3 produces small plaques on BHK-21 cells due to its slow in vitro growth rate. In contrast, PDK53 replicates rapidly, but is unable to evade antiviral responses that constrain its spread hence also giving rise to small plaques. Therefore, at least two different molecular mechanisms govern the plaque phenotype; determining which mechanism operates to constrain plaque size may be more informative on the safety of live-attenuated vaccines. PMID:27185466

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanodroplet spreading on solid surfaces, effect of droplet size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Nahid; Murad, Sohail; Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the spreading characteristics of nano-sized droplets on solid surfaces. The spreading behavior was analyzed in terms of the temporal evolution of the dynamic contact angle and spreading diameter for wettable, partially wettable and non-wettable surfaces. The computational model was validated through qualitative comparison with the measurements of Bayer and Megaridis, and through comparison with existing correlations. The comparison based on the ratio of relevant time scales indicated that for the conditions investigated, the spreading dynamics is governed by inertial and surface forces, with negligible influence of viscous forces. In addition, the simulation results indicated that the dynamic contact angle and spreading diameter, as well as the advancing and receding time periods, exhibit strong dependence on droplet size. These results were further analyzed to obtain correlations for the effect of droplet size on these spreading parameters. The correlations indicated that the normalized spreading diameter and contact angle scale with drop diameter as Dm /D0 ~D00.5 and θR ~D00.5, while the advancing and receding time periods scale as t~D02/3. Global kinetic energy and surface energy considerations were used to provide a physical basis for these correlations. The correlations were also found to be generally consistent with the experimentally observed spreading behavior of macroscopic droplets.

  5. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced or metastatic chordoma patients: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lebellec, Loïc; Aubert, Sébastien; Zaïri, Fahed; Ryckewaert, Thomas; Chauffert, Bruno; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Chordomas, derived from undifferentiated notochordal remnants, represent less than 4% of bone primary tumors. Despite surgery followed by radiotherapy, local and metastatic relapses are frequent. In case of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas, medical treatment is frequently discussed. While chemotherapy is ineffective, it would appear that some molecular targeted therapies, in particular imatinib, could slow down the tumor growth in case-reports, retrospective series, and phase I or II trials. Nineteen publications, between January 1990 and September 2014, have been found describing the activity of these targeted therapies. A systematic analysis of these publications shows that the best objective response with targeted therapies was stabilization in 52 to 69% of chordomas. Given the indolent course of advanced chordoma and because of the absence of randomized trial, the level of evidence to treat chordomas with molecular therapy is low (level III), whatever the drug. Furthermore, we could not draw firm conclusion on the activity of imatinib. Other putative targets have also been described. Therefore, further clinical trials are expected, especially with these targets. Nevertheless, it seems essential, in those future studies, to consider the naturally slow course of the disease.

  6. Efficient representations of continuum states for photoionization processes from atomic and molecular targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Frank L.

    The investigation of single and double photoionization effects in small atoms and molecules provides a means to probe fundamental quantum mechanical phenomena concerning electron correlation and interference effects. To consider these concepts accurately from first principles requires the construction of the exact final continuum states of a many body problem in atomic double photoionization and of the complicated continuum states in molecular single photoionization. Methods designed for incorporating exterior complex scaling (ECS) have proven very successful towards accomplishing these goals, providing a rigorous framework for describing continuum states involving any number of outgoing electrons with numerical exactness. Furthermore, such methods render solutions that can be interrogated to extract the full richness of information about the photoionization process from the wave function. This work aims to demonstrate the use of exterior complex scaling by first exactly solving the three-body breakup problem of the atomic hydride anion. H-- is the simplest atomic system and is most sensitive to electron correlation effects. The application of ECS with an efficient finite-element discrete variable representation proves quite capable and well-suited for this atomic Coulomb breakup problem. The evolution of this framework to treat molecular problems efficiently with exactness is furthered by the design of a hybrid basis method. The incorporation of analytic Gaussian basis sets ubiquitous in bound state molecular descriptions seems natural for considering molecular continuum states. The hybrid method is described in full detail and applied to completely describe photoionization of molecular H+2 and Li+2 . Photoionization of simple molecular systems offers significantly more complexity in the resulting angular distributions of the ejected electron as the target geometry becomes less atomic-like, i.e., as the internuclear separation increases. In this regard

  7. MOLECULARLY TARGETED THERAPIES IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER ANNUAL UPDATE 2014

    PubMed Central

    Morgensztern, Daniel; Campo, Meghan J.; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Doebele, Robert C.; Garon, Edward; Gerber, David E.; Goldberg, Sarah B.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Heist, Rebecca; Hensing, Thomas; Horn, Leora; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Rudin, Charles M.; Salgia, Ravi; Sequist, Lecia; Shaw, Alice T.; Simon, George R.; Somaiah, Neeta; Spigel, David R.; Wrangle, John; Johnson, David; Herbst, Roy S.; Bunn, Paul; Govindan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant advances in the understanding of the biology and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) over the past few years. A number of molecularly targeted agents are in the clinic or in development for patients with advanced NSCLC (Table 1). We are beginning to understand the mechanisms of acquired resistance following exposure to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with oncogene addicted NSCLC. The advent of next generation sequencing has enabled to study comprehensively genomic alterations in lung cancer. Finally, early results from immune checkpoint inhibitors are very encouraging. This review summarizes recent advances in the area of cancer genomics, targeted therapies and immunotherapy. PMID:25535693

  8. Size and targeting to PECAM vs ICAM control endothelial delivery, internalization and protective effect of multimolecular SOD conjugates.

    PubMed

    Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Muro, Silvia; Arguiri, Evguenia; Khoshnejad, Makan; Tliba, Samira; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2016-07-28

    Controlled endothelial delivery of SOD may alleviate abnormal local surplus of superoxide involved in ischemia-reperfusion, inflammation and other disease conditions. Targeting SOD to endothelial surface vs. intracellular compartments is desirable to prevent pathological effects of external vs. endogenous superoxide, respectively. Thus, SOD conjugated with antibodies to cell adhesion molecule PECAM (Ab/SOD) inhibits pro-inflammatory signaling mediated by endogenous superoxide produced in the endothelial endosomes in response to cytokines. Here we defined control of surface vs. endosomal delivery and effect of Ab/SOD, focusing on conjugate size and targeting to PECAM vs. ICAM. Ab/SOD enlargement from about 100 to 300nm enhanced amount of cell-bound SOD and protection against extracellular superoxide. In contrast, enlargement inhibited endocytosis of Ab/SOD and diminished mitigation of inflammatory signaling of endothelial superoxide. In addition to size, shape is important: endocytosis of antibody-coated spheres was more effective than that of polymorphous antibody conjugates. Further, targeting to ICAM provides higher endocytic efficacy than targeting to PECAM. ICAM-targeted Ab/SOD more effectively mitigated inflammatory signaling by intracellular superoxide in vitro and in animal models, although total uptake was inferior to that of PECAM-targeted Ab/SOD. Therefore, both geometry and targeting features of Ab/SOD conjugates control delivery to cell surface vs. endosomes for optimal protection against extracellular vs. endosomal oxidative stress, respectively. PMID:27210108

  9. Role of NOM molecular size on iodo-trihalomethane formation during chlorination and chloramination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Dan-Dan; Li, Lei; Li, Wen-Wei; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is the major precursor for the generation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during disinfection, but the role of the NOM molecular size on the formation of iodinated DBPs (I-DBPs) is still unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the function of the NOM molecular size on the formation of iodo-trihalomethane (I-THMs) during chlorination and chloramination. Humic acid was adopted as the NOM matrix and fractionated into four molecular weight (MW) groups. Various parameters, including iodide, bromide, NOM concentrations, pH, and pre-chlorination time, were investigated for each MW fraction. During chlorination, high MW fractions (i.e., MW > 100 K Da and 50 K < MW < K00 K Da) produced more I-THMs compared with small MW fractions (i.e., MW < 3 K Da and 3 K < MW < 50 K Da). With the increase in the I(-) or NOM concentration, the formation of I-THMs increased for small MW fractions, while a slight reduction occurred for high MW fractions during chlorination. Higher pH resulted in more I-THM formation for small MW fractions, while the opposite was true for high MW fractions during chlorination. Compared to small MW fractions, bromide was relatively more reactive with high MW fractions in the formation of I-THMs during chlorination. During chloramination, the I-THM yields decreased with the increasing NOM concentration for high MW fractions. The concentration of bromine-containing I-THMs decreased with increasing pH for all MW fractions during chloramination. Additionally, with the prolongation of pre-chlorination time, the total amount of I-THMs decreased remarkably for MWs higher than 3 K Da, while a slight change for MW lower than 3 K Da occurred during chloramination. The results from this study suggest that the molecular weight of the NOM plays an important role in the formation of I-THMs during chlorination and chloramination. PMID:27423047

  10. Molecular clusters size of Puerariae thomsonii radix aqueous decoction and relevance to oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gong; Yang, Caimei; Zhang, Kuan; Hu, Juan; Pang, Wensheng

    2015-07-07

    The multi-component system of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is very complicated. The clusters are dynamic aggregates whose molecules are held together by hydrogen-bonded, Van der Waals forces or the opposite charges of particles attract each other. In this paper, field emission scanning electron microscopy proved that molecules form clusters in Pueraria thomsonii Benth (Fenge) water decoction. Four kinds of Fenge water decoction, 0.07 g∙mL-1 (F-1), 0.1 g∙mL-1 (F-2), 0.17 g∙mL-1 (F-3), 0.35 g∙mL-1 (F-4); F-1, average diameter of molecular was about 120 nm; F-2, 195 nm; F-3, 256 nm; and F-4, 480 nm. The molecular size was shown to depend on concentration. Rabbits were given equal does of 2.8 g∙kg-1, to perfuse F-1, F-2, F-3, F-4 in volume of 80 mL, 56 mL, 33 mL, 17 mL, respectively. At 0-180 min to collect 2 mL blood from the rabbit ears middle arteries for metabolism fingerprints, the results show the particle size of molecular is smaller, the absorption of drugs is better instead. The acute blood stasis model rats were treatment with Fenge decoction of 1.5 g∙kg-1 for 14 days, the concentrations of Ang II in plasma were significantly lower in F-1 and F-2 groups than those in model group (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05), but there were no significantly difference in F-3 and F-4 groups than those in model group (p > 0.05). Despite the molecular aggregation is a common physical phenomenon, it influence on the kind and amount of molecule per unit volume. Molecules morphology influence on the absorption behavior of drugs in vivo therefore is to have an impact on pharmacological function.

  11. Molecular clusters size of Puerariae thomsonii radix aqueous decoction and relevance to oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gong; Yang, Caimei; Zhang, Kuan; Hu, Juan; Pang, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    The multi-component system of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is very complicated. The clusters are dynamic aggregates whose molecules are held together by hydrogen-bonded, Van der Waals forces or the opposite charges of particles attract each other. In this paper, field emission scanning electron microscopy proved that molecules form clusters in Pueraria thomsonii Benth (Fenge) water decoction. Four kinds of Fenge water decoction, 0.07 g∙mL-1 (F-1), 0.1 g∙mL-1 (F-2), 0.17 g∙mL-1 (F-3), 0.35 g∙mL-1 (F-4); F-1, average diameter of molecular was about 120 nm; F-2, 195 nm; F-3, 256 nm; and F-4, 480 nm. The molecular size was shown to depend on concentration. Rabbits were given equal does of 2.8 g∙kg-1, to perfuse F-1, F-2, F-3, F-4 in volume of 80 mL, 56 mL, 33 mL, 17 mL, respectively. At 0-180 min to collect 2 mL blood from the rabbit ears middle arteries for metabolism fingerprints, the results show the particle size of molecular is smaller, the absorption of drugs is better instead. The acute blood stasis model rats were treatment with Fenge decoction of 1.5 g∙kg-1 for 14 days, the concentrations of Ang II in plasma were significantly lower in F-1 and F-2 groups than those in model group (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05), but there were no significantly difference in F-3 and F-4 groups than those in model group (p > 0.05). Despite the molecular aggregation is a common physical phenomenon, it influence on the kind and amount of molecule per unit volume. Molecules morphology influence on the absorption behavior of drugs in vivo therefore is to have an impact on pharmacological function. PMID:26198223

  12. Does size matter? Study of performance of pseudo-ELISAs based on molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles prepared for analytes of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, C; Canfarotta, F; Chianella, I; Pereira, E; Moczko, E; Esen, C; Guerreiro, A; Piletska, E; Whitcombe, M J; Piletsky, S A

    2016-02-21

    The aim of this work is to evaluate whether the size of the analyte used as template for the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) can affect their performance in pseudo-enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (pseudo-ELISAs). Successful demonstration of a nanoMIPs-based pseudo-ELISA for vancomycin (1449.3 g mol(-1)) was demonstrated earlier. In the present investigation, the following analytes were selected: horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 44 kDa), cytochrome C (Cyt C, 12 kDa) biotin (244.31 g mol(-1)) and melamine (126.12 g mol(-1)). NanoMIPs with a similar composition for all analytes were synthesised by persulfate-initiated polymerisation in water. In addition, core-shell nanoMIPs coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and imprinted for melamine were produced in organics and tested. The polymerisation of the nanoparticles was done using a solid-phase approach with the correspondent template immobilised on glass beads. The performance of the nanoMIPs used as replacement for antibodies in direct pseudo-ELISA (for the enzymes) and competitive pseudo-ELISA for the smaller analytes was investigated. For the competitive mode we rely on competition for the binding to the nanoparticles between free analyte and corresponding analyte-HRP conjugate. The results revealed that the best performances were obtained for nanoMIPs synthesised in aqueous media for the larger analytes. In addition, this approach was successful for biotin but completely failed for the smallest template melamine. This problem was solved using nanoMIP prepared by UV polymerisation in an organic media with a PEG shell. This study demonstrates that the preparation of nanoMIP by solid-phase approach can produce material with high affinity and potential to replace antibodies in ELISA tests for both large and small analytes. This makes this technology versatile and applicable to practically any target analyte and diagnostic field. PMID:26796951

  13. Does size matter? Study of performance of pseudo-ELISAs based on molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles prepared for analytes of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, C; Canfarotta, F; Chianella, I; Pereira, E; Moczko, E; Esen, C; Guerreiro, A; Piletska, E; Whitcombe, M J; Piletsky, S A

    2016-02-21

    The aim of this work is to evaluate whether the size of the analyte used as template for the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) can affect their performance in pseudo-enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (pseudo-ELISAs). Successful demonstration of a nanoMIPs-based pseudo-ELISA for vancomycin (1449.3 g mol(-1)) was demonstrated earlier. In the present investigation, the following analytes were selected: horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 44 kDa), cytochrome C (Cyt C, 12 kDa) biotin (244.31 g mol(-1)) and melamine (126.12 g mol(-1)). NanoMIPs with a similar composition for all analytes were synthesised by persulfate-initiated polymerisation in water. In addition, core-shell nanoMIPs coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and imprinted for melamine were produced in organics and tested. The polymerisation of the nanoparticles was done using a solid-phase approach with the correspondent template immobilised on glass beads. The performance of the nanoMIPs used as replacement for antibodies in direct pseudo-ELISA (for the enzymes) and competitive pseudo-ELISA for the smaller analytes was investigated. For the competitive mode we rely on competition for the binding to the nanoparticles between free analyte and corresponding analyte-HRP conjugate. The results revealed that the best performances were obtained for nanoMIPs synthesised in aqueous media for the larger analytes. In addition, this approach was successful for biotin but completely failed for the smallest template melamine. This problem was solved using nanoMIP prepared by UV polymerisation in an organic media with a PEG shell. This study demonstrates that the preparation of nanoMIP by solid-phase approach can produce material with high affinity and potential to replace antibodies in ELISA tests for both large and small analytes. This makes this technology versatile and applicable to practically any target analyte and diagnostic field.

  14. Molecular Classification, Pathway Addiction, and Therapeutic Targeting in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Puvvada, Soham; Kendrick, Samantha; Rimsza, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The rapid emergence of molecularly-based techniques to detect changes in the genetic landscape of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) including gene expression, DNA and RNA sequencing, and epigenetic profiling, has significantly impacted the understanding and therapeutic targeting of DLBCL. In this review, we will briefly discuss the new methods used in the study of DLBCL. We will describe the influence of the generated data on DLBCL classification and the identification of new entities and altered cell survival strategies with a focus on the renewed interest in some classic oncogenic pathways that are currently targeted for new therapy. Lastly, we will examine the molecular genomic studies that revealed the importance of the tumor microenvironment in the pathogenesis of DLBCL. PMID:24080457

  15. Molecular targets and pathways involved in liver metastasis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Weidle, Ulrich H; Birzele, Fabian; Krüger, Achim

    2015-08-01

    We here summarize the current view of molecular mechanisms involved in the dissemination process of colorectal cancer cells to the liver as deduced from preclinical models. We focus on molecular aspects of the current understanding of the biology of liver metastases formation and survival, both being crucial for identification and validation of possible therapeutic targets and review the latest findings elucidating some features of the liver as a metastatic niche. In more detail, we outline the role of proteases and of major pathways such asc-MET signaling and its modulation by factors such as MACC1 and TIMP1, as well as Notch and TGFβ signaling. The relevance of these signalling pathways during tumor-stroma interactions in this context will be addressed. In addition, the functional role and validation of targets such as PRL3, Trop-2, L1CAM, S100A4, S100P, CD133, LIPC, and APOBEC3G are summarized. PMID:26104118

  16. [International comparison and regulatory issues of the molecular targeted therapy development].

    PubMed

    Iwasaku, Masahiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2015-08-01

    In July 2013 from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan notified "Approval application for in vitro companion diagnostics and corresponding therapeutic products" (manager notification). They recommended concurrent development of molecular targeted therapies and companion diagnostics. However, there are specific difficulties; cooperation between diagnostic company and pharmaceutical company, indeterminacy of profitability outlook etc. Moreover, it is also a problem how to supervise and to secure the quality and safety of the examination. In the future, multiplex diagnostic examination, which detect multiple molecular targets abnormalities at once, is developed commercially. In this paper, we outline the issues as well as international comparison in the current state of the approval and application system. PMID:26281697

  17. Determination of phytate in high molecular weight, charged organic matrices by two-dimensional size exclusion-ion chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-dimensional chromatography method for analyzing anionic targets (specifically phytate) in complex matrices is described. Prior to quantification by anion exchange chromatography, the sample matrix was prepared by size exclusion chromatography, which removed the majority of matrix complexities....

  18. Target size analysis of serotonin 5-HT/sub 1/ and 5-HT/sub 2/ receptors in bovine brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, N.; Tanaka, C.

    1985-09-23

    Freeze-dried crude synaptic membranes prepared from bovine cerebral cortex and striatum were exposed to high energy gamma ray from the source of /sup 60/Co. The size of serotonin 5-HT/sub 1/ receptors labeled by (/sup 3/H)serotonin and that of 5-HT/sub 2/ receptors labeled by (/sup 3/H)spiperone or (/sup 3/H)ketanserin was determined by target size analyses. The values were 57,000 daltons, 145,000 daltons and 152,000 daltons for the cerebral cortex and 56,000 daltons, 141,000 daltons and 150,000 daltons for the striatum, respectively. The estimated sizes were deduced by reference to enzyme standards with known molecular masses and which were irradiated in parallel. These results demonstrate that the molecular entities in situ for 5-HT/sub 1/ receptors are distinct from those for 5-HT/sub 2/ receptors, thus supporting data on the existence of two distinct populations of serotonin receptors, hitherto evidenced physiopharmacologically.

  19. Molecularly-Targeted Gold-Based Nanoparticles for Cancer Imaging and Near-Infrared Photothermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Emily Shannon

    2011-12-01

    This thesis advances the use of nanoparticles as multifunctional agents for molecularly-targeted cancer imaging and photothermal therapy. Cancer mortality has remained relatively unchanged for several decades, indicating a significant need for improvements in care. Researchers are evaluating strategies incorporating nanoparticles as exogenous energy absorbers to deliver heat capable of inducing cell death selectively to tumors, sparing normal tissue. Molecular targeting of nanoparticles is predicted to improve photothermal therapy by enhancing tumor retention. This hypothesis is evaluated with two types of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles utilized, silica-gold nanoshells and gold-gold sulfide nanoparticles, can convert light energy into heat to damage cancerous cells. For in vivo applications nanoparticles are usually coated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to increase blood circulation time. Here, heterobifunctional PEG links nanoparticles to targeting agents (antibodies and growth factors) to provide cell-specific binding. This approach is evaluated through a series of experiments. In vitro, antibody-coated nanoparticles can bind breast carcinoma cells expressing the targeted receptor and act as contrast agents for multiphoton microscopy prior to inducing cell death via photoablation. Furthermore, antibody-coated nanoparticles can bind tissue ex vivo at levels corresponding to receptor expression, suggesting they should bind their target even in the complex biological milieu. This is evaluated by comparing the accumulation of antibody-coated and PEG-coated nanoparticles in subcutaneous glioma tumors in mice. Contrary to expectations, antibody targeting did not yield more nanoparticles within tumors. Nevertheless, these studies established the sensitivity of glioma to photothermal therapy; mice treated with PEG-coated nanoshells experienced 57% complete tumor regression versus no regression in control mice. Subsequent experiments employed intracranial tumors to

  20. A comparative modeling and molecular docking study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fakhar, Zeynab; Naiker, Suhashni; Alves, Claudio N; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lameira, Jeronimo; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2016-11-01

    An alarming rise of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and the continuous high global morbidity of tuberculosis have reinvigorated the need to identify novel targets to combat the disease. The enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan in M. tuberculosis are essential and noteworthy therapeutic targets. In this study, the biochemical function and homology modeling of MurI, MurG, MraY, DapE, DapA, Alr, and Ddl enzymes of the CDC1551 M. tuberculosis strain involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan cell wall are reported. Generation of the 3D structures was achieved with Modeller 9.13. To assess the structural quality of the obtained homology modeled targets, the models were validated using PROCHECK, PDBsum, QMEAN, and ERRAT scores. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate root mean square deviation (RMSD) and radius of gyration (Rg) of MurI and MurG target proteins and their corresponding templates. For further model validation, RMSD and Rg for selected targets/templates were investigated to compare the close proximity of their dynamic behavior in terms of protein stability and average distances. To identify the potential binding mode required for molecular docking, binding site information of all modeled targets was obtained using two prediction algorithms. A docking study was performed for MurI to determine the potential mode of interaction between the inhibitor and the active site residues. This study presents the first accounts of the 3D structural information for the selected M. tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  1. NCCN Task Force Report: Optimizing Treatment of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma With Molecular Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Gary R.; Carducci, Michael A.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Esper, Peg; Jonasch, Eric; Kumar, Rashmi; Margolin, Kim A.; Michaelson, M. Dror; Motzer, Robert J.; Pili, Roberto; Roethke, Susan; Srinivas, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been substantially improved with administration of the currently available molecularly targeted therapies. However, proper selection of therapy and management of toxicities remain challenging. NCCN convened a multidisciplinary task force panel to address the clinical issues associated with these therapies in attempt to help practicing oncologists optimize patient outcomes. This report summarizes the background data presented at the task force meeting and the ensuing discussion. PMID:21335444

  2. Functionality in Electrospun Nanofibrous Membranes Based on Fiber's Size, Surface Area, and Molecular Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Tanioka, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile method for forming continuous thin fibers based on an electrohydrodynamic process. This method has the following advantages: (i) the ability to produce thin fibers with diameters in the micrometer and nanometer ranges; (ii) one-step forming of the two- or three-dimensional nanofiber network assemblies (nanofibrous membranes); and (iii) applicability for a broad spectrum of molecules, such as synthetic and biological polymers and polymerless sol-gel systems. Electrospun nanofibrous membranes have received significant attention in terms of their practical applications. The major advantages of nanofibers or nanofibrous membranes are the functionalities based on their nanoscaled-size, highly specific surface area, and highly molecular orientation. These functionalities of the nanofibrous membranes can be controlled by their fiber diameter, surface chemistry and topology, and internal structure of the nanofibers. This report focuses on our studies and describes fundamental aspects and applications of electrospun nanofibrous membranes. PMID:24957735

  3. Size dependence and phase transition during melting of fcc-Fe nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tong; Meng, Wenjian; Wu, Yongquan; Lu, Xionggang

    2013-07-01

    Continuous melting and cooling of isolated fcc-Fe nanoparticles with 59-9577 atoms are studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation with Sutton-Chen potential. An energy minimization process was employed to obtain the stable solid structure for simulation of melting. The energy-minimized nanoparticles show lower potential energy and radius compared with the counterparts without energy minimizing. The size dependence of melting point shows perfect linear variation with N-1/3 for particles above a limit of 113 atoms. The bulk melting temperature of 1833.3 K, which is close to the experimental data (1811 K for bcc and 1800.8 K for fcc), has been predicted by a linear relationship. Two different inner structures, including five-fold twinning and lamellar structures, have been found to be the initial stable configurations prior to melting, and both surface premelting and internal defects were verified as the origins for melting behavior.

  4. Molecular Simulation of Cavity Size Distributions and Diffusivity in Ultrahigh Free Volume Glassy Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Sanchez, Isaac C.; Freeman, Benny D.

    2003-03-01

    Poly (1-trimethylsilyl-1-propane) (PTMSP) and random copolymer of tetrafluoroethylene and 2,2-bis(trifluoromethyl)-4,5-difluoro-1,3-dioxole (TFE/BDD), two very permeable polymers, have very similar and large fractional free volumes, but very different permeabilities. Cavity size (free volume) distributions obtained by Monte Carlo methods shows that PTMSP has larger cavities compared with TFE/BDD. This explains the observation that PTMSP is more permeable than TFE/BDD in an order of magnitude. Our simulation results are also qualitatively consistent with free volume distributions determined by Positron Annihilation Lifetime (PAL) Spectroscopy. The diffusion coefficient of CO2 in these two high free volume polymers was also calculated through molecular dynamics. The diffusion coefficient of CO2 in PTMSP is much higher than TFE/BDD. Our simulated diffusion data are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Highly stereoselective, uniformly sized molecularly imprinted polymers for cinchona alkaloids in hydro-organic mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Haginaka, Jun; Kagawa, Chino

    2003-01-01

    Highly stereoselective, uniformly sized molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for cinchona alkaloids, cinchonine (CN) and cinchonidine (CD), were prepared using methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as a cross-linker. The MIPs were evaluated using a mixture of phosphate buffer and acetonitrile as the mobile phase. The CN- and CD-imprinted MAA-co-EDMA polymers can recognize the respective template molecule more than the other diastereomer, and afford an excellent diastereomer separation of CN and CD. In addition, the MIPs gave diastereomer separations of structurally related compounds, quinidine and quinine. The retentive and stereoselective properties of those compounds on the MIPs suggest that electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions can work to recognize these compounds. Furthermore, thermodynamic studies reveal that the entropy-driven effect is significant at mobile-phase pH 5.4, while the enthalpy-driven interactions seem to be dominant at mobile-phase pH 9.6.

  6. Recent advances in developing molecular tools for targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2015-01-01

    Various biological molecules naturally existing in diversified species including fungi, bacteria, and bacteriophage have functionalities for DNA binding and processing. The biological molecules have been recently actively engineered for use in customized genome editing of mammalian cells as the molecule-encoding DNA sequence information and the underlying mechanisms how the molecules work are unveiled. Excitingly, multiple novel methods based on the newly constructed artificial molecular tools have enabled modifications of specific endogenous genetic elements in the genome context at efficiencies that are much higher than that of the conventional homologous recombination based methods. This minireview introduces the most recently spotlighted molecular genome engineering tools with their key features and ongoing modifications for better performance. Such ongoing efforts have mainly focused on the removal of the inherent DNA sequence recognition rigidity from the original molecular platforms, the addition of newly tailored targeting functions into the engineered molecules, and the enhancement of their targeting specificity. Effective targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells will enable not only sophisticated genetic studies in the context of the genome, but also widely-applicable universal therapeutics based on the pinpointing and correction of the disease-causing genetic elements within the genome in the near future.

  7. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3 Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T cell co-regulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an immunohistochemical analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients. PMID:25899053

  8. A potential molecular target for morphological defects of fetal alcohol syndrome: Kir2.1.

    PubMed

    Bates, Emily A

    2013-06-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a developmental disorder that affects up to 0.2% of births. FASD comprises severe cognitive and structural birth defects including cleft lip/palate, small jaw, wide-set eyes, dental abnormalities, digit abnormalities, small head, and short stature. Strict counseling guidelines stress abstaining from alcohol during pregnancy, but the prevalence of FASD persists. The lack of a convincing molecular target has hindered FASD research and treatment. Interestingly, mutations in an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, Kir2.1, cause a similar constellation of birth defects as in FASD. In other words, FASD phenocopies the traits conveyed by Kir2.1 mutations. Furthermore, alcohol directly binds to and modulates Kir2.1. Substantial evidence now suggests that alcohol targets Kir2.1 to cause the birth defects associated with FASD. This review compiles clinical, genetic, biochemical, electrophysiological, and molecular evidence that identifies Kir2.1 as a molecular target for FASD development and possibly therapeutic treatment.

  9. Recent advances in developing molecular tools for targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2015-01-01

    Various biological molecules naturally existing in diversified species including fungi, bacteria, and bacteriophage have functionalities for DNA binding and processing. The biological molecules have been recently actively engineered for use in customized genome editing of mammalian cells as the molecule-encoding DNA sequence information and the underlying mechanisms how the molecules work are unveiled. Excitingly, multiple novel methods based on the newly constructed artificial molecular tools have enabled modifications of specific endogenous genetic elements in the genome context at efficiencies that are much higher than that of the conventional homologous recombination based methods. This minireview introduces the most recently spotlighted molecular genome engineering tools with their key features and ongoing modifications for better performance. Such ongoing efforts have mainly focused on the removal of the inherent DNA sequence recognition rigidity from the original molecular platforms, the addition of newly tailored targeting functions into the engineered molecules, and the enhancement of their targeting specificity. Effective targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells will enable not only sophisticated genetic studies in the context of the genome, but also widely-applicable universal therapeutics based on the pinpointing and correction of the disease-causing genetic elements within the genome in the near future. PMID:25104401

  10. Role for the propofol hydroxyl in anesthetic protein target molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Woll, Kellie A; Weiser, Brian P; Liang, Qiansheng; Meng, Tao; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Pinch, Benika; Dailey, William P; Gao, Wei Dong; Covarrubias, Manuel; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2015-06-17

    Propofol is a widely used intravenous general anesthetic. We synthesized 2-fluoro-1,3-diisopropylbenzene, a compound that we call "fropofol", to directly assess the significance of the propofol 1-hydroxyl for pharmacologically relevant molecular recognition in vitro and for anesthetic efficacy in vivo. Compared to propofol, fropofol had a similar molecular volume and only a small increase in hydrophobicity. Isothermal titration calorimetry and competition assays revealed that fropofol had higher affinity for a protein site governed largely by van der Waals interactions. Within another protein model containing hydrogen bond interactions, propofol demonstrated higher affinity. In vivo, fropofol demonstrated no anesthetic efficacy, but at high concentrations produced excitatory activity in tadpoles and mice; fropofol also antagonized propofol-induced hypnosis. In a propofol protein target that contributes to hypnosis, α1β2γ2L GABAA receptors, fropofol demonstrated no significant effect alone or on propofol positive allosteric modulation of the ion channel, suggesting an additional requirement for the 1-hydroxyl within synaptic GABAA receptor site(s). However, fropofol caused similar adverse cardiovascular effects as propofol by a dose-dependent depression of myocardial contractility. Our results directly implicate the propofol 1-hydroxyl as contributing to molecular recognition within protein targets leading to hypnosis, but not necessarily within protein targets leading to side effects of the drug.

  11. Creatinine Clearance Is Associated with Toxicity from Molecularly Targeted Agents in Phase I Trials

    PubMed Central

    Basu, B.; Vitfell-Pedersen, J.; Moreno Garcia, V.; Puglisi, M.; Tjokrowidjaja, A.; Shah, K.; Malvankar, S.; Anghan, B.; de Bono, J.S.; Kaye, S.B.; Molife, L.R.; Banerji, U.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate any correlations between baseline creatinine clearance and the development of grade 3/4 toxicities during treatment within oncology phase I trials of molecularly targeted agents where entry criteria mandate a serum creatinine of ≤1.5 × the upper limit of normal. Methods Documented toxicity and creatinine clearance (calculated by the Cockcroft-Gault formula) from all patients treated with molecularly targeted agents in the context of phase I trials within our centre over a 5-year period were analyzed. Results Data from 722 patients were analyzed; 116 (16%) developed at least one episode of grade 3/4 toxicity. Patients who developed a late-onset (>1 cycle) grade 3/4 toxicity had a lower creatinine clearance than those who did not (82.69 ml/min vs. 98.97 ml/min; p = < 0.001). Conclusion Creatinine clearance (even when within normal limits) should be studied as a potential factor influencing late toxicities in the clinical trials of molecularly targeted anti-cancer drugs. PMID:22889980

  12. High Sensitivity Method to Estimate Distribution of Hyaluronan Molecular Sizes in Small Biological Samples Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Do, Lan; Dahl, Christen P.; Kerje, Susanne; Hansell, Peter; Mörner, Stellan; Lindqvist, Ulla; Engström-Laurent, Anna; Larsson, Göran; Hellman, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a negatively charged polydisperse polysaccharide where both its size and tissue concentration play an important role in many physiological and pathological processes. The various functions of hyaluronan depend on its molecular size. Up to now, it has been difficult to study the role of hyaluronan in diseases with pathological changes in the extracellular matrix where availability is low or tissue samples are small. Difficulty to obtain large enough biopsies from human diseased tissue or tissue from animal models has also restricted the study of hyaluronan. In this paper, we demonstrate that gas-phase electrophoretic molecular mobility analyzer (GEMMA) can be used to estimate the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes in biological samples with a limited amount of hyaluronan. The low detection level of the GEMMA method allows for estimation of hyaluronan molecular sizes from different parts of small organs. Hence, the GEMMA method opens opportunity to attain a profile over the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes and estimate changes caused by disease or experimental conditions that has not been possible to obtain before. PMID:26448761

  13. Laser backscattered from partially convex targets of large sizes in random media for E-wave polarization.

    PubMed

    El-Ocla, Hosam

    2006-08-01

    The characteristics of a radar cross section (RCS) of partially convex targets with large sizes up to five wavelengths in free space and random media are studied. The nature of the incident wave is an important factor in remote sensing and radar detection applications. I investigate the effects of beam wave incidence on the performance of RCS, drawing on the method I used in a previous study on plane-wave incidence. A beam wave can be considered a plane wave if the target size is smaller than the beam width. Therefore, to have a beam wave with a limited spot on the target, the target size should be larger than the beam width (assuming E-wave incidence wave polarization. The effects of the target configuration, random medium parameters, and the beam width on the laser RCS and the enhancement in the radar cross section are numerically analyzed, resulting in the possibility of having some sort of control over radar detection using beam wave incidence.

  14. The potential role of aerobic exercise to modulate cardiotoxicity of molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jessica M; Lakoski, Susan; Mackey, John R; Douglas, Pamela S; Haykowsky, Mark J; Jones, Lee W

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapeutics (MTT) are the future of cancer systemic therapy. They have already moved from palliative therapy for advanced solid malignancies into the setting of curative-intent treatment for early-stage disease. Cardiotoxicity is a frequent and potentially serious adverse complication of some targeted therapies, leading to a broad range of potentially life-threatening complications, therapy discontinuation, and poor quality of life. Low-cost pleiotropic interventions are therefore urgently required to effectively prevent and/or treat MTT-induced cardiotoxicity. Aerobic exercise therapy has the unique capacity to modulate, without toxicity, multiple gene expression pathways in several organ systems, including a plethora of cardiac-specific molecular and cell-signaling pathways implicated in MTT-induced cardiac toxicity. In this review, we examine the molecular signaling of antiangiogenic and HER2-directed therapies that may underpin cardiac toxicity and the hypothesized molecular mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective properties of aerobic exercise. It is hoped that this knowledge can be used to maximize the benefits of small molecule inhibitors, while minimizing cardiac damage in patients with solid malignancies.

  15. From molecular classification to targeted therapeutics: the changing face of systemic therapy in metastatic gastroesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian; Kelly, Ronan J

    2015-01-01

    Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1) or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician's therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  16. From Molecular Classification to Targeted Therapeutics: The Changing Face of Systemic Therapy in Metastatic Gastroesophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ronan J.

    2015-01-01

    Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1) or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician's therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients. PMID:25784931

  17. Ionic size effects to molecular solvation energy and to ion current across a channel resulted from the nonuniform size-modified PNP equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yu; Tu, Bin; Lu, Benzhuo

    2014-05-01

    Ionic finite size can impose considerable effects to both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of a solvated molecular system, such as the solvation energy, ionic concentration, and transport in a channel. As discussed in our former work [B. Lu and Y. C. Zhou, Biophys. J. 100, 2475 (2011)], a class of size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) models can be uniformly studied through the general nonuniform size-modified PNP (SMPNP) equations deduced from the extended free energy functional of Borukhov et al. [I. Borukhov, D. Andelman, and H. Orland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 435 (1997)] This work focuses on the nonuniform size effects to molecular solvation energy and to ion current across a channel for real biomolecular systems. The main contributions are: (1) we prove that for solvation energy calculation with nonuniform size effects (through equilibrium SMPNP simulation), there exists a simplified approximation formulation which is the same as the widely used one in PB community. This approximate form avoids integration over the whole domain and makes energy calculations convenient. (2) Numerical calculations show that ionic size effects tend to negate the solvation effects, which indicates that a higher molecular solvation energy (lower absolute value) is to be predicted when ionic size effects are considered. For both calculations on a protein and a DNA fragment systems in a 0.5M 1:1 ionic solution, a difference about 10 kcal/mol in solvation energies is found between the PB and the SMPNP predictions. Moreover, it is observed that the solvation energy decreases as ionic strength increases, which behavior is similar as those predicted by the traditional PB equation (without size effect) and by the uniform size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation. (3) Nonequilibrium SMPNP simulations of ion permeation through a gramicidin A channel show that the ionic size effects lead to reduced ion current inside the channel compared with the results

  18. Locally Targeted Delivery of a Micron-Size Radiation Therapy Source Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogel

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yusung; Seol, Dong Rim; Mohapatra, Sucheta; Sunderland, John J.; Schultz, Michael K.; Domann, Frederick E.; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To propose a novel radiation therapy (RT) delivery modality: locally targeted delivery of micron-size RT sources by using temperature-sensitive hydrogel (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials: Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two US Food and Drug Administration-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as the radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and 3 with RT-saline. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT scans were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 h after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL was determined by comparison with that of the control datasets by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results: RT-GEL was successfully injected into the tumor by using a 30-gauge needle. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% at 24 h (44% at 48 h, respectively) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%, respectively) for RT-saline. Fused SPECT-CT images of RT-saline showed considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2886%, 261%, and 262% of RT-GEL at 0, 24, and 48 h, respectively). Conclusions: RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity: 170% (200%, respectively), than that of RT-saline at 24 h (48 h, respectively) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the

  19. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Huong T.; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F )-dependent velocity [P (v )] and run length [P (n )] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P (n ) and P (v ) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F , P (v ) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v , which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  20. The linewidth-size scaling law of molecular gas in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgarone, Edith G.; McKee, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    The origin of the linewidth-size (LWS) scaling law, first noticed by Larson three decades ago and ascribed to turbulence, is still a highly debated issue. Not unexpectedly, its properties depend on the environment and on the line tracer used.When the optically thick 12CO (J=1-0) line is used, a specific medium is sampled: the translucent molecular gas of moderate density that builds up the bulk of the molecular interstellar medium in galaxies like ours. The sensitivity of the 12CO line to this gas is such that the LWS is found to hold over almost five orders of magnitude in lengthscale, although with a considerable scatter (1 dex). It reveals an invariant of the cascade, the specific kinetic energy tranfer rate. It also appears to split into two regimes, depending on the gas mass surface density: below a given threshold that is proposed to be linked to the galactic dynamics, it bears the signature of a turbulent cascade, while above that threshold, the scaling law is ascribed to virial balance between turbulent energy and gravity. Large deviations from the scaling law are observed at small scales where signatures of turbulent intermittency may be present.

  1. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force.

    PubMed

    Vu, Huong T; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-08-12

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F)-dependent velocity [P(v)] and run length [P(n)] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P(n) and P(v) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F, P(v) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v, which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps. PMID:27564000

  2. Molecular size of benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain in situ: evidence for a functional dimer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, A.; Iversen, L. L.

    1982-02-01

    Benzodiazepine tranquillizers such as diazepam and chlordiazepoxide interact with high-affinity binding sites in nervous tissue1,2. The correlation between the affinities of various benzodiazepines for these sites with their clinical potencies and activity in behavioural and electrophysiological tests in animals suggests that the sites represent the functional `receptor' whereby benzodiazepines exert their effects3. The intimate involvement of benzodiazepines with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and chloride channels raised the possibility that the benzodiazepine binding site (BDZ-R) may be a protein in the GABA receptor-effector complex4,5. GABA agonists enhance the affinity of BDZ-R for benzodiazepines6, although BDZ-R is distinct from the GABA receptor itself3. However, electrophysiological evidence suggests that the action of benzodiazepines is chloride channel, rather than receptor, directed7-10. Several attempts have been made to measure the molecular weight (Mr) of BDZ-R after solubilization from brain membranes: treatment with 1% Triton X-100 followed by assay of binding activity in solute fractions separated according to molecular weight suggested11 a value of ~200,000, photoaffinity labelling of BDZ-R with 3H-flunitrazepam (3H-FNZ) followed by more rigorous solubilization and gel chromatography indicated12,13 an apparent Mr of ~55,000 and a third approach14 a value of ~100,000. The measured molecular weight seems to depend critically on the solubilization procedure used. Chang et al.15 recently described the use of radiation inactivation to determine the size of BDZ-R in situ in calf brain membranes, and estimated a Mr, of 216,000. We have also used this approach; the results reported here indicate a Mr of between 90,000 and 100,000, but this is reduced to 60,000-63,000 in membranes pretreated with GABA, suggesting the disaggregation of a normally dimeric form.

  3. High molecular weight chitosan derivative polymeric micelles encapsulating superparamagnetic iron oxide for tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunbin; Lin, Zuan Tao; Chen, Yanmei; Wang, He; Deng, Ya Li; Le, D Elizabeth; Bin, Jianguo; Li, Meiyu; Liao, Yulin; Liu, Yili; Jiang, Gangbiao; Bin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents based on chitosan derivatives have great potential for diagnosing diseases. However, stable tumor-targeted MRI contrast agents using micelles prepared from high molecular weight chitosan derivatives are seldom reported. In this study, we developed a novel tumor-targeted MRI vehicle via superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) encapsulated in self-aggregating polymeric folate-conjugated N-palmitoyl chitosan (FAPLCS) micelles. The tumor-targeting ability of FAPLCS/SPIONs was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. The results of dynamic light scattering experiments showed that the micelles had a relatively narrow size distribution (136.60±3.90 nm) and excellent stability. FAPLCS/SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility in cellular toxicity tests. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that FAPLCS/SPIONs bound specifically to folate receptor-positive HeLa cells, and that FAPLCS/SPIONs accumulated predominantly in established HeLa-derived tumors in mice. The signal intensities of T2-weighted images in established HeLa-derived tumors were reduced dramatically after intravenous micelle administration. Our study indicates that FAPLCS/SPION micelles can potentially serve as safe and effective MRI contrast agents for detecting tumors that overexpress folate receptors. PMID:25709439

  4. Magnetic trapping with simultaneous photoacoustic detection of molecularly targeted rare circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been widely used in molecular imaging to detect diseased cells by targeting them with nanoparticle-based contrast agents. However, the sensitivity and specificity are easily degraded because contrast agent signals can be masked by the background. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging uses a new type of multifunctional composite particle combining an optically absorptive gold nanorod core and magnetic nanospheres, which can potentially accumulate and concentrate targeted cells while simultaneously enhancing their specific contrast compared to background signals. In this study, HeLa cells molecularly targeted using nanocomposites with folic acid mimicking targeted rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were circulated at a 6 ml/min flow rate for trapping and imaging studies. Preliminary results show that the cells accumulate rapidly in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system. The sensitivity of the current system can reach up to 1 cell/ml in clear water. By manipulating the trapped cells magnetically, the specificity of detecting cells in highly absorptive ink solution can be enhanced with 16.98 dB background suppression by applying motion filtering on PA signals to remove unwanted background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results appear promising for future preclinical studies on a small animal model and ultimate clinical detection of rare CTCs in the vasculature.

  5. Molecular Targeted Therapies for the Treatment of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Jin Wook; Keam, Bhumsuk

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is the multifocal seeding of cerebrospinal fluid and leptomeninges by malignant cells. The incidence of LMC is approximately 5% in patients with malignant tumors overall and the rate is increasing due to increasing survival time of cancer patients. Eradication of the disease is not yet possible, so the treatment goals of LMC are to improve neurologic symptoms and to prolong survival. A standard treatment for LMC has not been established due to low incidences of LMC, the rapidly progressing nature of the disease, heterogeneous populations with LMC, and a lack of randomized clinical trial results. Treatment options for LMC include intrathecal chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, but the prognoses remain poor with a median survival of <3 months. Recently, molecular targeted agents have been applied in the clinic and have shown groundbreaking results in specific patient groups epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy or an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor in lung cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-directed therapy in breast cancer, and CD20-targeted therapy in B cell lymphoma). Moreover, there are results indicating that the use of these agents under proper dose and administration routes can be effective for managing LMC. In this article, we review molecular targeted agents for managing LMC. PMID:27399673

  6. Stopping cancer in its tracks: using small molecular inhibitors to target glioblastoma migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Austin K; Li, Jing; Adamson, David C

    2012-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents one of the most common aggressive types of primary brain tumors. Despite advances in surgical resection, novel neuroimaging procedures, and the most recent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival after diagnosis is about 12-14 months. Targeting migrating GBM cells is a key research strategy in the fight against this devastating cancer. Though the vast majority of the primary tumor focus can be surgically resected, these migrating cells are responsible for its universal recurrence. Numerous strategies and technologies are being explored to target migrating glioma cells, with small molecular inhibitors as one of the most commonly studied. Small molecule inhibitors, such as protein kinase inhibitors, phosphorylation site inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and antisense oligonucleotides show promise in slowing the progression of this disease. A better understanding of these small molecule inhibitors and how they target various extra- and intracellular signaling pathways may eventually lead to a cure for GBM.

  7. EPR characterization of molecular targets for NO · in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guissani, A.; Henry, Y. A.

    1997-02-01

    First some elementary properties of nitric oxide NO · are presented: NO · is synthesized in mammalian cells from L-arginine, the reaction being catalyzed by the enzyme NO-synthase. The EPR spectroscopy of NO-complexes is shown; the formation of paramagnetic complexes with some metalloproteins including haemoglobin enables the EPR detection of such complexes. EPR-detectable targets for NO · in mammalian cells are then (rapidly) described, including first their detection (after induction of NO-synthases) through interaction of NO · with specific metalloenzymes, then NO · localization, the fact that the induction of NO-synthases in a generator cell such as a macrophage gives the same metabolic effects in target cells, and finally the implication of NO · in pathological states, where the inducible L-arginine-NO pathway plays an important role. It is concluded that EPR spectroscopy enables the unambiguous detection of such specific molecular targets for NO ·; in mammalian cells.

  8. The development of molecularly targeted anticancer therapies: an Eli Lilly and Company perspective.

    PubMed

    Perry, William L; Weitzman, Aaron

    2005-03-01

    The ability to identify activated pathways that drive the growth and progression of cancer and to develop specific and potent inhibitors of key proteins in these pathways promises to dramatically change the treatment of cancer: A patient's cancer could be characterized at the molecular level and the information used to select the best treatment options. The development of successful therapies not only requires extensive target validation, but also new approaches to evaluating drug efficacy in animal models and in the clinic compared to the development of traditional cytotoxic agents. This article highlights Eli Lilly and Company's approach to developing targeted therapies, from target identification and validation through evaluation in the clinic. A selection of drugs in the Lilly Oncology pipeline is also discussed.

  9. Molecular evolution of the brain size regulator genes CDK5RAP2 and CENPJ.

    PubMed

    Evans, Patrick D; Vallender, Eric J; Lahn, Bruce T

    2006-06-21

    Primary microcephaly is a developmental defect of the brain characterized by severely reduced brain size but an absence of other overt abnormalities. Mutations in several loci have been linked to primary microcephaly. The underlying genes for two of these were recently identified as CDK5RAP2 and CENPJ. Here, we focus on CDK5RAP2 and show that the protein evolutionary rate of this gene is significantly higher in primates than rodents or carnivores. We further show that the evolutionary rate within primates is particularly high in the human and chimpanzee terminal branches. Thus, the pattern of molecular evolution seen in CDK5RAP2 appears to parallel, at least approximately, that seen in two other previously identified primary microcephaly genes, microcephalin and ASPM. We also briefly discuss CENPJ, which similarly exhibits higher rate of protein evolution in primates as compared to rodents and carnivores. Together, the evolutionary patterns of all four presently known primary microcephaly genes are consistent with the hypothesis that genes regulating brain size during development might also play a role in brain evolution in primates and especially humans. PMID:16631324

  10. Molecular dynamics study of the catalyst particle size dependence on carbon nanotube growth.

    PubMed

    Ding, Feng; Rosén, Arne; Bolton, Kim

    2004-08-01

    The molecular dynamics method, based on an empirical potential energy surface, was used to study the effect of catalyst particle size on the growth mechanism and structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The temperature for nanotube nucleation (800-1100 K), which occurs on the surface of the cluster, is similar to that used in catalyst chemical vapor deposition experiments, and the growth mechanism, which is described within the vapor-liquid-solid model, is the same for all cluster sizes studied here (iron clusters containing between 10 and 200 atoms were simulated). Large catalyst particles, which contain at least 20 iron atoms, nucleate SWNTs that have a far better tubular structure than SWNTs nucleated from smaller clusters. In addition, the SWNTs that grow from the larger clusters have diameters that are similar to the cluster diameter, whereas the smaller clusters, which have diameters less than 0.5 nm, nucleate nanotubes that are approximately 0.6-0.7 nm in diameter. This is in agreement with the experimental observations that SWNT diameters are similar to the catalyst particle diameter, and that the narrowest free-standing SWNT is 0.6-0.7 nm.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of the catalyst particle size dependence on carbon nanotube growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feng; Rosén, Arne; Bolton, Kim

    2004-08-01

    The molecular dynamics method, based on an empirical potential energy surface, was used to study the effect of catalyst particle size on the growth mechanism and structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The temperature for nanotube nucleation (800-1100 K), which occurs on the surface of the cluster, is similar to that used in catalyst chemical vapor deposition experiments, and the growth mechanism, which is described within the vapor-liquid-solid model, is the same for all cluster sizes studied here (iron clusters containing between 10 and 200 atoms were simulated). Large catalyst particles, which contain at least 20 iron atoms, nucleate SWNTs that have a far better tubular structure than SWNTs nucleated from smaller clusters. In addition, the SWNTs that grow from the larger clusters have diameters that are similar to the cluster diameter, whereas the smaller clusters, which have diameters less than 0.5 nm, nucleate nanotubes that are ≈0.6-0.7 nm in diameter. This is in agreement with the experimental observations that SWNT diameters are similar to the catalyst particle diameter, and that the narrowest free-standing SWNT is 0.6-0.7 nm.

  12. De novo synthesis of a narrow size distribution low-molecular-weight heparin

    PubMed Central

    Chandarajoti, Kasemsiri; Xu, Yongmei; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Key, Nigel S; Pawlinski, Rafal; Liu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Heparin, a commonly used anticoagulant drug, is a mixture of highly sulfated polysaccharides with various molecular weights (MWs). The unique sulfation pattern dictates the anticoagulant activity of heparin. Commercial heparins are categorized into three forms according to their average MW: unfractionated heparin (UFH, MWavg 14,000), low-MW heparin (LMWH, MWavg 3500–6500) and the synthetic pentasaccharide (fondaparinux, MW 1508.3). UFH is isolated from porcine intestine while LMWH is derived from UFH by various methods of depolymerization, which generate a wide range of oligosaccharide chain lengths. Different degradation methods result in structurally distinct LMWH products, displaying different pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties. In this report, we utilized a chemoenzymatic method to synthesize LMWH with the emphasis on controlling the size distribution of the oligosaccharides. A tetrasaccharide primer and a controlled enzyme-based polymerization were employed to build a narrow size oligosaccharide backbone. The oligosaccharide backbones were further modified by a series of sulfation and epimerization steps in order to obtain a full anticoagulation activity. Determination of the anticoagulation activity in vitro and ex vivo indicated that the synthetic LMWH has higher potency than enoxaparin, a commercial LMWH drug in clinical usage. PMID:24626379

  13. A comparative analysis of different molecular targets using PCR for diagnosis of old world leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Koltas, Ismail S; Eroglu, Fadime; Uzun, Soner; Alabaz, Derya

    2016-05-01

    The different sensitivity values were obtained in each study conducted for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, a standardized PCR target for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis does not exist. The aim of the current study, the most ideal PCR target was determined for diagnosis of leishmaniasis. A total of 72 smear and 48 bone marrow samples were analyzed with six different molecular targets to determine their potential as a tool for the specific molecular diagnosis of leishmaniasis using PCR. The positivity-negativity value and the sensitivity-specificity of each PCR targets were calculated. The positivity value of PCR targets were sequenced in different levels in the diagnosis of leishmaniasis from highest to lowest in the order of kDNA-PCR > SSU rRNA-PCR > ITS2-PCR > ITS1-PCR > ME-PCR > HSP70-PCR. The sensitivities of PCR targets except ITS1-PCR, ME-PCR and HSP70-PCR were found to be 100% in cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) cases as compared to microscopic examination accepted as a gold standard. The sensitivities of ITS1-PCR, ME-PCR and HSP70-PCR were found 96.6%, 90.0% and 86.6%, respectively, in CL-cases. In addition, the sensitivities of ITS1-PCR, ME-PCR and HSP70-PCR were found 90.0%, 70.0% and 60.0%, respectively, in VL-cases. The kDNA genomic region was the most sensitive for routine diagnosis of leishmaniasis. ITS1-PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism, the alternative method for the identification of Old World Leishmania species, did not require culturing of the parasites.

  14. The effect of age, movement direction, and target size on the maximum speed of targeted COP movements in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Manuel E.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid center of pressure (COP) movements are often required to avoid falls. Little is known about the effect of age on rapid and accurate volitional COP movements. We hypothesized that COP movements to a target would be slower and exhibit more submovements in older versus younger adults, particularly in posterior versus anterior movements. Healthy older (N = 12, mean age = 76 years) and young women (N = 13, mean age = 23 years) performed anterior and posterior lean movements while standing on a force plate, and were instructed to move their COP ‘as fast and as accurately as possible’ using visual feedback. The results show that rapid posterior COP movements were slower and had an increased number of submovements and ratio of peak-to-average velocity, in comparison to anterior movements (p < .005). Moreover, older compared to younger adults were 27% slower and utilized nearly twice as many compensatory submovements (p < .005), particularly when moving posteriorly (p < .05). Older women also had higher ratios of peak-to-average COP velocity than young (p < .05). Thus, despite moving more slowly, older women needed to take more frequent submovements to maintain COP accuracy, particularly posteriorly, thereby providing evidence of a compensatory strategy that may be used for preventing backward falls. PMID:22225924

  15. The effect of age, movement direction, and target size on the maximum speed of targeted COP movements in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Manuel E; Ashton-Miller, James A; Alexander, Neil B

    2012-10-01

    Rapid center of pressure (COP) movements are often required to avoid falls. Little is known about the effect of age on rapid and accurate volitional COP movements. We hypothesized that COP movements to a target would be slower and exhibit more submovements in older versus younger adults, particularly in posterior versus anterior movements. Healthy older (N=12, mean age=76 years) and young women (N=13, mean age=23 years) performed anterior and posterior lean movements while standing on a force plate, and were instructed to move their COP 'as fast and as accurately as possible' using visual feedback. The results showed that rapid posterior COP movements were slower and had an increased number of submovements and ratio of peak-to-average velocity, in comparison to anterior movements (p<.005). Moreover, older compared to younger adults were 27% slower and utilized nearly twice as many compensatory submovements (p<.005), particularly when moving posteriorly (p<.05). Older women also had higher ratios of peak-to-average COP velocity than young (p<.05). Thus, despite moving more slowly, older women needed to take more frequent submovements to maintain COP accuracy, particularly posteriorly, thereby providing evidence of a compensatory strategy that may be used for preventing backward falls.

  16. Effects of Microbubble Size on Ultrasound-Induced Transdermal Delivery of High-Molecular-Weight Drugs.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Ho, Hsin-Chiao; Lin, Yi-Chun; Chen, Hang-Kang; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2015-01-01

    The transdermal delivery of a wide range of high-molecular-weight drugs is limited by the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis representing a significant barrier to penetration across the skin. This study first determined the different effects of different-size ultrasound (US) contrast agents and microbubbles (MBs) for enhancing the transdermal delivery of high-molecular-weight drugs. The effects of US-mediated different-size (1.4, 2.1, and 3.5 μm) MBs (as a contrast agent) and ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate (VC-IP) on enhancing skin transdermal delivery were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that at a power density of 3 W/cm2 the penetration depth in group US combined with 3.5-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+3.5) was 34% and 14% higher than those in groups US combined with 1.4-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+1.4) and US combined with 2.1-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+2.1), respectively, for the agarose phantoms, while the corresponding increases for pigskin were 37% and 19%.In terms of the skin permeation of VC-IP, the VC-IP concentration in group U+3.5 was 23% and 10% higher in than those in groups U+1.4 and U+2.1, respectively. The whitening effect (luminosity index) of mice skin in group U+3.5 had increased (significantly) by 28% after 1 week, by 34% after 2 weeks, and tended to stabilize after 3 weeks (45%) in C57BL/6J mice over a 4-week experimental period. The results obtained in this study indicate that combining US with MBs of different sizes can produce different degrees of skin permeability so as to enhance the delivery of VC-IP to inhibit melanogenesis, without damaging the skin in mice. PMID:26390051

  17. Effects of Microbubble Size on Ultrasound-Induced Transdermal Delivery of High-Molecular-Weight Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Ho, Hsin-Chiao; Lin, Yi-Chun; Chen, Hang-Kang; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2015-01-01

    The transdermal delivery of a wide range of high-molecular-weight drugs is limited by the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis representing a significant barrier to penetration across the skin. This study first determined the different effects of different-size ultrasound (US) contrast agents and microbubbles (MBs) for enhancing the transdermal delivery of high-molecular-weight drugs. The effects of US-mediated different-size (1.4, 2.1, and 3.5 μm) MBs (as a contrast agent) and ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate (VC-IP) on enhancing skin transdermal delivery were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that at a power density of 3 W/cm2 the penetration depth in group US combined with 3.5-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+3.5) was 34% and 14% higher than those in groups US combined with 1.4-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+1.4) and US combined with 2.1-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+2.1), respectively, for the agarose phantoms, while the corresponding increases for pigskin were 37% and 19%.In terms of the skin permeation of VC-IP, the VC-IP concentration in group U+3.5 was 23% and 10% higher in than those in groups U+1.4 and U+2.1, respectively. The whitening effect (luminosity index) of mice skin in group U+3.5 had increased (significantly) by 28% after 1 week, by 34% after 2 weeks, and tended to stabilize after 3 weeks (45%) in C57BL/6J mice over a 4-week experimental period. The results obtained in this study indicate that combining US with MBs of different sizes can produce different degrees of skin permeability so as to enhance the delivery of VC-IP to inhibit melanogenesis, without damaging the skin in mice. PMID:26390051

  18. Conceptual Design of Low Pressure, 300 degree K Fill System for Ignition Target Capsules with Micron Size Fill Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J J

    2003-09-26

    A conceptual design for a low pressure, room temperature, fill system suitable for ignition target capsules is described. The fill system relies on the use of a 5-10 micron diameter fill tube connecting directly the target capsule to a DT fuel reservoir. The design uses a small reservoir to store the DT fuel at room temperature within the target assembly. A model of the design is developed and used to calculate reservoir size, layer thickness control, and control sensitivity. A procedure to fill the target in-situ after cooling the assembly to cryogenic temperatures using temperature control of the reservoir is also described. The effects of He3 generation and fuel contamination are also discussed.

  19. Peptide targeted tripod macrocyclic Gd(III) chelates for cancer molecular MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Wu, Xueming; Kresak, Adam; Griswold, Mark; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2013-10-01

    Rational design and develop of targeted contrast agents binding to cancer-related proteins will achieve more accurate cancer diagnosis and prognosis by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. CREKA is a tumor-homing pentapeptide (Cys-Arg-Glu-Lys-Ala) specifically homes to fibrin-fibronectin complexes abundantly expressed in tumor microenvironment. In this study, we developed and evaluated a CREKA peptide targeted multiplexed Gd-MR probe (CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)3) for MR imaging of breast tumors. CREKA and azide bearing Gd(III) was attached to a maleimide-functional trialkyne scaffold via thiol-maleimide and azide-alkyne click chemistry, respectively. CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)3 has a well-defined structure with a molecular weight of 2914 Da. The T1 relaxivity of CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)3 is 8.06 mM(-1) s(-1) per Gd (24.18 mM(-1) s(-1) per molecule) at room temperature and 3 T. Fluorescence imaging showed high binding specificity of CREKA to a 4T1 breast tumor model in mice while it was not found for the scrambled CREKA (CERAK). The CREKA peptide-targeted contrast agent resulted in greater contrast enhancement than the corresponding CERAK agent and the commercialized contrast agent ProHance(®) in tumor at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg in female athymic mice bearing 4T1 breast carcinoma xenograft. This small molecular contrast agent was easily excreted from body after imaging indicated low toxicity. The targeted MRI contrast agent has a potential for specific cancer molecular imaging with MRI.

  20. Mammaglobin as a potential molecular target for breast cancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lian; Li, Ly; Wang, Qian; Fleming, Timothy P; You, Shaojin

    2009-01-01

    Background Mammaglobin (MAM) has been used as a specific molecular marker for breast cancer diagnosis. Recently, several groups of researchers proposed a number of therapeutic strategies targeting this molecule. Some of the strategies are based upon an essential but not demonstrated hypothesis – mammaglobin is associated with the surface of breast cancer cells, which strongly disputes the therapeutic strategies. Results We conducted a computer-based predictive analysis and identified a small fragment at the N-end of MAM as a potential transmembrane domain. We provided several evidences to demonstrate the presence of the membrane-associated MAM. We isolated the membrane protein components from known MAM positive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB361 and MDA-MB415). We showed that about 22–64% of MAM proteins, depending upon the types of the cancer cells, directly attached on the membrane of breast cancer cells, by Western blotting assays. To directly visualize the presence of the membrane-bound MAM protein, we incubated the MAM positive cancer cells with FITC labeled anti-MAM antibody, and observed clear fluorescent signals on the surface of the cells. In studying the MAM protein distribution in human breast cancer tissues, we first identified two immunostain patterns that are associated with the membrane-bound MAM: the membrane stain pattern and luminary surface stain pattern. To test whether the membrane-associated MAM can serve as a molecular target for drug delivery, we conjugated anti-MAM antibody to human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and loaded doxorubicin (Dox) in the core of LDL. Specific binding and cytotoxicity of the MAM targeted and Dox loaded LDL was tested in the MAM positive breast cancer cells in vitro. Conclusion We first showed that some of MAM protein directly associated with the surface of breast cancer cells. The membrane-associated MAM protein may be utilized as a useful molecular marker for breast cancer targeted drug delivery. PMID:19309500

  1. Peptide Targeted Tripod Macrocyclic Gd(III) Chelates for Cancer Molecular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Wu, Xueming; Kresak, Adam; Griswold, Mark; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Rational design and develop of targeted contrast agents binding to cancer-related proteins will achieve more accurate cancer diagnosis and prognosis by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. CREKA is a tumor-homing pentapeptide (Cys-Arg-Glu-Lys-Ala) specifically homes to fibrin-fibronectin complexes abundantly expressed in tumor microenvironment. In this study, we developed and evaluated a CREKA peptide targeted multiplexed Gd-MR probe (CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)) for MR imaging of breast tumors. CREKA and azide bearing Gd(III) was attached to a maleimide-functional trialkyne scaffold via thiol-maleimide and azide-alkyne click chemistry, respectively. CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA) has a well-defined structure with a molecular weight of 2914 Da. The T1 relaxivity of CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA) is 8.06 mM-1s-1 per Gd (24.18 mM-1s-1 per molecule) at room temperature and 3 T. Fluorescence imaging showed high binding specificity of CREKA to a 4T1 breast tumor model in mice while it was not found for the scrambled CREKA (CERAK). The CREKA peptide-targeted contrast agent resulted in greater contrast enhancement than the corresponding CERAK agent and the commercialized contrast agent Prohance™ in tumor at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg in female athymic mice bearing 4T1 breast carcinoma xenograft. This small molecular contrast agent was easily excreted from body after imaging indicated low toxicity. The targeted MRI contrast agent has a potential for specific cancer molecular imaging with MRI. PMID:23863450

  2. The combination of novel targeted molecular agents and radiation in the treatment of pediatric gliomas.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Tina; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumors are the most common solid pediatric malignancy. For high-grade, recurrent, or refractory pediatric brain tumors, radiation therapy (XRT) is an integral treatment modality. In the era of personalized cancer therapy, molecularly targeted agents have been designed to inhibit pathways critical to tumorigenesis. Our evolving knowledge of genetic aberrations in pediatric gliomas is being exploited with the use of specific targeted inhibitors. These agents are additionally being combined with XRT to increase the efficacy and duration of local control. In this review, we discuss novel agents targeting three different pathways in gliomas, and their potential combination with XRT. BRAF is a serine/threonine kinase in the RAS/RAF/MAPK kinase pathway, which is integral to cellular division, survival, and metabolism. Two-thirds of pilocytic astrocytomas, a low-grade pediatric glioma, contain a translocation within the BRAF gene called KIAA1549:BRAF that causes an overactivation of the MEK/MAPK signaling cascade. In vitro and in vivo data support the use of MEK or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors in low-grade gliomas expressing this translocation. Additionally, 15-20% of high-grade pediatric gliomas express BRAF V600E, an activating mutation of the BRAF gene. Pre-clinical in vivo and in vitro data in BRAF V600E gliomas demonstrate dramatic cooperation between XRT and small molecule inhibitors of BRAF V600E. Another major signaling cascade that plays a role in pediatric glioma pathogenesis is the PI3-kinase (PI3K)/mTOR pathway, known to be upregulated in the majority of high- and low-grade pediatric gliomas. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors are in clinical trials for adult high-grade gliomas and are poised to enter studies of pediatric tumors. Finally, many brain tumors express potent stimulators of angiogenesis that render them refractory to treatment. An analog of thalidomide, CC-5103 increases the secretion of critical cytokines of the tumor

  3. A multi-array competitive immunoassay for the detection of broad-range molecular size organic compounds relevant for astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Näke, Christian; Rivas, Luis A.; García-Villadangos, Miriam; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Parro, Víctor

    2006-12-01

    We have developed antibodies and a multi-array competitive immunoassay (MACIA) for the detection of a wide range of molecular size compounds, from single aromatic ring derivatives or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), through small peptides, proteins or whole cells (spores). Multiple microarrays containing target molecules are used simultaneously to run several competitive immunoassays. The sensitivity of the MACIA for small organic compounds like naphthalene, 4-phenilphenol or 4-tertbutilphenol is in the range of 100-500 ppb (ng ml -1), for others like the insecticide terbutryn it is at the ppt (ng l -1) level, while for small peptides, as well as for more complex molecules like the protein thioredoxin, the sensitivity is approximately 1-2 ppb, or 10 4-10 5 spores of Bacillus subtilis per milliliter. For organic compounds, a water-methanol solution was used in order to achieve a better dissolution of the organics without compromising the antibody-antigen interaction. The above-mentioned compounds were detected by MACIA in water-(10%) methanol extracts from spiked pyrite and hematite-containing rock powder samples, as well as from a spiked-sand sample subjected to organic extraction with dichloromethane-methanol (1/1).

  4. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with an Integrin Targeted Microbubble Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher R.; Hu, Xiaowen; Tlaxca, Jose; Decleves, Anne-Emilie; Houghtaling, Robert; Sharma, Kumar; Lawrence, Michael; Ferrara, Katherine; Rychak, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Ultrasound molecular imaging is an emerging technique for sensitive detection of intravascular targets. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis has strong potential for both clinical use and as a research tool in tumor biology and the development of anti-angiogenic therapies. Our objective is to develop a robust microbubble (MB) ultrasound contrast agent platform to which targeting ligands can be conjugated by biocompatible, covalent conjugation chemistry, and to develop a pure low mechanical index imaging processing method and corresponding quantifying method. The microbubbles and the imaging methods were evaluated in a mouse model of breast cancer in vivo. Materials and Methods We utilized a cyclic RGD (cRGD) pentapeptide containing a terminal cysteine group conjugated to the surface of MB bearing pyridyldithio-propionate (PDP) for targeting αvβ3 integrins. As negative controls, MB without a ligand or MB bearing a scrambled sequence (cRAD) were prepared. To enable characterization of peptides bound to MB surfaces, the cRGD peptide was labeled with FITC and detected by plate fluorometry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy. Targeted adhesion of cRGD-MB was demonstrated in an in vitro flow adhesion assay against recombinant murine αvβ3 integrin protein and αvβ3 integrin-expressing endothelial cells (bEnd.3). The specificity of cRGD-MB for αvβ3 integrin was demonstrated by treating bEnd.3 EC with a blocking antibody. A murine model of mammary carcinoma was used to assess targeted adhesion and ultrasound molecular imaging in vivo. The targeted microbubbles were visualized using a low mechanical index contrast imaging pulse sequence, and quantified by intensity normalization and two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis, Results The cRGD ligand concentration on the MB surface was ~8.2 × 106 molecules/MB. At a wall shear stress of 1.0 dynes/cm2, cRGD-MB exhibited 5-fold higher adhesion to immobilized recombinant αvβ3 integrin

  5. Specific binding of molecularly targeted agents to pancreas tumors and impact on observed optical contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hextrum, Shannon K.; Pardesi, Omar; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-02-01

    In optical imaging it is thought that optimum tumor contrast can be achieved with the use of small-labeled molecular tracers that have high affinity to their targets and fast clearance rates from the blood stream and healthy tissues. An example of this is fluorescently tagged EGF to monitor the molecular activity of tumors, such as pancreatic cancer. Extensive fluorescence contrast analysis for fluorescence molecular tomography has been performed on the AsPC-1 pancreas tumor, grown orthotopically in mice; yet, the binding dynamics of the EGF-fluorescent agent in vivo is not completely known. The bulk pancreatic tumor displays 3:1 contrast relative to the normal pancreas at long times after injection; however, even higher levels of fluorescence in the liver, kidney and intestine suggest that molecular specificity for the tumor may be low. Mice were administered a fluorescently labeled EGF agent and were sacrificed at various time points post-injection. To analyze the amount of specific binding at each time point frozen tissue samples were fluorescently imaged, washed with saline to remove the interstitially distributed contrast agent, and then imaged again. This technique demonstrated that approximately ~10% of the molecular target was firmly bound to the cell, while 90% was mobile or unbound. This low binding ratio suggests that the contrast observed is from inherent properties of the tumor (i.e. enhanced permeability and retention effect) and not from specific bound contrast as previously anticipated. The use of EGF contrast agents in MRI-guided fluorescence tomography and the impact of low binding specificity are discussed.

  6. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  7. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane. PMID:2657842

  8. In situ relations of target strength to fish size for Great Lakes pelagic planktivores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, Guy W.; Argyle, Ray L.; Curtis, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    We found mean target strength to be a reliable in situ predictor of fish weight, which allows direct estimation of the pelagic planktivore fish biomass from target strength measurements. Fish were collected by midwater trawling concurrent with target strength measurements (120-kHz frequency) in Lake Michigan. The mean weight of fish caught ranged from 2 to 71 g and mean target strength ranged from –54.9 to –38.0 decibels. Changes in mean target strength explained 73% of the variability in mean weight for combinations of various planktivore species, principally rainbow smelt Osrnerus mordax, bloaters Coregonus hovi, and alewives Alosa pseudoharengus. Bloaters were found to be less acoustically reflective than the other pelagic species, and a linear regression model with a classification variable was used to predict weight from target strength for bloaters and for the other species. We demonstrated that variations in the backscattering properties of different fish species must be considered to obtain accurate acoustic-based estimates of fish biomass.

  9. Site-targeted acoustic contrast agent detects molecular expression of tissue factor after balloon angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher S.; Abendschein, Dana R.; Scherrer, David E.; Scott, Michael J.; Marsh, Jon N.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2000-04-01

    Complex molecular signaling heralds the early stages of pathologies such as angiogenesis, inflammation, and cellular responses to mechanically damaged coronary arteries after balloon angioplasty. In previous studies, we have demonstrated acoustic enhancement of blood clot morphology with the use of a nongaseous, ligand-targeted acoustic nanoparticle emulsion delivered to areas of thrombosis both in vitro and in vivo. In this paper, we characterize the early expression of tissue factor which contributes to subsequent arterial restenosis. Tissue factor is a 42kd glycoprotein responsible for blood coagulation but also plays a well-described role in cancer metastasis, angiogenesis, and vascular restenosis. This study was designed to determine whether the targeted contrast agent could localize tissue factor expressed within the wall of balloon-injured arteries. Both carotid arteries of five pigs (20 kg) were injured using an 8 X 20 mm angioplasty balloon. The carotids were treated in situ with a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle emulsion covalently complexed to either specific anti-tissue factor polyclonal F(ab) fragments (treatment) or non-specific IgG F(ab) fragments (control). Intravascular ultrasound (30 MHz) images of the arteries were obtained before and after exposure to the emulsions. Tissue- factor targeted ultrasonic contrast agent acoustically enhanced the subintima and media at the site of balloon- induced injury compared with control contrast arteries (p less than 0.05). Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of increased tissue factor at the sites of acoustic enhancement. Binding of the targeted agents was demonstrated in vitro by scanning electron microscope images of cultured smooth muscle cells that constitutively express tissue factor. This study demonstrates the concept of molecular imaging and localization of carotid arteries' tissue factor in vivo using a new, nanoparticulate emulsion. Enhancement of the visualization of the molecular

  10. Cell size control in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jonathan J.; Ewald, Jennifer C.; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Cell size is an important adaptive trait that influences nearly all aspects of cellular physiology. Despite extensive characterization of the cell cycle regulatory network, the molecular mechanismscoupling growth to division, and thereby controlling cell size, have remained elusive. Recent workin yeast has reinvigorated the size control field and suggested provocative mechanisms forthe distinct functions of setting and sensing cell size. Further examination of size sensing models based on spatial gradients and molecular titration, coupled with elucidation of the pathways responsible for nutrient-modulated target size, may reveal the fundamental principles of eukaryotic cell size control. PMID:22575477

  11. The Molecular Phenotype of Endocapillary Proliferation: Novel Therapeutic Targets for IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    John, Rohan; Grone, Elisabeth; Porubsky, Stefan; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Herzenberg, Andrew M.; Scholey, James W.; Hladunewich, Michelle; Cattran, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous disease. Endocapillary proliferation is associated with higher risk of progressive disease, and clinical studies suggest that corticosteroids mitigate this risk. However, corticosteroids are associated with protean cellular effects and significant toxicity. Furthermore the precise mechanism by which they modulate kidney injury in IgAN is not well delineated. To better understand molecular pathways involved in the development of endocapillary proliferation and to identify novel specific therapeutic targets, we evaluated the glomerular transcriptome of microdissected kidney biopsies from 22 patients with IgAN. Endocapillary proliferation was defined according to the Oxford scoring system independently by 3 nephropathologists. We analyzed mRNA expression using microarrays and identified transcripts differentially expressed in patients with endocapillary proliferation compared to IgAN without endocapillary lesions. Next, we employed both transcription factor analysis and in silico drug screening and confirmed that the endocapillary proliferation transcriptome is significantly enriched with pathways that can be impacted by corticosteroids. With this approach we also identified novel therapeutic targets and bioactive small molecules that may be considered for therapeutic trials for the treatment of IgAN, including resveratrol and hydroquinine. In summary, we have defined the distinct molecular profile of a pathologic phenotype associated with progressive renal insufficiency in IgAN. Exploration of the pathways associated with endocapillary proliferation confirms a molecular basis for the clinical effectiveness of corticosteroids in this subgroup of IgAN, and elucidates new therapeutic strategies for IgAN. PMID:25133636

  12. Target Product Profile of a Molecular Drug-Susceptibility Test for Use in Microscopy Centers

    PubMed Central

    Denkinger, Claudia M.; Dolinger, David; Schito, Marco; Wells, William; Cobelens, Frank; Pai, Madhukar; Zignol, Matteo; Cirillo, Daniela Maria; Alland, David; Casenghi, Martina; Gallarda, Jim; Boehme, Catharina C.; Perkins, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Current phenotypic testing for drug resistance in patients with tuberculosis is inadequate primarily with respect to turnaround time. Molecular tests hold the promise of an improved time to diagnosis. Methods. A target product profile for a molecular drug-susceptibility test (DST) was developed on the basis of a collaborative effort that included opinions gathered from researchers, clinicians, policy makers, and test developers on optimal clinical and operational characteristics in settings of intended use. In addition, the current diagnostic ecosystem and the diagnostic development landscape were mapped. Results. Molecular DSTs for detecting tuberculosis in microscopy centers should ideally evaluate for resistance to rifampin, fluoroquinolones, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide and enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen. Performance characteristics of DSTs need to be optimized, but compromises can be made that depend on the trade-off between a false-positive result and a false-negative result. The operational requirements of a test will vary depending on the site of implementation. However, the most-important considerations pertain to quality control, maintenance and calibration, and the ability to export data. Conclusion. This target product profile defines the needs as perceived by the tuberculosis stakeholder community and attempts to provide a means of communication with test developers to ensure that fit-for-purpose DSTs are being developed. PMID:25765105

  13. Cell signalling in insulin secretion: the molecular targets of ATP, cAMP and sulfonylurea.

    PubMed

    Seino, S

    2012-08-01

    Clarification of the molecular mechanisms of insulin secretion is crucial for understanding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of diabetes and for development of novel therapeutic strategies for the disease. Insulin secretion is regulated by various intracellular signals generated by nutrients and hormonal and neural inputs. In addition, a variety of glucose-lowering drugs including sulfonylureas, glinide-derivatives, and incretin-related drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are used for glycaemic control by targeting beta cell signalling for improved insulin secretion. There has been a remarkable increase in our understanding of the basis of beta cell signalling over the past two decades following the application of molecular biology, gene technology, electrophysiology and bioimaging to beta cell research. This review discusses cell signalling in insulin secretion, focusing on the molecular targets of ATP, cAMP and sulfonylurea, an essential metabolic signal in glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS), a critical signal in the potentiation of GIIS, and the commonly used glucose-lowering drug, respectively.

  14. Searching for life on Mars: selection of molecular targets for ESA's aurora ExoMars mission.

    PubMed

    Parnell, John; Cullen, David; Sims, Mark R; Bowden, Stephen; Cockell, Charles S; Court, Richard; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Gaubert, Francois; Grant, William; Parro, Victor; Rohmer, Michel; Sephton, Mark; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Steele, Andrew; Toporski, Jan; Vago, Jorge

    2007-08-01

    The European Space Agency's ExoMars mission will seek evidence of organic compounds of biological and non-biological origin at the martian surface. One of the instruments in the Pasteur payload may be a Life Marker Chip that utilizes an immunoassay approach to detect specific organic molecules or classes of molecules. Therefore, it is necessary to define and prioritize specific molecular targets for antibody development. Target compounds have been selected to represent meteoritic input, fossil organic matter, extant (living, recently dead) organic matter, and contamination. Once organic molecules are detected on Mars, further information is likely to derive from the detailed distribution of compounds rather than from single molecular identification. This will include concentration gradients beneath the surface and gradients from generic to specific compounds. The choice of biomarkers is informed by terrestrial biology but is wide ranging, and nonterrestrial biology may be evident from unexpected molecular distributions. One of the most important requirements is to sample where irradiation and oxidation are minimized, either by drilling or by using naturally excavated exposures. Analyzing regolith samples will allow for the search of both extant and fossil biomarkers, but sequential extraction would be required to optimize the analysis of each of these in turn. PMID:17723091

  15. Metastasis promoter S100A4 is a potentially valuable molecular target for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sherbet, G V

    2009-07-18

    The growth, invasion and metastatic spread of cancer have been identified with the deregulation of cell proliferation, altered intercellular and cell-substratum adhesion and enhanced motility and the deposition of disseminated cancer cells at distant sites. The identification of therapeutic targets for cancer is crucial to human welfare. Drug development, molecular modelling and design of effective drugs greatly depend upon the identification of suitable therapeutic targets. Several genetic determinants relating to proliferation and growth, invasion and metastasis have been identified. S100A4 appears to be able to activate and integrate pathways to generate the phenotypic responses that are characteristic of cancer. S100A4 signalling can focus on factors associated with normal and aberrant proliferation, apoptosis and growth, and differentiation. It is able to activate signalling pathways leading to the remodelling of the cell membrane and the extracellular matrix; modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics, acquisition of invasiveness and induction of angiogenesis. Therefore S100A4 is arguably a molecular target of considerable potential possessing a wide ranging biological activity that can alter and regulate the major phenotypic features of cancer. The evolution of an appropriate strategy that permits the identification of therapeutic targets most likely to be effective in the disease process without unduly affecting normal biological processes and function is an incontrovertible imperative. By virtue of its ability to activate interacting and multi-functional signalling systems, S100A4 appears to offer suitable targets for developing new therapeutic procedures. Some effectors of the S100A4-activated pathways might also lend themselves as foci of therapeutic interest.

  16. Molecular targeted therapy in enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: from biology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Fazio, N; Scarpa, A; Falconi, M

    2014-01-01

    Advanced enteropancreatic (EP) neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with several different therapies, including chemotherapy, biotherapy, and locoregional treatments. Over the last few decades, impressive progress has been made in the biotherapy field. Three main druggable molecular targets have been studied and developed in terms of therapy: somatostatin receptor (sstr), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and angiogenic factors. In particular, research has moved from the old somatostatin analogs (SSAs), such as octreotide (OCT) and lanreotide (LAN), specifically binding to the sstr-2, to the newer pasireotide (PAS), which presents a wider sstr spectrum. Over the last ten years, several molecular targeted agents (MTAs) have been studied in phase II trials, and very few of them have reached phase III. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the multitargeted inhibitor sunitinib have been approved for clinical use by the FDA and EMA in advanced well/moderately-differentiated (WD, MD) progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), on the basis of the positive results of two international large randomized phase III trials vs. placebo. Bevacizumab has been studied in a large US phase III trial vs. interferon (IFN)-alfa2b, and results are pending. In this review, the biological and clinical aspects of MTAs introduced into clinical practice or which are currently in an advanced phase of clinical investigation are addressed.

  17. Targeted next-generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Christopher P.; Koehler, Jeffrey W.; Minogue, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is an epidemic of increasing magnitude requiring rapid identification and profiling for appropriate and timely therapeutic measures and containment strategies. In this context, ciprofloxacin is part of the first-line of countermeasures against numerous high consequence bacteria. Significant resistance can occur via single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and deletions within ciprofloxacin targeted genes. Ideally, use of ciprofloxacin would be prefaced with AR determination to avoid overuse or misuse of the antibiotic. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of a panel of 44 single-stranded molecular inversion probes (MIPs) coupled to next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the detection of genetic variants known to confer ciprofloxacin resistance in Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. Sequencing results demonstrate MIPs capture and amplify targeted regions of interest at significant levels of coverage. Depending on the genetic variant, limits of detection (LOD) for high-throughput pooled sequencing ranged from approximately 300–1800 input genome copies. LODs increased 10-fold in the presence of contaminating human genome DNA. In addition, we show that MIPs can be used as an enrichment step with high resolution melt (HRM) real-time PCR which is a sensitive assay with a rapid time-to-answer. Overall, this technology is a multiplexable upfront enrichment applicable with multiple downstream molecular assays for the detection of targeted genetic regions. PMID:27174456

  18. Fluorescent-Guided Surgical Resection of Glioma with Targeted Molecular Imaging Agents: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Craig, Sonya E L; Wright, James; Sloan, Andrew E; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2016-06-01

    The median life expectancy after a diagnosis of glioblastoma is 15 months. Although chemotherapeutics may someday cure glioblastoma by killing the highly dispersive malignant cells, the most important contribution that clinicians can currently offer to improve survival is by maximizing the extent of resection and providing concurrent chemo-radiation, which has become standard. Strides have been made in this area with the advent and implementation of methods of improved intraoperative tumor visualization. One of these techniques, optical fluorescent imaging with targeted molecular imaging agents, allows the surgeon to view fluorescently labeled tumor tissue during surgery with the use of special microscopy, thereby highlighting where to resect and indicating when tumor-free margins have been obtained. This advantage is especially important at the difficult-to-observe margins where tumor cells infiltrate normal tissue. Targeted fluorescent agents also may be valuable for identifying tumor versus nontumor tissue. In this review, we briefly summarize nontargeted fluorescent tumor imaging agents before discussing several novel targeted fluorescent agents being developed for glioma imaging in the context of fluorescent-guided surgery or live molecular navigation. Many of these agents are currently undergoing preclinical testing. As the agents become available, however, it is necessary to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each. PMID:26915698

  19. Target Definition in Salvage Radiotherapy for Recurrent Prostate Cancer: The Role of Advanced Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Amzalag, Gaël; Rager, Olivier; Tabouret-Viaud, Claire; Wissmeyer, Michael; Sfakianaki, Electra; de Perrot, Thomas; Ratib, Osman; Miralbell, Raymond; Giovacchini, Giampiero; Garibotto, Valentina; Zilli, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) represents the main treatment option for relapsing prostate cancer in patients after radical prostatectomy. Several open questions remain unanswered in terms of target volumes definition and delivered doses for SRT: the effective dose necessary to achieve biochemical control in the SRT setting may be different if the tumor recurrence is micro- or macroscopic. At the same time, irradiation of only the prostatic bed or of the whole pelvis will depend on the localization of the recurrence, local or locoregional. In the “theragnostic imaging” era, molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) constitutes a useful tool for clinicians to define the site of the recurrence, the extent of disease, and individualize salvage treatments. The best option currently available in clinical routine is the combination of radiolabeled choline PET imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), associating the nodal and distant metastases identification based on PET with the local assessment by MRI. A new generation of targeted tracers, namely, prostate-specific membrane antigen, show promising results, with a contrast superior to choline imaging and a higher detection rate even for low prostate-specific antigen levels; validation studies are ongoing. Finally, imaging targeting bone remodeling, using whole-body SPECT–CT, is a relevant complement to molecular/metabolic PET imaging when bone involvement is suspected. PMID:27065024

  20. Oncogenic miR-544 is an important molecular target in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Qiaoming; Guo, Xiaobo; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Rongjuan; Jiang, Jinling; Ji, Jun; Zhang, Jianian; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Xuehua; Cai, Qu; Li, Jianfang; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Zhenggang; Yu, Yingyan

    2013-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and promoter hypermethylation are vital epigenetic mechanisms for transcriptional inactivation of tumor suppressor. IRX1 is a newly identified tumor suppressor gene and hypermethylation involves the decreased expression in gastric cancer. However, the microRNA regulatory mechanism on IRX1 expression is still unclear. In this study, we report an IRX1-targeting miRNA-544, which directly targets 3'-UTR of IRX1 gene by luciferase reporter assay. miR-544 suppresses the protein expression of IRX1 gene by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Ectopic expression of miR-544 promotes cell proliferation and cell cycle progression significantly in vitro on gastric cancer cells. The study suggests that miR-544 is an oncogenic microRNA in gastric cancer. Over expression of miR-544 contributes to the inactivation and low-expression of IRX1 in gastric cancer. These findings are helpful for clarifying the molecular mechanisms involved in gastric carcinogenesis and indicate that miR-544 is a key regulator in switching cell cycle on or off. miR-544 may be a potential molecular target in miRNA-based strategy on gastric cancer.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi Invasion into Host Cells: A Complex Molecular Targets Interplay.

    PubMed

    Campo, Vanessa Leiria; Martins-Teixeira, Maristela Braga; Carvalho, Ivone

    2016-01-01

    Chagas' disease is still a worldwide threat, with estimated from 6 to 7 million infected people, mainly in Latin America. Despite all efforts, especially from international consortia (DNDi, NMTrypI), to develop an innovative therapeutic strategy against this disease, no candidate has achieved full requirements for clinical use yet. In this review, we point out the general molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in T. cruzi cell invasion and elucidate the roles of specific parasite and host targets in the progress of Chagas' disease. Among these molecular targets are Gp85/transsialidase, mucins, cruzipain and oligopeptidase B, found in parasite cell surface, and Galectin-3 and Toll-like receptors present in host cells. Thus, the deep understanding of their interplay and involvement on T. cruzi host cell adhesion, invasion and evasion from host immune may expand the chances for discovering new therapeutic agents against this neglected disease. Additionally, these targets may represent a remarkable strategy to block parasite invasion in the early stages of infection. PMID:27281167

  2. Molecular signature of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: an insight from genotype to phenotype and challenges for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ibrahim H; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; O’Reilly, Eileen M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains one of the most clinically challenging cancers despite an in-depth characterization of the molecular underpinnings and biology of this disease. Recent whole-genome-wide studies have elucidated the diverse and complex genetic alterations which generate a unique oncogenic signature for an individual pancreatic cancer patient and which may explain diverse disease behavior in a clinical setting. Areas covered In this review article, we discuss the key oncogenic pathways of pancreatic cancer including RAS-MAPK, PI3KCA and TGF-β signaling, as well as the impact of these pathways on the disease behavior and their potential targetability. The role of tumor suppressors particularly BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and their role in pancreatic cancer treatment are elaborated upon. We further review recent genomic studies and their impact on future pancreatic cancer treatment. Expert opinion Targeted therapies inhibiting pro-survival pathways have limited impact on pancreatic cancer outcomes. Activation of pro-apoptotic pathways along with suppression of cancer-stem-related pathways may reverse treatment resistance in pancreatic cancer. While targeted therapy or a ‘precision medicine’ approach in pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains an elusive challenge for the majority of patients, there is a real sense of optimism that the strides made in understanding the molecular underpinnings of this disease will translate into improved outcomes. PMID:26439702

  3. Ultrapotent vinblastines in which added molecular complexity further disrupts the target tubulin dimer-dimer interface.

    PubMed

    Carney, Daniel W; Lukesh, John C; Brody, Daniel M; Brütsch, Manuela M; Boger, Dale L

    2016-08-30

    Approaches to improving the biological properties of natural products typically strive to modify their structures to identify the essential pharmacophore, or make functional group changes to improve biological target affinity or functional activity, change physical properties, enhance stability, or introduce conformational constraints. Aside from accessible semisynthetic modifications of existing functional groups, rarely does one consider using chemical synthesis to add molecular complexity to the natural product. In part, this may be attributed to the added challenge intrinsic in the synthesis of an even more complex compound. Herein, we report synthetically derived, structurally more complex vinblastines inaccessible from the natural product itself that are a stunning 100-fold more active (IC50 values, 50-75 pM vs. 7 nM; HCT116), and that are now accessible because of advances in the total synthesis of the natural product. The newly discovered ultrapotent vinblastines, which may look highly unusual upon first inspection, bind tubulin with much higher affinity and likely further disrupt the tubulin head-to-tail α/β dimer-dimer interaction by virtue of the strategic placement of an added conformationally well-defined, rigid, and extended C20' urea along the adjacent continuing protein-protein interface. In this case, the added molecular complexity was used to markedly enhance target binding and functional biological activity (100-fold), and likely represents a general approach to improving the properties of other natural products targeting a protein-protein interaction. PMID:27512044

  4. Targeted next-generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Christopher P; Koehler, Jeffrey W; Minogue, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is an epidemic of increasing magnitude requiring rapid identification and profiling for appropriate and timely therapeutic measures and containment strategies. In this context, ciprofloxacin is part of the first-line of countermeasures against numerous high consequence bacteria. Significant resistance can occur via single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and deletions within ciprofloxacin targeted genes. Ideally, use of ciprofloxacin would be prefaced with AR determination to avoid overuse or misuse of the antibiotic. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of a panel of 44 single-stranded molecular inversion probes (MIPs) coupled to next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the detection of genetic variants known to confer ciprofloxacin resistance in Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. Sequencing results demonstrate MIPs capture and amplify targeted regions of interest at significant levels of coverage. Depending on the genetic variant, limits of detection (LOD) for high-throughput pooled sequencing ranged from approximately 300-1800 input genome copies. LODs increased 10-fold in the presence of contaminating human genome DNA. In addition, we show that MIPs can be used as an enrichment step with high resolution melt (HRM) real-time PCR which is a sensitive assay with a rapid time-to-answer. Overall, this technology is a multiplexable upfront enrichment applicable with multiple downstream molecular assays for the detection of targeted genetic regions. PMID:27174456

  5. Five miRNAs Considered as Molecular Targets for Predicting Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jia-ying; Wang, Fei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Xing-bo; Yang, Lei; Wang, Wei; Xu, Hao; Liu, Da-zhong; Zhang, Lin-you

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer (EC) is one of the most aggressive malignant gastrointestinal tumors; however the traditional therapies for EC are not effective enough. Great improvements are needed to explore new and valid treatments for EC. We aimed to screen the differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) in esophageal cancer and explore the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer along with functions and pathways of the target genes. Material/Methods miRNA high-throughput sequencing data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), then the DEMs underwent principal component analysis (PCA) based on their expression value. Following that, TargetScan software was used to predict the target genes, and enrichment analysis and pathway annotation of these target genes were done by DAVID and KEGG, respectively. Finally, survival analysis between the DEMs and patient survival time was done, and the miRNAs with prediction potential were identified. Results A total of 140 DEMs were obtained, 113 miRNAs were up-regulated including hsa-mir-153-2, hsa-mir-92a-1 and hsa-mir-182; while 27 miRNAs were down-regulated including hsa-mir comprising 29a, hsa-mir-100 and hsa-mir-139 and so on. Five miRNAs (hsa-mir-103-1, hsa-mir-18a, hsa-mir-324, hsa-mir-369 and hsa-mir-320b-2) with diagnostic and preventive potential were significantly correlated with survival time. Conclusions The crucial molecular targets such as p53 may provide great clinical value in treatment, as well to provide new ideas for esophageal cancer therapy. The target genes of miRNA were found to play key roles in protein phosphorylation, and the functions of the target genes during protein phosphorylation should be further studied to explore novel treatment of EC. PMID:26498375

  6. Sampling Enrichment toward Target Structures Using Hybrid Molecular Dynamics-Monte Carlo Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kecheng; Różycki, Bartosz; Cui, Fengchao; Shi, Ce; Chen, Wenduo; Li, Yunqi

    2016-01-01

    Sampling enrichment toward a target state, an analogue of the improvement of sampling efficiency (SE), is critical in both the refinement of protein structures and the generation of near-native structure ensembles for the exploration of structure-function relationships. We developed a hybrid molecular dynamics (MD)-Monte Carlo (MC) approach to enrich the sampling toward the target structures. In this approach, the higher SE is achieved by perturbing the conventional MD simulations with a MC structure-acceptance judgment, which is based on the coincidence degree of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) intensity profiles between the simulation structures and the target structure. We found that the hybrid simulations could significantly improve SE by making the top-ranked models much closer to the target structures both in the secondary and tertiary structures. Specifically, for the 20 mono-residue peptides, when the initial structures had the root-mean-squared deviation (RMSD) from the target structure smaller than 7 Å, the hybrid MD-MC simulations afforded, on average, 0.83 Å and 1.73 Å in RMSD closer to the target than the parallel MD simulations at 310K and 370K, respectively. Meanwhile, the average SE values are also increased by 13.2% and 15.7%. The enrichment of sampling becomes more significant when the target states are gradually detectable in the MD-MC simulations in comparison with the parallel MD simulations, and provide >200% improvement in SE. We also performed a test of the hybrid MD-MC approach in the real protein system, the results showed that the SE for 3 out of 5 real proteins are improved. Overall, this work presents an efficient way of utilizing solution SAXS to improve protein structure prediction and refinement, as well as the generation of near native structures for function annotation. PMID:27227775

  7. Sampling Enrichment toward Target Structures Using Hybrid Molecular Dynamics-Monte Carlo Simulations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kecheng; Różycki, Bartosz; Cui, Fengchao; Shi, Ce; Chen, Wenduo; Li, Yunqi

    2016-01-01

    Sampling enrichment toward a target state, an analogue of the improvement of sampling efficiency (SE), is critical in both the refinement of protein structures and the generation of near-native structure ensembles for the exploration of structure-function relationships. We developed a hybrid molecular dynamics (MD)-Monte Carlo (MC) approach to enrich the sampling toward the target structures. In this approach, the higher SE is achieved by perturbing the conventional MD simulations with a MC structure-acceptance judgment, which is based on the coincidence degree of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) intensity profiles between the simulation structures and the target structure. We found that the hybrid simulations could significantly improve SE by making the top-ranked models much closer to the target structures both in the secondary and tertiary structures. Specifically, for the 20 mono-residue peptides, when the initial structures had the root-mean-squared deviation (RMSD) from the target structure smaller than 7 Å, the hybrid MD-MC simulations afforded, on average, 0.83 Å and 1.73 Å in RMSD closer to the target than the parallel MD simulations at 310K and 370K, respectively. Meanwhile, the average SE values are also increased by 13.2% and 15.7%. The enrichment of sampling becomes more significant when the target states are gradually detectable in the MD-MC simulations in comparison with the parallel MD simulations, and provide >200% improvement in SE. We also performed a test of the hybrid MD-MC approach in the real protein system, the results showed that the SE for 3 out of 5 real proteins are improved. Overall, this work presents an efficient way of utilizing solution SAXS to improve protein structure prediction and refinement, as well as the generation of near native structures for function annotation.

  8. STAT3 Inhibition by Microtubule-Targeted Drugs: Dual Molecular Effects of Chemotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Chaudhury, Mousumi; Frank, David A.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapies, it is necessary to identify molecular targets that are essential to a tumor cell but dispensable in a normal cell. Increasing evidence indicates that the transcription factor STAT3, which regulates the expression of genes controlling proliferation, survival, and self-renewal, constitutes such a target. Recently it has been found that STAT3 can associate with the cytoskeleton. Since many of the tumors in which STAT3 is activated, such as breast cancer and ovarian cancer, are responsive to drugs that target microtubules, we examined the effect of these compounds on STAT3. We found that microtubule stabilizers, such as paclitaxel, or microtubule inhibitors, such as vinorelbine, decrease the activating tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 in tumor cells and inhibit the expression of STAT3 target genes. Paclitaxel decreases the association between STAT3 and microtubules, and appears to decrease STAT3 phosphorylation through induction of a negative feedback regulator. The cytotoxic activity of paclitaxel in breast cancer cell lines correlates with its ability to decrease STAT3 phosphorylation. However, consistent with the necessity for expression of a negative regulator, treatment of resistant MDA-MB-231 cells with the DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine restores the ability of paclitaxel to block STAT3-dependent gene expression. Finally, the combination of paclitaxel and agents that directly target STAT3 has beneficial effects in killing STAT3-dependent cell lines. Thus, microtubule-targeted agents may exert some of their effects by inhibiting STAT3, and understanding this interaction may be important for optimizing rational targeted cancer therapies. PMID:21949561

  9. The Size of the Internal Loop in DNA Hairpins Influences Their Targeting with Partially Complementary Strands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of noncanonical DNA structures, such as hairpin loops, may have significant diagnostic and therapeutic potential. Oligonucleotides can be used for binding to mRNA, forming a DNA/RNA hybrid duplex that inhibits translation. This kind of modulation of gene expression is called the antisense approach. In order to determine the best strategy to target a common structural motif in mRNA, we have designed a set of stem-loop DNA molecules with sequence: d(GCGCTnGTAAT5GTTACTnGCGC), where n = 1, 3, or 5, “T5” is an end loop of five thymines. We used a combination of calorimetric and spectroscopy techniques to determine the thermodynamics for the reaction of a set of hairpins containing internal loops with their respective partially complementary strands. Our aim was to determine if internal- and end-loops are promising regions for targeting with their corresponding complementary strands. Indeed, all targeting reactions were accompanied by negative changes in free energy, indicating that reactions proceed spontaneously. Further investigation showed that these negative free energy terms result from a net balance of unfavorable entropy and favorable enthalpy contributions. In particular, unfolding of hairpins and duplexes is accompanied by positive changes in heat capacity, which may be a result of exposure of hydrophobic groups to the solvent. This study provides a new method for the targeting of mRNA in order to control gene expression. PMID:25486129

  10. Transport and detection of unlabeled nucleotide targets by microtubules functionalized with molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Raab, Matthew; Hancock, William O

    2008-03-01

    Shrinking biosensors down to microscale dimensions enables increases in sensitivity and the ability to analyze minute samples such as the contents of individual cells. The goal of the present study is to create mobile microscale biosensors by attaching molecular beacons to microtubules and using kinesin molecular motors to transport these functionalized microtubules across two-dimensional surfaces. Previous work has shown that microfluidic channels can be functionalized with kinesin motors such that microtubules can be transported and directed through these channels without the need for external power or pressure-driven pumping. In this work, we show that molecular beacons can be attached to microtubules such that both the fluorescence reporting capability of the beacon and the motility of the microtubules are retained. These molecular beacon-functionalized microtubules were able to bind ssDNA target sequences, transport them across surfaces, and report their presence by an increase in fluorescence that was detected by fluorescence microscopy. This work is an important step toward creating hybrid microdevices for sensitive virus detection or analyzing mRNA profiles of individual cells.

  11. Personalizing therapies for gastric cancer: Molecular mechanisms and novel targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Luis, Michael; Tavares, Ana; Carvalho, Liliana S; Lara-Santos, Lúcio; Araújo, António; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Globally, gastric cancer is the 4th most frequently diagnosed cancer and the 2nd leading cause of death from cancer, with an estimated 990000 new cases and 738000 deaths registered in 2008. In the advanced setting, standard chemotherapies protocols acquired an important role since last decades in prolong survival. Moreover, recent advances in molecular therapies provided a new interesting weapon to treat advanced gastric cancer through anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) therapies. Trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, was the first target drug in the metastatic setting that showed benefit in overall survival when in association with platinum-5-fluorouracil based chemotherapy. Further, HER2 overexpression analysis acquired a main role in predict response for trastuzumab in this field. Thus, we conducted a review that will discuss the main points concerning trastuzumab and HER2 in gastric cancer, providing a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms and novel trials involved. PMID:24151357

  12. FXR is a molecular target for the effects of vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Karen K.; Tremaroli, Valentina; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Myronovych, Andriy; Karns, Rebekah; Wilson-Pérez, Hilary E.; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Kohli, Rohit; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Seeley, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bariatric surgical procedures, such as vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), are currently the most effective therapy for the treatment of obesity, and are associated with substantial improvements in co-morbidities, including type-2 diabetes mellitus. The underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to these benefits remain largely undetermined, despite offering tremendous potential to reveal new targets for therapeutic intervention. The present study demonstrates that the therapeutic value of VSG does not result from mechanical restriction imposed by a smaller stomach. Rather, we report that VSG is associated with increased circulating bile acids, and associated changes to gut microbial communities. Moreover, in the absence of nuclear bile acid receptor FXR, the ability of VSG to reduce body weight and improve glucose tolerance is substantially reduced. These results point to bile acids and FXR signaling as an important molecular underpinning for the beneficial effects of this weight-loss surgery. PMID:24670636

  13. Precision Medicine for Molecularly Targeted Agents and Immunotherapies in Early-Phase Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Juanita; Harris, Sam; Roda, Desam; Yap, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Precision medicine in oncology promises the matching of genomic, molecular, and clinical data with underlying mechanisms of a range of novel anticancer therapeutics to develop more rational and effective antitumor strategies in a timely manner. However, despite the remarkable progress made in the understanding of novel drivers of different oncogenic processes, success rates for the approval of oncology drugs remain low with substantial fiscal consequences. In this article, we focus on how recent rapid innovations in technology have brought greater clarity to the biological and clinical complexities of different cancers and advanced the development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in clinical trials. We discuss the key challenges of identifying and validating predictive biomarkers of response and resistance using both tumor and surrogate tissues, as well as the hurdles associated with intratumor heterogeneity. Finally, we outline evolving strategies employed in early-phase trial designs that incorporate omics-based technologies. PMID:26609214

  14. Molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapy for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC).

    PubMed

    Azoury, SaÏd C; Gilmore, Richard C; Shukla, Vivek

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most frequent tumors of the head and neck and often presents at an advanced-stage. Traditionally, treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has included surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy depending on both the site and stage of disease. Although the treatment approach for local disease is often standardized, the management of recurrent and advanced disease is evolving. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HNSCC has led to numerous promising investigations and the push for the development of novel therapies. Similarly, over the past several decades, growing data supports the notion that an individual's immune system can be manipulated in such a way to help eradicate cancer. The success of immunotherapeutic agents such as interleukin therapy and immune checkpoint inhibitor blockade in cancer, particularly advanced-stage melanoma, has stimulated researchers to uncover similar success stories in HNSCC. Examples of immunotherapeutics that are being studied for the treatment of HNSCC include adoptive T-cell therapy, vaccines, and immune checkpoint inhibitor proteins (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, -PD-1, -PD-L1). Molecularly targeted agents of interest include inhibitors of transmembrane growth factor receptors, angiogenesis, and PI3K/AKT/mTOR and NOTCH signaling pathways. To date, cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, is the only targeted agent for HNSCC that was approved by the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the basis that it improves overall survival when combined with chemotherapy or radiation. Herein, the authors provide an up-to-date review of immunotherapeutic and molecularly targeted agents for the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:27448787

  15. Molecular photoacoustic imaging of breast cancer using an actively targeted conjugated polymer

    PubMed Central

    Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Li, Kai; Driessen, Wouter; Dinish, US; Wong, Chi Lok; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Liu, Bin; Olivo, Malini

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated polymers (CPs) are upcoming optical contrast agents in view of their unique optical properties and versatile synthetic chemistry. Biofunctionalization of these polymer-based nanoparticles enables molecular imaging of biological processes. In this work, we propose the concept of using a biofunctionalized CP for noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging of breast cancer. In particular, after verifying the PA activity of a CP nanoparticle (CP dots) in phantoms and the targeting efficacy of a folate-functionalized version of the same (folate-CP dots) in vitro, we systemically administered the probe into a folate receptor-positive (FR+ve) MCF-7 breast cancer xenograft model to demonstrate the possible application of folate-CP dots for imaging FR+ve breast cancers in comparison to CP dots with no folate moieties. We observed a strong PA signal at the tumor site of folate-CP dots-administered mice as early as 1 hour after administration as a result of the active targeting of the folate-CP dots to the FR+ve tumor cells but a weak PA signal at the tumor site of CP-dots-administered mice as a result of the passive accumulation of the probe by enhanced permeability and retention effect. We also observed that folate-CP dots produced ~4-fold enhancement in the PA signal in the tumor, when compared to CP dots. These observations demonstrate the great potential of this active-targeting CP to be used as a contrast agent for molecular PA diagnostic imaging in various biomedical applications. PMID:25609951

  16. Molecular Design of Bisphosphonate-Modified Proteins for Efficient Bone Targeting In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sano, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Makiya; Hanzawa, Keiko; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2015-01-01

    To establish a rational molecular design for bisphosphonate (BP)-modified proteins for efficient bone targeting, a pharmacokinetic study was performed using a series of alendronate (ALN), a nitrogen-containing BP, modified proteins with various molecular weights and varying degrees of modification. Four proteins with different molecular weight—yeast glutathione reductase (GR; MW: 112,000 Da), bovine serum albumin (BSA; MW: 67,000 Da), recombinant human superoxide dismutase (SOD; MW: 32,000 Da), and chicken egg white lysozyme (LZM; MW: 14,000 Da)—were modified with ALN to obtain ALN-modified proteins. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the tissue distribution of the ALN-modified and unmodified proteins was performed after radiolabeling them with indium-111 (111In) by using a bifunctional chelating agent. Calculation of tissue uptake clearances revealed that the bone uptake clearances of 111In-ALN-modified proteins were proportional to the degree of ALN modification. 111In-GR-ALN and BSA-ALN, the two high-molecular-weight proteins, efficiently accumulated in bones, regardless of the degree of ALN modification. Approximately 36 and 34% of the dose, respectively, was calculated to be delivered to the bones. In contrast, the maximum amounts taken up by bone were 18 and 13% of the dose for 111In-SOD-ALN(32) and LZM-ALN(9), respectively, because of their high renal clearance. 111In-SOD modified with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and ALN (111In-PEG-SOD-ALN) was efficiently delivered to the bone. Approximately 36% of the dose was estimated to be delivered to the bones. In an experimental bone metastasis mouse model, treatment with PEG-SOD-ALN significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in the bone of the mice. These results indicate that the combination of PEG and ALN modification is a promising approach for efficient bone targeting of proteins with a high total-body clearance. PMID:26287482

  17. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-02-01

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au25 clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au+ ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of ~5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f7/2~83.97 eV and Au 4f5/2~87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size ~1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size ~8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at ~674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 µg ml-1. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR+ve oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au25 clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the potential of using

  18. Manipulating target size influences perceptions of success when learning a dart-throwing skill but does not impact retention

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Nicole T.; Lohse, Keith R.; Hodges, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Positive feedback or experiences of success during skill acquisition have been shown to benefit motor skill learning. In this study, our aim was to manipulate learners’ success perceptions through a minor adjustment to goal criterion (target size) in a dart-throwing task. Two groups of novice participants practiced throwing at a large (easy) or a small (difficult) target from the same distance. In reference to the origin/center of the target, the practice targets were alike in objective difficulty and indeed participants in both groups were not different in their objective practice performance (i.e., radial error from the center). Although the groups experienced markedly different success rates, with the large target group experiencing more hits and reporting greater confidence (or self-efficacy) than the small target group, these practice effects were not carried into longer-term retention, which was assessed after a 1-week delay. For success perceptions to moderate or benefit motor learning, we argue that unambiguous indicators of positive performance are necessary, especially for tasks where intrinsic feedback about objective error is salient. PMID:26441753

  19. Determination of the primary molecular target of 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids.

    PubMed

    Plech, Tomasz; Kaproń, Barbara; Paneth, Agata; Kosikowska, Urszula; Malm, Anna; Strzelczyk, Aleksandra; Stączek, Paweł; Świątek, Łukasz; Rajtar, Barbara; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized and examined the antibacterial activity, toxicity and affinity towards bacterial type II topoisomerases of a series of 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids. A number of these compounds displayed enhanced activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria when compared to ciprofloxacin. The toxic concentrations of the obtained derivatives, evaluated on HEK-293 cells using MTT assay, were much higher than concentrations required to produce antibacterial effect. Finally, the results of enzymatic studies showed that the analyzed compounds demonstrated other preferences as regards primary and secondary molecular targets than ciprofloxacin. PMID:25859782

  20. The skin: target organ in immunotoxicology of small-molecular-weight compounds.

    PubMed

    Merk, H F; Sachs, B; Baron, J

    2001-01-01

    Immunotoxicology studies two different effects of xenobiotics: immunosuppression and dysregulation of immune responses leading to hypersensitivity or autoimmunity. The skin is a major target organ of immunotoxicity which is provoked by small-molecular-weight compounds. Methods may be helpful for immunotoxicological investigations and screenings for adverse effects of xenobiotics which are used for diagnosis or studies on the pathophysiology of skin disorders such as allergic contact dermatitis, cutaneous drug-allergic reactions or autoimmune diseases of the skin. Examples include well-designed patch tests, assays involving antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells, but also T lymphocytes, basophiles or keratinocytes.

  1. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czulak, J.; Guerreiro, A.; Metran, K.; Canfarotta, F.; Goddard, A.; Cowan, R. H.; Trochimczuk, A. W.; Piletsky, S.

    2016-05-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates.Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike

  2. Assistant DNA recycling with nicking endonuclease and molecular beacon for signal amplification using a target-complementary arched structure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fenglei; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-05-11

    A simple and universal method for ultrasensitive "signal on" detection of DNA was developed with a target-complementary arched structure to release assistant DNA, which was recycled with nicking endonuclease to amplify the detectable fluorescent signal of molecular beacons.

  3. Molecular Targets of β-Lactam-Based Antimicrobials: Beyond the Usual Suspects

    PubMed Central

    Konaklieva, Monika I.

    2014-01-01

    The common practice in antibacterial drug development has been to rapidly make an attempt to find ever-more stable and broad-spectrum variants for a particular antibiotic, once a drug resistance for that antibiotic is detected. We are now facing bacterial resistance toward our clinically relevant antibiotics of such a magnitude that the conversation for antimicrobial drug development ought to include effective new antibiotics with alternative mechanisms of action. The electrophilic β-lactam ring is amenable for the inhibition of different enzyme classes by a suitable decoration of the core scaffold. Monocyclic β-lactams lacking an ionizable group at the lactam nitrogen exhibit target preferences toward bacterial enzymes important for resistance and virulence. The present review intends to draw attention to the versatility of the β-lactams as antimicrobials with “unusual” molecular targets. PMID:27025739

  4. Liquid alkanes with targeted molecular weights from biomass-derived carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    West, Ryan M; Liu, Zhen Y; Peter, Maximilian; Dumesic, James A

    2008-01-01

    Liquid transportation fuels must burn cleanly and have high energy densities, criteria that are currently fulfilled by petroleum, a non-renewable resource, the combustion of which leads to increasing levels of atmospheric CO(2). An attractive approach for the production of transportation fuels from renewable biomass resources is to convert carbohydrates into alkanes with targeted molecular weights, such as C(8)-C(15) for jet-fuel applications. Targeted n-alkanes can be produced directly from fructose by an integrated process involving first the dehydration of this C(6) sugar to form 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, followed by controlled formation of C-C bonds with acetone to form C(9) and C(15) compounds, and completed by hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation reactions to form the corresponding n-alkanes. Analogous reactions are demonstrated starting with 5-methylfurfural or 2-furaldehyde, with the latter leading to C(8) and C(13) n-alkanes. PMID:18702136

  5. Inflammatory therapeutic targets in coronary atherosclerosis-from molecular biology to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Linden, Fabian; Domschke, Gabriele; Erbel, Christian; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Katus, Hugo A; Gleissner, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. Over the past two decades, it has been clearly recognized that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Accumulating data from animal experiments have supported this hypothesis, however, clinical applications making use of this knowledge remain scarce. In spite of optimal interventional and medical therapy, the risk for recurrent myocardial infarction remains by about 20% over 3 years after acute coronary syndromes, novel therapies to prevent atherogenesis or treat atherosclerosis are urgently needed. This review summarizes selected potential molecular inflammatory targets that may be of clinical relevance. We also review recent and ongoing clinical trails that target inflammatory processes aiming at preventing adverse cardiovascular events. Overall, it seems surprising that translation of basic science into clinical practice has not been a great success. In conclusion, we propose to focus on specific efforts that promote translational science in order to improve outcome and prognosis of patients suffering from atherosclerosis.

  6. Type IV traffic ATPase TrwD as molecular target to inhibit bacterial conjugation.

    PubMed

    Ripoll-Rozada, Jorge; García-Cazorla, Yolanda; Getino, María; Machón, Cristina; Sanabria-Ríos, David; de la Cruz, Fernando; Cabezón, Elena; Arechaga, Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial conjugation is the main mechanism responsible for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. Hence, the search for specific conjugation inhibitors is paramount in the fight against the spread of these genes. In this pursuit, unsaturated fatty acids have been found to specifically inhibit bacterial conjugation. Despite the growing interest on these compounds, their mode of action and their specific target remain unknown. Here, we identified TrwD, a Type IV secretion traffic ATPase, as the molecular target for fatty acid-mediated inhibition of conjugation. Moreover, 2-alkynoic fatty acids, which are also potent inhibitors of bacterial conjugation, are also powerful inhibitors of the ATPase activity of TrwD. Characterization of the kinetic parameters of ATPase inhibition has led us to identify the catalytic mechanism by which fatty acids exert their activity. These results open a new avenue for the rational design of inhibitors of bacterial conjugation in the fight against the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26915347

  7. High-resolution crystal structure reveals molecular details of target recognition by bacitracin

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacitracin is a metalloantibiotic agent that is widely used as a medicine and feed additive. It interferes with bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding undecaprenyl-pyrophosphate, a lipid carrier that serves as a critical intermediate in cell wall production. Despite bacitracin’s broad use, the molecular details of its target recognition have not been elucidated. Here we report a crystal structure for the ternary complex of bacitracin A, zinc, and a geranyl-pyrophosphate ligand at a resolution of 1.1 Å. The antibiotic forms a compact structure that completely envelopes the ligand’s pyrophosphate group, together with flanking zinc and sodium ions. The complex adopts a highly amphipathic conformation that offers clues to antibiotic function in the context of bacterial membranes. Bacitracin’s efficient sequestration of its target represents a previously unseen mode for the recognition of lipid pyrophosphates, and suggests new directions for the design of next-generation antimicrobial agents. PMID:23940351

  8. New molecular targeted therapies for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Míriam; Custodio, Ana; Provencio, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a uniformly fatal disease and most patients will present with advanced stage. Treatment outcomes remain unsatisfactory, with low long-term survival rates. Standard treatment, such as palliative chemotherapy and radiotherapy, offers a median survival not exceeding 1 year. Hence, considerable efforts have started to be made in order to identify new biological agents which may safely and effectively be administered to advanced NSCLC patients. Two cancer cell pathways in particular have been exploited, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) pathways. However, novel targeted therapies that interfere with other dysregulated pathways in lung cancer are already in the clinic. This review outlines the most promising research approaches to the treatment of NSCLC, discussed according to the specific molecular pathway targeted. PMID:22263060

  9. Beyond conventional chemotherapy: Emerging molecular targeted and immunotherapy strategies in urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Sadakatsu; Hansel, Donna E; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-09-01

    Advanced urothelial carcinoma is frequently lethal, and improvements in cytotoxic chemotherapy have plateaued. Recent technological advances allows for a comprehensive analysis of genomic alterations in a timely manner. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) study revealed that there are numerous genomic aberrations in muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma, such as TP53, ARID1A, PIK3CA, ERCC2, FGFR3, and HER2. Molecular targeted therapies against similar genetic alterations are currently available for other malignancies, but their efficacy in urothelial carcinoma has not been established. This review describes the genomic landscape of malignant urothelial carcinomas, with an emphasis on the potential to prosecute these tumours by deploying novel targeted agents and immunotherapy in appropriately selected patient populations. PMID:26138514

  10. Inflammatory therapeutic targets in coronary atherosclerosis—from molecular biology to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Fabian; Domschke, Gabriele; Erbel, Christian; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Katus, Hugo A.; Gleissner, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. Over the past two decades, it has been clearly recognized that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Accumulating data from animal experiments have supported this hypothesis, however, clinical applications making use of this knowledge remain scarce. In spite of optimal interventional and medical therapy, the risk for recurrent myocardial infarction remains by about 20% over 3 years after acute coronary syndromes, novel therapies to prevent atherogenesis or treat atherosclerosis are urgently needed. This review summarizes selected potential molecular inflammatory targets that may be of clinical relevance. We also review recent and ongoing clinical trails that target inflammatory processes aiming at preventing adverse cardiovascular events. Overall, it seems surprising that translation of basic science into clinical practice has not been a great success. In conclusion, we propose to focus on specific efforts that promote translational science in order to improve outcome and prognosis of patients suffering from atherosclerosis. PMID:25484870

  11. Molecular pathways: targeting the kinase effectors of RHO-family GTPases.

    PubMed

    Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Rawat, Sonali J; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    RHO GTPases, members of the RAS superfamily of small GTPases, are adhesion and growth factor-activated molecular switches that play important roles in tumor development and progression. When activated, RHO-family GTPases such as RAC1, CDC42, and RHOA, transmit signals by recruiting a variety of effector proteins, including the protein kinases PAK, ACK, MLK, MRCK, and ROCK. Genetically induced loss of RHO function impedes transformation by a number of oncogenic stimuli, leading to an interest in developing small-molecule inhibitors that either target RHO GTPases directly, or that target their downstream protein kinase effectors. Although inhibitors of RHO GTPases and their downstream signaling kinases have not yet been widely adopted for clinical use, their potential value as cancer therapeutics continues to facilitate pharmaceutical research and development and is a promising therapeutic strategy.

  12. Molecular phylogeny and genome size evolution of the genus Betula (Betulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nian; McAllister, Hugh A.; Bartlett, Paul R.; Buggs, Richard J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Betula L. (birch) is a genus of approx. 60 species, subspecies or varieties with a wide distribution in the northern hemisphere, of ecological and economic importance. A new classification of Betula has recently been proposed based on morphological characters. This classification differs somewhat from previously published molecular phylogenies, which may be due to factors such as convergent evolution, hybridization, incomplete taxon sampling or misidentification of samples. While chromosome counts have been made for many species, few have had their genome size measured. The aim of this study is to produce a new phylogenetic and genome size analysis of the genus. Methods Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were sequenced for 76 Betula samples verified by taxonomic experts, representing approx. 60 taxa, of which approx. 24 taxa have not been included in previous phylogenetic analyses. A further 49 samples from other collections were also sequenced, and 108 ITS sequences were downloaded from GenBank. Phylogenetic trees were built for these sequences. The genome sizes of 103 accessions representing nearly all described species were estimated using flow cytometry. Key Results As expected for a gene tree of a genus where hybridization and allopolyploidy occur, the ITS tree shows clustering, but not resolved monophyly, for the morphological subgenera recently proposed. Most sections show some clustering, but species of the dwarf section Apterocaryon are unusually scattered. Betula corylifolia (subgenus Nipponobetula) unexpectedly clusters with species of subgenus Aspera. Unexpected placements are also found for B. maximowicziana, B. bomiensis, B. nigra and B. grossa. Biogeographical disjunctions were found within Betula between Europe and North America, and also disjunctions between North-east and South-west Asia. The 2C-values for Betula ranged from 0·88 to 5·33 pg, and polyploids are scattered widely throughout the

  13. Quantification of lesion size, depth, and uptake using a dual-head molecular breast imaging system.

    PubMed

    Hruskaa, Carrie B; O'Connor, Michael K

    2008-04-01

    A method to perform quantitative lesion analysis in molecular breast imaging (MBI) was developed using the opposing views from a novel dual-head dedicated gamma camera. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom models were used to simulate MBI images with known lesion parameters. A relationship between the full widths at 25%, 35%, and 50% of the maximum of intensity profiles through lesions and the true lesion diameter as a function of compressed breast thickness was developed in order to measure lesion diameter. Using knowledge of compressed breast thickness and the attenuation of gamma rays in soft tissue, a method was developed to measure the depth of the lesion to the collimator face. Using the measured lesion diameter and measurements of counts in the lesion and background breast region, relative radiotracer uptake or tumor to background ratio (T/B ratio) was calculated. Validation of the methods showed that the size, depth, and T/B ratio can be accurately measured for a range of small breast lesions with T/B ratios between 10:1 and 40:1 in breasts with compressed thicknesses between 4 and 10 cm. Future applications of this work include providing information about lesion location in patients for performing a biopsy of site and the development of a threshold for the T/B ratio that can distinguish benign from malignant disease. PMID:18491531

  14. Molecular Size of the Bio-active Components from Haruan Channa striatus Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manan Mat Jais, Abdul

    Extracts of an indigenous tropical carnivorous and air breathing fish haruan Channa striatus was shown to have antinociceptive activity in mice and the aim was to study tinvestigateto, at the molecular size of the bioactive compound(s), for isolation and identification. The aqueous portion of crude extract in chloroform-methanol 2: v/v was subjected to filtration by Millipore Ultrafree-CL low binding cellulose filter 5,000; 10,000 and 30,000 Dalton (Nominal Molecules Weight Limit or NMWL) and centrifuged for 10 min at 5,000 rpm. Series of 0, 25, 50 and 100% dilutions of the filtered solutions in distilled water were purified through preparative HPLC. The fraction collected between 1-3 min was dried under vacuum yielding 30 mg to be reconstituted in distilled water to a concentration of 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 mg mL-1 in distilled water which were then used for abdominal constriction tests in mice according to method described by Mat Jais. The non-filtered, the 5,000 and 10,000 NMWL samples produced similar HPLC traces. The results indicated that the bioactive compound is less than 5,000 NMWL and finally, the fraction 1 at retention times 1 to 3 min, of the HPLC purified sample was also produced inhibition in the constriction test.

  15. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Bertrand; Hermanson, Ola

    2010-05-01

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  16. Quantification of lesion size, depth, and uptake using a dual-head molecular breast imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, Carrie B.; O’Connor, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    A method to perform quantitative lesion analysis in molecular breast imaging (MBI) was developed using the opposing views from a novel dual-head dedicated gamma camera. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom models were used to simulate MBI images with known lesion parameters. A relationship between the full widths at 25%, 35%, and 50% of the maximum of intensity profiles through lesions and the true lesion diameter as a function of compressed breast thickness was developed in order to measure lesion diameter. Using knowledge of compressed breast thickness and the attenuation of gamma rays in soft tissue, a method was developed to measure the depth of the lesion to the collimator face. Using the measured lesion diameter and measurements of counts in the lesion and background breast region, relative radiotracer uptake or tumor to background ratio (T∕B ratio) was calculated. Validation of the methods showed that the size, depth, and T∕B ratio can be accurately measured for a range of small breast lesions with T∕B ratios between 10:1 and 40:1 in breasts with compressed thicknesses between 4 and 10 cm. Future applications of this work include providing information about lesion location in patients for performing a biopsy of site and the development of a threshold for the T∕B ratio that can distinguish benign from malignant disease. PMID:18491531

  17. Reduced molecular size and altered disaccharide composition of cerebral chondroitin sulfate upon Alzheimer's pathogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zui; Ohtake-Niimi, Shiori; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Uchimura, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive disorder leading to cognitive impairment and neuronal loss. Cerebral extracellular accumulation and deposition of amyloid ß plaques is a pathological hallmark of AD. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is an extracellular component abundant in the brain. CS is a sulfated glycosaminoglycan covalently attached to a core protein, forming chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The structure of CS is heterogeneous with sulfation modification and elongation of the chain. The structural diversity of CS allows it to play various roles in the brain. Increasing evidence has shown that CS promotes aggregation of amyloid ß peptides into higher-order species such as insoluble amyloid ß fibrils. Difficulties in the structural analysis of brain CS, as well as its heterogeneity, limit the study of potential roles of CS in AD pathology. Here we established a microanalysis method with reversed-phase ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography and found that CS in the brains of Tg2576 AD model mice show a lower molecular size and an increased ratio of CS-B motif di-sulfated disaccharide. Our findings provide insight into the structural changes of cerebral CS upon Alzheimer's pathogenesis. PMID:27578913

  18. Molecular simulations of PEGylated lipids at interfaces: size selective dispersion of nanoscale objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Vierros, Sampsa; van Tassel, Paul R.; Määttä, Jukka

    2015-03-01

    Phospholipids and phospholipid derivatives offer efficient, noncovalent functionalization and dispersion of hydrophobic objects, e.g. therapeutic molecules and nanoparticles including carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, the relation of lipid aggregates in bulk solution and in the presence of the object, and the resulting dispersion remain important questions. We employ here molecular dynamics simulations to explore PEGylated lipid aggregates at interfaces and the resulting dispersion efficiency. By varying lipid and substrate curvature, and the PEG chain length, we find 1) lipid-CNT and PEGylated lipid-CNT aggregation behavior consistent with recent experiments, 2) the assembled morphology to vary from micellar-like to tubular coating (phospholipids) and micellar to monolayer-like (PEGylated lipids) with the transition depending on lipid curvature and for PEGylated lipids also on the PEG chain length and CNT diameter, 3) aggregation morphology dependent CNT dispersion ability, and 4) good agreement between simulation and scaling theories of a brush-type PEG. Finally, we discuss the implications to size-selective separation of hydrophobic particles and experimental observations.

  19. Evaluating Three Programs Using a School Effectiveness Model: Direct Instruction, Target Teach, and Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Value-added models, which rate schools for effectiveness while taking into account the poverty and other socioeconomic status of the students, are generating increased interest. This paper describes the use of one such model to evaluate whether school ratings changed when three new programs were introduced: the "Target Teach" curriculum alignment,…

  20. Molecular Inversion Probes for targeted resequencing in non-model organisms.

    PubMed

    Niedzicka, M; Fijarczyk, A; Dudek, K; Stuglik, M; Babik, W

    2016-01-01

    Applications that require resequencing of hundreds or thousands of predefined genomic regions in numerous samples are common in studies of non-model organisms. However few approaches at the scale intermediate between multiplex PCR and sequence capture methods are available. Here we explored the utility of Molecular Inversion Probes (MIPs) for the medium-scale targeted resequencing in a non-model system. Markers targeting 112 bp of exonic sequence were designed from transcriptome of Lissotriton newts. We assessed performance of 248 MIP markers in a sample of 85 individuals. Among the 234 (94.4%) successfully amplified markers 80% had median coverage within one order of magnitude, indicating relatively uniform performance; coverage uniformity across individuals was also high. In the analysis of polymorphism and segregation within family, 77% of 248 tested MIPs were confirmed as single copy Mendelian markers. Genotyping concordance assessed using replicate samples exceeded 99%. MIP markers for targeted resequencing have a number of advantages: high specificity, high multiplexing level, low sample requirement, straightforward laboratory protocol, no need for preparation of genomic libraries and no ascertainment bias. We conclude that MIP markers provide an effective solution for resequencing targets of tens or hundreds of kb in any organism and in a large number of samples. PMID:27046329

  1. Molecular Inversion Probes for targeted resequencing in non-model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Niedzicka, M.; Fijarczyk, A.; Dudek, K.; Stuglik, M.; Babik, W.

    2016-01-01

    Applications that require resequencing of hundreds or thousands of predefined genomic regions in numerous samples are common in studies of non-model organisms. However few approaches at the scale intermediate between multiplex PCR and sequence capture methods are available. Here we explored the utility of Molecular Inversion Probes (MIPs) for the medium-scale targeted resequencing in a non-model system. Markers targeting 112 bp of exonic sequence were designed from transcriptome of Lissotriton newts. We assessed performance of 248 MIP markers in a sample of 85 individuals. Among the 234 (94.4%) successfully amplified markers 80% had median coverage within one order of magnitude, indicating relatively uniform performance; coverage uniformity across individuals was also high. In the analysis of polymorphism and segregation within family, 77% of 248 tested MIPs were confirmed as single copy Mendelian markers. Genotyping concordance assessed using replicate samples exceeded 99%. MIP markers for targeted resequencing have a number of advantages: high specificity, high multiplexing level, low sample requirement, straightforward laboratory protocol, no need for preparation of genomic libraries and no ascertainment bias. We conclude that MIP markers provide an effective solution for resequencing targets of tens or hundreds of kb in any organism and in a large number of samples. PMID:27046329

  2. Targeting MKK3 as a novel anticancer strategy: molecular mechanisms and therapeutical implications

    PubMed Central

    Baldari, S; Ubertini, V; Garufi, A; D'Orazi, G; Bossi, G

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MAP2K3, MKK3) is a member of the dual specificity protein kinase group that belongs to the MAP kinase kinase family. This kinase is activated by mitogenic or stress-inducing stimuli and participates in the MAP kinase-mediated signaling cascade, leading to cell proliferation and survival. Several studies highlighted a critical role for MKK3 in tumor progression and invasion, and we previously identified MKK3 as transcriptional target of mutant (mut) p53 to sustain cell proliferation and survival, thus rendering MKK3 a promising target for anticancer therapies. Here, we found that targeting MKK3 with RNA interference, in both wild-type (wt) and mutp53-carrying cells, induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy that, respectively, contributed to stabilize wtp53 and degrade mutp53. MKK3 depletion reduced cancer cell proliferation and viability, whereas no significant effects were observed in normal cellular context. Noteworthy, MKK3 depletion in combination with chemotherapeutic agents increased tumor cell response to the drugs, in both wtp53 and mutp53 cancer cells, as demonstrated by enhanced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and reduced clonogenic ability in vitro. In addition, MKK3 depletion reduced tumor growth and improved biological response to chemotherapeutic in vivo. The overall results indicate MKK3 as a novel promising molecular target for the development of more efficient anticancer treatments in both wtp53- and mutp53-carrying tumors. PMID:25633290

  3. Recognition of dual targets by a molecular beacon-based sensor: subtyping of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Ching; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lai, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Chang-Chun David; Chuang, Min-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    A molecular beacon (MB)-based sensor to offer a decisive answer in combination with information originated from dual-target inputs is designed. The system harnesses an assistant strand and thermodynamically favored designation of unpaired nucleotides (UNs) to process the binary targets in "AND-gate" format and report fluorescence in "off-on" mechanism via a formation of a DNA four-way junction (4WJ). By manipulating composition of the UNs, the dynamic fluorescence difference between the binary targets-coexisting circumstance and any other scenario was maximized. Characteristic equilibrium constant (K), change of entropy (ΔS), and association rate constant (k) between the association ("on") and dissociation ("off") states of the 4WJ were evaluated to understand unfolding behavior of MB in connection to its sensing capability. Favorable MB and UNs were furthermore designed toward analysis of genuine genetic sequences of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) in an influenza A H5N2 isolate. The MB-based sensor was demonstrated to yield a linear calibration range from 1.2 to 240 nM and detection limit of 120 pM. Furthermore, high-fidelity subtyping of influenza virus was implemented in a sample of unpurified amplicons. The strategy opens an alternative avenue of MB-based sensors for dual targets toward applications in clinical diagnosis.

  4. Calculation of molecular weights of humic substances from colligative data: Application to aquatic humus and its molecular size fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, J. H.; Perdue, E. M.

    1981-11-01

    A rigorous mathematical expression for the dependence of colligative properties on acid dissociation of water soluble humic substances is presented. New data for number average molecular weights of a river derived humic material and its gel permeation Chromatographic fractions are compared with M¯n values obtained by a reevaluation of previously published experimental observations on soil and water fulvic acids. The results reveal a remarkable similarity of fulvic acids from widely different sources with respect to number-average molecular weight.

  5. Elucidation of molecular targets of bioactive principles of black cumin relevant to its anti-tumour functionality - An Insilico target fishing approach.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Amulyashree; Saremy, Sadegh; Bhattacharjee, Biplab

    2014-01-01

    Black cumin (Nigella sativa) is a spice having medicinal properties with pungent and bitter odour. It is used since thousands of years to treat various ailments, including cancer mainly in South Asia and Middle Eastern regions. Substantial evidence in multiple research studies emphasizes about the therapeutic importance of bioactive principles of N. sativa in cancer bioassays; however, the exact mechanism of their anti-tumour action is still to be fully comprehended. The current study makes an attempt in this direction by exploiting the advancements in the Insilico reverse screening technology. In this study, three different Insilico Reverse Screening approaches have been employed for identifying the putative molecular targets of the bioactive principles in Black cumin (thymoquinone, alpha-hederin, dithymoquinone and thymohydroquinone) relevant to its anti-tumour functionality. The identified set of putative targets is further compared with the existing set of experimentally validated targets, so as to estimate the performance of insilico platforms. Subsequently, molecular docking simulations studies were performed to elucidate the molecular interactions between the bioactive compounds & their respective identified targets. The molecular interactions of one such target identified i.e. VEGF2 along with thymoquinone depicted one H-bond formed at the catalytic site. The molecular targets identified in this study need further confirmatory tests on cancer bioassays, in order to justify the research findings from Insilico platforms. This study has brought to light the effectiveness of usage of Insilico Reverse Screening protocols to characterise the un-identified target-ome of poly pharmacological bioactive agents in spices.

  6. Elucidation of molecular targets of bioactive principles of black cumin relevant to its anti-tumour functionality - An Insilico target fishing approach.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Amulyashree; Saremy, Sadegh; Bhattacharjee, Biplab

    2014-01-01

    Black cumin (Nigella sativa) is a spice having medicinal properties with pungent and bitter odour. It is used since thousands of years to treat various ailments, including cancer mainly in South Asia and Middle Eastern regions. Substantial evidence in multiple research studies emphasizes about the therapeutic importance of bioactive principles of N. sativa in cancer bioassays; however, the exact mechanism of their anti-tumour action is still to be fully comprehended. The current study makes an attempt in this direction by exploiting the advancements in the Insilico reverse screening technology. In this study, three different Insilico Reverse Screening approaches have been employed for identifying the putative molecular targets of the bioactive principles in Black cumin (thymoquinone, alpha-hederin, dithymoquinone and thymohydroquinone) relevant to its anti-tumour functionality. The identified set of putative targets is further compared with the existing set of experimentally validated targets, so as to estimate the performance of insilico platforms. Subsequently, molecular docking simulations studies were performed to elucidate the molecular interactions between the bioactive compounds & their respective identified targets. The molecular interactions of one such target identified i.e. VEGF2 along with thymoquinone depicted one H-bond formed at the catalytic site. The molecular targets identified in this study need further confirmatory tests on cancer bioassays, in order to justify the research findings from Insilico platforms. This study has brought to light the effectiveness of usage of Insilico Reverse Screening protocols to characterise the un-identified target-ome of poly pharmacological bioactive agents in spices. PMID:25512684

  7. Exosomes and Microvesicles: Identification and Targeting By Particle Size and Lipid Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Kastelowitz, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles are two classes of submicroscopic vesicle released by cells into the extracellular space. Collectively referred to as extracellular vesicles, these membrane containers facilitate important cell-cell communication by carrying a diverse array of signaling molecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. Recently, the role of extracellular vesicle signaling in cancer progression has become a topic of significant interest. Methods to detect and target exosomes and microvesicles are needed to realize applications of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and, perhaps, therapeutic targets. Detection of exosomes and microvesicles is a complex problem as they are both submicroscopic and of heterogeneous cellular origins. In this Minireview, we highlight the basic biology of extracellular vesicles, and address available biochemical and biophysical detection methods. Detectible characteristics described here include lipid and protein composition, and physical properties such as the vesicle membrane shape and diffusion coefficient. In particular, we propose that detection of exosome and microvesicle membrane curvature with lipid chemical probes that sense membrane shape is a distinctly promising method for identifying and targeting these vesicles. PMID:24740901

  8. A Targetable Molecular Chaperone Hsp27 Confers Aggressiveness in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yurong; Tao, Xuemei; Jin, Guangzhi; Jin, Haojie; Wang, Ning; Hu, Fangyuan; Luo, Qin; Shu, Huiqun; Zhao, Fangyu; Yao, Ming; Fang, Jingyuan; Cong, Wenming; Qin, Wenxin; Wang, Cun

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is an ATP-independent molecular chaperone and confers survival advantages and resistance to cancer cells under stress conditions. The effects and molecular mechanisms of Hsp27 in HCC invasion and metastasis are still unclear. In this study, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissue array (n = 167) was used to investigate the expression and prognostic relevance of Hsp27 in HCC patients. HCC patients with high expression of Hsp27 exhibited poor prognosis. Overexpression of Hsp27 led to the forced invasion of HCC cells, whereas silencing Hsp27 attenuated invasion and metastasis of HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. We revealed that Hsp27 activated Akt signaling, which in turn promoted MMP2 and ITGA7 expression and HCC metastasis. We further observed that targeting Hsp27 using OGX-427 obviously suppressed HCC metastasis in two metastatic models. These findings indicate that Hsp27 is a useful predictive factor for prognosis of HCC and it facilitates HCC metastasis through Akt signaling. Targeting Hsp27 with OGX-427 may represent an attractive therapeutic option for suppressing HCC metastasis.

  9. [Economic Loss of Remaining Contents in Molecular Target Drug Preparation and the Simulation for Cost Saving].

    PubMed

    Usami, Eiseki; Kimura, Michio; Fukuoka, Tomohiro; Okada, Kazutomo; Yoshimura, Tomoaki

    2016-06-01

    While preparing an anticancer drug, even if it is an expensive molecular target drug, the remainder is not divided and saved for use in other patients; instead, it is discarded, resulting in waste of medical resources. In this study, we examined the economic loss in terms of medical costs by calculating the discarded amounts of 12 commonly used molecular target drugs at Ogaki Municipal Hospital, Japan between January 2012 and December 2014. We found, on average, that drugs valued at ¥ 52,593,182 were discarded annually. In particular, the discarded amounts of relatively expensive drugs, such as bevacizumab, bortezomib, and rituximab, were valued at ¥ 16,646,300, ¥ 15,866,289, and ¥ 8,401,324, respectively. Among these, the average amount of waste per administration of bortezomib was particularly expensive, at a cost of ¥ 67,325. Bortezomib is a commonly used treatment, resulting in excessive cumulative discarded cost. In an effort to save cost, we should consider using small capacity standard injections. Development of a simulation that used the remaining drug contents from only 1 day showed that bevacizumab alone accounts for an average cost saving of ¥1 2,542,191(75.3%) per year. This study suggests that effectively utilizing the remaining drug contents would ensure efficient use of medical resources, thereby reducing economic losses.

  10. Targeted Isolation of Indolopyridoquinazoline Alkaloids from Conchocarpus fontanesianus Based on Molecular Networks.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Rodrigo Sant'Ana; Allard, Pierre-Marie; Marcourt, Laurence; Young, Maria Cláudia Marx; Queiroz, Emerson Ferreira; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-23

    A dichloromethane-soluble fraction of the stem bark of Conchocarpus fontanesianus showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans in a bioautography assay. Off-line high-pressure liquid chromatography activity-based profiling of this extract enabled a precise localization of the compounds responsible for the antifungal activity that were isolated and identified as the known compounds flindersine (17) and 8-methoxyflindersine (18). As well as the identification of the bioactive principles, the ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry metabolite profiling of the dichloromethane stem bark fraction allowed the detection of more than 1000 components. Some of these could be assigned putatively to secondary metabolites previously isolated from the family Rutaceae. Generation of a molecular network based on MS(2) spectra indicated the presence of indolopyridoquinazoline alkaloids and related scaffolds. Efficient targeted isolation of these compounds was performed by geometric transfer of the analytical high-pressure liquid chromatography profiling conditions to preparative medium-pressure liquid chromatography. This yielded six new indolopyridoquinazoline alkaloids (5, 16, 19-22) that were assigned structurally. The medium-pressure liquid chromatography separations afforded additionally 16 other compounds. This work has demonstrated the usefulness of molecular networks to target the isolation of new natural products and the value of this approach for dereplication. A detailed analysis of the constituents of the stem bark of C. fontanesianus was conducted. PMID:27557347

  11. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP.

    PubMed

    Czulak, J; Guerreiro, A; Metran, K; Canfarotta, F; Goddard, A; Cowan, R H; Trochimczuk, A W; Piletsky, S

    2016-06-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates. PMID:27174700

  12. [Economic Loss of Remaining Contents in Molecular Target Drug Preparation and the Simulation for Cost Saving].

    PubMed

    Usami, Eiseki; Kimura, Michio; Fukuoka, Tomohiro; Okada, Kazutomo; Yoshimura, Tomoaki

    2016-06-01

    While preparing an anticancer drug, even if it is an expensive molecular target drug, the remainder is not divided and saved for use in other patients; instead, it is discarded, resulting in waste of medical resources. In this study, we examined the economic loss in terms of medical costs by calculating the discarded amounts of 12 commonly used molecular target drugs at Ogaki Municipal Hospital, Japan between January 2012 and December 2014. We found, on average, that drugs valued at ¥ 52,593,182 were discarded annually. In particular, the discarded amounts of relatively expensive drugs, such as bevacizumab, bortezomib, and rituximab, were valued at ¥ 16,646,300, ¥ 15,866,289, and ¥ 8,401,324, respectively. Among these, the average amount of waste per administration of bortezomib was particularly expensive, at a cost of ¥ 67,325. Bortezomib is a commonly used treatment, resulting in excessive cumulative discarded cost. In an effort to save cost, we should consider using small capacity standard injections. Development of a simulation that used the remaining drug contents from only 1 day showed that bevacizumab alone accounts for an average cost saving of ¥1 2,542,191(75.3%) per year. This study suggests that effectively utilizing the remaining drug contents would ensure efficient use of medical resources, thereby reducing economic losses. PMID:27306812

  13. Molecular Targets of Naturopathy in Cancer Research: Bridge to Modern Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aamir; Ginnebaugh, Kevin R.; Li, Yiwei; Padhye, Subhash B.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of naturopathy (defined as the practice of medicine for the treatment of human diseases with natural agents) in human cancer is beginning to be appreciated, as documented by renewed interest in nutraceutical research, the natural anticancer agents of dietary origin. Because of their pleiotropic effects and the ability to modulate multiple signaling pathways, which is a good attribute of natural agents, nutraceuticals have frequently been demonstrated to re-sensitize drug-resistant cancers. The effectiveness of nutraceuticals can be further enhanced if the tools for the relative assessment of their molecular targets are readily available. Such information can be critical for determining their most effective uses. Here, we discuss the anticancer potential of nutraceuticals and the associated challenges that have interfered with their translational potential as a naturopathic approach for the management of cancers. In the years to come, an efficient screening and assessment of molecular targets will be the key to make rapid progress in the area of drug design and discovery, especially focusing on evidence-based development of naturopathy for the treatment of human malignancies. PMID:25569626

  14. Mechanisms of hepatocellular carcinoma and challenges and opportunities for molecular targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuan; Wang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have fallen dramatically in China and elsewhere over the past several decades. Nonetheless, HCC remains a major public health issue as one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and one of the leading causes of death caused by cancer in China. Hepatocarcinogenesis is a very complex biological process associated with many environmental risk factors and factors in heredity, including abnormal activation of cellular and molecular signaling pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin, hedgehog, MAPK, AKT, and ERK signaling pathways, and the balance between the activation and inactivation of the proto-oncogenes and anti-oncogenes, and the differentiation of liver cancer stem cells. Molecule-targeted therapy, a new approach for the treatment of liver cancer, blocks the growth of cancer cells by interfering with the molecules required for carcinogenesis and tumor growth, making it both specific and selective. However, there is no one drug completely designed for liver cancer, and further development in the research of liver cancer targeted drugs is now almost stagnant. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of HCC and in the development of novel strategies for cancer therapeutics. PMID:26244070

  15. Computer-aided Molecular Design of Compounds Targeting Histone Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Federico; Del Rio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidences show that epigenetic mechanisms play crucial roles in the genesis and progression of many physiopathological processes. As a result, research in epigenetic grew at a fast pace in the last decade. In particular, the study of histone post-translational modifications encountered an extraordinary progression and many modifications have been characterized and associated to fundamental biological processes and pathological conditions. Histone modifications are the catalytic result of a large set of enzyme families that operate covalent modifications on specific residues at the histone tails. Taken together, these modifications elicit a complex and concerted processing that greatly contribute to the chromatin remodeling and may drive different pathological conditions, especially cancer. For this reason, several epigenetic targets are currently under validation for drug discovery purposes and different academic and industrial programs have been already launched to produce the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes. In this scenario, computer-aided molecular design techniques are offering important tools, mainly as a consequence of the increasing structural information available for these targets. In this mini-review we will briefly discuss the most common types of known histone modifications and the corresponding operating enzymes by emphasizing the computer-aided molecular design approaches that can be of use to speed-up the efforts to generate new pharmaceutically relevant compounds. PMID:26082827

  16. Molecular targets of Chinese herbs: a clinical study of hepatoma based on network pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Niu, Yang-Yang; Duan, Dan-Dan; Yang, Xue; Hao, Jian; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Chen, Dan; Wang, Ke-Xin; Qin, Xue-Mei; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-05-04

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat tumors for years and has been demonstrated to be effective. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of herbs remain unclear. This study aims to ascertain molecular targets of herbs prolonging survival time of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on network pharmacology, and to establish a research method for accurate treatment of TCM. The survival benefit of TCM treatment with Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) was proved by Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis among 288 patients. The correlation between herbs and survival time was performed by bivariate correlation analysis. Network pharmacology method was utilized to construct the active ingredient-target networks of herbs that were responsible for the beneficial effects against HCC. Cox regression analysis showed CHM was an independent favorable prognostic factor. The median survival time was 13 months and the 5-year overall survival rates were 2.61% in the TCM group, while there were 6 months, 0 in the non-TCM group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that 8 herbs closely associated with prognosis. Network pharmacology analysis revealed that the 8 herbs regulated multiple HCC relative genes, among which the genes affected proliferation (KRAS, AKT2, MAPK), metastasis (SRC, MMP), angiogenesis (PTGS2) and apoptosis (CASP3) etc.

  17. Computer-aided Molecular Design of Compounds Targeting Histone Modifying Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Federico; Del Rio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidences show that epigenetic mechanisms play crucial roles in the genesis and progression of many physiopathological processes. As a result, research in epigenetic grew at a fast pace in the last decade. In particular, the study of histone post-translational modifications encountered an extraordinary progression and many modifications have been characterized and associated to fundamental biological processes and pathological conditions. Histone modifications are the catalytic result of a large set of enzyme families that operate covalent modifications on specific residues at the histone tails. Taken together, these modifications elicit a complex and concerted processing that greatly contribute to the chromatin remodeling and may drive different pathological conditions, especially cancer. For this reason, several epigenetic targets are currently under validation for drug discovery purposes and different academic and industrial programs have been already launched to produce the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes. In this scenario, computer-aided molecular design techniques are offering important tools, mainly as a consequence of the increasing structural information available for these targets. In this mini-review we will briefly discuss the most common types of known histone modifications and the corresponding operating enzymes by emphasizing the computer-aided molecular design approaches that can be of use to speed-up the efforts to generate new pharmaceutically relevant compounds.

  18. An Overview on the Marine Neurotoxin, Saxitoxin: Genetics, Molecular Targets, Methods of Detection and Ecological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cusick, Kathleen D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Marine neurotoxins are natural products produced by phytoplankton and select species of invertebrates and fish. These compounds interact with voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels and modulate the flux of these ions into various cell types. This review provides a summary of marine neurotoxins, including their structures, molecular targets and pharmacologies. Saxitoxin and its derivatives, collectively referred to as paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), are unique among neurotoxins in that they are found in both marine and freshwater environments by organisms inhabiting two kingdoms of life. Prokaryotic cyanobacteria are responsible for PST production in freshwater systems, while eukaryotic dinoflagellates are the main producers in marine waters. Bioaccumulation by filter-feeding bivalves and fish and subsequent transfer through the food web results in the potentially fatal human illnesses, paralytic shellfish poisoning and saxitoxin pufferfish poisoning. These illnesses are a result of saxitoxin’s ability to bind to the voltage-gated sodium channel, blocking the passage of nerve impulses and leading to death via respiratory paralysis. Recent advances in saxitoxin research are discussed, including the molecular biology of toxin synthesis, new protein targets, association with metal-binding motifs and methods of detection. The eco-evolutionary role(s) PSTs may serve for phytoplankton species that produce them are also discussed. PMID:23535394

  19. Molecular targets of Chinese herbs: a clinical study of hepatoma based on network pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Wang, Xiao-dong; Niu, Yang-yang; Duan, Dan-dan; Yang, Xue; Hao, Jian; Zhu, Cui-hong; Chen, Dan; Wang, Ke-xin; Qin, Xue-mei; Wu, Xiong-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat tumors for years and has been demonstrated to be effective. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of herbs remain unclear. This study aims to ascertain molecular targets of herbs prolonging survival time of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on network pharmacology, and to establish a research method for accurate treatment of TCM. The survival benefit of TCM treatment with Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) was proved by Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis among 288 patients. The correlation between herbs and survival time was performed by bivariate correlation analysis. Network pharmacology method was utilized to construct the active ingredient-target networks of herbs that were responsible for the beneficial effects against HCC. Cox regression analysis showed CHM was an independent favorable prognostic factor. The median survival time was 13 months and the 5-year overall survival rates were 2.61% in the TCM group, while there were 6 months, 0 in the non-TCM group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that 8 herbs closely associated with prognosis. Network pharmacology analysis revealed that the 8 herbs regulated multiple HCC relative genes, among which the genes affected proliferation (KRAS, AKT2, MAPK), metastasis (SRC, MMP), angiogenesis (PTGS2) and apoptosis (CASP3) etc. PMID:27143508

  20. ATP Synthase: A Molecular Therapeutic Drug Target for Antimicrobial and Antitumor Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Okafor, Florence; Azim, Sofiya; Laughlin, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the role of ATP synthase as a molecular drug target for natural and synthetic antimi-crobial/antitumor peptides. We start with an introduction of the universal nature of the ATP synthase enzyme and its role as a biological nanomotor. Significant structural features required for catalytic activity and motor functions of ATP synthase are described. Relevant details regarding the presence of ATP synthase on the surface of several animal cell types, where it is associated with multiple cellular processes making it a potential drug target with respect to antimicrobial peptides and other inhibitors such as dietary polyphenols, is also reviewed. ATP synthase is known to have about twelve discrete inhibitor binding sites including peptides and other inhibitors located at the interface of α/β subunits on the F1 sector of the enzyme. Molecular interaction of peptides at the β DEELSEED site on ATP synthase is discussed with specific examples. An inhibitory effect of other natural/synthetic inhibitors on ATP is highlighted to explore the therapeutic roles played by peptides and other inhibitors. Lastly, the effect of peptides on the inhibition of the Escherichia coli model system through their action on ATP synthase is presented. PMID:23432591

  1. Resveratrol inhibits Epstein Barr Virus lytic cycle in Burkitt's lymphoma cells by affecting multiple molecular targets.

    PubMed

    De Leo, Alessandra; Arena, Giuseppe; Lacanna, Egidio; Oliviero, Giorgio; Colavita, Francesca; Mattia, Elena

    2012-11-01

    Resveratrol (RV), a polyphenolic natural product present in many plants and fruits, exhibits anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective and anti-proliferative properties. Moreover, RV affects a wide variety of viruses including members of the Herpesviridae family, retroviruses, influenza A virus and polyomavirus by altering cellular pathways that affect viral replication itself. Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis, is associated with different proliferative diseases in which it establishes a latent and/or a lytic infection. In t