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Sample records for molecular-level processes governing

  1. Molecular-Level Processes Governing the Interaction of Contaminants with Iron and Manganese Oxides - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., G. E.; Chambers, S. A.

    1999-10-31

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can be altered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on structurally and compositionally well-defined mineral surfaces will lead to: (i) improved models of contaminant fate and transport in geochemical systems, and (ii) optimized manipulation of these processes for remediation purposes. To contribute to this understanding, we will study, both experimentally and theoretically, redox processes involving three important contaminants - chromate ion, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene TCE, on the following iron and manganese oxides - hematite, magnetite, maghemite, and pyrolusite. These oxides and their hydroxylated analogs commonly occur as coatings on minerals or as interfaces in the subsurface environment. Single-crystal surfaces of these oxides will be synthesized in carefully controlled fashion by molecular beam epitaxy. These surfaces, as well as high surface are powdered samples of these oxides, will be used in spectroscopic and kinetic experiments in both aqueous and gas phases. Our goal is to identify products and to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of surface-catalyzed redox reaction of Cr(VI) and CR(III), and the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride and TCE. The combination of theory and experiment will provide the base information needed to scale from the molecular level to the microscopic grain level minerals.

  2. Molecular-level processes governing the interaction of contaminants with iron and manganese oxides. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, S.A.; Brown, G.

    1997-06-01

    'The central tenet of this proposal is that a fundamental understanding of specific mineral surface-site reactivities will substantially improve reactive transport models of contaminants in geologic systems, and will allow more effective remediation schemes to be devised. Most large-scale, macroscopic models employ global chemical reaction kinetics and thermochemistry. However, such models do not incorporate molecular-level input critical to the detailed prediction of how contaminants interact with minerals in the subsurface. A first step leading to the incorporation of molecular-level processes in large-scale macroscopic models is the ability to understand which molecular-level processes will dominate the chemistry at the microscopic grain level of minerals. To this end, the research focuses on the fundamental mechanisms of redox chemistry at mineral surfaces. As much of this chemistry in sediments involves the Fe(III)/Fe(II) and Mn(IV)/Mn(II) couples, the authors focus on mineral phases containing these species. Of particular interest is the effect of the local coordination environment of Fe and Mn atoms on their reactivity toward contaminant species. Studies of the impact of local atomic structure on reactivity in combination with knowledge about the types and amounts of various surfaces on natural grain- size minerals provide the data for statistical models. These models in turn form the basis of the larger-scale macroscopic descriptions of reactivity that are needed for reactive transport models. A molecular-level understanding of these mechanisms will enhance the ability to design much greater performance efficiency, cost effectiveness, and remediation strategies that have minimal negative impact on the local environment. For instance, a comprehensive understanding of how minerals that contain Fe(II) reduce oxyanions and chlorinated organics should enable the design of other Fe(II)-containing remediation materials in a way that is synergistic with existing

  3. Understanding molecular-level effects during post-exposure processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Gerard M.; Smith, Mark D.; Mack, Chris A.; Singh, Vivek K.; Burns, Sean D.; Willson, C. Grant

    2001-08-01

    The perpetual advancement of materials and equipment for microlithography has resulted in reduction of critical dimensions to scales approaching the size of the molecules that constitute a photoresist. As a result, molecular scale effects such as line edge roughness have become an increasing concern for resist manufacturers and process engineers alike. Computer simulation of lithography has become an integral tool for both process optimization and development of new technologies. However, these simulation tools are generally based upon continuum approximation of the resist material, and are therefore unable to investigate molecular level variations. In this work we investigate the increasing importance of molecular level effects, especially in terms of the contributions of the post exposure bake (PEB) to feature roughness. A linkage has been made between a previously reported mesoscale simulation of the post exposure bake. The mesoscale simulation models discrete transport and reaction events during the post exposure bake to determine solubility variations on the scale of a single oligomeric chain. These solubility variations are then imported into PROLITH and transformed into photoresist topography using the familiar Mack dissolution model. This method has been used to simulate line-edge formation in an APEX-type resist. It is found that the distribution of photoproducts produced during exposure can lead to significant solubility variations during the PEB. These solubility variations can become manifest as roughness of resist feature topogrpahy.

  4. Molecular-level insights into aging processes of skin elastin.

    PubMed

    Mora Huertas, Angela C; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Heyroth, Frank; Heinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging is characterized by different features including wrinkling, atrophy of the dermis and loss of elasticity associated with damage to the extracellular matrix protein elastin. The aim of this study was to investigate the aging process of skin elastin at the molecular level by evaluating the influence of intrinsic (chronological aging) and extrinsic factors (sun exposure) on the morphology and susceptibility of elastin towards enzymatic degradation. Elastin was isolated from biopsies derived from sun-protected or sun-exposed skin of differently aged individuals. The morphology of the elastin fibers was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis and label-free quantification allowed identifying differences in the cleavage patterns of the elastin samples after enzymatic digestion. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were used to visualize differences between the samples and to determine the contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic aging to the proteolytic susceptibility of elastin. Moreover, the release of potentially bioactive peptides was studied. Skin aging is associated with the decomposition of elastin fibers, which is more pronounced in sun-exposed tissue. Marker peptides were identified, which showed an age-related increase or decrease in their abundances and provide insights into the progression of the aging process of elastin fibers. Strong age-related cleavage occurs in hydrophobic tropoelastin domains 18, 20, 24 and 26. Photoaging makes the N-terminal and central parts of the tropoelastin molecules more susceptible towards enzymatic cleavage and, hence, accelerates the age-related degradation of elastin.

  5. Molecular level energy and electron transfer processes at nanocrystalline titanium dioxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzad, Fereshteh

    This thesis describes photo-induced molecular electron and energy transfer processes occurring at nanocrystalline semiconductor interfaces. The Introductory Chapter provides background and describes how these materials may be useful for solar energy conversion. In Chapter 2, results describing excitation of Ru(deeb)(bpy)2 2+, bis(2,2'-bipyridine)(2,2'-bipyridine-4,4 '-diethylester)ruthenium(II) hexafluorophosphate, bound to nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films, immersed in an acetonitrile bath are presented. The data indicates that light excitation forms predominately long-lived metal-to-ligand charge-transfer, MLCT, excited states under these conditions. Modeling of the data as a function of irradiance has been accomplished assuming parallel unimolecular and bimolecular excited state deactivation processes. The quantum yield for excited state formation depends on the excitation irradiance, consistent with triplet-triplet annihilation processes that occur with k > 1 x 108 s-1. Chapter 3 extends the work described in Chapter 2 to LiClO4 acetonitrile solutions. Li+ addition results in a red shift in the MLCT absorption and photoluminescence, PL, and a concentration dependent quenching of the PL intensity on TiO2. The Li+ induced spectroscopic changes were found to be reversible by varying the electrolyte composition. A second-order kinetic model quantified charge recombination transients. A model is proposed wherein Li+ ion adsorption stabilizes TiO2 acceptor states resulting in energetically more favorable interfacial electron transfer. The photophysical and photoelectrochemical properties of porous nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 electrodes modified with Ru(deeb)(bpy)2 2+, Os(deeb)(bpy)22+, and mixtures of both are described in Chapters 4 and 5. In regenerative solar cells with 0.5 M LiI/0.05 M I2 acetonitrile electrolyte, both compounds efficiently inject electrons into TiO2 producing monochromatic incident photon-to-current efficiencies (IPCE), IPCE (460 nm) = 0.70 + 0

  6. Water interactions with condensed organic phases: a combined experimental and theoretical study of molecular-level processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sofia M.; Kong, Xiangrui; Thomson, Erik S.; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Pettersson, Jan B. C.; Lovrić, Josip; Toubin, Céline

    2016-04-01

    Water uptake on aerosol particles modifies their chemistry and microphysics with important implications for air quality and climate. A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol consists of organic aerosol particles or inorganic particles with condensed organic components. Here, we combine laboratory studies using the environmental molecular beam (EMB) method1 with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize water interactions with organic surfaces in detail. The over-arching aim is to characterize the mechanisms that govern water uptake, in order to guide the development of physics-based models to be used in atmospheric modelling. The EMB method enables molecular level studies of interactions between gases and volatile surfaces at near ambient pressure,1 and the technique may provide information about collision dynamics, surface and bulk accommodation, desorption and diffusion kinetics. Molecular dynamics simulations provide complementary information about the collision dynamics and initial interactions between gas molecules and the condensed phase. Here, we focus on water interactions with condensed alcohol phases that serve as highly simplified proxies for systems in the environment. Gas-surface collisions are in general found to be highly inelastic and result in efficient surface accommodation of water molecules. As a consequence, surface accommodation of water can be safely assumed to be close to unity under typical ambient conditions. Bulk accommodation is inefficient on solid alcohol and the condensed materials appear to produce hydrophobic surface structures, with limited opportunities for adsorbed water to form hydrogen bonds with surface molecules. Accommodation is significantly more efficient on the dynamic liquid alcohol surfaces. The results for n-butanol (BuOH) are particularly intriguing where substantial changes in water accommodation taking place over a 10 K interval below and above the BuOH melting point.2 The governing mechanisms for the

  7. Mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotube/Cu nanocomposites by molecular-level mixing and controlled oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung K; Mo, Chan B; Nam, Dong H; Hong, Soon H

    2010-01-01

    A molecular-level mixing and controlled oxidation process is proposed as a novel fabrication technique for the production of CNT/Cu nanocomposite powders. The fabricated CNT/Cu2O nanocomposite powders showed microstructures with homogeneous dispersion of implanted CNTs in a Cu2O matrix. The CNT/Cu2O nanocomposite powders were reduced to CNT/Cu nanocomposite powders with H2 gas and then the as-prepared CNT/Cu nanocomposite powders were spark plasma sintered to fabricate CNT/Cu nanocomposites. The mechanical properties of the Cu and the CNT/Cu nanocomposites were characterized by tensile testing before and after hot compression. Before hot compression, the CNT/Cu nanocomposites were brittle, but after hot compression both yield strength and elongation were increased, while the yield strength of the Cu was decreased after hot compression. Hot compression enhanced the ductility and strength of the CNT/Cu nanocomposites due to alignment of Cu grains and CNTs. Electrical conductivity was also enhanced due to a reduced scattering of electrons because of the alignment of the CNTs and Cu grains as well as the annealing effects of the Cu matrix.

  8. Identification of light absorbing oligomers from glyoxal and methylglyoxal aqueous processing: a comparative study at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, Emanuela; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Rickard, Andrew; Baeza-Romero, Maria; Healy, Robert; Peppe, Salvatore; Adams, Tom; Daniels, Mark; Ball, Stephen; Goodall, Iain; Monks, Paul; Borras, Esther; Munoz, Amalia

    2014-05-01

    Numerous studies point to the reactive uptake of gaseous low molecular weight carbonyls onto atmospheric waters (clouds/fog droplets and wet aerosols) as an important SOA formation route not yet included in current models. However, the evaluation of these processes is challenging because water provides a medium for a complex array of reactions to take place such as self-oligomerization, aldol condensation and Maillard-type browning reactions in the presence of ammonium salts. In addition to adding to SOA mass, aqueous chemistry products have been shown to include light absorbing, surface-active and high molecular weight oligomeric species, and can therefore affect climatically relevant aerosol properties such as light absorption and hygroscopicity. Glyoxal (GLY) and methylglyoxal (MGLY) are the gaseous carbonyls that have perhaps received the most attention to date owing to their ubiquity, abundance and reactivity in water, with the majority of studies focussing on bulk physical properties. However, very little is known at the molecular level, in particular for MGLY, and the relative potential of these species as aqueous SOA precursors in ambient air is still unclear. We have conducted experiments with both laboratory solutions and chamber-generated particles to simulate the aqueous processing of GLY and MGLY with ammonium sulphate (AS) under typical atmospheric conditions and investigated their respective aging products. Both high performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV-Vis detection and ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MSn) and high resolution mass spectrometry (FTICRMS) have been used for molecular identification purposes. Comprehensive gas chromatography with nitrogen chemiluminescence detection (GCxGC-NCD) has been applied for the first time to these systems, revealing a surprisingly high number of nitrogen-containing organics (ONs), with a large extent of polarities. GCxGC-NCD proved to be a valuable tool to determine overall amount and rates of

  9. Tracking the Evolution of Polymer Interface Films during the Process of Thermal Annealing at the Domain and Single Molecular Levels using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Hua-Jie; Huang, Jian-Yao; Liu, Zhi-Fei; Li, Jin-Kuo; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Wei-Feng; Yu, Gui

    2016-09-20

    Structural evolution of polymer (NTZ12) interface films during the process of annealing is revealed at the domain and single molecular levels using the statistical data measured from scanning tunneling microscopy images and through theoretical calculations. First, common features of the interface films are examined. Then, mean values of surface-occupied ratio, size and density of the domain are used to reveal the intrinsic derivation of the respective stages. Formation of new domains is triggered at 70 °C, but domain ripening is not activated. At 110 °C, the speed of formation of new domains is almost balanced by the consumption due to the ripening process. However, formation of new domains is reduced heavily at 150 °C but restarted at 190 °C. At the single molecular level, the ratio of the average length of linear to curved backbones is increased during annealing, whereas the ratios of the total length and the total number of linear to curved skeletons reaches a peak value at 150 °C. The two major conformations of curved backbones for all samples are 120° and 180° bending, but the ripening at 150 °C reduces 180° folding dramatically. Molecular dynamic simulations disclose the fast relaxing process of curved skeletons at high temperature.

  10. Building an Identity Management Governance Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Joanne E.; Kraemer, Ron; Raatz, Carla; Devoti, Steve

    2009-01-01

    A particular challenge in any campus environment is determining how requests for access to services and resources are managed. Who decides the technology, infrastructure, policy, business process and procedure? The involvement of key institutional leaders and stakeholders in identity management governance is the driving force behind the way the…

  11. Building an Identity Management Governance Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Joanne E.; Kraemer, Ron; Raatz, Carla; Devoti, Steve

    2009-01-01

    A particular challenge in any campus environment is determining how requests for access to services and resources are managed. Who decides the technology, infrastructure, policy, business process and procedure? The involvement of key institutional leaders and stakeholders in identity management governance is the driving force behind the way the…

  12. Synthesis and spectral investigations of a new dyad with spiropyran and fluorescein units: toward information processing at the single molecular level.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuefeng; Zhang, Deqing; Zhou, Yucheng; Zhu, Daoben

    2003-07-11

    A new dyad 1 with two spiropyran units as the photochromic acceptors and one fluorescein unit as the fluorescent donor was synthesized and characterized. External inputs (ultraviolet light, visible light, and proton) induce the reversible changes of the structure and, concomitantly, the absorption spectrum of dyad 1 due to the presence of two spiropyran units. Only the absorption spectrum of the ME form of the spiropyran units in dyad 1 has large spectral overlap with the fluorescence spectrum of the fluorescein unit. Thus, the fluorescence intensity of dyad 1 is modulated by reversible conversion among the three states of the photochromic spiropyran units and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the ME form and the fluorescein unit. Based on the fact that dyad 1 could "read out" three external input signals (ultraviolet light, visible ligh,t and proton) and "write" a compatible specific output signal (fluorescence intensity), dyad 1 described here can be considered to perform an integrated circuit function with one OR and one AND interconnected logic gates. The present results demonstrate an efficient strategy for elaborating and transmitting information at the single molecular level.

  13. The Government View of Information Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchinal, L. G.

    1970-01-01

    Article focuses on government information systsms and resources, alternatives to computer storage retrieval and large scale information systems, and techniques to improve the utilization of existing information systems in colleges and universities. (Editor)

  14. Rule - Governed Behavior as a Psychological Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Erwin M.; Stacy, E. Webb, Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Some descriptive criteria for identifying rule-governed behavior are identified from the perspective of cognitive psychology. It is suggested that the concept of explanation in psychology be modified from a specification in terms of physical properties of the antecedent events in a causal sequence to a mapping of rules onto behavior or behavior…

  15. Shared Governance and Regional Accreditation: Institutional Processes and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrane, Wendy L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative single-case research study was conducted to gain deeper understanding of the institutional processes to address shared governance accreditation criteria and to determine whether institutional processes altered stakeholder perceptions of shared governance. The data collection strategies were archival records and personal…

  16. Shared Governance and Regional Accreditation: Institutional Processes and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrane, Wendy L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative single-case research study was conducted to gain deeper understanding of the institutional processes to address shared governance accreditation criteria and to determine whether institutional processes altered stakeholder perceptions of shared governance. The data collection strategies were archival records and personal…

  17. Temperature- and pressure-dependent densities, self-diffusion coefficients, and phase behavior of monoacid saturated triacylglycerides: toward molecular-level insights into processing.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Maximilian; Reilly, Anthony M; Briesen, Heiko

    2012-05-23

    Using molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations the densities and self-diffusion coefficients of a range of liquid monoacid triacylglycerides (TAGs) have been studied as a function of temperature and, for the first time, pressure. While offset by their ambient properties, the response of the TAGs to temperature and pressure is qualitatively similar. Application of pressure was found to significantly increase densities and reduce diffusion of the TAG molecules, suggesting that it may have as much a role in processing and crystallizing TAGs as supercooling does. A solution of glycerol tripalmitate and glycerol trihexanoate was also studied, showing that application of pressure should lead to a significant decrease in the saturation point of the solution, which is an important consideration for processing TAGs. Different solid/liquid interfaces of glycerol tripalmitate have also been investigated. Although crystal growth could not be observed, dissolution of one interface was seen in the MD simulations. The results suggest that over moderate distances the melting of TAGs may be cooperative in nature, rather than involving dissolution of individual TAG molecules.

  18. Systemic structural modular generalization of the crystallography of bound water applied to study the mechanisms of processes in biosystems at the atomic and molecular level

    SciTech Connect

    Bulienkov, N. A.

    2011-07-15

    The main reasons of the modern scientific revolution, one of the consequences of which are nanotechnologies and the development of interdisciplinary overall natural science (which can build potentially possible atomic structures and study the mechanisms of the processes occurring in them), are considered. The unifying role of crystallography in the accumulation of interdisciplinary knowledge is demonstrated. This generalization of crystallography requires the introduction of a new concept: a module which reflects the universal condition for stability of all real and potential and equilibrium and nonequilibrium structures of matter (their connectivity). A modular generalization of crystallography covers all forms of solids, including the structure of bound water (a system-forming matrix for the self-organization and morphogenesis of hierarchical biosystems which determines the metric selection of all other structural components of these systems). A dynamic model of the water surface layer, which serves as a matrix in the formation of Langmuir monolayers and plays a key role in the occurrence of life on the Earth, is developed.

  19. Total quality management and shared governance: synergistic processes.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D B; Cummings, C

    1994-01-01

    "Synergism" accurately describes the gains that can be made when total quality management (TQM) and shared governance are employed for reciprocal development. This article explores the relationship between TQM and shared governance from a systems perspective. Systems thinking is the fundamental framework that must be learned by nursing managers. An example of this synergistic process is described from the National Institutes of Health nursing department's experience in implementing TQM and shared governance. The idea that structure is fundamental to problems and solutions when implementing change and focusing upon interdependency issues are the systemic competencies nursing managers need to develop in order to become strong nursing leaders.

  20. Toward Sustainable Anticipatory Governance: Analyzing and Assessing Nanotechnology Innovation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Rider Williams

    Cities around the globe struggle with socio-economic disparities, resource inefficiency, environmental contamination, and quality-of-life challenges. Technological innovation, as one prominent approach to problem solving, promises to address these challenges; yet, introducing new technologies, such as nanotechnology, into society and cities has often resulted in negative consequences. Recent research has conceptually linked anticipatory governance and sustainability science: to understand the role of technology in complex problems our societies face; to anticipate negative consequences of technological innovation; and to promote long-term oriented and responsible governance of technologies. This dissertation advances this link conceptually and empirically, focusing on nanotechnology and urban sustainability challenges. The guiding question for this dissertation research is: How can nanotechnology be innovated and governed in responsible ways and with sustainable outcomes? The dissertation: analyzes the nanotechnology innovation process from an actor- and activities-oriented perspective (Chapter 2); assesses this innovation process from a comprehensive perspective on sustainable governance (Chapter 3); constructs a small set of future scenarios to consider future implications of different nanotechnology governance models (Chapter 4); and appraises the amenability of sustainability problems to nanotechnological interventions (Chapter 5). The four studies are based on data collected through literature review, document analysis, participant observation, interviews, workshops, and walking audits, as part of process analysis, scenario construction, and technology assessment. Research was conducted in collaboration with representatives from industry, government agencies, and civic organizations. The empirical parts of the four studies focus on Metropolitan Phoenix. Findings suggest that: predefined mandates and economic goals dominate the nanotechnology innovation process

  1. Understanding collective behavior at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestler, Troy; Gregor, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Social amoeba transition from a collection of individual cells into a multicellular spore-complex. During this process, amoebae display several interesting phenomena including intercellular signaling, pattern formation, and cell differentiation. At the heart of these phenomena is the exchange of the signaling molecule cyclic-AMP, which has been extensively studied using a variety of indirect monitoring methods. Here we employ a sensor that uses a compound fluorescent protein whose emission spectrum changes in the presence of bound cyclic AMP to directly monitor, in real time and in vivo, intracellular cAMP concentrations. We use cells expressing this sensor in custom made microfabricated chemostats to study how individual cells communicate via cAMP in the aggregation process in a larger effort to bridge the gap between individual and collective behavior of this system. Specifically, we observe changes in aggregatory behavior and measure cAMP signals in response to time-varying extracellular cAMP functions to build a comprehensive model with readily verifiable predictions with the goal of controlling collective behaviors at the molecular level.

  2. China engages global health governance: processes and dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Chan, L H; Lee, P K; Chan, G

    2009-01-01

    Using HIV/AIDS, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), and avian influenza as case studies, this paper discusses the processes and dilemmas of China's participation in health governance, both at the domestic level and the global level. Globalization has eroded the boundary between public and private health and between domestic and global health governance. In addition, the SARS outbreak of 2002-2003 focused global attention on China's public health. As a rising power with the largest population on earth, China is expected by the international community to play a better and more active role in health management. Since the turn of this century, China has increasingly embraced multilateralism in health governance. This paper argues that China's multilateral cooperation is driven by both necessity and conscious design. International concerns about good governance and its aspiration to become a 'responsible' state have exerted a normative effect on China to change tack. Its interactions with United Nations agencies have triggered a learning process for China to securitize the spread of infectious diseases as a security threat. Conversely, China has utilized multilateralism to gain access to international resources and technical assistance. It is still a matter of debate whether China's cooperative engagement with global health governance can endure, because of the persistent problems of withholding information on disease outbreaks and because of its insistence on the Westphalian notion of sovereignty.

  3. Science-policy processes for transboundary water governance.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Derek; de Loë, Rob C; Morris, Michelle; Edwards, Tom W D; Gerlak, Andrea K; Hall, Roland I; Huitema, Dave; Ison, Ray; Livingstone, David; MacDonald, Glen; Mirumachi, Naho; Plummer, Ryan; Wolfe, Brent B

    2015-09-01

    In this policy perspective, we outline several conditions to support effective science-policy interaction, with a particular emphasis on improving water governance in transboundary basins. Key conditions include (1) recognizing that science is a crucial but bounded input into water resource decision-making processes; (2) establishing conditions for collaboration and shared commitment among actors; (3) understanding that social or group-learning processes linked to science-policy interaction are enhanced through greater collaboration; (4) accepting that the collaborative production of knowledge about hydrological issues and associated socioeconomic change and institutional responses is essential to build legitimate decision-making processes; and (5) engaging boundary organizations and informal networks of scientists, policy makers, and civil society. We elaborate on these conditions with a diverse set of international examples drawn from a synthesis of our collective experiences in assessing the opportunities and constraints (including the role of power relations) related to governance for water in transboundary settings.

  4. Discrete Atomic Layers at the Molecular Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorimitsu, Hideki; Bhanuchandra, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this review, we deal with the syntheses of large discrete atomic layers at the molecular level. Spectroscopic measurements as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses lead to unambiguous characterizations of these layers. The molecular atomic layers can be considered to be parts of graphenes and related atomic layers, thereby helping to understand such indefinitely huge atomic layers or serving as seeds for the controlled synthesis of nanocarbons.

  5. Implementing Clinical governance in Iranian hospitals: purpose, process and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Mohaghegh, Bahram; Ravaghi, Hamid; Mannion, Russell; Heidarpoor, Peigham; Sajadi, Haniye Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical governance as an approach to improving the quality and safety of clinical care has been run in all Iranian hospitals since 2009. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the processes and challenges faced in implementing clinical governance (CG) in acute-care hospitals in Iran. Methods We conducted an in-depth, qualitative, multi-case study using semi-structured interviews with a range of key stakeholders and review of relevant documents. This study was conducted in 2011–2012 in six governmental hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The data were analyzed using framework analysis. Results The interviewees, predominantly senior managers and nurses, expressed generally positive attitudes towards the benefits of CG. Four out of the six hospitals had a formal strategic plan to implement and execute CG. The emergent barriers to the implementation of CG included insufficient resources, the absence of clear supporting structures, a lack of supportive cultures, and inadequate support from senior management. The main facilitating factors were the reverse of the barriers noted above in addition to developing good relationships with key stakeholders, raising the awareness of CG among staff, and well-designed incentives. Conclusions There is a positive sense towards CG, but its successful implementation in Iran will require raising the awareness of CG among staff and key stakeholders and the successful collaboration of internal staff and external agencies. PMID:26952249

  6. Implementing Clinical governance in Iranian hospitals: purpose, process and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Mohaghegh, Bahram; Ravaghi, Hamid; Mannion, Russell; Heidarpoor, Peigham; Sajadi, Haniye Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Clinical governance as an approach to improving the quality and safety of clinical care has been run in all Iranian hospitals since 2009. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the processes and challenges faced in implementing clinical governance (CG) in acute-care hospitals in Iran. We conducted an in-depth, qualitative, multi-case study using semi-structured interviews with a range of key stakeholders and review of relevant documents. This study was conducted in 2011-2012 in six governmental hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The data were analyzed using framework analysis. The interviewees, predominantly senior managers and nurses, expressed generally positive attitudes towards the benefits of CG. Four out of the six hospitals had a formal strategic plan to implement and execute CG. The emergent barriers to the implementation of CG included insufficient resources, the absence of clear supporting structures, a lack of supportive cultures, and inadequate support from senior management. The main facilitating factors were the reverse of the barriers noted above in addition to developing good relationships with key stakeholders, raising the awareness of CG among staff, and well-designed incentives. There is a positive sense towards CG, but its successful implementation in Iran will require raising the awareness of CG among staff and key stakeholders and the successful collaboration of internal staff and external agencies.

  7. Elementary processes governing the evolution of road networks

    PubMed Central

    Strano, Emanuele; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito; Porta, Sergio; Barthélemy, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Urbanisation is a fundamental phenomenon whose quantitative characterisation is still inadequate. We report here the empirical analysis of a unique data set regarding almost 200 years of evolution of the road network in a large area located north of Milan (Italy). We find that urbanisation is characterised by the homogenisation of cell shapes, and by the stability throughout time of high–centrality roads which constitute the backbone of the urban structure, confirming the importance of historical paths. We show quantitatively that the growth of the network is governed by two elementary processes: (i) ‘densification’, corresponding to an increase in the local density of roads around existing urban centres and (ii) ‘exploration’, whereby new roads trigger the spatial evolution of the urbanisation front. The empirical identification of such simple elementary mechanisms suggests the existence of general, simple properties of urbanisation and opens new directions for its modelling and quantitative description. PMID:22389765

  8. Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, K. D.

    The author notes that two trends appear to be developing in litigation over the governance of the public schools. One trend is increasing participation of organized groups in suits against the schools. The other is a greater volume of litigation dealing with open meeting laws and freedom of information acts. Reflecting the second trend, the…

  9. Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, K. D.

    This chapter summarized and analyzes all state supreme court and federal court decisions as well as other significant court decisions affecting the realm of school governance. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1974 and reported in the General Digest on or before March 1, 1975. Because of its unusual significance,…

  10. Governing processes for reactive nitrogen compounds in the European atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, O.; Skjøth, C. A.; Reis, S.; Bleeker, A.; Harrison, R. M.; Cape, J. N.; Fowler, D.; Skiba, U.; Simpson, D.; Jickells, T.; Kulmala, M.; Gyldenkærne, S.; Sørensen, L. L.; Erisman, J. W.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) compounds have different fates in the atmosphere due to differences in the governing processes of physical transport, deposition and chemical transformation. Nr compounds addressed here include reduced nitrogen (NHx: ammonia (NH3) and its reaction product ammonium (NH4+)), oxidized nitrogen (NOy: nitrogen monoxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and their reaction products) as well as organic nitrogen compounds (organic N). Pollution abatement strategies need to take into account the differences in the governing processes of these compounds when assessing their impact on ecosystem services, biodiversity, human health and climate. NOx (NO + NO2) emitted from traffic affects human health in urban areas where the presence of buildings increases the residence time in streets. In urban areas this leads to enhanced exposure of the population to NOx concentrations. NOx emissions generally have little impact on nearby ecosystems because of the small dry deposition rates of NOx. These compounds need to be converted into nitric acid (HNO3) before removal through deposition is efficient. HNO3 sticks quickly to any surface and is thereby either dry deposited or incorporated into aerosols as nitrate (NO3-). In contrast to NOx compounds, NH3 has potentially high impacts on ecosystems near the main agricultural sources of NH3 because of its large ground-level concentrations along with large dry deposition rates. Aerosol phase NH4+ and NO3- contribute significantly to background PM2.5 and PM10 (mass of aerosols with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 and 10 μm, respectively) with an impact on radiation balance as well as potentially on human health. Little is known quantitatively and qualitatively about organic N in the atmosphere, other than that it contributes a significant fraction of wet-deposited N, and is present in both gaseous and particulate forms. Further studies are needed to characterise the sources, air chemistry and

  11. Processes the Govern Helicity Injection in the SSPX Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S; Stallard, B W; Holcomb, C T; Cothran, C

    2002-10-08

    The physical processes that govern the gun-voltage and give rise to field generation by helicity injection are surveyed in the Sustained Spheromak Physics experiment (SSPX) using internal magnetic field probes and particular attention to the gun-voltage. SSPX is a gun-driven spheromak, similar in many respects to CTX, although differing substantially by virtue of a programmable vacuum field configuration. Device parameters are: diameter = 1m, I{sub tor}-400kA, T{sub e}{approx}120eV, t{sub pulse}{approx}3ms. SSPX is now in its third year of operation and has demonstrated reasonable confinement (core {chi}{sub e}{approx}30m{sup 2}/s), and evidence for a beta limit (<{beta}{sub e}>{sub vol}{approx}4%), suggesting that the route to high temperature is to increase the spheromak field-strength (or current amplification, A{sub I} = I{sub torr}/I{sub inj}). Some progress has been made to increase A{sub I} in SSPX (A{sub I} = 2.2), although the highest A{sub I} observed in a spheromak of 3 has yet to be beaten. We briefly review helicity injection as the paradigm for spheromak field generation. SSPX results show that the processes that give efficient injection of helicity are inductive, and that these processes rapidly terminate when the current path ceases to change. The inductive processes are subsequently replaced by ones that resistively dissipate the injected helicity. This result means that efficient helicity injection can be achieved by harnessing the inductive processes, possibly by pulsing the gun. A pulsed build-up scenario is presented which gives A{sub I} > 3 and emphasizes the need to maintain reasonable confinement while the field of the spheromak is being built.

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.65 - What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.65 Section 102-33.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft? Acquiring aircraft generally follows a...

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.65 - What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.65 Section 102-33.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft? Acquiring aircraft generally follows a...

  14. 41 CFR 102-33.65 - What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.65 Section 102-33.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft? Acquiring aircraft generally follows a...

  15. 41 CFR 102-33.65 - What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.65 Section 102-33.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft? Acquiring aircraft generally follows a...

  16. 41 CFR 102-33.65 - What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.65 Section 102-33.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft? Acquiring aircraft generally follows a...

  17. Empathic and Self-Regulatory Processes Governing Doping Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Boardley, Ian D.; Smith, Alan L.; Mills, John P.; Grix, Jonathan; Wynne, Ceri

    2017-01-01

    Evidence associating doping behavior with moral disengagement (MD) has accumulated over recent years. However, to date, research examining links between MD and doping has not considered key theoretically grounded influences and outcomes of MD. As such, there is a need for quantitative research in relevant populations that purposefully examines the explanatory pathways through which MD is thought to operate. Toward this end, the current study examined a conceptually grounded model of doping behavior that incorporated empathy, doping self-regulatory efficacy (SRE), doping MD, anticipated guilt and self-reported doping/doping susceptibility. Participants were specifically recruited to represent four key physical-activity contexts and consisted of team- (n = 195) and individual- (n = 169) sport athletes and hardcore- (n = 125) and corporate- (n = 121) gym exercisers representing both genders (nmale = 371; nfemale = 239); self-reported lifetime prevalence of doping across the sample was 13.6%. Each participant completed questionnaires assessing the aforementioned variables. Structural equation modeling indicated strong support for all study hypotheses. Specifically, we established: (a) empathy and doping SRE negatively predicted reported doping; (b) the predictive effects of empathy and doping SRE on reported doping were mediated by doping MD and anticipated guilt; (c) doping MD positively predicted reported doping; (d) the predictive effects of doping MD on reported doping were partially mediated by anticipated guilt. Substituting self-reported doping for doping susceptibility, multisample analyses then demonstrated these predictive effects were largely invariant between males and females and across the four physical-activity contexts represented. These findings extend current knowledge on a number of levels, and in doing so aid our understanding of key psychosocial processes that may govern doping behavior across key physical-activity contexts.

  18. Understanding the Process; Financial Responsibilities of Governing Boards. User's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 1980

    1980-01-01

    A supplement to a slide presentation on financial responsibilities of governing boards, suitable for use at a trustee workshop, is presented. A flow of funds model which depicts the five major financial zones (acquisition, allocation, current fund, plant fund, and endowment and similar funds) is the visual devise used through the presentation.…

  19. Molecular-level understanding of the carbonisation of polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, Peter S; Budarin, Vitaliy; White, Robin J; Gun'ko, Vladimir M; Luque, Rafael; Clark, James H

    2013-07-08

    Understanding of both the textural and functionality changes occurring during (mesoporous) polysaccharide carbonisation at the molecular level provides a deeper insight into the whole spectrum of material properties, from chemical activity to pore shape and surface energy, which is crucial for the successful application of carbonaceous materials in adsorption, catalysis and chromatography. Obtained information will help to identify the most appropriate applications of the carbonaceous material generated during torrefaction and different types of pyrolysis processes and therefore will be important for the development of cost- and energy-efficient zero-waste biorefineries. The presented approach is informative and semi-quantitative with the potential to be extended to the formation of other biomass-derived carbonaceous materials. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. 32 CFR 1806.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedures governing acceptance of service of process. 1806.3 Section 1806.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1806.3 Procedures...

  1. 32 CFR 1806.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures governing acceptance of service of process. 1806.3 Section 1806.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1806.3 Procedures...

  2. 32 CFR 1806.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedures governing acceptance of service of process. 1806.3 Section 1806.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1806.3 Procedures...

  3. 32 CFR 1806.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedures governing acceptance of service of process. 1806.3 Section 1806.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1806.3 Procedures...

  4. 47 CFR 22.959 - Rules governing processing of applications for initial systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rules governing processing of applications for...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.959 Rules governing processing of applications for initial systems. Pending applications for authority to operate the...

  5. Effects of Context on Students' Molecular-Level Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teichert, Melonie A.; Tien, Lydia T.; Anthony, Seth; Rickey, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    In the studies reported here, we investigate the effects of context on students' molecular-level ideas regarding aqueous solutions. During one-on-one interviews, 19 general chemistry students recruited from a two-year community college and a research university in the United States were asked to describe their molecular-level ideas about various…

  6. Effects of Context on Students' Molecular-Level Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teichert, Melonie A.; Tien, Lydia T.; Anthony, Seth; Rickey, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    In the studies reported here, we investigate the effects of context on students' molecular-level ideas regarding aqueous solutions. During one-on-one interviews, 19 general chemistry students recruited from a two-year community college and a research university in the United States were asked to describe their molecular-level ideas about various…

  7. Army Needs to Improve Processes Over Government-Furnished Material Inventory Actions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    Processes Over Government‑Furnished Material Inventory Actions Visit us at www.dodig.mil Objective We determined whether the Logistics Modernization ... Modernization Program (LMP) system correctly recorded Army inventory actions for Government-furnished material (GFM) in the general ledger accounts and...Government property 5 DoD IG Report No. D-2011-015, “Insufficient Governance Over Logistics Modernization Program System Development,” November 2, 2010

  8. AGU governance's decision-making process advances strategic plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael; Finn, Carol; McEntee, Chris

    2012-10-01

    A lot has happened in a little more than 2 years, and we want give AGU members an update on how things are working under AGU's strategic plan and governance model. AGU is an organization committed to its strategic plan (http://www.agu.org/about/strategic_plan.shtml), and if you have not read the plan lately, we encourage you to do so. AGU's vision is to be an organization that "galvanizes a community of Earth and space scientists that collaboratively advances and communicates science and its power to ensure a sustainable future." We are excited about the progress we have made under this plan and the future course we have set for the Union. Everything the Board of Directors, Council, and committees put on their agendas is intended to advance AGU's strategic goals and objectives. Together with headquarters staff, these bodies are working in an integrated, effective manner to carry out this plan. The best way to demonstrate the progress made and each group's role is to walk through a recent example: the creation of a new Union-level award (see Figure 1).

  9. Freshwater processing of terrestrial dissolved organic matter: What governs lability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrilli, J.; Smith, H. J.; Junker, J. R.; Scholl, E. A.; Foreman, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are linked through the transfer of energy and materials. Allochthonous organic matter (OM) is central to freshwater ecosystem function, influencing local food webs, trophic state, and nutrient availability. In order to understand the nature and fate of OM from inland headwaters to the open ocean, it is imperative to understand the links between OM lability and ecosystem function. Thus, biological, chemical, and physical factors need to be evaluated together to inform our understanding of environmental lability. We performed a laboratory processing experiment on naturally occurring OM leachates from riparian leaves, grasses, and pine needles. Measures of water chemistry, OM optical and molecular characterization, bacterial abundances, microbial assemblage composition, respiration, and C:N:P were integrated to discern the nature and fate of labile and recalcitrant OM in a freshwater stream. Peak processing of all OM sources in the stream water occurred after two days, with spikes in bacterial cell abundances, respiration rates, microbial assemblage shifts, and maximum C utilization. Respiration rates and microbial assemblages were dependent on the degree of lability of the OM molecular composition. Within the first few days, no differences in respiration rates were observed between leachate sources, however, beyond day five, the rates diverged with C processing efficiency correlated with OM lability. Originally comprised of amino acid-like, labile fluorescent species, the inoculated stream water OM became more recalcitrant after 16 days, indicating humification processing over time. Our study highlights the importance of interdisciplinary approaches for understanding the processing and fate of OM in aquatic ecosystems.

  10. 32 CFR 1904.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1904.3 Procedures governing... addressed as follows: Litigation Division, Office of General Counsel, Central Intelligence Agency... Director and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence—in his or her individual capacity. (3) Mail...

  11. 32 CFR 1904.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1904.3 Procedures governing... addressed as follows: Litigation Division, Office of General Counsel, Central Intelligence Agency... Director and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence—in his or her individual capacity. (3) Mail...

  12. 32 CFR 1904.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1904.3 Procedures governing... addressed as follows: Litigation Division, Office of General Counsel, Central Intelligence Agency... Director and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence—in his or her individual capacity. (3) Mail...

  13. 32 CFR 1904.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1904.3 Procedures governing... addressed as follows: Litigation Division, Office of General Counsel, Central Intelligence Agency... Director and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence—in his or her individual capacity. (3) Mail...

  14. 32 CFR 1904.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1904.3 Procedures governing... addressed as follows: Litigation Division, Office of General Counsel, Central Intelligence Agency... Director and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence—in his or her individual capacity. (3) Mail Service...

  15. Mirror symmetry breaking at the molecular level.

    PubMed Central

    Avetisov, V; Goldanskii, V

    1996-01-01

    Reasoning from two basic principles of molecular physics, P invariance of electromagnetic interaction and the second law of thermodynamics, one would conclude that mirror symmetry retained in the world of chiral molecules. This inference is fully consistent with what is observed in inorganic nature. However, in the bioorganic world, the reverse is true. Mirror symmetry there is definitely broken. Is it possible to account for this phenomenon without going beyond conventional concepts of the kinetics of enantioselective processes? This study is an attempt to survey all existing hypotheses containing this phenomenon. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8876153

  16. Trust in Numbers? Digital Education Governance and the Inspection Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozga, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to contribute to the critical study of digital data use in education, through examination of the processes surrounding school inspection judgements. The interaction between pupil performance data and other (embodied, enacted) sources of inspection judgement is scrutinised and discussed with a focus on the interaction…

  17. Trust in Numbers? Digital Education Governance and the Inspection Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozga, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to contribute to the critical study of digital data use in education, through examination of the processes surrounding school inspection judgements. The interaction between pupil performance data and other (embodied, enacted) sources of inspection judgement is scrutinised and discussed with a focus on the interaction…

  18. How Effective Are Simulated Molecular-level Experiments for Teaching Diffusion and Osmosis?

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Diffusion and osmosis are central concepts in biology, both at the cellular and organ levels. They are presented several times throughout most introductory biology textbooks (e.g., Freeman, 2002), yet both processes are often difficult for students to understand (Odom, 1995; Zuckerman, 1994; Sanger et al., 2001; and results herein). Students have deep-rooted misconceptions about how diffusion and osmosis work, especially at the molecular level. We hypothesized that this might be in part due to the inability to see and explore these processes at the molecular level. In order to investigate this, we developed new software, OsmoBeaker, which allows students to perform inquiry-based experiments at the molecular level. Here we show that these simulated laboratories do indeed teach diffusion and osmosis and help overcome some, but not all, student misconceptions. PMID:16220144

  19. How effective are simulated molecular-level experiments for teaching diffusion and osmosis?

    PubMed

    Meir, Eli; Perry, Judith; Stal, Derek; Maruca, Susan; Klopfer, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Diffusion and osmosis are central concepts in biology, both at the cellular and organ levels. They are presented several times throughout most introductory biology textbooks (e.g., Freeman, 2002), yet both processes are often difficult for students to understand (Odom, 1995; Zuckerman, 1994; Sanger et al., 2001; and results herein). Students have deep-rooted misconceptions about how diffusion and osmosis work, especially at the molecular level. We hypothesized that this might be in part due to the inability to see and explore these processes at the molecular level. In order to investigate this, we developed new software, OsmoBeaker, which allows students to perform inquiry-based experiments at the molecular level. Here we show that these simulated laboratories do indeed teach diffusion and osmosis and help overcome some, but not all, student misconceptions.

  20. Understanding diseases at a molecular level

    SciTech Connect

    Rosev, Tatjana K

    2008-01-01

    A group of scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 successfully pioneered a microscope able to track protein-sized, hard to see particles in three dimensions. The 3D Tracking Microscope, designed and developed by James H. Werner, Guillaume A. Lessard, Nathan Wells and Peter M. Goodwin of LANL's Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, won a 2008 R&D 100 award. The team's invention is a unique confocal 3D tracking microscope capable of following the motion of nanometer-sized objects, such as individual molecules, quantum dots, organic fluorophores and single green fluorescent proteins as they zoom through three-dimensional space at rates faster than many intracellular transport processes. The 3D tracking microscope can follow the transport of nanometer-sized particles at micrometer per second rates. This enables researchers to follow individual protein, ribonucleic acid (RNA), or deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) motion throughout the full three-dimensional volume of a cell to discover the path a particular biomolecule takes, the method it employs to get there and the specific proteins it may be interacting with along the way. In addition to applications in molecular spectroscopy and materials research, the 3D tracking microscope is a powerful tool primarily in the fields of cellular biology and biomedical research, Werner said. 'The 3D tracking microscope will advance our understanding of the molecular basis and kinetics of many diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, or muscular dystrophy,' he said. 'We anticipate the microscope will become a valuable weapon in the arsenal of biomedical researchers who are fighting to find cures for cancer, heart disease and other protein or DNA-based diseases.'

  1. 47 CFR 22.959 - Rules governing processing of applications for initial systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.959 Rules governing... cellular system on a channel block in an MSA or RSA market continue to be processed under the rules...

  2. Arctic mosses govern below-ground environment and ecosystem processes.

    PubMed

    Gornall, J L; Jónsdóttir, I S; Woodin, S J; Van der Wal, R

    2007-10-01

    Mosses dominate many northern ecosystems and their presence is integral to soil thermal and hydrological regimes which, in turn, dictate important ecological processes. Drivers, such as climate change and increasing herbivore pressure, affect the moss layer thus, assessment of the functional role of mosses in determining soil characteristics is essential. Field manipulations conducted in high arctic Spitsbergen (78 degrees N), creating shallow (3 cm), intermediate (6 cm) and deep (12 cm) moss layers over the soil surface, had an immediate impact on soil temperature in terms of both average temperatures and amplitude of fluctuations. In soil under deep moss, temperature was substantially lower and organic layer thaw occurred 4 weeks later than in other treatment plots; the growing season for vascular plants was thereby reduced by 40%. Soil moisture was also reduced under deep moss, reflecting the influence of local heterogeneity in moss depth, over and above the landscape-scale topographic control of soil moisture. Data from field and laboratory experiments show that moss-mediated effects on the soil environment influenced microbial biomass and activity, resulting in warmer and wetter soil under thinner moss layers containing more plant-available nitrogen. In arctic ecosystems, which are limited by soil temperature, growing season length and nutrient availability, spatial and temporal variation in the depth of the moss layer has significant repercussions for ecosystem function. Evidence from our mesic tundra site shows that any disturbance causing reduction in the depth of the moss layer will alleviate temperature and moisture constraints and therefore profoundly influence a wide range of ecosystem processes, including nutrient cycling and energy transfer.

  3. Interfacial Phenomena: Linking Atomistic and Molecular Level Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jay A Brandes

    2009-09-23

    This was a grant to support travel for scientists to present data and interact with others in their field. Specifically, speakers presented their data in a session entitled “Interfacial Phenomena: Linking Atomistic and Macroscopic Properties: Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Structure and Reactivity of Mineral Surfaces”. The session ran across three ½ day periods, March 30-31 2004. The session’s organizers were David J. Wesolowski andGordon E. Brown Jr. There were a total of 30 talks presented.

  4. Processes governing the carbon chemistry during the SAGE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, K. I.; Macaskill, B.; Reid, M. R.; Law, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of pCO 2, pH and alkalinity in the surface waters of an iron fertilised patch of sub-Antarctic water were made during SAGE (SOLAS SAGE: Surface-Ocean Lower Atmosphere Studies Air-Sea Gas Experiment). The iron addition induced a minor phytoplankton bloom, however the patch dynamics were dominated by physical processes which suppressed and masked the biological effects. The Lagrangian nature of the experiment allowed the carbonate chemistry in the patch to be followed for 15.5 days, and the relative importance of the biological and physical factors influencing the surface water pCO 2 was estimated. The pCO 2 of the surface waters of the patch increased from 327 μatm prior to iron addition to 338 μatm on Day 14, effects of vertical and horizontal mixing offset the 15 μatm drawdown that would have occurred had the induced biological uptake been the sole factor to influence the pCO 2. The air-sea carbon flux calculated using the measured skin temperature and a piston velocity parameterisation determined during SAGE ( Ho et al., 2006) was 98.5% of the flux determined using conventional bulk temperature measurement and the Wanninkhof (1992) piston velocity parameterisation. The skin temperature alone contributed to an 8% increase in the flux compared with that determined using bulk temperature.

  5. The Governance of Higher Education Regionalisation: Comparative Analysis of the Bologna Process and MERCOSUR-Educativo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verger, Antoni; Hermo, Javier Pablo

    2010-01-01

    The article analyses two processes of higher education regionalisation, MERCOSUR-Educativo in Latin America and the Bologna Process in Europe, from a comparative perspective. The comparative analysis is centered on the content and the governance of both processes and, specifically, on the reasons of their uneven evolution and implementation. We…

  6. The Governance of Higher Education Regionalisation: Comparative Analysis of the Bologna Process and MERCOSUR-Educativo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verger, Antoni; Hermo, Javier Pablo

    2010-01-01

    The article analyses two processes of higher education regionalisation, MERCOSUR-Educativo in Latin America and the Bologna Process in Europe, from a comparative perspective. The comparative analysis is centered on the content and the governance of both processes and, specifically, on the reasons of their uneven evolution and implementation. We…

  7. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  8. Solutions for a mass transfer process governed by fractional diffusion equations with reaction terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenzi, E. K.; dos Santos, M. A. F.; Lenzi, M. K.; Menechini Neto, R.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the behavior of a mass transfer process governed by a set of fractional diffusion equations coupled by appropriate reaction terms. The presence of memory effects in the diffusive term is also considered. For this set of equations, we obtain solutions and analyze the influence of the reaction terms on the spreading of these solutions. Particularly, we observe that for reversible reaction processes the reaction terms play an important role for intermediate times and for long times the processes are essentially governed by the bulk equations. These results show a rich class of behaviors which can be connected to sub- or superdiffusive regime.

  9. Feel Good--Be Good: Subject Content and Governing Processes in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohman, Marie; Quennerstedt, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background: In this paper a study of both subject "content" and governing "processes" in Swedish physical education is presented. The reason why an analysis of both content and processes is of special interest is that it makes it possible to understand the encounter between the institutional level and the practice of education.…

  10. Molecular-level simulations of turbulence and its decay

    DOE PAGES

    Gallis, M. A.; Bitter, N. P.; Koehler, T. P.; ...

    2017-02-08

    Here, we provide the first demonstration that molecular-level methods based on gas kinetic theory and molecular chaos can simulate turbulence and its decay. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, a molecular-level technique for simulating gas flows that resolves phenomena from molecular to hydrodynamic (continuum) length scales, is applied to simulate the Taylor-Green vortex flow. The DSMC simulations reproduce the Kolmogorov –5/3 law and agree well with the turbulent kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate obtained from direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations using a spectral method. This agreement provides strong evidence that molecular-level methods for gases can bemore » used to investigate turbulent flows quantitatively.« less

  11. Molecular-Level Simulations of Turbulence and Its Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, M. A.; Bitter, N. P.; Koehler, T. P.; Torczynski, J. R.; Plimpton, S. J.; Papadakis, G.

    2017-02-01

    We provide the first demonstration that molecular-level methods based on gas kinetic theory and molecular chaos can simulate turbulence and its decay. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, a molecular-level technique for simulating gas flows that resolves phenomena from molecular to hydrodynamic (continuum) length scales, is applied to simulate the Taylor-Green vortex flow. The DSMC simulations reproduce the Kolmogorov -5 /3 law and agree well with the turbulent kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate obtained from direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations using a spectral method. This agreement provides strong evidence that molecular-level methods for gases can be used to investigate turbulent flows quantitatively.

  12. Drug consumption rooms and the role of politics and governance in policy processes.

    PubMed

    Houborg, Esben; Frank, Vibeke Asmussen

    2014-09-01

    In 2012 after more than 20 years of discussion Denmark introduced drug consumption facilities as part of its drug policy. This article investigates the processes that led to this new policy and its implementation in Copenhagen. The aim of the article is to analyze if the new policy and its implementation can be understood in terms of a shift from 'government' to 'governance' in drug policy. On this basis the aim is also to discuss the possibilities and limitations of 'governance' as an analytical perspective for understanding policy change in the field of drug policy. Through the use of Kingdon's theory about policy change as following alignments of problem streams, policy streams and politics streams and deployment of Callon's concepts of 'framing' and 'overflowing' the article presents an analysis of recorded communication from the public debate and national and local policy processes. Politics and the authority of government played a key role in the policy change that led to the introduction of drug consumption facilities in Denmark. It was only after a change of government and a change of legislation that a new policy came about. Drug consumption facilities did exist on a small scale before this through acts of civil disobedience committed by civil society stakeholders. The space for governance seems to be limited in a drug policy that is prohibitive, at least when it touches upon issues that concern law enforcement and the sovereign power of the state. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Performance Measurement of Location Enabled e-Government Processes: A Use Case on Traffic Safety Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, D.; Vancauwenberghe, G.

    2016-12-01

    The European Union Location Framework (EULF), as part of the Interoperable Solutions for European Public Administrations (ISA) Programme of the EU (EC DG DIGIT), aims to enhance the interactions between governments, businesses and citizens by embedding location information into e-Government processes. The challenge remains to find scientific sound and at the same time practicable approaches to estimate or measure the impact of location enablement of e-Government processes on the performance of the processes. A method has been defined to estimate process performance in terms of variables describing the efficiency, effectiveness, as well as the quality of the output of the work processes. A series of use cases have been identified, corresponding to existing e-Government work processes in which location information could bring added value. In a first step, the processes are described by means of BPMN (Business Process Model and Notation) to better understand the process steps, the actors involved, the spatial data flows, as well as the required input and the generated output. In a second step the processes are assessed in terms of the (sub-optimal) use of location information and the potential enhancement of the process by better integrating location information and services. The process performance is measured ex ante (before using location enabled e-Government services) and ex-post (after the integration of such services) in order to estimate and measure the impact of location information. The paper describes the method for performance measurement and highlights how the method is applied to one use case, i.e. the process of traffic safety monitoring. The use case is analysed and assessed in terms of location enablement and its potential impact on process performance. The results of applying the methodology on the use case revealed that performance is highly impacted by factors such as the way location information is collected, managed and shared throughout the

  14. Reengineering business processes in government: A framework for performance improvement interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J.C.; Levine, L.O.; Carson, M.L.

    1995-02-01

    The world is changing quickly, and government agencies have difficulty adapting. One reason is that they are based on a bureaucratic model derived from the industrial mass production era. While this model provides organizational benefits, such as stability and clear lines of authority, it also minimizes flexibility and diversity in service delivery. While the private sector has moved away from this model, the public sector remains wedded to a top-down, standardized service delivery system. Dissatisfaction with the traditional model of government is rampant. Constituencies are demanding that government agencies consume less and provide more. There is tremendous pressure on government at all levels in the United States to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of government services and programs. Improving government agency performance is far more complex than simply reinventing or reengineering the agency for these efforts are likely to fail in procedural and copying agencies. The framework and decision process described in this paper should be used to prevent the high failure rates associated with blanket approaches to reengineering and reinventing. The best opportunities for change at the federal level are probably with agencies that have been mandated a change in mission. These agencies will tend to have a clearer sense of the need for change and have a greater sense of urgency regarding adopting a new way of conducting business. Also, for a higher rate of success, internal or external consultants may be utilized to avoid simplistic or faddish solutions when the real problems may be due to complex organizational behavior.

  15. Finding and Tracing the Effects of Governance Processes in the New Opportunities Initiative: An Outline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Based on a Globally Structured Agenda for Education, this article presents the construction of the New Opportunities Initiative in Portugal. Thus, it analyses the relationship between the European Union and the Portuguese State with regard to the construction of this programme, identifying for this purpose the effects of governance processes.…

  16. 32 CFR 1702.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... THE DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE PROCEDURES GOVERNING THE ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1702... Intelligence, Office of General Counsel, Washington, DC 20511, and the envelope must be conspicuously marked... capacity. Except for the DNI, the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence, and the Director...

  17. 32 CFR 1702.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE PROCEDURES GOVERNING THE ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1702... Intelligence, Office of General Counsel, Washington, DC 20511, and the envelope must be conspicuously marked... capacity. Except for the DNI, the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence, and the Director...

  18. 32 CFR 1702.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THE DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE PROCEDURES GOVERNING THE ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1702... Intelligence, Office of General Counsel, Washington, DC 20511, and the envelope must be conspicuously marked... capacity. Except for the DNI, the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence, and the Director...

  19. 32 CFR 1702.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE PROCEDURES GOVERNING THE ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1702... Intelligence, Office of General Counsel, Washington, DC 20511, and the envelope must be conspicuously marked... capacity. Except for the DNI, the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence, and the Director...

  20. Same Challenges, Different Processes: Perceptions on Governance Changes in Portuguese and Finnish Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diogo, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This article compares recent governance reforms in Finnish and Portuguese higher education (HE) systems and institutions (HEIs). Although Portugal and Finland differ significantly, both the countries have recently undertaken similar HE legislative reforms. This article analyses the contexts and implementation processes of these legal frameworks:…

  1. Relationship of Automatic Data Processing Training Curriculum and Methodology in the Federal Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    A conference, held in Washington, D. C., in 1967 by the Association for Educational Data Systems and the U.S. Office of Education, attempted to lay the groundwork for an efficient automatic data processing training program for the Federal Government utilizing new instructional methodologies. The rapid growth of computer applications and computer…

  2. Same Challenges, Different Processes: Perceptions on Governance Changes in Portuguese and Finnish Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diogo, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This article compares recent governance reforms in Finnish and Portuguese higher education (HE) systems and institutions (HEIs). Although Portugal and Finland differ significantly, both the countries have recently undertaken similar HE legislative reforms. This article analyses the contexts and implementation processes of these legal frameworks:…

  3. Finding and Tracing the Effects of Governance Processes in the New Opportunities Initiative: An Outline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Based on a Globally Structured Agenda for Education, this article presents the construction of the New Opportunities Initiative in Portugal. Thus, it analyses the relationship between the European Union and the Portuguese State with regard to the construction of this programme, identifying for this purpose the effects of governance processes.…

  4. 32 CFR 1702.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... THE DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE PROCEDURES GOVERNING THE ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS § 1702... Intelligence, Office of General Counsel, Washington, DC 20511, and the envelope must be conspicuously marked... capacity. Except for the DNI, the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence, and the Director of...

  5. Actinide geochemistry: from the molecular level to the real system.

    PubMed

    Geckeis, Horst; Rabung, Thomas

    2008-12-12

    Geochemical processes leading to either mobilization or retention of radionuclides in an aquifer system are significantly influenced by their interaction with rock, sediment and colloid surfaces. Therefore, a sound safety assessment of nuclear waste disposal requires the elucidation and quantification of those processes. State-of-the-art analytical techniques as e.g. laser- and X-ray spectroscopy are increasingly applied to study solid-liquid interface reactions to obtain molecular level speciation insight. We have studied the sorption of trivalent lanthanides and actinides onto aluminium oxides, hydroxides and purified clay minerals by the time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray-absorption spectroscopy. Chemical constitution and structure of surface bound actinides are proposed based on spectroscopic information. Open questions still remain with regard to the exact nature of mineral surface ligands and the mineral/water interface. Similarities of spectroscopic data obtained for M(III) sorbed onto gamma-alumina, and clay minerals suggest the formation of very comparable inner-sphere surface complexes such as S-O-An(III)(OH)x(2-x)(H2O)5-x at pH > 5. Those speciation data are found consistent with those predicted by surface complexation modelling. The applicability of data obtained for pure mineral phases to actinide sorption onto heterogeneously composed natural clay rock is examined by experiments and by geochemical modelling. Good agreement of experiment and model calculations is found for U(VI) and trivalent actinide/lanthanide sorption to natural clay rock. The agreement of spectroscopy, geochemical modelling and batch experiments with natural rock samples and purified minerals increases the reliability in model predictions. The assessment of colloid borne actinide migration observed in various laboratory and field studies calls for detailed information on actinide-colloid interaction. Kinetic stabilization of colloid bound actinides can be due

  6. What influences government adoption of vaccines in developing countries? A policy process analysis.

    PubMed

    Munira, Syarifah Liza; Fritzen, Scott A

    2007-10-01

    This paper proposes a framework for examining the process by which government consideration and adoption of new vaccines takes place, with specific reference to developing country settings. The cases of early Hepatitis B vaccine adoption in Taiwan and Thailand are used to explore the relevance of explanatory factors identified in the literature as well as the need to go beyond a variable-centric focus by highlighting the role of policy context and process in determining the pace and extent of adoption. The cases suggest the feasibility and importance of modeling 'causal diversity'-the complex set of necessary and sufficient conditions leading to particular decisional outcomes-in a broad range of country contexts. A better understanding of the lenses through which government decision-makers filter information, and of the arenas in which critical decisions are shaped and taken, may assist both analysts (in predicting institutionalization of new vaccines) and advocates (in crafting targeted strategies to accelerate their diffusion).

  7. E-Government Goes Semantic Web: How Administrations Can Transform Their Information Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klischewski, Ralf; Ukena, Stefan

    E-government applications and services are built mainly on access to, retrieval of, integration of, and delivery of relevant information to citizens, businesses, and administrative users. In order to perform such information processing automatically through the Semantic Web,1 machine-readable2 enhancements of web resources are needed, based on the understanding of the content and context of the information in focus. While these enhancements are far from trivial to produce, administrations in their role of information and service providers so far find little guidance on how to migrate their web resources and enable a new quality of information processing; even research is still seeking best practices. Therefore, the underlying research question of this chapter is: what are the appropriate approaches which guide administrations in transforming their information processes toward the Semantic Web? In search for answers, this chapter analyzes the challenges and possible solutions from the perspective of administrations: (a) the reconstruction of the information processing in the e-government in terms of how semantic technologies must be employed to support information provision and consumption through the Semantic Web; (b) the required contribution to the transformation is compared to the capabilities and expectations of administrations; and (c) available experience with the steps of transformation are reviewed and discussed as to what extent they can be expected to successfully drive the e-government to the Semantic Web. This research builds on studying the case of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, where semantic technologies have been used within the frame of the Access-eGov3 project in order to semantically enhance electronic service interfaces with the aim of providing a new way of accessing and combining e-government services.

  8. Hospital information system institutionalization processes in indonesian public, government-owned and privately owned hospitals.

    PubMed

    Handayani, P W; Hidayanto, A N; Ayuningtyas, Dumilah; Budi, Indra

    2016-11-01

    The Hospital Information System (HIS) could help hospitals as a public entity to provide optimal health services. One of the main challenges of HIS implementation is an institutional change. Using institutional theory as the analytical lens, this study aims to explain the institutionalization of HIS as an instance of e-health initiatives in Indonesia. Furthermore, this paper aims for hospital management and researchers to improve the understanding of the social forces that influence hospital personnel's HIS acceptance within an organizational context. We use case studies from four public, government-owned hospitals and four privately owned (public and specialty) hospitals to explain the HIS institutionalization process by exploring the three concepts of institutional theory: institutional isomorphism, institutional logic, and institutional entrepreneurship. This study reveals that differences exist between public, government-owned and private hospitals with regard to the institutionalization process: public, government-owned hospitals' management is more motivated to implement HIS to comply with the regulations, while private hospitals' management views HIS as an urgent requirement that must be achieved. The study findings also reveal that various institutional isomorphism mechanisms and forms of institutional logic emerge during the process. Finally, three factors-self-efficacy, social influence, and management support-have a significant influence on the individual acceptance of HIS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A social-level macro-governance mode for collaborative manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ji; Lv, Hexin; Jin, Zhiyong; Xu, Ping

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes the social-level macro-governance mode for innovating the popular centralized control for CoM (Collaborative Manufacturing) processes, and makes this mode depend on the support from three aspects of technologies standalone and complementary: social–level CoM process norms, CoM process supervision system, and rational agents as the brokers of enterprises. It is the close coupling of those technologies that redounds to removing effectively the uncontrollability obstacle confronted with by cross-management-domain CoM processes. As a result, this mode enables CoM applications to be implemented by uniting the centralized control of CoM partners for respective CoM activities, and therefore provides a new distributed CoM process control mode to push forward the convenient development and large-scale deployment of SME-oriented CoM applications.

  10. 75 FR 76467 - Draft Concept for Government-Wide “ExpertNet” Platform and Process To Elicit Expert Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Draft Concept for Government-Wide ``ExpertNet'' Platform and Process To Elicit Expert Public...) requests input, comment, and ideas from the public on a draft concept for next-generation citizen consultation, namely a government- wide software tool and process to elicit expert public...

  11. 42 CFR 137.295 - May Self-Governance Tribes elect to develop their own environmental review process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... own environmental review process? Yes, Self-Governance Tribes may develop their own environmental... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes elect to develop their own environmental review process? 137.295 Section 137.295 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH...

  12. Health and equity in all policies in local government: processes and outcomes in two Norwegian municipalities.

    PubMed

    Von Heimburg, Dina; Hakkebo, Berit

    2017-08-01

    To identify key factors in implementing Health and Equity in All Policies (HEiAP) at the local level in two Norwegian municipalities in order to accelerate the progress of promoting health, well-being and equity in other local governments. This case study is presented as a narrative from policy-making processes in two Norwegian municipalities. The story is told from an insider perspective, with a focus on HEiAP policy makers in these two municipalities. The narrative identified key learning from implementing HEiAP at the local level, i.e. the importance of strengthening system and human capacities. System capacity is strengthened by governing HEiAP according to national legislation and a holistic governance system at the local level. Municipal plans are based on theory, evidence and local data. A 'main story' is developed to support the vision, defining joint societal goals and co-creation strategies. Policies are anchored by measuring and monitoring outcomes, sharing accountability and continuous dialogue to ensure political commitment. Human capacity is strengthened through participatory leadership, soft skills and health promotion competences across sectors. Health promotion competence at a strategic level in the organization, participation in professional networks, crowd sourcing toward common goals, and commitment through winning hearts and minds of politicians and other stakeholders are vital aspects. Our experience pinpoints the importance of strengthening system and human capacity in local governments. Further, we found it important to focus on the two strategic objectives in the European strategy 'Health 2020': (1) Improving health for all and reducing health inequalities; (2) improving leadership and participatory governance for health.

  13. The Role of Contracts and Informal Relations in the Governance of IT Outsourcing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaia, Giovanni; Tommasetti, Aurelio

    This paper aims to give a contribution to represent and comprehend the characteristics of the relationships between customers and providers in the specific context of IT services supply; furthermore it provides its peculiar perspective on the relationship between the formal governance, which is mostly realized through the use of contracts, and the informal relations based on trust and commitment between the parties. Moreover, the current study underlines that within contexts which are strongly based on the uncertain evolution both of market and technology, the governance of IT outsourcing processesneeds the development of complex informal relationships in support of the contracts. The study shows how it is possible to absorb the effects of the market and technology uncertainty within the IT outsourcing contracts. Moreover, the research shows how the use of dynamic contracting together with an explicit attention to the social processes can lead to remarkable operative and strategic benefits.

  14. Tear film lipid layer: A molecular level view.

    PubMed

    Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2016-10-01

    Human cornea is covered by an aqueous tear film, and the outermost layer of the tear film is coated by lipids. This so-called tear film lipid layer (TFLL) reduces surface tension of the tear film and helps with the film re-spreading after blinks. Alterations of tear lipids composition and properties are related to dry eye syndrome. Therefore, unveiling structural and functional properties of TFLL is necessary for understanding tear film function under both normal and pathological conditions. Key properties of TFLL, such as resistance against high lateral pressures and ability to spread at the tear film surface, are directly related to the chemical identity of TFLL lipids. Hence, a molecular-level description is required to get better insight into TFLL properties. Molecular dynamics simulations are particularly well suited for this task and they were recently used for investigating TFLL. The present review discusses molecular level organization and properties of TFLL as seen by these simulation studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg.

  15. Health workforce governance: Processes, tools and actors towards a competent workforce for integrated health services delivery.

    PubMed

    Barbazza, Erica; Langins, Margrieta; Kluge, Hans; Tello, Juan

    2015-12-01

    A competent health workforce is a vital resource for health services delivery, dictating the extent to which services are capable of responding to health needs. In the context of the changing health landscape, an integrated approach to service provision has taken precedence. For this, strengthening health workforce competencies is an imperative, and doing so in practice hinges on the oversight and steering function of governance. To aid health system stewards in their governing role, this review seeks to provide an overview of processes, tools and actors for strengthening health workforce competencies. It draws from a purposive and multidisciplinary review of literature, expert opinion and country initiatives across the WHO European Region's 53 Member States. Through our analysis, we observe distinct yet complementary roles can be differentiated between health services delivery and the health system. This understanding is a necessary prerequisite to gain deeper insight into the specificities for strengthening health workforce competencies in order for governance to rightly create the institutional environment called for to foster alignment. Differentiating between the contribution of health services and the health system in the strengthening of health workforce competencies is an important distinction for achieving and sustaining health improvement goals.

  16. Scientific governance and the process for exposure scenario development in REACH.

    PubMed

    Money, Chris D; Van Hemmen, Joop J; Vermeire, Theo G

    2007-12-01

    The primary process established by the European Commission to address the science needed to define key REACH concepts and to help rationally implement REACH's ambitions is enshrined in a series of activities known as the REACH Implementation Projects (RIPs). These are projects that aim to define the methodology that could be used, and present the basis for guidance on the actual principles and procedures that may be (are proposed to be) followed in the development of the required documentation that ensures the safe use of chemicals. In order to develop soundly based and equitable regulation, it is necessary that science governance using established and accepted scientific principles must take a leading role. The extent to which such governance is embraced will be determined by many factors, but notably the process adopted to enable scientific discussion to take place. This article addresses the issues of science as they have impacted on the exemplification of the Exposure Scenario concept under REACH. The current RIP activities have created a non-adversarial process in which the key stakeholders are able to discuss the key REACH challenges. But the RIP activities will be finalised before REACH comes into force. A suitable mechanism should perhaps now be identified to ensure that this positive spirit of scientific discussion and collaboration can continue to benefit REACH and those that it serves well into the future.

  17. SNMG: a social-level norm-based methodology for macro-governing service collaboration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ji; Lv, Hexin; Jin, Zhiyong; Xu, Ping

    2017-08-01

    In order to adapt to the accelerative open tendency of collaborations between enterprises, this paper proposes a Social-level Norm-based methodology for Macro-Governing service collaboration processes, called SNMG, to regulate and control the social-level visible macro-behaviors of the social individuals participating in collaborations. SNMG not only can remove effectively the uncontrollability hindrance confronted with by open social activities, but also enables across-management-domain collaborations to be implemented by uniting the centralized controls of social individuals for respective social activities. Therefore, this paper provides a brand-new system construction mode to promote the development and large-scale deployment of service collaborations.

  18. Separating Mechanical and Chemical Contributions to Molecular-Level Friction

    SciTech Connect

    KIM,HYUN I.; HOUSTON,JACK E.

    2000-08-14

    The authors use force-probe microscopy to study the friction force and the adhesive interaction for molecular monolayer self-assembled on both Au probe tips and substrate surfaces. By systematically varying the chemical nature of the end groups on these monolayers the authors have, for the first time, delineated the mechanical and chemical origins of molecular-level friction. They use chemically inert {double_bond}CH{sub 3} groups on both interracial surfaces to establish the purely mechanical component of the friction and contrast the results with the findings for chemically active {double_bond}COOH end-groups. In addition, by using odd or even numbers of methylene groups in the alkyl backbones of the molecules they are able to determine the levels of inter-film and intra-film hydrogen bonding.

  19. Interfacial Reactivity of Radionuclides: Emerging Paradigms from Molecular Level Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-08-15

    Over the past few decades use of an increasing array of molecular-level analytical probes has provided new detailed insight into mineral and radionuclide interfacial reactivity in subsurface environments. This capability has not only helped change the way mineral surface reactivity is studied but also how field-scale contaminant migration problems are addressed and ultimately resolved. Here we overview examples of relatively new interfacial reactivity paradigms with implications for future research directions. Specific examples include understanding: the role of site-to-site electron conduction at mineral surfaces and through bulk mineral phases, effects of local chemical environment on the stability of intermediate species in oxidation/reduction reactions, and the importance of mechanistic reaction pathway for defining possible reaction products and thermodynamic driving force. The discussion also includes examples of how detailed molecular/microscopic characterization of field samples has changed the way complex contaminant migration problems were conceptualized and modeled.

  20. Biogeochemical processes governing natural pyrite oxidation and release of acid metalliferous drainage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-ting; Li, Jin-tian; Chen, Lin-xing; Hua, Zheng-shuang; Huang, Li-nan; Liu, Jun; Xu, Bi-bo; Liao, Bin; Shu, Wen-sheng

    2014-05-20

    The oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals (principally pyrite) is responsible for the majority of acid metalliferous drainage from mine sites, which represents a significant environmental problem worldwide. Understanding the complex biogeochemical processes governing natural pyrite oxidation is critical not only for solving this problem but also for understanding the industrial bioleaching of sulfide minerals. To this end, we conducted a simulated experiment of natural pyrite oxidative dissolution. Pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial community revealed a distinct succession across three stages. At the early stage, a newly proposed genus, Tumebacillus (which can use sodium thiosulfate and sulfite as the sole electron donors), dominated the microbial community. At the midstage, Alicyclobacillus (the fifth most abundant genus at the early stage) became the most dominant genus, whereas Tumebacillus was still ranked as the second most abundant. At the final stage, the microbial community was dominated by Ferroplasma (the tenth most abundant genus at the early stage). Our geochemical and mineralogical analyses indicated that exchangeable heavy metals increased as the oxidation progressed and that some secondary sulfate minerals (including jarosite and magnesiocopiapite) were formed at the final stage of the oxidation sequence. Additionally, we propose a comprehensive model of biogeochemical processes governing the oxidation of sulfide minerals.

  1. Implications of climate and land-use change for landscape processes, biodiversity, ecosystem services, and governance.

    PubMed

    Elmhagen, Bodil; Eriksson, Ove; Lindborg, Regina

    2015-01-01

    This introduction to the Special Issue summarizes the results of 14 scientific articles from the interdisciplinary research program Ekoklim at Stockholm University, Sweden. In this program, we investigate effects of changing climate and land use on landscape processes, biodiversity, and ecosystem services, and analyze issues related to adaptive governance in the face of climate and land-use change. We not only have a research focus on the 22 650 km(2) Norrström catchment surrounding lake Mälaren in south-central Sweden, but we also conduct research in other Swedish regions. The articles presented here show complex interactions between multiple drivers of change, as well as feedback processes at different spatiotemporal scales. Thus, the Ekoklim program highlights and deals with issues relevant for the future challenges society will face when land-use change interacts with climate change.

  2. Exploring the Impact of and Perceptions about Interactive, Self-Explaining Environments in Molecular-Level Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falvo, David A.; Urban, Michael J.; Suits, Jerry P.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-method study investigates the effects of interactivity in animations of a molecular-level process and explores perceptions about the animated learning tool used. Treatments were based on principles of cognitive psychology designed to study the main effects of treatment and spatial ability and their interaction. Results with students (n…

  3. The Public Health Service guidelines. Governing research involving human subjects: An analysis of the policy-making process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    The policy making process which led to development of the Public Health Service Guidelines governing research involving human subjects is outlined. Part 1 examines the evolution of PHS Guidelines, tracing (1) evolution of thought and legal interpretation regarding research using human subjects; (2) initial involvement of the Federal government; (3) development of the government's research program; (4) the social-political environment in which formal government policy was developed; and (5) various policy statements issued by the government. Part 2 analyzes the process by which PHS Guidelines were developed and examines the values and other underlying factors which contributed to their development. It was concluded that the evolution of the Guidelines is best understood within the context of a mixed-scanning strategy. In such a strategy, policy makers make fundamental decisions regarding the basic direction of policy and subsequent decisions are made incrementally and within the contexts set by the original fundamental decisions.

  4. RNASeq analysis reveals biological processes governing the clinical behaviour of endometrioid and serous endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Lemetre, Christophe; Vieites, Begoña; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Schultheis, Anne M; Marchiò, Caterina; Murali, Rajmohan; Lopez-García, Maria A; Palacios, Jose C; Jungbluth, Achim A; Terracciano, Luigi M; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Weigelt, Britta

    2016-09-01

    Endometrial carcinoma comprises a group of tumours with distinct histologic and molecular features and clinical behaviour. Here, we sought to define the biological processes that govern the clinical behaviour of endometrial cancers. Sixteen prototype genes representative of different biological processes that would likely play a role in endometrial and other hormone-driven cancers were defined. RNA-sequencing gene expression data from 323 endometrial cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to determine the transcription module of each prototype gene. The expression of prototype genes and modules and their association with outcome was assessed in univariate and multivariate survival analyses. The association of MSH6 expression with outcome was validated in an independent cohort of 243 primary endometrial cancers using immunohistochemistry. We observed that the clinical behaviour of endometrial cancers as a group was associated with hormone receptor signalling, PI3K pathway signalling and DNA mismatch repair processes. When analysed separately, in endometrioid carcinomas, hormone receptor, PI3K and DNA mismatch repair modules were significantly associated with outcome in univariate analysis, whereas the clinical behaviour of serous cancers was likely governed by apoptosis and Wnt signalling. Multivariate survival analysis revealed that MSH6 gene expression was associated with outcome of endometrial cancer patients independently from traditional prognostic clinicopathologic parameters, which was confirmed in an independent cohort at the protein level. Endometrioid and serous endometrial cancers are underpinned by distinct molecular pathways. MSH6 expression levels may be associated with outcome in endometrial cancers as a group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Status of Safeguards and Separations Model Development at Plant and Molecular Levels

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Hay, Benjamin; DePaoli, David W

    2009-10-01

    A primary goal of the Safeguards and Separations IPSC effort is the development of process modeling tools that allow dynamic simulations of separations plant operations under various configurations and conditions, and integration of relevant safeguards analyses. A requirement of the effort is to develop codes on modern, expandable architectures, with flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options. During FY09, efforts at ORNL have been focused on two priority tasks toward achieving the IPSC goal: (1) a top-down exploration of architecture - Subtask 1: Explore framework for code development and integration for plant-level simulation; and (2) a bottom-up fundamental modeling effort - Subtask 2: Development of molecular-level agent design code. Subtask 1 is important because definition and development of architecture is a key issue for the overall effort, as selection of an overall approach and code/data requirements is a necessary first step in the organization, design and development of separations and safeguards codes that will be incorporated. The agent design effort of Subtask 2 is a molecular-level modeling effort that has a direct impact on a near-term issue of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. A current focus of experimental efforts is the development of robust agents and processes for separation of Am/Cm. Development of enhanced agent-design codes will greatly accelerate discovery and experimental testing.

  6. Coherent transients generated at molecular levels dressed by electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubtsova, Natalia N.; Konstantinova, T. P.

    2002-05-01

    Free polarization decay and photon echo were studied experimentally in polar gas 13CH3F at the transition R(4,3) of vibrational mode 0 yields 1 (nu) 3 by Stark switching of molecular levels under irradiation by CW CO2 laser at 9P(32) line. Application of 4.5 mcs pulse to the Stark electrodes inside the gas cell allows to detect the free polarization decay signal, combined with the optical nutation. The sign of the signal corresponds to the increase of absorption in the limit of low intensity (not over 0.01 W/cm2) saturating radiation. Exciting intensity growth till the level of 6.0 W/cm2 implies decrease of signal absolute value, till the change of its sign, while the oscillation of the free polarization decay signal reveals remarkable frequency shift. Such behavior is attributed to the combined action of the dynamic Stark effect of CW radiation field and the levels splitting by the Stark voltage. Two shorter (of about 0.1 and 0.2 mcs) Stark pulses, applied to the gas, generate the photon echo signals detected by the same heterodyne technique. The study of the variations of photon echo parameters versus exciting radiation intensity is in progress.

  7. Plasma separation: physical separation at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Rax, Jean-Marcel; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-09-01

    Separation techniques are usually divided in two categories depending on the nature of the discriminating property: chemical or physical. Further to this difference, physical and chemical techniques differ in that chemical separation typically occurs at the molecular level, while physical separation techniques commonly operate at the macroscopic scale. Separation based on physical properties can in principle be realized at the molecular or even atomic scale by ionizing the mixture. This is in essence plasma based separation. Due to this fundamental difference, plasma based separation stands out from other separation techniques, and features unique properties. In particular, plasma separation allows separating different elements or chemical compounds based on physical properties. This could prove extremely valuable to separate macroscopically homogeneous mixtures made of substances of similar chemical formulation. Yet, the realization of plasma separation techniques' full potential requires identifying and controlling basic mechanisms in complex plasmas which exhibit suitable separation properties. In this paper, we uncover the potential of plasma separation for various applications, and identify the key physics mechanisms upon which hinges the development of these techniques.

  8. Processes and their explanatory factors governing distribution of organic phosphorous pools in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Lü, Changwei; He, Jiang; Zuo, Le; Vogt, Rolf D; Zhu, Liang; Zhou, Bin; Mohr, Christian W; Guan, Rui; Wang, Weiying; Yan, Daohao

    2016-02-01

    The amount of organic phosphorus (OP) and its distribution among different pools in lake sediments depends on biotic and abiotic processes driving the OP fractionation. Key environmental factors governing these transformations processes between OP fractionations in sediments were studied on the basis of geochemical characteristics of OP pools in relation to environmental factors in the sediments. The results illustrate that the factors influencing the accumulation or depletion of different OP pools were intrinsically dependent on the composition of the deposited organic matter (OM). During the mineralization of the OM the microorganisms excrete the enzyme alkaline phosphatase, accelerating the OP hydrolysis, and thereby setting the grounds for the bacterially-mediated oxidation of OM. There are two main degradation products of the labile OP pool (LOP) and the moderately labile OP pool (MLOP): Either the OP is transformed to a dissolved organic or inorganic P form, and thereby released to water column, or OP is transformed to a non-labile OP pool and stored in the sediments. A comparative study showed that oxy-hydroxides of iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) only played an important role in influencing OP fractionation in Lake Wuliangsuhai, while the complexation reactions of OP with calcium ions and sorption to its minerals are key factors governing the OP fractionation in the two alkaline lakes. It is worth noting that a significant correlation between the Fe-P pool and the pools of LOP and MLOP indicates that the degradation of the rather labile OP pools are highly dependent on the iron redox reaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The beauty of knots at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, Jean-Pierre; Amabilino, David B

    2012-01-01

    What makes a given object look beautiful to the observer, be it in the macroscopic world or at the molecular level? This very general question will be briefly addressed at the beginning of this essay, in relation to contemporary molecular chemistry and biology, leading to the general statement that, most of the time, beauty is tightly connected to function as well as to the cultural background of the observer. The main topic of the present article will be that of topologically non-trivial molecules or molecular ensembles and the fascination that such species have exerted on molecular or solid state chemists. Molecules with a graph identical to Kuratowski's K₅ or K₃,₃ graphs are indeed highly attractive from an aesthetical viewpoint, but perhaps even more fascinating and beautiful are molecular knots. A general discussion will be devoted to these compounds, which are still considered as exotic species because of the very limited number of efficient synthetic strategies leading to their preparation. Particularly efficient are templated approaches based either on transition metals such as copper(I) or on organic groups able to form hydrogen bonds or acceptor-donor stacks. A particularly noteworthy property of knots, and in particular of the trefoil knot, is their topological chirality. The isolation of both enantiomers of the trefoil knot (3₁) could be achieved and showed that such species have fascinating chiroptical properties. Finally, various routes to more complex and beautiful knots than the trefoil knot, which is the simplest non-trivial knot, will be discussed in line with the remarkable ability of transition metals to gather and orient in a very precise fashion several organic components in their coordination spheres, thus leading to synthetic precursors displaying geometries which are perfectly well adapted to the preparation of the desired knots or links.

  10. The impact of health system governance and policy processes on health services in Iraqi Kurdistan.

    PubMed

    Tawfik-Shukor, Ali; Khoshnaw, Hiro

    2010-06-08

    Relative to the amount of global attention and media coverage since the first and second Gulf Wars, very little has been published in the health services research literature regarding the state of health services in Iraq, and particularly on the semi-autonomous region of Kurdistan. Building on findings from a field visit, this paper describes the state of health services in Kurdistan, analyzes their underlying governance structures and policy processes, and their overall impact on the quality, accessibility and cost of the health system, while stressing the importance of reinvesting in public health and community-based primary care. Very little validated, research-based data exists relating to the state of population health and health services in Kurdistan. What little evidence exists, points to a region experiencing an epidemiological polarization, with different segments of the population experiencing rapidly-diverging rates of morbidity and mortality related to different etiological patterns of communicable, non-communicable, acute and chronic illness and disease. Simply put, the rural poor suffer from malnutrition and cholera, while the urban middle and upper classes deal with issues of obesity and Type 2 diabetes. The inequity is exacerbated by a poorly governed, fragmented, unregulated, specialized and heavily privatized system, that not only leads to poor quality of care and catastrophic health expenditures, but also threatens the economic and political stability of the region. There is an urgent need to revisit and clearly define the core values and goals of a future health system, and to develop an inclusive governance and policy framework for change, towards a more equitable and effective primary care-based health system, with attention to broader social determinants of health and salutogenesis. This paper not only frames the situation in Kurdistan in terms of a human rights or special political issue of a minority population, but provides important

  11. Extended principle component analysis - a useful tool to understand processes governing water quality at catchment scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selle, B.; Schwientek, M.

    2012-04-01

    Water quality of ground and surface waters in catchments is typically driven by many complex and interacting processes. While small scale processes are often studied in great detail, their relevance and interplay at catchment scales remain often poorly understood. For many catchments, extensive monitoring data on water quality have been collected for different purposes. These heterogeneous data sets contain valuable information on catchment scale processes but are rarely analysed using integrated methods. Principle component analysis (PCA) has previously been applied to this kind of data sets. However, a detailed analysis of scores, which are an important result of a PCA, is often missing. Mathematically, PCA expresses measured variables on water quality, e.g. nitrate concentrations, as linear combination of independent, not directly observable key processes. These computed key processes are represented by principle components. Their scores are interpretable as process intensities which vary in space and time. Subsequently, scores can be correlated with other key variables and catchment characteristics, such as water travel times and land use that were not considered in PCA. This detailed analysis of scores represents an extension of the commonly applied PCA which could considerably improve the understanding of processes governing water quality at catchment scales. In this study, we investigated the 170 km2 Ammer catchment in SW Germany which is characterised by an above average proportion of agricultural (71%) and urban (17%) areas. The Ammer River is mainly fed by karstic springs. For PCA, we separately analysed concentrations from (a) surface waters of the Ammer River and its tributaries, (b) spring waters from the main aquifers and (c) deep groundwater from production wells. This analysis was extended by a detailed analysis of scores. We analysed measured concentrations on major ions and selected organic micropollutants. Additionally, redox-sensitive variables

  12. System-Level Shared Governance Structures and Processes in Healthcare Systems With Magnet®-Designated Hospitals: A Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Carlisa M; Hayne, Arlene N

    The purpose was to identify and describe structures and processes of best practices for system-level shared governance in healthcare systems. Currently, more than 64.6% of US community hospitals are part of a system. System chief nurse executives (SCNEs) are challenged to establish leadership structures and processes that effectively and efficiently disseminate best practices for patients and staff across complex organizations, geographically dispersed locations, and populations. Eleven US healthcare SCNEs from the American Nurses Credentialing Center's repository of Magnet®-designated facilities participated in a 35-multiquestion interview based on Kanter's Theory of Organizational Empowerment. Most SCNEs reported the presence of more than 50% of the empowerment structures and processes in system-level shared governance. Despite the difficulties and complexities of growing health systems, SCNEs have replicated empowerment characteristics of hospital shared governance structures and processes at the system level.

  13. The Development of Self-Government of the Student in the Educational Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khusainova, Svetlana V.; Shepilova, Natalia A.; Kudyasheva, Albina N.; Sorokoumova, Elena A.; Murugova, Vera V.; Zulfugarzade, Teymur E.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by necessity to study and develop the phenomenon of students' self-government, providing their vocational formation. In this regard, this paper aims to identify the internal psychological-pedagogical factors for implementing of self-government of the students through the assessment of their personal-typological…

  14. Hydrologic processes governing near surface saturation of alpine wetlands in the Canadian Rockies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, C.; Mercer, J.

    2016-12-01

    Alpine wetlands are vital for habitat, biodiversity, carbon cycling and water storage, but little is known about their hydrologic condition. Climate trends toward smaller mountain snowpacks that melt earlier are thought to pose a threat to the continued provision of alpine wetland ecological functions, and their existence, as it is believed they derive their water mainly from snowmelt. Our objective was to determine the hydrologic processes governing near surface saturation in alpine wetlands. We monitored the water table dynamics of three alpine wetlands in contrasting hydrogeomorphic landscape positions for two summers in Banff National Park, Canada. We concurrently monitored water balance components, and analyzed soil properties and source water geochemistry. Despite very different snow conditions between the two study years, water tables remained near the surface and relatively stable in both years, indicating wetlands are more hydrologically buffered from snowpack variations than expected. We did not find convincing evidence of hydrogeomorphic position influencing wetland water table dynamics. Instead, peat thickness seemed to be critical in regulating water table as the wetland with the thickest peat soil (>1 m) maintained water tables closest to the ground surface for the longest period of time. Thicker peat deposits may develop under convergent hydrologic flow path conditions. Our results indicate that alpine wetlands are more resilient to shifting environmental conditions than previously reported.

  15. Process evaluation of community kitchens: Results from two Victorian local government areas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jia Hwa; Palermo, Claire; Bryce, Andrea; McCarten, Julia

    2010-12-01

    this paper describes a process evaluation of the participants and organisations involved in Community Kitchens in the Local Government Areas of Frankston City and Mornington Peninsula Shire in Victoria, Australia. participants, facilitators and project partners from 17 Community Kitchens were invited to participate in the evaluation via a written survey and focus group discussion (participants) or structured telephone interview (facilitators and project partners). Qualitative data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. ninety-three individuals (63 participants, 20 facilitators, and 10 project partners) participated in the evaluation. Data showed that Community Kitchens reached population sub-groups that face the greatest health inequalities. Project partners were generally satisfied with the project and were able to identify enablers (e.g. support from the project team and running of other concurrent programs) and barriers (e.g. size of the kitchen and transportation) to setting up and sustaining a Community Kitchen. The themes that emerged from participants' and facilitators' experience of participating in the project concerned food and cooking skills, social skills and community participation. the project enabled the development of food knowledge and cooking skills, as well as social skills and support networks among participants and facilitators. There is a need to determine what impact Community Kitchens may have on participants' nutritional status, as well as the effect of Community Kitchens on food security at an individual, household and community level. Further longitudinal studies are needed to affirm the findings of this study.

  16. Exploring the processes governing roadside pollutant concentrations in urban street canyon.

    PubMed

    Galatioto, Fabio; Bell, Margaret C

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes an in-depth analysis to investigate the huge variation in the measured roadside air-pollutant concentrations of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in terms of the traffic flow levels, the orientation of the street to the prevailing wind, the wind speed, temperature and barometric pressure. The work has attempted to develop generic parameters that can be applied to other urban areas. However, in the absence of a measure of congestion at the site in Palermo (Italy), the methodological approach proposed used the simultaneous noise measurements, in units of decibels (B), to help parameterise a generic congestion indicator in terms of the traffic flow. The potential transferability of the approach was demonstrated for a site in Marylebone Road, London (UK), given the similarity of the two study sites, canyon shape, traffic characteristics and road orientation. The results showed that, within the range of data available, noise levels could be used as a proxy for flow change on the shoulders of the peak hour and hence congestion and a generic relationship with factors statistically significant at 99% confidence allows roadside concentrations due to traffic to be estimated with a regression coefficient of R(2) = 0.73 (R = 0.85). The research demonstrates that whilst there are indeed underlying relationships that can explain the roadside concentrations based on traffic and meteorological conditions, evidence is presented that confirms the complexity of the physical and chemical processes that govern roadside concentrations.

  17. 25 CFR 1000.274 - How long does the Federal government have to process a FTCA claim after the claim is received by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How long does the Federal government have to process a...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.274 How long does the Federal government have to... Federal government has 6 months to process a FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.274 - How long does the Federal government have to process a FTCA claim after the claim is received by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How long does the Federal government have to process a...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.274 How long does the Federal government have to... Federal government has 6 months to process a FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal...

  19. 25 CFR 1000.274 - How long does the Federal government have to process a FTCA claim after the claim is received by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long does the Federal government have to process a...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.274 How long does the Federal government have to... Federal government has 6 months to process a FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.274 - How long does the Federal government have to process a FTCA claim after the claim is received by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How long does the Federal government have to process a...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.274 How long does the Federal government have to... Federal government has 6 months to process a FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.274 - How long does the Federal government have to process a FTCA claim after the claim is received by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How long does the Federal government have to process a...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.274 How long does the Federal government have to... Federal government has 6 months to process a FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal...

  2. Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gellman, Andrew John; Sholl, David S.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Zaera, Francisco

    2013-04-28

    Understanding and controlling selectivity is one of the key challenges in heterogeneous catalysis. Among problems in catalytic selectivity enantioselectivity is perhaps the most the most challenging. The primary goal of the project on “Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts” is to understand the origins of enantioselectivity on chiral heterogeneous surfaces and catalysts. The efforts of the project team include preparation of chiral surfaces, characterization of chiral surfaces, experimental detection of enantioselectivity on such surfaces and computational modeling of the interactions of chiral probe molecules with chiral surfaces. Over the course of the project period the team of PI’s has made some of the most detailed and insightful studies of enantioselective chemistry on chiral surfaces. This includes the measurement of fundamental interactions and reaction mechanisms of chiral molecules on chiral surfaces and leads all the way to rationale design and synthesis of chiral surfaces and materials for enantioselective surface chemistry. The PI’s have designed and prepared new materials for enantioselective adsorption and catalysis. Naturally Chiral Surfaces • Completion of a systematic study of the enantiospecific desorption kinetics of R-3-methylcyclohexanone (R-3-MCHO) on 9 achiral and 7 enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces with orientations that span the stereographic triangle. • Discovery of super-enantioselective tartaric acid (TA) and aspartic acid (Asp) decomposition as a result of a surface explosion mechanism on Cu(643)R&S. Systematic study of super-enantiospecific TA and Asp decomposition on five enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces. • Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-propylene oxide (PO) from Cu(100) imprinted with {3,1,17} facets by L-lysine adsorption. Templated Chiral Surfaces • Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-PO from Pt(111) and Pd(111

  3. Observing phthalate leaching from plasticized polymer films at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Chen, Zhan

    2014-05-06

    Phthalates, the most widely used plasticizers in poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), have been extensively studied. In this paper, a highly sensitive, easy, and effective method was developed to examine short-term phthalate leaching from PVC/phthalate films at the molecular level using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG). Combining SFG and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), surface and bulk molecular structures of PVC/phthalate films were also comprehensively evaluated during the phthalate leaching process under various environments. The leaching processes of two phthalates, diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), from the PVC/phthalate films with various weight ratios were studied. Oxygen plasma was applied to treat the PVC/phthalate film surfaces to verify its efficacy on preventing/reducing phthalate leaching from PVC. Our results show that DBP is more stable than DEP in PVC/phthalate films. Even so, DBP molecules were still found to very slowly leach to the environment from PVC at 30 °C, at a rate much slower than DEP. Also, the bulk DBP content substantially influences the DBP leaching. Higher DBP bulk concentration yields less stable DBP molecules in the PVC matrix, allowing molecules to leach from the polymer film more easily. Additionally, DBP leaching is very sensitive to temperature changes; higher temperature can strongly enhance the leaching process. For most cases, the oxygen plasma treatment can effectively prevent phthalate leaching from PVC films (e.g., for samples with low bulk concentrations of DBP-5 and 30 wt %). It is also capable of reducing phthalate leaching from high DBP bulk concentration PVC samples (e.g., 70 wt % DBP in PVC/DBP mixture). This research develops a highly sensitive method to detect chemicals at the molecular level as well as provides surface and bulk molecular structural changes. The method developed here is general and can be applied to detect small amounts of chemical

  4. Nonlinear modeling and dynamic analysis of a hydro-turbine governing system in the process of sudden load increase transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huanhuan; Chen, Diyi; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Feifei; Ba, Duoduo

    2016-12-01

    In order to study the nonlinear dynamic behaviors of a hydro-turbine governing system in the process of sudden load increase transient, we establish a novel nonlinear dynamic model of the hydro-turbine governing system which considers the elastic water-hammer model of the penstock and the second-order model of the generator. The six nonlinear dynamic transfer coefficients of the hydro-turbine are innovatively proposed by utilizing internal characteristics and analyzing the change laws of the characteristic parameters of the hydro-turbine governing system. Moreover, from the point of view of engineering, the nonlinear dynamic behaviors of the above system are exhaustively investigated based on bifurcation diagrams and time waveforms. More importantly, all of the above analyses supply theoretical basis for allowing a hydropower station to maintain a stable operation in the process of sudden load increase transient.

  5. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury. PMID:28327610

  6. Protein Fibrillar Nanopolymers: Molecular-Level Insights into Their Structural, Physical and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils represent a generic class of mechanically strong and stable biomaterials with extremely advantageous properties. Although amyloids were initially associated only with severe neurological disorders, the role of these structures nowadays is shifting from health debilitating to highly beneficial both in biomedical and technological aspects. Intensive involvement of fibrillar assemblies into the wide range of pathogenic and functional processes strongly necessitate the molecular level characterization of the structural, physical and elastic features of protein nanofibrils. In the present contribution, we made an attempt to highlight the up-to-date progress in the understanding of amyloid properties from the polymer physics standpoint. The fundamental insights into protein fibril behavior are essential not only for development of therapeutic strategies to combat the protein misfolding disorders but also for rational and precise design of novel biodegradable protein-based nanopolymers.

  7. Fibrin-based biomaterials: Modulation of macroscopic properties through rational design at the molecular level

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley C.; Barker, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrinogen is one of the primary components of the coagulation cascade and rapidly forms an insoluble matrix following tissue injury. In addition to its important role in hemostasis, fibrin acts as a scaffold for tissue repair and provides important cues for directing cell phenotype following injury. Because of these properties and the ease of polymerization of the material, fibrin has been widely utilized as a biomaterial for over a century. Modifying the macroscopic properties of fibrin, such as elasticity and porosity, has been somewhat elusive until recently, yet with a molecular-level rational design approach can now be somewhat easily modified through alterations of molecular interactions key to the protein’s polymerization process. This review outlines the biochemistry of fibrin and discusses methods for modification of molecular interactions and their application to fibrin based biomaterials. PMID:24056097

  8. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury.

  9. A Molecular-Level View of the Physical Stability of Amorphous Solid Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoda

    Many pharmaceutical compounds being developed in recent years are poorly soluble in water. This has led to insufficient oral bioavailability of many compounds in vitro. The amorphous formulation is one of the promising techniques to increase the oral bioavailability of these poorly water-soluble compounds. However, an amorphous drug substance is inherently unstable because it is a high energy form. In order to increase the physical stability, the amorphous drug is often formulated with a suitable polymer to form an amorphous solid dispersion. Previous research has suggested that the formation of an intimately mixed drug-polymer mixture contributes to the stabilization of the amorphous drug compound. The goal of this research is to better understand the role of miscibility, molecular interactions and mobility on the physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions. Methods were developed to detect different degrees of miscibility on nanometer scale and to quantify the extent of hydrogen-bonding interactions between the drug and the polymer. Miscibility, hydrogen-bonding interactions and molecular mobility were correlated with physical stability during a six-month period using three model systems. Overall, this research provides molecular-level insights into many factors that govern the physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions which can lead to a more effective design of stable amorphous formulations.

  10. Role of University-Industry-Government Linkages in the Innovation Processes of a Small Catching-Up Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varblane, Urmas; Mets, Tonis; Ukrainski, Kadri

    2008-01-01

    During the transformation process from a command economy, the extraordinary statist university-industry-government (UIG) linkages model was replaced by an extreme version of laissez-faire relationships. A more modern interaction-based UIG model could be implemented only by changing the whole national innovation system of catching-up economies. The…

  11. Role of University-Industry-Government Linkages in the Innovation Processes of a Small Catching-Up Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varblane, Urmas; Mets, Tonis; Ukrainski, Kadri

    2008-01-01

    During the transformation process from a command economy, the extraordinary statist university-industry-government (UIG) linkages model was replaced by an extreme version of laissez-faire relationships. A more modern interaction-based UIG model could be implemented only by changing the whole national innovation system of catching-up economies. The…

  12. Molecular level water and solute transport in reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Shen, Meng; Keten, Sinan

    2015-11-01

    The water permeability and rejection characteristics of six solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polymeric reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate that water flux increases with an increasing fraction of percolated free volume in the membrane polymer structure. Solute molecules display Brownian motion and hop from pore to pore as they pass through the membrane. The solute rejection depends on both the size of the solute molecule and the chemical interaction of the solute with water and the membrane. When the open spaces in the polymeric structure are such that solutes have to shed at least one water molecule from their solvation shell to pass through the membrane molecular structure, the water-solute pair interaction energy governs solute rejection. Organic solutes more easily shed water molecules than ions to more readily pass through the membrane. Hydrogen-bonding sites for molecules like urea also lead to a higher rejection. These findings underline the importance of the solute's solvation shell and solute-water-membrane chemistry in solute transport and rejection in RO membranes. Funded by the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern with computing resources from XSEDE (NSF grant ACI-1053575).

  13. UK Defence Acquisition Process for NEC: Transaction Governance within an Integrated Project Team

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-22

    Government of Margaret Thatcher . Of the five largest defence companies in 1979, four were state owned: British Aerospace, British Shipbuilders, Royal...NEC demands a more collaborative, through- life approach to defence acquisition. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...Innovative Systems Engineering), exploring organisational aspects of Through Life Systems Management. Maytorena became a lecturer in Construction Project

  14. The United States Government Interagency Process and the Failure of Institution Building in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-12

    LTG Martin Dempsey, to make the case for an increase in the investment by the United States Government (USG) in the development of a self-sufficient...the exception of 5 Feil , Scott R. “The Failure of Incrementalism: Interagency Coordination Challenges and Responses.” In The Interagency and...society invested in establishing a stable democratic, and economically viable Iraq.” (SIGIR-06-045, 2007) 35 Interview, Scott Feil , 27 November 2007. 22

  15. Nurses' Perception of Shared Decision-Making Processes: Quantifying a Shared Governance Culture.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Sally O; Owens, Deborah L; Oliver, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to describe how measuring the perceived and desired decision-making capacity of nurses in a model of shared governance (SG) can be beneficial. Shared governance (SG) increases nurse's control over professional practice. Engagement in SG can be impacted by how much decision-making power nurses desire. This concept related to decision making has been termed decisional involvement (DI). Few studies exist that examine the concept of DI. Using the Decisional Involvement Scale, acute care nurses were sampled concerning desired and perceived decision making on 21 topics related to nursing practice. Analysis of the data identified different governance priorities for several areas. Of particular interest was that those nurses on SG councils for more than 5 years did not report higher satisfaction with decision involvement. A comprehensive evaluation of shared decision making was a valuable tool to establish a baseline of data and seek opportunities for improvement. A well-integrated model of SG requires continuous improvement and analysis to be sustained. Measuring and evaluating staff nurses desire to control varied aspects of DI can allow organizations to make focused efforts to strengthen SG.

  16. One stop or full stop? The continuing challenges for researchers despite the new streamlined NHS research governance process.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew G H; France, Emma F

    2010-05-13

    Obtaining the necessary approvals and permission for clinical research requires successful negotiation of the ethical and R&D layers of the NHS. Differences in structure and governance frameworks feature between the constituent nations of the UK (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland), which adds complexity to cross-national studies. Difficulties in carrying out research in the NHS in the UK due to bureaucratic and time-consuming governance processes have led to the development of a new system of application and co-ordination from 2009. This paper illustrates how this new system fails to be consistent and streamlined and is unlikely to become so unless changes are made to the implementation and management of the governance processes. We present a case study of the research governance process at the survey stage of an investigation into the use, preferences and need for information by people making choices or decisions about health care. The method involved home-based, face-to-face interviewing in a questionnaire survey in relation to decisions about lymphoma treatment, Down's syndrome screening in pregnancy, and caring for people with dementia. Our experience of the ethics stage was very positive, noting an efficient process of application and a speedy decision, both in relation to the initial application and to subsequent substantial amendments. By contrast, the R&D stages were very slow, most with unexplained delays, but some offering contradictory advice and exhibiting a lack of clear guidance and training for NHS staff. The R&D arrangements in Scotland were far quicker and more likely to be successful than in England. Overall, the delays were so severe that substantial parts of the research could not be delivered as planned within the funding timescale. If high-quality research in the NHS, particularly in England, is to be delivered in a timely and cost-effective way, R&D processes for gaining research governance approval need improvement. Attention is

  17. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco Zaera

    2012-03-21

    , and the development of ways to imprint chiral centers on achiral solid surfaces. Chiral catalysis is not only a problem of great importance in its own right, but also the ultimate test of how to control selectivity in catalysis. The time is ripe for fundamental work in heterogeneous chiral catalysis to provide the U.S. with a leadership role in developing the next generation of catalytic processes for medicinal and agrochemical manufacturing. Our team provides the required expertise for a synergistic and comprehensive integration of physical and chemical experimentation with solid state and molecular reactivity theories to solve this problem.

  18. Molecular-level Simulations of Shock Generation and Propagation in Polyurea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-26

    Polyurea Shock-wave generation and propagation Molecular-level calculations a b s t r a c t A non -equilibrium molecular dynamics method is employed in order...homepage: www.e lsev ier .com/ locate /msea Molecular-level simulations of shock generation and propagation in polyurea M. Grujicica,∗, B. Pandurangana...to study various phenomena accompanying the generation and propagation of shock waves in polyurea (a micro-phase segregated elastomer). Several

  19. 25 CFR 900.185 - How long does the Federal government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How long does the Federal government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal agency, before a lawsuit may be filed? 900.185... government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal agency, before a...

  20. 25 CFR 900.185 - How long does the Federal government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long does the Federal government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal agency, before a lawsuit may be filed? 900.185... government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal agency, before a...

  1. 25 CFR 900.185 - How long does the Federal government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How long does the Federal government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal agency, before a lawsuit may be filed? 900.185... government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal agency, before a...

  2. 25 CFR 900.185 - How long does the Federal government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How long does the Federal government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal agency, before a lawsuit may be filed? 900.185... government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal agency, before a...

  3. 25 CFR 900.185 - How long does the Federal government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How long does the Federal government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal agency, before a lawsuit may be filed? 900.185... government have to process an FTCA claim after the claim is received by the Federal agency, before a...

  4. Creating Processes Associated with Providing Government Goods and Services Under the Commercial Space Launch Act at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Janet F.

    2011-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has decided to write its agreements under the Commercial Space Launch Act (CSLA) authority to cover a broad range of categories of support that KSC could provide to our commercial partner. Our strategy was to go through the onerous process of getting the agreement in place once and allow added specificity and final cost estimates to be documented on a separate Task Order Request (TOR). This paper is written from the implementing engineering team's perspective. It describes how we developed the processes associated with getting Government support to our emerging commercial partners, such as SpaceX and reports on our success to date.

  5. Molecular-Level Insights into Photocatalysis from Scanning Probe Microscopy Studies on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2013-06-12

    The field of heterogeneous photocatalysis has grown considerably in the decades since Fujishima and Honda's ground-breaking publications of photoelectrochemistry on TiO2. Numerous review articles continue to point to both progress made in the use of heterogeneous materials (such as TiO2) to perform photoconversion processes, and the many opportunities and challenges in heterogeneous photocatalysis research such as solar energy conversion and environmental remediation. The past decade has also seen an increase in the use of molecular-level approaches applied to model single crystal surfaces in an effort to obtain new insights into photocatalytic phenomena. In particular, scanning probe techniques (SPM) have enabled researchers to take a ‘nanoscale’ approach to photocatalysis that includes interrogation of the reactivities of specific sites and adsorbates on a model photocatalyst surface. The rutile TiO2(110) surface has become the prototypical oxide single crystal surface for fundamental studies of many interfacial phenomena. In particular, TiO2(110) has become an excellent model surface for probing photochemical and photocatalytic reactions at the molecular level. A variety of experimental approaches have emerged as being ideally suited for studying photochemical reactions on TiO2(110), including desorption-oriented approaches and electronic spectroscopies, but perhaps the most promising techniques for evaluating site-specific properties are those of SPM. In this review, we highlight the growing use of SPM techniques in providing molecular-level insights into surface photochemistry on the model photocatalyst surface of rutile TiO2(110). Our objective is to both illustrate the unique knowledge that scanning probe techniques have already provided the field of photocatalysis, and also to motivate a new generation of effort into the use of such approaches to obtain new insights into the molecular level details of photochemical events occurring at interfaces

  6. The Emerging Importance of Business Process Standards in the Federal Government

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-23

    delivers enough value for its commercialization into the general industry. Today, we are seeing standards such as SOA, BPMN and BPEL hit that...Process Modeling Notation ( BPMN ) and the Business Process Execution Language (BPEL). BPMN provides a standard representation for capturing and...execution. The combination of BPMN and BPEL offers organizations the potential to standardize processes in a distributed environment, enabling

  7. [Process orientation as a tool of strategic approaches to corporate governance and integrated management systems].

    PubMed

    Sens, Brigitte

    2010-01-01

    The concept of general process orientation as an instrument of organisation development is the core principle of quality management philosophy, i.e. the learning organisation. Accordingly, prestigious quality awards and certification systems focus on process configuration and continual improvement. In German health care organisations, particularly in hospitals, this general process orientation has not been widely implemented yet - despite enormous change dynamics and the requirements of both quality and economic efficiency of health care processes. But based on a consistent process architecture that considers key processes as well as management and support processes, the strategy of excellent health service provision including quality, safety and transparency can be realised in daily operative work. The core elements of quality (e.g., evidence-based medicine), patient safety and risk management, environmental management, health and safety at work can be embedded in daily health care processes as an integrated management system (the "all in one system" principle). Sustainable advantages and benefits for patients, staff, and the organisation will result: stable, high-quality, efficient, and indicator-based health care processes. Hospitals with their broad variety of complex health care procedures should now exploit the full potential of total process orientation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Document authentication at molecular levels using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Jia, Bin; Ding, Liying; Hong, Feng; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Chen, Rui; Zhou, Shumin; Chen, Huanwen; Fang, Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Molecular images of documents were obtained by sequentially scanning the surface of the document using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS), which was operated in either a gasless, solvent-free or methanol vapor-assisted mode. The decay process of the ink used for handwriting was monitored by following the signal intensities recorded by DAPCI-MS. Handwritings made using four types of inks on four kinds of paper surfaces were tested. By studying the dynamic decay of the inks, DAPCI-MS imaging differentiated a 10-min old from two 4 h old samples. Non-destructive forensic analysis of forged signatures either handwritten or computer-assisted was achieved according to the difference of the contour in DAPCI images, which was attributed to the strength personalized by different writers. Distinction of the order of writing/stamping on documents and detection of illegal printings were accomplished with a spatial resolution of about 140 µm. A Matlab® written program was developed to facilitate the visualization of the similarity between signature images obtained by DAPCI-MS. The experimental results show that DAPCI-MS imaging provides rich information at the molecular level and thus can be used for the reliable document analysis in forensic applications.

  9. The Building Blocks of Materials: Gathering Knowledge at the Molecular Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Two start-up positions were created within SD46 to pursue developments in the rapidly expanding areas of biomineralization and nano-technology. As envisioned by Dr. Sandor Lehoczy, the new laboratories to be developed must have the capacity to investigate not only processes associated with the self-assembly of molecules but also the examination of self-assembled structures. For these purposes, laboratories capable of performing the intended function, particularly light scattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were created. What follows then are recent advances arising from the development of these new laboratories. With the implementation of the Atomic Force Microscopy Facility, examples of investigations that determine a correlation between the molecular structure of materials and their macroscopic physical properties are provided. In addition, examples of investigations with particular emphasis on the physical properties of protein crystals, at the molecular level, and subsequent macroscopic characteristics are as provided. Finally, progress in fabrication of technology at the nano-scale levels at the developmental stage is also presented.

  10. The Building Blocks of Materials: Gathering Knowledge at the Molecular Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Two start-up positions were created within SD46 to pursue developments in the rapidly expanding areas of biomineralization and nano-technology. As envisioned by Dr. Sandor Lehoczy, the new laboratories to be developed must have the capacity to investigate not only processes associated with the self-assembly of molecules but also the examination of self-assembled structures. For these purposes, laboratories capable of performing the intended function, particularly light scattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were created. What follows then are recent advances arising from the development of these new laboratories. With the implementation of the Atomic Force Microscopy Facility, examples of investigations that determine a correlation between the molecular structure of materials and their macroscopic physical properties are provided. In addition, examples of investigations with particular emphasis on the physical properties of protein crystals, at the molecular level, and subsequent macroscopic characteristics are as provided. Finally, progress in fabrication of technology at the nano-scale levels at the developmental stage is also presented.

  11. Understanding thermal sensitivity at the molecular level and developing temperature-based systems using RNA Thermometers.

    PubMed

    Gul, Fatih; Orhan, Ibrahim Y; Ceylan, Furkan S; Akdeniz, Nadir B; Karadag, H Abdulkadir

    2016-12-01

    Temperature sensitivity is found in all multicelleular organisms, as well as in most primitive life forms. The ubiquity of this temperature sensitivity is an indicator of its effects at the multicellular, cellular and molecular levels [1]. Previous studies have shown that temperature-based regulation is present in the transcriptional process [2]. RNA Thermometers, temperature-sensitive sequences, have been shown to act on heat-shock genes to regulate temperature-dependant systems in many organisms [3,4]. The goal of this study was to characterize the shifts in the functioning of these RNA Thermometers at various temperatures. In addition, using the principle of transcriptional thermoregulation, an automated temperature-responsive system stimulating inverse endothermic and exothermic enzymatic reactions for heat stabilization was proposed. The endothermic enzymatic reaction was designated as the breakdown of urea, reflecting the function of urease, and the exothermic reaction was designated as the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide, reflecting the function of catalase [5]. The proposed system was built upon the translation of urease and the inhibition of catalase translation at higher temperatures, and the inverse at lower temperatures. As RNA Thermometers can be used only to drive transcription at higher temperatures, the installation of a lac-regulated 2-way system was suggested. This system would also provide a synthetic solution to thermoregulation and the current systems employed today. This system could be applied where the current thermoregulatory systems prove insufficient and could be further developed and optimized to replace them in the future.

  12. State Government: The Decision-making Process. A Resource Manual for Teachers and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanlian, John F.; Wallin, Katherine L.

    This material provides a program to instruct secondary level students in the political, governmental, and legal process and to encourage active student participation in these processes. Part of a year-long curriculum program, this unit examines the structure and function of the state, county, and local levels. Included are policy formation,…

  13. Government Regulatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Katie

    Government regulation of food products, food processing, and food preparation is imperative in bringing an unadulterated, nonmisleading, and safe food product to market and is relevant to all areas of food science, including engineering, processing, chemistry, and microbiology. The liability associated with providing consumers with an adulterated or substandard product cannot only tarnish a company's name and reputation, but also impose substantial financial repercussions on the company and those individuals who play an active role in the violation. In order for a company to fully comply with the relevant food laws (both federal and state), an intimate knowledge of food science is required. Individuals knowledgeable in food science play an integral role not only in implementing and counseling food companies/processors to ensure compliance with government regulations, but these individuals are also necessary to the state and federal governments that make and enforce the relevant laws and regulators.

  14. Temporal variations in water quality in a brackish tidal pond: Implications for governing processes and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenhui; Chui, Ting Fong May

    2017-02-10

    Brackish tidal ponds have been constructed along coastal areas in many parts of the world for aquaculture, including some Ramsar Sites. Such ponds are considered a sustainable, wise use of wetlands if managed properly, but they can also pose serious environmental problems if mismanaged. To understand the governing processes and to promote sustainable management strategies, this study examines the different temporal variations in water quality parameters in a brackish tidal pond located within the wetland complex of the Mai Po Ramsar Site in Hong Kong, China. The variations are compared with those of the receiving bay, and the water channel that connects the pond and the bay. Equations are then developed to link the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the pond with the governing processes, and to analyze their relative contributions to DO levels. Field data show seasonal patterns in water temperature and salinity in response to the seasonal variations in solar radiation and rainfall. For the pond and the channel, DO, chlorophyll and pH exhibit fortnightly variations due to the bi-weekly water exchange between the pond and the bay. There were also diurnal variations in water temperature and DO in response to changes in solar radiation for both locations, and the tidal flushing for the water channel. Analysis of the findings indicates that water exchange influences the DO concentration more strongly than solar radiation. The DO equation links pond water quality with the time of day, and the time in a water exchange cycle, and thus provides some guidance for determining water exchange and water sampling schedules. The study sheds light on the governing processes and management strategies related to the sustainable management of a brackish tidal pond. The results are thus beneficial in elucidating and promoting the sustainable management and wise use of wetlands in other locations.

  15. Reconciling Scale Mismatch in Water Governance, Hydro-climatic Processes and Infrastructure Systems of Water Supply in Las Vegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. E.; Alarcon, T.; Portney, K.; Islam, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water resource systems are a classic example of a common pool resource due to the high cost of exclusion and the subtractability of the resource; for common pool resources, the performance of governance systems primarily depends on how well matched the institutional arrangements and rules are to the biophysical conditions and social norms. Changes in water governance, hydro-climatic processes and infrastructure systems occur on disparate temporal and spatial scales. A key challenge is the gap between current climate change model resolution, and the spatial and temporal scale of urban water supply decisions. This gap will lead to inappropriate management policies if not mediated through a carefully crafted decision making process. Traditional decision support and planning methods (DSPM) such as classical decision analysis are not equipped to deal with a non-static climate. While emerging methods such as decision scaling, robust decision making and real options are designed to deal with a changing climate, governance systems have evolved under the assumption of a static climate and it is not clear if these methods are well suited to the existing governance regime. In our study, these questions are contextualized by examining an urban water utility that has made significant changes in policy to adapt to changing conditions: the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) which serves metropolitan Las Vegas. Like most desert cities, Las Vegas exists because of water; the artesian springs of the Las Vegas Valley once provided an ample water supply for Native Americans, ranchers and later a small railroad city. However, population growth has increased demands far beyond local supplies. The area now depends on the Colorado River for the majority of its water supply. Natural climate variability with periodic droughts has further challenged water providers; projected climate changes and further population growth will exacerbate these challenges. Las Vegas is selected as a case

  16. 32 CFR 1806.3 - Procedures governing acceptance of service of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Personal Service. Subject to the sole discretion of appropriate officials of the CIA, where NACIC is physically located, process servers generally will not be allowed to enter CIA Headquarters for the...

  17. Galaxy Evolution From Hydrodynamical Simulations: What Have We Learned About The Physical Processes Governing Galaxy Evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    I discuss how hydrodynamical simulations enable exploring nonlinear couplings amongst different physical processes in galaxy formation. I focus on three topics: the effect of baryonic processes on dark matter halos, how stellar feedback leads to 'self-regulated' galaxy formation, and the interplay amongst stellar feedback, magnetic fields, and cosmic rays. Invited talk presented at the conference Galaxy Evolution Across Time, 12-16 June 2017, Paris, France

  18. The growth of materials processing in space - A history of government support for new technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckannan, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    Development of a given technology for national defense and large systems developments when the task is too large or risky for entrepreneurs, yet is clearly in the best interest of the nation are discussed. Advanced research to identify areas of interest was completed. Examples of commercial opportunities are the McDonnell-Douglas Corporation purification process for pharmaceutical products and the Microgravity Research Associates process for growing gallium arsenide crystals in space.

  19. Analysis of physical-chemical processes governing SSME internal fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, A. K.; Owens, S. F.; Mukerjee, T.; Prakash, C.; Przekwas, A. J.; Kannapel, M.

    1985-01-01

    The basic issues concerning the physical chemical processes of the Space Shuttle Main Engine are discussed. The objectives being to supply the general purpose CFD code PHOENICS and the associated interactive graphics package - GRAFFIC; to demonstrate code usage on SSME related problems; to perform computations and analyses of problems relevant to current and future SSME's; and to participate in the development of new physical models of various processes present in SSME components. These objectives are discussed in detail.

  20. The growth of materials processing in space - A history of government support for new technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckannan, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    Development of a given technology for national defense and large systems developments when the task is too large or risky for entrepreneurs, yet is clearly in the best interest of the nation are discussed. Advanced research to identify areas of interest was completed. Examples of commercial opportunities are the McDonnell-Douglas Corporation purification process for pharmaceutical products and the Microgravity Research Associates process for growing gallium arsenide crystals in space.

  1. Processes governing phytoplankton blooms in estuaries. I: The local production-loss balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, L.V.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Cloern, J.E.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Thompson, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    The formation and spatial distribution of phytoplankton blooms in estuaries are controlled by (1) local mechanisms, which determine the production-loss balance for a water column at a particular spatial location (i.e. control if a bloom is possible), and (2) transport-related mechanisms, which govern biomass distribution (i.e. control if and where a bloom actually occurs). In this study, the first of a 2-paper series, we use a depth-averaged numerical model as a theoretical tool to describe how interacting local conditions (water column height, light availability, benthic grazing) influence the local balance between phytoplankton sources and sinks. We also explore trends in the spatial variability of the production-loss balance across the topographic gradients between deep channels and lateral shoals which are characteristic of shallow estuaries. For example, under conditions of high turbidity and slow benthic grazing the highest rates of phytoplankton population growth are found in the shallowest regions. On the other hand, with low turbidity and rapid benthic grazing the highest growth rates occur in the deeper areas. We also explore the effects of semidiurnal tidal variation in water column height, as well as spring-neap variability. Local population growth in the shallowest regions is very sensitive to tidal-scale shallowing and deepening of the water column, especially in the presence of benthic grazing. A spring-neap signal in population growth rate is also prominent in the shallow areas. Population growth in deeper regions is less sensitive to temporal variations in tidal elevation. These results show that both shallow and deep regions of estuaries can act as sources or sinks for phytoplankton biomass, depending on the local conditions of mean water column height, tidal amplitude, light-limited growth rate, and consumption by grazers.

  2. INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMODYNAMICS GOVERNING METAL HYDRIDE SYNTHESIS IN THE MOLTEN STATE PROCESS.

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, A; Polly Berseth, P; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Donald Anton, D

    2007-08-23

    Complex metal hydrides have been synthesized for hydrogen storage through a new synthetic technique utilizing high hydrogen overpressure at elevated temperatures (molten state processing). This synthesis technique holds the potential of fusing different complex hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures to form new species with enhanced hydrogen storage properties. Formation of these compounds is driven by thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. We report on investigations of the thermodynamics. Novel synthetic complexes were formed, structurally characterized, and their hydrogen desorption properties investigated. The effectiveness of the molten state process is compared with mechanicosynthetic ball milling.

  3. Molecular-Level Simulations of Shock Generation and Propagation in Soda-Lime Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Pandurangan, B.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Fountzoulas, C.; Patel, P.

    2012-08-01

    A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics method is employed to study the mechanical response of soda-lime glass (a material commonly used in transparent armor applications) when subjected to the loading conditions associated with the generation and propagation of planar shock waves. Specific attention is given to the identification and characterization of various (inelastic-deformation and energy-dissipation) molecular-level phenomena and processes taking place at, or in the vicinity of, the shock front. The results obtained revealed that the shock loading causes a 2-4% (shock strength-dependent) density increase. In addition, an increase in the average coordination number of the silicon atoms is observed along with the creation of smaller Si-O rings. These processes are associated with substantial energy absorption and dissipation and are believed to greatly influence the blast/ballistic impact mitigation potential of soda-lime glass. The present work was also aimed at the determination of the shock Hugoniot (i.e., a set of axial stress vs. density/specific-volume vs. internal energy vs. particle velocity vs. temperature) material states obtained in soda-lime glass after the passage of a shock wave of a given strength (as quantified by the shock speed). The availability of a shock Hugoniot is critical for construction of a high deformation-rate, large-strain, high pressure material model which can be used within a continuum-level computational analysis to capture the response of a soda-lime glass based laminated transparent armor structure (e.g., a military vehicle windshield, door window, etc.) to blast/ballistic impact loading.

  4. Creating an Administrative Structure to Support Faculty Governance: A Participatory Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Vivian M.

    1989-01-01

    Principles of organizational change are examined as they apply to academic units in general, and the way in which one well-established academic department in nursing changed its administrative structure is described. The process used faculty participation in decision-making. (Author/MSE)

  5. The Reform Process of Portuguese Higher Education Institutions: From Collegial to Managerial Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruckmann, Sofia; Carvalho, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Portuguese public higher education institutions have been undergoing a major reform process since 2007. The most noticeable changes were introduced by Law 62/2007, which gave higher education institutions the option to choose between two different institutional models (foundational and public institute), and allowed the implementation of new…

  6. Power in urban social-ecological systems: Processes and practices of governance and marginalization

    Treesearch

    Lindsay K. Campbell; Nate Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the urban forestry literature, including the workfeatured in Urban Forestry and Urban Greening, has focused primarily on either quantitative, positivistic analyses of human-environment dynamics, or applied research to inform the management of natural resources, without sufficiently problematizing the effects of power within these processes (Bentsen et al...

  7. The Reform Process of Portuguese Higher Education Institutions: From Collegial to Managerial Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruckmann, Sofia; Carvalho, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Portuguese public higher education institutions have been undergoing a major reform process since 2007. The most noticeable changes were introduced by Law 62/2007, which gave higher education institutions the option to choose between two different institutional models (foundational and public institute), and allowed the implementation of new…

  8. The mental health care model in Brazil: analyses of the funding, governance processes, and mechanisms of assessment

    PubMed Central

    Trapé, Thiago Lavras; Campos, Rosana Onocko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE This study aims to analyze the current status of the mental health care model of the Brazilian Unified Health System, according to its funding, governance processes, and mechanisms of assessment. METHODS We have carried out a documentary analysis of the ordinances, technical reports, conference reports, normative resolutions, and decrees from 2009 to 2014. RESULTS This is a time of consolidation of the psychosocial model, with expansion of the health care network and inversion of the funding for community services with a strong emphasis on the area of crack cocaine and other drugs. Mental health is an underfunded area within the chronically underfunded Brazilian Unified Health System. The governance model constrains the progress of essential services, which creates the need for the incorporation of a process of regionalization of the management. The mechanisms of assessment are not incorporated into the health policy in the bureaucratic field. CONCLUSIONS There is a need to expand the global funding of the area of health, specifically mental health, which has been shown to be a successful policy. The current focus of the policy seems to be archaic in relation to the precepts of the psychosocial model. Mechanisms of assessment need to be expanded. PMID:28355335

  9. Investigation of the Physical Processes Governing Large-scale Tracer Transport in the Stratosphere and Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews the second year of a three-year research program to investigate the physical mechanisms which underlie the transport of trace constituents in the stratosphere- troposphere system. The primary scientific goal of the research is to identify the processes which transport air masses within the lower stratosphere, particularly between the tropics and middle latitudes. The SASS program seeks to understand the impact of the present and future fleets of conventional jet traffic on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, while complementary airborne observations under UARP seek to understand the complex interactions of dynamical and chemical processes that affect the ozone layer. The present investigation contributes to the goals of each of these by diagnosing the history of air parcels intercepted by NASA research aircraft in UARP and AEAP campaigns.

  10. All-Atom Molecular-Level Analysis of the Ballistic-Impact-Induced Densification and Devitrification of Fused Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Barsoum, R. S.

    2015-08-01

    All-atom molecular-level computations are carried out to infer the dynamic response and material microstructure/topology changes of fused silica subjected to ballistic impact by a hard projectile. The analysis was focused on the investigation of specific aspects of the dynamic response and of the microstructural changes such as the deformation of highly sheared and densified regions and the conversion of amorphous fused silica to SiO2 crystalline allotropic modifications (in particular, α-quartz and stishovite). The microstructural changes in question were determined by carrying out a post-processing atom-coordination procedure. This procedure suggested the formation of stishovite (and perhaps α-quartz) within fused silica during ballistic impact. To rationalize the findings obtained, the all-atom molecular-level computational analysis is complemented by a series of quantum-mechanics density functional theory (DFT) computations. The latter computations enable determination of the relative potential energies of the fused silica, α-quartz, and stishovite under ambient pressure (i.e., under their natural densities) as well as under imposed (as high as 50 GPa) pressures (i.e., under higher densities) and shear strains. In addition, the transition states associated with various fused-silica devitrification processes were identified. The results obtained are found to be in good agreement with their respective experimental counterparts.

  11. Identifying Enclosed Chemical Reaction and Dynamics at the Molecular Level Using Shell-Isolated Miniaturized Plasmonic Liquid Marble.

    PubMed

    Han, Xuemei; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Lee, Yih Hong; Hao, Wei; Liu, Yejing; Phang, In Yee; Li, Shuzhou; Ling, Xing Yi

    2016-04-21

    Current microscale tracking of chemical kinetics is limited to destructive ex situ methods. Here we utilize Ag nanocube-based plasmonic liquid marble (PLM) microreactor for in situ molecular-level identification of reaction dynamics. We exploit the ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) capability imparted by the plasmonic shell to unravel the mechanism and kinetics of aryl-diazonium surface grafting reaction in situ, using just a 2-μL reaction droplet. This reaction is a robust approach to generate covalently functionalized metallic surfaces, yet its kinetics remain unknown to date. Experiments and simulations jointly uncover a two-step sequential grafting process. An initial Langmuir chemisorption of sulfonicbenzene diazonium (dSB) salt onto Ag surfaces forms an intermediate sulfonicbenzene monolayer (Ag-SB), followed by subsequent autocatalytic multilayer growth of Ag-SB3. Kinetic rate constants reveal 19-fold faster chemisorption than multilayer growth. Our ability to precisely decipher molecular-level reaction dynamics creates opportunities to develop more efficient processes in synthetic chemistry and nanotechnology.

  12. Quantifying reactive transport processes governing arsenic mobility in a Bengal Delta aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawson, Joey; Neidhardt, Harald; Siade, Adam; Berg, Michael; Prommer, Henning

    2017-04-01

    Over the last few decades significant progress has been made to characterize the extent and severity of groundwater arsenic pollution in S/SE Asia, and to understand the underlying geochemical processes. However, comparably little effort has been made to merge the findings from this research into quantitative frameworks that allow for a process-based quantitative analysis of observed arsenic behavior and predictions of its future fate. Therefore, this study developed and tested field-scale numerical modelling approaches to represent the primary and secondary geochemical processes associated with the reductive dissolution of Fe-oxy(hydr)oxides and the concomitant release of sorbed arsenic. We employed data from an in situ field experiment in the Bengal Delta Plain, which investigated the influence of labile organic matter (sucrose) on the mobility of Fe, Mn, and As. The data collected during the field experiment were used to guide our model development and to constrain the model parameterisation. Our results show that sucrose oxidation coupled to the reductive dissolution of Fe-oxy(hydr)oxides was accompanied by multiple secondary geochemical reactions that are not easily and uniquely identifiable and quantifiable. Those secondary reactions can explain the disparity between the observed Fe and As behavior. Our modelling results suggest that a significant fraction of the released As is scavenged through (co-)precipitation with newly formed Fe-minerals, specifically magnetite, rather than through sorption to pre-existing and freshly precipitated iron minerals.

  13. Processes governing the stable isotope composition of water in the St. Lawrence river system, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Eric; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Hélie, Jean-François; Myre, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Linkages between δ(18)O-δ(2)H and hydrological processes have been investigated from isotopic time series recorded in the St. Lawrence River basin. Three stations were monitored from 1997 to 2008. They include the Ottawa River, the St. Lawrence River main channel at Montreal and the fluvial estuary. All sites depict seasonal isotopic cycles characterized by heavy isotope depletions during the snowmelt period and heavy isotope enrichments throughout the ice-free period. The data define δ(2)H-δ(18)O regression lines falling below the meteoric water line. In the Ottawa River, calculations suggest that approximately 8 % of the total inflow to the basin is lost through evaporation. In the St. Lawrence River main channel, seasonal isotopic fluctuations most likely reflect hydrological processes occurring within the Great Lakes and mixing with tributaries located downstream. In the St. Lawrence River fluvial estuary, isotopic data allow partitioning streamflow components and suggest that the recorded seasonal variations mainly respond to mixing processes.

  14. Non-communicable diseases and global health governance: enhancing global processes to improve health development.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Roger S

    2007-05-22

    This paper assesses progress in the development of a global framework for responding to non-communicable diseases, as reflected in the policies and initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO), World Bank and the UN: the institutions most capable of shaping a coherent global policy. Responding to the global burden of chronic disease requires a strategic assessment of the global processes that are likely to be most effective in generating commitment to policy change at country level, and in influencing industry behaviour. WHO has adopted a legal process with tobacco (the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control), but a non-legal, advocacy-based approach with diet and physical activity (the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health). The paper assesses the merits of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the FCTC as distinct global processes for advancing health development, before considering what lessons might be learned for enhancing the implementation of the Global Strategy on Diet. While global partnerships, economic incentives, and international legal instruments could each contribute to a more effective global response to chronic diseases, the paper makes a special case for the development of international legal standards in select areas of diet and nutrition, as a strategy for ensuring that the health of future generations does not become dependent on corporate charity and voluntary commitments. A broader frame of reference for lifestyle-related chronic diseases is needed: one that draws together WHO's work in tobacco, nutrition and physical activity, and that envisages selective use of international legal obligations, non-binding recommendations, advocacy and policy advice as tools of choice for promoting different elements of the strategy.

  15. Non-communicable diseases and global health governance: enhancing global processes to improve health development

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Roger S

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses progress in the development of a global framework for responding to non-communicable diseases, as reflected in the policies and initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO), World Bank and the UN: the institutions most capable of shaping a coherent global policy. Responding to the global burden of chronic disease requires a strategic assessment of the global processes that are likely to be most effective in generating commitment to policy change at country level, and in influencing industry behaviour. WHO has adopted a legal process with tobacco (the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control), but a non-legal, advocacy-based approach with diet and physical activity (the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health). The paper assesses the merits of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the FCTC as distinct global processes for advancing health development, before considering what lessons might be learned for enhancing the implementation of the Global Strategy on Diet. While global partnerships, economic incentives, and international legal instruments could each contribute to a more effective global response to chronic diseases, the paper makes a special case for the development of international legal standards in select areas of diet and nutrition, as a strategy for ensuring that the health of future generations does not become dependent on corporate charity and voluntary commitments. A broader frame of reference for lifestyle-related chronic diseases is needed: one that draws together WHO's work in tobacco, nutrition and physical activity, and that envisages selective use of international legal obligations, non-binding recommendations, advocacy and policy advice as tools of choice for promoting different elements of the strategy. PMID:17519005

  16. Analysis of physical-chemical processes governing SSME internal fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, A. K.; Owens, S. F.; Mukerjee, T.; Keeton, L. W.; Tam, L. T.

    1984-01-01

    In order to aid the development of current and future SSME type engines, it is necessary to improve the understanding of basic issues related with physical-chemical processes of SSME internal flows. Accomplishments under each of the following specific objectives are described herein: (1) supplying a state-of-the-art CFD code and graphics package; (2) demonstrating code usage on SSME-related problems to NASA MSFC personnel; and (3) performance computations and analysis of problems relevant to current and future SSME's.

  17. Analysis of physical-chemical processes governing SSME internal fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, A. K.; Owens, S. F.; Mukerjee, T.; Keeton, L. W.; Prakash, C.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The efforts to adapt CHAM's computational fluid dynamics code, PHOENICS, to the analysis of flow within the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) aft-platform seal cavity of the SSME are summarized. In particular, the special purpose PHOENICS satellite and ground station specifically formulated for this application are listed and described, and the preliminary results of the first part two-dimensional analyses are presented and discussed. Planned three-dimensional analyses are also briefly outlined. To further understand the mixing and combustion processes in the SSME fuelside preburners, a single oxygen-hydrogen jet element was investigated.

  18. Technology and public policy: The process of technology assessment in the Federal Government

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, V. T.

    1975-01-01

    Conclusions drawn from research and a series of recommendations for the improvement of the technology assessment process in Federal agencies are presented. The following topics are discussed: (1) who is doing technology assessment; (2) the organization of technology assessments; (3) disciplines and techniques used in technology; (4) analysis of a sample of technology assessment studies: initiation, disciplines, techniques, costs, scope, purpose, and utilization; (5) gaps and overlaps in governmental assessment of nine major technologies; (6) prerequisites for further improvement of technology assessment; and (7) recommendations.

  19. Technology and public policy: The process of technology assessment in the Federal Government

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, V. T.

    1975-01-01

    Conclusions drawn from research and a series of recommendations for the improvement of the technology assessment process in Federal agencies are presented. The following topics are discussed: (1) who is doing technology assessment; (2) the organization of technology assessments; (3) disciplines and techniques used in technology; (4) analysis of a sample of technology assessment studies: initiation, disciplines, techniques, costs, scope, purpose, and utilization; (5) gaps and overlaps in governmental assessment of nine major technologies; (6) prerequisites for further improvement of technology assessment; and (7) recommendations.

  20. Some Physical Processes that Govern Inversion and Analytically Modelled Convection Over the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksakal, Ahmet

    1991-02-01

    The Arabian Sea troposphere during a Summer Monsoon Season is characterized by convection. While deep, well organized, banded convection is observed over the Eastern Arabian Sea, shallow convection capped by an inversion is present over the Western Arabian Sea. Observations indicate that this inversion layer rises from Western to Eastern Arabian Sea during the monsoon onset and post-onset periods. Moderately intense convection tends to appear wherever this inversion layer is lifted. The main goal of the research is to investigate the physical processes associated with the growth, maintenance and dissolution of this inversion. The processes that maintain the inversion are warm air advection from Saudi Arabia, and subsiding air from Iran. The processes that weaken an inversion is radiative cooling from a cloud top. The processes that promote convection include sensible warming from the sea surface, and latent heat release due to cumulus cloud. A 33-level analytical model of convection uses a linear system of an elastic perturbation equations to determine the solutions such as growth rate, phase speed, and orientation of the most unstable mode. A one-dimensional cloud model is employed to determine the vertical distribution of latent heating. A simple bulk aerodynamic formula is applied to evaluate the surface heat fluxes. The stability indicies are computed to evaluate the stratification over the Arabian Sea. Finally, LOWTRAN-7 computer code is engaged to estimate the radiative cooling rates at the cloud top. Results indicate that moderately deep convection is favored in the west during the pre-onset with intensely deep convection in the east during the onset and post-onset phases. The warm air advection from Saudi Arabian Desert is associated with the low level strong westerly flow during the onset and post-onset phases. Computed vertical velocities revealed ascent over the Western and Central Arabian Seas during the pre-onset phase and descent causing an inversion

  1. Bacterial community structure in the drinking water microbiome is governed by filtration processes.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ameet J; Xi, Chuanwu; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2012-08-21

    The bacterial community structure of a drinking water microbiome was characterized over three seasons using 16S rRNA gene based pyrosequencing of samples obtained from source water (a mix of a groundwater and a surface water), different points in a drinking water plant operated to treat this source water, and in the associated drinking water distribution system. Even though the source water was shown to seed the drinking water microbiome, treatment process operations limit the source water's influence on the distribution system bacterial community. Rather, in this plant, filtration by dual media rapid sand filters played a primary role in shaping the distribution system bacterial community over seasonal time scales as the filters harbored a stable bacterial community that seeded the water treatment processes past filtration. Bacterial taxa that colonized the filter and sloughed off in the filter effluent were able to persist in the distribution system despite disinfection of finished water by chloramination and filter backwashing with chloraminated backwash water. Thus, filter colonization presents a possible ecological survival strategy for bacterial communities in drinking water systems, which presents an opportunity to control the drinking water microbiome by manipulating the filter microbial community. Grouping bacterial taxa based on their association with the filter helped to elucidate relationships between the abundance of bacterial groups and water quality parameters and showed that pH was the strongest regulator of the bacterial community in the sampled drinking water system.

  2. Shallow water processes govern system-wide phytoplankton bloom dynamics: A modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, L.V.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Thompson, J.K.

    2009-01-01

    A pseudo-two-dimensional numerical model of estuarine phytoplankton growth and consumption, vertical turbulent mixing, and idealized cross-estuary transport was developed and applied to South San Francisco Bay. This estuary has two bathymetrically distinct habitat types (deep channel, shallow shoal) and associated differences in local net rates of phytoplankton growth and consumption, as well as differences in the water column's tendency to stratify. Because many physical and biological time scales relevant to algal population dynamics decrease with decreasing depth, process rates can be especially fast in the shallow water. We used the model to explore the potential significance of hydrodynamic connectivity between a channel and shoal and whether lateral transport can allow physical or biological processes (e.g. stratification, benthic grazing, light attenuation) in one sub-region to control phytoplankton biomass and bloom development in the adjacent sub-region. Model results for South San Francisco Bay suggest that lateral transport from a productive shoal can result in phytoplankton biomass accumulation in an adjacent deep, unproductive channel. The model further suggests that turbidity and benthic grazing in the shoal can control the occurrence of a bloom system-wide; whereas, turbidity, benthic grazing, and vertical density stratification in the channel are likely to only control local bloom occurrence or modify system-wide bloom magnitude. Measurements from a related field program are generally consistent with model-derived conclusions. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Independent active and thermodynamic processes govern the nucleolus assembly in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Falahati, Hanieh; Wieschaus, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Membraneless organelles play a central role in the organization of protoplasm by concentrating macromolecules, which allows efficient cellular processes. Recent studies have shown that, in vitro, certain components in such organelles can assemble through phase separation. Inside the cell, however, such organelles are multicomponent, with numerous intermolecular interactions that can potentially affect the demixing properties of individual components. In addition, the organelles themselves are inherently active, and it is not clear how the active, energy-consuming processes that occur constantly within such organelles affect the phase separation behavior of the constituent macromolecules. Here, we examine the phase separation model for the formation of membraneless organelles in vivo by assessing the two features that collectively distinguish it from active assembly, namely temperature dependence and reversibility. We use a microfluidic device that allows accurate and rapid manipulation of temperature and examine the quantitative dynamics by which six different nucleolar proteins assemble into the nucleoli of Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Our results indicate that, although phase separation is the main mode of recruitment for four of the studied proteins, the assembly of the other two is irreversible and enhanced at higher temperatures, behaviors indicative of active recruitment to the nucleolus. These two subsets of components differ in their requirements for ribosomal DNA; the two actively assembling components fail to assemble in the absence of ribosomal DNA, whereas the thermodynamically driven components assemble but lose temporal and spatial precision. PMID:28115706

  4. Summary of the government/industry workshop on new materials and processing technologies for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J K

    1992-07-01

    This report presents a summary of the 1-day workshop conducted at Ann Arbor, Michigan, on April 16, 1992, between the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) and the US Department of Energy Advanced Industrial Materials Program (DOE AIM). The workshop objectives were to: (1) encourage collaboration between DOE, the DOE national laboratories, and NCMS material manufacturers and (2) assist the DOE AIM program in targeting research and development (R D) more effectively. During the workshop, participants from industry and DOE laboratories were divided into three working groups. Representatives from the DOE national laboratories currently conducting major research programs for AIM were asked to be working group leaders. The groups developed recommendations for NCMS and AIM managers using a six-step process. As a result of the workshop, the groups identified problems of key concern to NCMS member companies and promising materials and processes to meet industry needs. Overall, the workshop found that the research agenda of DOE AIM should include working with suppliers to develop manufacturing technology. The agenda should not be solely driven by energy considerations, but rather it should be driven by industry needs. The role of DOE should be to ensure that energy-efficient technology is available to meet these needs.

  5. Summary of the government/industry workshop on new materials and processing technologies for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents a summary of the 1-day workshop conducted at Ann Arbor, Michigan, on April 16, 1992, between the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) and the US Department of Energy Advanced Industrial Materials Program (DOE AIM). The workshop objectives were to: (1) encourage collaboration between DOE, the DOE national laboratories, and NCMS material manufacturers and (2) assist the DOE AIM program in targeting research and development (R&D) more effectively. During the workshop, participants from industry and DOE laboratories were divided into three working groups. Representatives from the DOE national laboratories currently conducting major research programs for AIM were asked to be working group leaders. The groups developed recommendations for NCMS and AIM managers using a six-step process. As a result of the workshop, the groups identified problems of key concern to NCMS member companies and promising materials and processes to meet industry needs. Overall, the workshop found that the research agenda of DOE AIM should include working with suppliers to develop manufacturing technology. The agenda should not be solely driven by energy considerations, but rather it should be driven by industry needs. The role of DOE should be to ensure that energy-efficient technology is available to meet these needs.

  6. Geochemical processes governing the compositional features of the crater fumarolic field at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotta, Marcello; Paonita, Antonio; Caracausi, Antonio; Martelli, Mauro; Rizzo, Andrea; Favara, Rocco

    2010-05-01

    Mt Etna is one of the most-active volcanoes in the world. It is characterized by major eruptions, frequent Strombolian activity, and ash emissions. The volcano summit consists of the central crater of Voragine surrounded by the three active cones of the North-East Crater, Bocca Nuova, and the South-East Crater. They are characterized by very fractured and unstable edges. Under these conditions most of the fractures represent preferential degassing pathways for volcanic fluids, so that the main fumarolic fields develop in such fractured areas. The geochemistry of the fumaroles at the summit area of Mt. Etna was investigated. Fumarolic samples were collected between June 2008 and August 2009. Gas samples were usually collected as 'dry gas' and analyzed for the concentrations of He, H2, O2, N2, CO, CH4, and CO2. Fumarolic gases were also sampled a few times using the classical Giggenbach bottles and Giggenbach-type bottles filled with ammonia and silver nitrate in order to determine the SO2/H2S ratio. In addition a novel method was employed in order to sample fumaroles characterized by high content of atmospheric gases. Two types of fumaroles were identified: low-temperature fumaroles, which are dominated by CO2 with minor amounts of SO2 and H2S, and negligible halogen contents, and high-temperature fumaroles, which are strongly air-contaminated and characterized by appreciable amounts of volcanogenic carbon, sulfur, and chlorine. Our data clearly indicate that secondary processes modify the composition of the fluids once they leave the magma body. A model based on thermodynamic data is proposed to explore such postmagmatic processes. We computed the equilibrium composition of magmatic gases that cool starting from magmatic temperatures under several pressure conditions. The model, which uses Etnean plume geochemistry as starting composition of fluids exsolved from magma, shows that SO2 and H2S control the redox conditions of the gas mixture during the cooling, until

  7. Factors governing dissolution process of lignocellulosic biomass in ionic liquid: current status, overview and challenges.

    PubMed

    Badgujar, Kirtikumar C; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2015-02-01

    The utilisation of non-feed lignocellulosic biomass as a source of renewable bio-energy and synthesis of fine chemical products is necessary for the sustainable development. The methods for the dissolution of lignocellulosic biomass in conventional solvents are complex and tedious due to the complex chemical ultra-structure of biomass. In view of this, recent developments for the use of ionic liquid solvent (IL) has received great attention, as ILs can solubilise such complex biomass and thus provides industrial scale-up potential. In this review, we have discussed the state-of-art for the dissolution of lignocellulosic material in representative ILs. Furthermore, various process parameters and their influence for biomass dissolution were reviewed. In addition to this, overview of challenges and opportunities related to this interesting area is presented.

  8. Processes and mechanisms governing hard rock cliff erosion in western Brittany, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laute, Katja; Letortu, Pauline; Le Dantec, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    The evolution of rocky coasts is controlled by the interplay between subaerial, marine as well as biological processes, and the geological context. In times of ongoing climate change it is difficult to predict how these erosional landscapes will respond for example to anticipated sea-level rise or to an increase in storminess. However, it can be expected that changes in the morphodynamics of rocky coasts will have a noticeable effect on society and infrastructure. Recent studies have proven that monitoring cliff micro-seismic ground motion has been very effective in exploring both marine and atmospheric actions on coastal cliffs. But only few studies have focused so far on the effects of wave loading and water circulation (runoff, infiltration, water table variations) on cliff stability and subsequent erosion, considering the interaction between subaerial and marine processes. This project focuses on the identification and quantification of environmental controls on hard rock cliff erosion with an emphasis on discriminating the relative contributions of subaerial and marine processes. We aim at relating different sources of mechanical stress (e.g. wave loading, direct wave impact, hydrostatic pressure, thermal expansion) to cliff-scale strain (cliff-top swaying and shaking) and micro-fracturing (generation, expansion and contraction of micro-cracks) with the objective to unravel and discriminate triggering mechanisms of cliff failure. A four-month monitoring field experiment during the winter period (February-May) of 2017 is carried out at a cliff face located in Porsmilin beach (western Brittany, France). The selected cliff section is exposed to Atlantic swell from the south/southwest with a significant wave height of ca. 1.5 m on average and, reaching up to 4 m during storm events. The cliff rises ca. 20 m above the beach and is mainly formed of orthogneiss with intrusions of granodiorite. The entire cliff is highly fractured and altered, which can promote slope

  9. Competitive solvent-molecule interactions govern primary processes of diphenylcarbene in solvent mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, Johannes; Sokkar, Pandian; Schott, Sebastian; Costa, Paolo; Thiel, Walter; Sander, Wolfram; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Nuernberger, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Photochemical reactions in solution often proceed via competing reaction pathways comprising intermediates that capture a solvent molecule. A disclosure of the underlying reaction mechanisms is challenging due to the rapid nature of these processes and the intricate identification of how many solvent molecules are involved. Here combining broadband femtosecond transient absorption and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we show for one of the most reactive species, diphenylcarbene, that the decision-maker is not the nearest solvent molecule but its neighbour. The hydrogen bonding dynamics determine which reaction channels are accessible in binary solvent mixtures at room temperature. In-depth analysis of the amount of nascent intermediates corroborates the importance of a hydrogen-bonded complex with a protic solvent molecule, in striking analogy to complexes found at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show that adjacent solvent molecules take the role of key abettors rather than bystanders for the fate of the reactive intermediate. PMID:27708264

  10. Increasing corneal curvature by rf current: numerical model studies of governing physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, John A.; Ikei, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The cornea may be reshaped to correct hyperopia by selective shrinkage of collagen in the stroma using radio Frequency (RF) current from a needle electrode. Continuous sine wave current at constant power has proven very effective to achieve repeatable results by thermally shrinking corneal collagen. Post-treatment relaxation of the collagen may be moderated by creating a larger zone of lesser damage over a longer heating time; rather than using a smaller zone of greater damage created in a shorter time. Finite difference numerical models of the electric fields and resulting thermal events were used to study the process parameters and to identify advantageous treatment strategies. The models include temperature- and water-dependent electrical and thermal properties.

  11. Competitive solvent-molecule interactions govern primary processes of diphenylcarbene in solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Johannes; Sokkar, Pandian; Schott, Sebastian; Costa, Paolo; Thiel, Walter; Sander, Wolfram; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Nuernberger, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Photochemical reactions in solution often proceed via competing reaction pathways comprising intermediates that capture a solvent molecule. A disclosure of the underlying reaction mechanisms is challenging due to the rapid nature of these processes and the intricate identification of how many solvent molecules are involved. Here combining broadband femtosecond transient absorption and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we show for one of the most reactive species, diphenylcarbene, that the decision-maker is not the nearest solvent molecule but its neighbour. The hydrogen bonding dynamics determine which reaction channels are accessible in binary solvent mixtures at room temperature. In-depth analysis of the amount of nascent intermediates corroborates the importance of a hydrogen-bonded complex with a protic solvent molecule, in striking analogy to complexes found at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show that adjacent solvent molecules take the role of key abettors rather than bystanders for the fate of the reactive intermediate.

  12. Shallow water processes govern system-wide phytoplankton bloom dynamics: A field study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J.K.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Lucas, L.V.

    2008-01-01

    Prior studies of the phytoplankton dynamics in South San Francisco Bay, California, USA have hypothesized that bivalve filter-feeders are responsible for the limited phytoplankton blooms in the system. This study was designed to examine the effects of benthic grazing and light attenuation on this shallow, turbid, and nutrient replete system. We found that grazing by shallow water bivalves was important in determining phytoplankton bloom occurrence throughout the system and that above a shallow water bivalve grazing threshold, phytoplankton biomass did not exceed bloom levels. Wind speed, used as a proxy for light attenuation in the shallow water, was similarly important in determining bloom development in the shallow water. Environmental conditions and benthic grazing in the deep water channel had a less discernible effect on system-wide phytoplankton blooms although persistent water column stratification did increase bloom magnitude. The shallow water bivalves, believed to be preyed upon by birds and fish that migrate through the system in fall and winter, disappear each year prior to the spring phytoplankton bloom. Because growth of the phytoplankton depends so strongly on shallow water processes, any change in the shallow-water benthic filter-feeders or their predators has great potential to change the phytoplankton bloom dynamics in this system. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A review of the actual knowledge of the processes governing growth and development of long bones.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, Ugo Ernesto; Beluffi, Giampiero; Benetti, Anna; Bondioni, Maria Pia; Zarattini, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Autoptic samples of human bones (from 8 weeks of gestation to 12 years of age) and a second group of serial, skeletal x-rays (required for pathologies not related to bone dysplasia in children from 4 months to 17 years of age) provided the material for the analysis of the physes normal growth mechanism presented in this review. Before the appearance of the ossification centers epiphyseal growth rests exclusively on chondrocytes proliferation (interstitial growth), without any detectable differentiated cellular organization. When endochondral ossification starts a defined spatial disposition of chondrocytes and a corresponding organization of the intercellular matrix is set up, so that it is possible to identify a growth vector corresponding to the columns of piled chondrocytes with direction from hypertrophic toward the proliferative cell layers. The complexity of the tubular bones growth process is well represented by the spatial arrangement of the growth vectors. In the late epiphyseal growth another mechanism is active in addition to endochondral ossification, namely, articular cartilage interstitial growth and subchondral remodelling. The knowledge of the normal mode of organization of the physis and its temporal sequence can help to better understand of the deviaton from the normal development of metaphyseal and epiphyseal dysplasias.

  14. Factors and processes governing the C-14 content of carbonate in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundson, Ronald; Wang, Yang; Chadwick, Oliver; Trumbore, Susan; Mcfadden, Leslie; Mcdonald, Eric; Wells, Steven; Deniro, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented describing the factors and processes which determine the measured C-14 ages of soil calcium carbonate. Pedogenic carbonate forms in isotopic equilium with soil CO2. Carbon dioxide in soils is a mixture of CO2 derived from two biological sources: respiration by living plant roots and respiration of microorganisms decomposing soil humus. The relative proportion of these two CO2 sources can greatly affect the initial C-14 content of pedogenic carbonate: the greater the contribution of humus-derived CO2, the greater the initial C-14 age of the carbonate mineral. For any given mixture of CO2 sources, the steady-state (14)CO2 distribution vs. soil depth can be described by a production/diffusion model. As a soil ages, the C-14 age of soil humus increases, as does the steady-state C-14 age of soil CO2 and the initial C-14 age of any pedogenic carbonate which forms. The mean C-14 age of a complete pedogenic carbonate coating or nodule will underestimate the true age of the soil carbonate. This discrepancy increases the older a soil becomes. Partial removal of outer (and younger) carbonate coatings greatly improves the relationship between measured C-14 age and true age. Although the production/diffusion model qualitatively explains the C-14 age of pedogenic carbonate vs. soil depth in many soils, other factors, such as climate change, may contribute to the observed trends, particularily in soils older than the Holocene.

  15. Processes governing arsenic retardation on Pleistocene sediments: Adsorption experiments and model-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathi, Bhasker; Neidhardt, Harald; Berg, Michael; Siade, Adam; Prommer, Henning

    2017-05-01

    In many countries of south/south-east Asia, reliance on Pleistocene aquifers for the supply of low-arsenic groundwater has created the risk of inducing migration of high-arsenic groundwater from adjacent Holocene aquifers. Adsorption of arsenic onto mineral surfaces of Pleistocene sediments is an effective attenuation mechanism. However, little is known about the sorption under anoxic conditions, in particular the behavior of arsenite. We report the results of anoxic batch experiments investigating arsenite (1-25 µmol/L) adsorption onto Pleistocene sediments under a range of field-relevant conditions. The sorption of arsenite was nonlinear and decreased with increasing phosphate concentrations (3-60 µmol/L) while pH (range 6-8) had no effect on total arsenic sorption. To simulate the sorption experiments, we developed surface complexation models of varying complexity. The simulated concentrations of arsenite, arsenate, and phosphate were in good agreement for the isotherm and phosphate experiments while secondary geochemical processes affected the pH experiments. For the latter, the model-based analysis suggests that the formation of solution complexes between organic buffers and Mn(II) ions promoted the oxidation of arsenite involving naturally occurring Mn-oxides. Upscaling the batch experiment model to a reactive transport model for Pleistocene aquifers demonstrates strong arsenic retardation and could have useful implications in the management of arsenic-free Pleistocene aquifers.

  16. Factors and processes governing the C-14 content of carbonate in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundson, Ronald; Wang, Yang; Chadwick, Oliver; Trumbore, Susan; Mcfadden, Leslie; Mcdonald, Eric; Wells, Steven; Deniro, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented describing the factors and processes which determine the measured C-14 ages of soil calcium carbonate. Pedogenic carbonate forms in isotopic equilium with soil CO2. Carbon dioxide in soils is a mixture of CO2 derived from two biological sources: respiration by living plant roots and respiration of microorganisms decomposing soil humus. The relative proportion of these two CO2 sources can greatly affect the initial C-14 content of pedogenic carbonate: the greater the contribution of humus-derived CO2, the greater the initial C-14 age of the carbonate mineral. For any given mixture of CO2 sources, the steady-state (14)CO2 distribution vs. soil depth can be described by a production/diffusion model. As a soil ages, the C-14 age of soil humus increases, as does the steady-state C-14 age of soil CO2 and the initial C-14 age of any pedogenic carbonate which forms. The mean C-14 age of a complete pedogenic carbonate coating or nodule will underestimate the true age of the soil carbonate. This discrepancy increases the older a soil becomes. Partial removal of outer (and younger) carbonate coatings greatly improves the relationship between measured C-14 age and true age. Although the production/diffusion model qualitatively explains the C-14 age of pedogenic carbonate vs. soil depth in many soils, other factors, such as climate change, may contribute to the observed trends, particularily in soils older than the Holocene.

  17. Improvement of the Computing - Related Procurement Process at a Government Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gittins, C.

    2000-04-03

    The purpose of the project was to develop, implement, and market value-added services through the Computing Resource Center in an effort to streamline computing-related procurement processes across the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The power of the project was in focusing attention on and value of centralizing the delivery of computer related products and services to the institution. The project required a plan and marketing strategy that would drive attention to the facility's value-added offerings and services. A significant outcome of the project has been the change in the CRC internal organization. The realignment of internal policies and practices, together with additions to its product and service offerings has brought an increased focus to the facility. This movement from a small, fractious organization into one that is still small yet well organized and focused on its mission and goals has been a significant transition. Indicative of this turnaround was the sharing of information. One-on-one and small group meetings, together with statistics showing work activity was invaluable in gaining support for more equitable workload distribution, and the removal of blame and finger pointing. Sharing monthly reports on sales and operating costs also had a positive impact.

  18. Overcoming Interoperability Weaknesses in e-Government Processes: Organizing and Sharing Knowledge in Regional Development Programs Using Ontologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorza, Francesco; Casas, Giuseppe Las; Murgante, Beniamino

    European Regional Policy produced several generations of programmes at both National and Regional levels. Such a complex framework tends to increase multi-level governance in the period 2007-2013, promoting a wider participation of stakeholders (including Public Administration, Local Communities, Enterprises, etc). This process has been usually accompanied by e-tools for the management of bottom-up processes, with several instances related to common problems of participation processes. Communication between "programmer" and categories of beneficiaries always presented weakness due to the ineffective system of management knowledge within the process. Relevant issues in the framework of regional development programmes are: Do stakeholders understand the meaning of general and sectoral policies? Are citizens aware of technical instruments implementing such policies? Are they conscious of ex-ante comprehensive context analysis and/or can they share possible future scenarios? A way to tackle these problems is the use of ontologies. In this work we present the structural elements of the ontology of regional development programmes analyzing major steps of the ontology design and nodal phases of the ontology building (i.e. consensus on relations and restrictions, switch from glossary to taxonomy). The result of such an application is an ontology of regional development containing more than one hundred classes.

  19. Dynamic oscillatory processes governing cued orienting and allocation of auditory attention

    PubMed Central

    Ahveninen, Jyrki; Huang, Samantha; Belliveau, John W.; Chang, Wei-Tang; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2013-01-01

    In everyday listening situations, we need to constantly switch between alternative sound sources and engage attention according to cues that match our goals and expectations. The exact neuronal bases of these processes are poorly understood. We investigated oscillatory brain networks controlling auditory attention using cortically constrained fMRI-weighted magnetoencephalography/ electroencephalography (MEG/EEG) source estimates. During consecutive trials, subjects were instructed to shift attention based on a cue, presented in the ear where a target was likely to follow. To promote audiospatial attention effects, the targets were embedded in streams of dichotically presented standard tones. Occasionally, an unexpected novel sound occurred opposite to the cued ear, to trigger involuntary orienting. According to our cortical power correlation analyses, increased frontoparietal/temporal 30–100 Hz gamma activity at 200–1400 ms after cued orienting predicted fast and accurate discrimination of subsequent targets. This sustained correlation effect, possibly reflecting voluntary engagement of attention after the initial cue-driven orienting, spread from the temporoparietal junction, anterior insula, and inferior frontal (IFC) cortices to the right frontal eye fields. Engagement of attention to one ear resulted in a significantly stronger increase of 7.5–15 Hz alpha in the ipsilateral than contralateral parieto-occipital cortices 200–600 ms after the cue onset, possibly reflecting crossmodal modulation of the dorsal visual pathway during audiospatial attention. Comparisons of cortical power patterns also revealed significant increases of sustained right medial frontal cortex theta power, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior insula/IFC beta power, and medial parietal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex gamma activity after cued vs. novelty-triggered orienting (600–1400 ms). Our results reveal sustained oscillatory patterns associated with voluntary

  20. Dynamic oscillatory processes governing cued orienting and allocation of auditory attention.

    PubMed

    Ahveninen, Jyrki; Huang, Samantha; Belliveau, John W; Chang, Wei-Tang; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2013-11-01

    In everyday listening situations, we need to constantly switch between alternative sound sources and engage attention according to cues that match our goals and expectations. The exact neuronal bases of these processes are poorly understood. We investigated oscillatory brain networks controlling auditory attention using cortically constrained fMRI-weighted magnetoencephalography/EEG source estimates. During consecutive trials, participants were instructed to shift attention based on a cue, presented in the ear where a target was likely to follow. To promote audiospatial attention effects, the targets were embedded in streams of dichotically presented standard tones. Occasionally, an unexpected novel sound occurred opposite to the cued ear to trigger involuntary orienting. According to our cortical power correlation analyses, increased frontoparietal/temporal 30-100 Hz gamma activity at 200-1400 msec after cued orienting predicted fast and accurate discrimination of subsequent targets. This sustained correlation effect, possibly reflecting voluntary engagement of attention after the initial cue-driven orienting, spread from the TPJ, anterior insula, and inferior frontal cortices to the right FEFs. Engagement of attention to one ear resulted in a significantly stronger increase of 7.5-15 Hz alpha in the ipsilateral than contralateral parieto-occipital cortices 200-600 msec after the cue onset, possibly reflecting cross-modal modulation of the dorsal visual pathway during audiospatial attention. Comparisons of cortical power patterns also revealed significant increases of sustained right medial frontal cortex theta power, right dorsolateral pFC and anterior insula/inferior frontal cortex beta power, and medial parietal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex gamma activity after cued versus novelty-triggered orienting (600-1400 msec). Our results reveal sustained oscillatory patterns associated with voluntary engagement of auditory spatial attention, with the

  1. Processes governing phytoplankton blooms in estuaries. II: The role of horizontal transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, L.V.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Cloern, J.E.; Thompson, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    The development and distribution of phytoplankton blooms in estuaries are functions of both local conditions (i.e. the production-loss balance for a water column at a particular spatial location) and large-scale horizontal transport. In this study, the second of a 2-paper series, we use a depth-averaged hydrodynamic-biological model to identify transport-related mechanisms impacting phytoplankton biomass accumulation and distribution on a system level. We chose South San Francisco Bay as a model domain, since its combination of a deep channel surrounded by broad shoals is typical of drowned-river estuaries. Five general mechanisms involving interaction of horizontal transport with variability in local conditions are discussed. Residual (on the order of days to weeks) transport mechanisms affecting bloom development and location include residence time/export, import, and the role of deep channel regions as conduits for mass transport. Interactions occurring on tidal time scales, i.e. on the order of hours) include the phasing of lateral oscillatory tidal flow relative to temporal changes in local net phytoplankton growth rates, as well as lateral sloshing of shoal-derived biomass into deep channel regions during ebb and back into shallow regions during flood tide. Based on these results, we conclude that: (1) while local conditions control whether a bloom is possible, the combination of transport and spatial-temporal variability in local conditions determines if and where a bloom will actually occur; (2) tidal-time-scale physical-biological interactions provide important mechanisms for bloom development and evolution. As a result of both subtidal and tidal-time-scale transport processes, peak biomass may not be observed where local conditions are most favorable to phytoplankton production, and inherently unproductive areas may be regions of high biomass accumulation.

  2. Sorption and photodegradation processes govern distribution and fate of sulfamethazine in freshwater-sediment microcosms.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Keri L; Gross, Aaron D; Moorman, Thomas B; Coats, Joel R

    2013-10-01

    The antibiotic sulfamethazine can be transported from manured fields to surface water bodies. We investigated the degradation and fate of sulfamethazine in pond water using (14)C-phenyl-sulfamethazine in small pond water microcosms containing intact sediment and pond water. We found a 2.7-day half-life in pond water and 4.2-day half-life when sulfamethazine was added to the water (5 mg L(-1) initial concentration) with swine manure diluted to simulate runoff. Sulfamethazine dissipated exponentially from the water column, with the majority of loss occurring via movement into the sediment phase. Extractable sulfamethazine in sediment accounted for 1.9-6.1% of the applied antibiotic within 14 days and then declined thereafter. Sulfamethazine was transformed mainly into nonextractable sediment-bound residue (40-60% of applied radioactivity) and smaller amounts of photoproducts. Biodegradation, as indicated by metabolite formation and (14)CO2 evolution, was less significant than photodegradation. Two photoproducts accounted for 15-30% of radioactivity in the water column at the end of the 63-day study; the photoproducts were the major degradates in the aqueous and sediment phases. Other unidentified metabolites individually accounted for <7% of radioactivity in the water or sediment. Less than 3% of applied radioactivity was mineralized to (14)CO2. Manure input significantly increased sorption and binding of sulfamethazine residues to the sediment. These results show concurrent processes of photodegradation and sorption to sediment control aqueous concentrations and establish that sediment is a sink for sulfamethazine and sulfamethazine-related residues. Accumulation of the photoproducts and sulfamethazine in sediment may have important implications for benthic organisms.

  3. Investigation of heat flux processes governing the increase of groundwater temperatures beneath cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, P.; Menberg, K.; Zhu, K.; Blum, P.

    2012-12-01

    In the subsurface of many cities there are widespread and persistent thermal anomalies. These so-called subsurface urban heat islands (UHIs), which also stimulate warming of urban aquifers, are triggered by various processes. Possible heat sources are basements of buildings, leakage of sewage systems, buried district heating networks, re-injection of cooling water and solar irradiation on paved surfaces. In the current study, the reported groundwater temperatures in several Central European cities, such as Berlin, Cologne (Germany) and Zurich (Switzerland) are compared. Available data sets are supplemented by temperature measurements and depth profiles in observation wells. Trend analyses are conducted with time series of groundwater temperatures, and three-dimensional groundwater temperature maps are provided. In all investigated cities, pronounced positive temperature anomalies are present. The distribution of groundwater temperatures appears to be spatially and temporally highly variable. Apparently, the increased heat input into the urban subsurface is controlled by very local and site-specific parameters. In the long-run, the combination of various heat sources results in an extensive temperature increase. In many cases, the maximum temperature elevation is found close to the city center. Regional groundwater temperature differences between the city center and the rural background are up to 5 °C, with local hot spots of even more pronounced anomalies. Particular heat sources, like cooling water injections or case-specific underground constructions, can cause local temperatures > 20 °C in the subsurface. Examination of the long-term variations in isotherm maps shows that temperatures have increased by about 1 °C in the city, as well as in the rural background areas over the last decades. This increase could be reproduced with trend analysis of temperature data gathered from several groundwater wells. Comparison between groundwater and air temperatures in the

  4. Effects of Diacerein at the Molecular Level in the Osteoarthritis Disease Process

    PubMed Central

    Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In osteoarthritis (OA), the alterations in joint tissues are numerous and involve morphological, biochemical and metabolic changes and an upregulation of the inflammatory pathways. The focus of this article is a brief narrative review of the effects of diacerein, an antirheumatic drug from the anthraquinone chemical class, and its active metabolite, rhein, on the factors that participate in the complex interaction between OA tissues and cells leading to the progression of joint structural changes. PMID:22870441

  5. Coupled Hydrological and Geochemical Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals in the Hanford Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, M.A.; Jardine, P.M.; Fendorf, S.E.; Pace, M.N.; Yin, X.; Mehlhorn, T.L.; Zachara, J.M.

    2003-03-27

    At the D.O.E. Hanford Reservation, accelerated migration of radionuclides has been observed in the vadose zone underlying the tank farms. Our goal is to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the coupled hydrogeochemical mechanisms responsible for observed migration. Our approach is to perform a suite of experiments ranging from novel surface interrogation techniques (e.g., XAS) to miscible displacement experiments on disturbed and undisturbed sediments from the Hanford, Plio-Pleistocene and Ringold formations. Results indicate during unsaturated conditions hydrologic processes governing transport are a strong function of sediment layering in the Hanford and Ringold formations. The transport of radionuclides and toxic metals (U, Cr(VI), Cs, Sr and Co) is influenced by reactive geochemical nonequilibrium, sedimentary mineralogy and solution chemistry. This research will provide new insights into how physical and mineralogical heterogeneities (e.g. stratification, pore regime connectivity, mineral composition along flowpaths) influence contaminant retardation and degree of geochemical nonequilibrium during transport.

  6. Physical processes governing summer Chl-a in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, M. M.; Gille, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a crucial role in sequestering atmospheric CO2 by exporting fixed carbon into the deep ocean through the biological pump. It is a High Nitrate Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) region where phytoplankton growth is primarily Fe-limited. Several sources of Fe have been identified in the Southern Ocean, and phytoplankton blooms occur annually. Many of these blooms persist through the summer and even peak in the summer months. The mechanisms that explain spring blooms are well known, and the shoaling of the mixed-layer depth (MLD) plays a critical role in terms of light availability. A question that remains unanswered is what sustains blooms through the summer when presumably light conditions are optimal and nutrients in the mixed layer have been depleted. One source of Fe is the deep ocean, and models and observations suggest blooms in the Southern Ocean are largely driven by ocean dynamics. The evaluation of the input of Fe from subsurface waters into the euphotic zone depends in part on mixed-layer dynamics and Ekman-induced upwelling. The turbulent mixing caused by winds, along with the buoyancy forcing, prescribe the MLD and deepening of the MLD may facilitate the entrainment of Fe. The curl of the wind stress, by Ekman pumping, provides a mechanism of upwelling that can also contribute to the supply of Fe. Sea surface temperature (SST) responds to both of these processes, as well as to surface heat fluxes at the ocean-air interphase. In this work we explore the potential influence of nutrient entrainment due to MLD deepening and Ekman-induced upwelling on summer phytoplankton blooms. Using weekly satellite estimates and ocean reanalysis we correlate anomalies of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) with anomalies of physical variables such as wind speed intensity (W), Ekman pumping velocities (WEK), SST and surface heat fluxes (Qnet). Winds and SST can have strong feedbacks through Qnet and instabilities in the atmospheric boundary layer, and therefore in our

  7. Governing processes for reactive nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere in relation to ecosystem, climatic and human health impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, O.; Skjøth, C. A.; Reis, S.; Bleeker, A.; Harrison, R.; Cape, J. N.; Fowler, D.; Skiba, U.; Simpson, D.; Jickells, T.; Kulmala, M.; Gyldenkærne, S.; Sørensen, L. L.; Erisman, J. W.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-07-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) compounds have different fates in the atmosphere due to differences in governing processes of physical transport, deposition and chemical transformation. Nr compounds addressed here include reduced nitrogen (NHx: ammonia (NH3) and its reaction product ammonium (NH4+)), oxidized nitrogen (NOy: nitrogen monoxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and their reaction products) as well as organic nitrogen compounds (organic N). Pollution abatement strategies need to take into account these differences in the governing processes of these compounds when assessing their impact on ecosystem services, biodiversity, human health and climate. NOx (NO + NO2) emitted from traffic affects human health in urban areas where the presence of buildings increases the residence time in streets. In urban areas this leads to enhanced exposure of the population to NOx concentrations. NOx emissions have little impact on nearby ecosystems because of the small dry deposition rates of NOx. These compounds need to be converted into nitric acid (HNO3) before removal through deposition is efficient. HNO3 sticks quickly to any surface and is thereby either dry deposited or incorporated into aerosols as nitrate (NO3-). In contrast to NOx compounds, NH3 has potentially high impacts on ecosystems near the main agricultural sources of NH3 because of its large ground-level concentrations along with large dry deposition rates. Aerosol phase NH4+ and NO3- contribute significantly to background PM2.5 and PM10 (mass of aerosols with a diameter of less than 2.5 and 10 μm, respectively) with an impact on radiation balance as well as potentially on human health. Little is known quantitatively and qualitatively about organic N in the atmosphere, other than that it contributes a significant fraction of wet-deposited N, and is present in both gaseous and particulate forms in the atmosphere. Further studies are needed to characterize the sources, air chemistry and removal rates of organic N

  8. Up-scaling mineral-aqueous interfacial processes that govern isotope and trace element partitioning during calcite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    The dependence of the isotopic and trace element composition of calcium carbonate minerals on growth conditions including temperature, pH, and salinity is widely used to infer paleoclimate conditions. These inferences rely heavily on phenomenological observations of biogenic and inorganic precipitation both in and ex situ, where only limited variability in solution conditions can be explored. Ionic fluxes between the mineral surface and aqueous growth solution govern the net uptake of both stoichiometric and trace species during calcification, so developing a mechanistic understanding of the reactions governing these fluxes is critical to refine existing proxies and to develop new ones. The micro-scale mechanisms of calcite precipitation from aqueous solution have been extensively studied, and net ionic uptake post-nucleation is known to occur primarily at monomolecular kink sites along step edges at the mineral surface. In this talk, I will present a theoretical framework that uses the quasi-elementary ion attachment and detachment reactions governing ion uptake at kink sites to simultaneously model bulk mineral growth kinetics and tracer partitioning during calcite precipitation. Several distinct processes occur during ion uptake at kink sites that can influence the distribution of trace species, directly impacting the composition of various carbonate paleoproxies including δ44Ca, δ18O, Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca. The distribution of these trace species will be shown to depend on (1) the relative rates of ion desolvation during attachment to kink sites, (2) the relative rates of bond breaking during detachment from kink sites, and (3) the equilibrium partitioning of trace aqueous species. This model accounts for the impact of solution conditions on net ion fluxes and surface speciation, which in turn controls the population of kink sites available for direct ion exchange with the aqueous phase. The impacts of solution variables including pH, temperature and salinity can

  9. Numerical solution of equations governing longitudinal suspension line wave motion during the parachute unfurling process. Ph.D. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Washington, D. C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    Equations are presented which govern the dynamics of the lines-first parachute unfurling process, including wave motion in the parachute suspension lines. Techniques are developed for obtaining numerical solutions to the governing equations. Histories of tension at test data, and generally good agreement is observed. Errors in computed results are attributed to several areas of uncertainty, the most significant being a poorly defined boundary condition on the wave motion at the vehicle-suspension line boundary.

  10. New insights into the molecular-level control of silica mineralization by diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; Dove, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    microscopy with elements of modern materials chemistry, to directly measure the rate of amorphous silica nucleation on COOH, NH3+, and COOH / NH3+-terminated surfaces under controlled solution conditions. Our results provide new insights into the molecular-level control of silica mineralization in diatoms. We show that differences between substrate-specific nucleation rates are controlled largely by kinetic factors rather than thermodynamic drivers, and that amine-terminated surfaces are not capable of triggering the onset of silica deposition without the synergistic activity of neighboring negatively charged species on the surface or in solution (e.g. carboxyl or phosphoryl groups). In light of this result we conclude that sites on the organic matrix that have phosphate and amine moieties in close proximity serve not only as contact points between the constituent macromolecules in the matrix, but also as initial sites of silica deposition.

  11. Identification and analysis of evolutionary selection pressures acting at the molecular level in five forkhead subfamilies.

    PubMed

    Fetterman, Christina D; Rannala, Bruce; Walter, Michael A

    2008-09-24

    Members of the forkhead gene family act as transcription regulators in biological processes including development and metabolism. The evolution of forkhead genes has not been widely examined and selection pressures at the molecular level influencing subfamily evolution and differentiation have not been explored. Here, in silico methods were used to examine selection pressures acting on the coding sequence of five multi-species FOX protein subfamily clusters; FoxA, FoxD, FoxI, FoxO and FoxP. Application of site models, which estimate overall selection pressures on individual codons throughout the phylogeny, showed that the amino acid changes observed were either neutral or under negative selection. Branch-site models, which allow estimated selection pressures along specified lineages to vary as compared to the remaining phylogeny, identified positive selection along branches leading to the FoxA3 and Protostomia clades in the FoxA cluster and the branch leading to the FoxO3 clade in the FoxO cluster. Residues that may differentiate paralogs were identified in the FoxA and FoxO clusters and residues that differentiate orthologs were identified in the FoxA cluster. Neutral amino acid changes were identified in the forkhead domain of the FoxA, FoxD and FoxP clusters while positive selection was identified in the forkhead domain of the Protostomia lineage of the FoxA cluster. A series of residues under strong negative selection adjacent to the N- and C-termini of the forkhead domain were identified in all clusters analyzed suggesting a new method for refinement of domain boundaries. Extrapolation of domains among cluster members in conjunction with selection pressure information allowed prediction of residue function in the FoxA, FoxO and FoxP clusters and exclusion of known domain function in residues of the FoxA and FoxI clusters. Consideration of selection pressures observed in conjunction with known functional information allowed prediction of residue function and

  12. Identification and analysis of evolutionary selection pressures acting at the molecular level in five forkhead subfamilies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Members of the forkhead gene family act as transcription regulators in biological processes including development and metabolism. The evolution of forkhead genes has not been widely examined and selection pressures at the molecular level influencing subfamily evolution and differentiation have not been explored. Here, in silico methods were used to examine selection pressures acting on the coding sequence of five multi-species FOX protein subfamily clusters; FoxA, FoxD, FoxI, FoxO and FoxP. Results Application of site models, which estimate overall selection pressures on individual codons throughout the phylogeny, showed that the amino acid changes observed were either neutral or under negative selection. Branch-site models, which allow estimated selection pressures along specified lineages to vary as compared to the remaining phylogeny, identified positive selection along branches leading to the FoxA3 and Protostomia clades in the FoxA cluster and the branch leading to the FoxO3 clade in the FoxO cluster. Residues that may differentiate paralogs were identified in the FoxA and FoxO clusters and residues that differentiate orthologs were identified in the FoxA cluster. Neutral amino acid changes were identified in the forkhead domain of the FoxA, FoxD and FoxP clusters while positive selection was identified in the forkhead domain of the Protostomia lineage of the FoxA cluster. A series of residues under strong negative selection adjacent to the N- and C-termini of the forkhead domain were identified in all clusters analyzed suggesting a new method for refinement of domain boundaries. Extrapolation of domains among cluster members in conjunction with selection pressure information allowed prediction of residue function in the FoxA, FoxO and FoxP clusters and exclusion of known domain function in residues of the FoxA and FoxI clusters. Conclusion Consideration of selection pressures observed in conjunction with known functional information allowed

  13. Information storage at the molecular level - The design of a molecular shift register memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Hopfield, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The control of electron transfer rates is discussed and a molecular shift register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are made up of molecules which can exist in either an oxidized or reduced state and the bits can be shifted between the cells with photoinduced electron transfer reactions. The device integrates designed molecules onto a VLSI substrate. A control structure to modify the flow of information along a shift register is indicated schematically.

  14. Separation and molecular-level segregation of complex alkane mixtures in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dubbeldam, David; Galvin, Casey J; Walton, Krista S; Ellis, Donald E; Snurr, Randall Q

    2008-08-20

    In this computational work we explore metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for separating alkanes according to the degree of branching. We show that the structure MOF-1 shows an adsorption hierarchy for a 13-component light naphtha mixture precisely as desired for increasing the research octane number of gasoline. In addition we report an unusual molecular-level segregation of molecules based on their degree of branching.

  15. A Five-Year Plan for Meeting the Automatic Data Processing and Telecommunications Needs of the Federal Government. Volume l: Planning Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.

    The first of two volumes, this document describes the planning process of a 5-year plan for meeting the telecommunications and automatic data processing (ADP) needs of the federal government, examines the planning efforts of several typical agencies, and explores issues involved in managing new technology as it evolves. For each agency,…

  16. Update of technologies for examining the stratum corneum at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Norlén, L

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the molecular organization of the stratum corneum is still an outstanding problem, despite being both fundamentally and clinically significant. There is a need to develop methodology that yields molecular-level resolution of the stratum corneum components in their native state, without introducing artefacts. We outline here the recent success of cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS) combined with electron microscopy simulation to elucidate the molecular organization of the stratum corneum in its near-native state. Furthermore, some emerging technologies for studying the physical properties and dynamic behaviour of native stratum corneum at the molecular level are briefly reviewed. These encompass multiphoton microscopy (MPM), polarization transfer solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (PTssNMR) and PeakForce tapping-mode atomic force microscopy combined with frequency-modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). CEMOVIS combined with electron microscopy simulation allows for molecular structure determination in situ in native stratum corneum, while MPM allows probing of the stratum corneum local physicochemical properties such as fluorophore diffusion coefficients, water content and pH. PTssNMR allows for evaluation of the molecular mobility of stratum corneum keratin and lipid components, and PeakForce KPFM allows for analysis of the local nanomechanical properties of stratum corneum. These emerging techno-logies may contribute to a molecular-level understanding of stratum corneum structure and function in vivo. © 2014 The Author BJD © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Validating and determining the weight of items used for evaluating clinical governance implementation based on analytic hierarchy process model

    PubMed Central

    Hooshmand, Elaheh; Tourani, Sogand; Ravaghi, Hamid; Vafaee Najar, Ali; Meraji, Marziye; Ebrahimipour, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of implementing a system such as Clinical Governance (CG) is to integrate, establish and globalize distinct policies in order to improve quality through increasing professional knowledge and the accountability of healthcare professional toward providing clinical excellence. Since CG is related to change, and change requires money and time, CG implementation has to be focused on priority areas that are in more dire need of change. The purpose of the present study was to validate and determine the significance of items used for evaluating CG implementation. Methods: The present study was descriptive-quantitative in method and design. Items used for evaluating CG implementation were first validated by the Delphi method and then compared with one another and ranked based on the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) model. Results: The items that were validated for evaluating CG implementation in Iran include performance evaluation, training and development, personnel motivation, clinical audit, clinical effectiveness, risk management, resource allocation, policies and strategies, external audit, information system management, research and development, CG structure, implementation prerequisites, the management of patients’ non-medical needs, complaints and patients’ participation in the treatment process. The most important items based on their degree of significance were training and development, performance evaluation, and risk management. The least important items included the management of patients’ non-medical needs, patients’ participation in the treatment process and research and development. Conclusion: The fundamental requirements of CG implementation included having an effective policy at national level, avoiding perfectionism, using the expertise and potentials of the entire country and the coordination of this model with other models of quality improvement such as accreditation and patient safety. PMID:26673174

  18. Validating and determining the weight of items used for evaluating clinical governance implementation based on analytic hierarchy process model.

    PubMed

    Hooshmand, Elaheh; Tourani, Sogand; Ravaghi, Hamid; Vafaee Najar, Ali; Meraji, Marziye; Ebrahimipour, Hossein

    2015-04-08

    The purpose of implementing a system such as Clinical Governance (CG) is to integrate, establish and globalize distinct policies in order to improve quality through increasing professional knowledge and the accountability of healthcare professional toward providing clinical excellence. Since CG is related to change, and change requires money and time, CG implementation has to be focused on priority areas that are in more dire need of change. The purpose of the present study was to validate and determine the significance of items used for evaluating CG implementation. The present study was descriptive-quantitative in method and design. Items used for evaluating CG implementation were first validated by the Delphi method and then compared with one another and ranked based on the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) model. The items that were validated for evaluating CG implementation in Iran include performance evaluation, training and development, personnel motivation, clinical audit, clinical effectiveness, risk management, resource allocation, policies and strategies, external audit, information system management, research and development, CG structure, implementation prerequisites, the management of patients' non-medical needs, complaints and patients' participation in the treatment process. The most important items based on their degree of significance were training and development, performance evaluation, and risk management. The least important items included the management of patients' non-medical needs, patients' participation in the treatment process and research and development. The fundamental requirements of CG implementation included having an effective policy at national level, avoiding perfectionism, using the expertise and potentials of the entire country and the coordination of this model with other models of quality improvement such as accreditation and patient safety. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  19. The foreign defendant: Overview of principles governing jurisdiction, venue, extraterritorial service of process and extraterritorial discovery in US courts

    SciTech Connect

    Soiret, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    This article summarizes the principles governing the power of the United States courts to assert jurisdiction over nonresident parties and the ways and means by which those parties may be brought before the court. It is an overview in the context of aviation litigation, but its analysis is not limited to aviation litigation. It covers only federal authorities and focuses on non-American defendants. The issues are presented in the order they might be expected to arise in litigation. It covers only federal authorities and focuses on non-American defendants. The issues are presented in the order they might be expected to arise in litigation. First is the question of whether the plaintiff will be able to obtain jurisdiction over a defendant in the state where the suit is filed. This determination involves due process principles under the United State Constitution. While the bases articulated by the United States Supreme Court for the assertion of such jurisdiction are relatively simple to express, their application by the Supreme Court and lower courts has created significant confusion and has resulted in contradictory results. The next issue is how the defendants may be brought before the court. For non-American defendants, service of process is controlled by the Hague Convention on Service and is not a subject of significant controversy. Once the defendants have been served with process, one must determine whether the forum court is proper from a venue standpoint. Even if venue is technically proper, there may be arguments that the lawsuit should be transferred to another court, possible even to a court outside the United States, to permit the case to be most efficiently litigated. Once those arguments have been exhausted, the potential application of the foreign Sovereign Immunities Act must be carefully considered. Finally, this article touches upon pretrial discovery. 269 refs.

  20. Government Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlatch, Jo Bell

    1979-01-01

    Reviews recent federal publications on government information, particularly in the area of general informational services, public access to government information and privacy issues, coordination of government information systems, and congressional information needs. (Author)

  1. Governance is Academic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manahan, Richard A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A model for systematic development and reorganization of college governance systems consists of three processes: reviewing the existing governance structure; examining the concerns and interrelationships of individuals and groups; and pinpointing desired changes. All must be done in the context of linking governance to overall institutional…

  2. Safe meat-handling knowledge, attitudes and practices of private and government meat processing plants' workers: implications for future policy.

    PubMed

    Adesokan, H K; Raji, A O Q

    2014-03-01

    Food-borne disease outbreaks remain a major global health challenge and cross-contamination from raw meat due to poor handling is a major cause in developing countries. Adequate knowledge of meat handlers is important in limiting these outbreaks. This study evaluated and compared the safe meat-handling knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of private (PMPP) and government meat processing plants' (GMPP) workers in south-western Nigeria. This cross sectional study comprised 190 meat handlers (PMPP = 55; GMPP = 135). Data concerning their safe meat-handling knowledge, attitudes and practices as well as their socio-demographic characteristics, such as age, gender and work experience were collected. A significant association was observed between the type of meat processing plants and their knowledge (p = 0.000), attitudes (p = 0.000) and practices (p = 0.000) of safe meat-handling. Meat handlers in the GMPP were respectively, about 17 times (OR = 0.060, 95% CI: 0.018-0.203), 57 times (OR = 0.019, 95% CI: 0.007-0.054) and 111 times (OR = 0.009, 95% CI: 0.001- 0.067) less likely to obtain good knowledge, attitude and practice level of safe meat-handling than those from PMPP. Further, KAP levels were significantly associated with age group, education and work experience (p < 0.05). Study findings suggest the need for future policy in food industry in developing countries to accommodate increased involvement of private sector for improved food safety and quality delivery. Public health education on safe food handling and hygiene should be on the front burner among food handlers in general.

  3. Molecular-level understanding of protein adsorption at the interface between water and a strongly interacting uncharged solid surface.

    PubMed

    Penna, Matthew J; Mijajlovic, Milan; Biggs, Mark J

    2014-04-09

    Although protein adsorption on solids is of immense relevance, experimental limitations mean there is still a remarkable lack of understanding of the adsorption mechanism, particularly at a molecular level. By subjecting 240+ molecular dynamics simulations of two peptide/water/solid surface systems to statistical analysis, a generalized molecular level mechanism for peptide adsorption has been identified for uncharged surfaces that interact strongly with the solution phase. This mechanism is composed of three phases: (1) biased diffusion of the peptide from the bulk phase toward the surface; (2) anchoring of the peptide to the water/solid interface via interaction of a hydrophilic group with the water adjacent to the surface or a strongly interacting hydrophobic group with the surface; and (3) lockdown of the peptide on the surface via a slow, stepwise and largely sequential adsorption of its residues, which we term 'statistical zippering'. The adsorption mechanism is dictated by the existence of water layers adjacent to the solid and orientational ordering therein. By extending the solid into the solution by ~8 Å and endowing it with a charged character, the water layers ensure the peptide feels the effect of the solid at a range well beyond the dispersion force that arises from it, thus inducing biased diffusion from afar. The charging of the interface also facilitates anchoring of the peptide near the surface via one of its hydrophilic groups, allowing it time it would otherwise not have to rearrange and lockdown. Finally, the slowness of the lockdown process is dictated by the need for the peptide groups to replace adjacent tightly bound interfacial water.

  4. Coarse-grained Molecular-level Analysis of Polyurea Properties and Shock-mitigation Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Runt, J.; Tarter, J.; Dillon, G.

    2013-07-01

    Several experimental investigations reported in the open literature clearly established that polyurea (PU), an elastic copolymer, has an unusually high ability to attenuate and disperse shock waves. This behavior of PU is normally attributed to its unique nanometer-scale two-phase microstructure consisting of (high glass-transition temperature, T g) hydrogen-bonded discrete, hard domains dispersed within a (low T g) contiguous soft matrix. However, details regarding the mechanism(s) responsible for the superior shock-wave mitigation capacity of PU are still elusive. In the present study, molecular-level computational methods and tools are used to help us identify and characterize these mechanism(s). Because the shock-wave front structure and propagation involve coordinated motion of a large number of atoms and nano-second to micro-second characteristic times, these phenomena cannot be readily analyzed using all-atom molecular-level modeling and simulation techniques. To overcome this problem, all-atom PU microstructure is coarse-grained by introducing larger particles (beads), which account for the collective degrees of freedom of the constituent atoms, the associated force-field functions determined and parameterized using all-atom computational results, and the resulting coarse-grained model analyzed using conventional molecular-level computational methods and tools. The results thus obtained revealed that a combination of different deformation mechanisms (primarily shock-induced ordering and crystallization of hard domains and coordinated shuffle-like lateral motion of the soft-matrix segments) is most likely responsible for the superior ability of PU to attenuate/disperse shock waves.

  5. Molecular-level methods for monitoring soil organic matter responses to global climate change.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Simpson, Myrna J

    2011-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is one of the most complex natural mixtures on earth. It plays a critical role in many ecosystem functions and is directly responsible for sustaining life on our planet. However, due to its chemical heterogeneity, SOM composition at molecular-level is still not completely clear. Consequently, the response of SOM to global climate change is difficult to predict. Here we highlight applications of two complementary molecular-level methods (biomarkers and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) for ascertaining SOM responses to various environmental changes. Biomarker methods that measure highly specific molecules determine the source and decomposition stage of SOM components. However, biomarkers only make up a small fraction of SOM components because much of SOM is non-extractable. By comparison, (13)C solid-state NMR allows measurement of SOM in its entirety with little or no pretreatment but suffers from poor resolution (due to overlapping of SOM components) and insensitivity, and thus subtle changes in SOM composition may not always be detected. Alternatively, (1)H solution-state NMR methods offer an added benefit of improved resolution and sensitivity but can only analyze SOM components that are fully soluble (humic type molecules) in an NMR compatible solvent. We discuss how these complementary methods have been employed to monitor SOM responses to: soil warming in a temperate forest, elevated atmospheric CO(2) and nitrogen fertilization in a temperate forest, and permafrost thawing in the Canadian High Arctic. These molecular-level methods allow some novel and important observations of soil dynamics and ecosystem function in a changing climate.

  6. Molecular level studies on binding modes of labeling molecules with polyalanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Wang, Chenxuan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Lan; Niu, Lin; Zeng, Qindao; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides.In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides. Electronic

  7. Definitive molecular level characterization of defects in UiO-66 crystals.

    PubMed

    Trickett, Christopher A; Gagnon, Kevin J; Lee, Seungkyu; Gándara, Felipe; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Yaghi, Omar M

    2015-09-14

    The identification and characterization of defects, on the molecular level, in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) remain a challenge. With the extensive use of single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD), the missing linker defects in the zirconium-based MOF UiO-66, Zr6 O4 (OH)4 (C8 H4 O4 )6 , have been identified as water molecules coordinated directly to the zirconium centers. Charge balancing is achieved by hydroxide anions, which are hydrogen bonded within the pores of the framework. Furthermore, the precise nature of the defects and their concentration can be manipulated by altering the starting materials, synthesis conditions, and post-synthetic modifications.

  8. The mental health care model in Brazil: analyses of the funding, governance processes, and mechanisms of assessment.

    PubMed

    Trapé, Thiago Lavras; Campos, Rosana Onocko

    2017-03-23

    This study aims to analyze the current status of the mental health care model of the Brazilian Unified Health System, according to its funding, governance processes, and mechanisms of assessment. We have carried out a documentary analysis of the ordinances, technical reports, conference reports, normative resolutions, and decrees from 2009 to 2014. This is a time of consolidation of the psychosocial model, with expansion of the health care network and inversion of the funding for community services with a strong emphasis on the area of crack cocaine and other drugs. Mental health is an underfunded area within the chronically underfunded Brazilian Unified Health System. The governance model constrains the progress of essential services, which creates the need for the incorporation of a process of regionalization of the management. The mechanisms of assessment are not incorporated into the health policy in the bureaucratic field. There is a need to expand the global funding of the area of health, specifically mental health, which has been shown to be a successful policy. The current focus of the policy seems to be archaic in relation to the precepts of the psychosocial model. Mechanisms of assessment need to be expanded. Analisar o estágio atual do modelo de atenção à saúde mental do Sistema Único de Saúde, segundo seu financiamento, processos de governança e mecanismos de avaliação. Foi realizada uma análise documental de portarias, informes técnicos, relatórios de conferência, resoluções e decretos de 2009 a 2014. Trata-se de um momento de consolidação do modelo psicossocial, com ampliação da rede assistencial, inversão de financiamento para serviços comunitários com forte ênfase na área de crack e outras drogas. A saúde mental é uma área subfinanciada dentro do subfinanciamento crônico do Sistema Único de Saúde. O modelo de governança constrange o avanço de serviços essenciais, havendo a necessidade da incorporação de um

  9. Molecular-Level Transformations of Lignin During Photo-Oxidation and Biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Hills, K.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    As the second most abundant component of terrestrial plant residues, lignin plays a key role in regulating plant litter decomposition, humic substance formation, and dissolved organic matter (OM) production from terrestrial sources. Biodegradation is the primary decomposition process of lignin on land. However, photo- oxidation of lignin-derived compounds has been reported in aquatic systems and is considered to play a vital role in arid and semiarid regions. With increasing ultraviolet (UV) radiation due to ozone depletion, it is important to understand the biogeochemical fate of lignin exposed to photo-oxidation in terrestrial environments. This study examines and compares the transformation of lignin in a three-month laboratory simulation of biodegradation and photo-oxidation using molecular-level techniques. Lignin-derived monomers extracted by copper oxidation were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) from the water-soluble and insoluble OM of 13C-labeled corn leaves. Biodegradation increased the solubility of lignin monomers in comparison to the control samples, and the acid-to-aldehyde (Ad/Al) ratios increased in both the water-soluble and insoluble OM, indicating a higher degree of side-chain lignin oxidation. Photo-oxidation did not produce a significant change on the solubility or Ad/Al ratios of lignin from corn leaves. However, the ratios of trans-to-cis isomers of both cinnamyl units (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid) increased with photo-oxidation and decreased with biodegradation in the insoluble OM. We also investigated the role of photo-oxidation in lignin transformation in soils cropped with 13C-labeled corn. Interestingly, the organic carbon content increased significantly with time in the water-soluble OM from soil/corn residues under UV radiation. An increase in the concentration of lignin monomers and dimers and the Ad/Al ratios was also observed with photo-oxidation. Iso-branched fatty acids of microbial origin remained in

  10. Molecular-level transformations of lignin during photo-oxidation and biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Hills, K.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-04-01

    As the second most abundant component of terrestrial plant residues, lignin plays a key role in regulating plant litter decomposition, humic substance formation, and dissolved organic matter (OM) production from terrestrial sources. Biodegradation is the primary decomposition process of lignin on land. However, photo-oxidation of lignin-derived compounds has been reported in aquatic systems and is considered to play a vital role in arid and semiarid regions. With increasing ultraviolet (UV) radiation due to ozone depletion, it is important to understand the biogeochemical fate of lignin exposed to photo-oxidation in terrestrial environments. This study examines and compares the transformation of lignin in a three-month laboratory simulation of biodegradation and photo-oxidation using molecular-level techniques. Lignin-derived monomers extracted by copper oxidation were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) from the water-soluble and insoluble OM of 13C-labeled corn leaves. Biodegradation increased the solubility of lignin monomers in comparison to the control samples, and the acid-to-aldehyde (Ad/Al) ratios increased in both the water-soluble and insoluble OM, indicating a higher degree of side-chain lignin oxidation. Photo-oxidation did not produce a significant change on the solubility or Ad/Al ratios of lignin from corn leaves. However, the ratios of trans-to-cis isomers of both cinnamyl units (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid) increased with photo-oxidation and decreased with biodegradation in the insoluble OM. We also investigated the role of photo-oxidation in lignin transformation in soils cropped with 13C-labeled corn. Interestingly, the organic carbon content increased significantly with time in the water-soluble OM from soil/corn residues under UV radiation. An increase in the concentration of lignin monomers and dimers and the Ad/Al ratios was also observed with photo-oxidation. Iso-branched fatty acids of microbial origin remained in

  11. Heat impact caused molecular level changes in solid and dissolved soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Diana; Steffen, Bernhard; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Leinweber, Peter

    2015-04-01

    resolution (used 400.000 at m/z 400 Da) and mass accuracy (≤ 1 ppm), simultaneously providing molecular level details of thousands of compounds. The characteristics and differences of the FTICR-MS spectra with as many as ten or more peaks at each nominal mass are discussed: heated samples showed considerable higher intensities of even numbered peaks. An in-house developed, automated post processing was used for further exploitation of the data with the aim of an unambiguous assignment of as many peaks as possible. Obtained mass lists were transformed for sorting and preparation/ interpretation of graphics like Kendrick and van Krevelen plots. The heat-treated solid samples show decreasing C/N ratios and the formation cyclic and N-heterocyclic compounds in good agreement among the various methods (Py-FIMS and C- and N-XANES). Detailed insight into the hot-water extracts by FTICR-MS showed clear qualitative as well as quantitative changes in the number and the intensity of nitrogen and nitrogen + sulfur containing compounds, respectively, which generally became enriched under soil heating. This demonstrates for the first time, that not only the bulk SOM is affected in structure by heat impact but also the more mobile DOM. We assume, that heat impact volatilizes and oxidizes parts of the organic substances is as expected but another part of the substances incorporates (further) nitrogen atom(s) similar to the generation of new compounds under the conditions of plasma etching in nitrogen atmosphere. This would explain to some extent, why soils are e.g. after fire clearing of vegetation are highly fertile for a short period (better plant acceptable compounds) but become more infertile in the long run, especially under tropical conditions with frequently heavy rain that would lead to an increased leaching of compounds with higher polarity.

  12. Transformative environmental governance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffin, Brian C.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Harm Benson, Melinda; Angeler, David G.; Arnold, Craig Anthony (Tony); Cosens, Barbara; Kundis Craig, Robin; Ruhl, J.B.; Allen, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Transformative governance is an approach to environmental governance that has the capacity to respond to, manage, and trigger regime shifts in coupled social-ecological systems (SESs) at multiple scales. The goal of transformative governance is to actively shift degraded SESs to alternative, more desirable, or more functional regimes by altering the structures and processes that define the system. Transformative governance is rooted in ecological theories to explain cross-scale dynamics in complex systems, as well as social theories of change, innovation, and technological transformation. Similar to adaptive governance, transformative governance involves a broad set of governance components, but requires additional capacity to foster new social-ecological regimes including increased risk tolerance, significant systemic investment, and restructured economies and power relations. Transformative governance has the potential to actively respond to regime shifts triggered by climate change, and thus future research should focus on identifying system drivers and leading indicators associated with social-ecological thresholds.

  13. Regional Development Partnerships in Sweden: A Way for Higher Education Institutions to Develop their Role in the Processes of Regional Governance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Christine

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the multi-sectoral regional growth partnerships established as part of the new Swedish regional policy. It asks the question whether participation in these partnerships marks a closer involvement on the part of universities in the processes of regional governance. This paper argues that at least part of the explanation for…

  14. Reducing Bureaucratic Accretion in Government and University Procedures for Sponsored Research. New Approaches in Process and Additional Areas for Attention. Proceedings of a Hearing, June 5, 1985. Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable.

    On June 5, 1985, the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable conducted a hearing designed to be the first step in what will be a continuing process by the Research Roundtable of seeking ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the sponsored research system. The goal of the hearing was to identify ways to simplify the system…

  15. Reducing Bureaucratic Accretion in Government and University Procedures for Sponsored Research. New Approaches in Process and Additional Areas for Attention. Proceedings of a Hearing, June 5, 1985. Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable.

    On June 5, 1985, the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable conducted a hearing designed to be the first step in what will be a continuing process by the Research Roundtable of seeking ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the sponsored research system. The goal of the hearing was to identify ways to simplify the system…

  16. Regional Development Partnerships in Sweden: A Way for Higher Education Institutions to Develop their Role in the Processes of Regional Governance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Christine

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the multi-sectoral regional growth partnerships established as part of the new Swedish regional policy. It asks the question whether participation in these partnerships marks a closer involvement on the part of universities in the processes of regional governance. This paper argues that at least part of the explanation for…

  17. Physiological and molecular level effects of silver nanoparticles exposure in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Nair, Prakash M Gopalakrishnan; Chung, Ill Min

    2014-10-01

    The physiological and molecular level changes of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) exposure were investigated in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings. The seedlings were exposed to different concentrations of (0, 0.2, 0.5 and 1 mg L(-1)) AgNPs for one week. Significant reduction in root elongation, shoot and root fresh weights, total chlorophyll and carotenoids contents were observed. Exposure to 0.5 and 1 mg L(-1) of AgNPs caused significant increase in hydrogen peroxide formation and lipid peroxidation in shoots and roots, increased foliar proline accumulation and decreased sugar contents. AgNPs exposure resulted in a dose dependant increase in reactive oxygen species generation and also caused cytotoxicity as evidenced by increased dihydroethidium, 3'-(p-hydroxyphenyl) fluorescein and propidium iodide fluorescence. Tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester assay showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential with increasing concentrations of AgNPs exposure in roots. Real Time PCR analysis showed differential transcription of genes related to oxidative stress tolerance viz. FSD1, MSD1, CSD1, CSD2, CATa, CATb, CATc, APXa and APXb in shoots and roots of rice seedlings. The overall results suggest that exposure to AgNPs caused significant physiological and molecular level changes, oxidative stress and also resulted in the induction oxidative stress tolerance mechanisms in rice seedlings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. When biomolecules meet graphene: from molecular level interactions to material design and applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Wensi; Yu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Zhenping; Su, Zhiqiang; Wei, Gang

    2016-12-01

    Graphene-based materials have attracted increasing attention due to their atomically-thick two-dimensional structures, high conductivity, excellent mechanical properties, and large specific surface areas. The combination of biomolecules with graphene-based materials offers a promising method to fabricate novel graphene-biomolecule hybrid nanomaterials with unique functions in biology, medicine, nanotechnology, and materials science. In this review, we focus on a summarization of the recent studies in functionalizing graphene-based materials using different biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, and viruses. The different interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level are demonstrated and discussed in detail. In addition, the potential applications of the created graphene-biomolecule nanohybrids in drug delivery, cancer treatment, tissue engineering, biosensors, bioimaging, energy materials, and other nanotechnological applications are presented. This review will be helpful to know the modification of graphene with biomolecules, understand the interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level, and design functional graphene-based nanomaterials with unique properties for various applications.

  19. Nanoarchitectonics for Dynamic Functional Materials from Atomic-/Molecular-Level Manipulation to Macroscopic Action.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Li, Junbai; Fei, Jinbo; Ji, Qingmin; Hill, Jonathan P

    2016-02-10

    Objects in all dimensions are subject to translational dynamism and dynamic mutual interactions, and the ability to exert control over these events is one of the keys to the synthesis of functional materials. For the development of materials with truly dynamic functionalities, a paradigm shift from "nanotechnology" to "nanoarchitectonics" is proposed, with the aim of design and preparation of functional materials through dynamic harmonization of atomic-/molecular-level manipulation and control, chemical nanofabrication, self-organization, and field-controlled organization. Here, various examples of dynamic functional materials are presented from the atom/molecular-level to macroscopic dimensions. These systems, including atomic switches, molecular machines, molecular shuttles, motional crystals, metal-organic frameworks, layered assemblies, gels, supramolecular assemblies of biomaterials, DNA origami, hollow silica capsules, and mesoporous materials, are described according to their various dynamic functions, which include short-term plasticity, long-term potentiation, molecular manipulation, switchable catalysis, self-healing properties, supramolecular chirality, morphological control, drug storage and release, light-harvesting, mechanochemical transduction, molecular tuning molecular recognition, hand-operated nanotechnology. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Military Government

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-07-01

    CGSC MG MILITARY GOVERNMENT LIBHARY ARI\\’IY WAR COLLEGE CJ\\RLISLE BARRACKS, PAa This text is approved for resident and extension-course...and functions · of ’ military government . It conforms ·substantially to the subject matter , of Field Manual 27-5, Civil Affairs/ Military Government ...Teaching experience at the Command and General Staff College has ···--·demonstrated the need for a military government text which brings to- gether

  1. Molecular-level understanding of the adsorption mechanism of a graphite-binding peptide at the water/graphite interface.

    PubMed

    Penna, M J; Mijajlovic, M; Tamerler, C; Biggs, M J

    2015-07-14

    The association of proteins and peptides with inorganic material has vast technological potential. An understanding of the adsorption of peptides at liquid/solid interfaces on a molecular-level is fundamental to fully realising this potential. Combining our prior work along with the statistical analysis of 100+ molecular dynamics simulations of adsorption of an experimentally identified graphite binding peptide, GrBP5, at the water/graphite interface has been used here to propose a model for the adsorption of a peptide at a liquid/solid interface. This bottom-up model splits the adsorption process into three reversible phases: biased diffusion, anchoring and lockdown. Statistical analysis highlighted the distinct roles played by regions of the peptide studied here throughout the adsorption process: the hydrophobic domain plays a significant role in the biased diffusion and anchoring phases suggesting that the initial impetus for association between the peptide and the interface may be hydrophobic in origin; aromatic residues dominate the interaction between the peptide and the surface in the adsorbed state and the polar region in the middle of the peptide affords a high conformational flexibility allowing strongly interacting residues to maximise favourable interactions with the surface. Reversible adsorption was observed here, unlike in our prior work focused on a more strongly interacting surface. However, this reversibility is unlikely to be seen once the peptide-surface interaction exceeds 10 kcal mol(-1).

  2. The Impact of the Australian Government's Quality Assurance Program on Institutional Roles and Management Processes. AIR 1994 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Alan

    In Australia the Federal Government plays a dominant role in higher education funding. Changes to the role and structure of the higher education system in 1988 aligned the universities more closely with national economic goals and sent the message to institutions that they were expected to adopt a more managerial mode of operation in order to…

  3. Quantum transport through a molecular level: a scattering states numerical renormalization group study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovchev, Andre; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2015-10-01

    We use the scattering states numerical renormalization group (SNRG) approach to calculate the current I(V) through a single molecular level coupled to a local molecular phonon. The suppression of I for asymmetric junctions with increasing electron-phonon coupling, the hallmark of the Franck-Condon blockade, is discussed. We compare the SNRG currents with recently published data obtained by an iterative summation of path integrals approach (ISPI). Our results excellently agree with the ISPI currents for small and intermediate voltages. In the linear response regime I(V) approaches the current calculated from the equilibrium spectral function. We also present the temperature and voltage evolution of the non-equilibrium spectral functions for a particle-hole asymmetric junction with symmetric coupling to the lead.

  4. Non-Invasive Breast Cancer Diagnosis through Electrochemical Biosensing at Different Molecular Levels.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Susana; Pedrero, María; Pingarrón, José Manuel

    2017-08-31

    The rapid and accurate determination of specific circulating biomarkers at different molecular levels with non- or minimally invasive methods constitutes a major challenge to improve the breast cancer outcomes and life quality of patients. In this field, electrochemical biosensors have demonstrated to be promising alternatives against more complex conventional strategies to perform fast, accurate and on-site determination of circulating biomarkers at low concentrations in minimally treated body fluids. In this article, after discussing briefly the relevance and current challenges associated with the determination of breast cancer circulating biomarkers, an updated overview of the electrochemical affinity biosensing strategies emerged in the last 5 years for this purpose is provided highlighting the great potentiality of these methodologies. After critically discussing the most interesting features of the electrochemical strategies reported so far for the single or multiplexed determination of such biomarkers with demonstrated applicability in liquid biopsy analysis, existing challenges still to be addressed and future directions in this field will be pointed out.

  5. Molecular-level mechanisms of vibrational frequency shifts in a polar liquid.

    PubMed

    Morales, Christine M; Thompson, Ward H

    2011-06-16

    A molecular-level analysis of the origins of the vibrational frequency shifts of the CN stretching mode in neat liquid acetonitrile is presented. The frequency shifts and infrared spectrum are calculated using a perturbation theory approach within a molecular dynamics simulation and are in good agreement with measured values reported in the literature. The resulting instantaneous frequency of each nitrile group is decomposed into the contributions from each molecule in the liquid and by interaction type. This provides a detailed picture of the mechanisms of frequency shifts, including the number of surrounding molecules that contribute to the shift, the relationship between their position and relative contribution, and the roles of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. These results provide insight into what information is contained in infrared (IR) and Raman spectra about the environment of the probed vibrational mode. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Turning randomness into meaning at the molecular level using Muller's morphs

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Kathleen; Cooper, Melanie M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary While evolutionary theory follows from observable facts and logical inferences (Mayr, 1985), historically, the origin of novel inheritable variations was a major obstacle to acceptance of natural selection (Bowler, 1992; Bowler, 2005). While molecular mechanisms address this issue (Jablonka and Lamb, 2005), analysis of responses to the Biological Concept Inventory (BCI) (Klymkowsky et al., 2010), revealed that molecular biology majors rarely use molecular level ideas in their discourse, implying that they do not have an accessible framework within which to place evolutionary variation. We developed a “Socratic tutorial” focused on Muller's categorization of mutations' phenotypic effects (Muller, 1932). Using a novel vector-based method to analyzed students' essay responses, we found that a single interaction with this tutorial led to significant changes in thinking toward a clearer articulation of the effects of mutational change. We suggest that Muller's morphs provides an effective framework for facilitating student learning about mutational effects and evolutionary mechanisms. PMID:23213431

  7. Cell- and molecular-level mechanisms contributing to diastolic dysfunction in HFpEF.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S; Sorrell, Vincent L

    2015-11-15

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is the default diagnosis for patients who have symptoms of heart failure, an ejection fraction >0.5, and evidence of diastolic dysfunction. The clinical condition, which was largely unrecognized 30 years ago, is now a major health problem and currently accounts for 50% of all patients with heart failure. Clinical studies show that patients with HFpEF exhibit increased passive stiffness of the ventricles and a slower rate of pressure decline during diastole. This review discusses some of the cell- and molecular-level mechanisms that contribute to these effects and focuses on data obtained using human samples. Collagen cross linking, modulation of protein kinase G-related pathways, Ca(2+) handling, and strain-dependent detachment of cross bridges are highlighted as potential factors that could be modulated to improve ventricular function in patients with HFpEF.

  8. Elastins from patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome and healthy individuals differ on the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Andrea; Huertas, Angela C Mora; Schräder, Christoph U; Pankau, Rainer; Gosch, Angela; Schmelzer, Christian E H

    2016-07-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a congenital disorder, which involves the heterozygous deletion of the elastin gene and other genes on chromosome 7. Clinical symptoms that are associated with hemizygosity of the essential extracellular matrix protein elastin include premature aging of the skin and supravalvular aortic stenosis. However, only little is known about the molecular basis of structural abnormalities in the connective tissue of WBS patients. Therefore, for the first time this study aimed to systematically characterize and compare the structure and amount of elastin present in skin and aortic tissue from WBS patients and healthy individuals. Elastin fibers were isolated from tissue biopsies, and it was found that skin of WBS patients contains significantly less elastin compared to skin of healthy individuals. Scanning electron microscopy and mass spectrometric measurements combined with bioinformatics data analysis were used to investigate the molecular-level structure of elastin. Scanning electron microscopy revealed clear differences between WBS and healthy elastin. With respect to the molecular-level structure, it was found that the proline hydroxylation degree differed between WBS and healthy elastin, while the tropoelastin isoform appeared to be the same. In terms of cross-linking, no differences in the content of the tetrafunctional cross-links desmosine and isodesmosine were found between WBS and healthy elastin. However, principal component analysis revealed differences between enzymatic digests of elastin from healthy probands and WBS patients, which indicates differing susceptibility toward enzymatic cleavage. Overall, the study contributes to a better understanding of the correlation between genotypic and elastin-related phenotypic features of WBS patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Molecular Level Design Principle behind Optimal Sizes of Photosynthetic LH2 Complex: Taming Disorder through Cooperation of Hydrogen Bonding and Quantum Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seogjoo; Rivera, Eva; Montemayor, Daniel

    2015-03-19

    The light harvesting 2 (LH2) antenna complex from purple photosynthetic bacteria is an efficient natural excitation energy carrier with well-known symmetric structure, but the molecular level design principle governing its structure-function relationship is unknown. Our all-atomistic simulations of nonnatural analogues of LH2 as well as those of a natural LH2 suggest that nonnatural sizes of LH2-like complexes could be built. However, stable and consistent hydrogen bonding (HB) between bacteriochlorophyll and the protein is shown to be possible only near naturally occurring sizes, leading to significantly smaller disorder than for nonnatural ones. Extensive quantum calculations of intercomplex exciton transfer dynamics, sampled for a large set of disorder, reveal that taming the negative effect of disorder through a reliable HB as well as quantum delocalization of the exciton is a critical mechanism that makes LH2 highly functional, which also explains why the natural sizes of LH2 are indeed optimal.

  10. Modeling of growth factor-receptor systems: from molecular-level protein interaction networks to whole-body compartment models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Florence T.H.; Stefanini, Marianne O.; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2010-01-01

    Most physiological processes are subjected to molecular regulation by growth factors, which are secreted proteins that activate chemical signal transduction pathways through binding of specific cell-surface receptors. One particular growth factor system involved in the in vivo regulation of blood vessel growth is called the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) system. Computational and numerical techniques are well-suited to handle the molecular complexity (the number of binding partners involved, including ligands, receptors, and inert binding sites) and multi-scale nature (intra-tissue vs. inter-tissue transport and local vs. systemic effects within an organism) involved in modeling growth factor system interactions and effects. This paper introduces a variety of in silico models that seek to recapitulate different aspects of VEGF system biology at various spatial and temporal scales: molecular-level kinetic models focus on VEGF ligand-receptor interactions at and near the endothelial cell surface; meso-scale single-tissue 3D models can simulate the effects of multi-cellular tissue architecture on the spatial variation in VEGF ligand production and receptor activation; compartmental modeling allows efficient prediction of average interstitial VEGF concentrations and cell-surface VEGF signaling intensities across multiple large tissue volumes, permitting the investigation of whole-body inter-tissue transport (e.g., vascular permeability and lymphatic drainage). The given examples will demonstrate the utility of computational models in aiding both basic science and clinical research on VEGF systems biology. PMID:19897104

  11. Global Governance, Educational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundy, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In the last half decade, a rising literature has focused on the idea that processes of economic, political and social globalization require analysis in terms of governance at the global level. It is argued in this article that emerging forms of global governance have produced significant challenges to conventional conceptions of international…

  12. Reinventing Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, David T.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout all levels of American government, a shift is taking place from the rigid, wasteful, centralized bureaucracies of the industrial era to the more flexible, entrepreneurial, decentralized government needed to succeed in today's world. This shift has been brought about by an unprecedented, ongoing fiscal crisis that has created a sudden…

  13. Remaking Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, John

    2000-01-01

    The Policy Governance model's philosophical foundations lie in Rousseau's social contract, Greenleaf's servant-leadership, and modern management theory. Policy Governance stresses primacy of the owner-representative role; full-board authority; superintendents as chief executive officers; authoritative prescription of "ends," bounded…

  14. Action of boron at the molecular level: effects on transcription and translation in an acellular system.

    PubMed

    Dzondo-Gadet, M; Mayap-Nzietchueng, R; Hess, K; Nabet, P; Belleville, F; Dousset, B

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that boric acid has well-defined biological effects such as stimulation of wound healing in vivo, release of growth factors and cytokines, and increase of the extracellular matrice turnover. We examined its action at the molecular level, using cell-free systems of transcription (isolated placenta nuclei) and translation (wheat germ extract). We found that 10 mM boric acid greatly increased RNA synthesis, measured by absorbance at 260 nm (x 6.4) or by [3H]-UTP uptake (x 11). Full-length functional mRNA was produced because proteins of 14-80 kDa were translated. Among these proteins, factors involved in angiogenesis and, subsequently, in wound healing (VEGF and TGFbeta) were identified by slot blot, whereas growth factors such as FGF1 and TNFalpha were not detected. These results demonstrate that boron may contribute to biological cell activities at both the transcription and translation levels. However, the mechanism of action is still not known.

  15. Pseudomonas viridiflava, a Multi Host Plant Pathogen with Significant Genetic Variation at the Molecular Level

    PubMed Central

    Mpalantinaki, Evaggelia; Ververidis, Filippos; Goumas, Dimitrios E.

    2012-01-01

    The pectinolytic species Pseudomonas viridiflava has a wide host range among plants, causing foliar and stem necrotic lesions and basal stem and root rots. However, little is known about the molecular evolution of this species. In this study we investigated the intraspecies genetic variation of P. viridiflava amongst local (Cretan), as well as international isolates of the pathogen. The genetic and phenotypic variability were investigated by molecular fingerprinting (rep-PCR) and partial sequencing of three housekeeping genes (gyrB, rpoD and rpoB), and by biochemical and pathogenicity profiling. The biochemical tests and pathogenicity profiling did not reveal any variability among the isolates studied. However, the molecular fingerprinting patterns and housekeeping gene sequences clearly differentiated them. In a broader phylogenetic comparison of housekeeping gene sequences deposited in GenBank, significant genetic variability at the molecular level was found between isolates of P. viridiflava originated from different host species as well as among isolates from the same host. Our results provide a basis for more comprehensive understanding of the biology, sources and shifts in genetic diversity and evolution of P. viridiflava populations and should support the development of molecular identification tools and epidemiological studies in diseases caused by this species. PMID:22558343

  16. Organization of Lipids in the Tear Film: A Molecular-Level View

    PubMed Central

    Wizert, Alicja; Iskander, D. Robert; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Biophysical properties of the tear film lipid layer are studied at the molecular level employing coarse grain molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a realistic model of the human tear film. In this model, polar lipids are chosen to reflect the current knowledge on the lipidome of the tear film whereas typical Meibomian-origin lipids are included in the thick non-polar lipids subphase. Simulation conditions mimic those experienced by the real human tear film during blinks. Namely, thermodynamic equilibrium simulations at different lateral compressions are performed to model varying surface pressure, and the dynamics of the system during a blink is studied by non-equilibrium MD simulations. Polar lipids separate their non-polar counterparts from water by forming a monomolecular layer whereas the non-polar molecules establish a thick outermost lipid layer. Under lateral compression, the polar layer undulates and a sorting of polar lipids occurs. Moreover, formation of three-dimensional aggregates of polar lipids in both non-polar and water subphases is observed. We suggest that these three-dimensional structures are abundant under dynamic conditions caused by the action of eye lids and that they act as reservoirs of polar lipids, thus increasing stability of the tear film. PMID:24651175

  17. Solvent-free, molecular-level modeling of self-assembling amphiphiles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Somajit; Saha, Jayashree

    2017-02-01

    Aggregation mesophases of self-assembling amphiphiles in water are highly important in the context of biology (biomembranes), therapy (liposomes), industry (polymer surfactants), and condensed-matter physics (lyotropic liquid crystals). Besides helping to increase fundamental understanding of collective molecular behavior, simulations of these lyotropic phases are pivotal to technological and medical developments such as smart drug carriers for gene therapy. Implicit-solvent, coarse-grained, low resolution modeling with a simple pair potential is the key to realizing the larger length and time scales associated with such mesoscopic phenomena during a computer simulation. Modeling amphiphiles by directed, soft, ellipsoidal cores interacting via a computationally simple yet tunable anisotropic pair potential, we have come to such a single-site model amphiphile that can rapidly self-assemble to give diverse lyotropic phases (such as fluid bilayers, micelles, etc.) without requiring the explicit incorporation of solvent particles. The model directly represents a tunable packing parameter that manifests in the spontaneous curvature of the amphiphile aggregates. Besides the all-important hydrophobic interaction, the hydration force is also treated implicitly. Thanks to the efficient solvent-free molecular-level coarse graining, this model is suitable for generic mesoscale studies of phenomena such as self-assembly, amphiphile mixing, domain formation, fusion, elasticity, etc., in amphiphile aggregates.

  18. Direct molecular-level characterization of different heterogeneous freezing modes on mica - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmonem, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    The mechanisms behind heterogeneous ice nucleation are of fundamental importance to the prediction of the occurrence and properties of many cloud types, which influence climate and precipitation. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation and freezing nuclei. The surface-water interaction of an ice nucleation particle plays a major, not well explored, role in its ice nucleation ability. This paper presents a real-time molecular-level comparison of different freezing modes on the surface of an atmospherically relevant mineral surface (mica) under varying supersaturation conditions using second-harmonic generation spectroscopy. Two sub-deposition nucleation modes were identified (one- and two-stage freezing). The nonlinear signal at the water-mica interface was found to drop following the formation of a thin film on the surface regardless of (1) the formed phase (liquid or ice) and (2) the freezing path (one or two step), indicating similar molecular structuring. The results also revealed a transient phase of ice at water-mica interfaces during freezing, which has a lifetime of around 1 min. Such information will have a significant impact on climate change, weather modification, and the tracing of water in hydrosphere studies.

  19. Study on the mechanism of action between dimethyl phthalate and herring sperm DNA at molecular level.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhenxing; Wang, Donglin; You, Hong

    2016-08-02

    Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), a typical phthalic acid ester, is widespread in the environment and causes extensive concern due to its adverse effects on human health. To understand the genotoxicity of DMP at molecular level, the toxic interaction of DMP with herring sperm (hs) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA; hs-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions using multi-spectroscopic techniques and a molecular modeling method. The results of Ultraviolet-Visible absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, and circular dichroism spectra indicated that DMP interacts with hs-DNA in a groove-binding mode that changes the double helical structure of DNA. The binding constant and the number of binding sites calculated from the fluorescence quenching data were 565.718 L mol(-1) and 0.7872, respectively. A molecular modeling study revealed that DMP tends to bind with DNA in the A-T-rich regions of minor groove and that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces play main roles in the interaction. This research can help to elucidate the mechanism of DMP toxicity in vivo.

  20. Non-Invasive Breast Cancer Diagnosis through Electrochemical Biosensing at Different Molecular Levels

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Susana

    2017-01-01

    The rapid and accurate determination of specific circulating biomarkers at different molecular levels with non- or minimally invasive methods constitutes a major challenge to improve the breast cancer outcomes and life quality of patients. In this field, electrochemical biosensors have demonstrated to be promising alternatives against more complex conventional strategies to perform fast, accurate and on-site determination of circulating biomarkers at low concentrations in minimally treated body fluids. In this article, after discussing briefly the relevance and current challenges associated with the determination of breast cancer circulating biomarkers, an updated overview of the electrochemical affinity biosensing strategies emerged in the last 5 years for this purpose is provided highlighting the great potentiality of these methodologies. After critically discussing the most interesting features of the electrochemical strategies reported so far for the single or multiplexed determination of such biomarkers with demonstrated applicability in liquid biopsy analysis, existing challenges still to be addressed and future directions in this field will be pointed out. PMID:28858236

  1. Unravelling Protein-DNA Interactions at Molecular Level: A DFT and NCI Study.

    PubMed

    González, J; Baños, I; León, I; Contreras-García, J; Cocinero, E J; Lesarri, A; Fernández, J A; Millán, J

    2016-02-09

    Histone-DNA interactions were probed computationally at a molecular level, by characterizing the bimolecular clusters constituted by selected amino acid derivatives with polar (asparagine and glutamine), nonpolar (alanine, valine, and isoleucine), and charged (arginine) side chains and methylated pyrimidinic (1-methylcytosine and 1-methylthymine) and puric (9-methyladenine and 9-methylguanine) DNA bases. The computational approach combined different methodologies: a molecular mechanics (MMFFs forced field) conformational search and structural and vibrational density-functional calculations (M06-2X with double and triple-ζ Pople's basis sets). To dissect the interactions, intermolecular forces were analyzed with the Non-Covalent Interactions (NCI) analysis. The results for the 24 different clusters studied show a noticeable correlation between the calculated binding energies and the propensities for protein-DNA base interactions found in the literature. Such correlation holded even for the interaction of the selected amino acid derivatives with Watson and Crick pairs. Therefore, the balance between hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions (specially stacking) in the control of the final shape of the investigated amino acid-DNA base pairs seems to be well reproduced in dispersion-corrected DFT molecular models, reinforcing the idea that the specificity between the amino acids and the DNA bases play an important role in the regulation of DNA.

  2. A molecular level prototype for mechanoelectrical transducer in mammalian hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinkyoung

    2013-01-01

    The mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) is a crucial component of mammalian auditory system. The gating mechanism of the MET channel remains a puzzling issue, though there are many speculations, due to the lack of essential molecular building blocks. To understand the working principle of mammalian MET, we propose a molecular level prototype which constitutes a charged blocker, a realistic ion channel and its surrounding membrane. To validate the proposed prototype, we make use of a well-established ion channel theory, the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations, for three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations. A wide variety of model parameters, including bulk ion concentration, applied external voltage, blocker charge and blocker displacement, are explored to understand the basic function of the proposed MET prototype. We show that our prototype prediction of channel open probability in response to blocker relative displacement is in a remarkable accordance with experimental observation of rat cochlea outer hair cells. Our results appear to suggest that tip links which connect hair bundles gate MET channels. PMID:23625048

  3. Salinity Effects on the Isolation and Subsequent Molecular-Level Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, B. J.; Minor, E. C.

    2006-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteristics change down estuarine gradients. These changes are often attributed to photochemical and microbial degradation as well as mixing with different DOM sources. In this study, we collected freshwater DOM and treated it by mixing with artificial seawater. After isolating the DOM with common techniques (C18 solid phase extraction and stirred cell ultrafiltration), we collected mass spectra via electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and analyzed the data with principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Results from these experiments show that when freshwater DOM is subjected to changes in salinity prior to isolation, the isolated DOM assumes characteristics different from those of the initial freshwater DOM isolated in the same manner. These molecular-level changes may result from conformational changes in the DOM as a result of the salinity increase or from shifts in the retention characteristics of ultrafiltration and C18 membranes due to changes in ionic strength. In either case, the resulting fractionation of the DOM may help to explain the relative lack of identifiable terrestrial DOM in the global ocean.

  4. Dynamic, mechanistic, molecular-level modelling of cyanobacteria: Anabaena and nitrogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Hellweger, Ferdi L; Fredrick, Neil D; McCarthy, Mark J; Gardner, Wayne S; Wilhelm, Steven W; Paerl, Hans W

    2016-09-01

    Phytoplankton (eutrophication, biogeochemical) models are important tools for ecosystem research and management, but they generally have not been updated to include modern biology. Here, we present a dynamic, mechanistic, molecular-level (i.e. gene, transcript, protein, metabolite) model of Anabaena - nitrogen interaction. The model was developed using the pattern-oriented approach to model definition and parameterization of complex agent-based models. It simulates individual filaments, each with individual cells, each with genes that are expressed to yield transcripts and proteins. Cells metabolize various forms of N, grow and divide, and differentiate heterocysts when fixed N is depleted. The model is informed by observations from 269 laboratory experiments from 55 papers published from 1942 to 2014. Within this database, we identified 331 emerging patterns, and, excluding inconsistencies in observations, the model reproduces 94% of them. To explore a practical application, we used the model to simulate nutrient reduction scenarios for a hypothetical lake. For a 50% N only loading reduction, the model predicts that N fixation increases, but this fixed N does not compensate for the loading reduction, and the chlorophyll a concentration decreases substantially (by 33%). When N is reduced along with P, the model predicts an additional 8% reduction (compared to P only).

  5. Short-Term Dynamics of North Sea Bacterioplankton-Dissolved Organic Matter Coherence on Molecular Level

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Judith; Koester, Irina; Wichels, Antje; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten; Callies, Ulrich; Wiltshire, Karen H.; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Remineralization and transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by marine microbes shape the DOM composition and thus, have large impact on global carbon and nutrient cycling. However, information on bacterioplankton-DOM interactions on a molecular level is limited. We examined the variation of bacterial community composition (BCC) at Helgoland Roads (North Sea) in relation to variation of molecular DOM composition and various environmental parameters on short-time scales. Surface water samples were taken daily over a period of 20 days. Bacterial community and molecular DOM composition were assessed via 16S rRNA gene tag sequencing and ultrahigh resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS), respectively. Environmental conditions were driven by a coastal water influx during the first half of the sampling period and the onset of a summer phytoplankton bloom toward the end of the sampling period. These phenomena led to a distinct grouping of bacterial communities and DOM composition which was particularly influenced by total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration, temperature, and salinity, as revealed by distance-based linear regression analyses. Bacterioplankton-DOM interaction was demonstrated in strong correlations between specific bacterial taxa and particular DOM molecules, thus, suggesting potential specialization on particular substrates. We propose that a combination of high resolution techniques, as used in this study, may provide substantial information on substrate generalists and specialists and thus, contribute to prediction of BCC variation. PMID:27014241

  6. In-situ molecular-level elucidation of organofluorine binding sites in a whole peat soil.

    PubMed

    Longstaffe, James G; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, Myrna J; Maas, Werner E; Fey, Michael; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Struppe, Jochem; Alaee, Mehran; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J; Simpson, André J

    2012-10-02

    The chemical nature of xenobiotic binding sites in soils is of vital importance to environmental biogeochemistry. Interactions between xenobiotics and the naturally occurring organic constituents of soils are strongly correlated to environmental persistence, bioaccessibility, and ecotoxicity. Nevertheless, because of the complex structural and chemical heterogeneity of soils, studies of these interactions are most commonly performed indirectly, using correlative methods, fractionation, or chemical modification. Here we identify the organic components of an unmodified peat soil where some organofluorine xenobiotic compounds interact using direct molecular-level methods. Using (19)F→(1)H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the (19)F nuclei of organofluorine compounds are used to induce observable transverse magnetization in the (1)H nuclei of organic components of the soil with which they interact after sorption. The observed (19)F→(1)H CP-MAS spectra and dynamics are compared to those produced using model soil organic compounds, lignin and albumin. It is found that lignin-like components can account for the interactions observed in this soil for heptafluoronaphthol (HFNap) while protein structures can account for the interactions observed for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). This study employs novel comprehensive multi-phase (CMP) NMR technology that permits the application of solution-, gel-, and solid-state NMR experiments on intact soil samples in their swollen state.

  7. Toxic effects of pesticide mixtures at a molecular level: their relevance to human health.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Antonio F; Parrón, Tesifón; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Requena, Mar; Alarcón, Raquel; López-Guarnido, Olga

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides almost always occur in mixtures with other ones. The toxicological effects of low-dose pesticide mixtures on the human health are largely unknown, although there are growing concerns about their safety. The combined toxicological effects of two or more components of a pesticide mixture can take one of three forms: independent, dose addition or interaction. Not all mixtures of pesticides with similar chemical structures produce additive effects; thus, if they act on multiple sites their mixtures may produce different toxic effects. The additive approach also fails when evaluating mixtures that involve a secondary chemical that changes the toxicokinetics of the pesticide as a result of its increased activation or decreased detoxification, which is followed by an enhanced or reduced toxicity, respectively. This review addresses a number of toxicological interactions of pesticide mixtures at a molecular level. Examples of such interactions include the postulated mechanisms for the potentiation of pyrethroid, carbaryl and triazine herbicides toxicity by organophosphates; how the toxicity of some organophosphates can be potentiated by other organophosphates or by previous exposure to organochlorines; the synergism between pyrethroid and carbamate compounds and the antagonism between triazine herbicides and prochloraz. Particular interactions are also addressed, such as those of pesticides acting as endocrine disruptors, the cumulative toxicity of organophosphates and organochlorines resulting in estrogenic effects and the promotion of organophosphate-induced delayed polyneuropathy.

  8. A three-part signal governs differential processing of Gli1 and Gli3 proteins by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Erin K; Harstad, Kristine G; Holmgren, Robert A; Matouschek, Andreas

    2011-11-11

    The Gli proteins are the transcriptional effectors of the mammalian Hedgehog signaling pathway. In an unusual mechanism, the proteasome partially degrades or processes Gli3 in the absence of Hedgehog pathway stimulation to create a Gli3 fragment that opposes the activity of the full-length protein. In contrast, Gli1 is not processed but degraded completely, despite considerable homology with Gli3. We found that these differences in processing can be described by defining a processing signal that is composed of three parts: the zinc finger domain, an adjacent linker sequence, and a degron. Gli3 processing is inhibited when any one component of the processing signal is disrupted. We show that the zinc fingers are required for processing only as a folded structure and that the location but not the identity of the processing degron is critical. Within the linker sequence, regions of low sequence complexity play a crucial role, but other sequence features are also important. Gli1 is not processed because two components of the processing signal, the linker sequence and the degron, are ineffective. These findings provide new insights into the molecular elements that regulate Gli protein processing by the proteasome.

  9. Molecular level all-optical logic with chlorophyll absorption spectrum and polarization sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, B.; Bhattacharyya (Bhaumik), S.

    2008-06-01

    Chlorophyll is suggested as a suitable medium for realizing optical Boolean logic at the molecular level in view of its wavelength-selective property and polarization sensitivity in the visible region. Spectrophotometric studies are made with solutions of total chlorophyll and chromatographically isolated components, viz. chlorophyll a and b and carotenoids extracted from pumpkin leaves of different maturity stages. The absorption features of matured chlorophyll with two characteristic absorption peaks and one transmission band are molecular properties and independent of concentration. A qualitative explanation of such an absorption property is presented in terms of a ‘particle in a box’ model and the property is employed to simulate two-input optical logic operations. If both of the inputs are either red or blue, absorption is high. If either one is absent and replaced by a wavelength of the transmission band, e.g. green, absorption is low. Assigning these values as 0 s or 1 s, AND and OR operations can be performed. A NOT operation can be simulated with the transmittance instead of the absorbance. Also, the shift in absorbance values for two different polarizations of the same monochromatic light can simulate two logical states with a single wavelength. Cyclic change in absorbance is noted over a rotation of 360° for both red and blue peaks, although the difference is not very large. Red monochromatic light with polarizations apart by 90°, corresponding to maximum and minimum absorption, respectively, may be assigned as the two logical states. The fluorescence emissions for different pigment components are measured at different excitation wavelengths and the effect of fluorescence on the red absorbance is concluded to be negligible.

  10. The reorganization energy of electron transfer in nonpolar solvents: Molecular level treatment of the solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontyev, I. V.; Tachiya, M.

    2005-12-01

    The intermolecular electron transfer in a solute pair consisting of pyrene and dimethylaniline is investigated in a nonpolar solvent, n-hexane. The earlier elaborated approach [M. Tachiya, J. Phys Chem. 97, 5911 (1993)] is used; this method provides a physically relevant background for separating inertial and inertialess polarization responses for both nonpolarizable and polarizable molecular level simulations. The molecular-dynamics technique was implemented for obtaining the equilibrium ensemble of solvent configurations. The nonpolar solvent, n-hexane, was treated in terms of OPLS-AA parametrization. Solute Lennard-Jones parameters were taken from the same parametrization. Solute charge distributions of the initial and final states were determined using ab initio level [HF/6-31G(d,p)] quantum-chemical calculations. Configuration analysis was performed explicitly taking into account the anisotropic polarizability of n-hexane. It is shown that the Gaussian law well describes calculated distribution functions of the solvent coordinate, therefore, the rate constant of the ET reaction can be characterized by the reorganization energy. Evaluated values of the reorganization energies are in a range of 0.03-0.11 eV and significant contribution (more then 40% of magnitude) comes from anisotropic polarizability. Investigation of the reorganization energy λ dependence on the solute pair separation distance d revealed unexpected behavior. The dependence has a very sharp peak at the distance d =7Å where solvent molecules are able to penetrate into the intermediate space between the solute pair. The reason for such behavior is clarified. This new effect has a purely molecular origin and cannot be described within conventional continuum solvent models.

  11. The reorganization energy of electron transfer in nonpolar solvents: Molecular level treatment of the solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Leontyev, I.V.; Tachiya, M.

    2005-12-08

    The intermolecular electron transfer in a solute pair consisting of pyrene and dimethylaniline is investigated in a nonpolar solvent, n-hexane. The earlier elaborated approach [M. Tachiya, J. Phys Chem. 97, 5911 (1993)] is used; this method provides a physically relevant background for separating inertial and inertialess polarization responses for both nonpolarizable and polarizable molecular level simulations. The molecular-dynamics technique was implemented for obtaining the equilibrium ensemble of solvent configurations. The nonpolar solvent, n-hexane, was treated in terms of OPLS-AA parametrization. Solute Lennard-Jones parameters were taken from the same parametrization. Solute charge distributions of the initial and final states were determined using ab initio level [HF/6-31G(d,p)] quantum-chemical calculations. Configuration analysis was performed explicitly taking into account the anisotropic polarizability of n-hexane. It is shown that the Gaussian law well describes calculated distribution functions of the solvent coordinate, therefore, the rate constant of the ET reaction can be characterized by the reorganization energy. Evaluated values of the reorganization energies are in a range of 0.03-0.11 eV and significant contribution (more then 40% of magnitude) comes from anisotropic polarizability. Investigation of the reorganization energy {lambda} dependence on the solute pair separation distance d revealed unexpected behavior. The dependence has a very sharp peak at the distance d=7 A where solvent molecules are able to penetrate into the intermediate space between the solute pair. The reason for such behavior is clarified. This new effect has a purely molecular origin and cannot be described within conventional continuum solvent models.

  12. Long-term variation in above and belowground plant inputs alters soil organic matter biogeochemistry at the molecular-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, M. J.; Pisani, O.; Lin, L.; Lun, O.; Simpson, A.; Lajtha, K.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The long-term fate of soil carbon reserves with global environmental change remains uncertain. Shifts in moisture, altered nutrient cycles, species composition, or rising temperatures may alter the proportions of above and belowground biomass entering soil. However, it is unclear how long-term changes in plant inputs may alter the composition of soil organic matter (SOM) and soil carbon storage. Advanced molecular techniques were used to assess SOM composition in mineral soil horizons (0-10 cm) after 20 years of Detrital Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) at the Harvard Forest. SOM biomarkers (solvent extraction, base hydrolysis and cupric (II) oxide oxidation) and both solid-state and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to identify changes in SOM composition and stage of degradation. Microbial activity and community composition were assessed using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Doubling aboveground litter inputs decreased soil carbon content, increased the degradation of labile SOM and enhanced the sequestration of aliphatic compounds in soil. The exclusion of belowground inputs (No roots and No inputs) resulted in a decrease in root-derived components and enhanced the degradation of leaf-derived aliphatic structures (cutin). Cutin-derived SOM has been hypothesized to be recalcitrant but our results show that even this complex biopolymer is susceptible to degradation when inputs entering soil are altered. The PLFA data indicate that changes in soil microbial community structure favored the accelerated processing of specific SOM components with littler manipulation. These results collectively reveal that the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs alters the molecular-level composition of SOM and in some cases, enhances the degradation of recalcitrant SOM. Our study also suggests that increased litterfall is unlikely to enhance soil carbon storage over the long-term in temperate forests.

  13. Molecular-level control of feature separation in one-dimensional nanostructure assemblies formed by biomolecular nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Woehrle, Gerd H; Warner, Marvin G; Hutchison, James E

    2004-07-06

    In this paper, we present a convenient and reliable method to organize small gold nanoparticles (d(CORE) = 1.5 nm) into linear chains with precisely controlled interparticle spacing over a range of 1.5-2.8 nm through biomolecular nanolithography. Controlling the feature separations of 1 to a few nanometers with angstrom-level precision is a key requirement in electronic and optical applications of nanostructures to tune the properties of the nanostructures and manipulate the interactions between neighboring structures. Here, chains are formed in solution by utilizing functional-group-directed self-assembly to organize ligand-stabilized gold nanoparticles onto DNA templates. The spacing between neighboring nanoparticles can be controlled chemically and tuned at the molecular level by utilizing nanoparticles possessing ligand shells of varying thickness to achieve angstrom-level resolution at spacings of 1.5, 2.1, and 2.8 nm. The small standard deviation (< or = 20%) in the values for the interparticle spacing illustrates the reproducibility of the approach. Because the interparticle spacing is enforced by the ligand shell rather than the scaffold, the spacing is uniform even in nonlinear sections of the chain. We further show that the assembly process is robust and produces extended linear nanoparticle chains of up to 1 microm in length and a total coverage of > 90%. All structures and interparticle spacings were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy. Our results demonstrate the potential of scaffold-assisted assembly approaches for patterning features with tunable dimensions on a length scale that is important for future applications of these materials in nanoscale electronics and optics.

  14. Molecular Level Understanding of the Factors Affecting the Stability of Dimethoxy Benzene Catholyte Candidates from First-Principles Investigations

    DOE PAGES

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Jinhua; ...

    2016-06-14

    First-principles simulations are performed to gain molecular level insights into the factors affecting the stability of seven 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DMB) derivatives. These molecules are potential catholyte candidates for nonaqueous redox flow battery systems. Computations are performed to predict oxidation potentials in various dielectric mediums, intrinsic-reorganization energies, and structural changes of these representative catholyte molecules during the redox process. In order to understand the stability of the DMB-based radical cations, the thermodynamic feasibility of the following reactions is computed using density functional theory: (a) deprotonation, (b) dimerization, (c) hydrolysis, and (d) demethylation. The computations indicate that radical cations of the 2,3-dimethyl andmore » 2,5-dimethyl derivatives are the most stable among the DMB derivatives considered in this study. In the presence of solvents with high-proton solvating ability (water, DMSO, acetonitrile), degradation of cation radical occurring via deprotonation is the most likely mechanism. In the presence of solvents such as propylene carbonate (PC), demethylation was found to be the most likely reaction that causes degradation of radical cations. From the computed enthalpy of activation (Delta H-double dagger) for a demethylation reaction in PC, the 2,5-dimethyl DMB cation radical would exhibit better kinetic stability in comparison to the other candidates. Finally, this investigation suggests that computational studies of structural properties such as redox potentials, reorganization energies, and the computed reaction energetics (deprotonation and demethylation) of charged species can be used to predict the relative stability of a large set of molecules required for the discovery of novel redox active materials for flow battery applications« less

  15. Government Agencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    large, complex , and difficult to manage. U.S. Government procurement is the largest business enterprise in the world affecting the security...listed in this study.) With the single exception of rocket and spacecraft acquisitions, ship acquisitions are the highest cost and most complex ...acquisitions U.S. Government agencies undertake. Many factors influence the level of complexity for a given ship acquisition program. Between the Navy and

  16. Potential means of support for materials processing in space. A history of government support for new technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckannan, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    Development of a given technology for national defense and large systems developments when the task is too large or risky for entrepreneurs, yet is clearly in the best interest of the nation are discussed. Advanced research to identify areas of interest was completed. Examples of commercial opportunities are the McDonnell-Douglas Corporation purification process for pharmaceutical products and the Microgravity Research Associates process for growing gallium arsenide crystals in space.

  17. Insights into the molecular level composition, sources, and formation mechanisms of dissolved organic matter in aerosols and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, Katye Elisabeth

    Atmospheric aerosols scatter and absorb light influencing the global radiation budget and climate, and are associated with adverse effects on human health. Precipitation is an important removal mechanism for atmospheric dissolved organic matter (DOM), and a potentially important input for receiving ecosystems. However, the sources, formation, and composition of atmospheric DOM in aerosols and precipitation are not well understood. This dissertation investigates the composition and formation mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud processing reactions, elucidates the composition and sources of DOM in rainwater, and provides links connecting the two. Photochemical batch aqueous-phase reactions of organics with both biogenic and anthropogenic sources (i.e., methylglyoxal, pyruvic acid) and OH radical were performed to simulate cloud processing. The composition of products formed through cloud processing experiments and rainwater collected in New Jersey, USA was investigated using a combination of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry techniques, including ultra-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. This dissertation has resulted in the first evidence that oligomers form through cloud processing reactions, the first detailed chemical mechanism of aqueous phase oligomerization, the first identification of oligomers, organosulfates, and nitrooxy organosulfates in precipitation, and the first molecular level chemical characterization of organic nitrogen in precipitation. The formation of oligomers in SOA helps to explain the presence of large multifunctional compounds and humic like substances (HULIS) that dominate particulate organic mass. Oligomers have low vapor pressures and remain in the particle phase after cloud evaporation, enhancing SOA. The chemical properties of the oligomers suggest that they are less hygroscopic than the monomeric reaction products (i.e., organic acids). Their elemental

  18. Effectiveness of a MORE Laboratory Module in Prompting Students to Revise Their Molecular-Level Ideas about Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Lydia T.; Teichert, Melonie A.; Rickey, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of the implementation of the Model-Observe-Reflect-Explain (MORE) laboratory module in prompting different populations of general chemistry students to revise their molecular-level ideas regarding chemical compounds dissolved in water is examined. The module is effective for encouraging students to revise their ideas about…

  19. Effectiveness of a MORE Laboratory Module in Prompting Students to Revise Their Molecular-Level Ideas about Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Lydia T.; Teichert, Melonie A.; Rickey, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of the implementation of the Model-Observe-Reflect-Explain (MORE) laboratory module in prompting different populations of general chemistry students to revise their molecular-level ideas regarding chemical compounds dissolved in water is examined. The module is effective for encouraging students to revise their ideas about…

  20. Modelling Molecular Mechanisms: A Framework of Scientific Reasoning to Construct Molecular-Level Explanations for Cellular Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Mil, Marc H. W.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular-level details are part of the upper-secondary biology curriculum in most countries, many studies report that students fail to connect molecular knowledge to phenomena at the level of cells, organs and organisms. Recent studies suggest that students lack a framework to reason about complex systems to make this connection. In this…

  1. Modelling Molecular Mechanisms: A Framework of Scientific Reasoning to Construct Molecular-Level Explanations for Cellular Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Mil, Marc H. W.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular-level details are part of the upper-secondary biology curriculum in most countries, many studies report that students fail to connect molecular knowledge to phenomena at the level of cells, organs and organisms. Recent studies suggest that students lack a framework to reason about complex systems to make this connection. In this…

  2. We, the People(s)...in Order...to Promote the General Welfare...to Ourselves and Our Posterity...A Self-Evaluation Process for Indian Tribal Governments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gover, Maggie

    Describing a process by which tribal governments can, if they wish, use their past to evaluate their present and plan for the future, the document briefly discusses the historical relationship of the United States and American Indian nations; how Indians coped with the new system; the increasing pressures experienced by tribal governments, which…

  3. The status of medical laboratory towards of AFRO-WHO accreditation process in government and private health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mesfin, Eyob Abera; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Ashenafi, Aytenew

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO AFRO) introduces a step wise incremental accreditation approach to improving quality of laboratory and it is a new initiative in Ethiopia and activities are performed for implementation of accreditation program. Descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in 30 laboratory facilities including 6 laboratory sections to determine their status towards of accreditation using WHO AFRO accreditation checklist and 213 laboratory professionals were interviewed to assess their knowledge on quality system essentials and accreditation in Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Out of 30 laboratory facilities 1 private laboratory scored 156 (62%) points, which is the minimum required point for WHO accreditation and the least score was 32 (12.8%) points from government laboratory. The assessment finding from each section indicate that 2 Clinical chemistry (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Hematology (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Serology (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Microbiology (55.2% & 62.4%), 1 Parasitology (62.8%) & 1 Urinalysis (61.6%) sections scored the minimum required point for WHO accreditation. The average score for government laboratories was 78.2 (31.2%) points, of these 6 laboratories were under accreditation process with 106.2 (42.5%) average score, while the private laboratories had 71.2 (28.5%) average score. Of 213 respondents 197 (92.5%) professionals had a knowledge on quality system essentials whereas 155 (72.8%) respondents on accreditation. Although majority of the laboratory professionals had knowledge on quality system and accreditation, laboratories professionals were not able to practice the quality system properly and most of the laboratories had poor status towards the WHO accreditation process. Thus government as well as stakeholders should integrate accreditation program into planning and health policy.

  4. The status of medical laboratory towards of AFRO-WHO accreditation process in government and private health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Eyob Abera; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Ashenafi, Aytenew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO AFRO) introduces a step wise incremental accreditation approach to improving quality of laboratory and it is a new initiative in Ethiopia and activities are performed for implementation of accreditation program. Methods Descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in 30 laboratory facilities including 6 laboratory sections to determine their status towards of accreditation using WHO AFRO accreditation checklist and 213 laboratory professionals were interviewed to assess their knowledge on quality system essentials and accreditation in Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Results Out of 30 laboratory facilities 1 private laboratory scored 156 (62%) points, which is the minimum required point for WHO accreditation and the least score was 32 (12.8%) points from government laboratory. The assessment finding from each section indicate that 2 Clinical chemistry (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Hematology (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Serology (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Microbiology (55.2% & 62.4%), 1 Parasitology (62.8%) & 1 Urinalysis (61.6%) sections scored the minimum required point for WHO accreditation. The average score for government laboratories was 78.2 (31.2%) points, of these 6 laboratories were under accreditation process with 106.2 (42.5%) average score, while the private laboratories had 71.2 (28.5%) average score. Of 213 respondents 197 (92.5%) professionals had a knowledge on quality system essentials whereas 155 (72.8%) respondents on accreditation. Conclusion Although majority of the laboratory professionals had knowledge on quality system and accreditation, laboratories professionals were not able to practice the quality system properly and most of the laboratories had poor status towards the WHO accreditation process. Thus government as well as stakeholders should integrate accreditation program into planning and health policy. PMID:26889317

  5. Technology and Public Policy. The Process of Technology Assessment in the Federal Government. Volume 1. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Vary T.

    A descriptive and analytical study was made of the process of planning, programming, and evaluation of technological projects and programs as carried out by 86 offices within federal executive agencies. The focus is on the extent to which techniques of technology assessment are used, based on interviews with 115 officials. Ninety-seven…

  6. Technology and Public Policy. The Process of Technology Assessment in the Federal Government. Volume 1. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Vary T.

    A descriptive and analytical study was made of the process of planning, programming, and evaluation of technological projects and programs as carried out by 86 offices within federal executive agencies. The focus is on the extent to which techniques of technology assessment are used, based on interviews with 115 officials. Ninety-seven…

  7. Overview of the government/industry workshop on opportunities for new materials in pulp and paper processing

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.K.; Fowler, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report presents a synopsis of the presentations made at the two-day workshop conducted in Portland, Oregon, on August 12 and 13, 1993, for the Advanced Industrial Concepts division (AICD) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) and DOE national laboratory representatives from the pulp and paper industry. The information from the presentations is supplemented by additional statistics, as appropriate. The workshop objectives were (1) to develop a strategy and framework for collaboration between the pulp and paper industries and DOE`s national laboratories, (2) to identify major challenges to pulp and paper industry modernization, and (3) to identify research objectives for DOE national laboratories to improve materials and process technology in pulp and paper mills. Prior to the workshop, participants had the opportunity to tour paper mills and gain familiarity with pulp and paper processing methods. During the workshop, research needs for materials and processing that were identified at earlier AICD workshops were reviewed. Major problems of the pulp and paper industry were addressed, and ways in which DOE national laboratories are interacting with other industries to foster innovation and solve problems were presented. As a result of this and other workshops, a Pulp Paper Mill of the future strategy is being developed to address challenges identified in these proceedings. Continued efforts are expected by AICD to match candidate materials and processes from DOE national laboratories with the technology needs of pulp and paper mills.

  8. Implementing E-Government: A Case Study of Improving the Process for Transferring Conventional Ammunition Among the Military Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    likely familiar with Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats ( SWOT ) analysis and recognize it as a simple, but relatively powerful...analytical tool for identifying key issues. Below is a SWOT analysis of the Conventional Ammunition Cross-Leveling Process. STRENGTHS Strengths of the...Level Analysis ............................................................31 viii H. ACTIVITY BASED COSTING

  9. Desethylamiodarone antagonizes the effect of thyroid hormone at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Bogazzi, F; Bartalena, L; Brogioni, S; Burelli, A; Raggi, F; Ultimieri, F; Cosci, C; Vitale, M; Fenzi, G; Martino, E

    2001-07-01

    DEA antagonize the action of T3 at the molecular level, interacting with TR and reducing its binding to TREs. This effect may contribute to the hypothyroid-like effect observed in peripheral tissues of patients receiving amiodarone treatment.

  10. Multiprobe Spectroscopic Inverstigation of Molecular-level Behavior within Aqueous 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium Tetrafluoroborate

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Abhra; Ali, Maroof; Baker, Gary A; Tetin, Sergey Y.; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Pandey, Siddharth

    2009-01-01

    In this work, an array of molecular-level solvent featuressincluding solute-solvent/solvent-solvent interactions, dipolarity, heterogeneity, dynamics, probe accessibility, and diffusionswere investigated across the entire composition of ambient mixtures containing the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [bmim][BF4], and pH 7.0 phosphate buffer, based on results assembled for nine different molecular probes utilized in a range of spectroscopic modes. These studies uncovered interesting and unusual solvatochromic probe behavior within this benchmark mixture. Solvatochromic absorbance probessa watersoluble betaine dye (betaine dye 33), N,N-diethyl-4-nitroaniline, and 4-nitroanilineswere employed to determine ET (a blend of dipolarity/polarizability and hydrogen bond donor contributions) and the Kamlet-Taft indices * (dipolarity/polarizability), R (hydrogen bond donor acidity), and (hydrogen bond acceptor basicity) characterizing the [bmim][BF4] + phosphate buffer system. These parameters each showed a marked deviation from ideality, suggesting selective solvation of the individual probe solutes by [bmim][BF4]. Similar conclusions were derived from the responses of the fluorescent polarity-sensitive probes pyrene and pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde. Importantly, the fluorescent microfluidity probe 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane senses a microviscosity within the mixture that significantly exceeds expectations derived from simple interpolation of the behavior in the neat solvents. On the basis of results from this probe, a correlation between microviscosity and bulk viscosity was established; pronounced solvent-solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions were implicit in this behavior. The greatest deviation from ideal additive behavior for the probes studied herein was consistently observed to occur in the buffer-rich regime. Nitromethane-based fluorescence quenching of pyrene within the [bmim][BF4] + phosphate buffer system showed unusual compliance with a sphere

  11. British Muslims and the UK government's 'war on terror' within: evidence of a clash of civilizations or emergent de-civilizing processes?

    PubMed

    Vertigans, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    In the immediate aftermath of the September 2001 attacks on America, defending civilization was quickly established at the core of the 'war on terror'. Unintentionally or otherwise this incorporation of civilization connected with Samuel Huntington's 'Clash of Civilizations' thesis. Within the 'war on terror' the dark side of counterterrorism has become apparent through international practices like extrajudicial killing, extraordinary rendition and torture. The impact of Western governments' policies upon their indigenous Muslim populations has also been problematic but social and political analysis has been relatively limited. This paper seeks to help address the scarcity of sociological contributions. Hidden costs of the UK government's attempts to utilize violence and enhance social constraints within the nation-state are identified. It is argued that although counterterrorism strategies are contributing to a self-fulfilling spiral of hatred that could be considered evidence in support of the 'Clash of Civilizations', the thesis is unhelpful when trying to grasp the underlying processes. Instead the paper draws upon Norbert Elias's application of the concepts of 'civilizing' and 'de-civilizing' to help improve levels of understanding about the processes and consequences of particular Muslim communities being targeted by security forces. The paper concludes with an exploration of the majority of the population's acquiescence and willingness to accept restraints upon Muslims in order to safeguard their own security.

  12. Quantification of Hydrological, Geochemical, and Mineralogical Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Uranium over Multiple Scales in Hanford Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Melanie A.; Perfect, Edmund; van den Berg, Elmer; Parker, Jack C.; Jardine, Philip M.; Tang, Guoping; Fendorf, Scott

    2006-11-15

    A long-term measure of the DOE Environmental Remediation Sciences Division is to provide sufficient scientific understanding to allow a significant fraction of DOE sites to incorporate coupled biological, chemical, and physical processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship by 2015. Our research targets two related, major obstacles to understanding and predicting contaminant transport at DOE sites: the heterogeneity of subsurface geologic media, and the scale dependence of experimental and modeled results.

  13. Coal hydrogasification process development. Volume II. Peat studies. Second annual technical progress report, government fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, K.M.; Rosemary, J.K.

    1980-10-20

    This report describes work performed on a program directed towards investigating the effects of peat hydrogasification in an entrained flow reactor. The program was conducted in three phases: peat dense-phase feed system flow studies, hydrogasification entrained flow reactor testing, and preliminary peat process economic evaluations. The peat dense-phase feeding studies included low-pressure (below 150 psig) testing at nominal solid peat flow rates of 1 ton/hr and analytical modeling efforts. The hydrogasification reactor testing was performed at peat flow rates of over 1000 lb/hr and reactor temperatures to 1900/sup 0/F in hydrogen atmospheres from 500 to 1000 psig. A simple analytical kinetic model was developed to predict total carbon conversion as a function of reactor operating variables and its agreement with experimental data was found to be excellent. Finally, preliminary process economics were established for three variations of the Cities Service/Rockwell (CS/R) Flash Hydropyrolysis Process with the cost of high-Btu gas ranging from $3.43 to $4.06 per million Btu.

  14. Processes governing decadal-scale depositional narrowing of the major tidal channel in San Pablo Bay, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegen, M.; Jaffe, B. E.

    2014-05-01

    Bathymetric measurements show that a deep, subtidal channel in San Pablo Bay, California, has consistently narrowed during the past 150 years. This raises general questions on the seasonal and intertidal morphodynamic processes acting at the subtidal channel-shoal interface. The current work addresses these questions using a process-based morphodynamic model (Delft3D). Model results reveal considerable morphodynamic activity during a tidal cycle. Deposition on the channel margin is largest during flooding of the shoals. Erosion rates (mainly occuring during ebb) remain relatively small, so that net accretion occurs on much of the channel margin. A remarkable finding is that locally generated wind waves are responsible for shoal extension and depositional channel narrowing. High suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the channel is a critical factor. Apart from sediment supply during high river flow, wind waves suspending sediment on the shoals cause high SSC levels in the channel at ebb. Sensitivity analysis shows that wind direction even determines the location of channel margin accretion. Fluvial sediment supply is another cause of high SSC in the channel. Density currents, 3-D circulation flows, sea level rise, or varied sediment characteristics only have a limited effect on the erosion and sedimentation patterns. A 30 year forecast shows that deeper shoals and decreasing fluvial sediment supply lower SSC levels in the channel, limit channel margin accretion, and even lead to net channel margin erosion in some areas. Channel shape thus remains subject to dynamic processes related to local variations in sediment supply, albeit to a more limited extent than in earlier decades.

  15. Fires in Operating or Abandoned Coal Mines or Heaps of Reactive Materials and the Governing Transport and Reaction Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, M. W.; Kessels, W.; Wessling, S.; Han, J.

    2007-05-01

    Spontaneous combustion is a world wide problem for technical operations in mining, waste disposal and power plant facilities. The principle driving the combustion is every where the same independent of the different reactive materials: Fresh air with the common oxygen content is getting in contact with the reactive material by human operations. The following reaction process produces heat at a usually low but constant rate. The reactive material in operating or abandoned coal mines, heaps of coal, waste or reactive minerals is most times strongly broken or fractured, such that the atmospheric oxygen can deeply penetrate into the porous or fractured media. Because the strongly broken or fractured medium with air filled pores and fractures is often combined with a low thermal conductivity of the bulk material the produced heat accumulates and the temperature increases with time. If the reactivity strongly increases with temperature, the temperature rise accelerates up to the "combustion temperature". Once the temperature is high enough the combustion process is determined by the oxygen transport to the combustion center rather than the chemical reactivity. Spontaneous combustion is thus a self- amplifying process where an initial small variation in the parameters and the starting conditions can create exploding combustion hot spots in an apparently homogenous material. The phenomenon will be discussed by various examples in the context of the German - Sino coal fire project. A temperature monitoring in hot fracture systems documents the strong influence of the weather conditions on the combustion process. Numerical calculations show the sensitivity of the combustion to the model geometries, the boundary conditions and mainly the permeability. The most used fire fighting operations like covering and water injection are discussed. A new method of using saltwater for fire fighting is presented and discussed. References: Kessels, W., Wessling, S., Li, X., and Wuttke, M

  16. Dynamic processes governing lower-tropospheric HDO/H2O ratios as observed from space and ground.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Christian; Yoshimura, Kei; Warneke, Thorsten; Aben, Ilse; Butz, André; Deutscher, Nicholas; Griffith, David; Hase, Frank; Notholt, Justus; Schneider, Matthias; Schrijver, Hans; Röckmann, Thomas

    2009-09-11

    The hydrological cycle and its response to environmental variability such as temperature changes is of prime importance for climate reconstruction and prediction. We retrieved deuterated water/water (HDO/H2O) abundances using spaceborne absorption spectroscopy, providing an almost global perspective on the near-surface distribution of water vapor isotopologs. We observed an unexpectedly high HDO/H2O seasonality in the inner Sahel region, pointing to a strong isotopic depletion in the subsiding branch of the Hadley circulation and its misrepresentation in general circulation models. An extension of the analysis at high latitudes using ground-based observations of deltaD and a model study shows that dynamic processes can entirely compensate for temperature effects on the isotopic composition of precipitation.

  17. The political process in global health and nutrition governance: the G8's 2010 Muskoka Initiative on Maternal, Child, and Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Kirton, John; Kulik, Julia; Bracht, Caroline

    2014-12-01

    Why do informal, plurilateral summit institutions such as the Group of Eight (G8) major market democracies succeed in advancing costly public health priorities such as maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH), even when the formal, multilateral United Nations (UN) system fails to meet such goals, when G8 governments afflicted by recession, deficit, and debt seek to cut expenditures, and when the private sector is largely uninvolved, despite the growing popularity of public-private partnerships to meet global health and related nutrition, food, and agriculture needs? Guided by the concert-equality model of G8 governance, this case study of the G8's 2010 Muskoka Initiative on MNCH traces the process through which that initiative was planned within Canada, internationally prepared through negotiations with Canada's G8 partners, produced at Muskoka by the leaders in June, multiplied in its results by the UN summit in September, and reinforced by the new accountability mechanism put in place. It finds that the Muskoka summit succeeded in mobilizing major money and momentum for MNCH. This was due to the initiative and influence of children-focused nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), working with committed individuals and agencies within the host Canadian government, as well as supportive public opinion and the help of those in the UN responsible for realizing its Millennium Development Goals. Also relevant were the democratic like-mindedness of G8 leaders and their African partners, the deference of G8 members to the host's priority, and the need of the G8 to demonstrate its relevance through a division of labor between it and the new Group of Twenty summit. This study shows that G8 summits can succeed in advancing key global health issues without a global shock on the same subject to galvanize agreement and action. It suggests that, when committed, focused NGOs and government officials will lead and the private sector will follow, but that there will be a lag in the

  18. [The federal government discourse during the political decentralization process and the obstacles to implement the Brazilian Public Health Care System].

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Bárbara

    2007-01-01

    A discourse analysis carried out on basic operating standard Norma Operacional Básica do Sistema Unico de Saúde (NOB-SUS 01/96) of the Brazilian public health care system aiming at locating signs that could allow to identify lines of thought which have influenced health care policies prioritized by the federal administration. The author points out a peculiarity in the kind of discourse employed by the ministry directive: its structure is based on isolated aspects of legislation and on ideas advocated by other discourse communities, articulated with redefined legal principles - an effort towards authorizing the official reasoning in favor of the relevance in keeping the decentralization process under the control of the federal administration. The analysis concludes that an infra-legal standard can neither grant state and federal administrations a hierarchical superiority (mediation function) over municipal administrations, nor can it transfer the legal responsibilities pertaining to Health Councils over to inter-administration commissions (Comissões Intergestores) , thus making the former mere decision ratifiers. This study found that granting privileges not contemplated in the legislation to state and federal administrations surfaced again and more strongly so in 2001 in yet another operating standard.

  19. Field Flume Experiments Resolve Feedback Processes Governing Historic Formation, Recent Degradation, and Restoration of the Everglades Ridge and Slough Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Noe, G. B.; Larsen, L. G.

    2008-12-01

    The ridge and slough landscape of the central Everglades formed several thousand years ago and remained stable until relatively recently. These flow parallel features with a cross sectional wavelength of approximately 100 m are strikingly similar to topographic and vegetation features in other low-gradient, floodplain wetlands found worldwide. The ridge and slough landscape is valued for its relatively high biodiversity and high connectivity of habitats. Loss of the topographic and vegetative pattern started with drainage efforts that began decreasing flows a century ago. The year 2000 marked the beginning of one of the most ambitious restorations of an aquatic ecosystem ever attempted. Although progress has been made, the processes responsible for degradation of landscape topographic pattern remain uncertain. Our hypothesis of Everglades landscape formation and pattern maintenance is based on feedbacks between flow velocity, vegetative flow resistance, and shear stress. A key element within that feedback is the redistribution of sediment from topographically lower to higher areas, with consequent effects on water level and plant community that drive differential rates of peat accretion in sloughs and ridges toward an equilibrium height difference. However, both the velocity threshold needed to entrain and redistribute organic sediment from sloughs to ridges, and the role of the emergent macrophytes in intercepting suspended particulate material, have remained uncertain. We constructed experimental flumes (8-m long by 1-m wide) in the Everglades and equipped them with pumping systems to elevate velocity by an order of magnitude (covering the possible range in the pre-drainage Everglades) over five steps in velocity. Natural mobilization of flocculent detrital material (floc) from the bed occurred in our experiments at velocities between 3.2 and 5.3 cm s-1, i.e., velocities that are rare in the present-day Everglades where 90% of observations typically are below 1

  20. Investigating the relative role of local and atmospheric processes governing European summer heatwaves in the UPSCALE modelling campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Peter; Vidale, Pier-Luigi; Verhoef, Anne; Black, Emily

    2014-05-01

    Warm dry summer weather over Europe is due to the prevailing synoptic conditions, but actual heatwaves in particular regions also depend on the land surface conditions and interactions with the atmosphere, which may occur over longer time scales. This continuum of land-atmosphere interactions depends principally on evaporation from the soil and transpiration from plants, which cools the surface and so provides a negative feedback on surface temperature. The amount of evapotranspiration is controlled by the amount of soil moisture available, which in turn depends on previous precipitation, so that a dry winter or spring will often lead to a heatwave the following summer. The SWELTER-21 project is investigating European heatwaves by using simulations from the Met Office Unified Model (in its GA3 formulation), run at high resolution (UPSCALE campaign) and using the JULES surface scheme. The overall project aims to quantify the key processes and feedbacks which link the synoptic conditions, surface temperature, precipitation, soil moisture, soil evaporation and plant transpiration. The model simulations used in this study were free-running atmosphere-only, forced with OSTIA SSTs for a period of 27 years (1985-2011) and current climate atmospheric forcing. This experimental setup implies that the simulations do not reproduce the actual heatwaves which occurred during this period, but instead produce a large climatological database of different types of heatwaves over different regions. The model heatwaves can then be compared and contrasted with summers without heatwaves, by calculating the anomalies and the correlations between anomalies across Europe. Some of the model heatwaves are only correlated with the synoptic conditions, i.e. soil moisture and overall evapotranspiration are similar to or even above the 27-year climatology, and these are principally over Eastern Europe and European Russia. In contrast, other model heatwaves are also correlated with significantly

  1. Uncovering local magnetospheric processes governing the morphology and variability of Ganymede's aurora using three-dimensional multifluid simulations of Ganymede's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payan, A. P.; Paty, C. S.; Retherford, K. D.

    2015-01-01

    investigate local magnetospheric processes governing the morphology and variability of Ganymede's aurora depending on its position with respect to the center of the Jovian plasma sheet. We couple an existing three-dimensional multifluid simulation to a new aurora brightness model developed for this study. With this, we are able to qualitatively and quantitatively show that the short- and long-period variabilities observed in Ganymede's auroral footprint at Jupiter are also predicted to be present in the brightness and morphology of the aurora at Ganymede. We also examine the relationship between acceleration structures and precipitation of electrons in Ganymede's neutral atmosphere by looking at the component of the electric field parallel to Ganymede's magnetic field. Our results confirm that regions of electron accelerations coincide with regions of brightest auroral emissions, as expected. Finally, we identify the likely source regions of electrons generating the aurora at Ganymede and discuss the plasma dynamic mechanisms likely responsible for these accelerations.

  2. Molecular level description of the sorptive fractionation of a fulvic acid on aluminum oxide using electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Catherine; Del Nero, Mirella

    2014-07-01

    We addressed here, by means of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with ultrahigh resolution, the molecular level fractionation of a reference fulvic acid (SRFA) during its sorption at an alumina surface, taken as a model for surfaces of natural aluminum oxide hydrates. Examination of ESI-MS spectra of a native SRFA solution and of supernatants collected in sorption experiments at acidic pH showed that the ∼5700 compounds identified in the native solution were partitioned between the solution and alumina surface to quite varying degrees. Compounds showing the highest affinity for the surface were aromatic compounds with multiple oxygenated functionalities, polycyclic aromatic compounds depleted of hydrogen and carrying few oxygenated groups, and aliphatic compounds with very high O/C values, highlighting the fact that SRFA constituents were sorbed mainly via chemical sorption involving their oxygenated functionalities. We observed an inverse correlation between the degree of sorption of a molecule within a CH2 series and its number of CH2 groups and a positive correlation between the degree of sorption and the number of CO2 groups in a COO series, which was remarkable. These correlations provide evidence at the molecular scale that molecule acidity is the key parameter governing fulvic acid (FA) sorptive fractionation, and they are useful for predicting sorption of FA at a natural oxide surface.

  3. Research and development of methods and tools for achieving and maintaining consensus processes in the face of change within and among government oversight agencies: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This progress report summarizes our research activities under our consensus grant. In year four of the grant, we continued to capitalize on and benefit from historical events which drove our early emphasis on group process studies. Following our work on various procedures for bringing together groups such as the State and Tribal Government Working Group and the Stakeholders' Forum (both of which provide input to the Five-Year Waste Plan), we continue to observe these groups and collect data. We also began a configuration study involving the complex modeling of DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Related to group process studies is the issue of the information requirements for individuals making decisions in consensus groups. Our information studies examined the requirements for decision-related information, frameworks for such information, and the effectiveness of information portrayed for decision making. However, we were able not only to continue studying consensus groups in action and related information issues, but also to focus considerable attention on the fundamental side of our research. The fundamental or basic research conducted in year four included: (1) expanding our literature database; (2) beginning the writing of the literature review summary document and the consensus guide; (3) developing frameworks and models such as the Environmental Trilogy model and a structural equations model of the consensus process; and (4) conducting laboratory studies concerning the effects of the presence of an expert, met expectations, opportunity to express views, incentive structure and conflict type (competitive versus collaborative) on consensus outcomes.

  4. Transformative governance of urban social-ecological systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    A central aspect of adaptive governance is a learning process that can help communities achieve environmental objectives. Adaptive governance is a framework for managing social-ecological systems, and is the precursor to transformative governance. Adaptive governance accounts for...

  5. The minute virus of canines (MVC) NP1 protein governs the expression of a subset of essential NS proteins via its role in RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Fasina, Olufemi O; Stupps, Stephanie; Figueroa-Cuilan, Wanda; Pintel, David J

    2017-03-29

    Parvoviruses use a variety of means to control the expression of their compact genomes. The Bocaparvovirus Minute Virus of Canines (MVC) encodes a small, genus-specific protein, NP1, which governs access to the viral capsid gene via its role in alternative polyadenylation and alternative splicing of the single MVC pre-mRNA. In addition to NP1, MVC encodes five additional non-structural proteins (NS) that share an initiation codon at the left end of the genome and which are individually encoded by alternative multiply-spliced mRNAs. We found that three of these proteins were encoded by mRNAs that excise the NP1-regulated MVC intron immediately upstream of the internal polyadenylation site (pA)p, and that generation of these proteins was thus regulated by NP1. Splicing of their progenitor mRNAs joined the amino terminus of these proteins into the NP1 open reading frame, and splice-site mutations that prevented their expression inhibited virus replication in a host-cell dependent manner. Thus, in addition to controlling capsid gene access, NP1 also controls expression of three of the five identified NS proteins via its role in governing MVC pre-mRNA splicing.IMPORTANCE The Parvovirinae are small non-enveloped icosahedral viruses that are important pathogens in many animal species including humans. Minute virus of canine (MVC) is an autonomous parvovirus in the Bocaparvovirus genus. It has a single promoter that generates a single pre-mRNA. NP1, a small genus-specific MVC protein, participates in the processing of this pre-mRNA and so controls capsid gene access via its role in alternative internal polyadenylation and splicing. We show here that NP1 also controls expression of three of the five identified NS proteins via its role in governing MVC pre-mRNA splicing. These NS proteins are together required for virus replication in a host-cell dependent manner.

  6. REST-Governed Gene Expression Profiling in a Neuronal Cell Model Reveals Novel Direct and Indirect Processes of Repression and Up-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manteiga, Jose M.; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Folladori, Lucrezia; Malosio, Maria L.; Lazarevic, Dejan; Stupka, Elia; Cittaro, Davide; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The role of REST changes in neurons, including the rapid decrease of its level during differentiation and its fluctuations during many mature functions and diseases, is well established. However, identification of many thousand possible REST-target genes, mostly based on indirect criteria, and demonstration of their operative dependence on the repressor have been established for only a relatively small fraction. In the present study, starting from our recently published work, we have expanded the identification of REST-dependent genes, investigated in two clones of the PC12 line, a recognized neuronal cell model, spontaneously expressing different levels of REST: very low as in neurons and much higher as in most non-neural cells. The molecular, structural and functional differences of the two PC12 clones were shown to depend largely on their different REST level and the ensuing variable expression of some dependent genes. Comprehensive RNA-Seq analyses of the 13,700 genes expressed, validated by parallel RT-PCR and western analyses of mRNAs and encoded proteins, identified in the high-REST clone two groups of almost 900 repressed and up-regulated genes. Repression is often due to direct binding of REST to target genes; up-regulation to indirect mechanism(s) mostly mediated by REST repression of repressive transcription factors. Most, but not all, genes governing neurosecretion, excitability, and receptor channel signaling were repressed in the high REST clone. The genes governing expression of non-channel receptors (G protein-coupled and others), although variably affected, were often up-regulated together with the genes of intracellular kinases, small G proteins, cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins. Expression of REST-dependent genes governing functions other than those mentioned so far were also identified. The results obtained by the parallel investigation of the two PC12 clones revealed the complexity of the REST molecular and

  7. REST-Governed Gene Expression Profiling in a Neuronal Cell Model Reveals Novel Direct and Indirect Processes of Repression and Up-Regulation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manteiga, Jose M; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Folladori, Lucrezia; Malosio, Maria L; Lazarevic, Dejan; Stupka, Elia; Cittaro, Davide; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The role of REST changes in neurons, including the rapid decrease of its level during differentiation and its fluctuations during many mature functions and diseases, is well established. However, identification of many thousand possible REST-target genes, mostly based on indirect criteria, and demonstration of their operative dependence on the repressor have been established for only a relatively small fraction. In the present study, starting from our recently published work, we have expanded the identification of REST-dependent genes, investigated in two clones of the PC12 line, a recognized neuronal cell model, spontaneously expressing different levels of REST: very low as in neurons and much higher as in most non-neural cells. The molecular, structural and functional differences of the two PC12 clones were shown to depend largely on their different REST level and the ensuing variable expression of some dependent genes. Comprehensive RNA-Seq analyses of the 13,700 genes expressed, validated by parallel RT-PCR and western analyses of mRNAs and encoded proteins, identified in the high-REST clone two groups of almost 900 repressed and up-regulated genes. Repression is often due to direct binding of REST to target genes; up-regulation to indirect mechanism(s) mostly mediated by REST repression of repressive transcription factors. Most, but not all, genes governing neurosecretion, excitability, and receptor channel signaling were repressed in the high REST clone. The genes governing expression of non-channel receptors (G protein-coupled and others), although variably affected, were often up-regulated together with the genes of intracellular kinases, small G proteins, cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins. Expression of REST-dependent genes governing functions other than those mentioned so far were also identified. The results obtained by the parallel investigation of the two PC12 clones revealed the complexity of the REST molecular and

  8. Governance and Civic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ekundayo J. D., Ed.

    This book contains 13 papers on the socioeconomic development, legal, gender, philosophical, and human rights dimensions of state governance within the context of social, economic, and political processes in Sierra Leone and Kenya. The Political Literacy and Civic Education (PLACE) Project, which was sponsored by the British Overseas Development…

  9. How Effective Are Simulated Molecular-Level Experiments for Teaching Diffusion and Osmosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meir, Eli; Perry, Judith; Stal, Derek; Maruca, Susan; Klopfer, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Diffusion and osmosis are central concepts in biology, both at the cellular and organ levels. They are presented several times throughout most introductory biology textbooks (e.g., Freeman, 2002), yet both processes are often difficult for students to understand (Odom, 1995; Zuckerman, 1994; Sanger "et al.", 2001; and results herein). Students…

  10. How Effective Are Simulated Molecular-Level Experiments for Teaching Diffusion and Osmosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meir, Eli; Perry, Judith; Stal, Derek; Maruca, Susan; Klopfer, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Diffusion and osmosis are central concepts in biology, both at the cellular and organ levels. They are presented several times throughout most introductory biology textbooks (e.g., Freeman, 2002), yet both processes are often difficult for students to understand (Odom, 1995; Zuckerman, 1994; Sanger "et al.", 2001; and results herein). Students…

  11. Roles of Natural Compounds from Medicinal Plants in Cancer Treatment: Structure and Mode of Action at Molecular Level.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahmood; Malik, Arif; Manan, Abdul; Arooj, Mahwish; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Sheikh, Ishfaq Ahmed; Gan, Siew Hua; Asif, Muhammad; Naseer, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Every year, cancer takes the life of millions of people. Conventional treatments have produced unsatisfactory results for some types of cancer, and the side effects are extensive, leading to a shift in the focus of treatment towards alternative medicines. Indeed, medicinal plants have long been investigated by scientists for their anti-cancer properties. Some phytochemicals that are important active constituents of plants, including catechins, ursolic acid, silymarin, glycyrrhizin, ellagic acid, gallic acid and various types of flavonoids, have shown promise in future cancer management. The current review covers various aspects of cancer treatment based on medicinal plants at molecular level and sheds light on their structures and modes of action.

  12. Assessing the impact of synchrotron X-ray irradiation on proteinaceous specimens at macro and molecular levels.

    PubMed

    Moini, Mehdi; Rollman, Christopher M; Bertrand, Loïc

    2014-10-07

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) has become a preferred technique for the analysis of a wide range of archeological samples, artwork, and museum specimens. While SR is called a nondestructive technique, its effect on proteinaceous specimens has not been fully investigated at the molecular level. To investigate the molecular level effects of synchrotron X-ray on proteinaceous specimens, we propose a methodology where four variables are considered: (1) type of specimen: samples ranging from amino acids to proteinaceous objects such as silk, wool, parchment, and rabbit skin glue were irradiated; (2) synchrotron X-ray energy; (3) beam intensity; (4) irradiation time. Irradiated specimens were examined for both macroscopic and molecular effects. At macroscopic levels, color change, brittleness, and solubility enhancement were observed for several samples within 100 s of irradiation. At molecular levels, the method allowed one to quantify significant amino acid modifications. Aspartic acid (Asp), wool, parchment, and rabbit skin glue showed a significant increase in Asp racemization upon increasing irradiation time with rabbit skin glue showing the greatest increase in d-Asp formation. In contrast, Asp in silk, pure cystine (dimer of cysteine), and asparagine (Asn) did not show signs of racemization at the irradiation times studied; however, the latter two compounds showed significant signs of decomposition. Parchment and rabbit skin glue exhibited racemization of Asp, as well as racemization of isoleucine (Ile) and phenylalanine (Phe) after 100 s of irradiation with a focused beam. Under the experimental conditions and sample type and dimensions used here, more change was observed for focused and low energy (8 keV) beams than unfocused or higher energy (22 keV) beams. These results allow quantification of the change induced at the molecular level on proteinaceous specimens by synchrotron X-ray radiation and help to define accurate thresholds to minimize the probability of

  13. Construction of a bicontinuous donor-acceptor hybrid material at the molecular level by inserting inorganic nanowires into porous MOFs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Guan, Ying-Fang; Li, Ling; Chen, Yong; Dai, Wen-Xin; Huang, Chang-Cang; Lin, Mei-Jin

    2017-04-06

    Herein, we report an unprecedented hybrid structure of electron-rich iodoplumbate nanowires precisely inserted into the periodic pores of electron-deficient pyridinium metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of semiconductive MOFs in situ loaded with inorganic semiconductive nanowires via a simple self-assembly method. Due to the dissimilar semiconductivities between the host and guest components, this hybrid also represents the first bicontinuous donor-acceptor hybrid at the molecular level based on host-guest interactions.

  14. Two-Particle Interference of Electron Pairs on a Molecular Level

    SciTech Connect

    Waitz, M.; Metz, D.; Lower, J.; Schober, C.; Keiling, M.; Pitzer, M.; Mertens, K.; Martins, M.; Viefhaus, J.; Klumpp, S.; Weber, T.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Schmidt, L. Ph. H.; Morales, F.; Miyabe, S.; Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.; Martín, F.; Williams, J. B.; Schöffler, M. S.; Jahnke, T.; Dörner, R.

    2016-08-15

    Here, wWe investigate the photodouble ionization of H2 molecules with 400 eV photons. We find that the emitted electrons do not show any sign of two-center interference fringes in their angular emission distributions if considered separately. Conversely, the quasiparticle consisting of both electrons (i.e., the "dielectron") does. The work highlights the fact that nonlocal effects are embedded everywhere in nature where many-particle processes are involved.

  15. Two-Particle Interference of Electron Pairs on a Molecular Level

    DOE PAGES

    Waitz, M.; Metz, D.; Lower, J.; ...

    2016-08-15

    Here, wWe investigate the photodouble ionization of H2 molecules with 400 eV photons. We find that the emitted electrons do not show any sign of two-center interference fringes in their angular emission distributions if considered separately. Conversely, the quasiparticle consisting of both electrons (i.e., the "dielectron") does. The work highlights the fact that nonlocal effects are embedded everywhere in nature where many-particle processes are involved.

  16. On reproduction in red algae: further research needed at the molecular level

    PubMed Central

    García-Jiménez, Pilar; Robaina, Rafael R.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular red algae (Rhodophyta) have some of the most complex life cycles known in living organisms. Economically valuable seaweeds, such as phycocolloid producers, have a triphasic (gametophyte, carposporophyte, and tetrasporophyte) life cycle, not to mention the intricate alternation of generations in the edible “sushi-alga” nori. It is a well-known fact that reproductive processes are controlled by one or more abiotic factor(s), including day length, light quality, temperature, and nutrients. Likewise, endogenous chemical factors such as plant growth regulators have been reported to affect reproductive events in some red seaweeds. Still, in the genomic era and given the high throughput techniques at our disposal, our knowledge about the endogenous molecular machinery lags far behind that of higher plants. Any potential effective control of the reproductive process will entail revisiting most of these results and facts to answer basic biological questions as yet unresolved. Recent results have shed light on the involvement of several genes in red alga reproductive events. In addition, a working species characterized by a simple filamentous architecture, easy cultivation, and accessible genomes may also facilitate our task. PMID:25755663

  17. On reproduction in red algae: further research needed at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    García-Jiménez, Pilar; Robaina, Rafael R

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular red algae (Rhodophyta) have some of the most complex life cycles known in living organisms. Economically valuable seaweeds, such as phycocolloid producers, have a triphasic (gametophyte, carposporophyte, and tetrasporophyte) life cycle, not to mention the intricate alternation of generations in the edible "sushi-alga" nori. It is a well-known fact that reproductive processes are controlled by one or more abiotic factor(s), including day length, light quality, temperature, and nutrients. Likewise, endogenous chemical factors such as plant growth regulators have been reported to affect reproductive events in some red seaweeds. Still, in the genomic era and given the high throughput techniques at our disposal, our knowledge about the endogenous molecular machinery lags far behind that of higher plants. Any potential effective control of the reproductive process will entail revisiting most of these results and facts to answer basic biological questions as yet unresolved. Recent results have shed light on the involvement of several genes in red alga reproductive events. In addition, a working species characterized by a simple filamentous architecture, easy cultivation, and accessible genomes may also facilitate our task.

  18. Exposure to low pH induces molecular level changes in the marine worm, Platynereis dumerilii.

    PubMed

    Wäge, Janine; Lerebours, Adelaide; Hardege, Jörg D; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2016-02-01

    Fossil fuel emissions and changes in net land use lead to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration and a subsequent decrease of ocean pH. Noticeable effects on organisms' calcification rate, shell structure and energy metabolism have been reported in the literature. To date, little is known about the molecular mechanisms altered under low pH exposure, especially in non-calcifying organisms. We used a suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) approach to characterise differentially expressed genes isolated from Platynereis dumerilii, a non-calcifying marine polychaeta species, kept at normal and low pH conditions. Several gene sequences have been identified as differentially regulated. These are involved in processes previously considered as indicators of environment change, such as energy metabolism (NADH dehydrogenase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase and ATP synthase subunit F), while others are involved in cytoskeleton function (paramyosin and calponin) and immune defence (fucolectin-1 and paneth cell-specific alpha-defensin) processes. This is the first study of differential gene expression in a non-calcifying, marine polychaete exposed to low pH seawater conditions and suggests that mechanisms of impact may include additional pathways not previously identified as impacted by low pH in other species.

  19. Extracting physics of life at the molecular level: A review of single-molecule data analyses.

    PubMed

    Colomb, Warren; Sarkar, Susanta K

    2015-06-01

    Studying individual biomolecules at the single-molecule level has proved very insightful recently. Single-molecule experiments allow us to probe both the equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties as well as make quantitative connections with ensemble experiments and equilibrium thermodynamics. However, it is important to be careful about the analysis of single-molecule data because of the noise present and the lack of theoretical framework for processes far away from equilibrium. Biomolecular motion, whether it is free in solution, on a substrate, or under force, involves thermal fluctuations in varying degrees, which makes the motion noisy. In addition, the noise from the experimental setup makes it even more complex. The details of biologically relevant interactions, conformational dynamics, and activities are hidden in the noisy single-molecule data. As such, extracting biological insights from noisy data is still an active area of research. In this review, we will focus on analyzing both fluorescence-based and force-based single-molecule experiments and gaining biological insights at the single-molecule level. Inherently nonequilibrium nature of biological processes will be highlighted. Simulated trajectories of biomolecular diffusion will be used to compare and validate various analysis techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of the breakpoints of a polymorphic inversion complex detects strict and broad breakpoint reuse at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Puerma, Eva; Orengo, Dorcas J; Salguero, David; Papaceit, Montserrat; Segarra, Carmen; Aguadé, Montserrat

    2014-09-01

    Inversions are an integral part of structural variation within species, and they play a leading role in genome reorganization across species. Work at both the cytological and genome sequence levels has revealed heterogeneity in the distribution of inversion breakpoints, with some regions being recurrently used. Breakpoint reuse at the molecular level has mostly been assessed for fixed inversions through genome sequence comparison, and therefore rather broadly. Here, we have identified and sequenced the breakpoints of two polymorphic inversions-E1 and E2 that share a breakpoint-in the extant Est and E1 + 2 chromosomal arrangements of Drosophila subobscura. The breakpoints are two medium-sized repeated motifs that mediated the inversions by two different mechanisms: E1 via staggered breaks and subsequent repair and E2 via repeat-mediated ectopic recombination. The fine delimitation of the shared breakpoint revealed its strict reuse at the molecular level regardless of which was the intermediate arrangement. The occurrence of other rearrangements in the most proximal and distal extended breakpoint regions reveals the broad reuse of these regions. This differential degree of fragility might be related to their sharing the presence outside the inverted region of snoRNA-encoding genes.

  1. Research Frontiers in Bioinspired Energy: Molecular-Level Learning from Natural Systems: A Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Zolandz, Dorothy

    2012-03-28

    An interactive, multidisciplinary, public workshop, organized by a group of experts in biochemistry, biophysics, chemical and biomolecular engineering, chemistry, microbial metabolism, and protein structure and function, was held on January 6-7, 2011 in Washington, DC. Fundamental insights into the biological energy capture, storage, and transformation processes provided by speakers was featured in this workshop which included topics such as microbes living in extreme environments such as hydrothermal vents or caustic soda lakes (extremophiles) provided a fascinating basis for discussing the exploration and development of new energy systems. Breakout sessions and extended discussions among the multidisciplinary groups of participants in the workshop fostered information sharing and possible collaborations on future bioinspired research. Printed and web-based materials that summarize the committee's assessment of what transpired at the workshop were prepared to advance further understanding of fundamental chemical properties of biological systems within and between the disciplines. In addition, webbased materials (including two animated videos) were developed to make the workshop content more accessible to a broad audience of students and researchers working across disciplinary boundaries. Key workshop discussion topics included: Exploring and identifying novel organisms; Identifying patterns and conserved biological structures in nature; Exploring and identifying fundamental properties and mechanisms of known biological systems; Supporting current, and creating new, opportunities for interdisciplinary education, training, and outreach; and Applying knowledge from biology to create new devices and sustainable technology.

  2. Aquatic ecotoxicology: from the ecosystem to the cellular and molecular levels.

    PubMed

    Boudou, A; Ribeyre, F

    1997-02-01

    This review of aquatic ecotoxicology is presented in three parts. First, we discuss the fundamental concepts and stress the importance of its ecological basis and the complexity and diversity of the field of investigation, which result from actions and interactions between the physicochemical characteristics of the biotopes, the structural and functional properties of the living organisms, and the contamination modalities. Ecotoxicological mechanisms, regardless of the level of biological complexity, primarily depend on the bioavailability of the toxic products. Numerous processes control the chemical fate of contaminants in the water column and/or sediment compartments; accessibility to the biological barriers that separate the organisms from their surrounding medium depends directly on bioavailability. Second, we review the principal methodologies of the field, from in situ studies at the ecosystem/ecocomplex level to bioassays or single species tests. Third, we focus on mercury, selected as a reference contaminant, in order to illustrate the main ecotoxicological concepts, the complementarity between field and laboratory studies, and the indispensable multidisciplinarity of the approaches.

  3. Aquatic ecotoxicology: from the ecosystem to the cellular and molecular levels.

    PubMed Central

    Boudou, A; Ribeyre, F

    1997-01-01

    This review of aquatic ecotoxicology is presented in three parts. First, we discuss the fundamental concepts and stress the importance of its ecological basis and the complexity and diversity of the field of investigation, which result from actions and interactions between the physicochemical characteristics of the biotopes, the structural and functional properties of the living organisms, and the contamination modalities. Ecotoxicological mechanisms, regardless of the level of biological complexity, primarily depend on the bioavailability of the toxic products. Numerous processes control the chemical fate of contaminants in the water column and/or sediment compartments; accessibility to the biological barriers that separate the organisms from their surrounding medium depends directly on bioavailability. Second, we review the principal methodologies of the field, from in situ studies at the ecosystem/ecocomplex level to bioassays or single species tests. Third, we focus on mercury, selected as a reference contaminant, in order to illustrate the main ecotoxicological concepts, the complementarity between field and laboratory studies, and the indispensable multidisciplinarity of the approaches. PMID:9114275

  4. New tools for the study of chromosome segregation and aneuploidy at the molecular level

    SciTech Connect

    Charlieu, J.P.; Marcais, B.; Laurent, A.M.; Roizes, G.

    1993-12-31

    The molecular mechanisms which allow the correct distribution of chromosomes during cell division are not yet well known. The centromere, because of its possible involvement in the attachment of sister chromatids and its participation in the formation of the kinetochore, may play an important role in these mechanisms. Trisomy 21 (down syndrome, DS) provides a good model for studying aneuploidy resulting from the dysfunction of the chromosome distribution process. A possible means of analyzing the mechanisms leading to non-disjunction (NDJ) could be to determine the origin of the supernumerary chromosome 21 and to attempt to find some structural or physical characteristics of the potentially responsible centromere. This could be performed by using molecular tools which allow each of the two parental chromosomes 21 to be distinguished. Possible markers suitable for this purpose are DNA fragments that exhibit length polymorphisms. We present here some examples of such molecular tools, and discuss ways to use them in order to study the parental origin and the meiotic stage of nondisjunction, and we propose an hypothesis suggesting a possible cause of nondisjunction in human chromosomes.

  5. A probe to study the toxic interaction of tartrazine with bovine hemoglobin at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Li, Yating; Wei, Haoran; Liu, Rutao

    2014-03-01

    Tartrazine is an artificial azo dye commonly used in food products, but tartrazine in the environment is potentially harmful. The toxic interaction between tartrazine and bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was investigated using fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular modeling techniques under simulated physiological conditions. The fluorescence data showed that tartrazine can bind with BHb to form a complex. The binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction, in which van der Waals' forces and hydrogen bonds played major roles. Molecular docking results showed that the hydrogen bonds exist between the oxygen atoms at position 31 of tartrazine and the nitrogen atom NZ7 on Lys99, and also between the oxygen atoms at position 15 of tartrazine and the nitrogen atom NZ7 on Lys104, Lys105. The results of UV-vis and CD spectra revealed that tartrazine led to conformational changes in BHb, including loosening of the skeleton structure and decreasing α helix in the secondary structure. The synchronous fluorescence experiment revealed that tartrazine binds into the hemoglobin central cavity, and this was verified using a molecular modeling study.

  6. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes: manufacturing techniques and properties of customized nanocomponents for molecular-level technology.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Sohaib; Taimoor, Aqeel A

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) since their discovery have been the focus of research on account of exceptional chemical, mechanical and electrical properties. However, manipulation and processing of CNTs have been limited by their compatibility with other materials. Considerable efforts have therefore been devoted to the surface modification of CNTs to pave the way to many useful applications and to realize the potential applications in successful products, especially composite manufacturing. The chemical modification, dispersion and solubilization of CNTs represent an emerging area in the research on nanotubes-based materials. Several research groups have reported successful and doable functionalization techniques for single-walled (SWCNT) and multi-wall (MWCNT) carbon nanotubes. This paper presents an overview of the functionalization of the carbon nanotubes covering both covalent and non-covalent techniques at tips and walls of SWCNTs and MWCNTs, and summarizes recent patents possessing significant commercial value and large-scale practicality. The principal aim is to review main approaches to chemical functionalization of CNTs and to account for the advances that have been made so far.

  7. Highly consistent patterns for inherited human diseases at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    López-Bigas, Núria; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Ouzounis, Christos A

    2006-02-01

    Over 1600 mammalian genes are known to cause an inherited disorder, when subjected to one or more mutations. These disease genes represent a unique resource for the identification and quantification of relationships between phenotypic attributes of a disease and the molecular features of the associated disease genes, including their ascribed annotated functional classes and expression patterns. Such analyses can provide a more global perspective and a deeper understanding of the probable causes underlying human hereditary diseases. In this perspective and critical view of disease genomics, we present a comparative analysis of genes reported to cause inherited diseases in humans in terms of their causative effects on physiology, their genetics and inheritance modes, the functional processes they are involved in and their expression profiles across a wide spectrum of tissues. Our analysis reveals that there are more extensive correlations between these attributes of genetic disease genes than previously appreciated. For instance, the functional pattern of genes causing dominant and recessive diseases is markedly different. Also, the function of the genes and their expression correlate with the type of disease they cause when mutated. The results further indicate that a comparative genomics approach for the analysis of genes linked to human genetic diseases will facilitate the elucidation of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms.

  8. Shared Governance: Promises and Perils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Patricia L.

    Shared governance in the community college district has both advantages and disadvantages. Among the three "perils" of implementing shared governance are that the process is difficult, lengthy, and sometimes tedious; that responsibility for decisions and actions must somehow be maintained; and that an appropriate role for faculty, staff,…

  9. State and Local Government Purchasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of State Governments, Lexington, KY.

    This report concerns public purchasing at all levels of government and brings into focus the role of the purchasing official in government management. Covered in the report are essential elements of the purchasing process, including the assessment of needs; written specifications; advertising, evaluating, and awarding bids; and inspection and…

  10. Administration of Government Documents Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harleston, Rebekah M.; Stoffle, Carla J.

    A manual is presented which describes procedures for processing government documents. A brief overview of government publishing and the depository system is provided in chapter one. Chapter two explains the principles of the Superintendent of Documents classification system and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using it. Bibliographic…

  11. Dispersing perylene diimide/SWCNT hybrids: structural insights at the molecular level and fabricating advanced materials.

    PubMed

    Tsarfati, Yael; Strauss, Volker; Kuhri, Susanne; Krieg, Elisha; Weissman, Haim; Shimoni, Eyal; Baram, Jonathan; Guldi, Dirk M; Rybtchinski, Boris

    2015-06-17

    The unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are advantageous for emerging applications. Yet, the CNT insolubility hampers their potential. Approaches based on covalent and noncovalent methodologies have been tested to realize stable dispersions of CNTs. Noncovalent approaches are of particular interest as they preserve the CNT's structures and properties. We report on hybrids, in which perylene diimide (PDI) amphiphiles are noncovalently immobilized onto single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The resulting hybrids were dispersed and exfoliated both in water and organic solvents in the presence of two different PDI derivatives, PP2b and PP3a. The dispersions were investigated using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), providing unique structural insights into the exfoliation. A helical arrangement of PP2b assemblies on SWCNTs dominates in aqueous dispersions, while a single layer of PP2b and PP3a was found on SWCNTs in organic dispersions. The dispersions were probed by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopies, revealing appreciable charge redistribution in the ground state, and an efficient electron transfer from SWCNTs to PDIs in the excited state. We also fabricated hybrid materials from the PP2b/SWCNT dispersions. A supramolecular membrane was prepared from aqueous dispersions and used for size-selective separation of gold nanoparticles. Hybrid buckypaper films were prepared from the organic dispersions. In the latter, high conductivity results from enhanced electronic communication and favorable morphology within the hybrid material. Our findings shed light onto SWCNT/dispersant molecular interactions, and introduce a versatile approach toward universal solution processing of SWCNT-based materials.

  12. Investigating carbon dynamics in Siberian peat bogs using molecular-level analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, K.; Benner, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    Total hydrolysable carbohydrates, and lignin and cutin acid compounds were analyzed in peat cores collected 56.8 N (SIB04), 58.4 N (SIB06), 63.8 N (G137) and 66.5 N (E113) in the Western Siberian Lowland to investigate vegetation, chemical compositions and the stage of decomposition. Sphagnum mosses dominated peatland vegetation in all four cores. High-resolution molecular analyses revealed rapid vegetation changes on timescales of 50-200 years in the southern cores Sib4 and Sib6. Syringyl and vanillyl (S/V) ratios and cutin acids indicated these vegetation changes were due to varying inputs of angiosperm and gymnosperm and root material. In the G137 and E113 cores lichens briefly replaced sphagnum mosses and vascular plants. Molecular decomposition indicators used in this study tracked the decomposition of different organic constituents of peat organic matter. The carbohydrate decomposition index was sensitive to the polysaccharide component of all peat-forming plants, whereas acid/aldehyde ratios of S and V phenols (Ac/AlS,V) followed the lignin component of vascular plants. Low carbohydrate decomposition indices in peat layers corresponded well with elevated (Ad/Al)S,V ratios. This suggested both classes of biochemicals were simultaneously decomposed, and decomposition processes were associated with extensive total mass loss in these ombrotrophic systems. Selective decomposition or transformation of lignin was observed in the permafrost-influenced northern cores G137 and E113. Both cores exhibited the highest (Ad/Al)S,V ratios, almost four-fold higher than measured in peat-forming plants. The extent of decomposition in the four peat cores did not uniformly increase with age, but showed episodic extensive decomposition events. Variable decomposition events independent of climatic conditions and vegetation shifts highlight the complexity of peatland dynamics.

  13. Successful Shared Governance Through Education.

    PubMed

    Brull, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Shared governance is one way nurses can attain a healthy work environment. Having direct-care nurses involved in raising relevant clinical and operational issues and creating systematic approaches has been linked to greater levels of empowerment which is often transposed into shared governance. Nurse leaders at one hospital used a comprehensive educational strategy to implement shared governance in less than 2 years. An authoritative style of leadership and decision making does not meet the needs of today's complex health care environment; nor does it meet the needs of today's employees. The focus on a very deliberate and educational strategy for shared governance was successful in building the structures and processes needed to take a unit and division from traditional governance to shared governance in less than 2 years.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy to support the link between rheology and continuous twin-screw melt granulation on molecular level: A case study.

    PubMed

    Monteyne, Tinne; Heeze, Liza; Oldörp, Klaus; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean-Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Twin screw hot melt granulation (TSHMG) is an innovative and continuous drug formulation process allowing granulation of moisture sensitive drugs. However, due to the lack of experience and in-depth process understanding, this technique is not yet widely used. During the TSHMG process, the microstructure of the granules is generated and modified and strongly depends on the flow behavior of the material. Hence, rheology might be a suitable tool to simulate and examine this process. However, chemical interactions of the material are influencing the physical properties leading to the microstructure. In this research project it is spectroscopically investigated whether the heat applied in a rheometer induces the same molecular effects as these occurring during TSHMG of the model formulation caffeine anhydrous/Soluplus®. Hence, it is evaluated whether rheology can be used as a simulation tool to improve the understanding of the material behavior at molecular level during continuous melt granulation. Therefore, in-line Raman spectroscopy is executed during TSHMG and in situ Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) during oscillatory rheological experiments. The results from the in-line Raman monitoring revealed polymorph transition of caffeine anhydrous during twin screw melt granulation with Soluplus® which is stimulated depending on the binder concentration and/or granulation temperature. A correlation was seen between the FTIR spectra obtained during the rheological temperature ramp and the in-line collected Raman spectra during the melt granulation runs. The polymorphic conversion of caffeine anhydrous could be detected in the same temperature range with both techniques, proving the comparability of plate-plate rheometry and hot melt granulation (HMG) for this case with the used parameter settings. Process simulation using rheology combined with in situ FTIR seems a promising approach to increase process understanding and to facilitate binder and parameter selection for

  15. High-precision frequency measurements: indispensable tools at the core of the molecular-level analysis of complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Ruecker, C.; Meringer, M.; Gugisch, R.; Frommberger, M.; Perdue, E. M.; Witt, M.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2007-01-01

    This perspective article provides an assessment of the state-of-the-art in the molecular-resolution analysis of complex organic materials. These materials can be divided into biomolecules in complex mixtures (which are amenable to successful separation into unambiguously defined molecular fractions) and complex nonrepetitive materials (which cannot be purified in the conventional sense because they are even more intricate). Molecular-level analyses of these complex systems critically depend on the integrated use of high-performance separation, high-resolution organic structural spectroscopy and mathematical data treatment. At present, only high-precision frequency-derived data exhibit sufficient resolution to overcome the otherwise common and detrimental effects of intrinsic averaging, which deteriorate spectral resolution to the degree of bulk-level rather than molecular-resolution analysis. High-precision frequency measurements are integral to the two most influential organic structural spectroscopic methods for the investigation of complex materials—NMR spectroscopy (which provides unsurpassed detail on close-range molecular order) and FTICR mass spectrometry (which provides unrivalled resolution)—and they can be translated into isotope-specific molecular-resolution data of unprecedented significance and richness. The quality of this standalone de novo molecular-level resolution data is of unparalleled mechanistic relevance and is sufficient to fundamentally advance our understanding of the structures and functions of complex biomolecular mixtures and nonrepetitive complex materials, such as natural organic matter (NOM), aerosols, and soil, plant and microbial extracts, all of which are currently poorly amenable to meaningful target analysis. The discrete analytical volumetric pixel space that is presently available to describe complex systems (defined by NMR, FT mass spectrometry and separation technologies) is in the range of 108–14 voxels, and is

  16. 2D Confined-Space Assisted Growth of Molecular-Level-Thick Polypyrrole Sheets with High Conductivity and Transparency.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Dong; Wu, Yongjin; Tian, Xiaorui; Qin, Haili; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Ting; Ni, Weihai; Jin, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Herein, the use of a 2D soft template system composed of hundred-nanometer-thick water/ethanol mixed layers sandwiched by lamellar bilayer membranes of a self-assembled amphiphilic molecule to produce ultrathin polyprrole (PPy) with a uniform thickness as thin as 3.8 nm and with large dimensions (>2 μm(2)) is presented. The obtained PPy nanosheets exhibit regioregularity with ordered chain alignment where the polymer chains in the nanosheets produced are well aligned with a clear interchain spacing as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering measurement. The molecular-level-thick PPy nanosheets exhibit extremely high conductivity up to 1330 S m(-1), thanks to the ordered alignment of polymer chains in the nanosheets, and a high transparency in both the visible region (transmittance >99%) and near-infrared region (transmittance >93%).

  17. In Situ Molecular Level Studies on Membrane Related Peptides and Proteins in Real Time Using Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shuji; Nguyen, Khoi Tan; Le Clair, Stéphanie V.; Chen, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique to study the molecular structures of surfaces and interfaces in different chemical environments. This review summarizes recent SFG studies on hybrid bilayer membranes and substrate-supported lipid monolayers and bilayers, the interaction between peptides/proteins and lipid monolayers/bilayers, and bilayer perturbation induced by peptides/proteins. To demonstrate the ability of SFG to determine the orientations of various secondary structures, studies on the interaction between different peptides/proteins (melittin, G proteins, almethicin, and tachyplesin I) and lipid bilayers are discussed. Molecular level details revealed by SFG in these studies show that SFG can provide a unique understanding on the interactions between a lipid monolayer/bilayer and peptides/proteins in real time, in situ and without any exogenous labeling. PMID:19306928

  18. Study on the toxic interaction of methanol, ethanol and propanol against the bovine hemoglobin (BHb) on molecular level.

    PubMed

    Jun, Chai; Xue, Yan; Liu, Rutao; Wang, Meijie

    2011-09-01

    The toxic interaction of methanol, ethanol and propanol with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) at protein molecular level was studied by resonance light scattering (RLS), fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible absorption (UV-vis) and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. The experimental results showed that the three alcohols all had toxic effects on BHb and the effects increased along with the increasing alcohol dose. The results of RLS and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that alcohols can denature BHb. They changed the microenvironment of amino acid residues and led to molecular aggregation. The decreasing order of the influence is propanol, ethanol and methanol. The results of UV-vis and CD spectra revealed that alcohols led to conformational changes of BHb, including the loosening of the skeleton structure and the decreasing of α-helix in the second structure. The changes generated by propanol were much larger than those by methanol and ethanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Laser synthesis of a copper-single-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposite via molecular-level mixing and non-equilibrium solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jay F.; Rajule, Nilesh; Molian, Pal; Liu, Yi

    2016-12-01

    A copper-single-walled carbon nanotube (Cu-SWCNT) metal nanocomposite could be an ideal material if it can substantially improve the strength of copper while preserving the metal’s excellent thermal and electrical properties. However, synthesis of such a nanocomposite is highly challenging, because copper and SWCNTs do not form intermetallic compounds and are insoluble; as a result, there are serious issues regarding wettability and fine dispersion of SWCNTs within the copper matrix. In this paper we present a novel wet process, called the laser surface implantation process (LSI), to synthesize Cu-SWCNT nanocomposites by mixing SWCNTs into molten copper. The LSI process includes drilling several microholes on a copper substrate, filling the microholes with SWCNTs suspended in solution, and melting the copper substrate to create a micro-well of molten copper. The molten copper advances radially outward to engulf the microholes with pre-deposited SWCNTs to form the Cu-SWCNT implant upon solidification. Rapid and non-equilibrium solidification is achieved due to copper’s excellent heat conductivity, so that SWCNTs are locked in position within the copper matrix without agglomerating into large clusters. This wet process is very different from the typical dry processes used in powder metallurgy. Very high hardness improvement, up to 527% over pure copper, was achieved, confirmed by micro-indentation tests, with only a 0.23% SWCNT volume fraction. The nanostructure of the nanocomposite was characterized by TEM imaging, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping and spectroscopy measurements. The SWCNTs were found to be finely dispersed within the copper matrix with cluster sizes in the range of nanometers, achieving the goal of molecular-level mixing.

  20. Transformative environmental governance | Science Inventory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Transformative governance is an approach to environmental governance that has the capacity to respond to, manage, and trigger regime shifts in coupled social-ecological systems (SESs) at multiple scales. The goal of transformative governance is to actively shift degraded SESs to alternative, more desirable, or more functional regimes by altering the structures and processes that define the system. Transformative governance is rooted in ecological theories to explain cross-scale dynamics in complex systems, as well as social theories of change, innovation, and technological transformation. Similar to adaptive governance, transformative governance involves a broad set of governance components, but requires additional capacity to foster new social-ecological regimes including increased risk tolerance, significant systemic investment, and restructured economies and power relations. Transformative governance has the potential to actively respond to regime shifts triggered by climate change, and thus future research should focus on identifying system drivers and leading indicators associated with social-ecological thresholds. Transformative governance has the potential to actively respond to regime shifts triggered by climate change, and thus future research should focus on identifying system drivers and leading indicators associated with social-ecological thresholds.

  1. Ultrastructure Processing of Advanced Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    As a continuation of our efforts to improve the molecular level understanding of the sol-gel process , we have recently carried out several studies...using various experimental techniques are necessary to improve our molecular-level understanding of the gelation process . 22 UNDERSTANDING OF THE SOL...present in the solution. They are sometimes added in order to improve the process such as catalysts [4], stabilizing additives [5], or drying control

  2. Incentives for Part-Time Faculty to Participate in the Shared Governance Process within the Institution of California Community Colleges (CCC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyck, Kristen J.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of part-time faculty tends to be even lower than the engagement level of full-time faculty who partake in the system of shared governance in the California Community Colleges (CCC). During a time when state funds are diminishing, there is a projection of retirement for many community college leaders (Fulton-Calkins & Milling,…

  3. Incentives for Part-Time Faculty to Participate in the Shared Governance Process within the Institution of California Community Colleges (CCC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyck, Kristen J.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of part-time faculty tends to be even lower than the engagement level of full-time faculty who partake in the system of shared governance in the California Community Colleges (CCC). During a time when state funds are diminishing, there is a projection of retirement for many community college leaders (Fulton-Calkins & Milling,…

  4. "To Collect the Wisest Sentiments": Direct Democracy and Representative Government. A Guide for Discussion of Proposals for a National Initiative and Referendum Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, W. Richard, Jr.

    Given the role that initiatives and referenda have played in state and local governance, it is interesting that there has never been a national initiative or referendum in the United States. The reason for this is that the Constitution of the United States does not provide for direct citizen initiation of, or direct popular votes on, either…

  5. Enterprise Imaging Governance: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher J; Lannum, Louis M; Joseph, Carol L

    2016-10-01

    Enterprise imaging governance is an emerging need in health enterprises today. This white paper highlights the decision-making body, framework, and process for optimal enterprise imaging governance inclusive of five areas of focus: program governance, technology governance, information governance, clinical governance, and financial governance. It outlines relevant parallels and differences when forming or optimizing imaging governance as compared with other established broad horizontal governance groups, such as for the electronic health record. It is intended for CMIOs and health informatics leaders looking to grow and govern a program to optimally capture, store, index, distribute, view, exchange, and analyze the images of their enterprise.

  6. Surface tension, viscosity, and rheology of water-based nanofluids: a microscopic interpretation on the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gui; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Nanofluids are suspensions of nanometer-sized particles which significantly modify the properties of the base fluids. Nanofluids exhibit attractive properties, such as high thermal conductivity, tunable surface tension, viscosity, and rheology. Various attempts have been made to understand the mechanisms for these property modifications caused by adding nanoparticles; however, due to the lack of direct nanoscale evidence, these explanations are still controversial. This work calculated the surface tension, viscosity, and rheology of gold-water nanofluids using molecular dynamics simulations which provide a microscopic interpretation for the modified properties on the molecular level. The gold-water interaction potential parameters were changed to mimic various nanoparticle types. The results show that the nanoparticle wettability is responsible for the modified surface tension. Hydrophobic nanoparticles always tend to stay on the free surface so they behave like a surfactant to reduce the surface tension. Hydrophilic nanoparticles immersed into the bulk fluid impose strong attractive forces on the water molecules at the free surface which reduces the free surface thickness and increases the surface tension of the nanofluid. Solid-like absorbed water layers were observed around the nanoparticles which increase the equivalent nanoparticle radius and reduce the mobility of the nanoparticles within the base fluid which increases the nanofluid viscosity. The results show the water molecule solidification between two or many nanoparticles at high nanoparticle loadings, but the solidification effect is suppressed for shear rates greater than a critical shear rate; thus Newtonian nanofluids can present shear-thinning non-Newtonian behavior.

  7. Source Apportionment of Background PAHs in the Peace-Athabasca Delta (Alberta, Canada) Using Molecular Level Radiocarbon Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jautzy, Josué J; Ahad, Jason M E; Hall, Roland I; Wiklund, Johan A; Wolfe, Brent B; Gobeil, Charles; Savard, Martine M

    2015-08-04

    The downstream accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Peace-Athabasca Delta (PAD), an ecologically important landscape, is a key issue of concern given the rapid development of the oil sands industry in Northern Alberta, Canada. In addition to PAHs derived from industrial activity (i.e., oil sands mining) within the Athabasca watershed, however, forest fires and erosion of fossil fuel deposits within both the Athabasca and Peace watersheds are two potentially important natural sources of PAHs delivered to the PAD. Consequently, evaluating the environmental impact of mining activities requires a quantitative understanding of natural, background PAHs. Here, we utilize molecular-level natural-abundance radiocarbon measurements on an amalgamated sediment record from a Peace River flood-susceptible oxbow lake in the northern Peace sector of the PAD to quantitatively discriminate sources of naturally occurring alkylated PAHs (fossil and modern biomass). A radiocarbon mass balance quantified a predominantly natural petrogenic source (93% petrogenic, 7% forest fire) for alkylated PAHs during the past ∼50 years. Additionally, a significant petrogenic component determined for retene, a compound usually considered a biomarker for softwood combustion, suggests that its use as a unique forest fire indicator may not be suitable in PAD sediments receiving Peace watershed-derived fluvial inputs.

  8. Modification of nanocrystalline WO3 with a dicationic perylene bisimide: applications to molecular level solar water splitting.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Federico; Syrgiannis, Zois; Bonasera, Aurelio; Prato, Maurizio; Argazzi, Roberto; Caramori, Stefano; Cristino, Vito; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto

    2015-04-15

    [(N,N'-Bis(2-(trimethylammonium)ethylene) perylene 3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid bisimide)(PF6)2] (1) was observed to spontaneously adsorb on nanocrystalline WO3 surfaces via aggregation/hydrophobic forces. Under visible irradiation (λ > 435 nm), the excited state of 1 underwent oxidative quenching by electron injection (kinj > 10(8) s(-1)) to WO3, leaving a strongly positive hole (Eox ≈ 1.7 V vs SCE), which allows to drive demanding photo-oxidation reactions in photoelectrochemical cells (PECs). The casting of IrO2 nanoparticles (NPs), acting as water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) on the sensitized electrodes, led to a 4-fold enhancement in photoanodic current, consistent with hole transfer from oxidized dye to IrO2 occurring on the microsecond time scale. Once the interaction of the sensitizer with suitable WOCs is optimized, 1/WO3 photoanodes may hold potentialities for the straightforward building of molecular level devices for solar fuel production.

  9. Lethal and mutagenic interactions between γ-rays, cisplatin and etoposide at the cellular and molecular levels.

    PubMed

    Lillo, Olga; Bracesco, Nelson; Nunes, Elia

    2011-02-01

    We analysed the lethal and mutagenic interactions between γ-rays, cisplatin (Pt) and etoposide (E), three agents used in tumour chemoradiotherapy. Corresponding results at cellular and molecular levels could provide additional elements on involved mechanisms and, on antitumour activity and toxicity in combined cancer treatments. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae SC7K(lys2-3) (auxotrophic for lysine) was used as eukaryotic model. Exponential growing cells were exposed to the mentioned agents, as single and combined treatments. Lethal and mutation interaction equations were determined as a function of doses according to quantitative models. DNA double-strand breaks were evaluated immediately after treatments, through pulsed-field electrophoresis and laser densitometry. All three agents induced significant mutant frequency. The γ +Pt + E combination determined maximal lethal and mutagenic synergism, followed by γ + Pt and γ + E combinations. Meanwhile, Pt + E combination showed lethal additivity and very low mutagenic synergism. Pt + E double combination determined moderate DNA degradation. DNA degradation after γ-exposure, was similar to that of γ + Pt, γ + E and γ + Pt + E combinations. Synergistic lethal and mutagenic interactions indicate crosstalk between non-homologous end joining, homologous recombination and postreplicative repair pathways. Pt + E additivity indicate independence of involved repair pathways. Furthermore, the quantification of interactive events may be an additional suitable tool in tumour therapy planning.

  10. Molecular-Level Insights into the Reactivity of Siloxane-Based Electrolytes at a Lithium-Metal Anode

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Lu, Jun; Luo, Xiangyi; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Ren, Yang; Wu, Huiming; Albishri, Hassan M.; El-Hady, D. A.; Al-Bogami, A. S.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2014-07-21

    A molecular-level understanding of the reactions that occur at the lithium-metal anode/electrolyte interphase is essential to improve the performance of Li–O2 batteries. Experimental and computational techniques are applied to explore the reactivity of tri(ethylene glycol)-substituted trimethylsilane (1NM3), a siloxane-based ether electrolyte, at the lithium-metal anode. In situ/ex situ X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy studies provide evidence of the formation of lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonates at the anode upon gradual degradation of the metallic lithium anode and the solvent molecules in the presence of oxygen. Density functional calculations performed to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the reductive decomposition of 1NM3 indicate that the decomposition does not require any apparent barrier to produce lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonates when the reduced 1NM3 solvent molecules interact with the oxygen crossing over from the cathode. This study indicates that degradation may be more significant in the case of the 1NM3 solvent, compared to linear ethers such as tetraglyme or dioxalone, because of its relatively high electron affinity. Also, both protection of the lithium metal and prevention of oxygen crossover to the anode are essential for minimizing electrolyte and anode decomposition.

  11. Quantifying Molecular-Level Cell Adhesion on Electroactive Conducting Polymers using Electrochemical-Single Cell Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongrui; Molino, Paul J.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Higgins, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Single Cell Force Spectroscopy was combined with Electrochemical-AFM to quantify the adhesion between live single cells and conducting polymers whilst simultaneously applying a voltage to electrically switch the polymer from oxidized to reduced states. The cell-conducting polymer adhesion represents the non-specific interaction between cell surface glycocalyx molecules and polymer groups such as sulfonate and dodecylbenzene groups, which rearrange their orientation during electrical switching. Single cell adhesion significantly increases as the polymer is switched from an oxidized to fully reduced state, indicating stronger cell binding to sulfonate groups as opposed to hydrophobic groups. This increase in single cell adhesion is concomitant with an increase in surface hydrophilicity and uptake of cell media, driven by cation movement, into the polymer film during electrochemical reduction. Binding forces between the glycocalyx and polymer surface are indicative of molecular-level interactions and during electrical stimulation there is a decrease in both the binding force and stiffness of the adhesive bonds. The study provides insight into the effects of electrochemical switching on cell adhesion at the cell-conducting polymer interface and is more broadly applicable to elucidating the binding of cell adhesion molecules in the presence of electrical fields and directly at electrode interfaces. PMID:26335299

  12. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum: a zoomed image at the molecular level within a geographic context.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Farag, Hoda F; Allam, Amal F

    2013-02-01

    Antimalarial chemotherapy is one of the main pillars in the prevention and control of malaria. Following widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine came to the scene as an alternative to the cheap and well-tolerated chloroquine. However, widespread resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine has been documented. In vivo efficacy tests are the gold standard for assessing drug resistance and treatment failure. However, they have many disadvantages, such as influence of host immunity and drug pharmacokinetics. In vitro tests of antimalarial drug efficacy also have many technical difficulties. Molecular markers of resistance have emerged as epidemiologic tools to investigate antimalarial drug resistance even before becoming clinically evident. Mutations in P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase and dihydrofolate synthase have been extensively studied as molecular markers for resistance to pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine, respectively. This review highlights the resistance of P. falciparum at the molecular level presenting both supporting and opposing studies on the utility of molecular markers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular-level evidence provided by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry for oil-derived doc in groundwater at Bemidji, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ananna; Ahmed, Arif; Hur, Manhoi; Thorn, Kevin; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-12-15

    Dissolved organic matter samples extracted from ground water at the USGS Bemidji oil spill site in Minnesota were investigated by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry. Principle component analysis (PCA) of the elemental composition assignments of the samples showed that the score plots for the contaminated sites were well separated from those for the uncontaminated sites. Additionally, spectra obtained from the same sampling site 7 and 19 years after the spill were grouped together in the score plot, strongly suggesting a steady state of contamination within the 12year interval. The double bond equivalence (DBE) of Ox class compounds was broader for the samples from the contaminated sites, because of the complex nature of oil and the consequent formation of compounds with saturated and/or aromatic structures from the oxygenated products of oil. In addition, Ox class compounds with a relatively smaller number of x (x<8; x=number of oxygen) and OxS1 class compounds were more abundant in the samples from the contaminated sites, because of the lower oxygen and higher sulfur contents of the oil compared to humic substances. The molecular-level signatures presented here can be a fundamental basis for in-depth analysis of oil contamination.

  14. Molecular-level evidence provided by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry for oil-derived doc in groundwater at Bemidji, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Islam, Ananna; Ahmed, Arif; Hur, Manhoi; Thorn, Kevin A.; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter samples extracted from ground water at the USGS Bemidji oil spill site in Minnesota were investigated by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry. Principle component analysis (PCA) of the elemental composition assignments of the samples showed that the score plots for the contaminated sites were well separated from those for the uncontaminated sites. Additionally, spectra obtained from the same sampling site 7 and 19 years after the spill were grouped together in the score plot, strongly suggesting a steady state of contamination within the 12 year interval. The double bond equivalence (DBE) of Ox class compounds was broader for the samples from the contaminated sites, because of the complex nature of oil and the consequent formation of compounds with saturated and/or aromatic structures from the oxygenated products of oil. In addition, Ox class compounds with a relatively smaller number of x (x < 8; x = number of oxygen) and OxS1 class compounds were more abundant in the samples from the contaminated sites, because of the lower oxygen and higher sulfur contents of the oil compared to humic substances. The molecular-level signatures presented here can be a fundamental basis for in-depth analysis of oil contamination.

  15. Molecular-Level Thermodynamic Switch Controls Chemical Equilibrium in Sequence-Specific Hydrophobic Interaction of 35 Dipeptide Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Paul W.

    2003-01-01

    Applying the Planck-Benzinger methodology, the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions of 35 dipeptide pairs were examined over a temperature range of 273–333 K, based on data reported by Nemethy and Scheraga in 1962. The hydrophobic interaction in these sequence-specific dipeptide pairs is highly similar in its thermodynamic behavior to that of other biological systems. The results imply that the negative Gibbs free energy change minimum at a well-defined stable temperature, 〈Ts〉, where the bound unavailable energy, TΔSo = 0, has its origin in the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions, are highly dependent on details of molecular structure. Each case confirms the existence of a thermodynamic molecular switch wherein a change of sign in ΔCpo(T)reaction (change in specific heat capacity of reaction at constant pressure) leads to true negative minimum in the Gibbs free energy change of reaction, ΔGo(T)reaction, and hence a maximum in the related equilibrium constant, Keq. Indeed, all interacting biological systems examined to date by Chun using the Planck-Benzinger methodology have shown such a thermodynamic switch at the molecular level, suggesting its existence may be universal. PMID:12547816

  16. Governance, veterinary legislation and quality.

    PubMed

    Petitclerc, M

    2012-08-01

    This review of governance distinguishes between ends and means and, by highlighting the complexity and differing definitions of the concept, defines its scope and focuses discussion on its characteristics in order to establish an interrelationship between veterinary legislation and governance. Good governance must be backed by legislation, and good legislation must incorporate the principles and instruments of good governance. This article lists some of the main characteristics of governance and then reviews them in parallel with the methodology used to draft veterinary legislation, emphasising the importance of goal-setting and stakeholder participation. This article describes the criteria developed by the Veterinary Legislation Support Programme (VLSP) of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) for assessing the quality of veterinary legislation. It then makes a comparison between the quality assurance process and the good governance process in order to demonstrate that the introduction and proper use of the tools for developing veterinary legislation offered by the OIE VLSP leads to a virtuous circle linking legislation with good governance. Ultimately, the most important point remains the implementation of legislation. Consequently, the author points out that satisfactory implementation relies not only on legislation that is technically and legally appropriate, acceptable, applicable, sustainable, correctly drafted, well thought through and designed for the long term, but also on the physical and legal capacity of official Veterinary Services to perform their administrative and enforcement duties, and on there being the means available for all those involved to discharge their responsibilities.

  17. Architecture Governance: The Importance of Architecture Governance for Achieving Operationally Responsive Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolar, Mike; Estefan, Jeff; Giovannoni, Brian; Barkley, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Topics covered (1) Why Governance and Why Now? (2) Characteristics of Architecture Governance (3) Strategic Elements (3a) Architectural Principles (3b) Architecture Board (3c) Architecture Compliance (4) Architecture Governance Infusion Process. Governance is concerned with decision making (i.e., setting directions, establishing standards and principles, and prioritizing investments). Architecture governance is the practice and orientation by which enterprise architectures and other architectures are managed and controlled at an enterprise-wide level

  18. Architecture Governance: The Importance of Architecture Governance for Achieving Operationally Responsive Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolar, Mike; Estefan, Jeff; Giovannoni, Brian; Barkley, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Topics covered (1) Why Governance and Why Now? (2) Characteristics of Architecture Governance (3) Strategic Elements (3a) Architectural Principles (3b) Architecture Board (3c) Architecture Compliance (4) Architecture Governance Infusion Process. Governance is concerned with decision making (i.e., setting directions, establishing standards and principles, and prioritizing investments). Architecture governance is the practice and orientation by which enterprise architectures and other architectures are managed and controlled at an enterprise-wide level

  19. Molecular-Level Design of Hierarchically Porous Carbons Codoped with Nitrogen and Phosphorus Capable of In Situ Self-Activation for Sustainable Energy Systems.

    PubMed

    Ai, Wei; Wang, Xuewan; Zou, Chenji; Du, Zhuzhu; Fan, Zhanxi; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Peng; Yu, Ting; Huang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Hierarchically porous carbons are attracting tremendous attention in sustainable energy systems, such as lithium ion battery (LIB) and fuel cell, due to their excellent transport properties that arise from the high surface area and rich porosity. The state-of-the-art approaches for synthesizing hierarchically porous carbons normally require chemical- and/or template-assisted activation techniques, which is complicate, time consuming, and not feasible for large scale production. Here, a molecular-level design principle toward large-scale synthesis of nitrogen and phosphorus codoped hierarchically porous carbon (NPHPC) through an in situ self-activation process is proposed. The material is fabricated based on the direct pyrolysis of a well-designed polymer, melamine polyphosphate, which is capable of in situ self-activation to generate large specific surface area (1479 m(2) g(-1) ) and hierarchical pores in the final NPHPC. As an anode material for LIB, NPHPC delivers a high reversible capacity of 1073 mAh g(-1) and an excellent cyclic stability for 300 cycles with negligible capacity decay. The peculiar structural properties and synergistic effect of N and P codopants also enable NPHPC a promising electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction, a key cathodic reaction process of many energy conversion devices (for example, fuel cells and metal air batteries). Electrochemical measurements show NPHPC a comparable electrocatalytic performance to commercial Pt/C catalyst (onset potential of 0.88 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode in alkaline medium) with excellent stability (89.8% retention after 20 000 s continuous operation) and superior methanol tolerance. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Combination of statistical methods and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for more comprehensive, molecular-level interpretations of petroleum samples.

    PubMed

    Hur, Manhoi; Yeo, Injoon; Park, Eunsuk; Kim, Young Hwan; Yoo, Jongshin; Kim, Eunkyoung; No, Myoung-han; Koh, Jaesuk; Kim, Sunghwan

    2010-01-01

    Complex petroleum mass spectra obtained by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) were successfully interpreted at the molecular level by applying principle component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA). A total of 40 mass spectra were obtained from 20 crude oil samples using both positive and negative atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Approximately 400,000 peaks were identified at the molecular level. Conventional data analyses would have been impractical with so much data. However, PCA grouped samples into score plots based on their molecular composition. In this way, the overall compositional difference between samples could be easily displayed and identified by comparing score and loading plots. HCA was also performed to group and compare samples based on selected peaks that had been grouped by PCA. Subsequent heat map analyses revealed detailed compositional differences among grouped samples. This study demonstrates a promising new approach for studying multiple, complex petroleum samples at the molecular level.

  1. English obesity policies: To govern and not to govern.

    PubMed

    Vallgårda, Signild

    2015-06-01

    Problem definitions constitute a crucial part of the policy process. In 2008 the Labour Government presented a plan to reduce the obesity prevalence in England. Only three years later the Conservative-Liberal Government introduced a plan on the same topic, which it presented as new and innovative. The aim of this study is to analyse the respective governments' problematisations of obesity and to identify similarities and differences. Despite the different hues of the two governments, the programmes are surprisingly similar. They seek to simultaneously govern and not to govern. They adhere to liberal ideals of individual choice and they also suggest initiatives that will lead people to choose certain behaviours. Both governments encourage the food and drink industry to support their policies voluntarily, rather than obliging them to do so, although Labour is somewhat more inclined to use statutory measures. The Conservative-Liberal plan does not represent many new ideas. The plans are characterised by the paradox that they convey both ideas and ideals about freedom of choice as well as about state interventions to influence people's choices, which could be seen as incompatible, but as the study shows in practice they are not.

  2. Evaluating the oil sands reclamation process: Assessing policy capacity and stakeholder access for government and non-governmental organizations operating in Alberta's oil sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Tyler

    By employing interpretive policy analysis this thesis aims to assess, measure, and explain policy capacity for government and non-government organizations involved in reclaiming Alberta's oil sands. Using this type of analysis to assess policy capacity is a novel approach for understanding reclamation policy; and therefore, this research will provide a unique contribution to the literature surrounding reclamation policy. The oil sands region in northeast Alberta, Canada is an area of interest for a few reasons; primarily because of the vast reserves of bitumen and the environmental cost associated with developing this resource. An increase in global oil demand has established incentive for industry to seek out and develop new reserves. Alberta's oil sands are one of the largest remaining reserves in the world, and there is significant interest in increasing production in this region. Furthermore, tensions in several oil exporting nations in the Middle East remain unresolved, and this has garnered additional support for a supply side solution to North American oil demands. This solution relies upon the development of reserves in both the United States and Canada. These compounding factors have contributed to the increased development in the oil sands of northeastern Alberta. Essentially, a rapid expansion of oil sands operations is ongoing, and is the source of significant disturbance across the region. This disturbance, and the promises of reclamation, is a source of contentious debates amongst stakeholders and continues to be highly visible in the media. If oil sands operations are to retain their social license to operate, it is critical that reclamation efforts be effective. One concern non-governmental organizations (NGOs) expressed criticizes the current monitoring and enforcement of regulatory programs in the oil sands. Alberta's NGOs have suggested the data made available to them originates from industrial sources, and is generally unchecked by government

  3. Impact of copper oxide nanoparticles exposure on Arabidopsis thaliana growth, root system development, root lignificaion, and molecular level changes.

    PubMed

    Nair, Prakash M Gopalakrishnan; Chung, Ill Min

    2014-11-01

    The effect of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) on physiological and molecular level responses were studied in Arabidopsis thaliana. The seedlings were exposed to different concentrations of CuONPs (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L) for 21 days in half strength Murashige and Skoog medium. The plant biomass significantly reduced under different concentrations (2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L) of CuONPs stress. Exposure to 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L of CuONPs has resulted in significant reduction of total chlorophyll content. The anthocyanin content significantly increased upon exposure to 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L of CuONPs. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed upon exposure to 5, 10, and 20 mg/L of CuONPs and amino acid proline content was significantly high in plants exposed to 10 and 20 mg/L of CuONPs. Significant reduction in root elongation was observed upon exposure to 0.5-100 mg/L of CuONPs for 21 days. Exposure to CuONPs has resulted in retardation of primary root growth, enhanced lateral root formation, and also resulted in loss of root gravitropism. Staining with phloroglucionol detected the deposition of lignin in CuONPs-treated roots. Histochemical staining of leaves and roots of CuONPs-exposed plants with nitroblue tetrazolium and 3'3'-diaminobenzidine showed a concentration-dependant increase in superoxide and hydrogen peroxide formation in leaves and roots of CuONPs-exposed plants. Cytotoxicity was observed in root tips of CuONPs-exposed plants as evidenced by increased propidium iodide staining. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant induction of genes related to oxidative stress responses, sulfur assimilation, glutathione, and proline biosynthesis under CuONPs stress.

  4. A molecular level mechanism for uranium (VI) toxicity through Ca(2+) displacement in pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent bacterial dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Katherine A; Walker, Robert A; Peyton, Brent M

    2015-08-01

    Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a small molecule analogue for the pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) bacterial dehydrogenase cofactor, was used to model displacement of the complexing ion, Ca(2+), by a uranium (VI) dioxo-cation, UO2(2+). Complexation of UO2(2+) with DPA through the displacement of Ca(2+) was examined with UV/visible spectroscopy, ESI (electrospray ionization)-Mass spectrometry, and density functional theory based-modeling. The UO2(2+) displacement of other biologically important metal cations (Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Fe(3+)) from DPA was also examined. Results show that UO2(2+) has a distinctly higher binding affinity (logβ = 10.2 ± 0.1) for DPA compared to that of Ca(2+) (logβ = 4.6 ± 0.1), and provide molecular level insight into the mechanism of uranium toxicity associated with the {ONO} site. These results support those of VanEngelen et al. (2011) where a key interaction between PQQ and UO2(2+) produced significant uranium toxicity in bacteria. The observed toxicity mechanism was determined to be the displacement of a Ca(2+) cation bound to the {ONO} site on PQQ and was observed even at submicromolar UO2(2+) concentrations. Here we couple experimental findings with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the electronic and structural properties that make the {ONO} site so distinctively favorable for UO2(2+) binding. This novel approach using integrated experimental and fundamental atomic based models opens the path to identify a library of potential uranium interactions with critical biological molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular-level investigation into copper complexes on vermiculite: effect of reduction of structural iron on copper complexation.

    PubMed

    Furnare, Luca J; Vailionis, Arturas; Strawn, Daniel G

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we present results that describe the speciation of Cu sorbed to the clay mineral vermiculite, with special attention to the effects of reduction on Cu sorption complexes. Sorption complexes were studied using powdered extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, polarized EXAFS spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ionic strength (I), background ion, and clay reduction (structural iron) were varied in the sorption samples. At low I EXAFS results indicate that Cu was surrounded by up to six water molecules sorbed in the interlayer of reduced vermiculite. EXAFS results from Cu-equilibrated reduced vermiculite with high I Ca background electrolyte revealed that Cu was surrounded by 4 O atoms at 1.95 Angatroms and 8 second shell O atoms at 3.14 Angstroms. Angular dependence of the second shell O atoms interpreted from the polarized-EXAFS spectra indicated that the atoms are out of plane from the basal plane of the vermiculite (inclined approximately 25 degrees from the ab plane). The local atomic environment and angular dependence of the EXAFS spectra suggest that the Cu atoms are adsorbed above the hexagonal cavities of the reduced clay mineral and form a Cu dimer in the interlayer. This adsorption mechanism was not observed in the non-reduced vermiculite under identical equilibration conditions. Our results provide molecular level evidence that Cu sorption mechanisms on vermiculite are dependent on solution conditions, such as redox potential and background electrolyte. These results can be used to develop better models of Cu sorption mechanisms on clay mineral surfaces.

  6. Interaction of beta-lactoglobulin with phospholipid bilayers: a molecular level elucidation as revealed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, T; Subirade, M

    2000-10-10

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to study, at a molecular level, the interactions between beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), the most abundant globular protein in milk, and some lipids (sphingomyelin, SM; dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, DMPC; dipalmytoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC; dimyristoylphosphatidylserine-sodium salt, DMPS; dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine-sodium salt, DPPS) constituting the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). The interactions were monitored with respect to alteration in the secondary structure of BLG, as registered by the amide I' band, and phospholipid conformation, as revealed by the acyl chain and carbonyl bands. The results show that neither the conformation nor the thermotropism of neutral bilayers containing DMPC or DPPC is affected by BLG. Reciprocally, the secondary structure and thermal behaviour of pure BLG remain the same in the presence of PC. These results suggest that no interaction occurs between PC and BLG, in agreement with previous studies. However, it is found that BLG interacts with neutral bilayers constituted by milk SM lipids, increasing gauche conformers and thus conformational disorder of the lipid acyl chains. This perturbing effect has been attributed to a partial penetration of BLG into the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, which allows hydrophobic interactions between BLG and SM. Moreover, the fact that SM possesses the same headgroup of PC implies that the head group does not prevent the occurrence of BLG-lipid interactions and other lipid regions can control the binding of BLG to lipids. Furthermore, BLG was found to interact electrostatically with charged bilayers containing PS, leading to a rigidification of the lipid hydrocarbon chains and a dehydration of the interfacial region. This last effect suggests that the protein limits the accessibility of water molecules to the interfacial region of the phospholipids by its presence at the membrane surface.

  7. Initial Molecular-Level Response to Artificial Selection for Increased Aerobic Metabolism Occurs Primarily through Changes in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Konczal, Mateusz; Babik, Wiesław; Radwan, Jacek; Sadowska, Edyta T; Koteja, Paweł

    2015-06-01

    Experimental evolution combined with genome or transcriptome resequencing (Evolve and Resequence) represents a promising approach for advancing our understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation. Here, we applied this strategy to investigate the effect of selection on a complex trait in lines derived from a natural population of a small mammal. We analyzed the liver and heart transcriptomes of bank voles (Myodes [=Clethrionomys] glareolus) that had been selected for increased aerobic metabolism. The organs were sampled from 13th generation voles; at that point, the voles from four replicate selected lines had 48% higher maximum rates of oxygen consumption than those from four control lines. At the molecular level, the response to selection was primarily observed in gene expression: Over 300 genes were found to be differentially expressed between the selected and control lines and the transcriptome-wide pattern of expression distinguished selected lines from controls. No evidence for selection-driven changes of allele frequencies at coding sites was found: No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) changed frequency more than expected under drift alone and frequency changes aggregated over all SNPs did not separate selected and control lines. Nevertheless, among genes which showed highest differentiation in allele frequencies between selected and control lines we identified, using information about gene functions and the biology of the selected phenotype, plausible targets of selection; these genes, together with those identified in expression analysis, have been prioritized for further studies. Because our selection lines were derived from a natural population, the amount and the spectrum of variation available for selection probably closely approximated that typically found in populations of small mammals. Therefore, our results are relevant to the understanding of the molecular basis of complex adaptations occurring in natural vertebrate populations.

  8. Molecular level biodegradation of phenol and its derivatives through dmp operon of Pseudomonas putida: A bio-molecular modeling and docking analysis.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sujay; Banerjee, Arundhati

    2015-10-01

    Participation of Pseudomonas putida-derived methyl phenol (dmp) operon and DmpR protein in the biodegradation of phenol or other harmful, organic, toxic pollutants was investigated at a molecular level. Documentation documents that P. putida has DmpR protein which positively regulates dmp operon in the presence of inducers; like phenols. From the operon, phenol hydroxylase encoded by dmpN gene, participates in degrading phenols after dmp operon is expressed. For the purpose, the 3-D models of the four domains from DmpR protein and of the DNA sequences from the two Upstream Activation Sequences (UAS) present at the promoter region of the operon were demonstrated using discrete molecular modeling techniques. The best modeled structures satisfying their stereo-chemical properties were selected in each of the cases. To stabilize the individual structures, energy optimization was performed. In the presence of inducers, probable interactions among domains and then the two independent DNA structures with the fourth domain were perused by manifold molecular docking simulations. The complex structures were made to be stable by minimizing their overall energy. Responsible amino acid residues, nucleotide bases and binding patterns for the biodegradation, were examined. In the presence of the inducers, the biodegradation process is initiated by the interaction of phe50 from the first protein domain with the inducers. Only after the interaction of the last domain with the DNA sequences individually, the operon is expressed. This novel residue level study is paramount for initiating transcription in the operon; thereby leading to expression of phenol hydroxylase followed by phenol biodegradation.

  9. [Governance for health].

    PubMed

    Holčík, Jan

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to governance are driven by the changing nature of the challenges faced by 21st century societies. People, their health and capabilities are the key resources of a knowledge society. In the article the meaning of "governance for health" is explained and some methods of governance are presented. Governance for health will be implemented in the new European health policy - Health 2020.

  10. Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector. A Review of Federal and State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Gathering, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Paranhos, Elizabeth; Kozak, Tracy G.; Boyd, William; Bradbury, James; Steinberg, D. C.; Arent, D. J.

    2015-04-23

    This report provides an overview of the regulatory frameworks governing natural gas supply chain infrastructure siting, construction, operation, and maintenance. Information was drawn from a number of sources, including published analyses, government reports, in addition to relevant statutes, court decisions and regulatory language, as needed. The scope includes all onshore facilities that contribute to methane emissions from the natural gas sector, focusing on three areas of state and federal regulations: (1) natural gas pipeline infrastructure siting and transportation service (including gathering, transmission, and distribution pipelines), (2) natural gas pipeline safety, and (3) air emissions associated with the natural gas supply chain. In addition, the report identifies the incentives under current regulatory frameworks to invest in measures to reduce leakage, as well as the barriers facing investment in infrastructure improvement to reduce leakage. Policy recommendations regarding how federal or state authorities could regulate methane emissions are not provided; rather, existing frameworks are identified and some of the options for modifying existing regulations or adopting new regulations to reduce methane leakage are discussed.

  11. Leisure, Government and Governance: A Swedish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    The leisure sector has witnessed a tremendous expansion since 1960. The purpose of this article is to analyse the decisions and goals of Swedish government policy during the period 1962 to 2005. The empirical analysis covers government Propositions and governmental investigations. The fields covered are sports, culture, exercise, tourism and…

  12. Leisure, Government and Governance: A Swedish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    The leisure sector has witnessed a tremendous expansion since 1960. The purpose of this article is to analyse the decisions and goals of Swedish government policy during the period 1962 to 2005. The empirical analysis covers government Propositions and governmental investigations. The fields covered are sports, culture, exercise, tourism and…

  13. A Sociotechnical Framework for Governing Climate Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proposed ways of governing climate engineering have most often been supported by narrowly framed and unreflexive appraisals and processes. This article explores the governance implications of a Deliberative Mapping project that, unlike other governance principles, have emerged from an extensive process of reflection and reflexivity. In turn, the project has made significant advances in addressing the current deficit of responsibly defined criteria for shaping governance propositions. Three such propositions argue that (1) reflexive foresight of the imagined futures in which climate engineering proposals might reside is required; (2) the performance and acceptance of climate engineering proposals should be decided in terms of robustness, not optimality; and (3) climate engineering proposals should be satisfactorily opened up before they can be considered legitimate objects of governance. Taken together, these propositions offer a sociotechnical framework not simply for governing climate engineering but for governing responses to climate change at large. PMID:26973363

  14. 1H NMR Metabolomics: A New Molecular Level Tool for Assessment of Organic Contaminant Bioavailability to Earthworms in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvie, J. R.; Wolfe, D. M.; Celejewski, M. A.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    extractable using cyclodextrin. Hence, while cyclodextrin extraction may serve as a good proxy for microbial bioavailability, our results suggest that it may not serve as a good proxy for earthworm bioavailability. 1H NMR metabolomics therefore offers considerable promise as a novel, molecular-level method to directly monitor earthworm bioavailability of potentially toxic and persistent compounds in the environment.

  15. ENVIROSUITE: USING STATE-OF-THE-ART SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES TO UNDERSTAND ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION SCIENCE ISSUES AT THE MOLECULAR LEVEL.

    SciTech Connect

    FITTS,J.P.; KALB,P.D.; FRANCIS,A.J.; FUHRMANN,M.; DODGE,C.J.; GILLOW,J.B.

    2004-03-01

    Although DOE's Environmental Management program has made steady progress in cleaning up environmental legacies throughout the DOE complex, there are still significant remediation issues that remain to be solved. For example, DOE faces difficult challenges related to potential mobilization of radionuclides (e.g., actinides) and other hazardous contaminants in soils, removal and final treatment of high-level waste and residuals from leaking tanks, and the long-term stewardship of remediated sites and engineered disposal facilities, to name just a few. In some cases, new technologies and technology applications will be required based on current engineering expertise. In others, however, basic scientific research is needed to understand the mechanisms of how contaminants behave under specific conditions and how they interact with the environment, from which new engineering solutions can emerge. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Stony Brook University, scientists have teamed to use state-of-the-art synchrotron techniques to help understand the basic interactions of contaminants in the environment. Much of this work is conducted at the BNL National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), which is a user facility that provides high energy X-ray and ultraviolet photon beams to facilitate the examination of contaminants and materials at the molecular level. These studies allow us to determine how chemical speciation and structure control important parameters such as solubility, which in turn drive critical performance characteristics such as leaching. In one study for example, we are examining the effects of microbial activity on actinide contaminants under conditions anticipated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. One possible outcome of this research is the identification of specific microbes that can trap uranium or other contaminants within the intracellular structure and help mitigate mobility. In another study, we are exploring the interaction of contaminants with

  16. Integrating Sodium Reduction Strategies in the Procurement Process and Contracting of Food Venues in the County of Los Angeles Government, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Patricia L.; Kuo, Tony; Gase, Lauren N.; Mugavero, Kristy

    2015-01-01

    Since sodium is ubiquitous in the food supply, recent approaches to sodium reduction have focused on increasing the availability of lower-sodium products through system-level and environmental changes. This article reviews integrated efforts by the Los Angeles County Sodium Reduction Initiative to implement these strategies at food venues in the County of Los Angeles government. The review used mixed methods, including a scan of the literature, key informant interviews, and lessons learned during 2010–2012 to assess program progress. Leveraging technical expertise and shared resources, the initiative strategically incorporated sodium reduction strategies into the overall work plan of a multipartnership food procurement program in Los Angeles County. To date, 3 County departments have incorporated new or updated nutrition requirements that included sodium limits and other strategies. The strategic coupling of sodium reduction to food procurement and general health promotion allowed for simultaneous advancement and acceleration of the County’s sodium reduction agenda. PMID:24322811

  17. Integrating sodium reduction strategies in the procurement process and contracting of food venues in the County of Los Angeles government, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Patricia L; Kuo, Tony; Gase, Lauren N; Mugavero, Kristy

    2014-01-01

    Since sodium is ubiquitous in the food supply, recent approaches to sodium reduction have focused on increasing the availability of lower-sodium products through system-level and environmental changes. This article reviews integrated efforts by the Los Angeles County Sodium Reduction Initiative to implement these strategies at food venues in the County of Los Angeles government. The review used mixed methods, including a scan of the literature, key informant interviews, and lessons learned during 2010-2012 to assess program progress. Leveraging technical expertise and shared resources, the initiative strategically incorporated sodium reduction strategies into the overall work plan of a multipartnership food procurement program in Los Angeles County. To date, 3 County departments have incorporated new or updated nutrition requirements that included sodium limits and other strategies. The strategic coupling of sodium reduction to food procurement and general health promotion allowed for simultaneous advancement and acceleration of the County's sodium reduction agenda.

  18. Student Government in the School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    This paper discusses the need for a quality written constitution for student government. The thought process involved in implementing democracy in the university setting is outlined in 10 steps. Members of the student government need to realize the tremendous potential of using the democratic process to resolve disagreements. Each of the 10…

  19. Research and development of models and instruments to define, measure, and improve shared information processing within government oversight agencies: Volume 1, Research status: 2nd Annual performance report, August 1986-July 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    More than ever before, government managers must effectively and efficiently direct and coordinate the sharing of data, information, and the complex of people and machines that create it, store it, retrieve it, manipulate it, and convert it into actions to move the country's business decisively forward. Driving this need to share is a stunning technological capacity for automated processing, a deep-rooted desire to share born from a perception seemingly limitless possibilities, and a fiscal requirement to do better with less by making more out of what we have. Unfortunately, the shared information processing benefits Government Oversight Agencies (GOA's) need are not available just for the asking or for the cost of the equipment. This frustrates the manager who thinks the box on the desk should help with decision support as well as it helps with task automation. To move GOA's toward successful shared information processing and decision mechanisms, Management Systems Laboratories (MSL), under the grant, plans to accomplish the following two-part objectives: To use the real-world laboratory of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Materials (ONM) as a generic test to observe, define, characterize, and qualitatively model the shared information processing in a GOA; and then To develop qualitative and quantitative instruments to measure, evaluate and promote the psychological, sociological, and technological dimensions of successful sharing.

  20. Developing Government Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt S. Myers; Thomas L. Baldwin; Jason W. Bush; Jake P. Gentle

    2012-07-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers has retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a study of past INL experiences and complete a report that identifies the processes that are needed for the development of renewable energy projects on government properties. The INL has always maintained expertise in power systems and applied engineering and INL’s renewable energy experiences date back to the 1980’s when our engineers began performing US Air Force wind energy feasibility studies and development projects. Over the last 20+ years of working with Department of Defense and other government agencies to study, design, and build government renewable projects, INL has experienced the do’s and don’ts for being successful with a project. These compiled guidelines for government renewable energy projects could include wind, hydro, geothermal, solar, biomass, or a variety of hybrid systems; however, for the purpose of narrowing the focus of this report, wind projects are the main topic discussed throughout this report. It is our thought that a lot of what is discussed could be applied, possibly with some modifications, to other areas of renewable energy. It is also important to note that individual projects (regardless the type) vary to some degree depending on location, size, and need but in general these concepts and directions can be carried over to the majority of government renewable energy projects. This report focuses on the initial development that needs to occur for any project to be a successful government renewable energy project.

  1. Computational study of the molecular level mechanisms of the Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique for thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leveugle, Elodie Mathilde Julia Perrine

    There are a number of recent and emerging techniques that utilize the ability of laser ablation of a volatile matrix to entrain, eject and, if needed, deposit large macromolecules or nano-objects to a substrate. In particular, the Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique shows a potential to produce uniform ultra-thin nanocomposite films with concentrations of nanoscale elements not attainable by other current methods. The lack of understanding of the fundamental underlying processes involved in laser ablation, however, hampers further optimization of the experimental parameters in MAPLE. In this dissertation I report the results of a comprehensive computational investigation of the relation between the basic mechanisms of laser interaction with multi-component target materials, the non-equilibrium processes caused by the fast deposition of laser energy, the parameters of the ejected ablation plume, and the resulting morphological characteristics of the growing film. The physical mechanisms and molecular-level picture of laser-induced material ejection from solutions of polymer molecules in a volatile matrix are analyzed in a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Simulations are performed for polymer concentrations up to 6 wt.% and laser fluences covering the range from the regime where molecular ejection is limited to matrix evaporation from the surface up to more than twice the threshold fluence for the onset of the collective molecular ejection or ablation. Contrary to the original picture of the ejection and transport of individual polymer molecules in MAPLE, the simulations indicate that polymer molecules are only ejected in the ablation regime and are always incorporated into polymer-matrix clusters generated in "phase explosion" of the target. Additionally, the entanglement of the polymer molecules facilitates the formation of elongated viscous droplets that can be related to nanofilament structures observed

  2. Implementing a new governance model.

    PubMed

    Stanley-Clarke, Nicky; Sanders, Jackie; Munford, Robyn

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to discuss the lessons learnt from the process of implementing a new model of governance within Living Well, a New Zealand statutory mental health agency. Design/methodology/approach - It presents the findings from an organisational case study that involved qualitative interviews, meeting observations and document analysis. Archetype theory provided the analytical framework for the research enabling an analysis of both the formal structures and informal value systems that influenced the implementation of the governance model. Findings - The research found that the move to a new governance model did not proceed as planned. It highlighted the importance of staff commitment, the complexity of adopting a new philosophical approach and the undue influence of key personalities as key determining factors in the implementation process. The findings suggest that planners and managers within statutory mental health agencies need to consider the implications of any proposed governance change on existing roles and relationships, thinking strategically about how to secure professional commitment to change. Practical implications - There are ongoing pressures within statutory mental health agencies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of organisational structures and systems. This paper has implications for how planners and managers think about the process of implementing new governance models within the statutory mental health environment in order to increase the likelihood of sustaining and embedding new approaches to service delivery. Originality/value - The paper presents insights into the process of implementing new governance models within a statutory mental health agency in New Zealand that has relevance for other jurisdictions.

  3. Nanomedicine: Governing uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisolino, Antonella

    Nanomedicine is a promising and revolutionary field to improve medical diagnoses and therapies leading to a higher quality of life for everybody. Huge benefits are expected from nanomedicine applications such as in diagnostic and therapeutic field. However, nanomedicine poses several issues on risks to the human health. This thesis aims to defense a perspective of risk governance that sustains scientific knowledge process by developing guidelines and providing the minimum safety standards acceptable to protect the human health. Although nanomedicine is in an early stage of its discovery, some cautious measures are required to provide regulatory mechanisms able to response to the unique set of challenges associated to nanomedicine. Nanotechnology offers an unique opportunity to intensify a major interplay between different disciplines such as science and law. This multidisciplinary approach can positively contributes to find reliable regulatory choices and responsive normative tools in dealing with challenges of novel technologies.

  4. Coupled Biogeochemical Processes Governing the Stability of Bacteriogenic Uraninite and Release of U(VI) in Heterogeneous Media: Molecular to Meter Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R.

    2006-11-15

    In-situ reductive biotransformation of subsurface U(VI) to U(IV) (as ?UO2?) has been proposed as a bioremediation method to immobilize uranium at contaminated DOE sites. The chemical stability of bacteriogenic ?UO2? is the seminal issue governing its success as an in-situ waste form in the subsurface. The structure and properties of chemically synthesized UO2+x have been investigated in great detail. It has been found to exhibit complex structural disorder, with nonstoichiometry being common, hence the designation ?UO2+x?, where 0 < x < 0.25. Little is known about the structures and properties of the important bacteriogenic analogs, which are believed to occur as nanoparticles in the environment. Chemically synthesized UO2+x exhibits an open fluorite structure and is known to accommodate significant doping of divalent cations. The extent to which bacteriogenic UO2+x incorporates common ground water cations (e.g., Ca2+) has not been investigated, and little is known about nonstoichiometry and structure defects in the bacteriogenic material. Particle size, nonstoichiometry, and doping may significantly alter the reactivity, and hence stability, of bacteriogenic UO2+x in the subsurface. The presence of associated sulfide minerals, and solid phase oxidants such as bacteriogenic Mn oxides may also affect the longevity of bacteriogenic UO2 in the subsurface.

  5. Attitude of bachelor of dental surgery students and interns toward teaching-learning process in Government Dental College, Kottayam, Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Sandhya; Mathew, Philip; Vaidyanathan, Kannan

    2017-01-01

    The educational environment affects the academic performance of students. One of the most widely utilized tools for measuring the educational environment is Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM). The objective of the study was to assess the attitude toward study environment, as measured using DREEM questionnaire, and to find out the differences in perception of various batches of dental students. All Bachelor of Dental Surgery students from Government Dental College, Kottayam, Kerala, India, were included in the study. They were given the well-established DREEM questionnaire. A total of 234 students took part in the study, belonging to 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 batches. DREEM subcategories were analyzed for significance using analysis of variance. The significance of DREEM score across the different batches was further analyzed using post hoc test. Overall, DREEM score was positive (111.14), but there is need for improvement. Individual questions also were given positive score for most questions. The maximum score was obtained for 3rd year students. Similar results are obtained for three of the five subcategories of DREEM. The total DREEM score was positive (111.14). The total score as well as the scores for the subcategories was highest in 3rd year dental students. The increase might be due to the excitement of clinical exposure for the first time in 3rd year students.

  6. Transformative environmental governance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transformative governance is an approach to environmental governance that has the capacity to respond to, manage, and trigger regime shifts in coupled social-ecological systems (SESs) at multiple scales. The goal of transformative governance is to actively shift degraded SESs to ...

  7. Teaching about Comparative Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risinger, C. Frederick

    2009-01-01

    As international relationships become increasingly important (with both friendly and not-so-friendly governments), the author believes that it is important for U.S. students to learn about how a parliamentary democracy works--how it is similar, but different from a presidential-style government. Learning about the systems of government of other…

  8. Modelling University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trakman, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Twentieth century governance models used in public universities are subject to increasing doubt across the English-speaking world. Governments question if public universities are being efficiently governed; if their boards of trustees are adequately fulfilling their trust obligations towards multiple stakeholders; and if collegial models of…

  9. Modelling University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trakman, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Twentieth century governance models used in public universities are subject to increasing doubt across the English-speaking world. Governments question if public universities are being efficiently governed; if their boards of trustees are adequately fulfilling their trust obligations towards multiple stakeholders; and if collegial models of…

  10. Transformative environmental governance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transformative governance is an approach to environmental governance that has the capacity to respond to, manage, and trigger regime shifts in coupled social-ecological systems (SESs) at multiple scales. The goal of transformative governance is to actively shift degraded SESs to ...

  11. Teaching about Comparative Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risinger, C. Frederick

    2009-01-01

    As international relationships become increasingly important (with both friendly and not-so-friendly governments), the author believes that it is important for U.S. students to learn about how a parliamentary democracy works--how it is similar, but different from a presidential-style government. Learning about the systems of government of other…

  12. Taking Student Government Seriously.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolen, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the student government at La Mesa Middle School (California) that was modeled after the three-branch U.S. government as a means for increasing students' civic understanding. Describes the structure of the legislative, judicial, and executive branches, the different activities of the student government, and the reasons for the hiatus.…

  13. Wyoming Government, Unit VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming government presents concepts, activities, and stories for elementary school students. Concepts stress that the functions of government are determined according to the demands, needs, and traditions of the people; each part of government has a special function; as citizens, we should be loyal to the underlying concepts of our…

  14. Research and development of models and instruments to define, measure, and improve shared information processing with government oversight agencies. An analysis of the literature, August 1990--January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This document identifies elements of sharing, plus key variables of each and their interrelationships. The document`s model of sharing is intended to help management systems` users understand what sharing is and how to integrate it with information processing.

  15. Governance versus government: drug consumption rooms in Australia and the UK.

    PubMed

    Zampini, Giulia Federica

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate, through a case study, the extent to which elements of governance and elements of government are influential in determining the implementation or non-implementation of a drugs intervention. Comparative analysis of the case of a drug consumption room in the UK (England) and Australia (New South Wales), including 16 semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders and analysis of relevant documents according to characteristic features of governance and government (power decentralisation, power centralisation, independent self-organising policy networks, use of evidence, top-down steering/directing, legislation). Characteristic features of both governance and government are found in the data. Elements of governance are more prominent in New South Wales, Australia than in England, UK, where government prevails. Government is seen as the most important actor at play in the making, or absence, of drug consumption rooms. Both governance and government are useful frameworks in conceptualising the policy process. The governance narrative risks overlooking the importance of traditional government structures. In the case of drug consumption rooms in the UK and Australia, a focus on government is shown to have been crucial in determining whether the intervention was implemented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of the relaxation-assisted 2DIR method for accessing structures of molecules and its application for studying the energy transport on a molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyanenko, Valeriy Mitrofanovich

    Measuring the three-dimensional structure of molecules, dynamics of structural changes, and energy transport on a molecular scale is important for many areas of natural science. Supplementing the widely used methods of x-ray diffraction, NMR, and optical spectroscopies, a two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR) method was introduced about a decade ago. The 2DIR method measures pair-wise interactions between vibrational modes in molecules, thus acquiring molecular structural constraints such as distances between vibrating groups and the angles between their transition dipoles. The 2DIR method has been applied to a variety of molecular systems but in studying larger molecules such as proteins and peptides the method is facing challenges associated with the congestion of their vibrational spectra and delocalized character of their vibrational modes. To help extract structural information from such spectra and make efficient use of vibrational modes separated by large distances, a novel relaxation-assisted 2DIR method (RA 2DIR) has recently been proposed, which exploits the transport of excess vibrational energy from the initially excited mode. With the goal of further development of RA 2DIR, we applied it to a variety of molecular systems, including model compounds, transition-metal complexes, and isomers. The experiments revealed several novel effects which both enhance the power of RA 2DIR and bring a deeper understanding to the fundamental process of energy transport on a molecular level. We demonstrated that RA 2DIR can enhance greatly (27-fold) the cross-peak amplitude among spatially remote modes, which leads to an increase of the range of distances accessible for structural measurements by several fold. We demonstrated that the energy transport time correlates with the intermode distance. This correlation offers a new way for identifying connectivity patterns in molecules. We developed two models of energy transport in molecules. In one, a spatial overlap

  17. Simulation of soil loss processes based on rainfall runoff and the time factor of governance in the Jialing River Watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Long, Tian-Yu; Liu, Xia; Mmereki, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Jialing River is the largest tributary in the catchment area of Three Gorges Reservoir, and it is also one of the important areas of sediment yield in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River. In recent years, significant changes of water and sediment characteristics have taken place. The "Long Control" Project implemented since 1989 had greatly changed the surface appearance of the Jialing River Watershed (JRW), and it had made the environments of the watershed sediment yield and sediment transport change significantly. In this research, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation was selected and used to predict the annual average amount of soil erosion for the special water and sediment environments in the JRW after the implementation of the "Long Control" Project, and then the rainfall-runoff modulus and the time factor of governance were both considered as dynamic factors, the dynamic sediment transport model was built for soil erosion monitoring and forecasting based on the average sediment yield model. According to the dynamic model, the spatial and temporal distribution of soil erosion amount and sediment transport amount of the JRW from 1990 to 2007 was simulated using geographic information system (GIS) technology and space-grid algorithm. Simulation results showed that the average relative error of sediment transport was less than 10% except for the extreme hydrological year. The relationship between water and sediment from 1990 to 2007 showed that sediment interception effects of the soil and water conservation projects were obvious: the annual average sediment discharge reduced from 145.3 to 35 million tons, the decrement of sediment amount was about 111 million tons, and decreasing amplitude was 76%; the sediment concentration was also decreased from 2.01 to 0.578 kg/m(3). These data are of great significance for the prediction and estimation of the future changing trends of sediment storage in the Three Gorges Reservoir and the particulate non

  18. Emerging Strategies for Healthy Urban Governance

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Trevor; Lin, Vivian; Herzog, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Urban health promotion is not simply a matter of the right interventions, or even the necessary resources. Urban (and indeed global) health depends to an important extent on governance, the institutions and processes through which societies manage the course of events. This paper describes the concept of governance, distinguishing between reforms aimed at improving how government works and innovations that more fundamentally reinvent governance by developing new institutions and processes of local stakeholder control. The paper highlights strategies urban governors can use to maximize their influence on the national and international decisions that structure urban life. It concludes with some observations on the limitations of local governance strategies and the importance of establishing a “virtuous circuit” of governance through which urban dwellers play a greater role in the formation and implementation of policy at the national and global levels. PMID:17464568

  19. Local governments LANDSAT applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The approach used to develop the internal capabilities of local governments to handle and evaluate LANDSAT data included remote sensing training, development of a low-cost digital image processing system, and technical assistance. Cost sharing, program management and coordination, and networking were also employed to address problems related to land use, water resources, environmental assessment, and air quality as experienced by urban planners. Local experiences gained in Atlanta, Georgia; Henrico County, Virginia; Oklahoma City; Oklahoma; and San Jose, California are described. Policy recommendations formulated for transferring remote sensing technologies to local governments are included.

  20. Surveillance at the molecular level: Developing an integrated network for detecting variation in avian influenza viruses in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hartaningsih, Nining; Wibawa, Hendra; Pudjiatmoko; Rasa, Fadjar Sumping Tjatur; Irianingsih, Sri Handayani; Dharmawan, Rama; Azhar, Muhammad; Siregar, Elly Sawitri; McGrane, James; Wong, Frank; Selleck, Paul; Allen, John; Broz, Ivano; Torchetti, Mia Kim; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Claes, Filip; Sastraningrat, Wiryadi; Durr, Peter A

    2015-06-01

    Since 2006, Indonesia has used vaccination as the principal means of control of H5N1-HPAI. During this time, the virus has undergone gradual antigenic drift, which has necessitated changes in seed strains for vaccine production and associated modifications to diagnostic antigens. In order to improve the system of monitoring such viral evolution, the Government of Indonesia, with the assistance of FAO/OFFLU, has developed an innovative network whereby H5N1 isolates are antigenically and genetically characterised. This molecular surveillance network ("Influenza Virus Monitoring" or "IVM") is based on the regional network of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, and is supported by a web-based data management system ("IVM Online"). The example of the Indonesian IVM network has relevance for other countries seeking to establish laboratory networks for the molecular surveillance of avian influenza and other pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The first molecular level monitoring of carbohydrate conversion to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in ionic liquids. B2O3--an efficient dual-function metal-free promoter for environmentally benign applications.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Elena A; Kachala, Vadim V; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2012-04-01

    The mechanistic nature of the conversion of carbohydrates to the sustainable platform chemical 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) was revealed at the molecular level. A detailed study of the key sugar units involved in the biomass conversion process has shown that the simple dissolution of fructose in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride significantly changes the anomeric composition and favors the formation of the open fructoketose form. A special NMR approach was developed for the determination of molecular structures and monitoring of chemical reactions directly in ionic liquids. The transformation of glucose to 5-HMF has been followed in situ through the detection of intermediate species. A new environmentally benign, easily available, metal-free promoter with a dual functionality (B(2)O(3)) was developed for carbohydrate conversion to 5-HMF.

  2. The comparison of naturally weathered oil and artificially photo-degraded oil at the molecular level by a combination of SARA fractionation and FT-ICR MS.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ananna; Cho, Yunju; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-12-15

    Two sets of oil samples, one obtained from different weathering stages of the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill site and the other prepared by an in vitro photo-degradation experiment, were analyzed and compared at the molecular level by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). For a more detailed comparison at the molecular level, the oil samples were separated into saturate, aromatic, resin, and asphaltene (SARA) fractions before MS analysis. Gravimetric analysis of the SARA fractions revealed a decreased weight percentage of the aromatic fraction and an increased resin fraction in both sets of samples. Molecular-level investigations of the SARA fractions showed a significant reduction in the S1 class in the saturate fraction and increase of S1O1 class compounds with high DBE values in resin fraction. Levels of N1 and N1O1 class compounds resulting in protonated ions (presumably basic nitrogen compounds) increased after degradation compared to compounds generating molecular ions (presumably non-basic nitrogen compounds). This study revealed changes occurring in heteroatom polar species of crude oils such as sulfur and nitrogen containing compounds that have not been easily detected with conventional GC based techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular level lignin patterns of genetically modified Bt-maize MON88017 and three conventional varieties using tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH)-induced thermochemolysis.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, Juergen; Rauschen, Stefan; Langer, Uwe; Augustin, Juergen; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2008-12-24

    Bt-maize MON88017, its near-isogenic line DKC5143, and the two conventional varieties DK315 and Benicia were subjected to tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH)-induced thermochemolysis to reveal molecular level lignin patterns. MON88017 is genetically modified to express the Cry3Bb1 protein aimed at the Western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, a serious threat for European maize production. The results indicated that roots of the Bt-maize were characterized by a slightly enhanced total lignin content (by approximately 7%) compared to the near-isogenic line, whereas the molecular-based patterns, expressed by the relative fractions of p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl, and syringyl breakdown products (P-, G-, and S-units, respectively) were virtually identical for both lines. No effects regarding either total lignin or molecular-based lignin patterns could be observed for leaves, indicating that biogenesis of lignin was not pleiotropically affected by the genetic modification. Significant differences for both total lignin and different lignin proxies existed between the conventional maize lines. Molecular level lignin analysis by means of TMAH-induced thermochemolysis is able to distinguish conventional maize varieties. Further work is necessary to evaluate lignin-related pleiotropic effects in genetically modified maize plants. The validation and application of a commonly accepted method for lignin analysis, capable of characterizing lignin at the molecular level, is a prerequisite.

  4. A Participatory Process of Developing a Recommendation for the Government about the Education of Children from Birth to Three Years: The Case of Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasconcelos, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how the Portuguese National Council for Education initiated a participatory process that gave rise to the development of a "public statement", "The Education for Children from Zero to Six Years". This statement and its 11 recommendations were directed towards the Ministry of Education and called for a…

  5. Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) 25th Anniversary Recognition "A Model for Government Partnerships". LP DAAC "History and a Look Forward"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Jeanne; Doescher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This presentation discusses 25 years of interactions between NASA and the USGS to manage a Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC) for the purpose of providing users access to NASA's rich collection of Earth Science data. The presentation addresses challenges, efforts and metrics on the performance.

  6. A Participatory Process of Developing a Recommendation for the Government about the Education of Children from Birth to Three Years: The Case of Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasconcelos, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how the Portuguese National Council for Education initiated a participatory process that gave rise to the development of a "public statement", "The Education for Children from Zero to Six Years". This statement and its 11 recommendations were directed towards the Ministry of Education and called for a…

  7. Shared governance in a clinic system.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Michelle M; Costanzo, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Shared governance in health care empowers nurses to share in the decision-making process, which results in decentralized management and collective accountability. Share governance practices have been present in hospitals since the late 1970s. However, shared governance in ambulatory care clinics has not been well established. The subjects of this quality project included staff and administrative nurses in a clinic system. The stakeholder committee chose what model of shared governance to implement and educated clinic staff. The Index of Professional Nursing Governance measured a shared governance score pre- and postimplementation of the Clinic Nursing Council. The Clinic Nursing Council met bimonthly for 3 months during this project to discuss issues and make decisions related to nursing staff. The Index of Professional Nursing Governance scores indicated traditional governance pre- and postimplementation of the Clinic Nursing Council, which is to be expected. The stakeholder committee was beneficial to the initial implementation process and facilitated staff nurse involvement. Shared governance is an evolutionary process that develops empowered nurses and nurse leaders.

  8. Space Station Facility government estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Joseph A.

    1993-01-01

    This new, unique Cost Engineering Report introduces the 800-page, C-100 government estimate for the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) and Volume IV Aerospace Construction Price Book. At the January 23, 1991, bid opening for the SSPF, the government cost estimate was right on target. Metric, Inc., Prime Contractor, low bid was 1.2 percent below the government estimate. This project contains many different and complex systems. Volume IV is a summary of the cost associated with construction, activation and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) design, estimating, fabrication, installation, testing, termination, and verification of this project. Included are 13 reasons the government estimate was so accurate; abstract of bids, for 8 bidders and government estimate with additive alternates, special labor and materials, budget comparison and system summaries; and comments on the energy credit from local electrical utility. This report adds another project to our continuing study of 'How Does the Low Bidder Get Low and Make Money?' which was started in 1967, and first published in the 1973 AACE Transaction with 18 ways the low bidders get low. The accuracy of this estimate proves the benefits of our Kennedy Space Center (KSC) teamwork efforts and KSC Cost Engineer Tools which are contributing toward our goals of the Space Station.

  9. Governance processes and change within organizational participants of multi-sectoral community health care alliances: the mediating role of vision, mission, strategy agreement and perceived alliance value.

    PubMed

    Hearld, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2014-03-01

    Multi-sectoral community health care alliances are organizations that bring together individuals and organizations from different industry sectors to work collaboratively on improving the health and health care in local communities. Long-term success and sustainability of alliances are dependent on their ability to galvanize participants to take action within their 'home' organizations and institutionalize the vision, goals, and programs within participating organizations and the broader community. The purpose of this study was to investigate two mechanisms by which alliance leadership and management processes may promote such changes within organizations participating in alliances. The findings of the study suggest that, despite modest levels of change undertaken by participating organizations, more positive perceptions of alliance leadership, decision making, and conflict management were associated with a greater likelihood of participating organizations making changes as a result of their participation in the alliance, in part by promoting greater vision, mission, and strategy agreement and higher levels of perceived value. Leadership processes had a stronger relationship with change within participating organizations than decision-making style and conflict management processes. Open-ended responses by participants indicated that participating organizations most often incorporated new measures or goals into their existing portfolio of strategic plans and activities in response to alliance participation.

  10. Forcing functions governing salt transport processes in coastal navigation canals and connectivity to surrounding marshes in South Louisiana using Houma Navigation Canal as a surrogate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snedden, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how circulation and mixing processes in coastal navigation canals influence the exchange of salt between marshes and coastal ocean, and how those processes are modulated by external physical processes, is critical to anticipating effects of future actions and circumstance. Examples of such circumstances include deepening the channel, placement of locks in the channel, changes in freshwater discharge down the channel, changes in outer continental shelf (OCS) vessel traffic volume, and sea level rise. The study builds on previous BOEM-funded studies by investigating salt flux variability through the Houma Navigation Canal (HNC). It examines how external physical factors, such as buoyancy forcing and mixing from tidal stirring and OCS vessel wakes, influence dispersive and advective fluxes through the HNC and the impact of this salt flux on salinity in nearby marshes. This study quantifies salt transport processes and salinity variability in the HNC and surrounding Terrebonne marshes. Data collected for this study include time-series data of salinity and velocity in the HNC, monthly salinity-depth profiles along the length of the channel, hourly vertical profiles of velocity and salinity over multiple tidal cycles, and salinity time series data at three locations in the surrounding marshes along a transect of increasing distance from the HNC. Two modes of vertical current structure were identified. The first mode, making up 90% of the total flow field variability, strongly resembled a barotropic current structure and was coherent with alongshelf wind stress over the coastal Gulf of Mexico. The second mode was indicative of gravitational circulation and was linked to variability in tidal stirring and the longitudinal salinity gradients along the channel’s length. Diffusive process were dominant drivers of upestuary salt transport, except during periods of minimal tidal stirring when gravitational circulation became more important. Salinity in the

  11. A new governance space for health

    PubMed Central

    Kickbusch, Ilona; Szabo, Martina Marianna Cassar

    2014-01-01

    Global health refers to ‘those health issues which transcend national boundaries and governments and call for actions on the global forces and global flows that determine the health of people’. (Kickbusch 2006) Governance in this trans-national and cross-cutting arena can be analyzed along three political spaces: global health governance, global governance for health, and governance for global health. It is argued that the management of the interface between these three political spaces of governance in the global public health domain is becoming increasingly important in order to move the global health agenda forward. Global health governance refers mainly to those institutions and processes of governance which are related to an explicit health mandate, such as the World Health Organization; global governance for health refers mainly to those institutions and processes of global governance which have a direct and indirect health impact, such as the United Nations, World Trade Organization or the Human Rights Council; governance for global health refers to the institutions and mechanisms established at the national and regional level to contribute to global health governance and/or to governance for global health – such as national global health strategies or regional strategies for global health. It can also refer to club strategies, such as agreements by a group of countries such as the BRICS. In all three political spaces, the involvement of a multitude of state and non-state actors has become the norm – that is why issues of legitimacy, accountability and transparency have moved to the fore. The transnational nature of global health will require the engagement of all actors to produce global public goods for health (GPGH) and to ensure a rules-based and reliably financed global public health domain. PMID:24560259

  12. A new governance space for health.

    PubMed

    Kickbusch, Ilona; Szabo, Martina Marianna Cassar

    2014-01-01

    Global health refers to 'those health issues which transcend national boundaries and governments and call for actions on the global forces and global flows that determine the health of people'. (Kickbusch 2006) Governance in this trans-national and cross-cutting arena can be analyzed along three political spaces: global health governance, global governance for health, and governance for global health. It is argued that the management of the interface between these three political spaces of governance in the global public health domain is becoming increasingly important in order to move the global health agenda forward. Global health governance refers mainly to those institutions and processes of governance which are related to an explicit health mandate, such as the World Health Organization; global governance for health refers mainly to those institutions and processes of global governance which have a direct and indirect health impact, such as the United Nations, World Trade Organization or the Human Rights Council; governance for global health refers to the institutions and mechanisms established at the national and regional level to contribute to global health governance and/or to governance for global health--such as national global health strategies or regional strategies for global health. It can also refer to club strategies, such as agreements by a group of countries such as the BRICS. In all three political spaces, the involvement of a multitude of state and non-state actors has become the norm--that is why issues of legitimacy, accountability and transparency have moved to the fore. The transnational nature of global health will require the engagement of all actors to produce global public goods for health (GPGH) and to ensure a rules-based and reliably financed global public health domain.

  13. A new governance space for health.

    PubMed

    Kickbusch, Ilona; Szabo, Martina Marianna Cassar

    2014-12-01

    Global health refers to 'those health issues which transcend national boundaries and governments and call for actions on the global forces and global flows that determine the health of people'. (Kickbusch 2006) Governance in this trans-national and cross-cutting arena can be analyzed along three political spaces: global health governance, global governance for health, and governance for global health. It is argued that the management of the interface between these three political spaces of governance in the global public health domain is becoming increasingly important in order to move the global health agenda forward. Global health governance refers mainly to those institutions and processes of governance which are related to an explicit health mandate, such as the World Health Organization; global governance for health refers mainly to those institutions and processes of global governance which have a direct and indirect health impact, such as the United Nations, World Trade Organization or the Human Rights Council; governance for global health refers to the institutions and mechanisms established at the national and regional level to contribute to global health governance and/or to governance for global health - such as national global health strategies or regional strategies for global health. It can also refer to club strategies, such as agreements by a group of countries such as the BRICS. In all three political spaces, the involvement of a multitude of state and non-state actors has become the norm - that is why issues of legitimacy, accountability and transparency have moved to the fore. The transnational nature of global health will require the engagement of all actors to produce global public goods for health (GPGH) and to ensure a rules-based and reliably financed global public health domain.

  14. Essays in economics: 1. Pre-committed government spending and partisan politics. 2. Investment in energy efficiency: Do the characteristics of firms matter? 3. Information processing and organizational structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, William Edward, Jr.

    1. Spending commitments requiring future outlays are important for understanding partisan politics because they prevent a conservative government from scaling back spending programs. In a one-government-good model, a "stubborn liberal" policy maker can use precommitted spending to prevent a later conservative government from imposing spending cuts. In a model where parties differ about spending priorities, re-election uncertainty creates a bias towards higher government spending and higher taxes. 2. The literature on energy efficiency provides examples of profitable technologies that are not universally adopted. Theory indicates that firms should undertake all investments with a positive net present value, and that the discount rate for computing the present value of a project should be the return available on other projects in the same risk class, not on characteristics of the firm. This model is tested by examining whether firms' characteristics influence their decision to join the Environmental Protection Agency's Green Lights program. A discrete choice regression is estimated over a sample of participating and non-participating firms. Missing values in the data matrix are replaced with multiple imputations using the EM algorithm. The results show that: (1) substantial improvements in the power of hypothesis tests can be achieved through imputation of missing data, and (2) characteristics of firms do affect their decision to join Green Lights. 3. Standard theories of the firm stress profit maximization as the foundation for derivation of predictable behavior. Yet evidence continues to accumulate that firms do not act as required by the neoclassical framework. Instead of being represented by ever more elaborate maximization models, the firm can be modeled simply as a network of information-processing agents. The actions of the firm are then a function only of the network structure and the information-processing capabilities of the agents. This approach can be

  15. 77 FR 18258 - Government-to-Government Telephonic Consultation Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Government-to-Government Telephonic Consultation Meetings AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. SUMMARY: The National Park Service announces two telephonic government-...

  16. Government Relations: It's Not Rocket Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radway, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Many people in the early childhood education field are afraid of government relations work, intimidated by politicians, and believe the whole process is unseemly. The author asserts that they should not be afraid nor be intimidated because government relations is not rocket science and fundamentally officeholders are no different from the rest of…

  17. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  18. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  19. Contracting Out Government Procurement Functions: An Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-15

    assistance services (A&AS) and states that the acquisition of these services is a legitimate way to improve Government services and operations and...regulations controlling Government employee conduct, notwithstanding highly - 16 - publicized violations that were, in fact, adequately dealt with...needs assessment, would greatly improve the entire procurement process. Although Lehner’s thesis did not specifically address metrics associated with

  20. Government Relations: It's Not Rocket Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radway, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Many people in the early childhood education field are afraid of government relations work, intimidated by politicians, and believe the whole process is unseemly. The author asserts that they should not be afraid nor be intimidated because government relations is not rocket science and fundamentally officeholders are no different from the rest of…

  1. Governance in Educational Institutions in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García Redondo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The present study addresses the governance processes governing the organization and management of educational institutions in Portugal, in a context of analysis in which the educational reforms carried out in this country, from the early nineteenth century (when school responsibility is assumed exclusively by the State) to the present, play what…

  2. The metalloprotease SepA governs processing of accumulation-associated protein and shapes intercellular adhesive surface properties in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Paharik, Alexandra E; Kotasinska, Marta; Both, Anna; Hoang, Tra-My N; Büttner, Henning; Roy, Paroma; Fey, Paul D; Horswill, Alexander R; Rohde, Holger

    2017-03-01

    The otherwise harmless skin inhabitant Staphylococcus epidermidis is a major cause of healthcare-associated medical device infections. The species' selective pathogenic potential depends on its production of surface adherent biofilms. The Cell wall-anchored protein Aap promotes biofilm formation in S. epidermidis, independently from the polysaccharide intercellular adhesin PIA. Aap requires proteolytic cleavage to act as an intercellular adhesin. Whether and which staphylococcal proteases account for Aap processing is yet unknown. Here, evidence is provided that in PIA-negative S. epidermidis 1457Δica, the metalloprotease SepA is required for Aap-dependent S. epidermidis biofilm formation in static and dynamic biofilm models. qRT-PCR and protease activity assays demonstrated that under standard growth conditions, sepA is repressed by the global regulator SarA. Inactivation of sarA increased SepA production, and in turn augmented biofilm formation. Genetic and biochemical analyses demonstrated that SepA-related induction of biofilm accumulation resulted from enhanced Aap processing. Studies using recombinant proteins demonstrated that SepA is able to cleave the A domain of Aap at residue 335 and between the A and B domains at residue 601. This study identifies the mechanism behind Aap-mediated biofilm maturation, and also demonstrates a novel role for a secreted staphylococcal protease as a requirement for the development of a biofilm. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Proton transfer step in the carbon dioxide capture by monoethanol amine: a theoretical study at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Iida, Kenji; Sato, Hirofumi

    2012-02-23

    An aqueous solution of monoethanol amine (MEA) has been utilized in an industrial process of CO(2) absorption. The chemical reaction between CO(2) and MEA, which is employed in the process, consists of two steps. After the formation of the MEA-CO(2) complex ("capture"), a proton transfers from the complex to give a final product. In the present study, the overall mechanism of the reaction is discussed, especially focusing on the proton transfer step. Using RISM-SCF-SEDD, a hybrid method of electronic structure theory and statistical mechanics for molecular liquid, we clarified that the role of MEA as a base is crucial in the proton transfer step.

  4. Formalizing An Approach to Curate the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD)'s Controlled Vocabularies (Keywords) Through a Keyword Governance Process and Community Involvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, T.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) curates a hierarchical set of controlled vocabularies (keywords) covering Earth sciences and associated information (data centers, projects, platforms, and instruments). The purpose of the keywords is to describe Earth science data and services in a consistent and comprehensive manner, allowing for precise metadata search and subsequent retrieval of data and services. The keywords are accessible in a standardized SKOS/RDF/OWL representation and are used as an authoritative taxonomy, as a source for developing ontologies, and to search and access Earth Science data within online metadata catalogs. The keyword curation approach involves: (1) receiving community suggestions; (2) triaging community suggestions; (3) evaluating keywords against a set of criteria coordinated by the NASA Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Standards Office; (4) implementing the keywords; and (5) publication/notification of keyword changes. This approach emphasizes community input, which helps ensure a high quality, normalized, and relevant keyword structure that will evolve with users' changing needs. The Keyword Community Forum, which promotes a responsive, open, and transparent process, is an area where users can discuss keyword topics and make suggestions for new keywords. Others could potentially use this formalized approach as a model for keyword curation.

  5. Study of factors governing oil-water separation process using TiO₂ films prepared by spray deposition of nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Gondal, Mohammed A; Sadullah, Muhammad S; Dastageer, Mohamed A; McKinley, Gareth H; Panchanathan, Divya; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2014-08-27

    Surfaces which possess extraordinary water attraction or repellency depend on surface energy, surface chemistry, and nano- and microscale surface roughness. Synergistic superhydrophilic-underwater superoleophobic surfaces were fabricated by spray deposition of nanostructured TiO2 on stainless steel mesh substrates. The coated meshes were then used to study gravity driven oil-water separation, where only the water from the oil-water mixture is allowed to permeate through the mesh. Oil-water separation efficiencies of up to 99% could be achieved through the coated mesh of pore sizes 50 and 100 μm, compared to no separation at all, that was observed in the case of uncoated meshes of the same material and pore sizes. An adsorbed water on the TiO2 coated surface, formation of a water-film between the wires that form the mesh and the underwater superoleophobicity of the structured surface are the key factors that contribute to the enhanced efficiency observed in oil-water separation. The nature of the oil-water separation process using this coated mesh (in which the mesh allows water to pass through the porous structure but resists wetting by the oil phase) minimizes the fouling of mesh so that the need for frequent replacement of the separating medium is reduced. The fabrication approach presented here can be applied for coating large surface areas and to develop a large-scale oil-water separation facility for oil-field applications and petroleum industries.

  6. Challenges in developing e-government for good governance in North Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahaan, AY

    2017-01-01

    E-government as one form of public administration reform in Indonesia is increasingly related to the pursuance of good governance. This paper examines the relationship between of e-government and good governance by utilizing the case study design on the implementation of e-procurement in North Sumatra. It reveals centrality of local politics and business culture in understanding resistances of both local government officials and local business which creates loopholes’ for the practice of ‘bad governance’ in all phases of e-procurement in North Sumatra province. Data transparency does not equate and guarantee the realization of good governance. Public knowledge and understanding on government decision making processes and accountability (process and policy transparency) are central to achieve good governance through e-procurement. E-procurement system does not automatically change organizational and working culture of the implementers and suppliers. This paper provides insight to the attitude and the perception of private sector engage in e-procurement towards government in implementing e-government. Resistance, digital divide and local politics interrelatedly obstruct the realization of pursuing good governance through e-procurement.

  7. Government Quality Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Government Quality Conference was an attempt to bring together executive organizations and senior individuals in the Federal Government that have a desire to improve productivity. It was designed to provide an exchange of ideas based on experience, and to encourage individual management initiatives to tap the capabilities of Federal employees.

  8. Educational Governance in Denmark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Lejf

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has entered global competition by expanding collaboration with European countries, which is profoundly impacting the public sector and school governance. Relations between the state and institutions are transforming from traditional democratic, public-sector models of governance into new forms characterized as corporate and market-driven…

  9. Improve Governance for Charters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Manno, Bruno V.; Wright, Brandon L.

    2017-01-01

    With 25 years of experience, the charter sector has had enough time to experience a host of unanticipated and unresolved problems related to the complex ways in which charter school governance relates to school leadership. The time has come for the sector to revisit some fundamental decisions about how charter schools and networks are governed,…

  10. Using IT Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brobst, Jan; Council, Chip

    2005-01-01

    The discussion in this article is intended to provide an examination of why top management, IT management, and internal auditors should be interested in IT governance. Some aspects of IT management will be described including implementation, auditing, availability, security, and alignment. One governance framework, COBIT, will be utilized as a…

  11. State and local governments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    The Virginia Space Grant Consortium approach to a close working relation to state and local governments is presented as a model for consideration. State government relations are especially important in that this is a primary resource in securing matching funds. Avenues for establishing these relationships are listed and discussed.

  12. Restructuring for Good Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert, Stephen; Carey, Russell C.

    2006-01-01

    American higher education has never been more in need of good governance than it is right now. Yet much of the structure many boards have inherited or created tends to stall or impede timely, well-informed, and broadly supported decision making. At many institutions (ours included), layers of governance have been added with each passing year,…

  13. Using IT Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brobst, Jan; Council, Chip

    2005-01-01

    The discussion in this article is intended to provide an examination of why top management, IT management, and internal auditors should be interested in IT governance. Some aspects of IT management will be described including implementation, auditing, availability, security, and alignment. One governance framework, COBIT, will be utilized as a…

  14. Policy Governance Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, William J.

    2001-01-01

    An administrator trainer/former superintendent's experience suggests that corporate governance models don't fit the reality of school governance in many districts. Elected board members define their roles differently than their business counterparts and derive little or no monetary benefit from public service. The "new breed" resemble…

  15. Educational Governance in Denmark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Lejf

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has entered global competition by expanding collaboration with European countries, which is profoundly impacting the public sector and school governance. Relations between the state and institutions are transforming from traditional democratic, public-sector models of governance into new forms characterized as corporate and market-driven…

  16. Policy Governance Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, William J.

    2001-01-01

    An administrator trainer/former superintendent's experience suggests that corporate governance models don't fit the reality of school governance in many districts. Elected board members define their roles differently than their business counterparts and derive little or no monetary benefit from public service. The "new breed" resemble…

  17. Governance: Senates and Unions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polishook, Irwin H.; Naples, Caesar J.

    1989-01-01

    Edited versions of two conference papers are presented. The first paper, "The Debate Over Academic Unions and Faculty Governance," by Irwin H. Polishook, discusses why the concept of collective bargaining continues to be a significant issue in academe and is considered to be incompatible with faculty governance. It examines the union…

  18. Pricing Government Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, James

    1995-01-01

    Improvements in technology have increased the social and economic value of government information. This increase, combined with changes in information storage and dissemination cost, contributes to controversy over how government information should be disseminated and priced. Discussion includes economic concepts, rules and algorithms used by…

  19. Toward an E-Government Semantic Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbodio, Marco Luca; Moulin, Claude; Benamou, Norbert; Barthès, Jean-Paul

    This chapter describes the major aspects of an e-government platform in which semantics underpins more traditional technologies in order to enable new capabilities and to overcome technical and cultural challenges. The design and development of such an e-government Semantic Platform has been conducted with the financial support of the European Commission through the Terregov research project: "Impact of e-government on Territorial Government Services" (Terregov 2008). The goal of this platform is to let local government and government agencies offer online access to their services in an interoperable way, and to allow them to participate in orchestrated processes involving services provided by multiple agencies. Implementing a business process through an electronic procedure is indeed a core goal in any networked organization. However, the field of e-government brings specific constraints to the operations allowed in procedures, especially concerning the flow of private citizens' data: because of legal reasons in most countries, such data are allowed to circulate only from agency to agency directly. In order to promote transparency and responsibility in e-government while respecting the specific constraints on data flows, Terregov supports the creation of centrally controlled orchestrated processes; while the cross agencies data flows are centrally managed, data flow directly across agencies.

  20. Obesity and government.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Scott; Zvenyach, Tracy

    2016-10-01

    Despite much effort, obesity prevalence and disease severity continues to worsen. The purpose of this review is to describe the leading government supported food and nutrition interventions and policies to prevent and address obesity in the USA. The review also summarizes obesity interventions and policies that the government plays a role in, but further development is warranted. The government's role in obesity has largely focused on interventions and policies such as national surveillance, obesity education and awareness, grant-based food subsidy programs, zoning for food access, school-based nutrition programs, dietary guidelines, nutrition labeling, and food marketing and pricing policies. The government has played a lesser role in obesity interventions and policies that provide access to evidence-based obesity care to people affected by the disease. Given the magnitude of the obesity epidemic, the government should explore multiple evidence-based interventions and policies across prevention and clinical care.

  1. PDS4 Bundle Creation Governance Using BPMN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, C.; Levoe, S. R.; Algermissen, S. S.; Rye, E. D.; Hardman, S. H.

    2015-06-01

    The AMMOS-PDS Pipeline Service (APPS) provides a Bundle Builder tool, which governs the process of creating, and ultimately generates, PDS4 bundles incrementally, as science products are being generated.

  2. Government Approaches to the Humanization of Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, Neal Q.

    1975-01-01

    These two articles discuss ways to humanize the work environment and process for the workers. The first article describes government approaches to the humanization of work. The second article discussed types of job enrichment. (EJT)

  3. Media Notes: Bringing Government to Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sive, Mary Robinson

    1981-01-01

    This column examines some recent media materials for middle and high schools on federal, state, and local government; the legislative process; the presidency; the judicial branch; elections; and citizen participation. Complete ordering information is included. (Author/SJL)

  4. Physics and Government

    SciTech Connect

    Hendry, Nancy H.

    1999-08-24

    In defining the powers and duties of the three branches of government, the U.S. Constitution never explicitly referred to Science, except in the patent clause. But many technical responsibilities are implied in references to weights and measures, the census, and the like. Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and in particular Benjamin Franklin, were highly literate in science, but it was their disciple, President John Quincy Adams who promoted as a matter of policy a direct role of the government in science--in particular with respect to astronomy, land surveys and navigation--all physical sciences. Some agencies of government--notably the National Bureau of Standards and the Department of Agriculture were founded in the early days of the Republic with scientific and technical missions. Since then the involvement of the government with science has waxed and waned but the major expansion of the interaction between physics and government occurred after World War II when physicists demonstrated the power of their craft during mobilization of science in support of the war effort. In discussing the interaction of physics with government we should distinguish ''science in government''--scientific input into policy making--from ''government in science,'' which is the support and management of that part of the overall scientific endeavor for which the government has responsibility. Let me turn first to the subject of physics in government. An overwhelming fraction of governmental decisions today have scientific and technical components; decisions ignoring these components are wasteful at best and can imperil the nation. For this reason governmental bodies at all levels solicit scientific advice--or at least give lip service to the need for such advice. When such advice was deliberately avoided, as President Reagan did before announcing his Strategic Defense Initiative in March 1983, the technically unattainable goal ''to make nuclear weapons impotent and obsolete'' was proclaimed.

  5. Hydrogeochemical processes governing the origin, transport and fate of major and trace elements from mine wastes and mineralized rock to surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Mobility of potential or actual contaminants from mining and mineral processing activities depends on (1) occurrence: is the mineral source of the contaminant actually present? (2) abundance: is the mineral present in sufficient quantity to make a difference? (3) reactivity: what are the energetics, rates, and mechanisms of sorption and mineral dissolution and precipitation relative to the flow rate of the water? and (4) hydrology: what are the main flow paths for contaminated water? Estimates of relative proportions of minerals dissolved and precipitated can be made with mass-balance calculations if minerals and water compositions along a flow path are known. Combined with discharge, these mass-balance estimates quantify the actual weathering rate of pyrite mineralization in the environment and compare reasonably well with laboratory rates of pyrite oxidation except when large quantities of soluble salts and evaporated mine waters have accumulated underground. Quantitative mineralogy with trace-element compositions can substantially improve the identification of source minerals for specific trace elements through mass balances. Post-dissolution sorption and precipitation (attenuation) reactions depend on the chemical behavior of each element, solution composition and pH, aqueous speciation, temperature, and contact-time with mineral surfaces. For example, little metal attenuation occurs in waters of low pH (2, and redox-sensitive oxyanions (As, Sb, Se, Mo, Cr, V). Once dissolved, metal and metalloid concentrations are strongly affected by redox conditions and pH. Iron is the most reactive because it is rapidly oxidized by bacteria and archaea and Fe(III) hydrolyzes and precipitates at low pH (1–3) which is related directly to its first hydrolysis constant, pK1 = 2.2. Several insoluble sulfate minerals precipitate at low pH including anglesite, barite, jarosite, alunite and basaluminite. Aluminum hydrolyzes near pH 5 (pK1 = 5.0) and provides buffering and removal

  6. Molecular-Level Analysis of Shock-Wave Physics and Derivation of the Hugoniot Relations for Fused Silica

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    suggested that irreversible non-equilibrium deformation/damage processes play an important role in the mechanical response of fused silica to shock loading...approaches are greatly affected by the fidelity of M. Grujicic, B. Pandurangan, Z. Zhang, and W.C. Bell, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Clemson University,Department of Mechanical Engineering,241 Engineering Innovation Building

  7. Governance Resilience: The Presbyterian Journey.

    PubMed

    Hinton, James H

    2015-01-01

    Presbyterian Healthcare Services, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, is the state's only private, not-for-profit integrated healthcare system. It was founded in 1908 as a sanitorium for tuberculosis patients who came to the arid Southwest in search of a cure. Today, Presbyterian is thriving as a twenty-first-century integrated healthcare system, serving one in three New Mexicans in its statewide hospital system; it also includes a 440,000-member health plan and a 700-plus provider medical group. Presbyterian remains dedicated to its singular purpose of improving the health of the patients, members, and communities it serves. Just as Presbyterian has progressed and grown during its 106-year history, its governance system has evolved over time. Presbyterian has always believed that the New Mexico communities it serves deserve not just good governance but great governance and relies on strong structure and processes to lead it to superior outcomes. The ebb and flow of change, our ability to learn from trial and error, and our commitment to success in spite of obstacles make up the story of Presbyterian's strong governance system.

  8. National governance of archetypes in Norway.

    PubMed

    Ljosland Bakke, Silje

    2015-01-01

    Norwegian National ICT has implemented a national governance scheme for archetypes. The scheme uses openEHR, and is possibly the first of its kind worldwide. It introduces several new processes and methods for crowd sourcing clinician input. It has spent much of its first year establishing practical processes and recruiting clinicians, and only a few archetypes has been reviewed and approved. Some non-reusable archetypes have emerged while the governance scheme has established itself, which demonstrates the need for a centralised governance. As the mass of clinician involvement reached a critical point at the end of 2014, the rate of archetype review and approval increased.

  9. Shared governance in the endoscopy department.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, R; Tate, R

    1995-01-01

    Studies have indicated that active participation by employees improves job satisfaction and performance. There is a sense of pride and accountability that is demonstrated in the work environment when staff are involved in the decision-making process. Recent emergence of a relatively new philosophy for management that promotes employee ownership is shared governance. This type of leadership allows individuals who are at the center of the work place to participate in the decisions that actively reflect their needs. In this article, the authors describe the process of implementing shared governance in an Endoscopy Department. The effectiveness of shared governance is evidenced by the renewed enthusiasm and energy demonstrated by the staff.

  10. Research and development of methods and tools for achieving and maintaining consensus processes in the face of change within and among government oversight agencies. Progress report, October 1, 1992--March 31, 1994, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This progress report summarizes our research activities under our consensus grant. In year five, we devoted much of our activities to completing fundamental research projects delayed because of the considerably stepped-up effort in consensus processes efforts during development of DOE`s Five Year Waste Plan (FYWP). Following our work on various procedures for bringing together groups such as the State and Tribal Government Working Group and the Stakeholders` Forum (both of which provide input to the Five Year Waste Plan), we compiled a literature overview of small-group consensus gaining and a handbook for consensus decision making. We also tested the effectiveness Of group decision support software, and designed a structured observation process and its related hard- and software. We completed studies on experts and the role of personality characteristics in consensus group influence. Results of these studies are included in this final report. In consensus processes research, we were unable to continue studying consensus groups in action. However, we did study ways to improve ways to improve DOE`s technological information exchange effectiveness. We also studied how a new administration identifies what its strategic mission is and how it gets support from existing EM managers. We identified selection criteria for locating the EM exhibit, and tested our audience selection model. We also further calibrated our consensus measure. Additional conference papers and papers for journal submission were completed during year five.

  11. Research and development of methods and tools for achieving and maintaining consensus processes in the face of change within and among government oversight agencies: Volume 1. Progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This progress report summarizes our research activities under our consensus grant. In year four of the grant, we continued to capitalize on and benefit from historical events which drove our early emphasis on group process studies. Following our work on various procedures for bringing together groups such as the State and Tribal Government Working Group and the Stakeholders` Forum (both of which provide input to the Five-Year Waste Plan), we continue to observe these groups and collect data. We also began a configuration study involving the complex modeling of DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Related to group process studies is the issue of the information requirements for individuals making decisions in consensus groups. Our information studies examined the requirements for decision-related information, frameworks for such information, and the effectiveness of information portrayed for decision making. However, we were able not only to continue studying consensus groups in action and related information issues, but also to focus considerable attention on the fundamental side of our research. The fundamental or basic research conducted in year four included: (1) expanding our literature database; (2) beginning the writing of the literature review summary document and the consensus guide; (3) developing frameworks and models such as the Environmental Trilogy model and a structural equations model of the consensus process; and (4) conducting laboratory studies concerning the effects of the presence of an expert, met expectations, opportunity to express views, incentive structure and conflict type (competitive versus collaborative) on consensus outcomes.

  12. Government - contractor interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the Administrative Contracting Officer represents an advance in the Government system of contract management because it provides an individual with knowledge, time, and a specialized function to insure performance of Government contracts. However, the development has created a dichotomy between the award and the post-award function which increases the adversary relationship with Government contractors. This paper advocates that this adversary relationship can be decreased if PCOs and ACOs are provided with opportunities to serve in the assignments of the other.

  13. Chromosome replication and segregation govern the biogenesis and inheritance of inorganic polyphosphate granules

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jonathan T.; Crosson, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotes and eukaryotes synthesize long chains of orthophosphate, known as polyphosphate (polyP), which form dense granules within the cell. PolyP regulates myriad cellular functions and is often localized to specific subcellular addresses through mechanisms that remain undefined. In this study, we present a molecular-level analysis of polyP subcellular localization in the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We demonstrate that biogenesis and localization of polyP is controlled as a function of the cell cycle, which ensures regular partitioning of granules between mother and daughter. The enzyme polyphosphate kinase 1 (Ppk1) is required for granule production, colocalizes with granules, and dynamically localizes to the sites of new granule synthesis in nascent daughter cells. Localization of Ppk1 within the cell requires an intact catalytic active site and a short, positively charged tail at the C-terminus of the protein. The processes of chromosome replication and segregation govern both the number and position of Ppk1/polyP complexes within the cell. We propose a multistep model in which the chromosome establishes sites of polyP coalescence, which recruit Ppk1 to promote the in situ synthesis of large granules. These findings underscore the importance of both chromosome dynamics and discrete protein localization as organizing factors in bacterial cell biology. PMID:23985321

  14. Progress in our understanding of structure bonding and reactivity of metal surfaces and adsorbed monolayers at the molecular level: A 25 year perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somorjai, G. A.

    1995-12-01

    Over fifty techniques have been developed during the past 25 years that permit molecular level investigation of structure and bonding of the surface monolayer. Among them, low-energy electron diffraction surface crystallography and vibrational spectroscopies using photons and electrons have contributed the lion's share of quantitative experimental data. (Most of these investigations have utilized small area (~1 cm 2) external surfaces, although microporous large internal surface area samples were also scrutinized.) From these studies, the physical picture of the surface which emerges is one of a separate phase with distinct structure, composition, and bonding that is distinguishable from the solid bulk. The new surface phenomena which were discovered include clean surface reconstruction, adsorbate-induced restructuring, ordering and reactivity of surface defects (steps and kinks), cluster-like bonding, the large mobility of adsorbates, and the coadsorption bond. Techniques were also developed that permit in situ molecular level study of surfaces during reactions at high pressures and temperatures with good time resolution (10 -12-10 -3 sec). Molecular surface science has had a great impact in major applications involving surface phenomena-selective adsorption, heterogeneous catalysis, coatings, microelectronics, electrochemistry, and tribology-and spawned new surface technologies. The demands of these applications focus attention on the behavior of the buried interface, both solid-liquid and solid-solid.

  15. New tools for the investigations of Neuro-AIDS at a molecular level: The potential role of data-mining.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Bruno; Giacomelli, Luca; Chiappelli, Francesco; Barkhordarian, André

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment represents the most significant and devastating neurological complication associated with HIV infection. Despite recent advances in our knowledge of the clinical features, pathogenesis, and molecular aspects of HIV-related dementia, current diagnostic strategies are associated with significant limitations. It has been suggested that the use of some biomarkers may assist researchers and clinicians in predicting the onset of the disease process and in evaluating the effects of new therapies. However, the large number of chemicals and metabolic pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration, warrants the development of novel approaches to integrate this huge amount of data. The contribution of theoretical disciplines, such as bioinformatics and data-mining, may be useful for testing new hypotheses in diagnosis and patient-centered treatment interventions.

  16. Government and the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondale, Walter F.

    1975-01-01

    In order to deal successfully with the changes and pressures placed upon families, article considered the extent government policies are helping or hurting families, and what kind of support services are available. (Author/RK)

  17. Local Governments Reimbursement Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In the event of a release (or threatened release) of hazardous substances, EPA may provide a safety net of up to $25,000 per incident to local governments for expenses related to the release and associated emergency response measures.

  18. LESS Government Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Latham, Tom [R-IA-4

    2011-06-15

    06/30/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Government Organization, Efficiency, and Financial Management . (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. LESS Government Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Latham, Tom [R-IA-4

    2011-06-15

    06/30/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Government Organization, Efficiency, and Financial Management . (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Lean Government Methods Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Guide focuses primarily on Lean production, which is an organizational improvement philosophy and set of methods that originated in manufacturing but has been expanded to government and service sectors.

  1. Towards Self-Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses the advantages of student self-government and describes the work of student committees at Belper High School, Derbyshire, in setting up a student coffee shop, planning school sports, and orienting new students. (SJL)

  2. LESS Government Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Latham, Tom [R-IA-4

    2011-06-15

    House - 06/30/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Government Organization, Efficiency, and Financial Management . (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. 3 CFR - Government Contracting

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... contract oversight could reduce such sums significantly. Government outsourcing for services also raises... governmental functions. Agencies and departments must operate under clear rules prescribing when outsourcing is... oversee acquisitions appropriately; and (4) clarify when governmental outsourcing for services is and...

  4. Shared health governance.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2011-07-01

    Health and Social Justice (Ruger 2009a ) developed the "health capability paradigm," a conception of justice and health in domestic societies. This idea undergirds an alternative framework of social cooperation called "shared health governance" (SHG). SHG puts forth a set of moral responsibilities, motivational aspirations, and institutional arrangements, and apportions roles for implementation in striving for health justice. This article develops further the SHG framework and explains its importance and implications for governing health domestically.

  5. Dissociation dynamics of fluorinated ethene cations: from time bombs on a molecular level to double-regime dissociators.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Jonelle; Bodi, Andras; Tuckett, Richard P; Sztáray, Bálint

    2012-03-21

    The dissociative photoionization mechanism of internal energy selected C(2)H(3)F(+), 1,1-C(2)H(2)F(2)(+), C(2)HF(3)(+) and C(2)F(4)(+) cations has been studied in the 13-20 eV photon energy range using imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy. Five predominant channels have been found; HF loss, statistical and non-statistical F loss, cleavage of the C-C bond post H or F-atom migration, and cleavage of the C=C bond. By modelling the breakdown diagrams and ion time-of-flight distributions using statistical theory, experimental 0 K appearance energies, E(0), of the daughter ions have been determined. Both C(2)H(3)F(+) and 1,1-C(2)H(2)F(2)(+) are veritable time bombs with respect to dissociation via HF loss, where slow dissociation over a reverse barrier is followed by an explosion with large kinetic energy release. The first dissociative ionization pathway for C(2)HF(3) and C(2)F(4) involves an atom migration across the C=C bond, giving CF-CHF(2)(+) and CF-CF(3)(+), respectively, which then dissociate to form CHF(2)(+), CF(+) and CF(3)(+). The nature of the F-loss pathway has been found to be bimodal for C(2)H(3)F and 1,1-C(2)H(2)F(2), switching from statistical to non-statistical behaviour as the photon energy increases. The dissociative ionization of C(2)F(4) is found to be comprised of two regimes. At low internal energies, CF(+), CF(3)(+) and CF(2)(+) are formed in statistical processes. At high internal energies, a long-lived excited electronic state is formed, which loses an F atom in a non-statistical process and undergoes statistical redistribution of energy among the nuclear degrees of freedom. This is followed by a subsequent dissociation. In other words only the ground electronic state phase space stays inaccessible. The accurate E(0) of CF(3)(+) and CF(+) formation from C(2)F(4) together with the now well established Δ(f)H(o) of C(2)F(4) yield self-consistent enthalpies of formation for the CF(3), CF, CF(3)(+) and CF(+) species.

  6. ToF-SIMS imaging of molecular-level alteration mechanisms in Le Bonheur de vivre by Henri Matisse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voras, Zachary E.; deGhetaldi, Kristin; Wiggins, Marcie B.; Buckley, Barbara; Baade, Brian; Mass, Jennifer L.; Beebe, Thomas P.

    2015-11-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for cultural heritage studies, especially when used in conjunction with established analytical techniques in the field. The ability of ToF-SIMS to simultaneously image inorganic and organic species within a paint cross section at micrometer-level spatial resolution makes it a uniquely qualified analytical technique to aid in further understanding the processes of pigment and binder alteration, as well as pigment-binder interactions. In this study, ToF-SIMS was used to detect and image both molecular and elemental species related to CdS pigment and binding medium alteration on the painting Le Bonheur de vivre (1905-1906, The Barnes Foundation) by Henri Matisse. Three categories of inorganic and organic components were found throughout Le Bonheur de vivre and co-localized in cross-sectional samples using high spatial resolution ToF-SIMS analysis: (1) species relating to the preparation and photo-induced oxidation of CdS yellow pigments (2) varying amounts of long-chain fatty acids present in both the paint and primary ground layer and (3) specific amino acid fragments, possibly relating to the painting's complex restoration history. ToF-SIMS's ability to discern both organic and inorganic species via cross-sectional imaging was used to compare samples collected from Le Bonheur de vivre to artificially aged reference paints in an effort to gather mechanistic information relating to alteration processes that have been previously explored using μXANES, SR-μXRF, SEM-EDX, and SR-FTIR. The relatively high sensitivity offered by ToF-SIMS imaging coupled to the high spatial resolution allowed for the positive identification of degradation products (such as cadmium oxalate) in specific paint regions that have before been unobserved. The imaging of organic materials has provided an insight into the extent of destruction of the original binding medium, as well as

  7. ToF–SIMS imaging of molecular-level alteration mechanisms in Le Bonheur de vivre by Henri Matisse

    PubMed Central

    deGhetaldi, Kristin; Wiggins, Marcie B.; Buckley, Barbara; Baade, Brian; Mass, Jennifer L.; Beebe, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF–SIMS) has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for cultural heritage studies, especially when used in conjunction with established analytical techniques in the field. The ability of ToF–SIMS to simultaneously image inorganic and organic species within a paint cross section at micrometer-level spatial resolution makes it a uniquely qualified analytical technique to aid in further understanding the processes of pigment and binder alteration, as well as pigment–binder interactions. In this study, ToF–SIMS was used to detect and image both molecular and elemental species related to CdS pigment and binding medium alteration on the painting Le Bonheur de vivre (1905–1906, The Barnes Foundation) by Henri Matisse. Three categories of inorganic and organic components were found throughout Le Bonheur de vivre and co-localized in cross-sectional samples using high spatial resolution ToF–SIMS analysis: (1) species relating to the preparation and photo-induced oxidation of CdS yellow pigments (2) varying amounts of long-chain fatty acids present in both the paint and primary ground layer and (3) specific amino acid fragments, possibly relating to the painting’s complex restoration history. ToF–SIMS’s ability to discern both organic and inorganic species via cross-sectional imaging was used to compare samples collected from Le Bonheur de vivre to artificially aged reference paints in an effort to gather mechanistic information relating to alteration processes that have been previously explored using μXANES, SR-μXRF, SEM–EDX, and SR-FTIR. The relatively high sensitivity offered by ToF–SIMS imaging coupled to the high spatial resolution allowed for the positive identification of degradation products (such as cadmium oxalate) in specific paint regions that have before been unobserved. The imaging of organic materials has provided an insight into the extent of destruction of the original binding medium

  8. Weapons Acquisition. Processes of Selected Foreign Government.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    period from 1977 to 1985: (1) 5.56mm calibre assault rifle. (2) Milan and Hot antitank weapon systems. (3) Roland ground-to-air weapon system. (4) AMX 30...and standardization edicts . Awards and penalties are laid on accordingly. (7/17, 13/20) The ministries stand apart from one another in the same way

  9. THERMAL PROCESSES GOVERNING HOT-JUPITER RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-07-20

    There have been many proposed explanations for the larger-than-expected radii of some transiting hot Jupiters, including either stellar or orbital energy deposition deep in the atmosphere or deep in the interior. In this paper, we explore the important influences on hot-Jupiter radius evolution of (1) additional heat sources in the high atmosphere, the deep atmosphere, and deep in the convective interior; (2) consistent cooling of the deep interior through the planetary dayside, nightside, and poles; (3) the degree of heat redistribution to the nightside; and (4) the presence of an upper atmosphere absorber inferred to produce anomalously hot upper atmospheres and inversions in some close-in giant planets. In particular, we compare the radius expansion effects of atmospheric and deep-interior heating at the same power levels and derive the power required to achieve a given radius increase when night-side cooling is incorporated. We find that models that include consistent day/night cooling are more similar to isotropically irradiated models when there is more heat redistributed from the dayside to the nightside. In addition, we consider the efficacy of ohmic heating in the atmosphere and/or convective interior in inflating hot Jupiters. Among our conclusions are that (1) the most highly irradiated planets cannot stably have uB {approx}> 10 km s{sup -1} G over a large fraction of their daysides, where u is the zonal wind speed and B is the dipolar magnetic field strength in the atmosphere, and (2) that ohmic heating cannot in and of itself lead to a runaway in planet radius.

  10. Government Positions for Physicists.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, David

    2006-03-01

    There are a number of government agencies that employ physicists in a wide variety of jobs -- from student internships to post docs to full time staff positions. You can do real, creative, fore-front physics or pursue a wide range of leadership positions. The possibilities are almost unlimited and so is the impact your work can have on the government, academia, and industry. So how do you go about finding a government job? What qualities or abilities are deemed valuable? What are the advantages and disadvantages to working in the government? I will bring some personal experiences and observations from working in the government (one year as a rotator at the National Science Foundation in the Division of Materials Research and almost 18 years at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, both as a Group Leader and a Division Chief) to bear on these questions and more. Prior to my government career I was a physics professor pursuing research and teaching in academia.

  11. Understanding 'anticipatory governance'.

    PubMed

    Guston, David H

    2014-04-01

    Anticipatory governance is 'a broad-based capacity extended through society that can act on a variety of inputs to manage emerging knowledge-based technologies while such management is still possible'. It motivates activities designed to build capacities in foresight, engagement, and integration--as well as through their production ensemble. These capacities encourage and support the reflection of scientists, engineers, policy makers, and other publics on their roles in new technologies. This article reviews the early history of the National Nanotechnology Initiative in the United States, and it further explicates anticipatory governance through exploring the genealogy of the term and addressing a set of critiques found in the literature. These critiques involve skepticism of three proximities of anticipatory governance: to its object, nanotechnology, which is a relatively indistinct one; to the public, which remains almost utterly naive toward nanotechnology; and to technoscience itself, which allegedly renders anticipatory governance complicit in its hubris. The article concludes that the changing venues and the amplification within them of the still, small voices of folks previously excluded from offering constructive visions of futures afforded by anticipatory governance may not be complete solutions to our woes in governing technology, but they certainly can contribute to bending the long arc of technoscience more toward humane ends.

  12. Enhanced molecular level dispersion and interface bonding at low loading of modified graphene oxide to fabricate super nylon 12 composites.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sunanda; Tang, Xiuzhi; Das, Tanya; Zhang, Liying; Li, Yongmei; Ting, Sun; Hu, Xiao; Yue, C Y

    2015-02-11

    Development of advanced graphene based polymer composites is still confronted with severe challenges due to its poor dispersion caused by restacking, weak interface bonding, and incompatibility with polymer matrices which suppress exertion of the actual potential of graphene sheets in composites. Here, we have demonstrated an efficient chemical modification process with polyethylenimine (PEI) to functionalize graphene oxide which can overcome the above-mentioned drawbacks and also can remarkably increase the overall strength of the nylon 12 composites even at very low graphene loading. Chemical modification was analyzed by various surface characterizations including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Addition of only 0.25 and 0.35 wt % modified GO showed 37% and 54% improvement in tensile strength and 65% and 74% in Young's modulus, respectively, compared with that of the neat polymer. The dynamic mechanical analysis showed ∼39% and 63% increment in storage modulus of the nanocomposites. Moreover, the nanocomposites exhibited significantly high thermal stability (∼15 °C increment by only 0.35 wt %) as compared to neat polymer. Furthermore, the composites rendered outstanding resistance against various chemicals.

  13. Top-down models in biology: explanation and control of complex living systems above the molecular level

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It is widely assumed in developmental biology and bioengineering that optimal understanding and control of complex living systems follows from models of molecular events. The success of reductionism has overshadowed attempts at top-down models and control policies in biological systems. However, other fields, including physics, engineering and neuroscience, have successfully used the explanations and models at higher levels of organization, including least-action principles in physics and control-theoretic models in computational neuroscience. Exploiting the dynamic regulation of pattern formation in embryogenesis and regeneration requires new approaches to understand how cells cooperate towards large-scale anatomical goal states. Here, we argue that top-down models of pattern homeostasis serve as proof of principle for extending the current paradigm beyond emergence and molecule-level rules. We define top-down control in a biological context, discuss the examples of how cognitive neuroscience and physics exploit these strategies, and illustrate areas in which they may offer significant advantages as complements to the mainstream paradigm. By targeting system controls at multiple levels of organization and demystifying goal-directed (cybernetic) processes, top-down strategies represent a roadmap for using the deep insights of other fields for transformative advances in regenerative medicine and systems bioengineering. PMID:27807271

  14. Top-down models in biology: explanation and control of complex living systems above the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Levin, Michael

    2016-11-01

    It is widely assumed in developmental biology and bioengineering that optimal understanding and control of complex living systems follows from models of molecular events. The success of reductionism has overshadowed attempts at top-down models and control policies in biological systems. However, other fields, including physics, engineering and neuroscience, have successfully used the explanations and models at higher levels of organization, including least-action principles in physics and control-theoretic models in computational neuroscience. Exploiting the dynamic regulation of pattern formation in embryogenesis and regeneration requires new approaches to understand how cells cooperate towards large-scale anatomical goal states. Here, we argue that top-down models of pattern homeostasis serve as proof of principle for extending the current paradigm beyond emergence and molecule-level rules. We define top-down control in a biological context, discuss the examples of how cognitive neuroscience and physics exploit these strategies, and illustrate areas in which they may offer significant advantages as complements to the mainstream paradigm. By targeting system controls at multiple levels of organization and demystifying goal-directed (cybernetic) processes, top-down strategies represent a roadmap for using the deep insights of other fields for transformative advances in regenerative medicine and systems bioengineering.

  15. Structural analysis of wheat wax (Triticum aestivum, c.v. 'Naturastar' L.): from the molecular level to three dimensional crystals.

    PubMed

    Koch, K; Barthlott, W; Koch, S; Hommes, A; Wandelt, K; Mamdouh, W; De-Feyter, S; Broekmann, P

    2006-01-01

    In order to elucidate the self assembly process of plant epicuticular waxes, and the molecular arrangement within the crystals, re-crystallisation of wax platelets was studied on biological and non-biological surfaces. Wax platelets were extracted from the leaf blades of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., c.v. 'Naturastar', Poaceae). Waxes were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS). Octacosan-1-ol was found to be the most abundant chemical component of the wax mixture (66 m%) and also the determining compound for the shape of the wax platelets. The electron diffraction pattern showed that both the wax mixture and pure octacosan-1-ol are crystalline. The re-crystallisation of the natural wax mixture and the pure octacosan-1-ol were studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Crystallisation of wheat waxes and pure octacosano-1-ol on the non polar highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) led to the formation of platelet structures similar to those found on the plant surface. In contrast, irregular wax morphologies and flat lying plates were formed on glass, silicon, salt crystals (NaCl) and mica surfaces. Movement of wheat wax through isolated Convallaria majalis cuticles led to typical wax platelets of wheat, arranged in the complex patterns typical for C. majalis. STM of pure octacosan-1-ol monolayers on HOPG showed that the arrangement of the molecules strictly followed the hexagonal structure of the substrate crystal. Re-crystallisation of wheat waxes on non-polar crystalline HOPG substrate showed that technical surfaces could be used to generate microstructured, biomimetic surfaces. AFM and SEM studies proved that a template effect of the substrate determined the orientation of the re-grown crystals. These effects of the structure and polarity of the substrate on the morphology of the epicuticular waxes are relevant for

  16. Molecular-Level Insight into the Differential Oxidase and Oxygenase Reactivities of de Novo Due Ferri Proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Snyder, Rae Ana; Butch, Susan E.; Reig, Amanda J.; ...

    2015-06-19

    Using the single-chain due ferri (DFsc) peptide scaffold, the differential oxidase and oxygenase reactivities of two 4A → 4G variants, one with two histidines at the diiron center (G4DFsc) and the other with three histidines (3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)), are explored. By controlling the reaction conditions, the active form responsible for 4-aminophenol (4-AP) oxidase activity in both G4DFsc and 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3) is determined to be the substrate-bound biferrous site. Using circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field (VTVH) MCD spectroscopies, 4-AP is found to bind directly to the biferrous sites of the DF proteins. In G4DFsc, 4-AP increases the coordination of themore » biferrous site, while in 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3), the coordination number remains the same and the substrate likely replaces the additional bound histidine. This substrate binding enables a two-electron process where 4-AP is oxidized to benzoquinone imine and O2 is reduced to H2O2. In contrast, only the biferrous 3His variant is found to be active in the oxygenation of p-anisidine to 4-nitroso-methoxybenzene. From CD, MCD, and VTVH MCD, p-anisidine addition is found to minimally perturb the biferrous centers of both G4DFsc and 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3), indicating that this substrate binds near the biferrous site. Lastly, in 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3), the coordinative saturation of one iron leads to the two-electron reduction of O2 at the second iron to generate an end-on hydroperoxo-Fe(III) active oxygenating species.« less

  17. Significance of weak interactions in imidazolium picrate ionic liquids: spectroscopic and theoretical studies for molecular level understanding.

    PubMed

    Panja, Sumit Kumar; Dwivedi, Nidhi; Noothalapati, Hemanth; Shigeto, Shinsuke; Sikder, A K; Saha, Abhijit; Sunkari, Sailaja S; Saha, Satyen

    2015-07-21

    The effects of interionic hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions on the physical properties of a new series of picrate anion based ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The existence of aromatic (C2-HO) and aliphatic (C7-HO-N22 and C6-HO-N20) hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions in these ILs has been observed using various spectroscopic techniques. The aromatic and aliphatic C-HO hydrogen bonding interactions are found to have a crucial role in binding the imidazolium cation and picrate anion together. However, the π-π stacking interactions between two successive layers are found to play a decisive role in tight packing in ILs leading to differences in physical properties. The drastic difference in the melting points of the methyl and propyl derivatives (mmimPic and pmimPic respectively) have been found to be primarily due to the difference in the strength and varieties of π-π stacking interactions. While in mmimPic, several different types of π-π stacking interactions between the aromatic rings (such as picrate-picrate, picrate-imidazole and imidazolium-imidazolium cation rings) are observed, only one type of π-π stacking interaction (picrate-picrate rings) is found to exist in the pmimPic IL. NMR spectroscopic studies reveal that the interaction of these ILs with solvent molecules is different and depends on the dielectric constant of the solvent. While an ion solvation model explains the solvation in high dielectric solvents, an ion-pair solvation model is found to be more appropriate for low dielectric constant solvents. The enhanced stability of these investigated picrate ILs compared with that of inorganic picrate salts under high doses of γ radiation clearly indicates the importance of weak interionic interactions in ILs, and also opens up the possibility of the application of picrate ILs as prospective diluents in nuclear separation for advanced fuel cycling process.

  18. Governing drug use through partnerships: Towards a genealogy of government/non-government relations in drug policy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Natalie; Bull, Melissa; Dioso-Villa, Rachel; Smith, Catrin

    2016-02-01

    Drug policy in Australia is underpinned by the idea of partnerships wherein the non-government sector is one important partner in both delivering services and contributing to policy and decision-making processes. This article presents a genealogy of the concept of government/non-government 'partnerships', tracing its emergence and development within drug policy discourse in Australia. We find that the rise of neo-liberal policies since the 1980s has been a key factor facilitating the emergence of government/non-government 'partnerships' rhetoric in drug policy. Since the 1980s, the role of non-government organisations (NGOs) in drug policy has been articulated in relation to 'community' responsibilisation in contrast to the welfarist reliance on expert intervention. We link the rise of this rhetoric with the neo-liberal turn to governing through community and the individualisation of social problems. Furthermore, although we find that governments on the whole have encouraged the service delivery and policy work of NGOs at least in policy rhetoric, the actions of the state have at times limited the ability of NGOs to perform advocacy work and contribute to policy. Constraints on NGO drug policy work could potentially compromise the responsiveness of drug policy systems by limiting opportunities for innovative policy-making and service delivery.

  19. Roadmapping Future E-Government Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicking, Melanie

    Global electronic markets, virtual organisations, virtual identities, virtual products and services, and Internet-related crime are growing in prominence and importance. In a world that is increasingly non-physical and borderless, what are government's roles, responsibilities and limitations? The Internet plays a central role within the transformation process from traditional governments towards modern and innovative government that the requirements of an Information Society. Based on the findings of the eGovRTD2020 project, that aims at identifying key research challenges and at implementing a model for a holistic government with horizon 2020, this paper explains the necessity to investigate and understand the Internet and in particular government's role and responsibilities in it. Furthermore, the paper provides a research roadmap that details how to address certain issue related research questions.

  20. Defining the functions of public health governance.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Valeria; Chilton, Marita J; Corso, Liza C; Beitsch, Leslie M

    2015-04-01

    We conducted a literature review in 2011 to determine if accepted governance functions continue to reflect the role of public health governing entities. Reviewing literature and other source documents, as well as consulting with practitioners, resulted in an iterative process that identified 6 functions of public health governance and established definitions for each of these: policy development; resource stewardship; continuous improvement; partner engagement; legal authority; and oversight of a health department. These functions provided context for the role of governing entities in public health practice and aligned well with existing public health accreditation standards. Public health systems research can build from this work in future explorations of the contributions of governance to health department performance.

  1. Defining the Functions of Public Health Governance

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Marita J.; Corso, Liza C.; Beitsch, Leslie M.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a literature review in 2011 to determine if accepted governance functions continue to reflect the role of public health governing entities. Reviewing literature and other source documents, as well as consulting with practitioners, resulted in an iterative process that identified 6 functions of public health governance and established definitions for each of these: policy development; resource stewardship; continuous improvement; partner engagement; legal authority; and oversight of a health department. These functions provided context for the role of governing entities in public health practice and aligned well with existing public health accreditation standards. Public health systems research can build from this work in future explorations of the contributions of governance to health department performance. PMID:25689187

  2. Governing Software: Networks, Databases and Algorithmic Power in the Digital Governance of Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the emergence of "digital governance" in public education in England. Drawing on and combining concepts from software studies, policy and political studies, it identifies some specific approaches to digital governance facilitated by network-based communications and database-driven information processing software…

  3. Governing Software: Networks, Databases and Algorithmic Power in the Digital Governance of Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the emergence of "digital governance" in public education in England. Drawing on and combining concepts from software studies, policy and political studies, it identifies some specific approaches to digital governance facilitated by network-based communications and database-driven information processing software…

  4. How nurse leaders can foster a climate of good governance.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-09-01

    This article is the first in a series of four examining the components of good corporate governance. Poor governance can result in patients receiving poor quality care; all healthcare professionals, therefore, have a role in ensuring effective governance. This article discusses how an organisation's culture and leadership can contribute to good corporate governance. Nurse leaders can influence the culture of effective governance by building trust and respect and challenging the behaviours that led to poor quality care. The next article in this series will look at how an organisation's systems and processes can affect the effectiveness of its governance.

  5. Approaching Moisture Recycling Governance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keys, Patrick; Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Gordon, Line; Galaz, Victor; Ebbesson, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of water resources are a continuous challenge for effective and sustainable national and international governance. Despite the surface watershed being the typical unit of water management, recent advances in hydrology have revealed 'atmospheric watersheds' - otherwise known as precipitationsheds. Also, recent research has demonstrated that water flowing within a precipitationshed may be modified by land-use change in one location, while the effect of this modification could be felt in a different province, nation, or continent. Notwithstanding these insights, the major legal and institutional implications of modifying moisture recycling have remained unexplored. In this presentation, we examine potential approaches to moisture recycling governance. We first identify a set of international study regions, and then develop a typology of moisture recycling relationships within these regions ranging from bilateral moisture exchange to more complex networks. This enables us to classify different types of legal and institutional governance principles. Likewise, we relate the moisture recycling types to existing land and water governance frameworks and management practices. The complexity of moisture recycling means institutional fit will be difficult to generalize for all moisture recycling relationships, but our typology allows the identification of characteristics that make effective governance of these normally ignored water flows more tenable.

  6. The Federal Government's Role in Advancing Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Hotline, 1978

    1978-01-01

    As part of the Federal Data Processing Reorganization Study submitted by the Science and Technology Team, the Federal Government's role in advancing and diffusing computer technology is discussed. Findings and conclusions assess the state-of-the-art in government and in industry, and five recommendations provide directions for government policy…

  7. Why We Lead: Reflections of Female Student Government Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Student involvement is encouraged at contemporary colleges and universities. Involvement in student organizations can assist with academic and social integration, as well as retention. One way for students to become involved is through student government associations. As student government members, students participate in the governance process at…

  8. Preventing Federal Government Abuse of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifo, F. T.

    2006-12-01

    Investigations by the Union of Concerned Scientists and the mainstream media provide evidence of widespread and serious political interference in federal government science. To restore scientific integrity to the policy making process, the United States must adopt reforms that adequately protect government scientists, provide better scientific advice to Congress, strengthen the Office of Science and Technology Policy, ensure the independence of scientific advisory committees, and effectively insulate government science from politics. Methods for accomplishing these goals include ensuring that the next president is committed to respecting the scientific process and pressing Congress to exercise its oversight responsibilities. Creating meaningful reform will require the persistent and energetic engagement of the scientific community—in universities, laboratories, government agencies, and private companies. Individual scientists and scientific institutions have the opportunity to monitor the way science informs policy making and to act to defend the integrity of science.

  9. Detecting the oligomeric state of Escherichia coli MutS from its geometric architecture observed by an atomic force microscope at a single molecular level.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Li; Meng, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Zi-Mou; Jiang, Yong

    2014-08-07

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), which provides true 3D surface topography, can also be used to determine the geometric parameters of proteins quantitatively at a single molecular level. In this paper, two different kinds of Escherichia coli MutS (MutS) protein were observed using AFM, and the geometric parameters of the proteins such as height, perimeter, area, and volume were measured. On the basis of these measurements, the molecular weight, association constant, oligomeric state, and orientation of MutS proteins on a mica surface were deduced. The oligomerization mechanism of MutS was analyzed in detail, and the results show that two different kinds of interactions between MutS protein may be involved in oligomerization. Our results also show that AFM imaging is an accurate method for analyzing the geometric structures of a single protein quantitatively at a single-molecule level.

  10. Surface Functionalization of g-C3 N4 : Molecular-Level Design of Noble-Metal-Free Hydrogen Evolution Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin; Lin, Bin; Yu, Weili; Yang, Yong; Bashir, Shahid M; Wang, Hong; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Idriss, Hicham; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-13

    A stable noble-metal-free hydrogen evolution photocatalyst based on graphite carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) was developed by a molecular-level design strategy. Surface functionalization was successfully conducted to introduce a single nickel active site onto the surface of the semiconducting g-C3 N4 . This catalyst family (with less than 0.1 wt % of Ni) has been found to produce hydrogen with a rate near to the value obtained by using 3 wt % platinum as co-catalyst. This new catalyst also exhibits very good stability under hydrogen evolution conditions, without any evidence of deactivation after 24 h.

  11. Effect of molecular-level insulation on the performance of a dye-sensitized solar cell: fluorescence studies in solid state.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Na'il; Al-Trawneh, Salah; Al-Dmour, Hmoud; Al-Taweel, Samir; Graham, John P

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) that is based on the host-guest encapsulation of 5-[4-diphenylamino)phenyl]thiophene-2-cyanoacrylic acid (L1) inside β-cyclodextrin hosts has been tested. The formation of the complex in the solid state and when adsorbed on TiO(2) was characterized using steady and picosecond time-resolved emission techniques, as well as time dependent DFT calculations. The molecular-level insulation has led to a small enhancement in the energy-conversion performance of the fabricated DSSC with the best results being an increase in the open circuit voltage (Voc) from 0.7 to 0.8 V. The importance of the present investigation lies in the unique spectroscopic characterizations of the examined materials in the solid state.

  12. Conformational polymorphism in a heteromolecular single crystal leads to concerted movement akin to collective rack-and-pinion gears at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Anatoliy N; Swenson, Dale C; MacGillivray, Leonard R

    2008-02-12

    We describe a heteromolecular single crystal that exhibits three reversible and concerted reorganizations upon heating and cooling. The products of the reorganizations are conformational polymorphs. The reorganizations are postulated to proceed through three motions: (i) alkyl translations, (ii) olefin rotations, and (iii) rotational tilts. The motions are akin to rack-and-pinion gears at the molecular level. The rack-like movement is based on expansions and compressions of alkyl chains that are coupled with pinion-like 180 degree rotations of olefins. To accommodate the movements, phenol and thiophene components undergo rotational tilts about intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The movements are collective, being propagated in close-packed repeating units. This discovery marks a step to understanding how organic solids can support the development of crystalline molecular machines and devices through correlated and collective movements.

  13. Molecular-Level Study of the Effect of Prior Axial Compression/Torsion on the Axial-Tensile Strength of PPTA Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Yavari, R.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-11-01

    A comprehensive all-atom molecular-level computational investigation is carried out in order to identify and quantify: (i) the effect of prior longitudinal-compressive or axial-torsional loading on the longitudinal-tensile behavior of p-phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA) fibrils/fibers; and (ii) the role various microstructural/topological defects play in affecting this behavior. Experimental and computational results available in the relevant open literature were utilized to construct various defects within the molecular-level model and to assign the concentration to these defects consistent with the values generally encountered under "prototypical" PPTA-polymer synthesis and fiber fabrication conditions. When quantifying the effect of the prior longitudinal-compressive/axial-torsional loading on the longitudinal-tensile behavior of PPTA fibrils, the stochastic nature of the size/potency of these defects was taken into account. The results obtained revealed that: (a) due to the stochastic nature of the defect type, concentration/number density and size/potency, the PPTA fibril/fiber longitudinal-tensile strength is a statistical quantity possessing a characteristic probability density function; (b) application of the prior axial compression or axial torsion to the PPTA imperfect single-crystalline fibrils degrades their longitudinal-tensile strength and only slightly modifies the associated probability density function; and (c) introduction of the fibril/fiber interfaces into the computational analyses showed that prior axial torsion can induce major changes in the material microstructure, causing significant reductions in the PPTA-fiber longitudinal-tensile strength and appreciable changes in the associated probability density function.

  14. Perspective on post-menopausal osteoporosis: establishing an interdisciplinary understanding of the sequence of events from the molecular level to whole bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Current drug treatments for post-menopausal osteoporosis cannot eliminate bone fractures, possibly because the mechanisms responsible for bone loss are not fully understood. Although research within various disciplines has significantly advanced the state of knowledge, fundamental findings are not widely understood between different disciplines. For that reason, this paper presents noteworthy experimental findings from discrete disciplines focusing on post-menopausal osteoporosis. These studies have established that, in addition to bone loss, significant changes in bone micro-architecture, tissue composition and micro-damage occur. Cellular processes and molecular signalling pathways governing pathological bone resorption have been identified to a certain extent. Ongoing studies endeavour to determine how such changes are initiated at the onset of oestrogen deficiency. It emerges that, because of the discrete nature of previous research studies, the sequence of events that lead to bone fracture is not fully understood. In this paper, two sequences of multi-scale changes are proposed and the experimental challenges that need to be overcome to fully define this sequence are outlined. Future studies must comprehensively characterize the time sequence of molecular-, cellular- and tissue-level changes to attain a coherent understanding of the events that ultimately lead to bone fracture and inform the future development of treatments for post-menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:19846441

  15. Partnerships between government and industry

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    The author describes the future as one of unprecedented change as industry and other institutions become immersed in a system of global commerce driven by fast moving technologies that had their origin in the United States. These trends are expected to intensify as the pace of scientific and technological discovery and innovation continues unabated. The end of the Cold War is viewed as an opportunity to position the United States for leadership in this rapidly changing environment. The role of science and technology in achieving sustained economic growth and improved competitiveness and to address what government can do to help the process along is examined in detail. Statistical data on globalization of trade and market shares of various countries is given along with the participation by multi-national corporations. The historical aspects of technology ages and their development are discussed along with the history of government technology policy. New policies will improve the climate for innovation with government, industry, and the academic community developing interactive and supportive roles. 22 figs.

  16. Sharing in nursing governance: creating opportunities for change.

    PubMed

    Leary, A; Legg, S; Riley, R

    1998-10-01

    Shared governance has created a radical shift in the management and systems thinking of organisations by empowering employees through increased accountability, ownership and decision making. This paper outlines the process of introducing the concept of shared governance to the nursing division of a large not-for-profit private hospital in Victoria. The objectives for change and the philosophy of shared governance are explained so as to clarify the reasons for selection of the shared governance model. The steps involved in planning for the introduction of the change process, implementation and integration of the model at both organisational departmental levels, and the actual structure of the working model of shared governance are described.

  17. Electrochemistry at the Molecular Level.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Ill. are well known and now exvertial specular reflectance ird~ aied spe,trowopy is firmly established. Thus. irneracton betweer. electrochers- issrv and...8217. >- 4. 04 4, 0 : .0 A’~..o 4.4 >l 4- , wn C Q, (a. , lC .) o 41, *- 2 O - - 0 ~ 4. ’ 4 4 4 1 - 0 01 1 . 4 10 %-. GO-- m 4 Q’. CL( 0 wC. 0 0 InC04 44 0 0...er is tne natur- -f n -- 𔃾 ~ ~ o -- c7rte a ~s ;y’ r soon as 4 fenn- - r - a -z -et of fusoon. ai ic C" v3r~ --3 t .r7eratur e, c --ial- StaitJlity

  18. Electrostatics at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zürcher, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    In molecular systems, positive and negative charges are separated, making them ideal systems to examine electrostatic interactions. The attractive force between positive and negative charges is balanced by repulsive ‘forces’ that are quantum-mechanical in origin. We introduce an ‘effective’ potential energy that captures the repulsion; it allows us to obtain fairly accurate estimates of the bonding properties of molecular systems. We use units (e.g., kcal mol-1 for energy) that emphasize the relevance of electrostatics to macroscopic behavior.

  19. Quantitative Analyses of the Influence of Parameters Governing Rate-Determining Process of Hepatic Elimination of Drugs on the Magnitudes of Drug-Drug Interactions via Hepatic OATPs and CYP3A Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models.

    PubMed

    Yoshikado, Takashi; Maeda, Kazuya; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Furihata, Ken-Ichi; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2017-09-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were constructed for hepatic organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) and cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) substrates (bosentan, repaglinide, clarithromycin, and simeprevir), a CYP3A probe substrate (midazolam), and selective inhibitors for OATPs (rifampicin) and CYP3A (itraconazole), although the role of OATPs in the hepatic uptake of clarithromycin is unclear. The pharmacokinetic data were obtained from our previous clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) study. Parameters optimized from clinical PK data were confirmed to reproduce their blood concentrations in control phase. DDIs with rifampicin and itraconazole were simulated using in vivo Rdif (ratio of diffusional uptake to active uptake) and β (the fraction of the sum of intrinsic clearances for metabolism and biliary excretion in all possible itineraries of intracellular drugs including basolateral efflux) estimated by static analyses based on the extended clearance concept, in vivo inhibition constant (Ki) for hepatic OATPs reported previously, and in vivo Ki for CYP3A determined from DDI data with midazolam and itraconazole. Sensitivity analyses showed the magnitudes of DDIs largely depended on Rdif and β. In conclusion, our approach using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling showed that the rational estimation of parameters governing rate-determining process of hepatic elimination is critical to accurately predict DDI magnitudes involving OATPs/CYP3A inhibition. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Local government`s pollution prevention program

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, D.

    1996-12-31

    The pollution prevention program operated by the Health Department of Boulder County is called Business Partners for a Clean Environment (Business Partners). It is a cooperative effort among local businesses, the City of Boulder, Boulder County, and the Boulder Chamber of Commerce. This nonregulatory, incentive-based program provides industry with pollution prevention information and technical assistance necessary to reduce and/or eliminate environmental waste. This paper provides an overview of the program development, creation of partnerships and trust, and some of the results from implementation of the program. Following the first 18 months of the program, 35 businesses were recognized as Business Partners. The Business Partners program has also received an achievement award from the National Association of Counties for promoting {open_quotes}responsible, responsive, and effective government{close_quotes} and two governor`s awards from the State of Colorado. Participating businesses have demonstrated that a pollution prevention program can reduce environmental waste, increase employee safety, and decrease costs. 4 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.