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Sample records for molecularly targeted therapy

  1. Targeted Molecular Therapies for SBMA.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Malik, Bilal; Greensmith, Linda

    2016-03-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset neuromuscular disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor gene which results in progressive spinal and bulbar motor neuron degeneration, and muscle atrophy. Although the causative genetic defect is known, until recently, the molecular pathogenesis of the disease was unclear, resulting in few, if any, targets for therapy development. However, over the past decade, our understanding of the pathomechanisms that play a role in SBMA has increased dramatically, and several of these pathways and mechanisms have now been investigated as possible therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss some of the key pathomechanisms implicated in SBMA and describe some of the therapeutic strategies that have been tested in SBMA to date, which fall into four main categories: (i) gene silencing; (ii) protein quality control and/or increased protein degradation; (iii) androgen deprivation; and (iv) modulation of AR function. Finally, it is also now clear that in addition to a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie disease, the development of an effective disease modifying therapy for SBMA will require the coordinated, collaborative effort of research teams with diverse areas of expertise, clinicians, pharmaceutical companies as well as patient groups.

  2. Molecularly Targeted Therapies for Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Argyriou, Andreas A; Kalofonos, Haralabos P

    2009-01-01

    This review critically evaluates current knowledge of molecularly targeted therapies of malignant gliomas. Various molecularly targeted single-agent therapies, including targeted therapies of growth and survival, have been evaluated in clinical trials but have failed to demonstrate a significant survival benefit compared with standard treatment regimens. The efficacy of multi-targeted kinase inhibitors or combinations of single-targeted kinase inhibitors is a promising strategy, but requires additional clinical evaluation before definitive conclusions can be made. Important areas for further research include the assessment of serum or tissue biomarkers, the elucidation of prognostic molecular markers, and the determination of whether the mechanism of action of a drug is appropriate to the genetic alterations observed within individual tumors. PMID:19148300

  3. [Molecular targeted therapy in lymphoid leukemias].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kensuke; Ando, Toshihiko; Kimura, Shinya

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of lymphoid leukemias have incorporated molecular targeted drugs (CD20-targeting rituximab and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors) into the traditional chemotherapeutic agents. This article reviews novel molecular targeted therapies for patients with lymphoid leukemias including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, hairly cell leukemia and HTLV-I-related adult T-cell leukemia. Investigational agents that will be discussed in this review include inotuzumab, blinatumomab, alemtuzumab, ofatumumab, ibrutinib, idelalisib, bafetinib, lenalidomide, ABT-199 and mogamulizumab. Novel approaches warrant continued research to improve outcomes for patients with lymphoid leukemias.

  4. [Non oncologic applications of molecular targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Khaled, Wassef; de la Motte Rouge, Thibault; Amirault, Jean-Christophe; Vignot, Stéphane

    2012-10-01

    Significant improvements in the knowledge of cancer biology have permitted the development of new molecular targeted therapies. Meanwhile, a better understanding of the physiology of various non-cancerous diseases has allowed developing these agents in other areas. This review intends to illustrate these perspectives through examples corresponding to different strategies of molecular-targeted therapies : use of a monoclonal antibody binding a receptor (rituximab and rheumatoid arthritis) or a ligand (bevacizumab and age-related macular degeneration), tyrosine kinase inhibitor (imatinib and systemic sclerosis) or inhibitor of cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways (immunosuppressive and antiproliferative effects of mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] inhibitors). Clinical results can draw today what could become molecular medicine of tomorrow.

  5. Promising molecular targeted therapies in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Munagala, Radha; Aqil, Farrukh; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant improvement in the understanding of molecular events and critical pathways involved in breast cancer. This has led to the identification of novel targets and development of anticancer therapies referred to as targeted therapy. Targeted therapy has high specificity for the molecules involved in key molecular events that are responsible for cancer phenotype such as cell growth, survival, migration, invasion, metastasis, apoptosis, cell-cycle progression, and angiogenesis. Targeted agents that have been approved for breast cancer include trastuzumab and lapatinib, directed against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and bevacizumab, directed against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Several other targeted agents currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical trials include inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), dual EGFR and HER2 inhibitors, VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors, and agents that interfere with crucial signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/MEK/ERK; agents against other tyrosine kinases such as Src, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/IGF-receptor (IGFR); agents that promote apoptosis such as Poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors; agents that target invasion and metastasis such as matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors and others. In this review, we highlight the most promising targeted agents and their combination with mainstream chemotherapeutic drugs in clinical trials. PMID:21713084

  6. Promising molecular targeted therapies in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Munagala, Radha; Aqil, Farrukh; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant improvement in the understanding of molecular events and critical pathways involved in breast cancer. This has led to the identification of novel targets and development of anticancer therapies referred to as targeted therapy. Targeted therapy has high specificity for the molecules involved in key molecular events that are responsible for cancer phenotype such as cell growth, survival, migration, invasion, metastasis, apoptosis, cell-cycle progression, and angiogenesis. Targeted agents that have been approved for breast cancer include trastuzumab and lapatinib, directed against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and bevacizumab, directed against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Several other targeted agents currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical trials include inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), dual EGFR and HER2 inhibitors, VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors, and agents that interfere with crucial signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/MEK/ERK; agents against other tyrosine kinases such as Src, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/IGF-receptor (IGFR); agents that promote apoptosis such as Poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors; agents that target invasion and metastasis such as matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors and others. In this review, we highlight the most promising targeted agents and their combination with mainstream chemotherapeutic drugs in clinical trials.

  7. Molecularly targeted therapies for recurrent glioblastoma: current and future targets

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Darryl; Magill, Stephen T.; Aghi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Object Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and diffusely infiltrative primary brain tumor. Recurrence is expected and is extremely difficult to treat. Over the past decade, the accumulation of knowledge regarding the molecular and genetic profile of glioblastoma has led to numerous molecularly targeted therapies. This article aims to review the literature and highlight the mechanisms and efficacies of molecularly targeted therapies for recurrent glioblastoma. Methods A systematic search was performed with the phrase “(name of particular agent) and glioblastoma” as a search term in PubMed to identify all articles published up until 2014 that included this phrase in the title and/or abstract. The references of systematic reviews were also reviewed for additional sources. The review included clinical studies that comprised at least 20 patients and reported results for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma with molecular targeted therapies. Results A total of 42 articles were included in this review. In the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, various targeted therapies have been tested over the past 10–15 years. The targets of interest include epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, Ras pathway, protein kinase C, mammalian target of rapamycin, histone acetylation, and integrins. Unfortunately, the clinical responses to most available targeted therapies are modest at best. Radiographic responses generally range in the realm of 5%–20%. Progression-free survival at 6 months and overall survival were also modest with the majority of studies reporting a 10%–20% 6-month progression-free survival and 5- to 8-month overall survival. There have been several clinical trials evaluating the use of combination therapy for molecularly targeted treatments. In general, the outcomes for combination therapy tend to be superior to single-agent therapy, regardless of the specific agent studied

  8. [Anti-angiogenesis and molecular targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akihiko; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-08-01

    Tumor angiogenesis contributes to the development of tumor progression. Several vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF)-targeted agents, administered either as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy, have been shown to benefit patients with advanced-stage malignancies. In particular, bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that specifically targets VEGF, inhibiting angiogenesis, thereby impeding tumor growth and survival. It is also possible that combined VEGF and the epidermal growth factor (EGFR) pathway blockade could further enhance antitumor efficacy and help prevent resistance to therapy. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown new various molecular targets and the functional characteristics of tumor angiogenesis, which may provide strategies for improving the therapeutic benefit.

  9. Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Feda

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients will eventually relapse or become refractory to the treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is the resistance to therapy. Novel agents are currently in development for the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM, including immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, cell signaling targeted therapies, and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment. We have previously reviewed in detail the contemporary immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies therapies for MM. Therefore, in this review, we focused on the role of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, including cell signaling targeted therapies (HDAC, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Hsp90, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and cell cycle) and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment (hypoxia, angiogenesis, integrins, CD44, CXCR4, and selectins). Although these novel agents have improved the therapeutic outcomes for MM patients, further development of new therapeutic agents is warranted. PMID:24829804

  10. Molecularly targeted therapies in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Feda; Luderer, Micah; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients will eventually relapse or become refractory to the treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is the resistance to therapy. Novel agents are currently in development for the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM, including immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, cell signaling targeted therapies, and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment. We have previously reviewed in detail the contemporary immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies therapies for MM. Therefore, in this review, we focused on the role of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, including cell signaling targeted therapies (HDAC, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Hsp90, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and cell cycle) and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment (hypoxia, angiogenesis, integrins, CD44, CXCR4, and selectins). Although these novel agents have improved the therapeutic outcomes for MM patients, further development of new therapeutic agents is warranted.

  11. New molecularly targeted therapies for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sophie; Schiller, Joan H; Spinola, Monica; Minna, John D

    2007-10-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The disease is particularly difficult to detect, and patients often present at an advanced stage. Current treatments have limited effectiveness, and unfortunately, the prognosis remains poor. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis and biologic behavior of lung cancer have led to the development of rationally designed methods of early detection, prevention, and treatment of this disease. This article will review the important clinical implications of these advances, with a focus on new molecularly targeted therapies currently in development.

  12. New molecularly targeted therapies for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sophie; Schiller, Joan H.; Spinola, Monica; Minna, John D.

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The disease is particularly difficult to detect, and patients often present at an advanced stage. Current treatments have limited effectiveness, and unfortunately, the prognosis remains poor. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis and biologic behavior of lung cancer have led to the development of rationally designed methods of early detection, prevention, and treatment of this disease. This article will review the important clinical implications of these advances, with a focus on new molecularly targeted therapies currently in development. PMID:17909619

  13. Molecularly targeted therapies for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Eytan M

    2015-01-01

    The past 15 years have seen major leaps in our understanding of the molecular genetic mutations that act as drivers of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Clinical trials of agents against specific mutant proteins, such as FLT3-internal tandem duplications (ITDs) and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations (IDHs) are ongoing. This review discusses agents in clinical trials that target specific gene mutations and/or epigenetic targets. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  14. Targets for molecular therapy of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Green, Cheryl L; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-02-01

    Cancers of the skin encompass the first and second most common neoplasms in the United States, epidermal basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively, as well as the melanocytic malignancy, malignant melanoma (MM). Recently identified alterations in the function of specific genes in these cancers provide new potential therapeutic targets. These alterations affect conserved regulators of cellular proliferation and viability, including the Sonic Hedgehog, Ras/Raf, ARF/p53, p16(INK4A)/CDK4/Rb and NF-kappaB pathways. New modalities designed to target these specific proteins may represent promising approaches to therapy of human skin cancers.

  15. Molecular Targeted α-Particle Therapy for Oncologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Pandya, Darpan N.; Solingapuram Sai, Kiran Kumar; Mintz, Akiva

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A significant challenge facing traditional cancer therapies is their propensity to significantly harm normal tissue. The recent clinical success of targeting therapies by attaching them to antibodies that are specific to tumor-restricted biomarkers marks a new era of cancer treatments. CONCLUSION In this article, we highlight the recent developments in α-particle therapy that have enabled investigators to exploit this highly potent form of therapy by targeting tumor-restricted molecular biomarkers. PMID:25055256

  16. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  17. Molecularly targeted therapy for gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Marcus W; Caca, Karel

    2005-05-01

    Receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (TKs) have emerged as clinically useful drug target molecules for treating gastrointestinal cancer. Imatinib mesilate (STI-571, Gleevec(TM)), an inhibitior of bcr-abl TK, which was primarily designed to treat chronic myeloid leukemia is also an inhibitor of c-kit receptor TK, and is currently the drug of choice for the therapy of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), which frequently express constitutively activated forms of the c-kit-receptor. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is involved in cell proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis, is another important target. The two main classes of EGFR inhibitors are the TK inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa(TM)) has been on trial for esophageal and colorectal cancer (CRC) and erlotinib (OSI-774, Tarceva(TM)) on trial for esophageal, colorectal, hepatocellular, and biliary carcinoma. In addition, erlotinib has been evaluated in a Phase III study for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Cetuximab (IMC-C225, Erbitux(TM)), a monoclonal EGFR antibody, has been FDA approved for the therapy of irinotecan resistant colorectal cancer and has been tested for pancreatic cancer. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR) are critical regulators of tumor angiogenesis. Bevacizumab (Avastin(TM)), a monoclonal antibody against VEGF, was efficient in two randomized clinical trials investigating the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. It is also currently investigated for the therapy of pancreatic cancer in combination with gemcitabine. Other promising new drugs currently under preclinical and clinical evaluation, are VEGFR2 inhibitor PTK787/ZK 222584, thalidomide, farnesyl transferase inhibitor R115777 (tipifarnib, Zarnestra(TM)), matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade(TM)), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors

  18. Apoptosis and Molecular Targeting Therapy in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed; Watari, Hidemichi; AbuAlmaaty, Ali; Ohba, Yusuke; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is the programmed cell death which maintains the healthy survival/death balance in metazoan cells. Defect in apoptosis can cause cancer or autoimmunity, while enhanced apoptosis may cause degenerative diseases. The apoptotic signals contribute into safeguarding the genomic integrity while defective apoptosis may promote carcinogenesis. The apoptotic signals are complicated and they are regulated at several levels. The signals of carcinogenesis modulate the central control points of the apoptotic pathways, including inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). The tumor cells may use some of several molecular mechanisms to suppress apoptosis and acquire resistance to apoptotic agents, for example, by the expression of antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 or by the downregulation or mutation of proapoptotic proteins such as BAX. In this review, we provide the main regulatory molecules that govern the main basic mechanisms, extrinsic and intrinsic, of apoptosis in normal cells. We discuss how carcinogenesis could be developed via defective apoptotic pathways or their convergence. We listed some molecules which could be targeted to stimulate apoptosis in different cancers. Together, we briefly discuss the development of some promising cancer treatment strategies which target apoptotic inhibitors including Bcl-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for apoptosis induction. PMID:25013758

  19. Application of Monte Carlo Methods in Molecular Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann Siantar, C; Descalle, M-A; DeNardo, G L; Nigg, D W

    2002-02-19

    Targeted radionuclide therapy promises to expand the role of radiation beyond the treatment of localized tumors. This novel form of therapy targets metastatic cancers by combining radioactive isotopes with tumor-seeking molecules such as monoclonal antibodies and custom-designed synthetic agents. Ultimately, like conventional radiotherapy, the effectiveness of targeted radionuclide therapy is limited by the maximum dose that can be given to a critical, normal tissue, such as bone marrow, kidneys, and lungs. Because radionuclide therapy relies on biological delivery of radiation, its optimization and characterization are necessarily different than for conventional radiation therapy. We have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA treatment planning system. This system calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using a set of computed tomography scans to describe the 3D patient anatomy, combined with 2D (planar image) and 3D (SPECT, or single photon emission computed tomography) to describe the time-dependent radiation source. The accuracy of such a dose calculation is limited primarily by the accuracy of the initial radiation source distribution, overlaid on the patient's anatomy. This presentation provides an overview of MINERVA functionality for molecular targeted radiation therapy, and describes early validation and implementation results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Clinical Challenges to Current Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Gagan; Eggert, Ashley; Puri, Neelu

    Lung cancer is difficult to treat with a poor prognosis and a five year survival of 15%. Current molecularly targeted therapies are initially effective in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, they are plagued with difficulties including induced resistance and small therapeutically responsive populations. This mini review describes the mechanism of resistance to several molecularly targeted therapies which are currently being used to treat NSCLC. The major targets discussed are c-Met, EGFR, HER2, ALK, VEGFR, and BRAF. The first generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) resulted in resistance; however, second and third generation TKIs are being developed, which are generally more efficacious and have potential to treat NSCLC patients with resistance to first generation TKIs. Combination therapies could also be effective in preventing TKI resistance in NSCLC patients.

  1. New Molecular Targets of Anticancer Therapy - Current Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Marianna; Muszalska, Izabela; Jelinska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer therapy involves the use of drugs or other substances affecting specific molecular targets that play a part in the development, progression and spread of a given neoplasm. By contrast, the majority of classical chemotherapeutics act on all rapidly proliferating cells, both healthy and cancerous ones. Target anticancer drugs are designed to achieve a particular aim and they usually act cytostatically, not cytotoxically like classical chemotherapeutics. At present, more than 300 biological molecular targets have been identified. The proteins involved in cellular metabolism include (among others) receptor proteins, signal transduction proteins, mRNA thread matrix synthesis proteins participating in neoplastic transformation, cell cycle control proteins, functional and structural proteins. The receptor proteins that are targeted by currently used anticancer drugs comprise the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor(VEGFR). Target anticancer drugs may affect extracellular receptor domains (antibodies) or intracellular receptor domains (tyrosine kinase inhibitors). The blocking of the mRNA thread containing information about the structure of oncogenes (signal transduction proteins) is another molecular target of anticancer drugs. That type of treatment, referred to as antisense therapy, is in clinical trials. When the synthesis of genetic material is disturbed, in most cases the passage to the next cycle phase is blocked. The key proteins responsible for the blockage are cyclines and cycline- dependent kinases (CDK). Clinical trials are focused on natural and synthetic substances capable of blocking various CDKs. The paper discusses the molecular targets and chemical structure of target anticancer drugs that have been approved for and currently applied in antineoplastic therapy together with indications and contraindications for their

  2. Combining molecular targeted agents with radiation therapy for malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Scaringi, Claudia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Minniti, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The expansion in understanding the molecular biology that characterizes cancer cells has led to the rapid development of new agents to target important molecular pathways associated with aberrant activation or suppression of cellular signal transduction pathways involved in gliomagenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and integrins signaling pathways. The use of antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib and erlotinib, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors temsirolimus and everolimus, and integrin inhibitor cilengitide, in combination with radiation therapy, has been supported by encouraging preclinical data, resulting in a rapid translation into clinical trials. Currently, the majority of published clinical studies on the use of these agents in combination with radiation and cytotoxic therapies have shown only modest survival benefits at best. Tumor heterogeneity and genetic instability may, at least in part, explain the poor results observed with a single-target approach. Much remains to be learned regarding the optimal combination of targeted agents with conventional chemoradiation, including the use of multipathways-targeted therapies, the selection of patients who may benefit from combined treatments based on molecular biomarkers, and the verification of effective blockade of signaling pathways. PMID:23966794

  3. Molecular targeting agents in cancer therapy: science and society.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Asim Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The inception of targeted agents has revolutionized the cancer therapy paradigm, both for physicians and patients. A large number of molecular targeted agents for cancer therapy are currently available for clinical use today. Many more are in making, but there are issues that remain to be resolved for the scientific as well as social community before the recommendation of their widespread use in may clinical scenarios can be done, one such issue being cost and cost effectiveness, others being resistance and lack of sustained efficacy. With the current knowledge about available targeted agents, the growing knowledge of intricate molecular pathways and unfolding of wider spectrum of molecular targets that can really matter in the disease control, calls for only the just use of the agents available now, drug companies need to make a serious attempt to reduce the cost of the agents. Research should focus on agents that show sustained responses in preclinical data. More needs to be done in laboratories and by the pharmaceutical industries, before we can truly claim to have entered a new era of targeted therapy in cancer care.

  4. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC. PMID:26755872

  5. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC.

  6. Current status of DILD in molecular targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshinobu; Gemma, Akihiko

    2012-12-01

    Molecular targeted drugs have become the mainstream for cancer therapy, and they have contributed to improving the outcome for cancer patients. On the other hand, molecular targeted drugs are associated with a variety of adverse drug reactions. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) is a typical adverse drug reaction that has been an important problem with regard to safety management during cancer treatment. In the past, there was a lack of detailed and accurate epidemiological data about DILD. However, most of the molecular targeted drugs have been subject to all-case post-marketing surveillance since gefitinib-induced ILD became a concern. These surveillance data present useful information about DILD, such as frequency of adverse events, mortality, and risk factors, and as a result, the epidemiological profile of DILD associated with molecular targeted drugs has become apparent during the past decade. Further, it has been considered that the principal management for DILD is early detection and cessation of the suspected cause. However, ILD associated with everolimus and temsirolimus requires unusual management; i.e., patients with asymptomatic ILD are allowed to continue treatment with everolimus or temsirolimus, and even after symptomatic ILD, both everolimus and temsirolimus are allowed to be readministered after the resolution of ILD. As a result of the collected data, a change has begun in the field of DILD associated with molecular targeted drugs. The features of DILD can differ for each drug, and clinicians should thus keep this information about DILD in mind while treating patients.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, tyrosine kinases (TKs) have been recognized as central players and regulators of cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis, and are therefore considered suitable potential targets for anti-cancer therapies. Several strategies for targeting TKs have been developed, the most successful being monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, increasing evidence of acquired resistance to these drugs has been documented, and extensive preclinical studies are ongoing to try to understand the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells are able to bypass their inhibitory activity. This review intends to present the most recently identified molecular mechanisms that mediate acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, identified through the use of in vitro models or the analysis of patient samples. The knowledge obtained from these studies will help to design better therapies that prevent and overcome resistance to treatment in cancer patients. PMID:20385023

  8. Molecular Targeted Approaches to Cancer Therapy and Prevention Using Chalcones

    PubMed Central

    Jandial, Danielle D.; Blair, Christopher A.; Zhang, Saiyang; Krill, Lauren S.; Zhang, Yan-Bing; Zi, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging paradigm shift in oncology that seeks to emphasize molecularly targeted approaches for cancer prevention and therapy. Chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones), naturally-occurring compounds with widespread distribution in spices, tea, beer, fruits and vegetables, consist of open-chain flavonoids in which the two aromatic rings are joined by a three-carbon α, β-unsaturated carbonyl system. Due to their structural diversity, relative ease of chemical manipulation and reaction of α, β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety with cysteine residues in proteins, some lead chalcones from both natural products and synthesis have been identified in a variety of screening assays for modulating important pathways or molecular targets in cancers. These pathways and targets that are affected by chalcones include MDM2/p53, tubulin, proteasome, NF-kappa B, TRIAL/death receptors and mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathways, cell cycle, STAT3, AP-1, NRF2, AR, ER, PPAR-γ and β-catenin/Wnt. Compared to current cancer targeted therapeutic drugs, chalcones have the advantages of being inexpensive, easily available and less toxic; the ease of synthesis of chalcones from substituted benzaldehydes and acetophenones also makes them an attractive drug scaffold. Therefore, this review is focused on molecular targets of chalcones and their potential implications in cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:24467530

  9. Magnetomotive molecular probes for targeted contrast enhancement and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-03-01

    The diagnostic, interrogational, and therapeutic potential of molecular probes is rapidly being investigated and exploited across virtually every biomedical imaging modality. While many types of probes enhance contrast or delivery therapy by static localization to targeted sites, significant potential exists for utilizing dynamic molecular probes. Recent examples include molecular beacons, photoactivatable probes, or controlled switchable drug-releasing particles, to name a few. In this review, we describe a novel class of dynamic molecular probes that rely on the application and control of localized external magnetic fields. These magnetomotive molecular probes can provide optical image contrast through a modulated scattering signal, can interrogate the biomechanical properties of their viscoelastic microenvironment by tracking their underdamped oscillatory step-response to applied fields, and can potentially delivery therapy through nanometer-to-micrometer mechanical displacement or local hyperthermia. This class of magnetomotive agents includes not only magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles, but also new magnetomotive microspheres or nanostructures with embedded iron-oxide agents. In vitro three-dimensional cell assays and in vivo targeting studies in animal tumor models have demonstrated the potential for multimodal detection and imaging, using magnetic resonance imaging for whole-body localization, and magnetomotive optical coherence tomography for high-resolution localization and imaging.

  10. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-04-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: "uterine cervical cancer", "chemotherapy", and "targeted therapies". Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments offer only

  11. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  12. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-01-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: “uterine cervical cancer”, “chemotherapy”, and “targeted therapies”. Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments

  13. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM): Molecular insights lead to targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Connie G.; Steagall, Wendy K.; Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Cai, Xiong; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Moses, Marsha; Darling, Thomas; Moss, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Summary LAM is a rare lung disease, found primarily in women of childbearing age, characterized by cystic lung destruction and abdominal tumors (e.g., renal angiomyolipoma, lymphangioleiomyoma). The disease results from proliferation of a neoplastic cell, termed the LAM cell, which has mutations in either of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 or TSC2 genes. Molecular phenotyping of LAM patients resulted in the identification of therapeutic targets for drug trials. Loss of TSC gene function leads to activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and thereby, effects on cell size and number. The involvement of mTOR in LAM pathogenesis is the basis for initiation of therapeutic trials of mTOR inhibitors (e.g., sirolimus). Occurrence of LAM essentially entirely in women is consistent with the hypothesis that anti-estrogen agents might prevent disease progression (e.g., gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues). Levels of urinary matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were elevated in LAM patients, and MMPs were found in LAM lung nodules. In part because of these observations, effects of doxycycline, an anti-MMP, and anti-angiogenic agent, are under investigation. The metastatic properties of LAM cells offer additional potential for targets. Thus, insights into the molecular and biological properties of LAM cells and molecular phenotyping of patients with LAM have led to clinical trials of targeted therapies. Funded by the Intramural Research Program, NIH/NHLBI PMID:20630348

  14. Cytoreductive surgery in the era of targeted molecular therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Arun Z.; Adibi, Mehrad; Borregales, Leonardo D.; Karam, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) was regarded standard of care for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in the immunotherapy era. With the advent of targeted molecular therapy (TMT) for the treatment of mRCC, the routine use of CN has been questioned. Up to date evidence continues to suggest that CN remains an integral part of treatment in appropriately selected patients. This review details the original context in which the efficacy of CN was established and rationale for the continued use of cytoreductive surgery in the era of TMT. PMID:26815334

  15. Biologic Therapy and Novel Molecular Targets of Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Amber N; Renz, Harald; Casale, Thomas B; Garn, Holger

    Treatment options for severe or uncontrolled asthma are increasing, especially pertaining to novel biologic therapies. The 2 primary asthma endotypes, T2 high and T2 low, are defined by the level of type 2 T helper and innate lymphoid cell activity and mediators. Most therapies for severe asthma target T2 high asthma, including the 3 biologics approved for use in the United States and Europe: omalizumb, mepolizumb, and reslizumab. Other biologics, with various molecular targets, are under investigation. Unfortunately, treatment options for T2 low asthma are limited. Although these therapies may improve asthma symptoms, exacerbation rates, and lung function parameters, they have not been shown to modify the disease process or provide lasting benefits after discontinuation. Biomarkers identified thus far to help guide individualized therapy in severe asthma are helpful, but imperfect discriminators for picking the best option for individual patients. This review will discuss the mechanisms of action, indications, and therapeutic effects of currently available and emerging biologics for the treatment of severe or uncontrolled asthma. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prostate cancer heterogeneity: Discovering novel molecular targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Massari, Francesco; Iacovelli, Roberto; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Di Nunno, Vincenzo; Giunchi, Francesca; Brunelli, Matteo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) shows a broad spectrum of biological and clinical behavior, which represents the epiphenomenon of an extreme genetic heterogeneity. Recent genomic profiling studies have deeply improved the knowledge of the genomic landscape of localized and metastatic PCa. The AR and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways are the two most frequently altered, representing therefore interestingly targets for therapy. Moreover, somatic or germline aberrations of DNA repair genes (DRGs) have been observed at high frequency, supporting the potential role of platinum derivatives and PARP inhibitors as effective therapeutic strategies. In the future, the identification of driver mutations present at a specific stage of the disease, the classification PCa based on specific molecular alterations, and the selection of the most appropriate therapy based on biomarkers predictors of response represent the foundations for an increasingly more accurate personalized medicine.

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fillat, Cristina; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed. PMID:24212620

  18. Molecular pathways: targeted α-particle radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Baidoo, Kwamena E; Yong, Kwon; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2013-02-01

    An α-particle, a (4)He nucleus, is exquisitely cytotoxic and indifferent to many limitations associated with conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The exquisite cytotoxicity of α-radiation, the result of its high mean energy deposition [high linear energy transfer (LET)] and limited range in tissue, provides for a highly controlled therapeutic modality that can be targeted to selected malignant cells [targeted α-therapy (TAT)] with minimal normal tissue effects. A burgeoning interest in the development of TAT is buoyed by the increasing number of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. The short path length renders α-emitters suitable for treatment and management of minimal disease such as micrometastases or residual tumor after surgical debulking, hematologic cancers, infections, and compartmental cancers such as ovarian cancer or neoplastic meningitis. Yet, despite decades of study of high LET radiation, the mechanistic pathways of the effects of this modality remain not well defined. The modality is effectively presumed to follow a simple therapeutic mechanism centered on catastrophic double-strand DNA breaks without full examination of the actual molecular pathways and targets that are activated that directly affect cell survival or death. This Molecular Pathways article provides an overview of the mechanisms and pathways that are involved in the response to and repair of TAT-induced DNA damage as currently understood. Finally, this article highlights the current state of clinical translation of TAT as well as other high-LET radionuclide radiation therapy using α-emitters such as (225)Ac, (211)At, (213)Bi, (212)Pb, and (223)Ra.

  19. Molecular Pathways: Targeted α-Particle Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Yong, Kwon; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    An α-particle, a 4He nucleus, is exquisitely cytotoxic, and indifferent to many limitations associated with conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The exquisite cytotoxicity of α radiation, the result of its high mean energy deposition (high linear energy transfer, LET) and limited range in tissue, provides for a highly controlled therapeutic modality that can be targeted to selected malignant cells (targeted α-therapy (TAT)) with minimal normal tissue effects. There is a burgeoning interest in the development of TAT that is buoyed by the increasing number of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. The short path length renders α-emitters suitable for treatment and management of minimal disease such as micrometastases or residual tumor after surgical debulking, hematological cancers, infections, and compartmental cancers such as ovarian cancer or neoplastic meningitis. Yet, despite decades of study of high-LET radiation, the mechanistic pathways of the effects of this modality remain not well defined. The modality is effectively presumed to follow a simple therapeutic mechanism centered on catastrophic double strand (ds) DNA breaks without full examination of the actual molecular pathways and targets that are activated that directly impact cell survival or death. This Molecular Pathways article provides an overview of the mechanisms and pathways that are involved in the response to and repair of TAT induced DNA damage as currently understood. Finally, this article highlights the current state of clinical translation of TAT as well as other high-LET radionuclide radiation therapy using α-emitters such as 225Ac, 211At, 213Bi, 212Pb and 223Ra. PMID:23230321

  20. Molecular Pathways: The Necrosome-A Target for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lena; Miller, George

    2017-03-01

    Necroptosis is a caspase-8-independent cell death that requires coactivation of receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3) kinases. The necrosome is a complex consisting of RIP1, RIP3, and Fas-associated protein with death domain leading to activation of the pseudokinase mixed lineage kinase like followed by a rapid plasma membrane rupture and inflammatory response through the release of damage-associated molecular patterns and cytokines. The necrosome has been shown to be relevant in multiple tumor types, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, melanoma, and several hematologic malignancies. Preclinical data suggest that targeting this complex can have differential impact on tumor progression and that the effect of necroptosis on oncogenesis is cell-type and context dependent. The emerging data suggest that targeting the necrosome may lead to immunogenic reprogramming in the tumor microenvironment in multiple tumors and that combining therapies targeting the necrosome with either conventional chemotherapy or immunotherapy may have beneficial effects. Thus, understanding the interplay of necroptotic cell death, transformed cells, and the immune system may enable the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Clin Cancer Res; 23(5); 1132-6. ©2016 AACR.

  1. Alopecia in patients treated with molecularly targeted anticancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Belum, V R; Marulanda, K; Ensslin, C; Gorcey, L; Parikh, T; Wu, S; Busam, K J; Gerber, P A; Lacouture, M E

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of molecularly targeted anticancer therapies presents new challenges, among which dermatologic adverse events are noteworthy. Alopecia in particular is frequently reported, but the true incidence is not known. We sought to ascertain the incidence and risk of developing alopecia during treatment with approved inhibitors of oncogenic pathways and molecules [anaplastic lymphoma kinase, breakpoint cluster region-abelson, B-rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, Janus kinase, MAPK/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) Kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, smoothened, vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet derived growth factor receptor; proteasomes; CD20, CD30, CD52]. Electronic database (PubMed, Web of Science) and ASCO meeting abstract searches were conducted to identify clinical trials reporting alopecia. Meta-analysis was conducted utilizing fixed- or random-effects models. The calculated overall incidence of all-grade alopecia was 14.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 12.6% to 17.2%]-lowest with bortezomib, 2.2% (95% CI 0.4% to 10.9%), and highest with vismodegib, 56.9% (95% CI 50.5% to 63.1%). There was an increased risk of all-grade alopecia [relative risk (RR), 7.9 (95% CI 6.2-10.09, P ≤ 0.01)] compared with placebo, but when compared with chemotherapy, the risk was lower [RR, 0.32 (95% CI 0.2-0.55, P ≤ 0.01)]. Targeted therapies are associated with an increased risk of alopecia. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Alopecia in patients treated with molecularly targeted anticancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Belum, V. R.; Marulanda, K.; Ensslin, C.; Gorcey, L.; Parikh, T.; Wu, S.; Busam, K. J.; Gerber, P. A.; Lacouture, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The introduction of molecularly targeted anticancer therapies presents new challenges, among which dermatologic adverse events are noteworthy. Alopecia in particular is frequently reported, but the true incidence is not known. Patients and methods We sought to ascertain the incidence and risk of developing alopecia during treatment with approved inhibitors of oncogenic pathways and molecules [anaplastic lymphoma kinase, breakpoint cluster region-abelson, B-rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, Janus kinase, MAPK/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) Kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, smoothened, vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet derived growth factor receptor; proteasomes; CD20, CD30, CD52]. Electronic database (PubMed, Web of Science) and ASCO meeting abstract searches were conducted to identify clinical trials reporting alopecia. Meta-analysis was conducted utilizing fixed- or random-effects models. Results The calculated overall incidence of all-grade alopecia was 14.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 12.6% to 17.2%]—lowest with bortezomib, 2.2% (95% CI 0.4% to 10.9%), and highest with vismodegib, 56.9% (95% CI 50.5% to 63.1%). There was an increased risk of all-grade alopecia [relative risk (RR), 7.9 (95% CI 6.2–10.09, P ≤ 0.01)] compared with placebo, but when compared with chemotherapy, the risk was lower [RR, 0.32 (95% CI 0.2–0.55, P ≤ 0.01)]. Conclusions Targeted therapies are associated with an increased risk of alopecia. PMID:26387145

  3. Chemokine receptors as new molecular targets for antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, F; Vassena, L; Lusso, P

    2004-04-01

    Extraordinary advancements have been made over the past decade in our understanding of the molecular mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry into cells. The external HIV envelope glycoprotein, gp120, sequentially interacts with two cellular receptor molecules, the CD4 glycoprotein and a chemokine receptor, such as CCR5 or CXCR4, leading to the activation of the fusogenic domain of the transmembrane viral glycoprotein, gp41, which changes its conformation to create a hairpin structure that eventually triggers fusion between the viral and cellular membranes. Each of these discrete steps in the viral entry process represents a potential target for new antiviral agents. Current efforts to develop safe and effective HlV entry inhibitors are focused on naturally occurring proteins (e.g., chemokines, antibodies), engineered or modified derivatives of natural proteins (e.g., multimerized soluble CD4, gp41--or chemokine--derived synthetic peptides), as well as small synthetic compounds obtained either by high-throughput screening of large compound libraries or by structure-guided rational design. The recent introduction in therapy of the first fusion inhibitor, the gp41-derived synthetic peptide T20, heralds a new era in the treatment of AIDS, which will hopefully lead to more effective multi-drug regimens with reduced adverse effects for the patients.

  4. Molecular Targeted Therapy in Modern Oncology: Imaging Assessment of Treatment Response and Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; DiPiro, Pamela J.; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Shinagare, Atul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oncology is a rapidly evolving field with a shift toward personalized cancer treatment. The use of therapies targeted to the molecular features of individual tumors and the tumor microenvironment has become much more common. In this review, anti-angiogenic and other molecular targeted therapies are discussed, with a focus on typical and atypical response patterns and imaging manifestations of drug toxicities. PMID:28096716

  5. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) for molecular targeted therapies of tumours.

    PubMed

    Youns, Mahmoud; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Efferth, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Scientific progress in genetics, cell and molecular biology has greatly ameliorated our comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neoplastic transformation and progression. The rapidly advancing identification of molecular targets in human cancers during the last decade has provided an excellent starting point for the development of novel therapeutics. A huge variety of potential molecular targets have been identified, many of which are already in the market for therapeutic purposes. It is now becoming possible to target pathways and/or molecules that are crucial in maintaining the malignant phenotype. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is often considered as alternative or complementary medicine. TCM represents a holistic approach and lacks high-quality scientific evidence on its effectiveness. Therefore, it is frequently regarded with some scepticism by western academic medicine. In this review, we report that application of modern technologies allowed identification of novel molecular targets modulating the anti-tumour activity of natural products derived from TCM. Moreover, we tried to cross the bridge between TCM and Western modern medicine to be able to implement them for the sake of cancer patients.

  6. Cervical Cancer: Development of Targeted Therapies Beyond Molecular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Knoff, Jayne; Yang, Benjamin; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical cancer. The integration of HPV genes into the host genome causes the upregulation of E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 and E7 proteins inactivate and degrade tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma, respectively, leading to malignant progression. HPV E6 and E7 antigens are ideal targets for the development of therapies for cervical cancer and precursor lesions because they are constitutively expressed in infected cells and malignant tumors but not in normal cells and they are essential for cell immortalization and transformation. Immunotherapies are being developed to target E6/E7 by eliciting antigen-specific immune responses. siRNA technologies target E6/E7 by modulating the expression of the oncoproteins. Proteasome inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors are being developed to indirectly target E6/E7 by interfering with their oncogenic activities. The ultimate goal for HPV-targeted therapies is the progression through clinical trials to commercialization. PMID:24533233

  7. [Advances of molecular targeted therapy in squamous cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Shucai

    2013-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4)-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lung cancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  8. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Michael A; Simon, Elias D; Little, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment.

  9. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Michael A.; Simon, Elias D.; Little, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  10. Personalizing therapies for gastric cancer: Molecular mechanisms and novel targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Luis, Michael; Tavares, Ana; Carvalho, Liliana S; Lara-Santos, Lúcio; Araújo, António; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Globally, gastric cancer is the 4th most frequently diagnosed cancer and the 2nd leading cause of death from cancer, with an estimated 990000 new cases and 738000 deaths registered in 2008. In the advanced setting, standard chemotherapies protocols acquired an important role since last decades in prolong survival. Moreover, recent advances in molecular therapies provided a new interesting weapon to treat advanced gastric cancer through anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) therapies. Trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, was the first target drug in the metastatic setting that showed benefit in overall survival when in association with platinum-5-fluorouracil based chemotherapy. Further, HER2 overexpression analysis acquired a main role in predict response for trastuzumab in this field. Thus, we conducted a review that will discuss the main points concerning trastuzumab and HER2 in gastric cancer, providing a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms and novel trials involved. PMID:24151357

  11. Melanoma: the intersection of molecular targeted therapy and immune checkpoint inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lau, Peter Kar Han; Ascierto, Paolo A; McArthur, Grant

    2016-04-01

    Melanoma is at the forefront of development of systemic therapeutics with both molecular targeted therapies and immune checkpoint inhibitors as cornerstones of treatment. Although responses to molecularly targeted therapy is largely from blockade of oncogenic pathways, evidence is emerging of the immunomodulatory effects from BRAF inhibition. Additionally programmed-death-1 (PD-1) inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of melanoma and are set to pave future improvements in other solid tumors. Combinations of PD-1 inhibitors with novel immune checkpoints or with molecularly targeted therapies are under investigation and may improve on the considerable progress made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular pathogenesis and targeted therapy of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2015-08-01

    Over the past few years, knowledge regarding the molecular pathology of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) has increased substantially, and a number of targeted agents have been tested in clinical trials in this tumor type. For some of these agents there is a strong biological rationale. Among them, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor Everolimus and the antiangiogenic agent Sunitinib have both been approved for the treatment of PNETs. However, there is lack of knowledge regarding biomarkers able to predict their efficacy, and mechanisms of resistance. Other angiogenesis inhibitors, such as Pazopanib, inhibitors of Src, Hedgehog or of PI3K might all be useful in association or sequence with approved agents. On the other hand, the clinical significance, and potential for treatment of the most common mutations occurring in sporadic PNETs, in the MEN-1 gene and in ATRX and DAXX, remains uncertain. The present paper reviews the main molecular changes occurring in PNETs and how they might be linked with treatment options.

  13. The Challenges and the Promise of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Malignant Gliomas1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxiang; Xu, Tao; Jiang, Ying; Xu, Hanchong; Yan, Yong; Fu, Da; Chen, Juxiang

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors and one of the most challenging forms of cancers to treat. Despite advances in conventional treatment, the outcome for patients remains almost universally fatal. This poor prognosis is due to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence after surgical removal. However, over the past decade, molecular targeted therapy has held the promise of transforming the care of malignant glioma patients. Significant progress in understanding the molecular pathology of gliomagenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotypes will open opportunities to rationally develop new molecular targeted therapy options. Recently, therapeutic strategies have focused on targeting pro-growth signaling mediated by receptor tyrosine kinase/RAS/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, proangiogenic pathways, and several other vital intracellular signaling networks, such as proteasome and histone deacetylase. However, several factors such as cross-talk between the altered pathways, intratumoral molecular heterogeneity, and therapeutic resistance of glioma stem cells (GSCs) have limited the activity of single agents. Efforts are ongoing to study in depth the complex molecular biology of glioma, develop novel regimens targeting GSCs, and identify biomarkers to stratify patients with the individualized molecular targeted therapy. Here, we review the molecular alterations relevant to the pathology of malignant glioma, review current advances in clinical targeted trials, and discuss the challenges, controversies, and future directions of molecular targeted therapy. PMID:25810009

  14. Stroma-directed molecular targeted therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Michiyo; Shinagawa, Kei

    2011-12-08

    Recent studies in molecular and cellular biology have shown that tumor growth and metastasis are not determined by cancer cells alone, but also by a variety of stromal cells. Tumor stroma contains abundant extracellular matrix and several types of cells, including carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), endothelial cells, pericytes and inflammatory cells including macrophages. In gastric cancer tissues, tumor cells express platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B. Stromal cells, including CAFs, pericytes and lymphatic endothelial cells, express PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-β. Administration of PDGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor significantly decreases stromal reaction, lymphatic vessel area and pericyte coverage of tumor microvessels. Administration of PDGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drug(s) impairs the progressive growth and metastasis of gastric cancer. Activated stroma might serve as a novel therapeutic target in cases of gastric cancer.

  15. Molecular targets of curcumin for cancer therapy: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Kasi, Pandima Devi; Tamilselvam, Rajavel; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Daglia, Maria; Bishayee, Anupam; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, natural edible products have been found to be important therapeutic agents for the treatment of chronic human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegeneration. Curcumin is a well-known diarylheptanoid constituent of turmeric which possesses anticancer effects under both pre-clinical and clinical conditions. Moreover, it is well known that the anticancer effects of curcumin are primarily due to the activation of apoptotic pathways in the cancer cells as well as inhibition of tumor microenvironments like inflammation, angiogenesis, and tumor metastasis. In particular, extensive studies have demonstrated that curcumin targets numerous therapeutically important cancer signaling pathways such as p53, Ras, PI3K, AKT, Wnt-β catenin, mTOR and so on. Clinical studies also suggested that either curcumin alone or as combination with other drugs possess promising anticancer effect in cancer patients without causing any adverse effects. In this article, we critically review the available scientific evidence on the molecular targets of curcumin for the treatment of different types of cancer. In addition, we also discuss its chemistry, sources, bioavailability, and future research directions.

  16. [Molecular target therapy: a milestone on the road for curing cancer].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Liu, Quentin

    2008-08-01

    Molecular target therapy (MTT), using chemicals of low molecular weight, monoclonal antibodies, and/or polypeptides to interfere with specific signal pathways in cancer cells, causes inhibition of tumor progression. Clinical evidence has demonstrated that MTT has promising potential in not only killing tumors but also inducing tumor cells differentiate into normal cells, leading to cure of the patients. Furthermore, MTT leads to potent inhibition of oncogenic signals. The delay of tumor progression makes the patients "survival with tumor". Thus, in the future it is possible that cancer become a chronic disease much like diabetes and hypertension. This article reviewed the theory on molecular target therapy, its features and future direction.

  17. Molecular targeted therapy in the treatment of advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Kumarakulasinghe, Nesaretnam Barr; van Zanwijk, Nico; Soo, Ross A

    2015-04-01

    Historically, patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with chemotherapy alone, but a therapeutic plateau has been reached. Advances in the understanding of molecular genetics have led to the recognition of multiple molecularly distinct subsets of NSCLC. This in turn has led to the development of rationally directed molecular targeted therapy, leading to improved clinical outcomes. Tumour genotyping for EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement has meant chemotherapy is no longer given automatically as first-line treatment but reserved for when patients do not have a 'druggable' driver oncogene. In this review, we will address the current status of clinically relevant driver mutations and emerging new molecular subsets in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and the role of targeted therapy and mechanisms of acquired resistance to targeted therapy.

  18. Molecular targeted therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A review of completed and ongoing late phase clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Catalina; Maglic, Dino; Zervos, Emmanuel E

    2016-12-01

    Molecular targeted therapy is widely utilized and effective in a number of solid tumors. In pancreatic adenocarcinoma, targeted therapy has been extensively evaluated; however, survival improvement of this aggressive disease using a targeted strategy has been minimal. The purpose of this study is to review therapeutic molecular targets in completed and ongoing later phase (II and III) clinical trials to have a better understanding of the rationale and progress towards targeted molecular therapies for pancreatic cancer. The PubMed database and the NCDI clinical trial website (www.clinicaltrials.gov) were queried to identify phase II and III completed and published (PubMed) and ongoing (clinicaltrials.gov) trials using the keywords: pancreatic cancer and molecular targeted therapy. The search engines were further limited by adding Phase II or III, active enrollment and North American. A total of 14 completed and published phase II/III clinical trials and 17 ongoing trials were identified. Evaluated strategies included inhibition of growth factor receptors (EGFR, PDGFR, VGFR, IGF-1R), tyrosine kinase inhibitors, MEK1/2, mTOR blockade and PI3K and HER2-neu pathway inhibitors. Only one trial conducted by the National Cancer Institute of Canada and the PANTAR trial have demonstrated a survival improvement from EGFR inhibition using erlotinib. These trials ultimately led to FDA approval of erlotinib/Tarceva in advanced stage disease. It remains unclear whether new combinations of cytotoxic chemotherapy or immunotherapy plus molecular targeted therapy will be beneficial in management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Despite a number of phase II and III trials, to date, only erlotinib has emerged as an approved targeted therapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. There are several ongoing late phase trials evaluating a number of targets, the results of which will become available over the next 1 to 2 years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. NCCN Task Force Report: Optimizing Treatment of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma With Molecular Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Gary R.; Carducci, Michael A.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Esper, Peg; Jonasch, Eric; Kumar, Rashmi; Margolin, Kim A.; Michaelson, M. Dror; Motzer, Robert J.; Pili, Roberto; Roethke, Susan; Srinivas, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been substantially improved with administration of the currently available molecularly targeted therapies. However, proper selection of therapy and management of toxicities remain challenging. NCCN convened a multidisciplinary task force panel to address the clinical issues associated with these therapies in attempt to help practicing oncologists optimize patient outcomes. This report summarizes the background data presented at the task force meeting and the ensuing discussion. PMID:21335444

  20. Present Advances and Future Perspectives of Molecular Targeted Therapy for Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Atik Badshah; Li, Fangfei; Li, Min; He, Bing; He, Xiaojuan; Chen, Guofen; Guo, Baosheng; Li, Defang; Jiang, Feng; Dang, Lei; Zheng, Shaowei; Liang, Chao; Liu, Jin; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-04-06

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a bone cancer mostly occurring in pediatric population. Current treatment regime of surgery and intensive chemotherapy could cure about 60%-75% patients with primary osteosarcoma, however only 15% to 30% can be cured when pulmonary metastasis or relapse has taken place. Hence, novel precise OS-targeting therapies are being developed with the hope of addressing this issue. This review summarizes the current development of molecular mechanisms and targets for osteosarcoma. Therapies that target these mechanisms with updated information on clinical trials are also reviewed. Meanwhile, we further discuss novel therapeutic targets and OS-targeting drug delivery systems. In conclusion, a full insight in OS pathogenesis and OS-targeting strategies would help us explore novel targeted therapies for metastatic osteosarcoma.

  1. Present Advances and Future Perspectives of Molecular Targeted Therapy for Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Atik Badshah; Li, Fangfei; Li, Min; He, Bing; He, Xiaojuan; Chen, Guofen; Guo, Baosheng; Li, Defang; Jiang, Feng; Dang, Lei; Zheng, Shaowei; Liang, Chao; Liu, Jin; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a bone cancer mostly occurring in pediatric population. Current treatment regime of surgery and intensive chemotherapy could cure about 60%–75% patients with primary osteosarcoma, however only 15% to 30% can be cured when pulmonary metastasis or relapse has taken place. Hence, novel precise OS-targeting therapies are being developed with the hope of addressing this issue. This review summarizes the current development of molecular mechanisms and targets for osteosarcoma. Therapies that target these mechanisms with updated information on clinical trials are also reviewed. Meanwhile, we further discuss novel therapeutic targets and OS-targeting drug delivery systems. In conclusion, a full insight in OS pathogenesis and OS-targeting strategies would help us explore novel targeted therapies for metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:27058531

  2. Targeted Molecular Imaging in Oncology: Focus on Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Ford, Eric C.; Wong, John W.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2008-01-01

    Anatomically based technologies (CT, MR, etc.) are in routine use in radiotherapy for planning and assessment purposes. Even with improvements in imaging, however, radiotherapy is still limited in efficacy and toxicity in certain applications. Further advances may be provided by technologies that image the molecular activities of tumors and normal tissues. Possible uses for molecular imaging include better localization of tumor regions and early assay for the radiation response of tumors and normal tissues. Critical to the success of this approach is the identification and validation of molecular probes that are suitable in the radiotherapy context. Recent developments in molecular imaging probes and integration of functional imaging with radiotherapy are promising. This review focuses on recent advances in molecular imaging strategies and probes that may aid in improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:18314068

  3. Targeted Delivery Systems for Molecular Therapy in Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; Li, Fangfei; Wang, Luyao; Li, Defang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Feng; Liang, Chao; Liu, Biao; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; He, Bing; Lu, Jun; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the integral components of bone, including bone matrix, bone mineral and bone cells, give rise to complex disturbances of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis. Non-specific drug delivery using high-dose systemic administration may decrease therapeutic efficacy of drugs and increase the risk of toxic effects in non-skeletal tissues, which remain clinical challenges in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Thus, targeted delivery systems are urgently needed to achieve higher drug delivery efficiency, improve therapeutic efficacy in the targeted cells/tissues, and minimize toxicities in non-targeted cells/tissues. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of different targeting moieties and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in skeletal disorders, and also discuss the advantages, challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation. PMID:27011176

  4. Molecular Characterization of Head and Neck Cancer: How Close to Personalized Targeted Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Worsham, Maria J.; Ali, Haythem; Dragovic, Jadranka; Schweitzer, Vanessa P.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapy in squamous head and neck cancer (HNSCC) continues to make strides and holds much promise. Cetuximab remains the sole FDA-approved molecular targeted therapy available for HNSCC, though there are several new biological agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other pathways in the regulatory approval pipeline. While targeted therapies have the potential to be personalized, their current use in HNSCC is not personalized. This is illustrated for EGFR targeted drugs, where EGFR as a molecular target has yet to be individualized for HNSCC. Future research needs to identify factors that correlate with response (or lack of one) and the underlying genotype-phenotype relationship that dictates this response. Comprehensive exploration of genetic and epigenetic landscapes in HNSCC is opening new frontiers to further enlighten, mechanistically inform, and set a course for eventually translating these discoveries into therapies for patients. This opinion offers a snap shot of the evolution of molecular subytping in HNSCC, its current clinical applicability, as well as new emergent paradigms with implications for controlling this disease in the future. PMID:22873739

  5. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Childhood Choroid Plexus Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    adjuvant and...or adjuvant therapy remain the primary methods of treatment for CPC; however tumor progression and relapse is observed in ~70% of cases (2). Despite...T C P1 22 -T A C P1 39 -T B C P1 40 -T B C P1 41 -T B C P1 43 -T B C P1 44 -T B C P1 46 -T C P3 -T C P4 1- TA C P4 3- T C P4 6- T C P5 0- T C P5 1-

  6. Molecular Chaperones in Pathogen Virulence: Emerging New Targets for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Neckers, Len; Tatu, Utpal

    2009-01-01

    Summary Infectious organisms have to cope with demanding and rapidly changing environments during establishment in the host. This is particularly relevant for pathogens which utilize different hosts to complete their life cycle. In addition to homeotic environmental challenges, other stressful factors, such as oxidative bursts, are often triggered in response to infection. It is not surprising that many successful pathogens have developed robust chaperone systems to conquer the stressful environments in the host. In addition to discussing ingenious ways by which pathogens have utilized chaperones, the potential of exploiting pathogen chaperones as drug targets is also discussed. PMID:19064253

  7. [Targeted molecular therapy based on advanced cancer stem cell model].

    PubMed

    Hirao, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    Improvement of cell purification and transplantation techniques have contributed to the identification of cell populations known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Although it was hypothesized that tumors are organized as hierarchies of tumor cells that are sustained by rare TICs, like normal tissue stem cells, there are several controversies towards such cancer stem cell model, e.g. reversible change of stem cell like population based on epigenetic changes, clonal genetic evolution and problems in xenotransplantation system. Despite complexity in cancer stem cell models, studies in cancer stem cell field have revealed that there are close relationship between cancer malignancy and stem cell properties, called "stemness". Understanding molecular mechanisms for controlling stemness would contribute to establishment of novel diagnostics or therapeutics for cancer.

  8. Molecular targeted therapies in all histologies of head and neck cancers: an update.

    PubMed

    Razak, Albiruni R A; Siu, Lillian L; Le Tourneau, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    This article reviewed the recent developments in molecular targeted therapy in head and neck cancers. A brief summary of other pathways of interest is also enclosed. The use of cetuximab in squamous cell head and neck cancer is associated with clinical benefit and, in some cases, survival. However, the use of targeted agents beyond cetuximab in this disease remains investigational. Combination therapy of molecular targeted agents with chemoradiation in the locally advanced setting of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and nasopharyngeal cancer shows early promising results, but at the expense of increased toxicity. In malignant salivary gland tumors, the evaluation of targeted therapy has been disappointing. New therapeutic targets warrant further evaluation in these cancers. Despite the encouraging results achieved with antiepidermal growth factor receptor therapy, particularly with cetuximab, targeted therapy trials conducted in head and neck cancers to date have largely lacked efficacy or are associated with significant toxicity. Further research into modulation of other aberrant pathways is needed. The recent identification of improved prognosis among head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients whose tumors harbor the human papilloma virus may allow better treatment selection for these patients, while the identification of a hallmark gene fusion transcript in adenocystic carcinoma may herald new treatment promise.

  9. Molecular Biomarkers for Prediction of Targeted Therapy Response in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Trick or Treat?

    PubMed

    Toss, Angela; Venturelli, Marta; Peterle, Chiara; Piacentini, Federico; Cascinu, Stefano; Cortesi, Laura

    2017-01-04

    In recent years, the study of genomic alterations and protein expression involved in the pathways of breast cancer carcinogenesis has provided an increasing number of targets for drugs development in the setting of metastatic breast cancer (i.e., trastuzumab, everolimus, palbociclib, etc.) significantly improving the prognosis of this disease. These drugs target specific molecular abnormalities that confer a survival advantage to cancer cells. On these bases, emerging evidence from clinical trials provided increasing proof that the genetic landscape of any tumor may dictate its sensitivity or resistance profile to specific agents and some studies have already showed that tumors treated with therapies matched with their molecular alterations obtain higher objective response rates and longer survival. Predictive molecular biomarkers may optimize the selection of effective therapies, thus reducing treatment costs and side effects. This review offers an overview of the main molecular pathways involved in breast carcinogenesis, the targeted therapies developed to inhibit these pathways, the principal mechanisms of resistance and, finally, the molecular biomarkers that, to date, are demonstrated in clinical trials to predict response/resistance to targeted treatments in metastatic breast cancer.

  10. Molecular Biomarkers for Prediction of Targeted Therapy Response in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Trick or Treat?

    PubMed Central

    Toss, Angela; Venturelli, Marta; Peterle, Chiara; Piacentini, Federico; Cascinu, Stefano; Cortesi, Laura

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the study of genomic alterations and protein expression involved in the pathways of breast cancer carcinogenesis has provided an increasing number of targets for drugs development in the setting of metastatic breast cancer (i.e., trastuzumab, everolimus, palbociclib, etc.) significantly improving the prognosis of this disease. These drugs target specific molecular abnormalities that confer a survival advantage to cancer cells. On these bases, emerging evidence from clinical trials provided increasing proof that the genetic landscape of any tumor may dictate its sensitivity or resistance profile to specific agents and some studies have already showed that tumors treated with therapies matched with their molecular alterations obtain higher objective response rates and longer survival. Predictive molecular biomarkers may optimize the selection of effective therapies, thus reducing treatment costs and side effects. This review offers an overview of the main molecular pathways involved in breast carcinogenesis, the targeted therapies developed to inhibit these pathways, the principal mechanisms of resistance and, finally, the molecular biomarkers that, to date, are demonstrated in clinical trials to predict response/resistance to targeted treatments in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:28054957

  11. Targeting heat-shock protein 90 with ganetespib for molecularly targeted therapy of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Lu, J; Hua, Y; Zhang, P; Liang, Z; Ruan, L; Lian, C; Shi, H; Chen, K; Tu, Z

    2015-01-01

    -dependent kinase 1 (pCDK1), EGFR and Ki-67 revealed significant differences in ganetespib-treated tumors. Collectively, our data suggest that ganetespib, as a new potent treatment option, can be used for the molecularly targeted therapy of GC patients according to their expression profiles of EGFR. PMID:25590805

  12. Molecular Targeted Drugs and Biomarkers in NSCLC, the Evolving Role of Individualized Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Domvri, Kalliopi; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Browning, Robert F.; Li, Qiang; Turner, J. Francis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Tsiouda, Theodora; Freitag, Lutz; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer first line treatment has been directed from the non-specific cytotoxic doublet chemotherapy to the molecular targeted. The major limitation of the targeted therapies still remains the small number of patients positive to gene mutations. Furthermore, the differentiation between second line and maintenance therapy has not been fully clarified and differs in the clinical practice between cancer centers. The authors present a segregation between maintenance treatment and second line and present a possible definition for the term “maintenance” treatment. In addition, cancer cell evolution induces mutations and therefore either targeted therapies or non-specific chemotherapy drugs in many patients become ineffective. In the present work pathways such as epidermal growth factor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, met proto-oncogene and PI3K are extensively presented and correlated with current chemotherapy treatment. Future, perspectives for targeted treatment are presented based on the current publications and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:24312144

  13. Treatment of lung adenocarcinoma by molecular-targeted therapy and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Motonobu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kono, Koji; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Kohno, Takashi

    2017-03-09

    Lung adenocarcinoma (LADC) is a cancer treatable using targeted therapies against driver gene aberrations. EGFR mutations and ALK fusions are frequent gene aberrations in LADC, and personalized therapies against those aberrations have become a standard therapy. These targeted therapies have shown significant positive efficacy and tolerable toxicity compared to conventional chemotherapy, so it is necessary to identify additional druggable genetic aberrations. Other than EGFR mutations and ALK fusions, mutations in KRAS, HER2, and BRAF, and driver fusions involving RET and ROS1, have also been identified in LADC. Interestingly, the frequency of driver gene aberrations differs according to ethnicity, sex, and smoking, which leads to differences in treatment efficacy. To date, several molecular-targeted drugs against driver genes have been developed, and several clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy. However, targeted therapies against driver-gene-negative cases have not yet been well developed. Efforts to identify a new druggable target for such cases are currently underway. Furthermore, immune checkpoint blockade therapy might be effective for driver-negative cases, especially those with accumulated mutations.

  14. Molecular targets on blood vessels for cancer therapies in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanori; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2007-10-01

    This review covers progress to date in the identification of molecular targets on blood vessels in cancers, as well as agents that act on those targets, with emphasis on those currently in clinical trials. Current vascular-targeting therapies comprise two general types--antiangiogenic therapy and antivascular therapy. Advances in antiangiogenic therapies, particularly inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factors and their receptors, have clarified the capacity of these inhibitors to change tumor-associated vessel structure to a more normal state, thereby improving the ability of chemotherapeutics to access the tumors. The responses of other antiangiogenesis target molecules in humans are more complicated; for example, alphanubeta3 integrins are known to stimulate as well as inhibit angiogenesis, and cleavage of various extracellular proteins/proteoglycans by matrix metalloproteinases produces potent regulators of the angiogenic process. Antivascular therapies disrupt established blood vessels in solid tumors and often involve the use of ligand-based or small-molecule agents. Ligand-based agents, irrespective of the antiangiogenic capacity of the ligand, target antivascular effectors to molecules expressed specifically on blood vessels, such as aminopeptidase N, fibronectin extra-domain B, and prostate-specific membrane antigen. Small-molecule antivascular agents, which are not targeted to molecules on blood vessels, rely on physical differences between the vasculatures in tumors and those in normal tissues.

  15. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced or metastatic chordoma patients: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lebellec, Loïc; Aubert, Sébastien; Zaïri, Fahed; Ryckewaert, Thomas; Chauffert, Bruno; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Chordomas, derived from undifferentiated notochordal remnants, represent less than 4% of bone primary tumors. Despite surgery followed by radiotherapy, local and metastatic relapses are frequent. In case of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas, medical treatment is frequently discussed. While chemotherapy is ineffective, it would appear that some molecular targeted therapies, in particular imatinib, could slow down the tumor growth in case-reports, retrospective series, and phase I or II trials. Nineteen publications, between January 1990 and September 2014, have been found describing the activity of these targeted therapies. A systematic analysis of these publications shows that the best objective response with targeted therapies was stabilization in 52 to 69% of chordomas. Given the indolent course of advanced chordoma and because of the absence of randomized trial, the level of evidence to treat chordomas with molecular therapy is low (level III), whatever the drug. Furthermore, we could not draw firm conclusion on the activity of imatinib. Other putative targets have also been described. Therefore, further clinical trials are expected, especially with these targets. Nevertheless, it seems essential, in those future studies, to consider the naturally slow course of the disease.

  16. Molecular Targeted Therapies for the Treatment of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Jin Wook; Keam, Bhumsuk

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is the multifocal seeding of cerebrospinal fluid and leptomeninges by malignant cells. The incidence of LMC is approximately 5% in patients with malignant tumors overall and the rate is increasing due to increasing survival time of cancer patients. Eradication of the disease is not yet possible, so the treatment goals of LMC are to improve neurologic symptoms and to prolong survival. A standard treatment for LMC has not been established due to low incidences of LMC, the rapidly progressing nature of the disease, heterogeneous populations with LMC, and a lack of randomized clinical trial results. Treatment options for LMC include intrathecal chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, but the prognoses remain poor with a median survival of <3 months. Recently, molecular targeted agents have been applied in the clinic and have shown groundbreaking results in specific patient groups epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy or an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor in lung cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-directed therapy in breast cancer, and CD20-targeted therapy in B cell lymphoma). Moreover, there are results indicating that the use of these agents under proper dose and administration routes can be effective for managing LMC. In this article, we review molecular targeted agents for managing LMC. PMID:27399673

  17. Molecularly targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma - a drug development crisis?

    PubMed Central

    Thillai, Kiruthikah; Ross, Paul; Sarker, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fastest growing cause of cancer related death globally. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only drug proven to improve outcomes in patients with advanced disease offering modest survival benefit. Although comprehensive genomic mapping has improved understanding of the genetic aberrations in hepatocellular cancer (HCC), this knowledge has not yet impacted clinical care. The last few years have seen the failure of several first and second line phase III clinical trials of novel molecularly targeted therapies, warranting a change in the way new therapies are investigated in HCC. Potential reasons for these failures include clinical and molecular heterogeneity, trial design and a lack of biomarkers. This review discusses the current crisis in HCC drug development and how we should learn from recent trial failures to develop a more effective personalised treatment paradigm for patients with HCC. PMID:26909132

  18. Biomarker Tests for Molecularly Targeted Therapies: Laying the Foundation and Fulfilling the Dream.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Gary H; Moses, Harold L

    2016-06-10

    Precision medicine focuses on the management of individual patients on the basis of biomarkers and other distinguishing characteristics, with the overarching objective of improving clinical outcomes. The rapid proliferation of biomarker tests and targeted therapies has revolutionized patient care in a variety of serious disorders. Targeted cancer therapies interrupt oncogenic molecular pathways driven by mutations, overexpression, or translocation of specific genes. However, there is concern that the emergence of large-scale genomic data is exceeding our capacity to appropriately analyze and interpret the results.In 2014, the Institute of Medicine convened the Committee on Policy Issues in the Clinical Development and Use of Biomarkers for Molecularly Targeted Therapies. This committee conducted a study to develop recommendations to address diverse and interconnected development, regulatory, clinical practice, and reimbursement issues. The committee conducted an extensive search of the relevant literature and invited testimony from a wide range of experts in the field. The final report of the committee's study and deliberations was released on March 4, 2016, focusing on ways to achieve 10 goals to further advance the development and appropriate clinical use of biomarker tests for molecularly targeted therapies.This article presents an overview of the committee's study and resulting recommendations, which cover establishment of clinical utility, regulatory oversight, coverage and reimbursement, health system data integration, as well as education and access. The committee's recommendations presented and discussed here are fundamentally grounded in the understanding that, when properly validated and appropriately implemented, these assays and corresponding therapies hold considerable promise to enhance the quality of patient care and improve meaningful clinical outcomes. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Vimentin as a potential molecular target in cancer therapy Or Vimentin, an overview and its potential as a molecular target for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Satelli, Arun; Li, Shulin

    2011-01-01

    Vimentin, a major constituent of the intermediate filament (IF) family of proteins, is ubiquitously expressed in normal mesenchymal cells and is known to maintain cellular integrity and provide resistance against stress. Increased vimentin expression has been reported in various epithelial cancers including prostate cancer, gastrointestinal tumors, CNS tumors, breast cancer, malignant melanoma, lung cancer and other types of cancers. Vimentin's over-expression in cancer correlates well with increased tumor growth, invasion and poor prognosis; however, the role of vimentin in cancer progression remains obscure. In the recent years, vimentin has gained much importance as a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Although EMT is associated with a number of tumorigenic events, the role of vimentin in the underlying events mediating these processes remains unknown. Though majority of the literature findings indicate a future significance of vimentin as a biomarker for different cancers with clinical relevance, more research in to the molecular aspects will be crucial to particularly evaluate the function of vimentin in the process of tumorigenesis. By virtue of its over-expression in a large number of cancers and its role in mediating various tumorigenic events, vimentin serves as an attractive target for cancer therapy. Further, research directed toward elucidating the role of vimentin in various signaling pathways would open up new approaches for the development of promising therapeutic agents. This review summarizes the expression and functions of vimentin in cancers and also suggests some directions toward future cancer therapy utilizing vimentin as a potential target. PMID:21637948

  20. Molecularly-Targeted Gold-Based Nanoparticles for Cancer Imaging and Near-Infrared Photothermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Emily Shannon

    2011-12-01

    This thesis advances the use of nanoparticles as multifunctional agents for molecularly-targeted cancer imaging and photothermal therapy. Cancer mortality has remained relatively unchanged for several decades, indicating a significant need for improvements in care. Researchers are evaluating strategies incorporating nanoparticles as exogenous energy absorbers to deliver heat capable of inducing cell death selectively to tumors, sparing normal tissue. Molecular targeting of nanoparticles is predicted to improve photothermal therapy by enhancing tumor retention. This hypothesis is evaluated with two types of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles utilized, silica-gold nanoshells and gold-gold sulfide nanoparticles, can convert light energy into heat to damage cancerous cells. For in vivo applications nanoparticles are usually coated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to increase blood circulation time. Here, heterobifunctional PEG links nanoparticles to targeting agents (antibodies and growth factors) to provide cell-specific binding. This approach is evaluated through a series of experiments. In vitro, antibody-coated nanoparticles can bind breast carcinoma cells expressing the targeted receptor and act as contrast agents for multiphoton microscopy prior to inducing cell death via photoablation. Furthermore, antibody-coated nanoparticles can bind tissue ex vivo at levels corresponding to receptor expression, suggesting they should bind their target even in the complex biological milieu. This is evaluated by comparing the accumulation of antibody-coated and PEG-coated nanoparticles in subcutaneous glioma tumors in mice. Contrary to expectations, antibody targeting did not yield more nanoparticles within tumors. Nevertheless, these studies established the sensitivity of glioma to photothermal therapy; mice treated with PEG-coated nanoshells experienced 57% complete tumor regression versus no regression in control mice. Subsequent experiments employed intracranial tumors to

  1. Molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ANTONELLI, GIOVANNA; LIBRA, MASSIMO; PANEBIANCO, VINCENZO; RUSSO, ALESSIA ERIKA; VITALE, FELICE VITO; COLINA, PAOLO; D'ANGELO, ALESSANDRO; ROSSELLO, ROSALBA; FERRAÙ, FRANCESCO

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in men and women. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, >50% of patients are >65 years old. Through an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lung oncogenesis, molecular-targeted approaches have become an essential element for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. As the toxicity profiles of the techniques are definitely more favorable compared with chemotherapy, they are particularly attractive for use in elderly patients, who are potentially more susceptible to the toxicity of systemic oncological therapies. However, studies on the activity of molecular-targeted agents in this aged patient setting are much more limited compared with those in their younger counterparts. In the present review, the literature on molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC is discussed. It is concluded that bevacizumab should be reserved only for highly select elderly patients with advanced NSCLC when the clinician deems it useful in the face of acceptable toxicities. In elderly patients with advanced epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive NSCLC, erlotinib and gefitinib appear to repeat the same favorable performance as that documented on a larger scale in the overall population of patients with activating mutations. A good toxicity profile is also confirmed for active molecules on different pathways, such as crizotinib. PMID:26870160

  2. Molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Giovanna; Libra, Massimo; Panebianco, Vincenzo; Russo, Alessia Erika; Vitale, Felice Vito; Colina, Paolo; D'Angelo, Alessandro; Rossello, Rosalba; Ferraù, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in men and women. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, >50% of patients are >65 years old. Through an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lung oncogenesis, molecular-targeted approaches have become an essential element for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. As the toxicity profiles of the techniques are definitely more favorable compared with chemotherapy, they are particularly attractive for use in elderly patients, who are potentially more susceptible to the toxicity of systemic oncological therapies. However, studies on the activity of molecular-targeted agents in this aged patient setting are much more limited compared with those in their younger counterparts. In the present review, the literature on molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC is discussed. It is concluded that bevacizumab should be reserved only for highly select elderly patients with advanced NSCLC when the clinician deems it useful in the face of acceptable toxicities. In elderly patients with advanced epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive NSCLC, erlotinib and gefitinib appear to repeat the same favorable performance as that documented on a larger scale in the overall population of patients with activating mutations. A good toxicity profile is also confirmed for active molecules on different pathways, such as crizotinib.

  3. Dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles: a versatile platform for targeted molecular imaging, molecular diagnostics, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Tassa, Carlos; Shaw, Stanley Y; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-10-18

    Advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of disease susceptibility coupled with prominent successes for molecular targeted therapies have resulted in an emerging strategy of personalized medicine. This approach envisions risk stratification and therapeutic selection based on an individual's genetic makeup and physiologic state (the latter assessed through cellular or molecular phenotypes). Molecularly targeted nanoparticles can play a key role in this vision through noninvasive assessments of molecular processes and specific cell populations in vivo, sensitive molecular diagnostics, and targeted delivery of therapeutics. A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle with a cross-linked dextran coating, or CLIO, is a powerful and illustrative nanoparticle platform for these applications. These structures and their derivatives support diagnostic imaging by magnetic resonance (MRI), optical, and positron emission tomography (PET) modalities and constitute a versatile platform for conjugation to targeting ligands. A variety of conjugation methods exist to couple the dextran surface to different functional groups; in addition, a robust bioorthogonal [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction between 1,2,4,5-tetrazene (Tz) and trans-cyclooctene (TCO) can conjugate nanoparticles to targeting ligands or label pretargeted cells. The ready availability of conjugation methods has given rise to the synthesis of libraries of small molecule modified nanoparticles, which can then be screened for nanoparticles with specificity for a specific cell type. Since most nanoparticles display their targeting ligands in a multivalent manner, a detailed understanding of the kinetics and affinity of a nanoparticle's interaction with its target (as determined by surface plasmon resonance) can yield functionally important insights into nanoparticle design. In this Account, we review applications of the CLIO platform in several areas relevant to the mission of personalized medicine. We demonstrate

  4. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  5. MOLECULARLY TARGETED THERAPIES IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER ANNUAL UPDATE 2014

    PubMed Central

    Morgensztern, Daniel; Campo, Meghan J.; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Doebele, Robert C.; Garon, Edward; Gerber, David E.; Goldberg, Sarah B.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Heist, Rebecca; Hensing, Thomas; Horn, Leora; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Rudin, Charles M.; Salgia, Ravi; Sequist, Lecia; Shaw, Alice T.; Simon, George R.; Somaiah, Neeta; Spigel, David R.; Wrangle, John; Johnson, David; Herbst, Roy S.; Bunn, Paul; Govindan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant advances in the understanding of the biology and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) over the past few years. A number of molecularly targeted agents are in the clinic or in development for patients with advanced NSCLC (Table 1). We are beginning to understand the mechanisms of acquired resistance following exposure to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with oncogene addicted NSCLC. The advent of next generation sequencing has enabled to study comprehensively genomic alterations in lung cancer. Finally, early results from immune checkpoint inhibitors are very encouraging. This review summarizes recent advances in the area of cancer genomics, targeted therapies and immunotherapy. PMID:25535693

  6. Genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity of epithelial ovarian cancer and the clinical implications for molecular targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Huimin; Cao, Dongyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Shen, Keng

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynaecological malignancy, and tumoural heterogeneity (TH) has been blamed for treatment failure. The genomic and epigenomic atlas of EOC varies significantly with tumour histotype, grade, stage, sensitivity to chemotherapy and prognosis. Rapidly accumulating knowledge about the genetic and epigenetic events that control TH in EOC has facilitated the development of molecular-targeted therapy. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, designed to target homologous recombination, are poised to change how breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA)-related ovarian cancer is treated. Epigenetic treatment regimens being tested in clinical or preclinical studies could provide promising novel treatment approaches and hope for improving patient survival.

  7. [Molecular-Genetic Diagnosis and Molecular-Targeted Therapy in Cancer: Challenges in the Era of Precision Medicine].

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Hayato

    2015-10-01

    Elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of neoplasms and application of emerging technologies for testing and therapy have resulted in a series of paradigm shifts in patient care, from conventional to personalized medicine. This has been promoted by companion diagnostics and molecular targeted therapy, tailoring the treatment to the individual characteristics of each patient. Precision oncology has been accelerated by integrating the enhanced resolution of molecular analysis, mechanism clarity, and therapeutic relevance through genomic knowledge. In its clinical implementation, there are laboratory challenges concerning accurate measurement using stored samples, differentiation between driver and passenger mutations as well as between germline and somatic mutations, bioinformatics availability, practical decision-making algorithms, and ethical issues regarding incidental findings. The medical laboratory has a new role in providing not only testing services but also an instructive approach to users to ensure the sample quality and privacy protection of personal genome information, supporting the quality of patient practice based on laboratory diagnosis.

  8. The Clinical Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Combination With Radiation Therapy: A Pharmaceutical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Ataman, Ozlem U.; Sambrook, Sally J.; Wilks, Chris; Lloyd, Andrew; Taylor, Amanda E.; Wedge, Stephen R.

    2012-11-15

    Summary: This paper explores historical and current roles of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of clinical trials testing radiation therapy combinations with molecularly targeted agents and attempts to identify potential solutions to expediting further combination studies. An analysis of clinical trials involving a combination of radiation therapy and novel cancer therapies was performed. Ongoing and completed trials were identified by searching the (clinicaltrials.gov) Web site, in the first instance, with published trials of drugs of interest identified through American Society of Clinical Oncology, European CanCer Organisation/European Society for Medical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and PubMed databases and then cross-correlated with (clinicaltrials.gov) protocols. We examined combination trials involving radiation therapy with novel agents and determined their distribution by tumor type, predominant molecular mechanisms examined in combination to date, timing of initiation of trials relative to a novel agent's primary development, and source of sponsorship of such trials. A total of 564 studies of targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy were identified with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Most studies were in phase I/II development, with only 36 trials in phase III. The tumor site most frequently studied was head and neck (26%), followed by non-small cell lung cancer. Pharmaceutical companies were the sponsors of 33% of studies overall and provided support for only 16% of phase III studies. In terms of pharmaceutical sponsorship, Genentech was the most active sponsor of radiation therapy combinations (22%), followed by AstraZeneca (14%). Most radiation therapy combination trials do not appear to be initiated until after drug approval. In phase III studies, the most common (58%) primary endpoint was overall survival. Collectively, this analysis suggests that such

  9. [The quality practice of molecular-genetic testing in the era of molecular target therapy in chronic myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Hayato; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Masukawa, Atsuko; Asai, Satomi

    2012-10-01

    The advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as molecular target therapy has resulted in a marked change in the laboratory process for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of chronic myelogenous leukemia. This includes defining the molecular typing of BCR-ABL1 to establish the diagnosis, a quantitative and/or high quality assay for minimal residual disease to evaluate the molecular response, and mutation analysis and chromosomal examination to assess its resistance to inhibitors. These processes should be used where appropriate for each patient. In the ongoing development and clinical use of novel agents for treatment of the leukemia, the quality assurance of each process of molecular-genetic testing, such as specimen handling, measurement, and reporting, has become increasingly important in the quality care of patients.

  10. CD22ΔE12 as a molecular target for RNAi therapy.

    PubMed

    Uckun, Fatih M; Ma, Hong; Cheng, Jianjun; Myers, Dorothea E; Qazi, Sanjive

    2015-05-01

    B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BPL) is the most common form of cancer in children and adolescents. Our recent studies have demonstrated that CD22ΔE12 is a characteristic genetic defect of therapy-refractory clones in paediatric BPL and implicated the CD22ΔE12 genetic defect in the aggressive biology of relapsed or therapy-refractory paediatric BPL. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the biological significance of the CD22ΔE12 molecular lesion in BPL and determine if it could serve as a molecular target for RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. Here we report a previously unrecognized causal link between CD22ΔE12 and aggressive biology of human BPL cells by demonstrating that siRNA-mediated knockdown of CD22ΔE12 in primary leukaemic B-cell precursors is associated with a marked inhibition of their clonogenicity. Additionally, we report a nanoscale liposomal formulation of CD22ΔE12-specific siRNA with potent in vitro and in vivo anti-leukaemic activity against primary human BPL cells as a first-in-class RNAi therapeutic candidate targeting CD22ΔE12.

  11. Molecular signature of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: an insight from genotype to phenotype and challenges for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ibrahim H; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; O’Reilly, Eileen M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains one of the most clinically challenging cancers despite an in-depth characterization of the molecular underpinnings and biology of this disease. Recent whole-genome-wide studies have elucidated the diverse and complex genetic alterations which generate a unique oncogenic signature for an individual pancreatic cancer patient and which may explain diverse disease behavior in a clinical setting. Areas covered In this review article, we discuss the key oncogenic pathways of pancreatic cancer including RAS-MAPK, PI3KCA and TGF-β signaling, as well as the impact of these pathways on the disease behavior and their potential targetability. The role of tumor suppressors particularly BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and their role in pancreatic cancer treatment are elaborated upon. We further review recent genomic studies and their impact on future pancreatic cancer treatment. Expert opinion Targeted therapies inhibiting pro-survival pathways have limited impact on pancreatic cancer outcomes. Activation of pro-apoptotic pathways along with suppression of cancer-stem-related pathways may reverse treatment resistance in pancreatic cancer. While targeted therapy or a ‘precision medicine’ approach in pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains an elusive challenge for the majority of patients, there is a real sense of optimism that the strides made in understanding the molecular underpinnings of this disease will translate into improved outcomes. PMID:26439702

  12. CRISPR/Cas9: molecular tool for gene therapy to target genome and epigenome in the treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, M; Sachdeva, N; Pal, M; Gupta, N; Khan, I A; Majumdar, M; Tiwari, A

    2015-11-01

    Although varied drugs and therapies have been developed for lung cancer treatment, in the past 5 years overall survival rates have not improved much. It has also been reported that lung cancer is diagnosed in most of the patients when it is already in the advanced stages with heterogeneous tumors where single therapy is mostly ineffective. A combination of therapies are being administered and specific genes in specific tissues are targeted while protecting normal cell, but most of the therapies face drawbacks for the development of resistance against them and tumor progression. Therefore, therapeutic implications for various therapies need to be complemented by divergent strategies. This review frames utilization of CRISPR/Cas9 for molecular targeted gene therapy leading to long-term repression and activation or inhibition of molecular targets linked to lung cancer, avoiding the cycles of therapy.

  13. Emerging Targets For Prostate Adenocarcinoma Therapy: How Molecular Biology May Drive Towards a More Tailored Approach.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Pirtoli, Luigi; del Vecchio, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Prostate adenocarcinoma is the most diagnosed male cancer in the Western world and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Albeit most of the patients with prostate adenocarcinoma are currently treated by surgery and/or radiation therapy, more than 30-40% of affected subjects will eventually progress and develop advanced disease. To date, management decisions depend on the clinical stage of the patient and the histological diagnosis which unfortunately often lack to predict the real prognosis. Current therapies have shown to be insufficient, mainly in the metastatic disease. For clear-cut diagnosis and follow-up, we promptly need molecular markers also useful in predicting patient's outcome. Advances in cancer genomics have led to a plethora of biomarkers, which must now to be rigorously validated in the clinical setting. Recent insights on prostate adenocarcinoma biology which unveiled some of the biological mechanisms leading to this tumour, have managed in devising novel strategies for therapy. Immunotherapeutic agents, selective adrenal inhibitors, anti-angiogenic molecules, newly engineered androgen receptor inhibitors, compounds targeting the bone microenvironment are demonstrated to limit cancer growth by blocking specific signaling pathways. Such strategies can be complemented to existing therapeutic paradigm in improving beneficial outcome. Moreover, other emerging pharmacological compounds have shown encouraging results and several clinical trials are ongoing. This review summarizes the developing targeted therapies for prostate adenocarcinoma and discuss their potential benefit mainly in the castration- resistant forms.

  14. From molecular classification to targeted therapeutics: the changing face of systemic therapy in metastatic gastroesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian; Kelly, Ronan J

    2015-01-01

    Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1) or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician's therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  15. Toxins and derivatives in molecular pharmaceutics: Drug delivery and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Li, Chong; Wei, Xiaoli; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-08-01

    Protein and peptide toxins offer an invaluable source for the development of actively targeted drug delivery systems. They avidly bind to a variety of cognate receptors, some of which are expressed or even up-regulated in diseased tissues and biological barriers. Protein and peptide toxins or their derivatives can act as ligands to facilitate tissue- or organ-specific accumulation of therapeutics. Some toxins have evolved from a relatively small number of structural frameworks that are particularly suitable for addressing the crucial issues of potency and stability, making them an instrumental source of leads and templates for targeted therapy. The focus of this review is on protein and peptide toxins for the development of targeted drug delivery systems and molecular therapies. We summarize disease- and biological barrier-related toxin receptors, as well as targeted drug delivery strategies inspired by those receptors. The design of new therapeutics based on protein and peptide toxins is also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Silicon Phthalocyanines Axially Disubstituted with Erlotinib toward Small-Molecular-Target-Based Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan-Juan; Huang, Yi-Zhen; Song, Mei-Ru; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Xue, Jin-Ping

    2017-09-21

    Small-molecular-target-based photodynamic therapy-a promising targeted anticancer strategy-was developed by conjugating zinc(II) phthalocyanine with a small-molecular-target-based anticancer drug. To prevent self-aggregation and avoid problems of phthalocyanine isomerization, two silicon phthalocyanines di-substituted axially with erlotinib have been synthesized and fully characterized. These conjugates are present in monomeric form in various solvents as well as culture media. Cell-based experiments showed that these conjugates localize in lysosomes and mitochondria, while maintaining high photodynamic activities (IC50 values as low as 8 nm under a light dose of 1.5 J cm(-2) ). With erlotinib as the targeting moiety, two conjugates were found to exhibit high specificity for EGFR-overexpressing cancer cells. Various poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker lengths were shown to have an effect on the photophysical/photochemical properties and on in vitro phototoxicity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Biological carrier molecules of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular cancer imaging and targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Aerts, A; Impens, N R E N; Gijs, M; D'Huyvetter, M; Vanmarcke, H; Ponsard, B; Lahoutte, T; Luxen, A; Baatout, S

    2014-01-01

    Many tumors express one or more proteins that are either absent or hardly present in normal tissues, and which can be targeted by radiopharmaceuticals for either visualization of tumor cells or for targeted therapy. Radiopharmaceuticals can consist of a radionuclide and a carrier molecule that interacts with the tumor target and as such guides the attached radionuclide to the right spot. Radiopharmaceuticals hold great promise for the future of oncology by providing early, precise diagnosis and better, personalized treatment. Most advanced developments with marketed products are based on whole antibodies or antibody fragments as carrier molecules. However, a substantial number of (pre)clinical studies indicate that radiopharmaceuticals based on other carrier molecules, such as peptides, nonimmunoglobulin scaffolds, or nucleic acids may be valuable alternatives. In this review, we discuss the biological molecules that can deliver radionuclide payloads to tumor cells in terms of their structure, the selection procedure, their (pre)clinical status, and advantages or obstacles to their use in a radiopharmaceutical design. We also consider the plethora of molecular targets existing on cancer cells that can be targeted by radiopharmaceuticals, as well as how to select a radionuclide for a given diagnostic or therapeutic product.

  18. Molecular-targeted therapy for chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hung-Yang; Yeh, Kun-Huei

    2014-07-01

    The prognosis of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains poor despite therapeutic advances in recent decades. Several recent positive phase III trials established the efficacy of second-line chemotherapy for metastatic gastric cancer in prolonging overall survival. However, malnutrition and poor performance of AGC in late stages usually preclude such patients from intensive treatment. Many targeted-therapies failed to show a significant survival benefit in AGC, but have regained attention after the positive result of ramucirumab was announced last year. Among all targeted agents, only trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) protein, has been proven as having survival benefit by addition to first-line chemotherapy. Herein we reported a patient who benefited from adding trastuzumab to the same second-line combination chemotherapy (paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin) upon progression of bulky liver metastases. At least five months of progression-free survival were achieved without any additional toxicity. We also reviewed literature of molecularly-targeted therapy for chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer, including several large phase III trials (REGARD, GRANITE-1, EXPAND, and REAL-3) published in 2013-2014.

  19. Genetics and molecular pathology of gastric malignancy: Development of targeted therapies in the era of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Van Ness, Michael; Gregg, Jeffrey; Wang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Gastric malignancy constitutes a major cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Despite recent advances in surgical techniques combined with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy approaches, patients with advanced disease still have poor outcomes. An emerging understanding of the molecular pathways that characterize cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis has provided novel targets in gastric cancer therapy. In this review, recent advances in the understanding of molecular tumorigenesis for common gastric malignancies are discussed. We also briefly review the current targeted therapies in the treatment of gastric malignancies. Practical insights are highlighted including HER2 testing and target therapy in gastric adenocarcinoma, morphologic features and molecular signatures of imatinib-resistance GISTs, and recent investigations aimed at tumor-specific therapy for neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:22943015

  20. Targeted systemic gene therapy and molecular imaging of cancer contribution of the vascular-targeted AAVP vector.

    PubMed

    Hajitou, Amin

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy and molecular-genetic imaging have faced a major problem: the lack of an efficient systemic gene delivery vector. Unquestionably, eukaryotic viruses have been the vectors of choice for gene delivery to mammalian cells; however, they have had limited success in systemic gene therapy. This is mainly due to undesired uptake by the liver and reticuloendothelial system, broad tropism for mammalian cells causing toxicity, and their immunogenicity. On the other hand, prokaryotic viruses such as bacteriophage (phage) have no tropism for mammalian cells, but can be engineered to deliver genes to these cells. However, phage-based vectors have inherently been considered poor vectors for mammalian cells. We have reported a new generation of vascular-targeted systemic hybrid prokaryotic-eukaryotic vectors as chimeras between an adeno-associated virus (AAV) and targeted bacteriophage (termed AAV/phage; AAVP). In this hybrid vector, the targeted bacteriophage serves as a shuttle to deliver the AAV transgene cassette inserted in an intergenomic region of the phage DNA genome. As a proof of concept, we assessed the in vivo efficacy of vector in animal models of cancer by displaying on the phage capsid the cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD-4C) ligand that binds to alphav integrin receptors specifically expressed on the angiogenic blood vessels of tumors. The ligand-directed vector was able to specifically deliver imaging and therapeutic transgenes to tumors in mice, rats, and dogs while sparing the normal organs. This chapter reviews some gene transfer strategies and the potential of the vascular-targeted AAVP vector for enhancing the effectiveness of existing systemic gene delivery and genetic-imaging technologies.

  1. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Torres-García, Eugenio; Gonz&Ález-v&Ázquez, Armando; de Murphy, Consuelo Arteaga

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC has shown high stability both in vitro and in vivo and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 188Re-anti-CD20 and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The OLINDA/EXM code was used to calculate patient-specific internal radiation dose estimates. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood ratio of 4.3±0.7 in receptor-positive tumors with an average effective dose of 4.4 mSv. Dosimetric studies indicated that after administration of 5.8 to 7.5 GBq of 188Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to total body would be 0.75 Gy which corresponds to the recommended dose for NHL therapies.

  2. Molecular targets of dietary agents for prevention and therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Shishodia, Shishir

    2006-05-14

    While fruits and vegetables are recommended for prevention of cancer and other diseases, their active ingredients (at the molecular level) and their mechanisms of action less well understood. Extensive research during the last half century has identified various molecular targets that can potentially be used not only for the prevention of cancer but also for treatment. However, lack of success with targeted monotherapy resulting from bypass mechanisms has forced researchers to employ either combination therapy or agents that interfere with multiple cell-signaling pathways. In this review, we present evidence that numerous agents identified from fruits and vegetables can interfere with several cell-signaling pathways. The agents include curcumin (turmeric), resveratrol (red grapes, peanuts and berries), genistein (soybean), diallyl sulfide (allium), S-allyl cysteine (allium), allicin (garlic), lycopene (tomato), capsaicin (red chilli), diosgenin (fenugreek), 6-gingerol (ginger), ellagic acid (pomegranate), ursolic acid (apple, pears, prunes), silymarin (milk thistle), anethol (anise, camphor, and fennel), catechins (green tea), eugenol (cloves), indole-3-carbinol (cruciferous vegetables), limonene (citrus fruits), beta carotene (carrots), and dietary fiber. For instance, the cell-signaling pathways inhibited by curcumin alone include NF-kappaB, AP-1, STAT3, Akt, Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), caspases, PARP, IKK, EGFR, HER2, JNK, MAPK, COX2, and 5-LOX. The active principle identified in fruit and vegetables and the molecular targets modulated may be the basis for how these dietary agents not only prevent but also treat cancer and other diseases. This work reaffirms what Hippocrates said 25 centuries ago, let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

  3. Molecular characterisation of cutaneous melanoma: creating a framework for targeted and immune therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Shivshankari; Watson, Ian R

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale genomic analyses of cutaneous melanoma have revealed insights into the aetiology and heterogeneity of this disease, as well as opportunities to further personalise treatment for patients with targeted and immune therapies. Herein, we review the proposed genomic classification of cutaneous melanoma from large-scale next-generation sequencing studies, including the largest integrative analysis of melanoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network. We examine studies that have identified molecular features of melanomas linked to immune checkpoint inhibitor response. In addition, we draw attention to low-frequency actionable mutations and highlight frequent non-coding mutations in melanoma where little is known about their biological function that may provide novel avenues for the development of treatment strategies for melanoma patients. PMID:27336610

  4. Model-specific selection of molecular targets for heart failure gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Fargnoli, Anthony S.; Tomasulo, Catherine E.; Pritchette, Louella A.; Bridges, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex multifaceted problem of abnormal ventricular function and structure. In recent years, new information has been accumulated allowing for a more detailed understanding of the cellular and molecular alterations that are the underpinnings of diverse causes of HF, including myocardial ischemia, pressure-overload, volume-overload or intrinsic cardiomyopathy. Modern pharmacological approaches to treat HF have had a significant impact on the course of the disease, although they do not reverse the underlying pathological state of the heart. Therefore gene-based therapy holds a great potential as a targeted treatment for cardiovascular diseases. Here, we survey the relative therapeutic efficacy of genetic modulation of β-adrenergic receptor signaling, Ca2+ handling proteins and angiogenesis in the most common extrinsic models of HF. PMID:21954055

  5. Model-specific selection of molecular targets for heart failure gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael G; Fargnoli, Anthony S; Tomasulo, Catherine E; Pritchette, Louella A; Bridges, Charles R

    2011-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex multifaceted problem of abnormal ventricular function and structure. In recent years, new information has been accumulated allowing for a more detailed understanding of the cellular and molecular alterations that are the underpinnings of diverse causes of HF, including myocardial ischemia, pressure-overload, volume-overload or intrinsic cardiomyopathy. Modern pharmacological approaches to treat HF have had a significant impact on the course of the disease, although they do not reverse the underlying pathological state of the heart. Therefore gene-based therapy holds a great potential as a targeted treatment for cardiovascular diseases. Here, we survey the relative therapeutic efficacy of genetic modulation of β-adrenergic receptor signaling, Ca(2+) handling proteins and angiogenesis in the most common extrinsic models of HF. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma: molecular pathways, treatment options and new targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Salas, Veronica; Alegre, Marta; Garcés, Joan Ramón; Puig, Lluis

    2014-06-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified as important to normal embryonic development in living organisms and it is implicated in processes including cell proliferation, differentiation and tissue patterning. Aberrant Hh pathway has been involved in the pathogenesis and chemotherapy resistance of different solid and hematologic malignancies. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and medulloblastoma are two well-recognized cancers with mutations in components of the Hh pathway. Vismodegib has recently approved as the first inhibitor of one of the components of the Hh pathway (smoothened). This review attempts to provide current data on the molecular pathways involved in the development of BCC and the therapeutic options available for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic BCC, and the new targeted therapies in development.

  7. Melanoma patients in a phase I clinic: molecular aberrations, targeted therapy and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Henary, H.; Hong, D. S.; Falchook, G. S.; Tsimberidou, A.; George, G. C.; Wen, S.; Wheler, J.; Fu, S.; Naing, A.; Piha-Paul, S.; Janku, F.; Kim, K. B.; Hwu, P.; Kurzrock, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to assess the outcome of patients with advanced melanoma treated with matched molecularly targeted therapy. Patients and methods We reviewed 160 consecutive patients with metastatic melanoma treated in the phase I program (N = 35 protocols). Treatment was considered to be ‘matched’ (N = 84) if at least one drug in the regimen was known to inhibit the functional activity of at least one of the patient's mutations. Results Of 160 patients, 134 (83.7%) had adequate tissue for molecular analysis; 69% (110 of 160) had ≥1 mutation: 61.2% (82 of 134), BRAF; 20.7% (23 of 111), NRAS; 2.6% (2 of 77), KIT; 2.3% (1 of 44), KRAS; 20% (1 of 5), GNAQ; 11.1% (1 of 9), P53 and 2.6% (1 of 39), coexisting mutations in BRAF and PIK3CA. Eighty-four patients (52.4%) were treated with matched-targeted agents, most of whom had BRAF mutations (N = 74). Twenty-six percent of patients (41 of 160) achieved a complete or partial remission (CR/PR) [40% (34 of 84)) on a matched phase I protocol versus 9.2% (7 of 76) for those on a non-matched study (P ≤ 0.0001)]. The median progression-free survival (PFS) (95% CI) was longer for patients treated on a matched phase I trial than on their prior first standard treatment [5.27 (4.10, 6.44) versus 3.10 (1.92, 4.28) months, P = 0.023], but not on non-matched phase I treatment. Multivariable analysis showed that matched therapy was an independent predictor of higher CR/PR rates, prolonged PFS and survival. Conclusions For melanoma patients, especially those with BRAF mutations, administering molecularly matched agents can be associated with better outcomes, including longer PFS compared with their first-line systemic therapy. PMID:23576709

  8. Molecular targets for cancer therapy in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Polivka, Jiri; Janku, Filip

    2014-05-01

    Aberrations in various cellular signaling pathways are instrumental in regulating cellular metabolism, tumor development, growth, proliferation, metastasis and cytoskeletal reorganization. The fundamental cellular signaling cascade involved in these processes, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase-B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR), closely related to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, is a crucial and intensively explored intracellular signaling pathway in tumorigenesis. Various activating mutations in oncogenes together with the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes are found in diverse malignancies across almost all members of the pathway. Substantial progress in uncovering PI3K/AKT/mTOR alterations and their roles in tumorigenesis has enabled the development of novel targeted molecules with potential for developing efficacious anticancer treatment. Two approved anticancer drugs, everolimus and temsirolimus, exemplify targeted inhibition of PI3K/AKT/mTOR in the clinic and many others are in preclinical development as well as being tested in early clinical trials for many different types of cancer. This review focuses on targeted PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling from the perspective of novel molecular targets for cancer therapy found in key pathway members and their corresponding experimental therapeutic agents. Various aberrant prognostic and predictive biomarkers are also discussed and examples are given. Novel approaches to PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibition together with a better understanding of prognostic and predictive markers have the potential to significantly improve the future care of cancer patients in the current era of personalized cancer medicine.

  9. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A.; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  10. Recent advances in Hodgkin lymphoma: interim PET and molecular-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hirokazu

    2015-02-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma is a highly curative lymphoid malignancy, but some patients relapse or experience adverse events from treatment. Therefore, prognostic markers are needed to allow a more patient-tailored approach to treatment. The positive-predictive value of interim positron emission tomography for progression-free survival was reported as 81%, and the negative-predictive value was reported as 97%. Interim positron emission tomography might identify high-risk patients who would benefit from more intensive treatment regimens as well as identify low-risk patients in whom even the standard treatment regimen might be a form of overtreatment. Indeed, major clinical study groups have conducted risk-adapted treatment protocols based on interim positron emission tomography. The Japan Clinical Oncology Group is also planning a Phase II trial of this concept for advanced Hodgkin lymphoma. These trials are now ongoing, but the data of them are expected soon. Molecular-targeted therapy is another important approach to improve outcomes for these patients. Brentuximab vedotin is an antibody-drug conjugate that targets CD30 on Hodgkin cells and has excellent efficacy when used as monotherapy. The combination of brentuximab vedotin and standard chemotherapies are being investigated in randomized Phase III trials. These approaches might lead to a paradigm shift in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma.

  11. Targeted Therapy for Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Targeted therapy is a type of cancer treatment that targets the changes in cancer cells that help them grow, divide, and spread. Learn how targeted therapy works against cancer and about side effects that may occur.

  12. Molecular targeted therapy to improve radiotherapeutic outcomes for non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Bhaskar; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Bhardwaj, Himanshu; Balusu, Sree; Shwaiki, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Effective treatments for non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) remain elusive. The use of concurrent chemotherapy with radiotherapy (RT) has improved outcomes, but a significant proportion of NSCLC patients are too frail to be able to tolerate an intense course of concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The development of targeted therapies ignited new hope in enhancing radiotherapeutic outcomes. The use of targeted therapies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has offered slight but significant benefits in concurrent use with RT for certain patients in certain situations. However, despite theoretical promise, the use of anti-angiogenics, such as bevacizumab and endostatin, has not proven clinically safe or useful in combination with RT. However, many new targeted agents against new targets are being experimented for combined use with RT. It is hoped that these agents may provide a significant breakthrough in the radiotherapeutic management of NSCLC. The current review provides a brief discussion about the targets, the targeted therapies, the rationale for the use of targeted therapies in combination with RT, and a brief review of the existing data on the subject.

  13. Targeted α-Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a viable strategy for the delivery of therapeutic, particle emitting radionuclides specifically to tumor cells to either augment anti-tumor action of the native antibodies or to solely take advantage of their action as targeting vectors. Proper and rational selection of radionuclide and antibody combinations is critical to making radioimmunotherapy (RIT) a standard therapeutic modality due to the fundamental and significant differences in the emission of either α- and β-particles. The α-particle has a short path length (50-80 μm) that is characterized by high linear energy transfer (∼100 keV/μm). Actively targeted α-therapy potentially offers a more specific tumor cell killing action with less collateral damage to the surrounding normal tissues than ß-emitters. These properties make targeted α-therapy appropriate therapies to eliminate of minimal residual or micrometastatic disease. RIT using α-emitters such as 213Bi, 211At, 225Ac, and others has demonstrated significant activity in both in vitro and in vivo model systems. Limited numbers of clinical trials have progressed to demonstrate safety, feasibility, and therapeutic activity of targeted α-therapy, despite having to traverse complex obstacles. Further advances may require more potent isotopes, additional sources and more efficient means of isotope production. Refinements in chelation and/or radiolabeling chemistry combined with rational improvements of isotope delivery, targeting vectors, molecular targets, and identification of appropriate clinical applications remains as active areas of research. Ultimately, randomized trials comparing targeted α-therapy combined with integration into existing standard of care treatment regimens will determine the clinical utility of this modality. PMID:17992276

  14. Nanomolecular HLA-DR10 antibody mimics: A potent system for molecular targeted therapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    DeNardo, Gerald L; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hok, Saphon; Mirick, Gary; DeNardo, Sally J; Corzett, Michele; Sysko, Vladimir; Lehmann, Joerg; Beckett, Laurel; Balhorn, Rod

    2008-12-01

    To mimic the molecular specificity and cell selectivity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) binding while decreasing size, nanomolecules (selective high-affinity ligands; SHALs), based on in silico modeling, have been created to bind to human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR10), a signaling receptor protein upregulated on the malignant B-lymphocytes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. SHALs were synthesized with a biotin or DOTA chelate (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid), using a solid-phase lysine-polyethyleneglycol backbone to link sets of ligands shown previously to bind to HLA-DR10. Using cell-binding and death assays and confocal microscopy, SHAL uptake, residualization, and cytocidal activity were evaluated in HLA-DR10 expressing and nonexpressing live, human lymphoma cell lines. All of the SHALs tested were selective for, and accumulated in, expressing cells. Reflecting binding to HLA-DR10 inside the cells, SHALs having the Ct ligand (3-(2-([3-chloro-5-trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]oxy)-anilino)-3-oxopropanionic acid) residualized in expressing cells greater than 179 times more than accountable by cell-surface membrane HLA-DR10. Confocal microscopy confirmed the intracellular residualization of these SHALs. Importantly, SHALs with a Ct ligand had direct cytocidal activity, similar in potency to that of Lym-1 mAb and rituximab, selectively for HLA-DR10 expressing lymphoma cells and xenografts. The results show that SHALs containing the Ct ligand residualize intracellularly and have cytocidal effects mediated by HLA-DR10. These SHALs have extraordinary potential as novel molecules for the selective targeting of lymphoma and leukemia for molecular therapy and imaging. Further, these SHALs can be used to transport and residualize cytotoxic agents near critical sites inside these malignant cells.

  15. Molecular Imaging of Angiogenic Therapy in Peripheral Vascular Disease with αvβ3-Integrin-Targeted Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Patrick M.; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Allen, John S.; Cai, Kejia; Williams, Todd A.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Noninvasive molecular imaging of angiogenesis could play a critical role in the clinical management of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) patients. The αvβ3-integrin, a well-established biomarker of neovascular proliferation, is an ideal target for molecular imaging of angiogenesis. This study investigates whether MR molecular imaging with αvβ3-integrin-targeted perfluorocarbon nanoparticles can detect the neovascular response to angiogenic therapy. Hypercholesterolemic rabbits underwent femoral artery ligation followed by no treatment or angiogenic therapy with dietary L-arginine. MR molecular imaging performed 10 days after vessel ligation revealed increased signal enhancement in L-arginine treated animals compared to controls. Furthermore, specifically targeted nanoparticles produced two times higher MRI signal enhancement compared to non-targeted particles, demonstrating improved identification of angiogenic vasculature with biomarker targeting. X-ray angiography performed 40 days post-ligation revealed that L-arginine treatment increased the development of collateral vessels. Histological staining of muscle capillaries revealed a denser pattern of microvasculature in L-arginine treated animals, confirming the MR and X-ray imaging results. The clinical application of noninvasive molecular imaging of angiogenesis could lead to earlier and more accurate detection of therapeutic response in PVD patients, enabling individualized optimization for a variety of treatment strategies. PMID:20665780

  16. Mechanisms and strategies to overcome resistance to molecularly targeted therapy for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su Yin; Menzies, Alexander M; Rizos, Helen

    2017-06-01

    The identification of driver mutations in melanoma has changed the field of cancer treatment. BRAF and NRAS mutations are predominant in melanoma and lead to overactivation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathways. Selective inhibitors targeting key effectors of the MAPK pathway have revolutionized the treatment of patients with advanced metastatic BRAF-mutant melanoma. However, resistance to therapy is almost universal and remains a major challenge in clinical care, with the majority of patients progressing within 1 year. Dissecting the mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies may offer new insights into strategies for overcoming resistance. This review describes the efficacy of therapies targeting the MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in melanoma, details the mechanisms contributing to drug resistance, and discusses current approaches to improving outcomes further. Cancer 2017;123:2118-29. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  17. Molecular stratification of metastatic melanoma using gene expression profiling: Prediction of survival outcome and benefit from molecular targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Cirenajwis, Helena; Ekedahl, Henrik; Lauss, Martin; Harbst, Katja; Carneiro, Ana; Enoksson, Jens; Rosengren, Frida; Werner-Hartman, Linda; Törngren, Therese; Kvist, Anders; Fredlund, Erik; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Jirström, Karin; Lundgren, Lotta; Howlin, Jillian; Borg, Åke; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K; Saal, Lao H; Nielsen, Kari; Ringnér, Markus; Tsao, Hensin; Olsson, Håkan; Ingvar, Christian; Staaf, Johan; Jönsson, Göran

    2015-05-20

    Melanoma is currently divided on a genetic level according to mutational status. However, this classification does not optimally predict prognosis. In prior studies, we have defined gene expression phenotypes (high-immune, pigmentation, proliferative and normal-like), which are predictive of survival outcome as well as informative of biology. Herein, we employed a population-based metastatic melanoma cohort and external cohorts to determine the prognostic and predictive significance of the gene expression phenotypes. We performed expression profiling on 214 cutaneous melanoma tumors and found an increased risk of developing distant metastases in the pigmentation (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.05-3.28; P=0.03) and proliferative (HR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.43-5.57; P=0.003) groups as compared to the high-immune response group. Further genetic characterization of melanomas using targeted deep-sequencing revealed similar mutational patterns across these phenotypes. We also used publicly available expression profiling data from melanoma patients treated with targeted or vaccine therapy in order to determine if our signatures predicted therapeutic response. In patients receiving targeted therapy, melanomas resistant to targeted therapy were enriched in the MITF-low proliferative subtype as compared to pre-treatment biopsies (P=0.02). In summary, the melanoma gene expression phenotypes are highly predictive of survival outcome and can further help to discriminate patients responding to targeted therapy.

  18. TARGETED THERAPY IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the emergence of targeted therapies that have led to significant breakthroughs in cancer therapy and completed or ongoing clinical trials of novel agents for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. Methods The literature was systematically reviewed, based on clinical experience and the use of technologies that improved our understanding of carcinogenesis. Results Genomics and model systems have enabled the validation of novel therapeutic strategies. Tumor molecular profiling has enabled the reclassification of cancer, and elucidated some mechanisms of disease progression or resistance to treatment, the heterogeneity between primary and metastatic tumors, and the dynamic changes of tumor molecular profiling over time. Despite the notable technologic advances, there is a gap between the plethora of preclinical data and the lack of effective therapies, which is attributed to suboptimal drug development for “driver” alterations of human cancer, the high cost of clinical trials and available drugs, and limited access of patients to clinical trials. Bioinformatic analyses of complex data to characterize tumor biology, function, and the dynamic tumor changes in time and space may improve cancer diagnosis. The application of discoveries in cancer biology in clinic holds the promise to improve the clinical outcomes in a large scale of patients with cancer. Increased harmonization between discoveries, policies, and practices will expedite the development of anticancer drugs and will accelerate the implementation of precision medicine. Conclusions Combinations of targeted, immunomodulating, antiangiogenic, or chemotherapeutic agents are in clinical development. Innovative adaptive study design is used to expedite effective drug development. PMID:26391154

  19. The Molecular, Cellular and Clinical Consequences of Targeting the Estrogen Receptor Following Estrogen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ping; Maximov, Philipp Y.; Curpan, Ramona F.; Abderrahman, Balkees; Jordan, V. Craig

    2015-01-01

    During the past twenty years our understanding of the control of breast tumor development, growth and survival has changed dramatically. The once long forgotten application of high dose synthetic estrogen therapy as the first chemical therapy to treat any cancer has been resurrected, refined and reinvented as the new biology of estrogen-induced apoptosis. High dose estrogen therapy was cast aside once tamoxifen, from its origins as a failed “morning after pill”, was reinvented as the first targeted therapy to treat any cancer. The current understanding of the mechanism of estrogen-induced apoptosis is described as a consequence of acquired resistance to long term antihormone therapy in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. The ER signal transduction pathway remains a target for therapy in breast cancer despite “antiestrogen” resistance, but becomes a regulator of resistance. Multiple mechanisms of resistance come into play: Selective ER Modulator (SERM) stimulated growth, growth factor/ER crosstalk, estrogen-induced apoptosis and mutations of ER. But it is with the science of estrogen-induced apoptosis that the next innovation in women’s health will be developed. Recent evidence suggests that the glucocorticoid properties of medroxyprogesterone acetate blunt estrogen-induced apoptosis in estrogen deprived breast cancer cell populations. As a result breast cancer develops during long-term Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). A new synthetic progestin with estrogen-like properties, such as the 19 nortestosterone derivatives used in oral contraceptives, will continue to protect the uterus from unopposed estrogen stimulation but at the same time, reinforce apoptosis in vulnerable populations of nascent breast cancer cells. PMID:26052034

  20. Emerging targeted therapies for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Douglas B; Pollack, Megan H; Sosman, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive cutaneous malignancy associated with poor response to traditional therapies. Recent regulatory approval for immune checkpoint inhibitors and agents targeting mutated BRAF has led to a tremendous expansion of effective treatment options for patients with advanced melanoma. Unfortunately, primary or acquired resistance develops in most patients, highlighting the need for additional therapies. Numerous genetic and other molecular features of this disease may provide effective targets for therapy development. This article reviews available melanoma treatments, including immune and molecularly-targeted therapies. We then discuss agents in development, with a focus on targeted (rather than immune) therapies. In particular, we discuss agents that block mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, as well as other emerging approaches such as antibody-drug conjugates, cell-cycle targeting, and novel genetically-informed clinical trials. Despite the incredible advances in melanoma therapeutics over the last several years, a clear need to develop more effective therapies remains. Molecularly-targeted therapy approaches will likely remain a cornerstone of melanoma treatment in parallel to immune therapy strategies.

  1. Affibody molecules: new protein domains for molecular imaging and targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2007-03-01

    Molecular imaging shows promise as a useful tool to aid drug discovery and development and also to provide important prognostic and predictive diagnostic information affecting patient management in the clinic. However, the use of molecular imaging diagnostically is not widely adopted, in part due to the lack of suitable targeting agents. Affibody molecules are a class of small and very stable protein domains, which can be used to selectively address a wide range of protein targets. Their small size enables high contrast radionuclide imaging and they can be produced by conventional peptide synthesis methods. Their potential utility in molecular imaging is highlighted in a large number of animal studies using anti-HER2 Affibody tracers and has recently been validated in breast cancer patients with HER2-expressing metastases. The therapeutic efficacy of the Affibody molecules in this indication was demonstrated in preclinical models using a targeted radionuclide as the effector function. This review will focus on the recent use of Affibody molecules for molecular imaging and their application for radioimmunotherapy.

  2. Targeted Therapy Database (TTD): A Model to Match Patient's Molecular Profile with Current Knowledge on Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Mocellin, Simone; Shrager, Jeff; Scolyer, Richard; Pasquali, Sandro; Verdi, Daunia; Marincola, Francesco M.; Briarava, Marta; Gobbel, Randy; Rossi, Carlo; Nitti, Donato

    2010-01-01

    Background The efficacy of current anticancer treatments is far from satisfactory and many patients still die of their disease. A general agreement exists on the urgency of developing molecularly targeted therapies, although their implementation in the clinical setting is in its infancy. In fact, despite the wealth of preclinical studies addressing these issues, the difficulty of testing each targeted therapy hypothesis in the clinical arena represents an intrinsic obstacle. As a consequence, we are witnessing a paradoxical situation where most hypotheses about the molecular and cellular biology of cancer remain clinically untested and therefore do not translate into a therapeutic benefit for patients. Objective To present a computational method aimed to comprehensively exploit the scientific knowledge in order to foster the development of personalized cancer treatment by matching the patient's molecular profile with the available evidence on targeted therapy. Methods To this aim we focused on melanoma, an increasingly diagnosed malignancy for which the need for novel therapeutic approaches is paradigmatic since no effective treatment is available in the advanced setting. Relevant data were manually extracted from peer-reviewed full-text original articles describing any type of anti-melanoma targeted therapy tested in any type of experimental or clinical model. To this purpose, Medline, Embase, Cancerlit and the Cochrane databases were searched. Results and Conclusions We created a manually annotated database (Targeted Therapy Database, TTD) where the relevant data are gathered in a formal representation that can be computationally analyzed. Dedicated algorithms were set up for the identification of the prevalent therapeutic hypotheses based on the available evidence and for ranking treatments based on the molecular profile of individual patients. In this essay we describe the principles and computational algorithms of an original method developed to fully exploit

  3. Improving gemcitabine-mediated radiosensitization using molecularly targeted therapy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Meredith A.; Parsels, Leslie A.; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2009-01-01

    In the last three decades gemcitabine has progressed from the status of a laboratory cytotoxic drug to a standard clinical chemotherapeutic agent and a potent radiation sensitizer. In an effort to improve the efficacy of gemcitabine, additional chemotherapeutic agents have been combined with gemcitabine (both with and without radiation) but with toxicity proving to be a major limitation. Therefore, the integration of molecularly targeted agents, which potentially produce less toxicity than standard chemotherapy, with gemcitabine-radiation is a promising strategy for improving chemoradiation. Two of the most promising targets, described in this review, for improving the efficacy of gemcitabine-radiation are EGFR and Chk1. PMID:18980967

  4. Cardiotoxicity of Molecularly Targeted Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hedhli, Nadia; Russell, Kerry S

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity of molecularly targeted cancer agents is increasingly recognized as a significant side effect of chemotherapy. These new potent therapies may not only affect the survival of cancer cells, but have the potential to adversely impact normal cardiac and vascular function. Unraveling the mechanisms by which these therapies affect the heart and vasculature is crucial for improving drug design and finding alternative therapies to protect patients predisposed to cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the classification and side effects of currently approved molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics. PMID:22758623

  5. Molecularly targeted therapies for advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Soley; Rocha-Lima, Caio M

    2013-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States. Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy has been a standard for patients with advanced stage disease. Improvements in overall survival and quality of life have been modest. Improved knowledge of the aberrant molecular signaling pathways found in NSCLC has led to the development of biomarkers with associated targeted therapeutics, thus changing the treatment paradigm for many NSCLC patients. In this review, we present a summary of many of the currently investigated biologic targets in NSCLC, discuss their current clinical trial status, and also discuss the potential for development of other targeted agents. PMID:23696960

  6. Transfer of genetic therapy across human populations: molecular targets for increasing patient coverage in repeat expansion diseases.

    PubMed

    Varela, Miguel A; Curtis, Helen J; Douglas, Andrew G L; Hammond, Suzan M; O'Loughlin, Aisling J; Sobrido, Maria J; Scholefield, Janine; Wood, Matthew J A

    2016-02-01

    Allele-specific gene therapy aims to silence expression of mutant alleles through targeting of disease-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNP linkage to disease varies between populations, making such molecular therapies applicable only to a subset of patients. Moreover, not all SNPs have the molecular features necessary for potent gene silencing. Here we provide knowledge to allow the maximisation of patient coverage by building a comprehensive understanding of SNPs ranked according to their predicted suitability toward allele-specific silencing in 14 repeat expansion diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy 1, myotonic dystrophy 2, Huntington's disease and several spinocerebellar ataxias. Our systematic analysis of DNA sequence variation shows that most annotated SNPs are not suitable for potent allele-specific silencing across populations because of suboptimal sequence features and low variability (>97% in HD). We suggest maximising patient coverage by selecting SNPs with high heterozygosity across populations, and preferentially targeting SNPs that lead to purine:purine mismatches in wild-type alleles to obtain potent allele-specific silencing. We therefore provide fundamental knowledge on strategies for optimising patient coverage of therapeutics for microsatellite expansion disorders by linking analysis of population genetic variation to the selection of molecular targets.

  7. Transfer of genetic therapy across human populations: molecular targets for increasing patient coverage in repeat expansion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Miguel A; Curtis, Helen J; Douglas, Andrew GL; Hammond, Suzan M; O'Loughlin, Aisling J; Sobrido, Maria J; Scholefield, Janine; Wood, Matthew JA

    2016-01-01

    Allele-specific gene therapy aims to silence expression of mutant alleles through targeting of disease-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNP linkage to disease varies between populations, making such molecular therapies applicable only to a subset of patients. Moreover, not all SNPs have the molecular features necessary for potent gene silencing. Here we provide knowledge to allow the maximisation of patient coverage by building a comprehensive understanding of SNPs ranked according to their predicted suitability toward allele-specific silencing in 14 repeat expansion diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy 1, myotonic dystrophy 2, Huntington's disease and several spinocerebellar ataxias. Our systematic analysis of DNA sequence variation shows that most annotated SNPs are not suitable for potent allele-specific silencing across populations because of suboptimal sequence features and low variability (>97% in HD). We suggest maximising patient coverage by selecting SNPs with high heterozygosity across populations, and preferentially targeting SNPs that lead to purine:purine mismatches in wild-type alleles to obtain potent allele-specific silencing. We therefore provide fundamental knowledge on strategies for optimising patient coverage of therapeutics for microsatellite expansion disorders by linking analysis of population genetic variation to the selection of molecular targets. PMID:25990798

  8. Malignant Cardiac Tamponade from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Case Series from the Era of Molecular Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bob T.; Pearson, Antonia; Pavlakis, Nick; Bell, David; Lee, Adrian; Chan, David; Harden, Michael; Mathur, Manu; Marshman, David; Brady, Peter; Clarke, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade complicating malignant pericardial effusion from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is generally associated with extremely poor prognosis. With improved systemic chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy for NSCLC in recent years, the prognosis of such patients and the value of invasive cardiothoracic surgery in this setting have not been adequately examined. We report outcomes from a contemporary case series of eight patients who presented with malignant cardiac tamponade due to NSCLC to an Australian academic medical institution over an 18 months period. Two cases of cardiac tamponade were de novo presentations of NSCLC and six cases were presentations following previous therapy for NSCLC. The median survival was 4.5 months with a range between 9 days to alive beyond 17 months. The two longest survivors are still receiving active therapy at 17 and 15 months after invasive surgical pericardial window respectively. One survivor had a histological subtype of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and the other received targeted therapy for epidermal growth factor receptor mutation. These results support the consideration of active surgical palliation to treating this oncological emergency complicating NSCLC, including the use of urgent drainage, surgical creation of pericardial window followed by appropriate systemic therapy in suitably fit patients. PMID:26237019

  9. Molecular classification of gastric cancer: Towards a pathway-driven targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Jaime A.; Weber, Helga; García, Patricia; Nervi, Bruno; Garrido, Marcelo; Corvalán, Alejandro H.; Roa, Juan Carlos; Bizama, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Although surgical resection is a potentially curative approach for localized cases of GC, most cases of GC are diagnosed in an advanced, non-curable stage and the response to traditional chemotherapy is limited. Fortunately, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that mediate GC hold great promise for the development of more effective treatment strategies. In this review, an overview of the morphological classification, current treatment approaches, and molecular alterations that have been characterized for GC are provided. In particular, the most recent molecular classification of GC and alterations identified in relevant signaling pathways, including ErbB, VEGF, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, and HGF/MET signaling pathways, are described, as well as inhibitors of these pathways. An overview of the completed and active clinical trials related to these signaling pathways are also summarized. Finally, insights regarding emerging stem cell pathways are described, and may provide additional novel markers for the development of therapeutic agents against GC. The development of more effective agents and the identification of biomarkers that can be used for the diagnosis, prognosis, and individualized therapy for GC patients, have the potential to improve the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness for GC treatments. PMID:26267324

  10. Molecular classification of gastric cancer: Towards a pathway-driven targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Ismael; Saavedra, Kathleen; Espinoza, Jaime A; Weber, Helga; García, Patricia; Nervi, Bruno; Garrido, Marcelo; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Roa, Juan Carlos; Bizama, Carolina

    2015-09-22

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Although surgical resection is a potentially curative approach for localized cases of GC, most cases of GC are diagnosed in an advanced, non-curable stage and the response to traditional chemotherapy is limited. Fortunately, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that mediate GC hold great promise for the development of more effective treatment strategies. In this review, an overview of the morphological classification, current treatment approaches, and molecular alterations that have been characterized for GC are provided. In particular, the most recent molecular classification of GC and alterations identified in relevant signaling pathways, including ErbB, VEGF, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, and HGF/ MET signaling pathways, are described, as well as inhibitors of these pathways. An overview of the completed and active clinical trials related to these signaling pathways are also summarized. Finally, insights regarding emerging stem cell pathways are described, and may provide additional novel markers for the development of therapeutic agents against GC. The development of more effective agents and the identification of biomarkers that can be used for the diagnosis, prognosis, and individualized therapy for GC patients, have the potential to improve the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness for GC treatments.

  11. Pathogenesis and molecular targeted therapy of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    PubMed

    Banno, Haruhiko; Katsuno, Masahisa; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2012-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), also known as Kennedy's disease, is an adult-onset, X-linked motor neuron disease characterized by muscle atrophy, weakness, contraction fasciculations, and bulbar involvement. SBMA is caused by the expansion of a CAG triplet repeat, encoding a polyglutamine tract within the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The histopathological finding in SBMA is the loss of lower motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord as well as in the brainstem motor nuclei. There is no established disease-modifying therapy for SBMA. Animal studies have revealed that the pathogenesis of SBMA depends on the level of serum testosterone, and that androgen deprivation mitigates neurodegeneration through inhibition of nuclear accumulation and/or stabilization of the pathogenic AR. Heat shock proteins, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and transcriptional regulation are also potential targets for development of therapy for SBMA. Among these therapeutic approaches, the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue, leuprorelin, prevents nuclear translocation of aberrant AR proteins, resulting in a significant improvement of disease phenotype in a mouse model of SBMA. In a phase 2 clinical trial of leuprorelin, the patients treated with this drug exhibited decreased mutant AR accumulation in scrotal skin biopsy. Phase 3 clinical trial showed the possibility that leuprorelin treatment is associated with improved swallowing function particularly in patients with a disease duration less than 10 years. These observations suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the toxic accumulation of mutant AR is a potential therapy for SBMA.

  12. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT∕CT and PET∕CT scanners. PMID:18697529

  13. [Molecular therapy targeting protein misfolding and aggregation for the polyglutamine diseases].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2009-11-01

    Abnormal aggregation and deposition of misfolded proteins have been recognized as a common molecular pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases. The polyQ diseases, including Huntington's disease and various spinocerebellar ataxias, are caused by abnormal expansions of the polyQ stretch (> 35-40) within disease-causative proteins, which are thought to trigger their misfolding and aggregation, leading to their deposition as inclusion bodies, and eventually resulting in neurodegeneration. We found that the expanded polyQ protein undergoes a conformational transition to a beta-sheet dominant structure in the monomeric state, triggering cytotoxicity, and subsequently resulting in formation of insoluble amyloid-like fibrillar aggregates. Targeting misfolding and aggregation of the expanded polyQ protein, we demonstrated that QBP1 (PolyQ-Binding Peptide 1: SNWKWWPGIFD) prevents the toxic beta-sheet transition and aggregation of the expanded polyQ protein in vitro and suppresses polyQ-induced neurodegeneration in Drosophila. From high-throughput screening of a chemical compound library (46,000), we have identified approximately 100 polyQ aggregate inhibitors as therapeutic candidates so far. We also found that 17-AAG, an HSF1-activating compound, suppresses polyQ-induced neurodegeneration in Drosophila through induction of endogenous molecular chaperones. We propose that our therapeutic strategy targeting protein misfolding and aggregation can also be applied to other neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Targeted therapies for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/23589545 . Kummar S, Murgo AJ, Tomaszewski JE, Doroshow JH. Therapeutic targeting of cancer cells: Era of molecularly targeted agents. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, ...

  15. Affibody molecules: potential for in vivo imaging of molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Feldwisch, Joachim; Wennborg, Anders; Abrahmsén, Lars

    2007-04-01

    Targeting radionuclide imaging of tumor-associated antigens may help to select patients who will benefit from a particular biological therapy. Affibody molecules are a novel class of small (approximately 7 kDa) phage display-selected affinity proteins, based on the B-domain scaffold of staphylococcal protein A. A large library (3 x 10(9) variants) has enabled selection of high-affinity (up to 22 pM) binders for a variety of tumor-associated antigens. The small size of Affibody molecules provides rapid tumor localization and fast clearance from nonspecific compartments. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the potential of Affibody molecules for specific and high-contrast radionuclide imaging of HER2 in vivo, and pilot clinical data using indium-111 and gallium-68 labeled anti-HER2 Affibody tracer have confirmed its utility for radionuclide imaging in cancer patients.

  16. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I; Driessen, Wouter H P; D'Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M; Flores, Leo G; Arap, Marco A; Lauer, Richard C; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-10-24

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC.

  17. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; D’Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C.; Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M.; Flores, Leo G.; Arap, Marco A.; Lauer, Richard C.; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC. PMID:27791181

  18. The transcriptional modulator BCL6 as a molecular target for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Liu, Suhu; Xiang, Michael; Nicolais, Maria; Hatzi, Katerina; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Elemento, Olivier; Cerchietti, Leandro; Melnick, Ari; Frank, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate expression or activation of transcription factors can drive patterns of gene expression leading to the malignant behavior of breast cancer cells. We have found that the transcriptional repressor BCL6 is highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines, and its locus is amplified in about half of primary breast cancers. To understand how BCL6 regulates gene expression in breast cancer cells, we utilized ChIP-seq to identify the BCL6 binding sites on a genomic scale. This revealed that BCL6 regulates a unique cohort of genes in breast cancer cell lines compared to B cell lymphomas. Furthermore, BCL6 expression promotes the survival of breast cancer cells, and targeting BCL6 with a peptidomimetic inhibitor leads to apoptosis of these cells. Finally, combining a BCL6 inhibitor and a STAT3 inhibitor provided enhanced cell killing in triple negative breast cancer cell lines, suggesting that combination therapy may be particularly useful. Thus, targeting BCL6 alone or in conjunction with other signaling pathways may be a useful therapeutic strategy for treating breast cancer. PMID:24662818

  19. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  20. Endometrial Cancer: What Is New in Adjuvant and Molecularly Targeted Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Zagouri, Flora; Bozas, George; Kafantari, Eftichia; Tsiatas, Marinos; Nikitas, Nikitas; Dimopoulos, Meletios-A.; Papadimitriou, Christos A.

    2010-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in western countries. Radiotherapy remains the mainstay of postoperative management, but accumulating data show that adjuvant chemotherapy may display promising results after staging surgery. The prognosis of patients with metastatic disease remains disappointing with only one-year survival. Progestins represent an effective option, especially for those patients with low-grade estrogen and/or progesterone receptor positive disease. Chemotherapy using the combination of paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and cisplatin is beneficial for patients with advanced or metastatic disease after staging surgery and potentially for patients with early-stage disease and high-risk factors. Toxicity is a point in question; however, the combination of paclitaxel with carboplatin may diminish these concerns. In women with multiple medical comorbidities, single-agent chemotherapy may be better tolerated with acceptable results. Our increased knowledge of the molecular aspects of endometrial cancer biology has paved the way for clinical research to develop novel targeted antineoplastic agents (everolimus, temsirolimus, gefitinib, erlotinib, cetuximab, trastuzumab, bevacizumab, sorafenib) as more effective and less toxic options. Continued investigation into the molecular pathways of endometrial cancer development and progression will increase our knowledge of this disease leading to the discovery of novel, superior agents. PMID:20148071

  1. Targeting G protein coupled receptor-related pathways as emerging molecular therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ghanemi, Abdelaziz

    2013-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the most important targets in modern pharmacology because of the different functions they mediate, especially within brain and peripheral nervous system, and also because of their functional and stereochemical properties. In this paper, we illustrate, via a variety of examples, novel advances about the GPCR-related molecules that have been shown to play diverse roles in GPCR pathways and in pathophysiological phenomena. We have exemplified how those GPCRs’ pathways are, or might constitute, potential targets for different drugs either to stimulate, modify, regulate or inhibit the cellular mechanisms that are hypothesized to govern some pathologic, physiologic, biologic and cellular or molecular aspects both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, influencing such pathways will, undoubtedly, lead to different therapeutical applications based on the related pharmacological implications. Furthermore, such new properties can be applied in different fields. In addition to offering fruitful directions for future researches, we hope the reviewed data, together with the elements found within the cited references, will inspire clinicians and researchers devoted to the studies on GPCR’s properties. PMID:25972730

  2. A Molecular Combination of Zinc(II) Phthalocyanine and Tamoxifen Derivative for Dual Targeting Photodynamic Therapy and Hormone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng-Ling; Song, Mei-Ru; Yuan, Gan-Kun; Ye, Huan-Nian; Tian, Ye; Huang, Ming-Dong; Xue, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Jian-Yong

    2017-08-10

    The combination of photodynamic therapy and other cancer treatment modalities is a promising strategy to enhance therapeutic efficacy and reduce side effects. In this study, a tamoxifen-zinc(II) phthalocyanine conjugate linked by a triethylene glycol chain has been synthesized and characterized. Having tamoxifen as the targeting moiety, the conjugate shows high specific affinity to MCF-7 breast cancer cells overexpressed estrogen receptors (ERs) and tumor tissues, therefore leading to a cytotoxic effect in the dark due to the cytostatic tamoxifen moiety, and a high photocytotoxicity due to the photosensitizing phthalocyanine unit against the MCF-7 cancer cells. The high photodynamic activity of the conjugate can be attributed to its high cellular uptake and efficiency in generating intracellular reactive oxygen species. Upon addition of exogenous 17β-estradiol as an ER inhibitor, the cellular uptake and photocytotoxicity of the conjugate are reduced significantly. As shown by confocal microscopy, the conjugate is preferentially localized in the lysosomes of the MCF-7 cells.

  3. Recent Advances on the Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Drug Resistance of Cancer Cells and Novel Targeting Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, M; Hauke, R; Batra, SK

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the recent knowledge obtained on the molecular mechanisms involved in the intrinsic and acquired resistance of cancer cells to current cancer therapies. We describe the cascades that are often altered in cancer cells during cancer progression that may contribute in a crucial manner to drug resistance and disease relapse. The emphasis is on the implication of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug efflux transporters in drug disposition and antiapoptotic factors, including epidermal growth factor receptor cascades and deregulated enzymes in ceramide metabolic pathways. The altered expression and activity of these signaling elements may have a critical role in the resistance of cancer cells to cytotoxic effects induced by diverse chemotherapeutic drugs and cancer recurrence. Of therapeutic interest, new strategies for reversing the multidrug resistance and developing more effective clinical treatments against the highly aggressive, metastatic, and recurrent cancers, based on the molecular targeting of the cancer progenitor cells and their further differentiated progeny, are also described. PMID:17786164

  4. Tumor targeting with RGD peptide ligands-design of new molecular conjugates for imaging and therapy of cancers.

    PubMed

    Garanger, Elisabeth; Boturyn, Didier; Dumy, Pascal

    2007-09-01

    Development of molecular devices endowed with tumor-targeting functions and carrying cytotoxic components should enable the specific delivery of chemotherapeutics to malignant tissues, thus increasing their local efficacy while limiting their peripheral toxicity. Such molecular vectors can pave the way for the development of new classes of therapeutics, fighting against protagonists of neoplastic development. In line with this concept, peptide ligands containing the Arginine-Glycine-Aspartate (RGD) triad, which display a strong affinity and selectivity to the alpha(V)beta(3) integrin, have been developed to target the tumor-associated cells expressing the alpha (V)beta (3) receptors. Among the validated ligands, the leader compound is the cyclic pentapeptide c[-RGDf(NMe)V-] (Cilengitide) developed by kessler et al. (J. Med. Chem., 1999, 42, 3033-3040). This compound has entered phase II clinical trials as an anti-angiogenic agent. Further studies have been directed to develop molecular conjugates of the parent c[-RGDfK-] with conventional chemotherapeutics or with labels for non-invasive imaging technologies. More recently, multimeric RGD containing compounds have been exploited to improve the targeting potential as well as cell-membrane breaching, through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The latter have been constructed on various scaffolds (polylysines or polyglutamates, liposomes, nanoparticles...). Our group has developed a chemical system combining all these properties where multivalent RGD targeting functions are associated with functional molecules through a cyclopeptide template. The latter represents a relevant non-viral vector for tumor targeting, imaging and therapy. This review describes the considerations for the design of the diverse RGD ligands developed so far and reports an overview of the main applications of these structures in cancer research.

  5. Targeted Cancer Therapy: Vital Oncogenes and a New Molecular Genetic Paradigm for Cancer Initiation Progression and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Rudolph E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been declared repeatedly that cancer is a result of molecular genetic abnormalities. However, there has been no working model describing the specific functional consequences of the deranged genomic processes that result in the initiation and propagation of the cancer process during carcinogenesis. We no longer need to question whether or not cancer arises as a result of a molecular genetic defect within the cancer cell. The legitimate questions are: how and why? This article reviews the preeminent data on cancer molecular genetics and subsequently proposes that the sentinel event in cancer initiation is the aberrant production of fused transcription activators with new molecular properties within normal tissue stem cells. This results in the production of vital oncogenes with dysfunctional gene activation transcription properties, which leads to dysfunctional gene regulation, the aberrant activation of transduction pathways, chromosomal breakage, activation of driver oncogenes, reactivation of stem cell transduction pathways and the activation of genes that result in the hallmarks of cancer. Furthermore, a novel holistic molecular genetic model of cancer initiation and progression is presented along with a new paradigm for the approach to personalized targeted cancer therapy, clinical monitoring and cancer diagnosis. PMID:27649156

  6. Targeted Cancer Therapy: Vital Oncogenes and a New Molecular Genetic Paradigm for Cancer Initiation Progression and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Willis, Rudolph E

    2016-09-14

    It has been declared repeatedly that cancer is a result of molecular genetic abnormalities. However, there has been no working model describing the specific functional consequences of the deranged genomic processes that result in the initiation and propagation of the cancer process during carcinogenesis. We no longer need to question whether or not cancer arises as a result of a molecular genetic defect within the cancer cell. The legitimate questions are: how and why? This article reviews the preeminent data on cancer molecular genetics and subsequently proposes that the sentinel event in cancer initiation is the aberrant production of fused transcription activators with new molecular properties within normal tissue stem cells. This results in the production of vital oncogenes with dysfunctional gene activation transcription properties, which leads to dysfunctional gene regulation, the aberrant activation of transduction pathways, chromosomal breakage, activation of driver oncogenes, reactivation of stem cell transduction pathways and the activation of genes that result in the hallmarks of cancer. Furthermore, a novel holistic molecular genetic model of cancer initiation and progression is presented along with a new paradigm for the approach to personalized targeted cancer therapy, clinical monitoring and cancer diagnosis.

  7. Indocyanine green as effective antibody conjugate for intracellular molecular targeted photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sijia; Hüttmann, Gereon; Rudnitzki, Florian; Diddens-Tschoeke, Heyke; Zhang, Zhenxi; Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin

    2016-07-01

    The fluorescent dye indocyanine green (ICG) is clinically approved and has been applied for ophthalmic and intraoperative angiography, measurement of cardiac output and liver function, or as contrast agent in cancer surgery. Though ICG is known for its photochemical effects, it has played a minor role so far in photodynamic therapy or techniques for targeted protein-inactivation. Here, we investigated ICG as an antibody-conjugate for the selective inactivation of the protein Ki-67 in the nucleus of cells. Conjugates of the Ki-67 antibody TuBB-9 with different amounts of ICG were synthesized and delivered into HeLa and OVCAR-5 cells through conjugation to the nuclear localization sequence. Endosomal escape of the macromolecular antibodies into the cytoplasm was optically triggered by photochemical internalization with the photosensitizer BPD. The second light irradiation at 690 nm inactivated Ki-67 and subsequently caused cell death. Here, we show that ICG as an antibody-conjugate can be an effective photosensitizing agent. Best effects were achieved with 1.8 ICG molecules per antibody. Conjugated to antibodies, the ICG absorption peaks vary proportionally with concentration. The absorption of ICG above 650 nm within the optical window of tissue opens the possibility of selective Ki-67 inactivation deep inside of tissues.

  8. Molecular and Clinical Aspects of the Target Therapy with the Calcimimetic Cinacalcet in the Treatment of Parathyroid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mingione, Alessandra; Verdelli, Chiara; Terranegra, Annalisa; Soldati, Laura; Corbetta, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Parathyroid tumors are almost invariably associated with parathormone (PTH) hypersecretion resulting in primary (PHPT) or secondary (SHPT) hyperparathyroidism. PHPT is the third most common endocrine disorder with a prevalence of 1-2% in post-menopausal women; SHPT is a major complication of chronic kidney failure, the prevalence of which is increasing. The calciumsensing receptor (CASR) is the key molecule regulating PTH synthesis and release from the parathyroid cells in response to changes in extracellular calcium concentrations. A potent calcimimetic, cinacalcet, has been developed in the last ten years and made available for medical treatment of both PHPT and SHPT. Cinacalcet has been demonstrated to be effective in inhibiting PTH secretion, though the drug fails to normalize PTH release, both in PHPT and SHPT patients with different degrees of disease severity, including patients with parathyroid carcinomas and with MEN1-related parathyroid tumors. Here we reviewed the molecular aspects of CASR target therapy and the effect of the CASR gene single nucleotide polymorphisms. Clinical data concerning the efficacy and safety of cinacalcet in controlling hyperparathyroidism are reported, focusing on the treatment of the different types of parathyroid tumors. Finally, limits of this target therapy are analyzed, pointing out the lack of efficacy in improving kidney and bone morbidities in PHPT and cardiovascular diseases in SHPT. Though cinacalcet is a target therapeutic option for parathyroid tumors, further approaches are warranted to fully control these metabolic disorders and the underlying tumors.

  9. Therapy in prion diseases: from molecular and cellular biology to therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Krammer, Carmen; Vorberg, Ina; Schätzl, Hermann M; Gilch, Sabine

    2009-02-01

    Prion diseases are infectious and fatal neurodegenerative disorders of man and animals which are characterized by spongiform degeneration in the central nervous system. In human diseases, the manifestation can be sporadic, familial or acquired by infection. Prion disorders are caused by the accumulation of an aberrantly folded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)), commonly named PrP(Sc). Although prion diseases are usually rare, they have the potential to be transferred within and also between species by infection processes, giving then raise even to epidemic scenarios. As pathology is obviously restricted to the central nervous system pre-mortem diagnosis is usually hard to achieve. Promising approaches towards the development of therapeutic and even prophylactic anti-prion regimens were recently made. However, only a profound knowledge of the infectious agent and its replication strategy enables the design of effective anti-prion strategies. Cell culture models were highly instrumental in uncovering fundamental aspects of prion propagation. In this chapter, the cellular and molecular biology of prion proteins in general is discussed and prophylactic and therapeutic concepts derived thereof are introduced. In particular, emphasis is put on strategies targeting PrP(c) which is absolutely needed as substrate for prion conversion, and on intrinsic cellular clearance mechanisms for prions.

  10. Molecularly targeted therapy and radiotherapy in the management of localized gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the rectum: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ciresa, Marzia; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Ramella, Sara; Cellini, Francesco; Gaudino, Diego; Stimato, Gerardina; Fiore, Michele; Greco, Carlo; Nudo, Raffaele; Trodella, Lucio

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. The main treatment for localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors is surgical resection. These tumors respond poorly to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy agents and to radiotherapy. Imatinib mesylate, a small-molecule kinase inhibitor, has proved useful in the treatment of recurrent or metastatic GISTs and is now being tested in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting. The role of radiotherapy in the management of patients with GIST is currently restricted to symptomatic palliation. We present the case of a 54-year-old man affected by rectal GIST extending to the anal canal, with constipation, hematochezia, and anal pain. He received imatinib, 400 mg orally per day, for a week before and during radiation therapy. Irradiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume by 3D conformal therapy. The planned total dose was 50.4 Gy in fractions of 1.8 Gy daily. We observed a partial clinical response 3 weeks after the end of combination treatment. The patient then underwent a sphincter-saving surgical procedure. There was no perioperative morbidity and a complete pathological response was obtained. At the present time, the role of radiotherapy in the management of patients with GIST is restricted to symptomatic palliation. The introduction of molecularly targeted therapy combined with radiation therapy could improve the outcomes for patients diagnosed with GIST.

  11. Molecular Profiling to Optimize Treatment in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Review of Potential Molecular Targets for Radiation Therapy by the Translational Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Ausborn, Natalie L.; Le, Quynh Thu; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Choy, Hak; Dicker, Adam P.; Saha, Debabrata; Simko, Jeff; Story, Michael D.; Torossian, Artour; Lu, Bo

    2012-07-15

    Therapeutic decisions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been mainly based on disease stage, performance status, and co-morbidities, and rarely on histological or molecular classification. Rather than applying broad treatments to unselected patients that may result in survival increase of only weeks to months, research efforts should be, and are being, focused on identifying predictive markers for molecularly targeted therapy and determining genomic signatures that predict survival and response to specific therapies. The availability of such targeted biologics requires their use to be matched to tumors of corresponding molecular vulnerability for maximum efficacy. Molecular markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), K-ras, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) represent potential parameters guide treatment decisions. Ultimately, identifying patients who will respond to specific therapies will allow optimal efficacy with minimal toxicity, which will result in more judicious and effective application of expensive targeted therapy as the new paradigm of personalized medicine develops.

  12. [Molecular targets in colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Borner, M M

    2006-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Switzerland. The nihilism that dominated the treatment of these patients for decades has been replaced by a measure of enthusiasm, given recent therapeutic advances. New anticancer drugs such as irinotecan and oxaliplatin have changed the standard chemotherapy treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, the real hype has come from molecular targeted therapy. Identification of cellular processes characteristic of colon cancer has permitted therapeutic targeting with favorable therapeutic index. Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor in the clinic has provided proof of principle that interruption of signal transduction cascades in patients has therapeutic potential. Angiogenesis, especially the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway, has been proven to be another highly successful molecular target. In this article, we will review molecular targets, which are under active clinical investigation in colon cancer.

  13. Renal effects of molecular targeted therapies in oncology: a review by the Cancer and the Kidney International Network (C-KIN).

    PubMed

    Launay-Vacher, V; Aapro, M; De Castro, G; Cohen, E; Deray, G; Dooley, M; Humphreys, B; Lichtman, S; Rey, J; Scotté, F; Wildiers, H; Sprangers, B

    2015-08-01

    A number of cancer therapy agents are cleared by the kidney and may affect renal function, including cytotoxic chemotherapy agents, molecular targeted therapies, analgesics, antibiotics, radiopharmaceuticals and radiation therapy, and bone-targeted therapies. Many of these agents can be nephrotoxic, including targeted cancer therapies. The incidence, severity, and pattern of renal toxicities may vary according to the respective target of the drug. Here, we review the renal effects associated with a selection of currenty approved targeted cancer therapies, directed to vascular endothelial growth factor or VEGF receptor(s) (VEGF/VEGFR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor2 (HER2), BRAF, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), programmed cell death protein-1 or its ligand (PD-1/PDL-1), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The early diagnosis and prompt treatment of these renal alterations are essential in the daily practice where molecular targeted therapies have a definitive role in the armamentarium used in many cancers.

  14. Genomic profiling guides the choice of molecular targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Frank, Thomas S; Sun, Xiaotian; Zhang, Yuqing; Yang, Jingxuan; Fisher, William E; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Li, Min

    2015-07-10

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst five-year survival rate of all malignancies due to its aggressive progression and resistance to therapy. Current therapies are limited to gemcitabine-based chemotherapeutics, surgery, and radiation. The current trend toward "personalized genomic medicine" has the potential to improve the treatment options for pancreatic cancer. Gene identification and genetic alterations like single nucleotide polymorphisms and mutations will allow physicians to predict the efficacy and toxicity of drugs, which could help diagnose pancreatic cancer, guide neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment, and evaluate patients' prognosis. This article reviews the multifaceted roles of genomics and pharmacogenomics in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeted anti bacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Benhar, Itai

    2007-09-01

    The increasing development of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has reached alarming levels, thus necessitating a strong need to develop new antimicrobial agents. These new antimicrobials should possess novel modes of action and/or different cellular targets compared with the existing antibiotics. As a result, new classes of compounds designed to avoid defined resistance mechanisms are undergoing pre clinical and clinical evaluation. Microbial and phage genomic sequencing are now being used to find previously unidentified genes and their corresponding proteins. In both traditional and newly developed antibiotics, the target selectivity lies in the drug itself, in its ability to affect a mechanism that is unique to prokaryotes. As a result, a vast number of potent agents that, due to low selectivity, in addition to the pathogen also affect the eukaryote host have been excluded from use as therapeutics. Such compounds could be re-considered for clinical use if applied as part of a targeted delivery platform where the drug selectivity is replaced by target-selectivity borne by the targeting moiety. With a large number of antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates already approved or near approval as cancer therapeutics, targeted therapy is becoming increasingly attractive and additional potential targeting moieties that are non-antibody based, such as peptides, non-antibody ligand-binding proteins and even carbohydrates are receiving increasing attention. Still, targeted therapy is mostly focused on cancer, with targeted anti bacterial therapies being suggested only very recently. This review will focus in the various methods of antimicrobial targeting, by systemic and local application of targeted antimicrobial substances.

  16. Influences of BRAF Inhibitors on the Immune Microenvironment and the Rationale for Combined Molecular and Immune Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sangeetha M.; Reuben, Alexandre; Wargo, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    The identification of key driver mutations in melanoma has led to the development of targeted therapies aimed at BRAF and MEK, but responses are often limited in duration. There is growing evidence that MAPK pathway activation impairs antitumor immunity and that targeting this pathway may enhance responses to immunotherapies. There is also evidence that immune mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy exist, providing the rationale for combining targeted therapy with immunotherapy. Preclinical studies have demonstrated synergy in combining these strategies, and combination clinical trials are ongoing. It is, however, becoming clear that additional translational studies are needed to better understand toxicity, proper timing, and sequence of therapy, as well as the utility of multidrug regimens and effects of other targeted agents on antitumor immunity. Insights gained through translational research in preclinical models and clinical studies will provide mechanistic insight into therapeutic response and resistance and help devise rational strategies to enhance therapeutic responses. PMID:27215436

  17. Molecular probing of TNF: From identification of therapeutic target to guidance of therapy in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2016-09-12

    Therapy by blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activity is highly efficacious and profoundly changed the paradigm of several inflammatory diseases. However, a significant proportion of patients with inflammatory diseases do not respond to TNF inhibitors (TNFi). Prediction of therapeutic response is required for TNFi therapy. Isotope labeled anti-TNF antibodies or TNF receptor have been investigated to localize TNF production at inflammatory tissue in animal models and in patients with inflammatory diseases. The in vivo detection of TNF has been associated with treatment response. Recently, fluorophore labeled anti-TNF antibody in combination with confocal laser endomicroscopy in patients with Crohn's disease yielded more accurate and quantitative in vivo detection of TNF in the diseased mucosa. More importantly, this method demonstrated high therapeutic predication value. Fluorophore labeled TNF binding aptamers in combination with modern imaging technology offers additional tools for in vivo TNF probing.

  18. Molecular Pathogenesis and Targeted Therapies in Well-Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Four proto-oncogenes commonly associated with well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma, rearranged during transfection (RET)/papillary thyroid cancer, BRAF, RAS, and PAX8/peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ, may carry diagnostic and prognostic significance. These oncogenes can be used to improve the diagnosis and management of well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Limited therapeutic options are available for patients with metastatic well-differentiated thyroid cancer, necessitating the development of novel therapies. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)- and RET-directed therapies such as sorafenib, motesanib, and sunitinib have been shown to be the most effective at inducing clinical responses and stabilizing the disease process. Further clinical trials of these therapeutic agents may soon change the management of thyroid cancer. PMID:25309777

  19. Novel Therapies Against Aggressive and Recurrent Epithelial Cancers by Molecular Targeting Tumor- and Metastasis-Initiating Cells and Their Progenies

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence has revealed that the highly tumorigenic cancer stem/progenitor cells endowed with stem cell-like properties might be responsible for initiation and progression of numerous aggressive epithelial cancers into locally invasive, metastatic and incurable disease states. The malignant transformation of tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells or their progenies into tumorigenic and migrating cancer stem/progenitor cells and their resistance to current cancer therapies have been associated with their high expression levels of specific oncogenic products and drug resistance-associated molecules. In this regard, we describe the tumorigenic cascades that are frequently activated in cancer stem/progenitor cells versus their differentiated progenies during the early and late stages of the epithelial cancer progression. The emphasis is on the growth factor signaling pathways involved in the malignant behavior of prostate and pancreatic cancer stem/progenitor cells and their progenies. Of clinical interest, the potential molecular therapeutic targets to eradicate the tumor- and metastasis-initiating cells and their progenies and develop new effective combination therapies against locally advanced and metastatic epithelial cancers are also described. PMID:20184544

  20. Lung cancer in never-smokers. Does smoking history matter in the era of molecular diagnostics and targeted therapy?

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer in never-smokers was recognised as a distinct clinical entity around the mid-2000s because these patients tended to be Asian women and diagnosed at a younger age with a preponderance of adenocarcinoma and better survival outcome despite a more advanced stage of presentation. It was soon discovered that lung cancer in never-smokers had a higher prevalence of activating EGFR mutations and we tend to classify lung cancer by smoking status for screening purpose. With the discoveries of many actionable driver mutations such as activating EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement in adenocarcinoma of the lung we have switched to classifying non-small cell lung cancer into different individual molecular subgroups based on the presence of a dominant driver mutation. Although many actionable driver mutations are found in never-smokers with adenocarcinoma, this review will summarise that a substantial proportion of patients with these actionable driver mutations had a previous smoking history. Alternatively among the driver mutations that are associated with smoking history, a fair amount of these patients were never-smokers. Thus smoking status should not be used as a screen strategy for identifying driver mutations in clinical practice. Finally smoking history may have predictive and/or prognostic significance within individual molecular subgroups and identifying the difference according to smoking history may help optimise future targeted therapy.

  1. Republished: lung cancer in never-smokers. Does smoking history matter in the era of molecular diagnostics and targeted therapy?

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2014-04-01

    Lung cancer in never-smokers was recognised as a distinct clinical entity around the mid-2000s because these patients tended to be Asian women and diagnosed at a younger age with a preponderance of adenocarcinoma and better survival outcome despite a more advanced stage of presentation. It was soon discovered that lung cancer in never-smokers had a higher prevalence of activating EGFR mutations and we tend to classify lung cancer by smoking status for screening purpose. With the discoveries of many actionable driver mutations such as activating EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement in adenocarcinoma of the lung we have switched to classifying non-small cell lung cancer into different individual molecular subgroups based on the presence of a dominant driver mutation. Although many actionable driver mutations are found in never-smokers with adenocarcinoma, this review will summarise that a substantial proportion of patients with these actionable driver mutations had a previous smoking history. Alternatively among the driver mutations that are associated with smoking history, a fair amount of these patients were never-smokers. Thus smoking status should not be used as a screen strategy for identifying driver mutations in clinical practice. Finally smoking history may have predictive and/or prognostic significance within individual molecular subgroups and identifying the difference according to smoking history may help optimise future targeted therapy.

  2. The intersection of immune-directed and molecularly targeted therapy in advanced melanoma: where we have been, are, and will be.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Ryan J; Lorusso, Patricia M; Flaherty, Keith T

    2013-10-01

    In three years, four drugs have gained regulatory approval for the treatment of metastatic and unresectable melanoma, with at least seven other drugs having recently completed, currently in, or soon to be in phase III clinical testing. This amazing achievement has been made following a remarkable increase of knowledge in molecular biology and immunology that led to the identification of high-valued therapeutic targets and the clinical development of agents that effectively engage and inhibit these targets. The discovery of either effective molecularly targeted therapies or immunotherapies would have led to dramatic improvements to the standard-of-care treatment of melanoma. However, through parallel efforts that have showcased the efficacy of small-molecule BRAF and MAP-ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors, as well as the immune checkpoint inhibitors, namely ipilimumab and the anti-PD1/PDL1 antibodies (lambrolizumab, nivolumab, MPDL3280), an opportunity exists to transform the treatment of melanoma specifically and cancer generally by exploring rational combinations of molecularly targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and molecular targeted therapies with immunotherapies. This overview presents the historical context to this therapeutic revolution, reviews the benefits and limitations of current therapies, and provides a look ahead at where the field is headed. ©2013 AACR.

  3. The intersection of immune-directed and molecularly targeted therapy in advanced melanoma: Where we have been, are, and will be

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Ryan J.; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2013-01-01

    In three years, four drugs have gained regulatory approval for the treatment of metastatic and unresectable melanoma with at least seven other drugs having recently completed, currently in, or soon to be in phase III clinical testing. This amazing achievement has been made following a remarkable increase of knowledge in molecular biology and immunology that led to the identification of high-valued therapeutic targets and the clinical development of agents that effectively engage and inhibit these targets. The discovery of either effective molecularly targeted therapies or immunotherapies would have led to dramatic improvements to the standard of care treatment of melanoma. However, through parallel efforts that have showcased the efficacy of small molecule BRAF and MEK inhibitors as well as the immune checkpoint inhibitors, namely ipilimumab and the anti-PD1/PDL1 antibodies (lambrolizumab, nivolumab, MPDL3280), an opportunity exists to transform the treatment of melanoma specifically and cancer generally by exploring rational combinations of molecularly targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and molecular targeted therapies with immunotherapies. This overview presents the historical context to this therapeutic revolution, reviews the benefits and limitations of current therapies, and provides a look ahead at where the field is headed. PMID:24089441

  4. [Targeted therapies for melanoma].

    PubMed

    Leiter, U; Meier, F; Garbe, C

    2014-07-01

    Since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF oncogene and also stimulation of immune mediated antitumor response in melanoma, there has been remarkable progress in the development of targeted therapies for unresectable and metastatic melanoma. This article addresses the latest developments of BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway signaling. In addition, the development of drugs to attack alternative mutations in melanoma, such as NRAS and KIT is described. Strategies for the management of BRAF inhibitor resistance, such as with combination therapy, are outlined. Antitumor immune therapies with monoclonal antibodies such as ipilimumab which acts by promoting T-cell activation or antibody blockade of programmed death-1 (PD-1) led to a long term response in metastatic melanoma. Results of latest clinical studies including the toxicity profile are described. Due to selective kinase inhibitors and immune checkpoint blockade, the therapy of unresectable metastatic melanoma has greatly improved and long-term survival of patients with metastatic melanoma seems a real possibility.

  5. [Molecular-targeted therapy for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA)].

    PubMed

    Sobue, Gen

    2010-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. The cause of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine tract, within the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA exclusively occurs in males, whereas both heterozygous and homozygous females are usually asymptomatic. In a transgenic mouse model of SBMA, neuromuscular symptoms are markedly pronounced in the male mice, but far less severe in the female counterparts. Androgen deprivation through both surgical and chemical castration substantially suppresses nuclear accumulation of the pathogenic AR, and thereby improves symptoms in the male mice. Since the nuclear translocation of AR is ligand-dependent, testosterone appears to show toxic effects by accelerating nuclear translocation of the pathogenic AR. In a phase 2 clinical trial, 12-month treatment with leuprorelin significantly diminished the serum level of creatine kinase, and suppressed nuclear accumulation of the pathogenic AR. The ligand-dependent accumulation of the pathogenic AR, an initial step in the neurodegenerative process in SBMA, is followed by several downstream molecular events such as transcriptional dysregulation, axonal transport disruption, and mitochondrial insufficiency, indicating that both upstream and downstream molecular abnormalities should be corrected.

  6. Recent advances in myelodysplastic syndromes: Molecular pathogenesis and its implications for targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Hironori; Harada, Yuka

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are defined as stem cell disorders caused by various gene abnormalities. Recent analysis using next-generation sequencing has provided great advances in identifying relationships between gene mutations and clinical phenotypes of MDS. Gene mutations affecting RNA splicing machinery, DNA methylation, histone modifications, transcription factors, signal transduction proteins and components of the cohesion complex participate in the pathogenesis and progression of MDS. Mutations in RNA splicing and DNA methylation occur early and are considered “founding mutations”, whereas others that occur later are regarded as “subclonal mutations”. RUNX1 mutations are more likely to subclonal; however, they apparently play a pivotal role in familial MDS. These genetic findings may lead to future therapies for MDS. PMID:25611784

  7. Characterization of ovarian clear cell carcinoma using target drug-based molecular biomarkers: implications for personalized cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengjiao; Li, Haoran; Liu, Fei; Bi, Rui; Tu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Lihua; Ye, Shuang; Cheng, Xi

    2017-02-10

    results were observed in HGSC patients. Ovarian CCC showed a markedly different expression map of drug-based molecular biomarkers from HGSC, which suggested a new personalized target therapy in this rare subtype.

  8. Gastric Carcinoma: Recent Trends in Diagnostic Biomarkers and Molecular Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Wafa; Iftikhar, Asra; Khaliq, Tanweer; Aslam, Bilal; Muzaffar, Humaira; Atta, Komal; Mahmood, Aisha; Waris, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is generally associated with poor survival rates and accounts for a remarkable proportion of global cancer mortality. The prevalence of gastric carcinoma varies in different regions of world and across teh various ethnic groups. On the basis of pathological assessment, gastric cancer can be categorized as intestinal and diffuse carcinomas. The etiology is diverse, including chemical carcinogen exposure, and high salt intake Helicobacter pylori also plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of certain gastric carcinomas. The development of gastric cancer involves various alterations in mRNAs, genes (GOLPH3, MTA2) and proteins (Coronins). miRNAs, Hsamir135b, MiR21, miR106b, miR17, miR18a, MiR21, miR106b, miR17, miR18a and MiRNA375, miRNA1955p are the latest diagnostic biomarkers which can facilitate the early diagnosis of gastric carcinomas. Recent development in the treatment strategies for gastric carcinoma include the introduction of monoclonal antibodies, TKI inhibitors, inhibitors of PDGFR β, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, AntiEGFR and antiHER2 agents which can be applied along with conventional therapies.

  9. Molecular targets of vitexin and isovitexin in cancer therapy: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Kumar; Xu, Baojun

    2017-08-01

    Cancer is a primary public health problem and the second leading cause of death worldwide. It causes life-threatening malignancies and results in high financial costs for both patients and the healthcare system. Hence, it is important to develop effective long-term strategies pertaining to prevention and control of cancers. Plant-derived secondary metabolites have been shown to have positive roles against various cancers. A number of plant extracts have been evaluated for possible use in the treatment of cancer; some have provided direction for new strategies for the research and development of antitumor agents. Here, we provide comprehensive data on various cancers, potential molecular mechanisms, and therapeutic implications of just two plant-derived compounds, vitexin and isovitexin. Information on the chemotherapeutic potential of vitexin and isovitexin was collected from a library database and through electronic searches (ScienceDirect, Pubmed, and Google Scholar). Both in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that vitexin and isovitexin are chemopreventive compounds with activity against various cancers through proapoptotic processes and/or autophagy. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Development and Characterization of Bladder Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts for Molecularly Guided Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-yin; Davis, Ryan R.; Keck, James; Ghosh, Paramita M.; Gill, Parkash; Airhart, Susan; Bult, Carol; Gandara, David R.; Liu, Edison; de Vere White, Ralph W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The overarching goal of this project is to establish a patient-derived bladder cancer xenograft (PDX) platform, annotated with deep sequencing and patient clinical information, to accelerate the development of new treatment options for bladder cancer patients. Herein, we describe the creation, initial characterization and use of the platform for this purpose. Methods and Findings Twenty-two PDXs with annotated clinical information were established from uncultured unselected clinical bladder cancer specimens in immunodeficient NSG mice. The morphological fidelity was maintained in PDXs. Whole exome sequencing revealed that PDXs and parental patient cancers shared 92–97% of genetic aberrations, including multiple druggable targets. For drug repurposing, an EGFR/HER2 dual inhibitor lapatinib was effective in PDX BL0440 (progression-free survival or PFS of 25.4 days versus 18.4 days in the control, p = 0.007), but not in PDX BL0269 (12 days versus 13 days in the control, p = 0.16) although both expressed HER2. To screen for the most effective MTT, we evaluated three drugs (lapatinib, ponatinib, and BEZ235) matched with aberrations in PDX BL0269; but only a PIK3CA inhibitor BEZ235 was effective (p<0.0001). To study the mechanisms of secondary resistance, a fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 inhibitor BGJ398 prolonged PFS of PDX BL0293 from 9.5 days of the control to 18.5 days (p<0.0001), and serial biopsies revealed that the MAPK/ERK and PIK3CA-AKT pathways were activated upon resistance. Inhibition of these pathways significantly prolonged PFS from 12 day of the control to 22 days (p = 0.001). To screen for effective chemotherapeutic drugs, four of the first six PDXs were sensitive to the cisplatin/gemcitabine combination, and chemoresistance to one drug could be overcome by the other drug. Conclusion The PDX models described here show good correlation with the patient at the genomic level and known patient response to treatment. This supports further

  11. Overall survival and the response to radiotherapy among molecular subtypes of breast cancer brain metastases treated with targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacob A; Kotecha, Rupesh; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Chao, Samuel T; Barnett, Gene H; Murphy, Erin S; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Angelov, Lilyana; Peereboom, David M; Suh, John H

    2017-06-15

    The current study was conducted to investigate survival and the response to radiotherapy among patients with molecular subtypes of breast cancer brain metastases treated with or without targeted therapies. Patients diagnosed with breast cancer brain metastases at a single tertiary care institution were included. The primary outcome was overall survival, whereas secondary outcomes included the cumulative incidences of distant intracranial failure, local failure, and radiation necrosis. Competing risks regression was used to model secondary outcomes. Within the study period, 547 patients presented with 3224 brain metastases and met inclusion criteria. Among patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-amplified disease, 80% received HER2 antibodies and 38% received HER2/epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The median survival was significantly shorter in the basal cohort (8.4 months), and progressively increased in the luminal A (12.3 months), HER2-positive (15.4 months), and luminal B (18.8 months) cohorts (P<.001). Among patients with HER2-amplified disease, the median survival was extended with the use of both HER2 antibodies (17.9 months vs 15.1 months; P = .04) and TKIs (21.1 months vs 15.4 months; P = .03). The 12-month cumulative incidences of local failure among molecular subtypes were 6.0% in the luminal A cohort, 10.3% in the luminal B cohort, 15.4% in the HER2-positive cohort, and 9.9% in the basal cohort (P = .01). Concurrent HER2/epidermal growth factor receptor TKIs with stereotactic radiosurgery significantly decreased the 12-month cumulative incidence of local failure from 15.1% to 5.7% (P<.001). Molecular subtypes appear to be prognostic for survival and predictive of the response to radiotherapy. TKIs were found to improve survival and local control, and may decrease the rate of distant failure. To preserve neurocognition, these results support a paradigm of upfront radiosurgery and HER2

  12. Evaluation of Three Small Molecular Drugs for Targeted Therapy to Treat Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jun; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To guide the optimal selection among first-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in clinical practice. This review attempted to provide a thorough comparison among three first-generation EGFR-TKIs, namely icotinib, erlotinib, and gefitinib, with regard to their molecular structure, pharmacokinetic parameters, clinical data, adverse reactions, and contraindications. Data Sources: An electronic literature search of the PubMed database and Google Scholar for all the available articles regarding gefitinib, icotinib, and erlotinib in the English language from January 2005 to December 2014 was used. Study Selection: The search terms or keywords included but not limited to “lung cancer”, “nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC)”, “epidemiology”, “EGFR”, “TKIs”, and “optimal selection”. Results: As suggested by this review, even though the three first-generation EGFR-TKIs share the quinazoline structure, erlotinib had the strongest apoptosis induction activity because of its use of a different side-chain. The pharmacokinetic parameters indicated that both erlotinib and icotinib are affected by food. The therapeutic window of erlotinib is narrow, and the recommended dosage is close to the maximum tolerable dosage. Icotinib enjoys a wider therapeutic window, and its concentration in the blood is within a safe dosage range even if it is administered with food. Based on multiple large-scale clinical trials, erlotinib is universally applied as the first-line treatment. In marked contrast, icotinib is available only in China as the second- or third-line therapeutic approach for treating advanced lung cancer. In addition, it exhibits a similar efficacy but better safety profile than gefitinib. Conclusions: Although there is a paucity of literature regarding whether icotinib is superior to erlotinib, its superior toxicity profile, noninferior efficacy, and lower cost indicate that it is a better alternative

  13. Risk for molecular contamination of tissue samples evaluated for targeted anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Einav; Fahoum, Ibrahim; Sabo, Edmond; Ben-Izhak, Ofer; Hershkovitz, Dov

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing usage of sensitive PCR technology for pharmacogenetics, cross contamination becomes a significant concern. Researchers employed techniques which basically include replacing laboratory equipment after each sample preparation; however, there are no recommended guidelines. In the present work we wanted to evaluate the risk of cross contamination during tissue processing using the routine precaution measures. Twenty-one surgical samples of lung adenocarcinoma were used, of which 7 contained EGFR exon 19 mutation, 7 contained EGFR exon 21 mutation (p.L858R) and 7 were EGFR wild-type. The samples were ordered by alternating the mutation group to maximize the potential for cross contamination and underwent tissue sectioning and de-paraffinization. The entire process was performed using the same tools. Following DNA extraction all samples underwent PCR amplification and were scrutinized for small fractions of EGFR mutation using deep sequencing with the Ion torrent PGM technology. Twenty samples yielded results. The fraction of mutated copies was 41 ± 23% (range 11–66) for the cases with known exon 19 mutation and 48±24% (range 0–65) for the cases with known exon 21 mutations. No in-frame exon 19 deletion mutations were identified in the wild-type (WT) and exon 21 groups. The fraction of EGFR exon 21 (codon 858) mutations was 0.018±0.014% (range 0–0.05%) in the WT and exon 19 groups, which was not statistically different than the background sequencing artifact noise for the same base-pair alteration (p = 0.21). Our results suggest that standard precautions are sufficient for molecular pathology diagnosis of surgical samples and are not associated with increased risk of cross contamination. PMID:28288198

  14. Evaluation of Three Small Molecular Drugs for Targeted Therapy to Treat Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jun; Zhang, Li

    2016-02-05

    To guide the optimal selection among first-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in clinical practice. This review attempted to provide a thorough comparison among three first-generation EGFR-TKIs, namely icotinib, erlotinib, and gefitinib, with regard to their molecular structure, pharmacokinetic parameters, clinical data, adverse reactions, and contraindications. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database and Google Scholar for all the available articles regarding gefitinib, icotinib, and erlotinib in the English language from January 2005 to December 2014 was used. The search terms or keywords included but not limited to "lung cancer", "nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC)", "epidemiology", "EGFR", "TKIs", and "optimal selection ". As suggested by this review, even though the three first-generation EGFR-TKIs share the quinazoline structure, erlotinib had the strongest apoptosis induction activity because of its use of a different side-chain. The pharmacokinetic parameters indicated that both erlotinib and icotinib are affected by food. The therapeutic window of erlotinib is narrow, and the recommended dosage is close to the maximum tolerable dosage. Icotinib enjoys a wider therapeutic window, and its concentration in the blood is within a safe dosage range even if it is administered with food. Based on multiple large-scale clinical trials, erlotinib is universally applied as the first-line treatment. In marked contrast, icotinib is available only in China as the second- or third-line therapeutic approach for treating advanced lung cancer. In addition, it exhibits a similar efficacy but better safety profile than gefitinib. Although there is a paucity of literature regarding whether icotinib is superior to erlotinib, its superior toxicity profile, noninferior efficacy, and lower cost indicate that it is a better alternative for Chinese patients living with advanced NSCLC.

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Fluorescent Antibody-Drug Conjugate for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Steve; Raja, Erum; Bomgarden, Ryan; Nlend, Marie; Chen, Aoshuang; Kalyanasundaram, Ramaswamy; Desai, Surbhi

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are widely available and cost-effective research tools in life science, and antibody conjugates are now extensively used for targeted therapy, immunohistochemical staining, or in vivo diagnostic imaging of cancer. Significant advances in site-specific antibody labeling technologies have enabled the production of highly characterized and homogenous conjugates for biomedical purposes, and some recent studies have utilized site-specific labeling to synthesize bifunctional antibody conjugates with both imaging and drug delivery properties. While these advances are important for the clinical safety and efficacy of such biologics, these techniques can also be difficult, expensive, and time-consuming. Furthermore, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) used for tumor treatment generally remain distinct from conjugates used for diagnosis. Thus, there exists a need to develop simple dual-labeling methods for efficient therapeutic and diagnostic evaluation of antibody conjugates in pre-clinical model systems. Here, we present a rapid and simple method utilizing commercially available reagents for synthesizing a dual-labeled fluorescent ADC. Further, we demonstrate the fluorescent ADC’s utility for simultaneous targeted therapy and molecular imaging of cancer both in vitro and in vivo. Employing non-site-specific, amine-reactive chemistry, our novel biopharmaceutical theranostic is a monoclonal antibody specific for a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) biomarker conjugated to both paclitaxel and a near-infrared (NIR), polyethylene glycol modified (PEGylated) fluorophore (DyLight™ 680-4xPEG). Using in vitro systems, we demonstrate that this fluorescent ADC selectively binds a CEA-positive pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3) in immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry, exhibits efficient internalization kinetics, and is cytotoxic. Model studies using a xenograft of BxPC-3 cells in athymic mice also show the fluorescent ADC’s efficacy in detecting tumors in vivo and

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Fluorescent Antibody-Drug Conjugate for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Steve; Raja, Erum; Bomgarden, Ryan; Nlend, Marie; Chen, Aoshuang; Kalyanasundaram, Ramaswamy; Desai, Surbhi

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are widely available and cost-effective research tools in life science, and antibody conjugates are now extensively used for targeted therapy, immunohistochemical staining, or in vivo diagnostic imaging of cancer. Significant advances in site-specific antibody labeling technologies have enabled the production of highly characterized and homogenous conjugates for biomedical purposes, and some recent studies have utilized site-specific labeling to synthesize bifunctional antibody conjugates with both imaging and drug delivery properties. While these advances are important for the clinical safety and efficacy of such biologics, these techniques can also be difficult, expensive, and time-consuming. Furthermore, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) used for tumor treatment generally remain distinct from conjugates used for diagnosis. Thus, there exists a need to develop simple dual-labeling methods for efficient therapeutic and diagnostic evaluation of antibody conjugates in pre-clinical model systems. Here, we present a rapid and simple method utilizing commercially available reagents for synthesizing a dual-labeled fluorescent ADC. Further, we demonstrate the fluorescent ADC's utility for simultaneous targeted therapy and molecular imaging of cancer both in vitro and in vivo. Employing non-site-specific, amine-reactive chemistry, our novel biopharmaceutical theranostic is a monoclonal antibody specific for a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) biomarker conjugated to both paclitaxel and a near-infrared (NIR), polyethylene glycol modified (PEGylated) fluorophore (DyLight™ 680-4xPEG). Using in vitro systems, we demonstrate that this fluorescent ADC selectively binds a CEA-positive pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3) in immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry, exhibits efficient internalization kinetics, and is cytotoxic. Model studies using a xenograft of BxPC-3 cells in athymic mice also show the fluorescent ADC's efficacy in detecting tumors in vivo and

  17. TNF-α in a molecularly targeted therapy of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wcisło-Dziadecka, Dominika; Zbiciak-Nylec, Martyna; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia; Mazurek, Urszula

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic immunological skin disease and patients with this disorder typically experience a significant decrease in their quality of life. The disease is traditionally managed with topical and systemic agents (retinoids, ciclosporin A, methotrexate), but these treatment options are often long-term and their effects can be inconsistent and not ideal. The use of biological drugs in dermatological treatment is relatively new and began in the early 2000s. It should be noted that, in most countries, in order for biological treatment to be administered, specific criteria must be met. The current treatment options for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis include tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) blockers, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23 inhibitors, T cell inhibitors and B cell inhibitors. These classes of biological drugs are characterised by protein structure as well as high molecular weight and their effectiveness is evaluated based on the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), Body Surface Area (BSA) and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). TNF-α antagonists are one such class of biological drugs which includes infliximad, etanercept and adalimumab. Infliximab is a chimeric protein that is administered via intravenous infusions as a monotherapy in psoriasis vulgaris. Etanercept is indicated for use in both psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis and it is the only drug that can be used as a treatment for children under the age of 8 with psoriasis. The drug is administered subcutaneously. Finally, adalimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that neutralises both free and membrane-bound TNF-α and is used in the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis. This article reviews the latest research in the use of TNF-α for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. The results of research in this field are promising and confirm the effectiveness and safety of biological drugs as dermatological treatments

  18. Targeted Therapies for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Jill E.; Cascone, Tina; Gerber, David E.; Heymach, John V.; Minna, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Although lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer in the United States, recently a number of developments indicate future clinical benefit. These include evidence that computed tomography–based screening decreases lung cancer mortality, the use of stereotactic radiation for early-stage tumors, the development of molecular methods to predict chemotherapy sensitivity, and genome-wide expression and mutation analysis data that have uncovered oncogene “addictions” as important therapeutic targets. Perhaps the most significant advance in the treatment of this challenging disease is the introduction of molecularly targeted therapies, a term that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The development of effective targeted therapeutics requires knowledge of the genes and pathways involved and how they relate to the biologic behavior of lung cancer. Drugs targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor are now U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. These agents are generally better tolerated than conventional chemotherapy and show dramatic efficacy when their use is coupled with a clear understanding of clinical data, mechanism, patient selection, drug interactions, and toxicities. Integrating genome-wide tumor analysis with drug- and targeted agent-responsive phenotypes will provide a wealth of new possibilities for lung cancer–targeted therapeutics. Ongoing research efforts in these areas as well as a discussion of emerging targeted agents being evaluated in clinical trials are the subjects of this review. PMID:22157296

  19. [Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome: toward a new molecular-targeted therapy and a new cytomorphological and molecular definition].

    PubMed

    Moles, M-P; Landry, J; Roche-Lestienne, C; Godon, A; Schmidt-Tanguy, A; Gardembas, M; Le Clech, C; Verret, J-L; Zandecki, M; Blanchet, O

    2005-01-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterised by chronic hypereosinophilia leading to tissue damage, and after exclusion of reactive eosinophilia. Until recently no specific or efficient therapeutic was available. In 2003, a recurrent interstitial deletion 4q12 leading to the fusion of the FIP1L1 and PDGFRA genes was detected in hypereosinophilic syndromes. The resulting protein has constitutive tyrosine kinase activity which explains clinical and cytological remission of hypereosinophilic syndrome after treatment by a specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate or Glivec, usually used in chronic myeloid leukaemia. Here we report a patient with hypereosinophilic syndrome associated to peculiar morphology of neutrophilic series and the 4q12 deletion. He presented clinical and haematological remission since the introduction of imatinib mesylate therapy.

  20. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the Era of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: An Evolving Paradigm of Molecularly Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohamed A M

    2016-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm, characterized by the unrestrained expansion of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. CML was the first malignancy in which a unique chromosomal abnormality was identified and a pathophysiologic association was suggested. The hallmark of CML is a reciprocal chromosomal translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 9 and 22, t(9; 22)(q34; q11), creating a derivative 9q+ and a shortened 22q-. The latter, known as the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, harbors the breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR-ABL) fusion gene, encoding the constitutively active BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase that is necessary and sufficient for initiating CML. The successful implementation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for the treatment of CML remains a flagship for molecularly targeted therapy in cancer. TKIs have changed the clinical course of CML; however, some patients nonetheless demonstrate primary or secondary resistance to such therapy and require an alternative therapeutic strategy. Therefore, the assessment of early response to treatment with TKIs has become an important tool in the clinical monitoring of CML patients. Although mutations in the BCR-ABL have proven to be the most prominent mechanism of resistance to TKIs, other mechanisms-either rendering the leukemic cells still dependent on BCR-ABL activity or supporting oncogenic properties of the leukemic cells independent of BCR-ABL signaling-have been identified. This article provides an overview of the current understanding of CML pathogenesis; recommendations for diagnostic tools, treatment strategies, and management guidelines; and highlights the BCR-ABL-dependent and -independent mechanisms that contribute to the development of resistance to TKIs.

  1. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  2. Targeted Therapy for Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Thomas; Moore, Herbert

    2016-12-05

    The research project, entitled ”Targeted Therapy for Melanoma,” was focused on investigating the use of kidney protection measures to lower the non-specific kidney uptake of the radiolabeled Pb-DOTA-ReCCMSH peptide. Previous published work demonstrated that the kidney exhibited the highest non-target tissue uptake of the 212Pb/203Pb radiolabeled melanoma targeting peptide DOTA-ReCCMSH. The radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptide analog DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH, which binds the melanocortin-1 receptor over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells, has shown promise as a PRRT agent in pre-clinical studies. High tumor uptake of 212Pb labeled DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH resulted in tumor reduction or eradication in melanoma therapy studies. Of particular note was the 20-50% cure rate observed when melanoma mice were treated with alpha particle emitter 212Pb. However, as with most PRRT agents, high radiation doses to the kidneys where observed. To optimize tumor treatment efficacy and reduce nephrotoxicity, the tumor to kidney uptake ratio must be improved. Strategies to reduce kidney retention of the radiolabeled peptide, while not effecting tumor uptake and retention, can be broken into several categories including modification of the targeting peptide sequence and reducing proximal tubule reabsorption.

  3. Advances in molecular-based personalized non-small-cell lung cancer therapy: targeting epidermal growth factor receptor and mechanisms of resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jotte, Robert M; Spigel, David R

    2015-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapies, directed against the features of a given tumor, have allowed for a personalized approach to the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The reversible epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib had undergone turbulent clinical development until it was discovered that these agents have preferential activity in patients with NSCLC harboring activating EGFR mutations. Since then, a number of phase 3 clinical trials have collectively shown that EGFR-TKI monotherapy is more effective than combination chemotherapy as first-line therapy for EGFR mutation-positive advanced NSCLC. The next generation of EGFR-directed agents for EGFR mutation-positive advanced NSCLC is irreversible TKIs against EGFR and other ErbB family members, including afatinib, which was recently approved, and dacomitinib, which is currently being tested in phase 3 trials. As research efforts continue to explore the various proposed mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI therapy, agents that target signaling pathways downstream of EGFR are being studied in combination with EGFR TKIs in molecularly selected advanced NSCLC. Overall, the results of numerous ongoing phase 3 trials involving the EGFR TKIs will be instrumental in determining whether further gains in personalized therapy for advanced NSCLC are attainable with newer agents and combinations. This article reviews key clinical trial data for personalized NSCLC therapy with agents that target the EGFR and related pathways, specifically based on molecular characteristics of individual tumors, and mechanisms of resistance. PMID:26310719

  4. Imaging of hepatic toxicity of systemic therapy in a tertiary cancer centre: chemotherapy, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, molecular targeted therapies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alessandrino, F; Tirumani, S H; Krajewski, K M; Shinagare, A B; Jagannathan, J P; Ramaiya, N H; Di Salvo, D N

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to familiarise radiologists with the spectrum of hepatic toxicity seen in the oncology setting, in view of the different systemic therapies used in cancer patients. Drug-induced liver injury can manifest in various forms, and anti-neoplastic agents are associated with different types of hepatotoxicity. Although chemotherapy-induced liver injury can present as hepatitis, steatosis, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, and chronic parenchymal damages, molecular targeted therapy-associated liver toxicity ranges from mild liver function test elevation to fulminant life-threatening acute liver failure. The recent arrival of immune checkpoint inhibitors in oncology has introduced a new range of immune-related adverse events, with differing mechanisms of liver toxicity and varied imaging presentation of liver injury. High-dose chemotherapy regimens for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation are associated with sinusoidal obstruction syndrome. Management of hepatic toxicity depends on the clinical scenario, the drug in use, and the severity of the findings. In this article, we will (1) present the most common types of oncological drugs associated with hepatic toxicity and associated liver injuries; (2) illustrate imaging findings of hepatic toxicities and the possible differential diagnosis; and (3) provide a guide for management of these conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Intra-tumour molecular heterogeneity of clear cell renal cell carcinoma reveals the diversity of the response to targeted therapies using patient-derived xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Baoan; Yang, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Duoerkun, Shayiremu; Deng, Xiaohu; Chen, Dawei; Yu, Shijun; Qian, Wubin; Li, Qixiang; Li, Qing; Gong, Kan; Zhang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Inter- and intra-tumour molecular heterogeneity is increasingly recognized in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). It may partially explain the diversity of responses to targeted therapies and the various clinical outcomes. In this study, a 56-year-old male ccRCC patient with multiple metastases received radical nephrectomy and resection of the metastatic tumour in chest wall. The surgical specimens were implanted into nude mice to establish patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models with KI2367 model derived from the primary tumour and KI2368 model from the metastastic tumour. The two modles were treated with Sorafenib, Sunitinib, Axitinib, combined Sorafenib/Sunitinib, or alternating therapy of Sorafenib and Sunitinib. Significant anti-tumour activity was found in KI2367 treated with Sorafenib/Sunitinib monotherapy, combined Sorafenib/Sunitinib, and alternating therapy of Sorafenib/Sunitinib (P<0.05) but not in that treated with Axitinib monotherapy. In contrast, KI2368 was significantly responsive to Sunitinib monotherapy, combined Sorafenib/Sunitinib therapy and alternating therapy of Sorafenib/Sunitinib but not responsive to Sorafenib and Axitinib monotherapy (P<0.05). RNAseq of the two models demonstrated that the expression levels of 1,725 genes including the drug targeted genes of PDGFA, PDGFB and PDGFRA were >5-fold higher in KI2367 than in KI2368 and the expression levels of 994 genes were > 5-fold higher in KI2368 than in KI2367. These results suggest the presence of intra-tumour molecular heterogeneity in this patient. This heterogeneity may influence the response to targeted therapies. Multiple biopsy, liquid biopsy and genomic analysis of intra- tumour molecular heterogeneity may help guide a more precise and effective plan in selecting targeted therapies for ccRCC patients. PMID:28548943

  6. Intra-tumour molecular heterogeneity of clear cell renal cell carcinoma reveals the diversity of the response to targeted therapies using patient-derived xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Hong, Baoan; Yang, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Duoerkun, Shayiremu; Deng, Xiaohu; Chen, Dawei; Yu, Shijun; Qian, Wubin; Li, Qixiang; Li, Qing; Gong, Kan; Zhang, Ning

    2017-07-25

    Inter- and intra-tumour molecular heterogeneity is increasingly recognized in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). It may partially explain the diversity of responses to targeted therapies and the various clinical outcomes. In this study, a 56-year-old male ccRCC patient with multiple metastases received radical nephrectomy and resection of the metastatic tumour in chest wall. The surgical specimens were implanted into nude mice to establish patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models with KI2367 model derived from the primary tumour and KI2368 model from the metastastic tumour. The two modles were treated with Sorafenib, Sunitinib, Axitinib, combined Sorafenib/Sunitinib, or alternating therapy of Sorafenib and Sunitinib. Significant anti-tumour activity was found in KI2367 treated with Sorafenib/Sunitinib monotherapy, combined Sorafenib/Sunitinib, and alternating therapy of Sorafenib/Sunitinib (P<0.05) but not in that treated with Axitinib monotherapy. In contrast, KI2368 was significantly responsive to Sunitinib monotherapy, combined Sorafenib/Sunitinib therapy and alternating therapy of Sorafenib/Sunitinib but not responsive to Sorafenib and Axitinib monotherapy (P<0.05). RNAseq of the two models demonstrated that the expression levels of 1,725 genes including the drug targeted genes of PDGFA, PDGFB and PDGFRA were >5-fold higher in KI2367 than in KI2368 and the expression levels of 994 genes were > 5-fold higher in KI2368 than in KI2367. These results suggest the presence of intra-tumour molecular heterogeneity in this patient. This heterogeneity may influence the response to targeted therapies. Multiple biopsy, liquid biopsy and genomic analysis of intra- tumour molecular heterogeneity may help guide a more precise and effective plan in selecting targeted therapies for ccRCC patients.

  7. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics.

  8. Targeted therapy in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Smalley, Keiran S M; Glass, L Frank; Trimble, James S; Sondak, Vernon K

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF oncogene in melanoma, there has been remarkable progress in the development of targeted therapies for unresectable and metastatic melanoma. We review the latest developments in our understanding of the role of BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway signaling in melanoma, and the development of inhibitors of this pathway. We also explore alternative mutations seen in melanoma, such as NRAS, KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11, and the drug development that is ongoing based on this biology. Strategies for the management of the vexing clinical problem of BRAF inhibitor resistance, primarily via combination therapy, are outlined. With the recent approval of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib for stage IV metastatic melanoma, use of this agent is expanding in the United States. Thus, management of the skin toxicities of this agent, such as squamous cell carcinomas, "acneiform" eruptions, hand-foot syndrome, and panniculitis, will be a growing problem facing dermatologists today. We discuss the toxicities of targeted agents in use for melanoma, in particular the dermatologic effects and the management of these skin toxicities.

  9. The rationale for targeted therapies in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Tobey J.; Aguilera, Dolly; Castellino, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most frequent malignant brain tumor in children. Patients with MB who are classified as having high-risk disease or those with recurrent disease respond poorly to current therapies and have an increased risk of MB-related mortality. Preclinical studies and molecular profiling of MB tumors have revealed upregulation or activation of several key signaling pathways such as the sonic hedgehog and WNT pathways. Although the exact mechanisms underlying MB tumorigenesis remain poorly understood, inhibiting these key pathways with molecularly targeted therapies represents an important approach to improving MB outcomes. Several molecularly targeted therapies are already under clinical investigation in MB patients. We discuss current preclinical and clinical data, as well as data from clinical trials of targeted therapies that are either ongoing or in development for MB. PMID:24305711

  10. Molecular targeting for malignant gliomas (Review).

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasuko; Hollingsworth, Emporia F; Kondo, Seiji

    2004-05-01

    With tendency to invade rapidly in the brain, malignant gliomas are very resistant to conventional therapies including radiation and chemotherapy. Recent advances in genetic and molecular techniques have made it possible to define characteristic molecular profiles of malignant gliomas. Based on the list of the molecules closely related to glioblastoma tissues, we reviewed strategies targeting them. Target molecules extensively studied include EGFR, PTEN, telomerase and signal pathway modulators for Ras/Raf/MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways. Therapies targeting specific molecules may result in killing tumor cells effectively while keeping normal cells intact.

  11. Inner salt-shaped small molecular photosensitizer with extremely enhanced two-photon absorption for mitochondrial-targeted photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenbo; He, Tingchao; Jiang, Rongcui; Yin, Jun; Li, Lin; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Ling; Sun, Handong; Huang, Wei; Fan, Quli

    2017-02-04

    Herein, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate an unprecedentedly enhanced two-photon absorption in a small organic molecule by a simple introduction of an inner salt-shaped structure. Moreover, such an inner salt-shaped small molecule also exhibits superior singlet oxygen quantum yield and fascinating structure-inherent mitochondrial-targeting ability for highly efficient two-photon photodynamic therapy via a mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

  12. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Forscher, Charles; Mita, Monica; Figlin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing’s sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing’s sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. PMID:24669185

  13. Type of Cancer Treatment: Targeted Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Information about the role that targeted therapies play in cancer treatment. Includes how targeted therapies work against cancer, who receives targeted therapies, common side effects, and what to expect when having targeted therapies.

  14. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain Control for Kidney Cancer Treatment ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  15. Convection enhanced delivery of boronated EGF as a molecular targeting agent for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weilian; Wu, Gong; Huo, Tianyao; Tjarks, Werner; Ciesielski, Michael; Fenstermaker, Robert A.; Ross, Brain D.; Wikstrand, Carol J.; Riley, Kent J.; Binns, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated a boronated dendrimer-epidermal growth factor (BD-EGF) bioconjugate as a molecular targeting agent for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of the human EGFR gene-transfected F98 rat glioma, designated F98EGFR. EGF was chemically linked to a heavily boronated polyamidoamine dendrimer (BD) by means of the heterobifunctional reagent, mMBS. Biodistribution studies were carried out at 6 h and 24 h following intratumoral (i.t.) injection or intracerebral (i.c.) convection enhanced delivery (CED) of 125I-labeled or unlabeled BD-EGF (40 μg 10B/10 μg EGF) to F98 glioma bearing rats. At 24 h. there was 43% more radioactivity in EGFR(+) tumors following CED compared to i.t. injection, and a doubling of the tumor boron concentration (22.3 μg/g vs. 11.7 μg/g). CED of BD-EGF resulted in a 7.2× increase in the volume of distribution within the infused cerebral hemisphere and a 1.9× increase in tumor uptake of BD-EGF compared with i.t. injection. Based on these favorable bio-distribution data, BNCT was carried out at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology nuclear reactor 14 days following i.c. tumor implantation and 24 h. after CED of BD-EGF. These animals had a MST of 54.1 ± 4.7 days compared to 43.0 ± 2.8 days following i.t. injection. Rats that received BD-EGF by CED in combination with i.v. boronophenylalanine (BPA), which has been used in both experimental and clinical studies, had a MST of 86.0 ± 28.1 days compared to 39.8 ± 1.6 days for i.v. BPA alone (P < 0.01), 30.9 ± 1.4 days for irradiated controls and 25.1 ± 1.0 days for untreated controls (overall P < 0.0001). These data have demonstrated that the efficacy of BNCT was significantly increased (P < 0.006), following i.c CED of BD-EGF compared to i.t injection, and that the survival data were equivalent to those previously reported by us using the boronated anti-human-EGF mAb, C225 (cetuximab). PMID:19588228

  16. Convection enhanced delivery of boronated EGF as a molecular targeting agent for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weilian; Barth, Rolf F; Wu, Gong; Huo, Tianyao; Tjarks, Werner; Ciesielski, Michael; Fenstermaker, Robert A; Ross, Brain D; Wikstrand, Carol J; Riley, Kent J; Binns, Peter J

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated a boronated dendrimer-epidermal growth factor (BD-EGF) bioconjugate as a molecular targeting agent for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of the human EGFR gene-transfected F98 rat glioma, designated F98(EGFR). EGF was chemically linked to a heavily boronated polyamidoamine dendrimer (BD) by means of the heterobifunctional reagent, mMBS. Biodistribution studies were carried out at 6 h and 24 h following intratumoral (i.t.) injection or intracerebral (i.c.) convection enhanced delivery (CED) of (125)I-labeled or unlabeled BD-EGF (40 microg (10)B/10 microg EGF) to F98 glioma bearing rats. At 24 h. there was 43% more radioactivity in EGFR(+) tumors following CED compared to i.t. injection, and a doubling of the tumor boron concentration (22.3 microg/g vs. 11.7 microg/g). CED of BD-EGF resulted in a 7.2x increase in the volume of distribution within the infused cerebral hemisphere and a 1.9x increase in tumor uptake of BD-EGF compared with i.t. injection. Based on these favorable biodistribution data, BNCT was carried out at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology nuclear reactor 14 days following i.c. tumor implantation and 24 h. after CED of BD-EGF. These animals had a MST of 54.1 +/- 4.7 days compared to 43.0 +/- 2.8 days following i.t. injection. Rats that received BD-EGF by CED in combination with i.v. boronophenylalanine (BPA), which has been used in both experimental and clinical studies, had a MST of 86.0 +/- 28.1 days compared to 39.8 +/- 1.6 days for i.v. BPA alone (P < 0.01), 30.9 +/- 1.4 days for irradiated controls and 25.1 +/- 1.0 days for untreated controls (overall P < 0.0001). These data have demonstrated that the efficacy of BNCT was significantly increased (P < 0.006), following i.c CED of BD-EGF compared to i.t injection, and that the survival data were equivalent to those previously reported by us using the boronated anti-human-EGF mAb, C225 (cetuximab).

  17. Molecularly targeted therapy based on tumour molecular profiling versus conventional therapy for advanced cancer (SHIVA): a multicentre, open-label, proof-of-concept, randomised, controlled phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Gonçalves, Anthony; Gavoille, Céline; Dubot, Coraline; Isambert, Nicolas; Campone, Mario; Trédan, Olivier; Massiani, Marie-Ange; Mauborgne, Cécile; Armanet, Sebastien; Servant, Nicolas; Bièche, Ivan; Bernard, Virginie; Gentien, David; Jezequel, Pascal; Attignon, Valéry; Boyault, Sandrine; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Servois, Vincent; Sablin, Marie-Paule; Kamal, Maud; Paoletti, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Molecularly targeted agents have been reported to have anti-tumour activity for patients whose tumours harbour the matching molecular alteration. These results have led to increased off-label use of molecularly targeted agents on the basis of identified molecular alterations. We assessed the efficacy of several molecularly targeted agents marketed in France, which were chosen on the basis of tumour molecular profiling but used outside their indications, in patients with advanced cancer for whom standard-of-care therapy had failed. The open-label, randomised, controlled phase 2 SHIVA trial was done at eight French academic centres. We included adult patients with any kind of metastatic solid tumour refractory to standard of care, provided they had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, disease that was accessible for a biopsy or resection of a metastatic site, and at least one measurable lesion. The molecular profile of each patient's tumour was established with a mandatory biopsy of a metastatic tumour and large-scale genomic testing. We only included patients for whom a molecular alteration was identified within one of three molecular pathways (hormone receptor, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, RAF/MEK), which could be matched to one of ten regimens including 11 available molecularly targeted agents (erlotinib, lapatinib plus trastuzumab, sorafenib, imatinib, dasatinib, vemurafenib, everolimus, abiraterone, letrozole, tamoxifen). We randomly assigned these patients (1:1) to receive a matched molecularly targeted agent (experimental group) or treatment at physician's choice (control group) by central block randomisation (blocks of size six). Randomisation was done centrally with a web-based response system and was stratified according to the Royal Marsden Hospital prognostic score (0 or 1 vs 2 or 3) and the altered molecular pathway. Clinicians and patients were not masked to treatment allocation. Treatments in both groups were given in accordance with

  18. Molecular alterations in non-small-cell lung cancer: perspective for targeted therapy and specimen management for the bronchoscopist.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Kujawa, Kasia; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Major advances have occurred over the past decade in our understanding of lung cancer pathobiology. Increasing knowledge of molecular aberrations in lung cancer, specifically the discovery of two driver genes in pharmacologically targetable tyrosine kinases involved in growth factor receptor signalling, epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase, has been of major therapeutic and prognostic importance. This discovery has allowed for new, personalized approach to the management of lung cancer. Recognizing the importance of molecular signatures of lung cancer, the College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer and Association for Molecular Pathology released the first guidelines for molecular testing in lung cancer. The introduction of minimally invasive needle techniques for the evaluation of lung cancer patients, such as endobronchial ultrasound transbronchial needle aspiration and oesophageal ultrasound-fine-needle aspiration, has revolutionized the way lung cancer patients are assessed. Samples obtained using the minimally invasive needle approaches have been shown to be sufficient not only for routine molecular testing but also for multigenic analysis. This allows bronchoscopist to assume an increasingly important role in the diagnostic workup of patients with lung cancer at all stages of the disease and contribute to personalizing the care of lung cancer patients.

  19. Emerging targeted therapies for glioma.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie J; Wen, Patrick Y

    2016-12-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Despite aggressive treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, these tumors are incurable and invariably recur. Molecular characterization of these tumors in recent years has advanced our understanding of gliomagenesis and offered an array of pathways that can be specifically targeted. Areas covered: The most commonly dysregulated signaling pathways found in gliomas will be discussed, as well as the biologic importance of these disrupted pathways and how each may contribute to tumor development. Our knowledge regarding these pathways are most relevant to Grade IV glioma/glioblastoma, but we will also discuss genomic categorization of low grade glioma. Further, drugs targeting single pathways, which have undergone early phase clinical trials will be reviewed, followed by an in depth discussion of emerging treatments on the horizon, which will include inhibitors of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and receptor tyrosine kinases, Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase (PI3K), angiogenesis, cell cycle and mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations. Expert opinion: Results from single agent targeted therapy trials have been modest. Lack of efficacy may stem from a combination of poor blood brain barrier penetration, the genetically heterogeneous make-up of the tumors and the emergence of resistance mechanisms. These factors can be overcome by rational drug design that capitalizes on ways to target critical pathways and limits upregulation of redundant pathways.

  20. Targeted therapy in brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Soffietti, Riccardo; Trevisan, Elisa; Rudà, Roberta

    2012-11-01

    To review the state of the art and new developments in the field of targeted agents for brain metastases. The huge amount of information on new molecular compounds and the advances in understanding the molecular pathways that mediate brain colonization have led to an increase of interest in preclinical and clinical investigations in the field of brain metastases. Targeted therapies can be employed either on established brain metastases or in a prevention setting. Targeting angiogenesis is an attractive approach. Up to date, large clinical trial datasets have shown that antiangiogenic agents do not increase the risk of bleeding into the brain. Bevacizumab (an anti-VEGF agent) is undergoing investigation in clinical trials on brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), breast cancer and melanoma. Sunitinib, a multitarget small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), is a promising agent in brain metastases from renal cell cancer. The EGFR inhibitors gefitinib and erlotinib have a definite activity in brain metastases from NSCLC with activating EGFR mutations. Regarding HER2-positive breast cancer patients with established brain metastases, lapatinib (small molecule TKI) seems particularly active in association with capecitabine. Lapatinib alone is attractive in the prevention setting. Brain metastases from melanoma with BRAF V600E mutations respond to a specific inhibitor, such as vemurafenib. The immunomodulator ipilimumab is also active on brain metastases from melanoma. The use of targeted agents in brain metastases from solid tumors is promising. The setting of prevention will be probably expanded in the next years. Well designed clinical trials with proper endpoints are needed.

  1. Immunotherapy or molecularly targeted therapy: what is the best initial treatment for stage IV BRAF-mutant melanoma?

    PubMed

    Gibney, Geoffrey T; Atkins, Michael B

    2015-07-01

    The recent developments in BRAF-targeted therapy and checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapies for metastatic melanoma patients have led to better tolerability and markedly improved clinical outcomes, including higher objective response rates and longer survival. Treatment planning has become complex in patients with metastatic BRAF-mutant melanoma, with several options for BRAF- and/or MEK-targeted therapy (vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib) and immunotherapy (interleukin 2, ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, and nivolumab). Clinicians must weigh various patient factors, including the extent of disease (eg, symptomatic visceral metastases vs limited disease) and central nervous system involvement, as well as factors related to the therapeutic agent, such as rate of clinical response, durability of response, and impact on median and long-term survival. The combination regimen of dabrafenib plus trametinib has become a standard treatment strategy, and ipilimumab plus nivolumab is emerging as a promising treatment strategy. In this review, we discuss the benchmark trials leading to the approval of these new agents and provide emerging data on their use in sequence and impact on overall survival, with the goal of helping oncologists navigate treatment decisions for patients with metastatic BRAF-mutant melanoma.

  2. Targeted Cancer Therapy Systems: An In Silico Study of Radiohalogenated Ligands in the Estrogen Receptor and the Synthesis of a Molecular Toolkit for the Fabrication of Customizable Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Kelton K.

    Chemotherapy is often limited by off-target toxicity and the development of multi-drug resistance in response to treatment. Strategies which reduce off-target toxicity by passively or actively targeting cancer cells may improve the efficacy of chemotherapy. Herein, two projects relating to targeted therapy are described. In the first project, the binding modes of 1,1-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenylethylenes (THPEs), a class of synthetic estrogens previously developed by our group, in the human estrogen receptor alpha-ligand binding domain were studied using molecular modeling programs YASARA AutoDock and Schrodinger Glide. The results were internally consistent and supported the observation that a bromine or iodine atom at the 2-position of the THPEs contributes positively to their binding in the estrogen receptor. In the second project, a "molecular toolkit" approach to the synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles was envisioned. Our hypothesis was that the physical and chemical properties of the final product could be defined by controlling the types and relative amounts of prefunctionalized polymer units (PPUs) as well as the emulsification conditions. The design and syntheses of heterobifunctional linkers and other components for a preliminary molecular toolkit are reported, and the literature on select heterobifunctional aliphatic linkers is examined.

  3. 3β-Hydroxysterol Δ24-Reductase on the Surface of Hepatitis C Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Can Be a Target for Molecular Targeting Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Makoto; Takano, Takashi; Nishimura, Tomohiro; Kohara, Michinori; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we demonstrated that 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) was overexpressed in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and that its expression was induced by HCV. Using a monoclonal antibody against DHCR24 (2-152a MAb), we found that DHCR24 was specifically expressed on the surface of HCC cell lines. Based on these findings, we aimed to establish a novel targeting strategy using 2-152a MAb to treat HCV-related HCC. In the present study, we examined the antitumor activity of 2-152a MAb. In the presence of complement, HCC-derived HuH-7 cells were killed by treatment with 2-152a MAb, which was mediated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). In addition, the antigen recognition domain of 2-152a MAb was responsible for the unique anti-HCV activity. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using 2-152a MAb for antibody therapy against HCV-related HCC. In addition, surface DHCR24 on HCC cells exhibited a functional property, agonist-induced internalization. We showed that 2-152a MAb-mediated binding of a cytotoxic agent (a saponin-conjugated secondary antibody) to surface DHCR24 led to significant cytotoxicity. This suggests that surface DHCR24 on HCC cells can function as a carrier for internalization. Therefore, surface DHCR24 could be a valuable target for HCV-related HCC therapy, and 2-152a MAb appears to be useful for this targeted therapy. PMID:25875901

  4. Broad RTK-targeted therapy overcomes molecular heterogeneity-driven resistance to cetuximab via vectored immunoprophylaxis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shi; Dai, Haibin; Li, Tian; Tang, Ying; Fu, Wenyan; Yuan, Qingning; Wang, Feifei; Lv, Gaojian; Lv, Yuanyuan; Fan, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Sheng; Jin, Ruobing; Shen, Yafeng; Lin, Fangxing; Ye, Xuting; Ding, Min; Yang, Yongji; Lei, Changhai

    2016-11-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting chimeric monoclonal antibody, cetuximab (Erbitux®), is a widely used drug in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, the activation of the extensive crosstalk among the EGFR family receptors as well as other tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) impairs the efficacy of the drug by fueling acquired resistance. To identify the responsible potential activation pathway underlying cetuximab resistance and generate novel treatment strategies, cetuximab-resistant colorectal cancer cell lines were generated and validated and a functional RNAi screen targeting human RTKs was used to identify extensive receptor tyrosine kinase signaling networks established in resistant cancer cells. MET, Axl, and IGF-1R were identified as contributors to the acquired resistance to cetuximab. Targeting vectored immunoprophylaxis (VIPs) to different RTKs were generated and characterized. Different VIP approaches were evaluated in vivo with parental and cetuximab-resistance xenografts and the RTKs in resistant cancer xenografts were inhibited with VIPs via re-sensitization to cetuximab treatment. Combination of VIPs was more broadly efficacious, mechanistically, due to co-blocking the EGFR/Axl/MET signaling pathway, which was cross-activated in the resistant cell lines. Moreover, a VIP-based procedural treatment strategy not only eliminated the tumor but also afforded long-lasting protection from tumor recurrence and resistance. Overall, EGFR-related RTK pathway-network activation represents a novel mechanism underlying cetuximab resistance. A broad VIP combination strategy and VIP-based procedural treatment strategy may be a recommended addition to cetuximab-based targeted therapy. Our results establish a new principle to achieve combined RTK inhibition and reverse drug resistance using a VIP approach.

  5. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the human blood-nerve barrier in vitro and in vivo geared towards targeted molecular therapies for peripheral neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Greathouse, Kelsey M; Palladino, Steven P; Dong, Chaoling; Helton, Eric S; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2016-01-06

    Peripheral neuroinflammation is characterized by hematogenous mononuclear leukocyte infiltration into peripheral nerves. Despite significant clinical knowledge, advancements in molecular biology and progress in developing specific drugs for inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis, there are currently no specific therapies that modulate pathogenic peripheral nerve inflammation. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the blood-nerve barrier using a reliable human in vitro model and potential intravital microscopy techniques in representative animal models guided by human observational data should facilitate the targeted modulation of the complex inflammatory cascade needed to develop safe and efficacious therapeutics for immune-mediated neuropathies and chronic neuropathic pain.

  6. Low molecular weight hydroxyethyl chitosan-prednisolone conjugate for renal targeting therapy: synthesis, characterization and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    He, Xia-kai; Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Wu, Xiao-juan; Xu, Chao-qun; Li, Wan-yu

    2012-01-01

    To further evaluate the potential renal targeting profile of low molecular weight hydroxyethyl chitosan (LMWHC) we developed before, prednisolone (Pre) was conjugated with LMWHC by EDC/NHS chemistry to improve the therapeutic effect of glucocorticoids in vivo. The conjugate was denoted as LMWHC-Pre. The prednisolone content of the conjugate was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with Kromasil C18 column. The results showed that the average coupling degree of prednisolone to LMWHC was 76.7±3.2 μg·mg(-1). The stability and physicochemical characterization of LMWHC-Pre under various conditions were also investigated. To study the fate of LMWHC-Pre after intravenous (i.v.) administration, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was coupled to the conjugate to explore the renal targeting efficacy. The in vivo results showed that significant amount of the conjugate was accumulated into the kidneys while negligible signal could be detected when the mixture of FITC-LMWHC and prednisolone was co-administered. The preliminary pharmacodynamics study of LMWHC-Pre showed that the conjugate could effectively alleviate the nephrotic syndrome of rats induced by minimal change nephrosis (MCN) model. Toxicity study also revealed that there was little glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis by LMWHC-Pre upon 20 days of treatment. From this study, LMWHC-Pre may be employed as an effective potential drug candidate for the treatment of chronic renal disease.

  7. Targeted therapies in gynecologic cancers and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Eugenia; Marti, Rosa M; Yeramian, Andree; Sorolla, Anabel; Dolcet, Xavier; Llobet, David; Abal, Leandro; Santacana, Maria; Pallares, Judit; Llombart-Cussac, Antonio; Matias-Guiu, Xavier

    2008-11-01

    The article reviews the main molecular pathology alterations of endometrial and ovarian carcinomas and melanoma. Several promising drugs targeting the genes most frequently altered in these tumors are under consideration. The most promising signaling pathways to be targeted for therapies in these tumors are the tyrosine kinase receptor (EGFR, HER2, c-KIT), the RAS/B-RAF/MAPK, the PI3K-mTOR, and apoptosis signaling pathways.

  8. Designing the Sniper: Improving Targeted Human Cytolytic Fusion Proteins for Anti-Cancer Therapy via Molecular Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Bochicchio, Anna; Jordaan, Sandra; Losasso, Valeria; Chetty, Shivan; Casasnovas Perera, Rodrigo; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Barth, Stefan; Carloni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Targeted human cytolytic fusion proteins (hCFPs) are humanized immunotoxins for selective treatment of different diseases including cancer. They are composed of a ligand specifically binding to target cells genetically linked to a human apoptosis-inducing enzyme. hCFPs target cancer cells via an antibody or derivative (scFv) specifically binding to e.g., tumor associated antigens (TAAs). After internalization and translocation of the enzyme from endocytosed endosomes, the human enzymes introduced into the cytosol are efficiently inducing apoptosis. Under in vivo conditions such enzymes are subject to tight regulation by native inhibitors in order to prevent inappropriate induction of cell death in healthy cells. Tumor cells are known to up-regulate these inhibitors as a survival mechanism resulting in escape of malignant cells from elimination by immune effector cells. Cytosolic inhibitors of Granzyme B and Angiogenin (Serpin P9 and RNH1, respectively), reduce the efficacy of hCFPs with these enzymes as effector domains, requiring detrimentally high doses in order to saturate inhibitor binding and rescue cytolytic activity. Variants of Granzyme B and Angiogenin might feature reduced affinity for their respective inhibitors, while retaining or even enhancing their catalytic activity. A powerful tool to design hCFPs mutants with improved potency is given by in silico methods. These include molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and enhanced sampling methods (ESM). MD and ESM allow predicting the enzyme-protein inhibitor binding stability and the associated conformational changes, provided that structural information is available. Such “high-resolution” detailed description enables the elucidation of interaction domains and the identification of sites where particular point mutations may modify those interactions. This review discusses recent advances in the use of MD and ESM for hCFP development from the viewpoints of scientists involved in both fields. PMID

  9. [Perspectives of the stomach cancer treatment: the introduction of molecular targeted therapy and the hope for cure].

    PubMed

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2013-03-25

    The overall survival of patients with gastric cancer has increased markedly in Korea, even higher than those of developed nations in Western world. It is due to the virtue of Korean National Cancer Screening Program and nowadays more than half of patients are diagnosed at the early stage of gastric cancer. However, for patients with unresectable gastric cancer, the outcomes of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens stay at a median survival of 9-11 months. The knowledge of cancer biology and the data from gene expression profiling has explosively expanded. Alternations in the expression of receptor tyrosine kinases pathways including Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), phosphatydyl inositol 3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR/MET), and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) were proved to be critical in cancer cell survival and biological agents targeting those altered receptor tyrosine kinases, their ligands and downstream effector molecules are developed for anti-cancer purpose. Until now, only trastuzumab succeeded to significantly increase overall survival of patients with HER2 overexpressing gastric cancer. Other agents including bevacizumab, gefitinib, erlotinib, and lapatinib failed to achieve the efficacy in survival gain over standard chemotherapy. Insights about the variations between regions, races, and individuals call for the effort to find reliable predictive biomarkers for drug efficacy and to design finely stratified clinical trials. Compared to current treatment paradigms, it is hoped that molecularly targeted treatment along with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy will lead to significant gains in survival.

  10. New targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Seicean, Andrada; Petrusel, Livia; Seicean, Radu

    2015-05-28

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor prognosis with a median survival of 4-6 mo and a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Despite therapy with gemcitabine, patient survival does not exceed 6 mo, likely due to natural resistance to gemcitabine. Therefore, it is hoped that more favorable results can be obtained by using guided immunotherapy against molecular targets. This review summarizes the new leading targeted therapies in pancreatic cancers, focusing on passive and specific immunotherapies. Passive immunotherapy may have a role for treatment in combination with radiochemotherapy, which otherwise destroys the immune system along with tumor cells. It includes mainly therapies targeting against kinases, including epidermal growth factor receptor, Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, insulin growth factor-1 receptor, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR and hepatocyte growth factor receptor. Therapies against DNA repair genes, histone deacetylases, microRNA, and pancreatic tumor tissue stromal elements (stromal extracellular matric and stromal pathways) are also discussed. Specific immunotherapies, such as vaccines (whole cell recombinant, peptide, and dendritic cell vaccines), adoptive cell therapy and immunotherapy targeting tumor stem cells, have the role of activating antitumor immune responses. In the future, treatments will likely include personalized medicine, tailored for numerous molecular therapeutic targets of multiple pathogenetic pathways.

  11. Tamoxifen Resistance: Emerging Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Villegas, Victoria E.; Rangel, Nelson; Sánchez, Magda Carolina; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of breast cancer. As a result, blockade of the E2 signal through either tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors is an important therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, resistance to TAM is the major obstacle in endocrine therapy. This resistance occurs either de novo or is acquired after an initial beneficial response. The underlying mechanisms for TAM resistance are probably multifactorial and remain largely unknown. Considering that breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and patients respond differently to treatment, the molecular analysis of TAM’s biological activity could provide the necessary framework to understand the complex effects of this drug in target cells. Moreover, this could explain, at least in part, the development of resistance and indicate an optimal therapeutic option. This review highlights the implications of TAM in breast cancer as well as the role of receptors/signal pathways recently suggested to be involved in the development of TAM resistance. G protein—coupled estrogen receptor, Androgen Receptor and Hedgehog signaling pathways are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic indicators for breast cancer, based on their ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in ERα-positive or -negative breast cancer. PMID:27548161

  12. Tamoxifen Resistance: Emerging Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Villegas, Victoria E; Rangel, Nelson; Sánchez, Magda Carolina; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2016-08-19

    17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of breast cancer. As a result, blockade of the E2 signal through either tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors is an important therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, resistance to TAM is the major obstacle in endocrine therapy. This resistance occurs either de novo or is acquired after an initial beneficial response. The underlying mechanisms for TAM resistance are probably multifactorial and remain largely unknown. Considering that breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and patients respond differently to treatment, the molecular analysis of TAM's biological activity could provide the necessary framework to understand the complex effects of this drug in target cells. Moreover, this could explain, at least in part, the development of resistance and indicate an optimal therapeutic option. This review highlights the implications of TAM in breast cancer as well as the role of receptors/signal pathways recently suggested to be involved in the development of TAM resistance. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, Androgen Receptor and Hedgehog signaling pathways are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic indicators for breast cancer, based on their ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in ERα-positive or -negative breast cancer.

  13. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  14. Detection of Chromosomal Abnormalities with Different In Situ Hybridisation Techniques--the Usefulness in the Qualification of Cancer Patients for Molecularly-Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Nicoś, Marcin; Wojas-Krawczyk, Kamila; Krawczyk, Paweł; Milanowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proper qualification of patients with cancer for an effective treatment regiment is essential to rationalize therapy benefit and costs. The early detection of genetic disorders that are responsible for the stimulation of uncontrolled cancer cells proliferation makes it possible to select a group of patients with a high probability of response to molecularly-targeted therapy. Data has shown that careful analysis of genes mutation using different PCR and sequencing techniques or chromosomal aberrations using in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques have a predictive value for drug targeted therapy. Overexpression of receptors and gene amplification has been reported in various cancers. Their detection is still a considerable challenge, which is connected with the unsatisfactory quality of DNA and low mutated cells percentage compared to cells with no genetic abnormalities in tested material. Different techniques of standardization were performed to prevent false negative results and to increase the sensitivity of qualitative and quantitative evaluation of chromosomal abnormalities. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) technique is useful in the screening of receptor expression in paraffin-embedded tissue samples in different malignant diseases. Whereas ISH techniques, especially fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), are now considered the diagnostic gold standard method in detection chromosomal aberrations. Moreover, molecular biology techniques, which are using molecular probes and real-time PCR and quantitative PCR techniques, were also applied for the detection of chromosomal changes. In order to identify the best genetic marker for treatment regiment, it is important to compare results of different studies, which are evaluating the sensitivity of diagnostic techniques and treatment response after a suitable selection factors based on genetic aberrations profile.

  15. Targeted therapies in advanced differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Raquel M; Carneiro, Benedito A; Agulnik, Mark; Kopp, Peter A; Giles, Francis J

    2015-09-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, and its incidence has been rising rapidly over the past 10 years. Although most patients with this disease have an excellent prognosis, a subset develops a more aggressive disease phenotype refractory to conventional therapies. Until recently, there was no effective therapy for these patients. With increasing knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer, novel targeted therapies are being developed for this group of patients. Sorafenib and lenvatinib, small-molecule multikinase inhibitors, were approved for the treatment of progressive, symptomatic, radioactive iodine refractory, advanced differentiated thyroid cancer in 2013 and 2015, respectively. This represents a major innovation in the therapy of patients with advanced thyroid cancer. However, these therapies still have many limitations and further research needs to be pursued with the ultimate goal of providing safe and effective personalized therapy for patients with advanced thyroid cancer.

  16. Optimizing Molecular-Targeted Therapies in Ovarian Cancer: The Renewed Surge of Interest in Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers and Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hiss, Donavon

    2012-01-01

    The hallmarks of ovarian cancer encompass the development of resistance, disease recurrence and poor prognosis. Ovarian cancer cells express gene signatures which pose significant challenges for cancer drug development, therapeutics, prevention and management. Despite enhancements in contemporary tumor debulking surgery, tentative combination regimens and abdominal radiation which can achieve beneficial response rates, the majority of ovarian cancer patients not only experience adverse effects, but also eventually relapse. Therefore, additional therapeutic possibilities need to be explored to minimize adverse events and prolong progression-free and overall response rates in ovarian cancer patients. Currently, a revival in cancer drug discovery is devoted to identifying diagnostic and prognostic ovarian cancer biomarkers. However, the sensitivity and reliability of such biomarkers may be complicated by mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, diverse genetic risk factors, unidentified initiation and progression elements, molecular tumor heterogeneity and disease staging. There is thus a dire need to expand existing ovarian cancer therapies with broad-spectrum and individualized molecular targeted approaches. The aim of this review is to profile recent developments in our understanding of the interrelationships among selected ovarian tumor biomarkers, heterogeneous expression signatures and related molecular signal transduction pathways, and their translation into more efficacious targeted treatment rationales. PMID:22481932

  17. Update on the targeted therapy of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Douglas B; Sosman, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive of the cutaneous malignancies, causing more than 9,000 deaths in the past year in the United States. Historically, systemic therapies have been largely ineffective, because melanoma is usually resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, during the past few years, several targeted therapies have proved effective in this challenging disease. These recent advances have been facilitated by an improved understanding of the driving genetic aberrations of melanoma, particularly mutations in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, demonstrated an overall survival advantage in phase III trials and is an appropriate option for first-line therapy in metastatic BRAF mutant melanoma. Dabrafenib, another BRAF inhibitor, and trametinib, a MEK inhibitor, also have been shown to be effective in phase III trials for BRAF mutant melanoma and may be additional treatment options as monotherapy or in combination pending regulatory approval. Additionally, imatinib is a promising targeted therapy for patients whose tumors harbor a KIT mutation in exons 11 and 13. Although these targeted agents cause objective responses and clinical benefit in patients with metastatic melanoma, resistance invariably develops. New targets and strategies to overcome acquired resistance are urgently needed. Furthermore, no effective targeted therapy has been developed for NRAS mutant tumors or in melanomas with as yet unknown driver mutations. In this review, we discuss current molecular targeted treatment options and promising ongoing research to develop new strategies to treat melanoma.

  18. Targeted Therapy in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hui Jun; Ledger, William

    2016-01-01

    Among female-specific cancers worldwide, ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the western world. Despite radical surgery and initial high response rates to first-line chemotherapy, up to 70% of patients experience relapses with a median progression-free survival of 12–18 months. There remains an urgent need for novel targeted therapies to improve clinical outcomes in ovarian cancer. This review aims to assess current understanding of targeted therapy in ovarian cancer and evaluate the evidence for targeting growth-dependent mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Of the many targeted therapies currently under evaluation, the most promising strategies developed thus far are antiangiogenic agents and PARP inhibitors. PMID:27215391

  19. Runx1 Regulation of Pu.1 Corepressor/Coactivator Exchange Identifies Specific Molecular Targets for Leukemia Differentiation Therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaorong; Hu, Zhenbo; Ebrahem, Quteba; Crabb, John S.; Mahfouz, Reda Z.; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Crabb, John W.; Saunthararajah, Yogen

    2014-01-01

    Gene activation requires cooperative assembly of multiprotein transcription factor-coregulator complexes. Disruption to cooperative assemblage could underlie repression of tumor suppressor genes in leukemia cells. Mechanisms of cooperation and its disruption were therefore examined for PU.1 and RUNX1, transcription factors that cooperate to activate hematopoietic differentiation genes. PU.1 is highly expressed in leukemia cells, whereas RUNX1 is frequently inactivated by mutation or translocation. Thus, coregulator interactions of Pu.1 were examined by immunoprecipitation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry/Western blot in wild-type and Runx1-deficient hematopoietic cells. In wild-type cells, the NuAT and Baf families of coactivators coimmunoprecipitated with Pu.1. Runx1 deficiency produced a striking switch to Pu.1 interaction with the Dnmt1, Sin3A, Nurd, CoRest, and B-Wich corepressor families. Corepressors of the Polycomb family, which are frequently inactivated by mutation or deletion in myeloid leukemia, did not interact with Pu.1. The most significant gene ontology association of Runx1-Pu.1 co-bound genes was with macrophages, therefore, functional consequences of altered corepressor/coactivator exchange were examined at Mcsfr, a key macrophage differentiation gene. In chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, high level Pu.1 binding to the Mcsfr promoter was not decreased by Runx1 deficiency. However, the Pu.1-driven shift from histone repression to activation marks at this locus, and terminal macrophage differentiation, were substantially diminished. DNMT1 inhibition, but not Polycomb inhibition, in RUNX1-translocated leukemia cells induced terminal differentiation. Thus, RUNX1 and PU.1 cooperate to exchange corepressors for coactivators, and the specific corepressors recruited to PU.1 as a consequence of RUNX1 deficiency could be rational targets for leukemia differentiation therapy. PMID:24695740

  20. Potential therapeutics specific to c-MET/RON receptor tyrosine kinases for molecular targeting in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Hai; Padhye, Snehal S; Guin, Sunny; Ma, Qi; Zhou, Yong-qing

    2010-01-01

    Products of proto-oncogenes c-MET and RON belong to a subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that contribute significantly to tumorigenic progression. In primary tumors, altered c-MET/RON expression transduces signals regulating invasive growth that is characterized by cell migration and matrix invasion. These pathogenic features provide the basis for targeting c-MET/RON in cancer therapy. In the last decade, various approaches have been investigated to suppress c-MET/RON-transduced oncogenesis. Among the therapeutics developed, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and small-molecule inhibitors (SMIs) have emerged as promising candidates. The mechanism of these therapeutic candidates is the disruption of tumor dependency on c-MET/RON signals for survival. The mAbs specific to hepatocyte growth factor (AMG102) and c-MET (MetMAb) are both humanized and able to block c-MET signaling, leading to inhibition of tumor cell proliferation in vitro and inhibition of tumor growth in xenograft models. The mAb AMG102 neutralizes hepatocyte growth factor and enhances the cytotoxicity of various chemotherapeutics to tumors in vivo. AMG102 is currently in phase II clinical trials for patients with advanced solid tumors. IMC-41A40 and Zt/f2 are RON-specific mAbs that down-regulate RON expression and inhibit ligand-induced phosphorylation. Both mAbs inhibit tumor growth in mice mediated by colon and pancreatic cancer cells. SMIs specific to c-MET (ARQ107 and PF-02341066) are in various phases of clinical trials. Therapeutic efficacy has also been observed with dual inhibitors such as Compound I, which is specific to c-MET/RON. However, a potential issue is the emergence of acquired resistance to these inhibitors. Clearly, development of c-MET/RON therapeutics provides opportunities and challenges for combating cancer in the future. PMID:20694025

  1. Prodrug applications for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Giang, Irene; Boland, Erin L; Poon, Gregory M K

    2014-09-01

    Prodrugs are widely used in the targeted delivery of cytotoxic compounds to cancer cells. To date, targeted prodrugs for cancer therapy have achieved great diversity in terms of target selection, activation chemistry, as well as size and physicochemical nature of the prodrug. Macromolecular prodrugs such as antibody-drug conjugates, targeted polymer-drug conjugates and other conjugates that self-assemble to form liposomal and micellar nanoparticles currently represent a major trend in prodrug development for cancer therapy. In this review, we explore a unified view of cancer-targeted prodrugs and highlight several examples from recombinant technology that exemplify the prodrug concept but are not identified as such. Recombinant "prodrugs" such as engineered anthrax toxin show promise in biological specificity through the conditionally targeting of multiple cellular markers. Conditional targeting is achieved by structural complementation, the spontaneous assembly of engineered inactive subunits or fragments to reconstitute functional activity. These complementing systems can be readily adapted to achieve conditionally bispecific targeting of enzymes that are used to activate low-molecular weight prodrugs. By leveraging strengths from medicinal chemistry, polymer science, and recombinant technology, prodrugs are poised to remain a core component of highly focused and tailored strategies aimed at conditionally attacking complex molecular phenotypes in clinically relevant cancer.

  2. Targeting complement in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    2001-04-01

    With increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases, strategies that interfere with its deleterious action have become a major focus in pharmacological research. Endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1 inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1, antibodies) blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction, neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium have successfully been tested in various animal models over the past years. Promising results consequently led to clinical trials. Furthermore, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (decay-accelerating factor (CD55), membrane co-factor protein (CD46), CD59) in transgenic animals has provided a major step forward in protecting xenografts from hyperacute rejection. At the same time, the poor contribution of complement to the antitumor response, which is caused by multiple resistance mechanisms that hamper the efficacy of antibody-based tumor therapy, is increasingly recognized and requires pharmacologic intervention. First attempts have now been made to interfere with the resistance mechanisms, thereby improving complement-mediated tumor cell destruction.

  3. Androgen deprivation induces phenotypic plasticity and promotes resistance to molecular targeted therapy in a PTEN-deficient mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Velasco, Marco A.; Tanaka, Motoyoshi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Hatanaka, Yuji; Koike, Hiroyuki; Nishio, Kazuto; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer is an incurable heterogeneous disease that is characterized by a complex multistep process involving different cellular and biochemical changes brought on by genetic and epigenetic alterations. These changes lead to the activation or overexpression of key survival pathways that also serve as potential therapeutic targets. Despite promising preclinical results, molecular targeted therapies aimed at such signaling pathways have so far been dismal. In the present study, we used a PTEN-deficient mouse model of prostate cancer to show that plasticity in castration-resistant tumors promotes therapeutic escape. Unlike castration-naïve tumors which depend on androgen receptor and PI3K/AKT signal activation for growth and survival, castration-resistant tumors undergo phenotypic plasticity leading to increased intratumoral heterogeneity. These tumors attain highly heterogeneous phenotypes that are characterized by cancer cells relying on alternate signal transduction pathways for growth and survival, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase and janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, and losing their dependence on PI3K signaling. These features thus enabled castration-resistant tumors to become insensitive to the therapeutic effects of PI3K/AKT targeted therapy. Overall, our findings provide evidence that androgen deprivation drives phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer cells and implicate it as a crucial contributor to therapeutic resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Therefore, incorporating intratumoral heterogeneity in a dynamic tumor model as a part of preclinical efficacy determination could improve prediction for response and provide better rationale for the development of more effective therapies. PMID:24986896

  4. Targeted therapies for cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kee, Damien; McArthur, Grant

    2014-06-01

    Melanoma is resistant to cytotoxic therapy, and treatment options for advanced disease have been limited historically. However, improved understanding of melanoma driver mutations, particularly those involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, has led to the development of targeted therapies that are effective in this previously treatment-refractory disease. In cutaneous melanomas with BRAF V600 mutations the selective RAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, have demonstrated survival benefits. Early signals of efficacy have also been demonstrated with MEK inhibitors in melanomas with NRAS mutations, and KIT inhibitors offer promise in melanomas driven through activation of their target receptor.

  5. Translating gastric cancer genomics into targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ang, Yvonne L E; Yong, Wei Peng; Tan, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a common disease with limited treatment options and a poor prognosis. Many gastric cancers harbour potentially actionable targets, including over-expression and mutations in tyrosine kinase pathways. Agents have been developed against these targets with varying success- in particular, the use of trastuzumab in HER2-overexpressing gastric cancers has resulted in overall survival benefits. Gastric cancers also have high levels of somatic mutations, making them candidates for immunotherapy; early work in this field has been promising. Recent advances in whole genome and multi-platform sequencing have driven the development of molecular classification systems, which may in turn guide the selection of patients for targeted treatment. Moving forward, challenges will include the development of appropriate biomarkers to predict responses to targeted therapy, and the application of new molecular classifications into trial development and clinical practice.

  6. Potential of Central, Eastern and Western Africa Medicinal Plants for Cancer Therapy: Spotlight on Resistant Cells and Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Mbaveng, Armelle T.; Kuete, Victor; Efferth, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cancer remains a major health hurdle worldwide and has moved from the third leading cause of death in the year 1990 to second place after cardiovascular disease since 2013. Chemotherapy is one of the most widely used treatment modes; however, its efficiency is limited due to the resistance of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents. The present overview deals with the potential of the flora of Central, Eastern and Western African (CEWA) regions as resource for anticancer drug discovery. It also reviews the molecular targets of phytochemicals of these plants such as ABC transporters, namely P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multi drug-resistance-related proteins (MRPs), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) as well as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB-1/HER1), human tumor suppressor protein p53, caspases, mitochondria, angiogenesis, and components of MAP kinase signaling pathways. Plants with the ability to preferentially kills resistant cancer cells were also reported. Data compiled in the present document were retrieved from scientific websites such as PubMed, Scopus, Sciencedirect, Web-of-Science, and Scholar Google. In summary, plant extracts from CEWA and isolated compounds thereof exert cytotoxic effects by several modes of action including caspases activation, alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells and inhibition of angiogenesis. Ten strongest cytotoxic plants from CEWA recorded following in vitro screening assays are: Beilschmiedia acuta Kosterm, Echinops giganteus var. lelyi (C. D. Adams) A. Rich., Erythrina sigmoidea Hua (Fabaceae), Imperata cylindrical Beauv. var. koenigii Durand et Schinz, Nauclea pobeguinii (Pobég. ex Pellegr.) Merr. ex E.M.A., Piper capense L.f., Polyscias fulva (Hiern) Harms., Uapaca togoensis Pax., Vepris soyauxii Engl. and Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Rich. Prominent antiproliferative compounds include: isoquinoline alkaloid isotetrandrine (51), two

  7. Potential of Central, Eastern and Western Africa Medicinal Plants for Cancer Therapy: Spotlight on Resistant Cells and Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Mbaveng, Armelle T; Kuete, Victor; Efferth, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cancer remains a major health hurdle worldwide and has moved from the third leading cause of death in the year 1990 to second place after cardiovascular disease since 2013. Chemotherapy is one of the most widely used treatment modes; however, its efficiency is limited due to the resistance of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents. The present overview deals with the potential of the flora of Central, Eastern and Western African (CEWA) regions as resource for anticancer drug discovery. It also reviews the molecular targets of phytochemicals of these plants such as ABC transporters, namely P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multi drug-resistance-related proteins (MRPs), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) as well as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB-1/HER1), human tumor suppressor protein p53, caspases, mitochondria, angiogenesis, and components of MAP kinase signaling pathways. Plants with the ability to preferentially kills resistant cancer cells were also reported. Data compiled in the present document were retrieved from scientific websites such as PubMed, Scopus, Sciencedirect, Web-of-Science, and Scholar Google. In summary, plant extracts from CEWA and isolated compounds thereof exert cytotoxic effects by several modes of action including caspases activation, alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells and inhibition of angiogenesis. Ten strongest cytotoxic plants from CEWA recorded following in vitro screening assays are: Beilschmiedia acuta Kosterm, Echinops giganteus var. lelyi (C. D. Adams) A. Rich., Erythrina sigmoidea Hua (Fabaceae), Imperata cylindrical Beauv. var. koenigii Durand et Schinz, Nauclea pobeguinii (Pobég. ex Pellegr.) Merr. ex E.M.A., Piper capense L.f., Polyscias fulva (Hiern) Harms., Uapaca togoensis Pax., Vepris soyauxii Engl. and Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Rich. Prominent antiproliferative compounds include: isoquinoline alkaloid isotetrandrine (51), two

  8. Overcoming resistance to molecularly targeted anticancer therapies: Rational drug combinations based on EGFR and MAPK inhibition for solid tumours and haematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Giampaolo; Bianco, Roberto; Daniele, Gennaro; Ciardiello, Fortunato; McCubrey, James A; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Cognetti, Francesco; Tafuri, Agostino; Milella, Michele

    2007-06-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer can be envisioned as a "signaling disease", in which alterations in the cellular genome affect the expression and/or function of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. This ultimately disrupts the physiologic transmission of biochemical signals that normally regulate cell growth, differentiation and programmed cell death (apoptosis). From a clinical standpoint, signal transduction inhibition as a therapeutic strategy for human malignancies has recently achieved remarkable success. However, as additional drugs move forward into the clinical arena, intrinsic and acquired resistance to "targeted" agents becomes an issue for their clinical utility. One way to overcome resistance to targeted agents is to identify genetic and epigenetic aberrations underlying sensitivity/resistance, thus enabling the selection of patients that will most likely benefit from a specific therapy. Since resistance often ensues as a result of the concomitant activation of multiple, often overlapping, signaling pathways, another possibility is to interfere with multiple, cross-talking pathways involved in growth and survival control in a rational, mechanism-based, fashion. These concepts may be usefully applied, among others, to agents that target two major signal transduction pathways: the one initiated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and the one converging on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of sensitivity/resistance to EGFR inhibitors, as well as the rationale for combining them with other targeted agents, in an attempt to overcome resistance. In the second part of the paper, we review MAPK-targeted agents, focusing on their therapeutic potential in haematologic malignancies, and examine the prospects for combinations of MAPK inhibitors with cytotoxic agents or other signal transduction-targeted agents to obtain synergistic anti-tumour effects.

  9. Ocular toxicity of targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Daniel J; Velazquez-Martin, Juan P; Simpson, Rand; Siu, Lillian L; Bedard, Philippe L

    2012-09-10

    Molecularly targeted agents are commonly used in oncology practice, and many new targeted agents are currently being tested in clinical trials. Although these agents are thought to be more specific and less toxic then traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, they are associated with a variety of toxicities, including ocular toxicity. Many of the molecules targeted by anticancer agents are also expressed in ocular tissues. We reviewed the literature for described ocular toxicities associated with both approved and investigational molecularly targeted agents. Ocular toxicity has been described with numerous approved targeted agents and also seems to be associated with several classes of agents currently being tested in early-phase clinical trials. We discuss the proposed pathogenesis, monitoring guidelines, and management recommendations. It is important for oncologists to be aware of the potential for ocular toxicity, with prompt recognition of symptoms that require referral to an ophthalmologist. Ongoing collaboration between oncologists and ocular disease specialists is critical as the use of molecularly targeted agents continues to expand and novel targeted drug combinations are developed.

  10. Emerging targeted therapies for melanoma treatment (review).

    PubMed

    Russo, Angela; Ficili, Bartolomea; Candido, Saverio; Pezzino, Franca Maria; Guarneri, Claudio; Biondi, Antonio; Travali, Salvatore; McCubrey, James A; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Libra, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis for patients with advanced disease. The identification of several key molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of melanoma has led to the development of novel therapies for this devastating disease. In melanoma, both the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK (MAPK) and the PI3K/AKT (AKT) signalling pathways are constitutively activated through multiple mechanisms. Targeting various effectors of these pathways with pharmacologic inhibitors may inhibit melanoma cell growth and angiogenesis. Ongoing clinical trials provide hope to improve progression-free survival of patients with advanced melanoma. This review summarizes the most relevant studies focused on the specific action of these new molecular targeted agents. Mechanisms of resistance to therapy are also discussed.

  11. Emerging targeted therapies for melanoma treatment (Review)

    PubMed Central

    RUSSO, ANGELA; FICILI, BARTOLOMEA; CANDIDO, SAVERIO; PEZZINO, FRANCA MARIA; GUARNERI, CLAUDIO; BIONDI, ANTONIO; TRAVALI, SALVATORE; McCUBREY, JAMES A.; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; LIBRA, MASSIMO

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis for patients with advanced disease. The identification of several key molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of melanoma has led to the development of novel therapies for this devastating disease. In melanoma, both the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK (MAPK) and the PI3K/AKT (AKT) signalling pathways are constitutively activated through multiple mechanisms. Targeting various effectors of these pathways with pharmacologic inhibitors may inhibit melanoma cell growth and angiogenesis. Ongoing clinical trials provide hope to improve progression-free survival of patients with advanced melanoma. This review summarizes the most relevant studies focused on the specific action of these new molecular targeted agents. Mechanisms of resistance to therapy are also discussed. PMID:24899250

  12. VP40 of the Ebola Virus as a Target for EboV Therapy: Comprehensive Conformational and Inhibitor Binding Landscape from Accelerated Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Balmith, Marissa; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2017-03-01

    The first account of the dynamic features of the loop region of VP40 of the Ebola virus was studied using accelerated molecular dynamics simulations and reported herein. Among the proteins of the Ebola virus, the matrix protein (VP40) plays a significant role in the virus lifecycle thereby making it a promising therapeutic target. Of interest is the newly elucidated N-terminal domain loop region of VP40 comprising residues K127, T129, and N130 which when mutated to alanine have demonstrated an unrecognized role for N-terminal domain-plasma membrane interaction for efficient VP40-plasma membrane localization, oligomerization, matrix assembly, and egress. The molecular understanding of the conformational features of VP40 in complex with a known inhibitor still remains elusive. Using accelerated molecular dynamics approaches, we conducted a comparative study on VP40 apo and bound systems to understand the conformational features of VP40 at the molecular level and to determine the effect of inhibitor binding with the aid of a number of post-dynamic analytical tools. Significant features were seen in the presence of an inhibitor as per molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area binding free energy calculations. Results revealed that inhibitor binding to VP40 reduces the flexibility and mobility of the protein as supported by root mean square fluctuation and root mean square deviation calculations. The study revealed a characteristic "twisting" motion and coiling of the loop region of VP40 accompanied by conformational changes in the dimer interface upon inhibitor binding. We believe that results presented in this study will ultimately provide useful insight into the binding landscape of VP40 which could assist researchers in the discovery of potent Ebola virus inhibitors for anti-Ebola therapies.

  13. Managing Resistance to EFGR- and ALK-Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Lovly, Christine M; Iyengar, Puneeth; Gainor, Justin F

    2017-01-01

    Targeted therapies have transformed the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and placed an increased emphasis on stratifying patients on the basis of genetic alterations in oncogenic drivers. To date, the best characterized molecular targets in NSCLC are the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Despite steady advances in targeted therapies within these molecular subsets, however, acquired resistance to therapy is near universal. Recent preclinical models and translational efforts have provided critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of resistance to EGFR and ALK inhibitors. In this review, we present a framework for understanding resistance to targeted therapies. We also provide overviews of the molecular mechanisms of resistance and strategies to overcome resistance among EGFR-mutant and ALK-rearranged lung cancers. To date, these strategies have centered on the development of novel next-generation inhibitors, rationale combinations, and use of local ablative therapies, such as radiotherapy.

  14. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance.

  15. Molecular functions of the iron-regulated metastasis suppressor, NDRG1, and its potential as a molecular target for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bernard A; Kovačević, Žaklina; Park, Kyung Chan; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Jansson, Patric J; Lane, Darius J R; Sahni, Sumit; Richardson, Des R

    2014-01-01

    N-myc down-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a known metastasis suppressor in multiple cancers, being also involved in embryogenesis and development, cell growth and differentiation, lipid biosynthesis and myelination, stress responses and immunity. In addition to its primary role as a metastasis suppressor, NDRG1 can also influence other stages of carcinogenesis, namely angiogenesis and primary tumour growth. NDRG1 is regulated by multiple effectors in normal and neoplastic cells, including N-myc, histone acetylation, hypoxia, cellular iron levels and intracellular calcium. Further, studies have found that NDRG1 is up-regulated in neoplastic cells after treatment with novel iron chelators, which are a promising therapy for effective cancer management. Although the pathways by which NDRG1 exerts its functions in cancers have been documented, the relationship between the molecular structure of this protein and its functions remains unclear. In fact, recent studies suggest that, in certain cancers, NDRG1 is post-translationally modified, possibly by the activity of endogenous trypsins, leading to a subsequent alteration in its metastasis suppressor activity. This review describes the role of this important metastasis suppressor and discusses interesting unresolved issues regarding this protein.

  16. [Molecular diagnostic and targeted therapy--"Barking dogs are going to bite": presentations from the 42nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Atlanta 2006].

    PubMed

    Rody, A; Loibl, S; Kaufmann, M

    2006-10-01

    This years ASCO-meeting reinforced the trend of the recent years to get off from empirical treatment concepts to tailored and individualized diagnostics and therapy. However, the basis for an individual therapy is a specific molecular diagnostic which can be reflected in the analysis of hormonal receptor, HER-1, HER-2 and topoisomerase IIalpha in breast cancer. All these markers are not only able to prognosticate the course of disease but they also can predict the success of specific treatment approaches. Trastuzumab is standard therapy in HER-2 positive breast cancer both in the adjuvant and palliative setting. But new therapeutic agents, as e. g. lapatinib, are promising in the treatment of HER-2 positive breast cancer even if trastuzumab is failing. Otherwise it might possibly be an alternative option but adequate clinical results have to be awaited. The targeted inactivation of EGFR-related signal transduction pathways by e. g. gefitinib did not show a substantial improvement neither as a single agent nor in combination with endocrine treatment. However, the appropriate subgroup which might benefit from this therapy has to be defined even if molecular data suggest that patients with ER positive and PR negative breast cancer might be such a group. The increasing knowledge in terms of the biology of bone metastasis led to the development of new treatment options as e. g. denosumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody for RANK ligand. Two adjuvant cytotoxic treatment trials revealed that taxanes improve the prognosis of node positive breast cancer and should be administered sequentially. The advantage of switching to an aromatase inhibitor after two to three years of tamoxifen in endocrine treatment of postmenopausal patients is proved by two clinical trials (IES, ARNO) which could demonstrate a survival benefit. In conclusion it seems to be evident that new targeted therapy options are effective and will set new standards for the treatment of breast cancer patients

  17. Overcoming resistance to molecularly targeted anticancer therapies: rational drug combinations based on EGFR and MAPK inhibition for solid tumours and haematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tortora, Giampaolo; Bianco, Roberto; Daniele, Gennaro; Ciardiello, Fortunato; McCubrey, James A; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Cognetti, Francesco; Tafuri, Agostino; Milella, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer can be envisioned as a “signaling disease”, in which alterations in the cellular genome affect the expression and/or function of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. This ultimately disrupts the physiologic transmission of biochemical signals that normally regulate cell growth, differentiation and programmed cell death (apoptosis). From a clinical standpoint, signal transduction inhibition as a therapeutic strategy for human malignancies has recently achieved remarkable success. However, as additional drugs move forward into the clinical arena, intrinsic and acquired resistance to “targeted” agents becomes an issue for their clinical utility. One way to overcome resistance to targeted agents is to identify genetic and epigenetic aberrations underlying sensitivity/resistance, thus enabling the selection of patients that will most likely benefit from a specific therapy. Since resistance often ensues as a result of the concomitant activation of multiple, often overlapping, signaling pathways, another possibility is to interfere with multiple, cross-talking pathways involved in growth and survival control in a rational, mechanism-based, fashion. These concepts may be usefully applied, among others, to agents that target two major signal transduction pathways: the one initiated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and the one converging on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Here we review the molecular mechanisms of sensitivity/resistance to EGFR inhibitors, as well as the rationale for combining them with other targeted agents, in an attempt to overcome resistance. In the second part of the paper, we review MAPK-targeted agents, focusing on their therapeutic potential in hematologic malignancies, and examine the prospects for combinations of MAPK inhibitors with cytotoxic agents or other signal transduction-targeted agents to obtain synergistic anti-tumour effects. PMID:17482503

  18. Time to progression after first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor predicts survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma receiving second-line molecular-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hiroki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Omae, Kenji; Takagi, Toshio; Iizuka, Junpei; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-09-01

    The effect of response to first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy on second-line survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who receive second-line molecular-targeted therapy (mTT) after first-line failure remains unclear. Sixty patients who developed disease progression after first-line TKI, without prior cytokine therapy, were enrolled. According to the median first-line time to progression (1L-TTP), patients were divided into 2 groups (i.e., short vs. long). Second-line progression-free survival (2L-PFS) and second-line overall survival (2L-OS) were defined as the time from second-line mTT initiation. Survival was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test between patients with short and long 1L-PFS. Predictors for survivals were identified using Cox proportional hazards regression models. The median 1L-TTP was 8.84 months. Thirty patients (50.0%) with short 1L-TTP (<8.84mo) had significantly shorter 2L-PFS and 2L-OS compared to patients with long 1L-TTP (2L-PFS: 4.96 vs. 10.2mo, P = 0.0002; 2L-OS: 9.6 vs. 28.0mo, P = 0.0036). Multivariable analyses for 2L-PFS and 2L-OS showed that 1L-TTP was an independent predictor both as a categorical classification (cutoff: 8.84mo) and as a continuous variable (both P<0.05). The median follow-up duration was 13.1 months (interquartile range: 6.56-24.7). Patients who achieve a long-term response after first-line TKI therapy could have a favorable prognosis with second-line mTT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Targeted alpha-therapy: past, present, future?

    PubMed

    Brechbiel, Martin W

    2007-11-21

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a viable strategy for the delivery of therapeutic, particle emitting radionuclides specifically to tumor cells to either augment anti-tumor action of the native antibodies or to solely take advantage of their action as targeting vectors. Proper and rational selection of radionuclide and antibody combinations is critical to making radioimmunotherapy (RIT) a standard therapeutic modality due to the fundamental and significant differences in the emission of either alpha- and beta-particles. The alpha-particle has a short path length (50-80 microm) that is characterized by high linear energy transfer (100 keV microm(-1)). Actively targeted alpha-therapy potentially offers a more specific tumor cell killing action with less collateral damage to the surrounding normal tissues than beta-emitters. These properties make targeted alpha-therapy an appropriate therapy to eliminate minimal residual or micrometastatic disease. RIT using alpha-emitters such as (213)Bi, (211)At, (225)Ac, and others has demonstrated significant activity in both in vitro and in vivo model systems. Limited numbers of clinical trials have progressed to demonstrate safety, feasibility, and therapeutic activity of targeted alpha-therapy, despite having to traverse complex obstacles. Further advances may require more potent isotopes, additional sources and more efficient means of isotope production. Refinements in chelation and/or radiolabeling chemistry combined with rational improvements of isotope delivery, targeting vectors, molecular targets, and identification of appropriate clinical applications remain as active areas of research. Ultimately, randomized trials comparing targeted alpha-therapy combined with integration into existing standards of care treatment regimens will determine the clinical utility of this modality.

  20. Targeted therapy in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dorff, Tanya B.; Goldkorn, Amir; Quinn, David I.

    2009-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) has an increasing incidence internationally and is a disease for which there have been limited therapeutic options until recently. The last decade has seen a vastly improved understanding of the biological and clinical factors that predict the outcome of this disease. We now understand some of the different molecular underpinnings of renal clear cell carcinoma by mutation or silencing of the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene and subsequent deregulated proliferation and angiogenesis. Survival in advanced disease is predicted by factors (performance status, anemia, hypercalcemia, and serum lactate dehydrogenase, time from diagnosis to recurrence) incorporated into the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) criteria (also referred to as ‘Motzer’ criteria). These criteria allow classification of patients with RCC into good, intermediate and poor risk categories with median overall survivals of 22 months, 12 months and 5.4 months, respectively. Predicated upon these advances, six new targeted drugs (sorafenib, sunitinib, temsirolimus, everolimus, bevacizumab and pazopanib) have been tested in well-designed phase III trials, selected or stratified for MSKCC risk criteria, with positive results. All of these new drugs act at least in part through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mediated pathways with other potential therapeutic impact on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), raf kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. Importantly, data from each of these trials show a consistent doubling of progression-free survival (PFS) over prior standard of care treatments. In addition, sorafenib, sunitinib and temsirolimus, have demonstrated significant overall survival (OS) benefits as well; further follow-up is required to determine whether the disease control exhibited by everolimus and pazopanib will translate into a survival advantage. These drugs are generally well tolerated, as demonstrated by quality

  1. Interferon α-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Hironari; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to various cellular components. Although many of therapies have shown great efficacy, they often associate with adverse effects. The development of safer therapies for SLE has led to recent emphasis on targeting selected pathways that can be important in the inflammatory process in SLE. The cytokine family of type I interferons (IFNs), and especially the IFNα subtypes, are implicated in pathogenesis of SLE. Genetic polymorphisms of several components of the IFN signaling pathway have been associated with an increased risk of SLE. Therefore, IFNα subtypes have been identified as a potential target for drug development in SLE. There have been developed three agents, IFNα-targeted therapy, Sifalimumab, Rontalizumab and NNC 0152-0000-0001. They are anti-IFNα monoclonal antibodies that bind to and specifically neutralizes most IFNα subtypes, preventing signaling through the type I IFN receptor. The safety and dose-proportional pharmacokinetics of those agents were demonstrated. A larger study is currently ongoing, further safety profile will be evaluated. This review provides an update on the ongoing clinical trials of anti-IFNα therapy and the promise and obstacles in the use of biologics in SLE.

  2. The impact of molecularly targeted therapies upon the understanding of leukemogenesis and the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Sumimasa; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2010-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a distinct subset of acute myeloid leukemia. An abnormal fusion gene, PML/RARA is detected in approximately 98% of patients with APL. PML/RARA confers long-term self-renewal properties to promyelocytes. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO), which are the major molecularly targeted therapies in APL, affect the PML/RARA fusion protein and cause differentiation and apoptosis of APL cells. Although the leukemia-initiating cells of APL may be present in a myeloid progenitor committed compartment, the precise population of those remains to be elucidated. However, recent studies have demonstrated the effect of ATRA and ATO on APL leukemia-initiating cells. Through these studies, we can understand more deeply how current clinical therapies lead to long-lasting remission of APL. ATRA and ATO have improved the prognosis of APL patients and have changed the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At present, HSCT is not indicated for patients with APL in first complete remission, and considered for patients with relapsed APL. In this review, we discuss the three main topics as follows: the leukemia-initiating cells in APL, the current state-of-the-art treatment for newly diagnosed and relapsed APL, and the role of HSCT in APL patients.

  3. Engineering a hollow nanocontainer platform with multifunctional molecular machines for tumor-targeted therapy in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhong; Ding, Xingwei; Hu, Yan; Wu, Shaojue; Xiang, Yang; Zeng, Yongfei; Zhang, Beilu; Yan, Hong; Zhang, Huacheng; Zhu, Liangliang; Liu, Junjie; Li, Jinghua; Cai, Kaiyong; Zhao, Yanli

    2013-11-26

    In order to selectively target malignant cells and eliminate severe side effects of conventional chemotherapy, biocompatible and redox-responsive hollow nanocontainers with tumor specificity were fabricated. The mechanized nanocontainers were achieved by anchoring mechanically interlocked molecules, i.e., [2]rotaxanes, onto the orifices of hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles via disulfide bonds as intermediate linkers for intracellular glutathione-triggered drug release. The [2]rotaxane employed was mainly composed of U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved tetraethylene glycol chains, α-cyclodextrin, and folic acid. In this study, folate groups on the mechanized hollow nanocontainers act as both the tumor-targeting agents and stoppers of the [2]rotaxanes. Detailed investigations showed that anticancer drug doxorubicin loaded mechanized nanocontainers could selectively induce the apoptosis and death of tumor cells. The drug-loaded nanocontainers enhanced the targeting capability to tumor tissues in vitro and inhibited the tumor growth with minimal side effects in vivo. The present controlled and targeted drug delivery system paves the way for developing the next generation of nanotherapeutics toward efficient cancer treatment.

  4. Targeted therapy in lung cancer: IPASS and beyond, keeping abreast of the explosion of targeted therapies for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Peter; Hughes, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) over the last decade have predominantly involved the development of therapies directed at molecular targets such as mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or rearrangements in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. Other targets have been discovered at low frequency, with multiple agents approved or in development for treatment of these rare molecular subtypes. The tumour microenvironment has also provided opportunities for therapies targeting angiogenesis and the host immune response. This review will provide an overview of current targeted therapies in NSCLC and promising treatment approaches on the horizon. PMID:24163750

  5. Novel Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Iams, Wade T; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Chandra, Sunandana

    Oncogene-targeted therapy is a major component of precision oncology, and although patients with metastatic melanoma have experienced improved outcomes with this strategy, there are a number of potential therapeutic targets currently under study that may further increase the drug armamentarium for this patient population. In this review, we discuss the landscape of targeted therapies for patients with advanced melanoma, focusing on oncogene mutation-specific targets. In patients with typical BRAF V600-mutant melanoma, combination BRAF and MEK inhibition has surpassed outcomes compared with monotherapy with BRAF or MEK inhibition alone, and current strategies seek to address inevitable resistance mechanisms. For patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma, MEK inhibitor monotherapy and combined MEK and CDK4/6 inhibition are burgeoning strategies; for patients with KIT-mutant melanoma, tyrosine kinase inhibition is being leveraged, and for NF-1-mutant melanoma, mTOR and MEK inhibition is being actively evaluated. In patients with atypical, non-V600 BRAF-mutant melanoma, MEK inhibitor monotherapy is the potential novel targeted approach on the horizon. For advanced uveal melanoma, novel targets such as IMCgp100 and glembatumumab have shown activity in early studies. We review additional strategies that remain in the preclinical and early clinical pipeline, so there is much hope for the future of targeted agents for distinct molecular cohorts of patients with advanced melanoma.

  6. EGFR-PI3K-AKT-mTOR Signaling in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas - Attractive Targets for Molecular-Oriented Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Freudlsperger, Christian; Burnett, Jeffrey R.; Friedman, Jay A.; Kannabiran, Vishnu R.; Chen, Zhong; Van Waes, Carter

    2012-01-01

    Importance of the field Recent advances in understanding the oncogenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have revealed multiple dysregulated signaling pathways. One frequently altered axis is the EGFR/PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. This pathway plays a central role in numerous cellular processes including metabolism, cell growth, apoptosis, survival and differentiation, which ultimately contributes to HNSCC progression. What the reader will gain This article reviews the current understanding of EGFR/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in HNSCC, including the impact of both genetic and epigenetic alterations. This review further highlights the potential of targeting this signaling cascade as a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of HNSCC. Areas covered in this review Books, journals, databases and websites have been searched to provide a current review on the subject. Take home message Genetic alterations of several nodes within this pathway, including both genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to either oncogene activation or inactivation of tumor suppressors, have frequently been implicated in HNSCC. Consequently, drugs that target the central nodes of this pathway have become attractive for molecular oriented cancer therapies. Numerous preclinical and clinical studies are being performed in HNSCC, however, more studies are still needed to better understand the biology of this pathway. PMID:21110697

  7. [Novel signal transduction pathways: the molecular basis for targeted cancer therapies in Hedgehog/Notch/Wnt pathway].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshio; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways via mutations or ligand overexpression has been implicated in a large number of cancer types where they are involved in functions ranging from tumor initiation to cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance and angiogenesis. Agents targeting each one of these three pathways have now reached clinical trials, and the first one of these, Vismodegib, a hedgehog pathway inhibitor, was approved in 2012 by US FDA for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Development of agents that target critical steps in these pathways as novel signal transduction pathways will be complicated by signaling cross-talk. The role that embryonic signaling pathways play in the function of CSCs, the development of new anti-CSC therapeutic agents, and the complexity of potential CSC signaling cross-talk are being explored coupled with early phase I clinical studies.

  8. Molecular Targets and Synaptic Effects of Carbamates, Organophosphates, Oximes, and Pyridiniums: Implications for Prophylaxis and Therapy of Organophosphate Toxicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-16

    simple issme, amplIfyilng device by mainimizing blanks. this means that if the Uigand binds to site" A and S. the blank drug I- blank) should bind to...Molecular Basis of * Drug and Pesticide Action," Ed. G.G. Lunt, Elsevier Publ., Cambridge, U.K., pp. 349- 373, 1988. 11. Albuquerque, E.X., Alkondon, M...625, 1991. 16. Albuquerque, E.X., Daly, J.W., and Warnick, L.E. Macromolecular sites for specific neurotoxins and drugs on chemosensitive synapses and

  9. Novel targets for HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Greene, Warner C; Debyser, Zeger; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Freed, Eric O; Stephens, Edward; Yonemoto, Wes; Buckheit, Robert W; Esté, José A; Cihlar, Tomas

    2008-12-01

    There are currently 25 drugs belonging to 6 different inhibitor classes approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, new anti-HIV agents are still needed to confront the emergence of drug resistance and various adverse effects associated with long-term use of antiretroviral therapy. The 21st International Conference on Antiviral Research, held in April 2008 in Montreal, Canada, therefore featured a special session focused on novel targets for HIV therapy. The session included presentations by world-renowned experts in HIV virology and covered a diverse array of potential targets for the development of new classes of HIV therapies. This review contains concise summaries of discussed topics that included Vif-APOBEC3G, LEDGF/p75, TRIM 5alpha, virus assembly and maturation, and Vpu. The described viral and host factors represent some of the most noted examples of recent scientific breakthroughs that are opening unexplored avenues to novel anti-HIV target discovery and validation, and should feed the antiretroviral drug development pipeline in the near future.

  10. Current Status of Herbal Medicines in Chronic Liver Disease Therapy: The Biological Effects, Molecular Targets and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Li, Sha; Tan, Hor Yue; Wang, Ning; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2015-12-02

    Chronic liver dysfunction or injury is a serious health problem worldwide. Chronic liver disease involves a wide range of liver pathologies that include fatty liver, hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The efficiency of current synthetic agents in treating chronic liver disease is not satisfactory and they have undesirable side effects. Thereby, numerous medicinal herbs and phytochemicals have been investigated as complementary and alternative treatments for chronic liver diseases. Since some herbal products have already been used for the management of liver diseases in some countries or regions, a systematic review on these herbal medicines for chronic liver disease is urgently needed. Herein, we conducted a review describing the potential role, pharmacological studies and molecular mechanisms of several commonly used medicinal herbs and phytochemicals for chronic liver diseases treatment. Their potential toxicity and side effects were also discussed. Several herbal formulae and their biological effects in chronic liver disease treatment as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms are also summarized in this paper. This review article is a comprehensive and systematic analysis of our current knowledge of the conventional medicinal herbs and phytochemicals in treating chronic liver diseases and on the potential pitfalls which need to be addressed in future study.

  11. Current Status of Herbal Medicines in Chronic Liver Disease Therapy: The Biological Effects, Molecular Targets and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ming; Li, Sha; Tan, Hor Yue; Wang, Ning; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver dysfunction or injury is a serious health problem worldwide. Chronic liver disease involves a wide range of liver pathologies that include fatty liver, hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The efficiency of current synthetic agents in treating chronic liver disease is not satisfactory and they have undesirable side effects. Thereby, numerous medicinal herbs and phytochemicals have been investigated as complementary and alternative treatments for chronic liver diseases. Since some herbal products have already been used for the management of liver diseases in some countries or regions, a systematic review on these herbal medicines for chronic liver disease is urgently needed. Herein, we conducted a review describing the potential role, pharmacological studies and molecular mechanisms of several commonly used medicinal herbs and phytochemicals for chronic liver diseases treatment. Their potential toxicity and side effects were also discussed. Several herbal formulae and their biological effects in chronic liver disease treatment as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms are also summarized in this paper. This review article is a comprehensive and systematic analysis of our current knowledge of the conventional medicinal herbs and phytochemicals in treating chronic liver diseases and on the potential pitfalls which need to be addressed in future study. PMID:26633388

  12. Updates on the Molecular Pathology of Selected Ocular and Ocular Adnexal Tumors: Potential Targets for Future Therapy.

    PubMed

    Stagner, Anna M; Jakobiec, Frederick A

    2016-01-01

    Ophthalmic pathologic studies of retinoblastoma first definitively elucidated a genetic etiology for cancer three decades ago. Advances in DNA sequencing, protein expression profiling, and the exploration of epigenetics have since led to categorization of tumors and clinical prognostication based on genetic aberrancy. There are now many neoplasms that are defined by a characteristic genetic signature. In the past several years alone, much has been discovered in regard to the original tumor-suppressor gene initially defined in retinoblastoma as well as in other intraocular tumors such as medulloepithelioma. Our further understanding of ocular adnexal tumors that result in substantial morbidity and mortality, such as sebaceous carcinoma, has also benefited from a genetic approach. In this article, we review the clinicopathologic features of the foregoing three entities--retinoblastoma, medulloepithelioma, and sebaceous carcinoma--in order to highlight discoveries in their underlying abnormal molecular genetic functioning.

  13. Emerging targets for COPD therapy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2005-12-01

    No currently available treatments reduce the progression of COPD or suppress the inflammation in small airways and lung parenchyma. However, several new treatments that target the inflammatory process are in clinical development. A group of specific therapies are directed against the influx of inflammatory cells into the airways and lung parenchyma that occurs in COPD; these include adhesion molecule and chemokine-directed therapy, as well as therapies to combat tumour necrosis factor-alpha and augment interleukin-10. Broad spectrum anti-inflammatory drugs are now in phase III development for COPD, and include phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors. Other drugs that inhibit cell signalling include inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-kappaB and phosphoinositide-3 kinase-gamma. More specific approaches are to give antioxidants, inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and leukotriene B4 receptor antagonists. Epidermal growth factor receptor kinase inhibitors and calcium-activated chloride channel inhibitors have potential to combat mucus overproduction. Therapy to inhibit fibrosis is being developed against transforming growth factor-beta1 and protease activated receptor-2. There is also a search for serine proteinase and matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors to prevent lung destruction and the development of emphysema, as well as drugs such as retinoids that may even reverse this process. Effective delivery of drugs to the sites of disease in the peripheral lung is an important consideration, and there is the need for validated biomarkers and monitoring techniques in early clinical studies with new therapies for COPD.

  14. PET/Computed Tomography Using New Radiopharmaceuticals in Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punit; Kumar, Rakesh; Alavi, Abass

    2015-10-01

    Targeted therapy is gaining prominence in the management of different cancers. Given different mechanism of action compared with traditional chemoradiotherapy, selection of patients for targeted therapy and monitoring response to these agents is difficult with conventional imaging. Various new PET radiopharmaceuticals have been evaluated for molecular imaging of these targets to achieve specific patient selection and response monitoring. These PET/computed tomography (CT) agents target the cell surface receptors, hormone receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, or angiogenesis components. This article reviews the established and potential role of PET/CT with new radiopharmaceuticals for guiding targeted therapy.

  15. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    pathophysiology of epilepsy and the structural and functional characterization of the molecular targets provide many opportunities to create improved epilepsy therapies. PMID:17199015

  16. Advances in targeted therapy for osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenya; Hao, Mengze; Du, Xiaoling; Chen, Kexin; Wang, Guowen; Yang, Jilong

    2014-06-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive cancer in skeletal system with unknown molecular mechanisms of etiology and pathogenesis, therefore it remains a challenge for current therapeutic strategies to effectively treat osteosarcoma. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the molecular and mechanistic changes identified in recent years which might be new targets for the treatment of osteosarcoma. These molecules play important roles in different biological and pathological programs of osteosarcoma, including the altered oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, molecules involved in tumor cell migration and invasion, angiogenesis, apoptosis and proliferation, miRNAs, and molecules involved in osteoclast function and multidrug resistance. Further research on these molecules in osteosarcoma will provide new insights into the target therapy for osteosarcoma.

  17. Ovarian Cancer: Opportunity for Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Tomoko; Morgan, Robert; Yen, Yun; Mortimer, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a common cause of cancer mortality in women with limited treatment effectiveness in advanced stages. The limitation to treatment is largely the result of high rates of cancer recurrence despite chemotherapy and eventual resistance to existing chemotherapeutic agents. The objective of this paper is to review current concepts of ovarian carcinogenesis. We will review existing hypotheses of tumor origin from ovarian epithelial cells, Fallopian tube, and endometrium. We will also review the molecular pathogenesis of ovarian cancer which results in two specific pathways of carcinogenesis: (1) type I low-grade tumor and (2) type II high-grade tumor. Improved understanding of the molecular basis of ovarian carcinogenesis has opened new opportunities for targeted therapy. This paper will also review these potential therapeutic targets and will explore new agents that are currently being investigated. PMID:22235203

  18. The evolution of combined molecular targeted therapies to advance the therapeutic efficacy in melanoma: a highlight of vemurafenib and cobimetinib

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Theresa M; Lewis, Karl D

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is an aggressive, rapidly progressive disease which historically had very few effective treatment options. However, since 2011, the therapeutic landscape of melanoma has undergone a dramatic transformation with two distinct approaches and has catalyzed the successful advancement in the clinical field of immuno-oncology. In addition, the recognition of a key oncogenic driver mutation in melanoma, BRAF, stimulated the development of multiple potent kinase inhibitors which has also influenced the expansion and use of targeted agents in the practice of oncology. Vemurafenib, the initial BRAF inhibitor approved for the treatment of melanoma, was the first agent to demonstrate rapid clinical responses and significantly improved survival which was a clinical breakthrough in the treatment of melanoma. Although exciting and practice changing, the unparalleled responses with vemurafenib are usually not sustained. Further investigations delineated several mechanisms of acquired resistance which are most often mediated by the upregulation of the MAPK pathway. MEK inhibitors, another class of small-molecule inhibitors, were developed as an alternative agent to suppress the MAPK pathway downstream, independent from BRAF activation. Multiple studies have demonstrated the improvement in antitumor activity when MEK inhibitors are used in combination with BRAF inhibitors in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. This is a review of the investigations that led to the US Food and Drug Administration approval in 2015 of the combination of vemurafenib and cobimetinib, adding to the quickly growing armament for the treatment of advanced or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600 mutation. PMID:27382311

  19. The evolution of combined molecular targeted therapies to advance the therapeutic efficacy in melanoma: a highlight of vemurafenib and cobimetinib.

    PubMed

    Medina, Theresa M; Lewis, Karl D

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is an aggressive, rapidly progressive disease which historically had very few effective treatment options. However, since 2011, the therapeutic landscape of melanoma has undergone a dramatic transformation with two distinct approaches and has catalyzed the successful advancement in the clinical field of immuno-oncology. In addition, the recognition of a key oncogenic driver mutation in melanoma, BRAF, stimulated the development of multiple potent kinase inhibitors which has also influenced the expansion and use of targeted agents in the practice of oncology. Vemurafenib, the initial BRAF inhibitor approved for the treatment of melanoma, was the first agent to demonstrate rapid clinical responses and significantly improved survival which was a clinical breakthrough in the treatment of melanoma. Although exciting and practice changing, the unparalleled responses with vemurafenib are usually not sustained. Further investigations delineated several mechanisms of acquired resistance which are most often mediated by the upregulation of the MAPK pathway. MEK inhibitors, another class of small-molecule inhibitors, were developed as an alternative agent to suppress the MAPK pathway downstream, independent from BRAF activation. Multiple studies have demonstrated the improvement in antitumor activity when MEK inhibitors are used in combination with BRAF inhibitors in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. This is a review of the investigations that led to the US Food and Drug Administration approval in 2015 of the combination of vemurafenib and cobimetinib, adding to the quickly growing armament for the treatment of advanced or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600 mutation.

  20. Emerging targets for antidepressant therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Holtzheimer, Paul E; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2015-01-01

    Despite adequate antidepressant monotherapy, the majority of depressed patients do not achieve remission. Even optimal and aggressive therapy leads to a substantial number of patients who show minimal and often only transient improvement. In order to address this substantial problem of treatment-resistant depression, a number of novel targets for antidepressant therapy have emerged as a consequence of major advances in the neurobiology of depression. Three major approaches to uncover novel therapeutic interventions are: first, optimizing the modulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission; second, developing medications that act upon neurotransmitter systems other than monoaminergic circuits; and third, using focal brain stimulation to directly modulate neuronal activity. We review the most recent data on novel therapeutic compounds and their antidepressant potential. These include triple monoamine reuptake inhibitors, atypical antipsychotic augmentation, and dopamine receptor agonists. Compounds affecting extra-monoamine neurotransmitter systems include CRF1 receptor antagonists, glucocorticoid receptor antagonists, substance P receptor antagonists, NMDA receptor antagonists, nemifitide, omega-3 fatty acids, and melatonin receptor agonists. Focal brain stimulation therapies include vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic seizure therapy (MST), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS). PMID:19501541

  1. Molecular Pathophysiology of Priapism: Emerging Targets

    PubMed Central

    Anele, Uzoma A.; Morrison, Belinda F.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Priapism is an erectile disorder involving uncontrolled, prolonged penile erection without sexual purpose, which can lead to erectile dysfunction. Ischemic priapism, the most common of the variants, occurs with high prevalence in patients with sickle cell disease. Despite the potentially devastating complications of this condition, management of recurrent priapism episodes historically has commonly involved reactive treatments rather than preventative strategies. Recently, increasing elucidation of the complex molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder, principally involving dysregulation of nitric oxide signaling, has allowed for greater insights and exploration into potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the multiple molecular regulatory pathways implicated in the pathophysiology of priapism. We also identify the roles and mechanisms of molecular effectors in providing the basis for potential future therapies. PMID:25392014

  2. Targeted therapy using nanotechnology: focus on cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Vanna; Pala, Nicolino; Sechi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology have contributed to the development of engineered nanoscale materials as innovative prototypes to be used for biomedical applications and optimized therapy. Due to their unique features, including a large surface area, structural properties, and a long circulation time in blood compared with small molecules, a plethora of nanomaterials has been developed, with the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases, in particular by improving the sensitivity and recognition ability of imaging contrast agents and by selectively directing bioactive agents to biological targets. Focusing on cancer, promising nanoprototypes have been designed to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents, as well as for early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. However, several obstacles, including difficulty in achieving the optimal combination of physicochemical parameters for tumor targeting, evading particle clearance mechanisms, and controlling drug release, prevent the translation of nanomedicines into therapy. In spite of this, recent efforts have been focused on developing functionalized nanoparticles for delivery of therapeutic agents to specific molecular targets overexpressed on different cancer cells. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has resulted in a new programmable nanotherapeutic formulation of docetaxel, namely BIND-014, which recently entered Phase II clinical testing for patients with solid tumors. BIND-014 has been developed to overcome the limitations facing delivery of nanoparticles to many neoplasms, and represents a validated example of targeted nanosystems with the optimal biophysicochemical properties needed for successful tumor eradication. PMID:24531078

  3. Targeted alpha therapy: part I.

    PubMed

    Elgqvist, Jorgen

    2011-07-01

    The possibility of pinpointing biological targets, and thereby potentially targeting and eradicating small tumors or even single cancer cells, is a tantalizing concept that has been discussed since the magic-bullet concept was first presented by Paul Erlich in the beginning of the 20th century in connection with his work on tissue staining for histological examinations and the work by Kohler and Milstein on antibody production published in 1975. This concept now seems feasible through the use of highly specific targeting constructs, chemical labeling of radioactive substances to these targeting constructs that results in high specific activities, radioimmunocomplexes with good stability even after injection, and the use of radionuclides emitting alpha( α)-particles having exceedingly high ionizing density and, therefore, a high probability of killing cells along its track in tissue. The short range of the emitted α-particles makes them even more interesting by minimizing unwanted irradiation of normal tissue surrounding the targeted cancer cells of interest, assuming high specificity of the targeting construct and good stability of the chemical bonds between the targeting construct and the α-particle emitter. Targeted Alpha Therapy (TAT), in which an α-particle emitting radionuclide is specifically directed to the biological target, is gaining more attention as new targets, targeting constructs, chemical labeling techniques, and α-particle emitters are, respectively, identified, constructed, developed, and made available. Results and improvements are now being published at an increasing rate and the number of conceivable applications is expanding, especially in the field of cancer treatment. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to provide an overview of the overall progress in the research field of TAT on a regular basis. However, problems such as limited or delayed diffusion of the α-radioimmunocomplex and inhomogeneous activity distributions in the

  4. Combination treatment including targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; Wang, Anqiang; Zhang, Haohai; Yang, Xiaobo; Wan, Xueshuai; Lu, Xin; Sang, Xinting; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Management of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, has presented a therapeutic challenge over past decades. Most patients with advanced HCC and a low possibility of surgical resection have limited treatment options and no alternative but to accept local or palliative treatment. In the new era of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of molecular targeted agents (MTAs) have been applied in the treatment of advanced HCC. However, mono-targeted therapy has shown disappointing outcomes in disease control, primarily because of tumor heterogeneity and complex cell signal transduction. Because incapacitation of a single target is insufficient for cancer suppression, combination treatment for targeted therapy has been proposed and experimentally tested in several clinical trials. In this article, we review research studies aimed to enhance the efficacy of targeted therapy for HCC through combination strategies. Combination treatments involving targeted therapy for advanced HCC are compared and discussed. PMID:27626176

  5. How have advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of paediatric leukaemia led to improved targeted therapies for these diseases?

    PubMed

    Szychot, Elwira; Brodkiewicz, Andrzej; Peregud-Pogorzelski, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    The term "leukaemia" refers to a large and heterogenous group of diseases, with treatment response and outcome dependent on the specific type of malignancy. New molecular methods allow us to specifically evaluate the type of disorder, and provide treatment of necessary intensity. The aim of this review is to provide insight into the progress in leukaemia treatment that had been possible due to advances in molecular genetics over the last few decades. Those new sophisticated diagnostic methods have allowed us not only to predict patients' prognosis but also to provide a specific therapy depending on the molecular and genetic characteristics of patients. Our review is based on 25 articles regarding novel diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as prognostic factors, released between 1992 and 2011. Those articles focus mostly on molecular and cytogenetic testing allowing revolutionary methods of patient classification and individual therapy for this highly heterogeneous group of disorders. Implementation of molecular genetic testing to evaluate the type of leukaemia allowed paediatric oncologists and haematologists to adjust the intensity of treatment, improve outcome, minimize toxicity of therapies and considerably lower the risk of side effects. In the last few decades there has been a great improvement in survival among children suffering from haematopoietic malignancies. Progress made in molecular genetics allowed the creation of new treatment protocols that are designed to maintain a high cure rate for children with leukaemia while reducing toxicity.

  6. Targeted therapy in gastroesophageal cancers: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Janghee; Cohen, Stacey A.; Grim, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal cancer is a significant global problem that frequently presents at an incurable stage and has very poor survival with standard chemotherapy approaches. This review will examine the epidemiology and molecular biology of gastroesophageal cancer and will focus on the key deregulated signaling pathways that have been targeted in the clinic. A comprehensive overview of clinical data highlighting successes and failures with targeted agents will be presented. Most notably, HER2-targeted therapy with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab has proven beneficial in first-line therapy and has been incorporated into standard practice. Targeting the VEGF pathway has also proven beneficial, and the VEGFR-targeted monoclonal antibody ramucirumab is now approved for second-line therapy. In contrast to these positive results, agents targeting the EGFR and MET pathways have been evaluated extensively in gastroesophageal cancer but have repeatedly failed to show benefit. An increased understanding of the molecular predictors of response to targeted therapies is sorely needed. In the future, improved molecular pathology approaches should subdivide this heterogeneous disease entity to allow individualization of cancer therapy based on integrated and global identification of deregulated signaling pathways. Better patient selection, rational combinations of targeted therapies and incorporation of emerging immunotherapeutic approaches should further improve the treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:26510453

  7. Targeted Therapy in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies use an understanding of the pathophysiology of a disease in an individual patient. Although targeted therapy for systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma) has not yet reached the level of patient-specific treatments, recent developments in the understanding of the global pathophysiology of the disease have led to new treatments based on the cells and pathways that have been shown to be involved in the disease pathogenesis. The presence of a B cell signature in skin biopsies has led to the trial of rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, in SSc. The well-known properties of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in promoting collagen synthesis and secretion has led to a small trial of fresolimumab, a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody capable of neutralizing TGF-β. Evidence supporting important roles for interleukin-6 in the pathogenesis of SSc have led to a large trial of tocilizumab in SSc. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) upon binding of nitric oxide (NO) to the sGC molecule. Processes such as cell growth and proliferation are regulated by cGMP. Evidence that sGC may play a role in SSc has led to a trial of riociguat, a molecule that sensitizes sGC to endogenous NO. Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are involved in a wide variety of physiologic and pathological processes including vascular remodeling and fibrogenesis such as occurs in SSc. This has led to a trial of nintedanib, a next-generation tyrosine-kinase (TK) inhibitor which targets multiple TKs, in SSc. PMID:27824545

  8. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Dana; Fong, Yuman

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy. PMID:27119098

  9. Molecular tweezers targeting transthyretin amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Nelson; Pereira-Henriques, Alda; Attar, Aida; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Gales, Luís; Saraiva, Maria João; Almeida, Maria Rosário

    2014-04-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses comprise a wide spectrum of acquired and hereditary diseases triggered by extracellular deposition of toxic TTR aggregates in various organs. Despite recent advances regarding the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying TTR misfolding and pathogenic self-assembly, there is still no effective therapy for treatment of these fatal disorders. Recently, the "molecular tweezers", CLR01, has been reported to inhibit self-assembly and toxicity of different amyloidogenic proteins in vitro, including TTR, by interfering with hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions known to play an important role in the aggregation process. In addition, CLR01 showed therapeutic effects in animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Here, we assessed the ability of CLR01 to modulate TTR misfolding and aggregation in cell culture and in an animal model. In cell culture assays we found that CLR01 inhibited TTR oligomerization in the conditioned medium and alleviated TTR-induced neurotoxicity by redirecting TTR aggregation into the formation of innocuous assemblies. To determine whether CLR01 was effective in vivo, we tested the compound in mice expressing TTR V30M, a model of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, which recapitulates the main pathological features of the human disease. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses showed a significant decrease in TTR burden in the gastrointestinal tract and the peripheral nervous system in mice treated with CLR01, with a concomitant reduction in aggregate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress response, protein oxidation, and apoptosis. Taken together, our preclinical data suggest that CLR01 is a promising lead compound for development of innovative, disease-modifying therapy for TTR amyloidosis.

  10. Pathophysiological response to hypoxia - from the molecular mechanisms of malady to drug discovery:hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-active cells as a target for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Kadonosono, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    The microenvironment of solid tumors is characterized by low pO(2) that is well below physiological levels. Intratumoral hypoxia is a major factor contributing to cancer progression and is exacerbated as a result of oxygen consumption by rapidly proliferating tumor cells near blood vessels, poor lymphatic drainage resulting in high interstitial pressure, and irregular blood supply through immature tumor vasculature. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates cellular responses to hypoxia. Cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets for cancer therapy. Therefore, targeting strategies to counteract HIF-1-active cells are essential for cancer therapy. In this study, we introduce a novel strategy for targeting HIF-1-active cells.

  11. Recent Advances in Molecular Image-Guided Cancer Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Duo; Sun, Xianlei; Gao, Liquan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-targeted radionuclide therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of a wide variety of malignancies, especially those resistant to conventional therapies. However, to improve the use of targeted radionuclide therapy for the management of cancer patients, the in vivo behaviors, dosimetry, and efficacy of radiotherapeutic agents need to be well characterized and monitored. Molecular imaging, which is a powerful tool for the noninvasive characterization and quantification of biological processes in living subjects at the cellular and molecular levels, plays an important role in the guidance of cancer radionuclide therapy. In this review, we introduce the radiotherapeutics for cancer-targeted therapy and summarize the most recent evidence supporting the use of molecular imaging to guide cancer radionuclide therapy.

  12. Targeted therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sameer; Odunsi, Kunle

    2005-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death in women with gynecological malignancies and overall survival for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains poor. The majority of patients recur after initial treatment. A strategy for improving outcome is to minimise recurrence via targeted therapy in patients after front-line therapy, or more appropriately as consolidation therapy. EOC represents an attractive target because of the biology of the disease and that the bulk of disease occurs in the peritoneal cavity. To initiate targeted therapy, a candidate target must be identified. Innovative approaches via targeted therapy to control metastatic residual EOC are currently under investigation. The targets are molecules and pathways, on which cancer cells depend to proliferate, invade, metastasise and prevent apoptosis. Potential targeted therapies include: proapoptototic therapy, suicide gene therapy, signal transduction, antiangiogenesis, immunotherapy and cytokine therapy. The utilisation of these targets in the clinic demands carefully conducted, well-coordinated but discovery-oriented translational research in the form of clinical trials that can quickly assess alternative strategies or combination of strategies that could result in clinical benefit. Therefore, targeted therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, especially after complete response to standard regimens, represents a paradigm whose time has come to be nurtured.

  13. Mitochondrial targeted peptides for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Farsinejad, Sadaf; Gheisary, Zohre; Ebrahimi Samani, Sanaz; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are a key pharmacological target in all cancer cells, since the structure and function of this organelle is different between healthy and malignant cells. Oxidative damage, disruption of mitochondrial ATP synthesis, calcium dyshomeostasis, mtDNA damage, and induction of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) lead to the mitochondrial dysfunctionality and increase the probability of the programmed cell death or apoptosis. A variety of the signaling pathways have been developed to promote cell death including overexpression of pro-apoptotic members of Bcl-2 family, overloaded calcium, and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in the promoting mitochondrial cytochrome c release through MOMP and eventually leads to cell death. There are a wide range of the therapeutic-based peptide drugs, known mitochondrial targeted peptides (MTPs), which specifically target mitochondrial pathways into death. They have prominent advantages such as low toxicity, high specificity, and easy to synthesis. Some of these therapeutic peptides have shown to increased the clinical activity alone or in combination with other agents. In this review, we will outline the biological properties of MTPs for cancer therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways controlling cell death by MTPs can be critical for the development of the therapeutic strategies for cancer patients that would be valuable for researchers in both fields of molecular and clinical oncology.

  14. Adaptive stress signaling in targeted therapy resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pazarentzos, Evangelos; Bivona, Trever G.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of specific genetic alterations that drive the initiation and progression of cancer and the development of targeted drugs that act against these driver alterations has revolutionized the treatment of many human cancers. While substantial progress has been achieved with the use of such targeted cancer therapies, resistance remains a major challenge that limits the overall clinical impact. Hence, despite progress, new strategies are needed to enhance response and eliminate resistance to targeted cancer therapies in order to achieve durable or curative responses in patients. To date, efforts to characterize mechanisms of resistance have primarily focused on molecular events that mediate primary or secondary resistance in patients. Less is known about the initial molecular response and adaptation that may occur in tumor cells early upon exposure to a targeted agent. Although understudied, emerging evidence indicates that the early adaptive changes by which tumor cells respond to the stress of a targeted therapy may be crucial for tumor cell survival during treatment and the development of resistance. Here, we review recent data illuminating the molecular architecture underlying adaptive stress signaling in tumor cells. We highlight how leveraging this knowledge could catalyze novel strategies to minimize or eliminate targeted therapy resistance, thereby unleashing the full potential of targeted therapies to transform many cancers from lethal to chronic or curable conditions. PMID:25703329

  15. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  16. Oncogenicity of L-type amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1) revealed by targeted gene disruption in chicken DT40 cells: LAT1 is a promising molecular target for human cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkawa, Mayumi; Ohno, Yoshiya; Masuko, Kazue; Takeuchi, Akiko; Suda, Kentaro; Kubo, Akihiro; Kawahara, Rieko; Okazaki, Shogo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi; Yagi, Hideki; Hashimoto, Yoshiyuki; Masuko, Takashi

    2011-03-25

    Highlights: {yields} We established LAT1 amino-acid transporter-disrupted DT40 cells. {yields} LAT1-disrupted cells showed slow growth and lost the oncogenicity. {yields} siRNA and mAb inhibited human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. {yields} LAT1 is a promising target molecule for cancer therapy. -- Abstract: L-type amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is the first identified light chain of CD98 molecule, disulfide-linked to a heavy chain of CD98. Following cDNA cloning of chicken full-length LAT1, we have constructed targeting vectors for the disruption of chicken LAT1 gene from genomic DNA of chicken LAT1 consisting of 5.4 kb. We established five homozygous LAT1-disrupted (LAT1{sup -/-}) cell clones, derived from a heterozygous LAT1{sup +/-} clone of DT40 chicken B cell line. Reactivity of anti-chicken CD98hc monoclonal antibody (mAb) with LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 cells was markedly decreased compared with that of wild-type DT40 cells. All LAT1{sup -/-} cells were deficient in L-type amino-acid transporting activity, although alternative-splice variant but not full-length mRNA of LAT1 was detected in these cells. LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 clones showed outstandingly slow growth in liquid culture and decreased colony-formation capacity in soft agar compared with wild-type DT40 cells. Cell-cycle analyses indicated that LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 clones have prolonged cell-cycle phases compared with wild-type or LAT1{sup +/-} DT40 cells. Knockdown of human LAT1 by small interfering RNAs resulted in marked in vitro cell-growth inhibition of human cancer cells, and in vivo tumor growth of HeLa cells in athymic mice was significantly inhibited by anti-human LAT1 mAb. All these results indicate essential roles of LAT1 in the cell proliferation and occurrence of malignant phenotypes and that LAT1 is a promising candidate as a molecular target of human cancer therapy.

  17. Targeted Therapy of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rieke, Damian T; Klinghammer, Konrad; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the most common solid cancers worldwide. It is mainly caused by exposure to tobacco smoke and alcohol as well as infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV). The prognosis is poor, especially once it recurs or metastasizes. Current therapeutic options include surgery, radio- and chemotherapy. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are so far the only targeted agents that have been approved in head and neck cancer. Primary or secondary resistance is frequent or will eventually develop. Several driver mutations and other genomic aberrations have been described in HNSCC including EGFR overexpression and amplification. Yet, no predictive biomarkers for the application of EGFR inhibitors have been identified. Further targeted agents are in development for HNSCC, of which inhibitors of the PI3K pathway are the closest to clinical application. In recent years, the incidence of HPV-driven HNSCC has risen in Western countries. HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC are distinct molecular tumor entities, and consequences for targeted therapies have been discussed. This review looks at approved and investigational targeted treatment strategies as well as potential predictive biomarkers such as the HPV status to guide treatment. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  18. Site-specific antibody-liposome conjugation through copper-free click chemistry: a molecular biology approach for targeted photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Girgis; Wang, Yucheng; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Broekgaarden, Mans; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Hui, James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, have the ability to potentiate photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment regimens by the encapsulation of high payloads of photosensitizers and enhance their passive delivery to tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. By conjugating targeting moieties to the surface of the liposomal nanoconstructs, cellular selectivity is imparted on them and PDT-based therapies can be performed with significantly higher dose tolerances, as off-target toxicity is simultaneously reduced.1 However, the maximal benefits of conventional targeted nanocarriers, including liposomes, are hindered by practical limitations including chemical instability, non-selective conjugation chemistry, poor control over ligand orientation, and loss of ligand functionality following conjugation, amongst others.2 We have developed a robust, physically and chemically stable liposomal nanoplatform containing benzoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer molecules within the phospholipid bilayer and an optimized surface density of strained cyclooctyne moieties for `click' conjugation to azido-functionalized antibodies.3 The clinical chimeric anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab is site-specifically photocrosslinked to a recombinant bioengineered that recognizes the antibody's Fc region, containing a terminal azide.4 The copper-free click conjugation of the bioengineered Cetuximab derivative to the optimized photosensitizing liposome provides exceptional control over the antibody's optimal orientation for cellular antigen binding. Importantly, the reaction occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, bioorthogonally (selectively in the presence of other biomolecules) and without the need for toxic copper catalysis.3 Such state-of-the-art conjugation strategies push the boundaries of targeted photodynamic therapy beyond the limitations of traditional chemical coupling techniques to produce more robust and effective targeted therapeutics with applications beyond

  19. Bioengineering Strategies for Designing Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    The goals of bioengineering strategies for targeted cancer therapies are (1) to deliver a high dose of an anticancer drug directly to a cancer tumor, (2) to enhance drug uptake by malignant cells, and (3) to minimize drug uptake by nonmalignant cells. Effective cancer-targeting therapies will require both passive- and active targeting strategies and a thorough understanding of physiologic barriers to targeted drug delivery. Designing a targeted therapy includes the selection and optimization of a nanoparticle delivery vehicle for passive accumulation in tumors, a targeting moiety for active receptor-mediated uptake, and stimuli-responsive polymers for control of drug release. The future direction of cancer targeting is a combinatorial approach, in which targeting therapies are designed to use multiple targeting strategies. The combinatorial approach will enable combination therapy for delivery of multiple drugs and dual ligand targeting to improve targeting specificity. Targeted cancer treatments in development and the new combinatorial approaches show promise for improving targeted anticancer drug delivery and improving treatment outcomes. PMID:23768509

  20. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: potential targets and therapies.

    PubMed

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Nanda, Sanjeev; Konety, Badrinath R; Saleem, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The treatment landscape for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is undergoing significant changes with the advent of new therapies and multidisciplinary efforts by scientists and clinicians. As activation of multiple molecular pathways in the neoplastic prostate makes it impossible for single-target drugs to be completely effective in treating CRPC, this has led to combination therapy strategy, where several molecules involved in tumor growth and disease progression are targeted by a therapeutic regimen. In the present review, we provide an update on the molecular pathways that play an important role in the pathogenesis of CRPC and discuss the current wave of new treatments to combat this lethal disease.

  1. Ultrasound for molecular imaging and therapy in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Osamu F.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, molecularly-targeted contrast enhanced ultrasound (ultrasound molecular imaging) has attracted significant attention in preclinical research of cancer diagnostic and therapy. Potential applications for ultrasound molecular imaging run the gamut from early detection and characterization of malignancies to monitoring treatment responses and guiding therapies. There may also be a role for ultrasound contrast agents for improved delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene therapies across biological barriers. Currently, a first Phase 0 clinical trial in patients with prostate cancer assesses toxicity and feasibility of ultrasound molecular imaging using contrast agents targeted at the angiogenic marker vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2). This mini-review highlights recent advances and potential applications of ultrasound molecular imaging and ultrasound-guided therapy in cancer. PMID:23061039

  2. Molecular pathways and therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Hensing, Thomas; Simon, George R.; Dennis, Phillip A.; Otterson, Gregory A.; Bueno, Raphael; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Both histologically and molecularly lung cancer is heterogeneous. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the pathways involved in the various types of lung cancer with an emphasis on the clinical implications of the increasing number of actionable molecular targets. It describes the major pathways and molecular alterations implicated in the development and progression of non-small cell lung cancer (adenocarcinoma and squamous cancer), and of small cell carcinoma, emphasizing the molecular alterations comprising the specific blueprints in each group. The approved and investigational targeted therapies as well as the immune therapies, and clinical trials exploring the variety of targeted approaches to treatment of lung cancer are the main focus of this review. PMID:24722523

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Updates on Molecular Targets for Biologics.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2017-07-15

    Therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has changed, with several new agents being evaluated. The era of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) antibody therapy saw remarkable progress in IBD therapy. Some patients, however, do not respond to anti-TNF treatment, or their response decreases over time. This phenomenon highlights the need to identify new molecular targets for therapy in IBD. The targets of new therapeutic molecules in IBD must aim to restore immune dysregulation by the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, interleukin [IL]-6, IL-13, IL-17, IL-18, and IL-21) and augmentation of the effect of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-11, and transforming growth factor β) and to pursue new anti-inflammatory targets, such as regulatory T-cell therapy, Smad7 antisense, Janus-activated kinase inhibition, Toll-like receptor stimulation, leukocyte adhesion, and blockade of T-cell homing via integrins and mucosal addressin cellular adhesion molecule-1. In addition, potential molecular targets could restore mucosal barrier function and stimulate mucosal healing. Despite these potential targets, the value and clinical significance of most new molecules remain unclear, and clinical efficacy and safety must be better defined before their implementation in clinical practice. This article aims to review the promising and emerging molecular targets that could be clinically meaningful for novel therapeutic approaches.

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Updates on Molecular Targets for Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H.; Papadakis, Konstantinos A.

    2017-01-01

    Therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has changed, with several new agents being evaluated. The era of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) antibody therapy saw remarkable progress in IBD therapy. Some patients, however, do not respond to anti-TNF treatment, or their response decreases over time. This phenomenon highlights the need to identify new molecular targets for therapy in IBD. The targets of new therapeutic molecules in IBD must aim to restore immune dysregulation by the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, interleukin [IL]-6, IL-13, IL-17, IL-18, and IL-21) and augmentation of the effect of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-11, and transforming growth factor β) and to pursue new anti-inflammatory targets, such as regulatory T-cell therapy, Smad7 antisense, Janus-activated kinase inhibition, Toll-like receptor stimulation, leukocyte adhesion, and blockade of T-cell homing via integrins and mucosal addressin cellular adhesion molecule-1. In addition, potential molecular targets could restore mucosal barrier function and stimulate mucosal healing. Despite these potential targets, the value and clinical significance of most new molecules remain unclear, and clinical efficacy and safety must be better defined before their implementation in clinical practice. This article aims to review the promising and emerging molecular targets that could be clinically meaningful for novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:28486793

  5. Bladder cancer: molecular determinants of personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cheng, Liang; Moch, Holger; Scarpelli, Marina; Reymundo, Carlos; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular and genetic studies have provided new perspectives on the histologic classification of bladder tumors. Recent developments in the field of molecular mutational pathway analyses based on next generation sequencing technology together with classic data derived from the description of mutations in the FGFR3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 3) gene, mutations on TP53 gene, and cDNA technology profiling data gives support to a differentiated taxonomy of bladder cancer. All these changes are behind the use of non-traditional approach to therapy of bladder cancer patients and are ready to change our daily practice of uro-oncology. The observed correlation of some molecular alterations with tumor behavior and the identification of their targets at cellular level might support the use of molecular changes together with morphological data to develop new clinical and biological strategies to manage patients with urothelial cancer. The current review provides comprehensive data to support personalized therapy for bladder cancer based on an integrated approach including pathologic and clinical features and molecular biology.

  6. Enhancing Targeted Therapy for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0450 TITLE: Enhancing Targeted Therapy for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms PRINCIPAL...TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2012 - 29 Sep 20144 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing Targeted Therapy for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ... Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are blood cancers that affect almost 300,000 people in the United States. MPN drugs (JAK inhibitors) do not effectively

  7. Targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.; Raja, Chand; Rizvi, Syed; Li, Yong; Tsui, Wendy; Zhang, David; Song, Emma; Qu, Chang Fa; Kearsley, John; Graham, Peter; Thompson, John

    2004-08-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The 213Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 µCi in human

  8. Targeted therapy using alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1996-10-01

    Radionuclides such as and which decay by the emission of -particles are attractive for certain applications of targeted radiotherapy. The tissue penetration of and -particles is equivalent to only a few cell diameters, offering the possibility of combining cell-specific targeting with radiation of similar range. Unlike the -particles emitted by radionuclides such as and , -particles are radiation of high linear energy transfer and thus greater biological effectiveness. Several approaches have been explored for targeted radiotherapy with - and -labelled substances including colloids, monoclonal antibodies, metabolic precursors, receptor-avid ligands and other lower molecular weight molecules. An additional agent which exemplifies the promise of -emitting radiopharmaceuticals is meta-[]astatobenzylguanidine. The toxicity of this compound under single-cell conditions, determined both by [Molecularly targeted agents in oculoplastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard C

    2017-09-01

    Significant advances have been made in oncology and rheumatology with the introduction of molecularly targeted agents (MTAs). MTAs consist of monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the recent applications of MTAs to orbital, lacrimal, and eyelid disease. The use of monoclonal antibodies has been described in the treatment of orbital vascular lesions, lymphoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Inflammatory conditions treated with monoclonal antibodies include thyroid eye disease, IgG4 disease, and granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibitors has also found applications to orbital disease. Use of small molecule inhibitors has been described in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and Erdheim-Chester disease. There are many orbital, lacrimal, and eyelid side effects of MTAs with which the oculoplastic surgeon should be familiar, including hypertrichosis, edema, and orbital and eyelid inflammation. MTAs represent the future of treatment of oncologic and inflammatory conditions. Application of these agents to orbital, lacrimal, and eyelid disease will continue to expand. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of oculoplastic disorders will facilitate additional potential pathways that could be targeted for therapy.

  9. JAK1/STAT3 Activation through a Proinflammatory Cytokine Pathway Leads to Resistance to Molecularly Targeted Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shien, Kazuhiko; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A; Ruder, Dennis; Behrens, Carmen; Shen, Li; Kalhor, Neda; Song, Juhee; Lee, J Jack; Wang, Jing; Tang, Ximing; Herbst, Roy S; Toyooka, Shinichi; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D; Kurie, Jonathan M; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Izzo, Julie G

    2017-10-01

    Molecularly targeted drugs have yielded significant therapeutic advances in oncogene-driven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but a majority of patients eventually develop acquired resistance. Recently, the relation between proinflammatory cytokine IL6 and resistance to targeted drugs has been reported. We investigated the functional contribution of IL6 and the other members of IL6 family proinflammatory cytokine pathway to resistance to targeted drugs in NSCLC cells. In addition, we examined the production of these cytokines by cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF). We also analyzed the prognostic significance of these molecule expressions in clinical NSCLC samples. In NSCLC cells with acquired resistance to targeted drugs, we observed activation of the IL6-cytokine pathway and STAT3 along with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) features. In particular, IL6 family cytokine oncostatin-M (OSM) induced a switch to the EMT phenotype and protected cells from targeted drug-induced apoptosis in OSM receptors (OSMRs)/JAK1/STAT3-dependent manner. The cross-talk between NSCLC cells and CAFs also preferentially activated the OSM/STAT3 pathway via a paracrine mechanism and decreased sensitivity to targeted drugs. The selective JAK1 inhibitor filgotinib effectively suppressed STAT3 activation and OSMR expression, and cotargeting inhibition of the oncogenic pathway and JAK1 reversed resistance to targeted drugs. In the analysis of clinical samples, OSMR gene expression appeared to be associated with worse prognosis in patients with surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma. Our data suggest that the OSMRs/JAK1/STAT3 axis contributes to resistance to targeted drugs in oncogene-driven NSCLC cells, implying that this pathway could be a therapeutic target. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2234-45. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    AD AWARD NUMBER DAMD17-97-1-7232 TITLE: Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jinha M. Park CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...FUNDING NUMBERS Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer DAMD17-97-1-7232 6. AUTHOR(S) Jinha M. Park 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...of surface mAb has been internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis. These mAbs show promise in the specific delivery of gene therapy vectors

  11. Important cellular targets for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Awad, Mariam M; Tovmasyan, Artak; Craik, James D; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Benov, Ludmil T

    2016-09-01

    The persistent problem of antibiotic resistance has created a strong demand for new methods for therapy and disinfection. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microbes has demonstrated promising results for eradication of antibiotic-resistant strains. PDI is based on the use of a photosensitive compound (photosensitizer, PS), which upon illumination with visible light generates reactive species capable of damaging and killing microorganisms. Since photogenerated reactive species are short lived, damage is limited to close proximity of the PS. It is reasonable to expect that the larger the number of damaged targets is and the greater their variety is, the higher the efficiency of PDI is and the lower the chances for development of resistance are. Exact molecular mechanisms and specific targets whose damage is essential for microbial inactivation have not been unequivocally established. Two main cellular components, DNA and plasma membrane, are regarded as the most important PDI targets. Using Zn porphyrin-based PSs and Escherichia coli as a model Gram-negative microorganism, we demonstrate that efficient photoinactivation of bacteria can be achieved without detectable DNA modification. Among the cellular components which are modified early during illumination and constitute key PDI targets are cytosolic enzymes, membrane-bound protein complexes, and the plasma membrane. As a result, membrane barrier function is lost, and energy and reducing equivalent production is disrupted, which in turn compromises cell defense mechanisms, thus augmenting the photoinduced oxidative injury. In conclusion, high PDI antimicrobial effectiveness does not necessarily require impairment of a specific critical cellular component and can be achieved by inducing damage to multiple cellular targets.

  12. Gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy.

    PubMed

    Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2012-04-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) form a group of inherited metabolic disorders caused by dysfunction of one of the lysosomal proteins, resulting in the accumulation of certain compounds. Although these disorders are among first genetic diseases for which specific treatments were proposed, there are still serious unsolved problems that require development of novel therapeutic procedures. An example is neuronopathy, which develops in most of LSD and cannot be treated efficiently by currently approved therapies. Recently, a new potential therapy, called gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy (GET IT), has been proposed for a group of LSD named mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), in which storage of incompletely degraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) results in severe symptoms of virtually all tissues and organs, including central nervous system. The idea of this therapy is to inhibit synthesis of GAGs by modulating expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in synthesis of these compounds. Such a modulation is possible by using isoflavones, particularly genistein, which interfere with a signal transduction process necessary for stimulation of expression of certain genes. Results of in vitro experiments and studies on animal models indicated a high efficiency of GET IT, including correction of behavior of affected mice. However, clinical trials, performed with soy isoflavone extracts, revealed only limited efficacy. This caused a controversy about GET IT as a potential, effective treatment of patients suffering from MPS, especially neuronopathic forms of these diseases. It this critical review, I present possible molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action of isoflavones (particularly genistein) and suggest that efficacy of GET IT might be sufficiently high when using relatively high doses of synthetic genistein (which was employed in experiments on cell cultures and mouse models) rather than low doses of soy isoflavone extracts (which were used in clinical trials). This

  13. Methods to monitor gene therapy with molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Waerzeggers, Yannic; Monfared, Parisa; Viel, Thomas; Winkeler, Alexandra; Voges, Jürgen; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2009-06-01

    Recent progress in scientific and clinical research has made gene therapy a promising option for efficient and targeted treatment of several inherited and acquired disorders. One of the most critical issues for ensuring success of gene-based therapies is the development of technologies for non-invasive monitoring of the distribution and kinetics of vector-mediated gene expression. In recent years many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been developed and successfully used in animals and humans. In this review molecular imaging techniques for monitoring of gene therapy are described and specific use of these methods in the different steps of a gene therapy protocol from gene delivery to assessment of therapy response is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging (MI) to gene therapy will eventually help to improve the efficacy and safety of current gene therapy protocols for human application and support future individualized patient treatment.

  14. Druggable targets in pediatric neurocutaneous melanocytosis: Molecular and drug sensitivity studies in xenograft and ex vivo tumor cell culture to identify agents for therapy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yibing; Kovalchuk, Anna; Jayanthan, Aarthi; Lun, Xueqing; Nagashima, Yoji; Kovalchuk, Olga; Wright, James R; Pinto, Alfredo; Kirton, Adam; Anderson, Ronald; Narendran, Aru

    2015-06-01

    Neurocutaneous melanocytosis (NCM) is a rare congenital disorder that presents with pigmented cell lesions of the brain or leptomeninges in children with large or multiple congenital melanocytic nevi. Although the exact pathological processes involved are currently unclear, NCM appears to arise from an abnormal development of melanoblasts or melanocyte precursors. Currently, it has an extremely poor prognosis due to rapid disease progression and lack of effective treatment modalities. In this study, we report on an experimental approach to examining NCM cells by establishing subcutaneous tumors in nude mice, which can be further expanded for conducting molecular and drug sensitivity experiments. Analysis of the NRAS gene-coding sequences of an established NCM cell line (YP-MEL) and NCM patient cells revealed heterogeneity in NRAS Q61K that activated mutation and possibly consequential differential sensitivity to MEK inhibition. Gene expression studies were performed to compare the molecular profiles of NCM cells with normal skin fibroblasts. In vitro cytotoxicity screens of libraries of targeted small-molecule inhibitors revealed prospective agents for further evaluation. Our studies provide an experimental platform for the generation of NCM cells for preclinical studies and the production of molecular and in vitro data with which to identify druggable targets for the treatment. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Engineering targeted viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Waehler, Reinhard; Russell, Stephen J; Curiel, David T

    2007-08-01

    To achieve therapeutic success, transfer vehicles for gene therapy must be capable of transducing target cells while avoiding impact on non-target cells. Despite the high transduction efficiency of viral vectors, their tropism frequently does not match the therapeutic need. In the past, this lack of appropriate targeting allowed only partial exploitation of the great potential of gene therapy. Substantial progress in modifying viral vectors using diverse techniques now allows targeting to many cell types in vitro. Although important challenges remain for in vivo applications, the first clinical trials with targeted vectors have already begun to take place.

  16. Pathway inhibition: emerging molecular targets for treating glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Wolfgang; Weller, Michael; Weiler, Markus; Batchelor, Tracy; Yung, Alfred W.K.; Platten, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Insights into the molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma have not yet resulted in relevant clinical improvement. With standard therapy, which consists of surgical resection with concomitant temozolomide in addition to radiotherapy followed by adjuvant temozolomide, the median duration of survival is 12–14 months. Therefore, the identification of novel molecular targets and inhibitory agents has become a focus of research for glioblastoma treatment. Recent results of bevacizumab may represent a proof of principle that treatment with targeted agents can result in clinical benefits for patients with glioblastoma. This review discusses limitations in the existing therapy for glioblastoma and provides an overview of current efforts to identify molecular targets using large-scale screening of glioblastoma cell lines and tumor samples. We discuss preclinical and clinical data for several novel molecular targets, including growth factor receptors, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, SRC-family kinases, integrins, and CD95 ligand and agents that inhibit these targets, including erlotinib, enzastaurin, dasatinib, sorafenib, cilengitide, AMG102, and APG101. By combining advances in tumor screening with novel targeted therapies, it is hoped that new treatment options will emerge for this challenging tumor type. PMID:21636705

  17. miR-21, An Oncogenic Target miRNA for Cancer Therapy:Molecular Mechanisms and Recent Advancements in Chemo and Radio-Resistance.

    PubMed

    Javanmardi, Sanaz; Aghamaali, Mahmoud Reza; Abolmaali, Samira Sadat; Mohammadi, Samaneh; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, miRNAs have been extensively attracted the scientist's attentions as tumor suppressors or oncogenes that have been implicated in tumor progression, metastasis and intrinsic resistance to various cancer therapies. microRNA-21 (miR-21) demonstrates a potential oncogenic function and target tumor inhibitor proteins in almost all types of cancer. miR-21 overexpression has been studied in terms of cell proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, and apoptosis regulation.Inhibition of miRNA expression using antisense technology by various nanovectors of different sizes, shapes and compositions has been evolved progressively to overcome the barriers confronted by miRNA delivery.Application of miR-21 antisense oligonucleotides for treating cancerous cells has become a promising achievement for cancer therapy. Moreover,miR-21 can mediate resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. The expanding role of miR-21 functions in human cancers with an emphasis on its regulatory targets and mechanisms, miR-21 related achievements against cancer promotion have been discussed.

  18. Cancer gene therapy targeting cellular apoptosis machinery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin-Tao; Chen, Si-Yi; Yang, An-Gang

    2012-11-01

    The unraveling of cellular apoptosis machinery provides novel targets for cancer treatment, and gene therapy targeting this suicidal system has been corroborated to cause inflammation-free autonomous elimination of neoplastic cells. The apoptotic machinery can be targeted by introduction of a gene encoding an inducer, mediator or executioner of apoptotic cell death or by inhibition of anti-apoptotic gene expression. Strategies targeting cancer cells, which are achieved by selective gene delivery, specific gene expression or secretion of target proteins via genetic modification of autologous cells, dictate the outcome of apoptosis-based cancer gene therapy. Despite so far limited clinical success, gene therapy targeting the apoptotic machinery has great potential to benefit patients with threatening malignancies provided the availability of efficient and specific gene delivery and administration systems.

  19. Targeted nanosystems: Advances in targeted dendrimers for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimers possess discrete highly compact nanostructures constituted of successive branched layers. Soon after the inception of dendrimers, recognition of their tunable structures and biologically favorable properties provoked a great enthusiasm in delving deeply into the utility of dendrimers for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. One of the most important nanotechnology applications is the development of nanomedicines for targeted cancer therapies. Tremendous success in targeted therapies has been achieved with the use of dendrimer-based nanomedicines. This article provides a concise review on latest advances in the utility of dendrimers in immunotherapies and hormone therapies. PMID:26706410

  1. Molecular profiling of childhood cancer: Biomarkers and novel therapies

    PubMed Central

    Saletta, Federica; Wadham, Carol; Ziegler, David S.; Marshall, Glenn M.; Haber, Michelle; McCowage, Geoffrey; Norris, Murray D.; Byrne, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Technological advances including high-throughput sequencing have identified numerous tumor-specific genetic changes in pediatric and adolescent cancers that can be exploited as targets for novel therapies. Scope of review This review provides a detailed overview of recent advances in the application of target-specific therapies for childhood cancers, either as single agents or in combination with other therapies. The review summarizes preclinical evidence on which clinical trials are based, early phase clinical trial results, and the incorporation of predictive biomarkers into clinical practice, according to cancer type. Major conclusions There is growing evidence that molecularly targeted therapies can valuably add to the arsenal available for treating childhood cancers, particularly when used in combination with other therapies. Nonetheless the introduction of molecularly targeted agents into practice remains challenging, due to the use of unselected populations in some clinical trials, inadequate methods to evaluate efficacy, and the need for improved preclinical models to both evaluate dosing and safety of combination therapies. General significance The increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of molecular causes of cancer favors the continued development of molecularly targeted agents, and their transfer to pediatric and adolescent populations. PMID:26675306

  2. Targeted Therapy for Breast Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Petra; Savage, Michelle I.; Brown, Powel H.

    2013-01-01

    With a better understanding of the etiology of breast cancer, molecularly targeted drugs have been developed and are being testing for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Targeted drugs that inhibit the estrogen receptor (ER) or estrogen-activated pathways include the selective ER modulators (tamoxifen, raloxifene, and lasofoxifene) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane) have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies. Tamoxifen and raloxifene have been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer and promising results of AIs in breast cancer trials, suggest that AIs might be even more effective in the prevention of ER-positive breast cancer. However, these agents only prevent ER-positive breast cancer. Therefore, current research is focused on identifying preventive therapies for other forms of breast cancer such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, breast cancer that does express ER, progesterone receptor, or HER2). HER2-positive breast cancers are currently treated with anti-HER2 therapies including trastuzumab and lapatinib, and preclinical and clinical studies are now being conducted to test these drugs for the prevention of HER2-positive breast cancers. Several promising agents currently being tested in cancer prevention trials for the prevention of TNBC include poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, vitamin D, and rexinoids, both of which activate nuclear hormone receptors (the vitamin D and retinoid X receptors). This review discusses currently used breast cancer preventive drugs, and describes the progress of research striving to identify and develop more effective preventive agents for all forms of breast cancer. PMID:24069582

  3. Targeting ubiquitination for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, John Kenneth; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Sun, Shao-Cong; Zhang, Shuxing

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination, the structured degradation and turnover of cellular proteins, is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS). Most proteins that are critical for cellular regulations and functions are targets of the process. Ubiquitination is comprised of a sequence of three enzymatic steps, and aberrations in the pathway can lead to tumor development and progression as observed in many cancer types. Recent evidence indicates that targeting the UPS is effective for certain cancer treatment, but many more potential targets might have been previously overlooked. In this review, we will discuss the current state of small molecules that target various elements of ubiquitination. Special attention will be given to novel inhibitors of E3 ubiquitin ligases, especially those in the SCF family. PMID:26630263

  4. SCF ubiquitin ligase targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Pagan, Julia K.; Pagano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recent clinical successes of inhibitors of the proteasome for the treatment of cancer have highlighted the therapeutic potential of this protein degradation system. Proteasome inhibitors prevent the degradation of numerous proteins, so increased specificity could be achieved by inhibiting the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that target specific subsets of proteins for degradation. F-box proteins are the substrate-targeting subunits of SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complexes. Through the degradation of a plethora of diverse substrates, SCF ubiquitin ligases control a large number of processes at the cellular and organismal levels, and their misregulation is implicated in many pathologies. SCF ligases are characterized by a high specificity for their substrates, so they represent promising drug targets. However, the potential for therapeutic manipulation of SCF complexes remains an underdeveloped area. This review will explore and discuss potential strategies to target SCF-mediated biology to treat human diseases. PMID:25394868

  5. The influence of subclonal resistance mutations on targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Michael W.; Loeb, Lawrence A.; Salk, Jesse J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical oncology is being revolutionized by the increasing use of molecularly targeted therapies. This paradigm holds great promise for improving cancer treatment; however, allocating specific therapies to the patients who are most likely to derive a durable benefit continues to represent a considerable challenge. It is becoming increasingly clear that cancers are characterized by extensive intratumour genetic heterogeneity, and that patients being considered for treatment with a targeted agent might, therefore, already possess resistance to the drug in a minority of cells. Indeed, multiple examples of pre-existing subclonal resistance mutations to various molecularly targeted agents have been described, which we review herein. Early detection of pre-existing or emerging drug resistance could enable more personalized use of targeted cancer therapy, as patients could be stratified to receive the therapies that are most likely to be effective. We consider how monitoring of drug resistance could be incorporated into clinical practice to optimize the use of targeted therapies in individual patients. PMID:26483300

  6. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    author on both abstracts; “Differences Between Beacon-Localized and Cone- Beam CT (CBCT)-Localized Radiation Therapy to the Prostatic Fossa” and “Inter...intent of this task is to create a facility specialized in all modalities of targeted radiation therapy such as cone beam CT, on board kilovoltage... beam CT (CBCT)-localized radiation therapy to the prostatic fossa. Purpose/Objectives: Either CBCT or electromagnetic beacon transponders can

  7. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R.; Zamboni, Camila G.; Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented. PMID:26061296

  8. Overexpression of CRM1: A Characteristic Feature in a Transformed Phenotype of Lung Carcinogenesis and a Molecular Target for Lung Cancer Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weimin; Lu, Chuanwen; Chen, Lixia; Keohavong, Phouthone

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study showed that chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1), a nuclear export receptor for various cancer-associated "cargo" proteins, was important in regulating lung carcinogenesis in response to a tobacco carcinogen, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). The objectives of this study are to comprehensively evaluate the significance of CRM1 in lung cancer development and investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting CRM1 for lung cancer treatment using both in vitro and in vivo models. We showed that CRM1 was overexpressed not only in lung tumor tissues from both lung cancer patients and mice treated with NNK but also in NNK-transformed BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Furthermore, stable overexpression of CRM1 in BEAS-2B cells by plasmid vector transfection led to malignant cellular transformation. Moreover, a decreased CRM1 expression level in A549 cells by short hairpin siRNA transfection led to a decreased tumorigenic activity both in vitro and in nude mice, suggesting the potential to target CRM1 for lung cancer treatment. Indeed, we showed that the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on A549 cells with CRM1 down-regulated by short hairpin siRNA were significantly increased, compared with A549 cells, and the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin became further enhanced when the drug was used in combination with leptomycin B, a CRM1 inhibitor, in both in vitro and in vivo models. Cancer target genes were significantly involved in these processes. These data suggest that CRM1 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis and provides a novel target for lung cancer adjuvant therapy.

  9. Molecular sonography with targeted microbubbles: current investigations and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Misun; Lyshchik, Andrej; Fleischer, Arthur C

    2010-06-01

    Sonography using targeted microbubbles affords a variety of diagnostic and potentially therapeutic clinical applications. It provides a whole new world of functional information at the cellular and molecular level. This information can then be used to diagnose and possibly prevent diseases at early stages as well as devise therapeutic strategies at the molecular level. It is also useful in monitoring tumor response to therapy and devising treatment timing and plans based on the molecular state of an individual's health. Moreover, targeted microbubble-enhanced sonography has several advantages over other imaging modalities, including widespread availability, low cost, fast acquisition times, and lack of radiation risk. These traits are likely to advance it as one of the imaging methods of choice in future clinical trials examining the impact of molecular imaging on treatment outcome. This review describes the fundamental concepts of targeted microbubble-enhanced sonography as well as its potential clinical applications.

  10. Molecular imaging and cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Saadatpour, Z; Bjorklund, G; Chirumbolo, S; Alimohammadi, M; Ehsani, H; Ebrahiminejad, H; Pourghadamyari, H; Baghaei, B; Mirzaei, H R; Sahebkar, A; Mirzaei, H; Keshavarzi, M

    2016-11-18

    Gene therapy is known as one of the most advanced approaches for therapeutic prospects ranging from tackling genetic diseases to combating cancer. In this approach, different viral and nonviral vector systems such as retrovirus, lentivirus, plasmid and transposon have been designed and employed. These vector systems are designed to target different therapeutic genes in various tissues and cells such as tumor cells. Therefore, detection of the vectors containing therapeutic genes and monitoring of response to the treatment are the main issues that are commonly faced by researchers. Imaging techniques have been critical in guiding physicians in the more accurate and precise diagnosis and monitoring of cancer patients in different phases of malignancies. Imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are non-invasive and powerful tools for monitoring of the distribution of transgene expression over time and assessing patients who have received therapeutic genes. Here, we discuss most recent advances in cancer gene therapy and molecular approaches as well as imaging techniques that are utilized to detect cancer gene therapeutics and to monitor the patients' response to these therapies worldwide, particularly in Iranian Academic Medical Centers and Hospitals.Cancer Gene Therapy advance online publication, 18 November 2016; doi:10.1038/cgt.2016.62.

  11. Targeting angiogenesis with integrative cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Yance, Donald R; Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-03-01

    An integrative approach for managing a patient with cancer should target the multiple biochemical and physiological pathways that support tumor development while minimizing normal tissue toxicity. Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer. Many natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis also manifest other anticancer activities. The authors will focus on natural health products (NHPs) that have a high degree of antiangiogenic activity but also describe some of their many other interactions that can inhibit tumor progression and reduce the risk of metastasis. NHPs target various molecular pathways besides angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the HER-2/neu gene, the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, the NF-kB transcription factor, the protein kinases, Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. The herbalist has access to hundreds of years of observational data on the anticancer activity of many herbs. Laboratory studies are confirming the knowledge that is already documented in traditional texts. The following herbs are traditionally used for anticancer treatment and are antiangiogenic through multiple interdependent processes that include effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities: Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (turmeric), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinale (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens (rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs. Quality assurance of appropriate extracts is essential prior to embarking on clinical trials. More data are required on dose response, appropriate combinations, and potential toxicities. Given the multiple effects of these agents, their future use for cancer therapy probably lies in synergistic combinations

  12. Upregulation of Key Molecules for Targeted Imaging and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Taelman, Vincent F; Radojewski, Piotr; Marincek, Nicolas; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Grotzky, Andrea; Olariu, Cristina I; Perren, Aurel; Stettler, Christoph; Krause, Thomas; Meier, Lorenz P; Cescato, Renzo; Walter, Martin A

    2016-11-01

    Targeted diagnosis and therapy enable precise tumor detection and treatment. Successful examples for precise tumor targeting are diagnostic and therapeutic radioligands. However, patients with tumors expressing low levels of the relevant molecular targets are deemed ineligible for such targeted approaches. We performed a screen for drugs that upregulate the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sstr2). Then, we characterized the effects of these drugs on transcriptional, translational, and functional levels in vitro and in vivo. We identified 9 drugs that act as epigenetic modifiers, including the inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase decitabine as well as the inhibitors of histone deacetylase tacedinaline and romidepsin. In vitro, these drugs upregulated sstr2 on transcriptional, translational, and functional levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Thereby, their combinations revealed synergistic effects. In vivo, drug-based sstr2 upregulation improved the tumor-to-background and tumor-to-kidney ratios, which are the key determinants of successful sstr2-targeted imaging and radiopeptide therapy. We present an approach that uses epigenetic modifiers to improve sstr2 targeting in vitro and in vivo. Translation of this method into the clinic may potentially convert patients ineligible for targeted imaging and therapy to eligible candidates. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  13. Ion channels: molecular targets of neuroactive insecticides.

    PubMed

    Raymond-Delpech, Valérie; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, Benedict M; Rauh, James J; Sattelle, David B

    2005-11-01

    Many of the insecticides in current use act on molecular targets in the insect nervous system. Recently, our understanding of these targets has improved as a result of the complete sequencing of an insect genome, i.e., Drosophila melanogaster. Here we examine the recent work, drawing on genetics, genomics and physiology, which has provided evidence that specific receptors and ion channels are targeted by distinct chemical classes of insect control agents. The examples discussed include, sodium channels (pyrethroids, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT), dihydropyrazoles and oxadiazines); nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (cartap, spinosad, imidacloprid and related nitromethylenes/nitroguanidines); gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (cyclodienes, gamma-BHC and fipronil) and L-glutamate receptors (avermectins). Finally, we have examined the molecular basis of resistance to these molecules, which in some cases involves mutations in the molecular target, and we also consider the future impact of molecular genetic technologies in our understanding of the actions of neuroactive insecticides.

  14. Molecular subtyping of brain metastases and implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Renfrow, Jaclyn J; Lesser, Glenn J

    2013-12-01

    Molecular subtyping of tumors and treatment with specifically targeted therapy is a rapidly developing trend in oncology. Genetic and protein biomarkers impact biological behavior, patient prognosis, and inform treatment options. Select examples include EGFR mutations in primary non-small cell lung cancers, Her2 overexpression in breast cancer, and BRAF mutations in melanoma. Systemic benefit is emphasized in targeted therapies; yet lung cancer, breast cancer, and melanoma comprise the most common diagnoses in patients with brain metastases making the effectiveness of targeted therapies in the treatment and/or prevention of brain metastases relevant.Emerging evidence suggests efficacy for targeted therapy in the setting of brain metastases. Randomized, phase III clinical trials indicate targeted HER2 treatment with lapatinib and capecitabine in brain metastases from breast cancer increases the time to progression and decreases the frequency of CNS involvement at progression. Phase II trials and retrospective reviews for gefitinib and erlotinib demonstrate these agents may have a role in both the chemoprevention of brain metastases and, in combination with WBRT, treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) brain metastases. Dabrafenib and other BRAF inhibitors have demonstrated improved survival in patients with brain metastases from melanoma in a recent phase II clinical trial. Further data that support the use of these agents are the subject of several active clinical trials. Challenges and future directions for targeted therapies in brain metastases include both better characterization and drug design with respect to central nervous system distribution. Limited published data demonstrate suboptimal CNS distribution of currently available targeted chemotherapeutic agents. Increasing systemic dosing, alternate delivery methods, and new compounds with improved CNS distribution are being pursued. Additionally, eventual resistance to targeted therapies poses a

  15. A critical question for cancer therapy: what new targets exist?

    PubMed

    Rosell, Rafael; Karachaliou, Niki; Codony, Jordi; Teixido, Cristina; Garcia-Roman, Silvia; Morales, Daniela; Cao, María González; Viteri, Santiago; Veliz, Ignacio; Loo, Yong; Castillo, Omar

    2014-12-01

    Designing molecular targeted therapy with high specificity based on novel tumor biomarkers is a high priority in lung cancer research. Several molecular aberrations have been already identified in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with subsequent development of drugs targeted to these aberrations. A more recent actionable target is MET, a multifaceted receptor tyrosine kinase which frequently interacts with other key oncogenic tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ERBB3 leading to resistance to anti-EGFR therapies. However a phase III trial enrolling only patients with MET-positive tumors was stopped in early March due to futility since there was no evidence that the addition of onartuzumab to erlotinib has any positive effect. From the results of the MET lung phase III trial, we provide new pieces of information that can contribute to further preclinical validation and also be part of the armamentarium for clinical translational research.

  16. Therapeutic drug monitoring of targeted anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Decosterd, Laurent A; Widmer, Nicolas; Zaman, Khalil; Cardoso, Evelina; Buclin, Thierry; Csajka, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    New oral targeted anticancer therapies are revolutionizing cancer treatment by transforming previously deadly malignancies into chronically manageable conditions. Nevertheless, drug resistance, persistence of cancer stem cells, and adverse drug effects still limit their ability to stabilize or cure malignant diseases in the long term. Response to targeted anticancer therapy is influenced by tumor genetics and by variability in drug concentrations. However, despite a significant inter-patient pharmacokinetic variability, targeted anticancer drugs are essentially licensed at fixed doses. Their therapeutic use could however be optimized by individualization of their dosage, based on blood concentration measurements via the therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). TDM can increase the probability of therapeutic responses to targeted anticancer therapies, and would help minimize the risk of major adverse reactions.

  17. Advances in molecular preclinical therapy mediated by imaging.

    PubMed

    Greco, Adelaide; Albanese, Sandra; Auletta, Luigi; DE Carlo, Flavia; Salvatore, Marco; Howard, Candace M; Claudio, Pier P

    2017-03-01

    Several advances have been made toward understanding the biology of cancer and most of them are due to robust genetic studies that led to the scientific recognition that although many patients have the same type of cancer their tumors may have harbored different molecular alterations. Personalized therapy and the development of advanced techniques of preclinical imaging and new murine models of disease are emerging concepts that are allowing mapping of disease markers in vivo and in some cases also receptor targeted therapy. Aim of this review is to illustrate some emerging models of disease that allow patient tumor implantation in mice for subsequent drug testing and advanced approaches for therapy mediated by preclinical imaging. In particular we discuss targeted therapy mediated by high frequency ultrasound and magnetic resonance, two emerging techniques in molecular preclinical therapy.

  18. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  19. Targeted Gene Therapies: Tools, Applications, Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Olivier; Davis, Luther; Maizels, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Many devastating human diseases are caused by mutations in a single gene that prevent a somatic cell from carrying out its essential functions, or by genetic changes acquired as a result of infectious disease or in the course of cell transformation. Targeted gene therapies have emerged as potential strategies for treatment of such diseases. These therapies depend upon rare-cutting endonucleases to cleave at specific sites in or near disease genes. Targeted gene correction provides a template for homology-directed repair, enabling the cell's own repair pathways to erase the mutation and replace it with the correct sequence. Targeted gene disruption ablates the disease gene, disabling its function. Gene targeting can also promote other kinds of genome engineering, including mutation, insertion, or gene deletion. Targeted gene therapies present significant advantages compared to approaches to gene therapy that depend upon delivery of stably expressing transgenes. Recent progress has been fueled by advances in nuclease discovery and design, and by new strategies that maximize efficiency of targeting and minimize off-target damage. Future progress will build on deeper mechanistic understanding of critical factors and pathways. PMID:22530743

  20. Gene therapy and targeted toxins for glioma.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maria G; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D; Curtin, James F; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Ghulam Muhammad, A K M; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2011-06-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of 15-18 months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors.

  1. Application of MINERVA Monte Carlo simulations to targeted radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Descalle, Marie-Anne; Hartmann Siantar, Christine L; Dauffy, Lucile; Nigg, David W; Wemple, Charles A; Yuan, Aina; DeNardo, Gerald L

    2003-02-01

    Recent clinical results have demonstrated the promise of targeted radionuclide therapy for advanced cancer. As the success of this emerging form of radiation therapy grows, accurate treatment planning and radiation dose simulations are likely to become increasingly important. To address this need, we have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA system. The goal of the MINERVA dose calculation system is to provide 3-D Monte Carlo simulation-based dosimetry for radiation therapy, focusing on experimental and emerging applications. For molecular targeted radionuclide therapy applications, MINERVA calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using computed tomography to describe the patient anatomy, combined with a user-defined 3-D radiation source. This paper describes the validation of the 3-D Monte Carlo transport methods to be used in MINERVA for molecular targeted radionuclide dosimetry. It reports comparisons of MINERVA dose simulations with published absorbed fraction data for distributed, monoenergetic photon and electron sources, and for radioisotope photon emission. MINERVA simulations are generally within 2% of EGS4 results and 10% of MCNP results, but differ by up to 40% from the recommendations given in MIRD Pamphlets 3 and 8 for identical medium composition and density. For several representative source and target organs in the abdomen and thorax, specific absorbed fractions calculated with the MINERVA system are generally within 5% of those published in the revised MIRD Pamphlet 5 for 100 keV photons. However, results differ by up to 23% for the adrenal glands, the smallest of our target organs. Finally, we show examples of Monte Carlo simulations in a patient-like geometry for a source of uniform activity located in the kidney.

  2. Peptide-Targeted Radionuclide Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yubin; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1-R) and melanin are two attractive melanoma-specific targets for peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy for melanoma. Radiolabeled peptides targeting MC1-R/melanin can selectively and specifically target cytotoxic radiation generated from therapeutic radionuclides to melanoma cells for cell killing, while sparing the normal tissues and organs. This review highlights the recent advances of peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma targeting MC1R and melanin. The promising therapeutic efficacies of 188Re-(Arg11)CCMSH (188Re-[Cys3,4,10, d-Phe7, Arg11]-α-MSH3-13), 177Lu- and 212Pb-labeled DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-[ReO-(Cys3,4,10, d-Phe7, Arg11)]-α-MSH3-13) and 188Re-HYNIC-4B4 (188Re-hydrazinonicotinamide-Tyr-Glu-Arg-Lys-Phe-Trp-His-Gly-Arg-His) in preclinical melanoma-bearing models demonstrate an optimistic outlook for peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy for melanoma. Peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy for melanoma will likely contribute in an adjuvant setting, once the primary tumor has been surgically removed, to treat metastatic deposits and for treatment of end-stage disease. The lack of effective treatments for metastatic melanoma and end stage disease underscores the necessity to develop and implement new treatment strategies, such as peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy. PMID:18387816

  3. The molecular targets of approved treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Marc; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, three classes of medical therapy were available for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)—prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. With the approval of the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat, an additional drug class has become available targeting a distinct molecular target in the same pathway as PDE5 inhibitors. Treatment recommendations currently include the use of all four drug classes to treat PAH, but there is a lack of comparative data for these therapies. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanistic differences between these agents is critical when making treatment decisions. Combination therapy is often used to treat PAH and it is therefore important that physicians understand how the modes of action of these drugs may interact to work as complementary partners, or potentially with unwanted consequences. Furthermore, different patient phenotypes mean that patients respond differently to treatment; while a certain monotherapy may be adequate for some patients, for others it will be important to consider alternating or combining compounds with different molecular targets. This review describes how the four currently approved drug classes target the complex pathobiology of PAH and will consider the distinct target molecules of each drug class, their modes of action, and review the pivotal clinical trial data supporting their use. It will also discuss the rationale for combining drugs (or not) from the different classes, and review the clinical data from studies on combination therapy. PMID:26219978

  4. Conotoxins: Molecular and Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Richard J.

    Marine molluscs known as cone snails produce beautiful shells and a complex array of over 50,000 venom peptides evolved for prey capture and defence. Many of these peptides selectively modulate ion channels and transporters, making them a valuable source of new ligands for studying the role these targets play in normal and disease physiology. A number of conopeptides reduce pain in animal models, and several are now in pre-clinical and clinical development for the treatment of severe pain often associated with diseases such as cancer. Less than 1% of cone snail venom peptides are pharmacologically characterised.

  5. Nanobody-photosensitizer conjugates for targeted photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Heukers, Raimond; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Oliveira, Sabrina

    2014-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) induces cell death through light activation of a photosensitizer (PS). Targeted delivery of PS via monoclonal antibodies has improved tumor selectivity. However, these conjugates have long half-lives, leading to relatively long photosensitivity in patients. In an attempt to target PS specifically to tumors and to accelerate PS clearance, we have developed new conjugates consisting of nanobodies (NB) targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and a traceable PS (IRDye700DX). These fluorescent conjugates allow the distinction of cell lines with different expression levels of EGFR. Results show that these conjugates specifically induce cell death of EGFR overexpressing cells in low nanomolar concentrations, while PS alone or the NB-PS conjugates in the absence of light induce no toxicity. Delivery of PS using internalizing biparatopic NB-PS conjugates results in even more pronounced phototoxicities. Altogether, EGFR-targeted NB-PS conjugates are specific and potent, enabling the combination of molecular imaging with cancer therapy. From the clinical editor: This study investigates the role of EGFR targeting nanobodies to deliver traceable photosensitizers to cancer molecules for therapeutic exploitation and concomitant imaging. Altogether, EGFR-targeted NB-PS conjugates combine molecular imaging with cancer therapy, the method is specific and potent, paving the way to clinical application of this technology.

  6. [Targeted therapies: sequential and combined treatments].

    PubMed

    Gross-Goupil, M; Escudier, B

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic kidney cancer has dramatically changed in the last three years, with demonstration of efficacy of sunitinib, sorafenib, temsirolimus, bevacizumab combined with interferon and more recently everolimus. Although the international guidelines have recently been reviewed, some major questions are still open. Particularly, the best order of administration of these targeted therapies should be considered, since sequential schedule becomes usual with the availability of these new agents. At the same time, the tolerability and efficacy of the combination of the targeted therapies are under investigation in clinical trials. We report recent studies, mainly presented during the ASCO 2007 and 2008 congress. Furthermore, other studies are ongoing to answer other important questions, to optimize the treatment of this disease, such as the role of nephrectomy in case of synchronous metastatic disease, or the efficacy of the targeted therapies in different histological subtype than clear cell carcinoma, or in neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings.

  7. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-28

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract.

  8. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  9. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  10. The molecular targets of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sameer S; Cantó, Carles

    2015-06-01

    Resveratrol has emerged in recent years as a compound conferring strong protection against metabolic, cardiovascular and other age-related complications, including neurodegeneration and cancer. This has generated the notion that resveratrol treatment acts as a calorie-restriction mimetic, based on the many overlapping health benefits observed upon both interventions in diverse organisms, including yeast, worms, flies and rodents. Though studied for over a decade, the molecular mechanisms governing the therapeutic properties of resveratrol still remain elusive. Elucidating how resveratrol exerts its effects would provide not only new insights in its fundamental biological actions but also new avenues for the design and development of more potent drugs to efficiently manage metabolic disorders. In this review we will cover the most recent advances in the field, with special focus on the metabolic actions of resveratrol and the potential role of SIRT1 and AMPK. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Resveratrol: Challenges in translating pre-clinical findings to improved patient outcomes.

  11. Multimodality Therapy: Bone-Targeted Radioisotope Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Podoloff, Donald A.; Logothetis, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data suggest that bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals can be used to treat prostate cancer bone metastasis and improve the clinical outcome of patients with advanced prostate cancer. It remains to be elucidated whether radiopharmaceuticals enhance the disruption of the onco-niche or the eradication of micrometastatic cells in the bone marrow. The purpose of this review is to investigate the role of bone-targeted radioisotope therapy in the setting of multimodality therapy for advanced prostate cancer. We examine available data and evaluate whether dose escalation, newer generations, or repeated dosing of radiopharmaceuticals enhance their antitumor effects and whether their combination with hormone ablative therapy, chemotherapy, or novel targeted therapy can improve clinical efficacy. PMID:20551894

  12. A Targeting Microbubble for Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, James Shue-Min; Sennoga, Charles A.; McConnell, Ellen; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng-Xing; Nourshargh, Sussan; Seddon, John M.; Haskard, Dorian O.; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Microbubbles conjugated with targeting ligands are used as contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging. However, they often contain immunogenic (strept)avidin, which impedes application in humans. Although targeting bubbles not employing the biotin-(strept)avidin conjugation chemistry have been explored, only a few reached the stage of ultrasound imaging in vivo, none were reported/evaluated to show all three of the following properties desired for clinical applications: (i) low degree of non-specific bubble retention in more than one non-reticuloendothelial tissue; (ii) effective for real-time imaging; and (iii) effective for acoustic quantification of molecular targets to a high degree of quantification. Furthermore, disclosures of the compositions and methodologies enabling reproduction of the bubbles are often withheld. Objective To develop and evaluate a targeting microbubble based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry for ultrasound molecular imaging. Methods and Results Microbubbles with a previously unreported generic (non-targeting components) composition were grafted with anti-E-selectin F(ab’)2 using maleimide-thiol conjugation, to produce E-selectin targeting microbubbles. The resulting targeting bubbles showed high specificity to E-selectin in vitro and in vivo. Non-specific bubble retention was minimal in at least three non-reticuloendothelial tissues with inflammation (mouse heart, kidneys, cremaster). The bubbles were effective for real-time ultrasound imaging of E-selectin expression in the inflamed mouse heart and kidneys, using a clinical ultrasound scanner. The acoustic signal intensity of the targeted bubbles retained in the heart correlated strongly with the level of E-selectin expression (|r|≥0.8), demonstrating a high degree of non-invasive molecular quantification. Conclusions Targeting microbubbles for ultrasound molecular imaging, based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry and the generic composition described

  13. Target marketing strategies for occupational therapy entrepreneurs.

    PubMed

    Kautzmann, L N; Kautzmann, F N; Navarro, F H

    1989-01-01

    Understanding marketing techniques is one of the skills needed by successful entre renews. Target marketing is an effective method for occupational therapy entrepreneurs to use in determining when and where to enter the marketplace. The two components of target marketing, market segmentation and the development of marketing mix strategies for each identified market segment, are described. The Profife of Attitudes Toward Health Care (PATH) method of psychographic market segmentation of health care consumers is presented. Occupational therapy marketing mix strategies for each PATH consumer group are delineated and compatible groupings of market segments are suggested.

  14. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barrena Medel, Nicanor I.; Wright, Jason D.; Herzog, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer remains a major women's health problem due to its high lethality. Despite great efforts to develop effective prevention and early detection strategies, most patients are still diagnosed at advanced stages of disease. This pattern of late presentation has resulted in significant challenges in terms of designing effective therapies to achieve long-term cure. One potential promising strategy is the application of targeted therapeutics that exploit a myriad of critical pathways involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis. This review examines three of the most provocative targeted therapies with current or future applicability in epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:20111741

  15. Mitochondria: a target for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Jeffrey S

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria, the cells powerhouses, are essential for maintaining cell life, and they also play a major role in regulating cell death, which occurs upon permeabilization of their membranes. Once mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) occurs, cells die either by apoptosis or necrosis. Key factors regulating MMP include calcium, the cellular redox status (including levels of reactive oxygen species) and the mobilization and targeting to mitochondria of Bcl-2 family members. Contemporary approaches to targeting mitochondria in cancer therapy use strategies that either modulate the action of Bcl-2 family members at the mitochondrial outer membrane or use specific agents that target the mitochondrial inner membrane and the mitochondrial permeability transition (PT) pore. The aim of this review is to describe the major mechanisms regulating MMP and to discuss, with examples, mitochondrial targeting strategies for potential use in cancer therapy. PMID:16331284

  16. Translating depression biomarkers for improved targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Bredt, David S; Furey, Maura L; Chen, Guang; Lovenberg, Tim; Drevets, Wayne C; Manji, Husseini K

    2015-12-01

    Mood disorders are among the most common medical conditions and cause amongst the greatest disease burden. Currently approved antidepressants target monoamine pathways; these medicines take many weeks to relieve symptoms, and most patients do not have sustained responses. This review will highlight recent advances in translational science identifying dysfunctional biochemical processes and neuronal circuits associated with mood disorders. We will also summarize strategies for targeting these pathways and for enhancing synaptic plasticity to develop most effective and rapidly acting antidepressant therapies.

  17. Molecular Approaches to Sarcoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, R. J.; Tarantolo, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas comprise a heterogeneous group of aggressive tumors that have a relatively poor prognosis. Although conventional therapeutic regimens can effectively cytoreduce the overall tumor mass, they fail to consistently achieve a curative outcome. Alternative gene-based approaches that counteract the underlying neoplastic process by eliminating the clonal aberrations that potentiate malignant behavior have been proposed. As compared to the accumulation of gene alterations associated with epithelial carcinomas, sarcomas are frequently characterized by the unique presence of a single chromosomal translocation in each histological subtype. Similar to the Philadelphia chromosome associated with CML, these clonal abnormalities result in the fusion of two independent unrelated genes to generate a unique chimeric protein that displays aberrant activity believed to initiate cellular transformation. Secondary gene mutations may provide an additional growth advantage that further contributes to malignant progression. The recent clinical success of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, STI571, suggests that therapeutic approaches specifically directed against essential survival factors in sarcoma cells may be effective. This review summarizes published approaches targeting a specific molecular mechanism associated with sarcomagenesis. The strategy and significance of published translational studies in six distinct areas are presented. These include: (1) the disruption of chimeric transcription factor activity; (2) inhibition of growth stimulatory post-translational modifications; (3) restoration of tumor suppressor function; (4) interference with angiogenesis; (5) induction of apoptotic pathways; and (6) introduction of toxic gene products. The potential for improving outcomes in sarcoma patients and the conceptual obstacles to be overcome are discussed. PMID:18521343

  18. Biological targeted therapies in patients with advanced enteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Nicola; Cinieri, Saverio; Lorizzo, Katia; Squadroni, Michela; Orlando, Laura; Spada, Francesca; Maiello, Evaristo; Bodei, Lisa; Paganelli, Giovanni; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; de Braud, Filippo

    2010-11-01

    Enteropancreatic (EP) neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) represent relatively rare and heterogeneous malignancies. They are the most common group among neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). In most cases they are advanced at diagnosis and slow-growing, therefore conditioning a better prognosis compared with non neuroendocrine carcinomas from the same sites. No standard medical therapy exists, except for somatostatin analogs in functioning tumors, and octreotide LAR in functioning or non functioning well differentiated NECs from small bowel. Several systemic therapeutic options exist, including chemotherapy, somatostatin analog, interferon, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), and molecular targeted drugs. Among them some therapies have specific biological tumor targets and can be defined as "biological targeted therapies". This review focuses on the status of EP NECs targeted therapies in the light of recent advances. Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are the first therapeutic target detected in EP NECs. Through them SS analogs and PRRT act, producing symptomatic, biochemical, and, to a lesser extent, antiproliferative effects. New SS analogs, covering a higher number of SSTR subtypes, were developed, including pasireotide (SOM230), which controls 25% of carcinoid syndromes resistant to full dose octreotide LAR. Chimeric analogs, which bind SSTR2/SSTR5 and dopamine-2 receptor subtype (D2), are in preclinical phase of development. Among the numerous molecular targeted agents investigated in NETs, mTOR inhibitors and VEGF/VEGFR/PDGFR inhibitors are in most advanced clinical phase of investigation. In particular, everolimus, sunitinib, and bevacizumab are all studied in phase III trials. Both everolimus and sunitinib produced significant survival benefit versus placebo in advanced progressing well-differentiated pancreatic NECs. Sunitinib data have been presented at the last ASCO in June 2010, and everolimus data will be presented at next ESMO in September 2010. Copyright

  19. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: potential targets and therapies

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Nanda, Sanjeev; Konety, Badrinath R; Saleem, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The treatment landscape for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is undergoing significant changes with the advent of new therapies and multidisciplinary efforts by scientists and clinicians. As activation of multiple molecular pathways in the neoplastic prostate makes it impossible for single-target drugs to be completely effective in treating CRPC, this has led to combination therapy strategy, where several molecules involved in tumor growth and disease progression are targeted by a therapeutic regimen. In the present review, we provide an update on the molecular pathways that play an important role in the pathogenesis of CRPC and discuss the current wave of new treatments to combat this lethal disease. PMID:22956858

  20. Lung cancer biomarkers, targeted therapies and clinical assays

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Jennifer L.; Kim, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, the majority of genomic cancer research has been in discovery and validation; however, as our knowledge of tumor molecular profiling improves, the idea of genomic application in the clinic becomes increasingly tangible, paralleled with the drug development of newer targeted therapies. A number of profiling methodologies exist to identify biomarkers found within the patient (germ-line DNA) and tumor (somatic DNA). Subsequently, commercially available clinical assays to test for both germ-line and somatic alterations that are prognostic and/or predictive of disease outcome, toxicity or treatment response have significantly increased. This review aims to summarize clinically relevant cancer biomarkers that serve as targets for therapy and their potential relationship to lung cancer. In order to realize the full potential of genomic cancer medicine, it is imperative that clinicians understand these intricate molecular pathways, the therapeutic implication of mutations within these pathways, and the availability of clinical assays to identify such biomarkers. PMID:26629419

  1. Molecular therapy of colorectal cancer: progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Weng, Wenhao; Feng, Junlan; Qin, Huanlong; Ma, Yanlei

    2015-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common types of cancer and leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Although the introduction of cytotoxic drugs such as oxaliplatin, irinotecan and fluorouracil has improved the treatment of advanced CRC, the individual response to chemoradiotherapy varies tremendously from one patient to another. However, recent progress in CRC molecular therapies may provide new insight into the treatment of this disease. Currently, components of the EGFR, VEGF, Wnt and NF-kB pathways are the most important targets for CRC therapy. This review chronicles the development of molecular CRC therapies over the past few decades. We also provide an update on the current progress of research concerning the molecular pathways leading to CRC and discuss the possible implications for CRC therapy.

  2. Enhancing Targeted Therapy for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Myeloproliferative Neoplasms PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gary W. Reuther CONTRACTING...2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 2012-2 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing Targeted Therapy for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Myeloproliferative neoplasms

  3. Advances in targeted therapies and new promising targets in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belkhiri, Abbes; El-Rifai, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer, comprising squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Notably, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased at an alarming rate in the Western world. Unfortunately, the standard first-line chemo-radiotherapeutic approaches are toxic and of limited efficacy in the treatment of a significant number of cancer patients. The molecular analysis of cancer cells has uncovered key genetic and epigenetic alterations underlying the development and progression of tumors. These discoveries have paved the way for the emergence of targeted therapy approaches. This review will highlight recent progress in the development of targeted therapies in esophageal cancer. This will include a review of drugs targeting receptor tyrosine kinases and other kinases in esophageal cancer. Additional studies will be required to develop a rational integration of these targeted agents with respect to histologic types of esophageal cancer and the optimal selection of cancer patients who would most likely benefit from targeted therapy. Identification of AURKA and AXL as key molecular players in esophageal tumorigenesis and drug resistance strongly justifies the evaluation of the available drugs against these targets in clinical trials. PMID:25593196

  4. Targeted endometrial cancer therapy as a future prospect.

    PubMed

    Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Cheewakriangkrai, Chalong; Likittanasombut, Puchong; Thanapprapasr, Kamolrat; Mutch, David G

    2013-03-01

    Among female-specific cancers worldwide, endometrial cancer is the third most common after breast cancer and cervical cancer. In addition, it is the most common gynecological cancer in the USA and Europe. The incidence of this disease appears to be increasing. The cause of this increase is multifactorial, but a few possible factors involved are increasing obesity, an aging population leading to more postmenopausal women and greater tamoxifen use. Surgery is generally the primary treatment of this disease and postoperative radiation therapy in some patients with high or intermediate risk may prevent locoregional recurrences. Adjuvant chemotherapy improves progression-free survival in advanced or recurrent cancer. However, overall survival in patients with advanced disease is poor. Hence, better therapy is needed and targeted molecular therapies are emerging as possible treatment candidates. These include molecules that target VEGF, mTOR, tyrosine kinases, human EGF receptors and FGF receptors. Therapies targeting specific molecular features should be evaluated in future strategies in the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  5. Harnessing the potential of epigenetic therapy to target solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Nita; Easwaran, Hariharan; Baylin, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic therapies may play a prominent role in the future management of solid tumors. This possibility is based on the clinical efficacy of existing drugs in treating defined hematopoietic neoplasms, paired with promising new data from preclinical and clinical studies that examined these agents in solid tumors. We suggest that current drugs may represent a targeted therapeutic approach for reprogramming solid tumor cells, a strategy that must be pursued in concert with the explosion in knowledge about the molecular underpinnings of normal and cancer epigenomes. We hypothesize that understanding targeted proteins in the context of their enzymatic and scaffolding functions and in terms of their interactions in complexes with proteins that are targets of new drugs under development defines the future of epigenetic therapies for cancer. PMID:24382390

  6. Tumor Therapy with Targeted Atomic Nanogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, Michael R.; Ma, Dangshe; Lai, Lawrence T.; Simon, Jim; Borchardt, Paul; Frank, R. Keith; Wu, Karen; Pellegrini, Virginia; Curcio, Michael J.; Miederer, Matthias; Bander, Neil H.; Scheinberg, David A.

    2001-11-01

    A single, high linear energy transfer alpha particle can kill a target cell. We have developed methods to target molecular-sized generators of alpha-emitting isotope cascades to the inside of cancer cells using actinium-225 coupled to internalizing monoclonal antibodies. In vitro, these constructs specifically killed leukemia, lymphoma, breast, ovarian, neuroblastoma, and prostate cancer cells at becquerel (picocurie) levels. Injection of single doses of the constructs at kilobecquerel (nanocurie) levels into mice bearing solid prostate carcinoma or disseminated human lymphoma induced tumor regression and prolonged survival, without toxicity, in a substantial fraction of animals. Nanogenerators targeting a wide variety of cancers may be possible.

  7. Tumor therapy with targeted atomic nanogenerators.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, M R; Ma, D; Lai, L T; Simon, J; Borchardt, P; Frank, R K; Wu, K; Pellegrini, V; Curcio, M J; Miederer, M; Bander, N H; Scheinberg, D A

    2001-11-16

    A single, high linear energy transfer alpha particle can kill a target cell. We have developed methods to target molecular-sized generators of alpha-emitting isotope cascades to the inside of cancer cells using actinium-225 coupled to internalizing monoclonal antibodies. In vitro, these constructs specifically killed leukemia, lymphoma, breast, ovarian, neuroblastoma, and prostate cancer cells at becquerel (picocurie) levels. Injection of single doses of the constructs at kilobecquerel (nanocurie) levels into mice bearing solid prostate carcinoma or disseminated human lymphoma induced tumor regression and prolonged survival, without toxicity, in a substantial fraction of animals. Nanogenerators targeting a wide variety of cancers may be possible.

  8. Targeted therapies in the management of metastatic bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fassan, Matteo; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Gomella, Leonard G; Baffa, Raffaele

    2007-01-01

    The management of metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is a common and complex clinical challenge. Despite the fact that UC is one of the most frequent tumors in the population, long term survival for metastatic disease remains low, and chemotherapy is curative for only a small minority of patients. UC is genetically heterogeneous, and it is surrounded by a complex tissue microenvironment. The problems of clinical practice in the field of metastatic bladder cancer have begun to stimulate translational research. Advances in the understanding of the molecular biology of urothelial cancer continue to contribute to the identification of molecular pathways upon which new therapeutic approaches can be targeted. New agents and strategies have recently been developed which can direct the most appropriate choice of treatment for advanced disease. A review of literature published on the targeted therapy for metastatic bladder cancer is presented, focusing on the molecular pathways shut down by the new therapeutic agents. PMID:19707309

  9. Targeting tumors with nanobodies for cancer imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sabrina; Heukers, Raimond; Sornkom, Jirawas; Kok, Robbert J; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    2013-12-28

    The use of monoclonal antibodies has revolutionized both cancer therapy and cancer imaging. Antibodies have been used to directly inhibit tumor cell proliferation or to target drugs to tumors. Also in molecular imaging, monoclonal antibodies have found their way to the clinic. Nevertheless, distribution within tumors is hampered by their size, leading to insufficient efficacy of cancer treatment and irregular imaging. An attractive alternative for monoclonal antibodies are nanobodies or VHHs. These are the variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies from animals from the Camelidae family that were first discovered in 1993. Stimulated by the ease of nanobody selection, production, and low immunogenicity potential, a number of nanobodies specific to different disease-related targets have been developed. For cancer therapy, nanobodies have been employed as antagonistic drugs, and more recently, as targeting moieties of effector-domaINS and of drug delivery systems. In parallel, nanobodies have also been employed for molecular imaging with modalities such as nuclear and optical imaging. In this review, we discuss recent developments in the application of nanobodies as targeting moieties in cancer therapy and cancer imaging. With such a wide range of successful applications, nanobodies have become much more than simple antagonists.

  10. [Targeted therapies, prognostic and predictive factors in endocrine oncology].

    PubMed

    Hescot, S; Baudin, E; Borson-Chazot, F; Lombès, M

    2013-10-01

    A better understanding of molecular mechanisms responsible for tumorigenesis has allowed the development of targeted drugs designed to improve the outcome of cancer. In endocrine tumors, several molecules have demonstrated efficacy in terms of progression free survival during phase III trials such as vandetanib and cabozantinib in medullary thyroid carcinoma, sorafenib in differentiated thyroid carcinoma and everolimus or sunitinib for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Rare cancer network has allowed ongoing phase III trials in malignant pheochromocytoma and adrenocortical carcinoma. However, to date no specific predictive biomarker has yet been identified for a personalized cancer medicine. We review recent advances in endocrine oncology concerning molecular targets identification, targeted therapies and predictive or prognostic markers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Crizotinib for the Treatment of ALK-Rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Success Story to Usher in the Second Decade of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Cui, Jean; Iafrate, A. John

    2012-01-01

    Crizotinib, an ALK/MET/ROS1 inhibitor, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in August 2011, merely 4 years after the first publication of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. The crizotinib approval was accompanied by the simultaneous approval of an ALK companion diagnostic fluorescent in situ hybridization assay for the detection of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Crizotinib continued to be developed as an ALK and MET inhibitor in other tumor types driven by alteration in ALK and MET. Crizotinib has recently been shown to be an effective ROS1 inhibitor in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC, with potential future clinical applications in ROS1-rearranged tumors. Here we summarize the heterogeneity within the ALK- and ROS1-rearranged molecular subtypes of NSCLC. We review the past and future clinical development of crizotinib for ALK-rearranged NSCLC and the diagnostic assays to detect ALK-rearranged NSCLC. We highlight how the success of crizotinib has changed the paradigm of future drug development for targeted therapies by targeting a molecular-defined subtype of NSCLC despite its rarity and affected the practice of personalized medicine in oncology, emphasizing close collaboration between clinical oncologists, pathologists, and translational scientists. PMID:22989574

  12. Computational molecular biology approaches to ligand-target interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lupieri, Paola; Nguyen, Chuong Ha Hung; Bafghi, Zhaleh Ghaemi; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Carloni, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Binding of small molecules to their targets triggers complex pathways. Computational approaches are keys for predictions of the molecular events involved in such cascades. Here we review current efforts at characterizing the molecular determinants in the largest membrane-bound receptor family, the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We focus on odorant receptors, which constitute more than half GPCRs. The work presented in this review uncovers structural and energetic aspects of components of the cellular cascade. Finally, a computational approach in the context of radioactive boron-based antitumoral therapies is briefly described. PMID:20119480

  13. Targeted radionuclide therapies for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Da Silva, R; Gravekamp, C; Libutti, S K; Abraham, T; Dadachova, E

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic malignancies, the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, have an aggressive behavior with poor prognosis, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of only 4%. It is typically a silent malignancy until patients develop metastatic disease. Targeted radionuclide therapies of cancer such as radiolabeled peptides, which bind to the receptors overexpressed by cancer cells and radiolabeled antibodies to tumor-specific antigens provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy and external beam radiation of metastatic cancers. Multiple clinical trials of targeted radionuclide therapy of pancreatic cancer have been performed in the last decade and demonstrated safety and potential efficacy of radionuclide therapy for treatment of this formidable disease. Although a lot of progress has been made in treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with radiolabeled (90)Y and (177)Lu somatostatin peptide analogs, pancreatic adenocarcinomas remain a major challenge. Novel approaches such as peptides and antibodies radiolabeled with alpha emitters, pre-targeting, bispecific antibodies and biological therapy based on the radioactive tumorlytic bacteria might offer a potential breakthrough in treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  14. Targeting the TGFβ pathway for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Cohen, Romain; Cros, Jérôme; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; de Gramont, Armand

    2015-03-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway has pleiotropic functions regulating cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, motility and invasion, extracellular matrix production, angiogenesis, and immune response. TGFβ signaling deregulation is frequent in tumors and has crucial roles in tumor initiation, development and metastasis. TGFβ signaling inhibition is an emerging strategy for cancer therapy. The role of the TGFβ pathway as a tumor-promoter or suppressor at the cancer cell level is still a matter of debate, due to its differential effects at the early and late stages of carcinogenesis. In contrast, at the microenvironment level, the TGFβ pathway contributes to generate a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth and metastasis throughout all the steps of carcinogenesis. Then, targeting the TGFβ pathway in cancer may be considered primarily as a microenvironment-targeted strategy. In this review, we focus on the TGFβ pathway as a target for cancer therapy. In the first part, we provide a comprehensive overview of the roles played by this pathway and its deregulation in cancer, at the cancer cell and microenvironment levels. We go on to describe the preclinical and clinical results of pharmacological strategies to target the TGFβ pathway, with a highlight on the effects on tumor microenvironment. We then explore the perspectives to optimize TGFβ inhibition therapy in different tumor settings.

  15. Targeted Therapies in Combination With Immune Therapies for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Shelly A; Khan, Shaheer; Gibney, Geoffrey T

    In recent years, the field of oncology has witnessed many breakthroughs in the treatment of advanced malignancies, particularly in patients with advanced melanoma. Targeted and immune checkpoint therapies have emerged as the primary treatment strategies for these patients. Molecular profiling of melanoma is incorporated into routine practice to identify potential therapeutic targets, and patients are offered either a targeted or immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy approach. Both strategies have limitations where not all patients experience durable responses. Preclinical data have demonstrated the ability of targeted therapy to enhance activity of effector T cells, reduce immunosuppressive cytokine production, and increase tumor cell antigen presentation, which can augment antitumor immunity. In vivo models have shown synergy with improved tumor control when targeted and immune checkpoint agents are combined. Therefore, combination strategies with targeted and immune checkpoint therapy may improve patient outcomes. Early clinical data with anti-programmed cell-death protein 1/programmed cell-death ligand 1 agents in combination with targeted inhibitors appear to have acceptable toxicity rates and the potential for enhanced antitumor activity. This review explores the current status of preclinical and clinical development for these combination approaches in patients with advanced melanoma.

  16. Targeted Therapy for Cancer in the Genomic Era.

    PubMed

    Afghahi, Anosheh; Sledge, George W

    2015-01-01

    The advent of cancer genomics has led to the development of many highly successful targeted therapies, primarily inhibitors of growth factor receptors and related kinases, including imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia and trastuzumab for HER2-positive breast cancer. This approach has become highly successful for certain cancers. However, as the list of targeted therapies expands, their efficacy becomes more limited, and toxicity accumulates. What we have learned in the past decades is that while the targeted therapeutics approach may be highly successful in less complex tumors, cancers defined by carcinogen-induced genomic chaos, such a UV-induced melanoma or tobacco-induced lung cancer, are driven by a multitude of competing molecular pathways and, as such, are not as successfully managed by a similar approach. Luckily, in the past years, the field of cancer immunotherapy has become more fully developed with the emergence of checkpoint blockade inhibitor therapy. These promising new agents are particularly well suited for tumors with a high mutational burden due to underlying genomic disarray. While still in its infancy, we predict that cancer immunotherapy will offer a better alternative to our current targeted approach and eagerly await the results of several ongoing clinical trials that will elucidate this new direction in cancer therapy.

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy: Moving toward targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Salehi, Rasoul; Nahand, Javid Sadri; Karimi, Ehsan; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) occurs when a stable isotope, boton-10, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield stripped down helium-4 nuclei and lithium-7 nuclei. It is a binary therapy in the treatment of cancer in which a cytotoxic event is triggered when an atom placed in a cancer cell. Here, we provide an overview on the application of BNCT in cancer therapy as well as current preclinical and clinical evidence on the efficacy of BNCT in the treatment of melanoma, brain tumors, head and neck cancer, and thyroid cancer. Several studies have shown that BNCT is effective in patients who had been treated with a full dose of conventional radiotherapy, because of its selectivity. In addition, BNCT is dependent on the normal/tumor tissue ratio of boron distribution. Increasing evidence has shown that BNCT can be combined with different drug delivery systems to enhance the delivery of boron to cancer cells. The flexibility of BNCT to be used in combination with different tumor-targeting approaches has made this strategy a promising option for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the recent advances in the use of BNCT for targeted therapy of cancer.

  18. Targets for therapy in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tardiff, Jil C.; Carrier, Lucie; Bers, Donald M.; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Maier, Lars S.; Ashrafian, Houman; Huke, Sabine; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    To date, no compounds or interventions exist that treat or prevent sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. Established therapies currently improve the outcome, but novel therapies may be able to more fundamentally affect the disease process and course. Investigations of the pathomechanisms are generating molecular insights that can be useful for the design of novel specific drugs suitable for clinical use. As perturbations in the heart are stage-specific, proper timing of drug treatment is essential to prevent initiation and progression of cardiac disease in mutation carrier individuals. In this review, we emphasize potential novel therapies which may prevent, delay, or even reverse hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by sarcomeric gene mutations. These include corrections of genetic defects, altered sarcomere function, perturbations in intracellular ion homeostasis, and impaired myocardial energetics. PMID:25634554

  19. Targets for therapy in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Tardiff, Jil C; Carrier, Lucie; Bers, Donald M; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Maier, Lars S; Ashrafian, Houman; Huke, Sabine; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-04-01

    To date, no compounds or interventions exist that treat or prevent sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. Established therapies currently improve the outcome, but novel therapies may be able to more fundamentally affect the disease process and course. Investigations of the pathomechanisms are generating molecular insights that can be useful for the design of novel specific drugs suitable for clinical use. As perturbations in the heart are stage-specific, proper timing of drug treatment is essential to prevent initiation and progression of cardiac disease in mutation carrier individuals. In this review, we emphasize potential novel therapies which may prevent, delay, or even reverse hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by sarcomeric gene mutations. These include corrections of genetic defects, altered sarcomere function, perturbations in intracellular ion homeostasis, and impaired myocardial energetics. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Molecular-based choice of cancer therapy: realities and expectations.

    PubMed

    Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Moiseyenko, Vladimir M

    2007-04-01

    Current choice of cancer therapy is usually empirical and relies mainly on the statistical prediction of the treatment success. Molecular research provides some opportunities to personalize antitumor treatment. For example, life-threatening toxic reactions can be avoided by the identification of subjects, who carry susceptible genotypes of drug-metabolizing genes (e.g. TPMT, UGT1A1, MTHFR, DPYD). Tumor sensitivity can be predicted by molecular portraying of targets and other molecules associated with drug response. Tailoring of antiestrogen and trastuzumab therapy based on hormone and HER2 receptor status has already become a classical example of customized medicine. Other predictive markers have been identified both for cytotoxic and for targeted therapies, and include, for example, expression of TS, TP, DPD, OPRT, ERCC1, MGMT, TOP2A, class III beta-tubulin molecules as well as genomic alterations of EGFR, KIT, ABL oncogenes.

  1. Resisting Resistance: Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jessica J.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance inevitably limits the efficacy of all targeted therapies including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Understanding the biological underpinnings of TKI resistance is key to the successful development of future therapeutic strategies. Traditionally, mechanisms of TKI resistance have been viewed under a dichotomous lens. Tumor cells are TKI-sensitive or TKI-refractory, exhibit intrinsic or acquired resistance, and accumulate alterations within or outside the target to promote their survival. Such classifications facilitate our comprehension of an otherwise complex biology, but are likely an oversimplification. Recent studies underscore the multifaceted, genetically heterogeneous nature of TKI resistance, which evolves dynamically with changes in therapy. In this Review, we provide a broad framework for understanding the diverse mechanisms of resistance at play in oncogene-driven lung cancers. PMID:27819059

  2. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these strategies should provide improved targeting of metastatic tumours following systemic gene delivery. Rapid progress in the ability to specifically control transgenes will allow systemic gene delivery for cancer therapy to become a real possibility in the near future. PMID:12721516

  3. [Radiotherapy and targeted therapy/immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Antoni, D; Bockel, S; Deutsch, E; Mornex, F

    2016-10-01

    Thanks to recent advances achieved in oncologic systemic and local ablative treatment, the treatments become more and more efficient in term of local control and overall survival. Thus, the targeted therapies, immunotherapy or stereotactic radiotherapy have modified the management of patients, especially in case of oligometastatic disease. Many questions are raised by these innovations, particularly the diagnosis and management of new side effects or that of the combination of these different treatments, depending on the type of primary tumor. Fundamental data are available, while clinical data are still limited. Ongoing trials should help to clarify the clinical management protocols. This manuscript is a review of the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy/immunotherapy.

  4. Targeted therapy for melanoma: a primer.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer. Unfortunately, despite recent improvements for some solid tumors, the prevalence and mortality of melanoma continue to increase. The identification of activating mutations in melanoma, combined with a growing appreciation of the different pattern of genetic changes in the anatomically defined melanoma subtypes, has become the focus of a concerted effort to translate these discoveries into personalized therapeutic approaches for this disease. This article reviews the known mutations, amplifications, and deletions in kinase signaling pathways that have been implicated in melanoma; the prevalence of these genetic events in clinicopathologically defined melanoma subtypes; and the results of clinical trials that use targeted therapy approaches to block aberrantly activated pathways resulting from these mutations. The challenges that must be overcome to achieve improved outcomes with targeted therapies in melanoma in the future are also discussed.

  5. [Immunotherapies and targeted therapies in medical oncology].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Benoît; Champiat, Stéphane; Loirat, Delphine; Arrondeau, Jennifer; Lemoine, Nathalie; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    New immunotherapies, also called "immune checkpoints", are promising and showed interesting antitumoral activities in particular in advanced setting of melanoma, clear cell renal cancer or non-small cell lung carcinoma. These treatments include ipilimumab, anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1. There is a strong rational for combination of immunotherapies and targeted therapies. This review is dedicated to expose the theorical issues and preclinical data of such combinations. This review examined the impact of immunotherapies on transduction pathways and modification of immunity related to targeted therapies. First clinical data form early drug development studies showed the difficulties observed with such combination and limitating toxicities. Finally, potential interesting combinations are overviewed with an emphasis on sequential treatments.

  6. Targeting calcium signaling in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chaochu; Merritt, Robert; Fu, Liwu; Pan, Zui

    2017-01-01

    The intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) act as second messenger to regulate gene transcription, cell proliferation, migration and death. Accumulating evidences have demonstrated that intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis is altered in cancer cells and the alteration is involved in tumor initiation, angiogenesis, progression and metastasis. Targeting derailed Ca(2+) signaling for cancer therapy has become an emerging research area. This review summarizes some important Ca(2+) channels, transporters and Ca(2+)-ATPases, which have been reported to be altered in human cancer patients. It discusses the current research effort toward evaluation of the blockers, inhibitors or regulators for Ca(2+) channels/transporters or Ca(2+)-ATPase pumps as anti-cancer drugs. This review is also aimed to stimulate interest in, and support for research into the understanding of cellular mechanisms underlying the regulation of Ca(2+) signaling in different cancer cells, and to search for novel therapies to cure these malignancies by targeting Ca(2+) channels or transporters.

  7. Evolution of targeted therapies in cancer: opportunities and challenges in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sam; Kumar, Prasanna; Ramprasad, Vedam; Chaudhuri, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapies have changed the course of cancer treatment in recent years. By reducing toxicity and improving outcome, these new generations of precision medicines have extended patient lives beyond what could be achieved by the use of nontargeted therapies. In the last 2 years, several new molecular entities targeting signaling proteins and immune pathways have gone through successful clinical development resulting in their approval. These new targeted therapies require patient selection and the discovery of biomarkers of response. This review discusses the evolution of targeted therapies in cancer and challenges in translating the concepts into clinical practice.

  8. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. PMID:24522270

  9. Targeted Nanoparticles for Kidney Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    noninva- sive radiofrequency field. Cancer 110(12):2654–2665. Ge, Z. B., Y. J. Kang et al. 2005. Thermal transport in Au-core polymer –shell nanoparticles ...modalities using bare SPIONs cannot be realized. Recently, core/shell nanoparticles with SPIONs and polymer -passivated SPION/ metallic hybrid...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-0434 TITLE: Targeted Nanoparticles for Kidney Cancer Therapy

  10. Targeted therapies for lung cancer: clinical experience and novel agents.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jill E; Cascone, Tina; Gerber, David E; Heymach, John V; Minna, John D

    2011-01-01

    Although lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer in the United States, recently a number of developments indicate future clinical benefit. These include evidence that computed tomography-based screening decreases lung cancer mortality, the use of stereotactic radiation for early-stage tumors, the development of molecular methods to predict chemotherapy sensitivity, and genome-wide expression and mutation analysis data that have uncovered oncogene "addictions" as important therapeutic targets. Perhaps the most significant advance in the treatment of this challenging disease is the introduction of molecularly targeted therapies, a term that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The development of effective targeted therapeutics requires knowledge of the genes and pathways involved and how they relate to the biologic behavior of lung cancer. Drugs targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor are now U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. These agents are generally better tolerated than conventional chemotherapy and show dramatic efficacy when their use is coupled with a clear understanding of clinical data, mechanism, patient selection, drug interactions, and toxicities. Integrating genome-wide tumor analysis with drug- and targeted agent-responsive phenotypes will provide a wealth of new possibilities for lung cancer-targeted therapeutics. Ongoing research efforts in these areas as well as a discussion of emerging targeted agents being evaluated in clinical trials are the subjects of this review.

  11. Targeted therapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Licitra, Lisa; Bergamini, Cristiana; Mirabile, Aurora; Granata, Roberta

    2011-04-01

    Results of clinical studies on targeted cancer therapies are rapidly accumulating. This is also true in the field of head and neck cancer (HNC). Due to the unique multidisciplinary needs of the disease, it is of paramount importance that physicians who treat HNC are aware of the evolving changes that research is offering. Many targeted agents directed at inhibiting epithelial growth factor receptors (EGFRs) are under investigation in both curable loco-regional advanced disease in combination with standard treatments and in the recurrent metastatic setting. Human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive tumors present a distinct biological profile. Consequently, the role of targeted agents in this specific setting still needs to be refined. Herein we will briefly review the results of the most recent studies on targeted agents. Cetuximab and other monoclonal antibodies (panitumumab, zalotumumab and nimotumumab) have been already investigated in phase III studies; and some results are now available. Small molecules inhibiting EGFR have still to prove their efficacy. Other agents such as vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor, vascular endoinsulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, MET, PI3KA and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor are in development. At present treatment options in HNC are changing and include targeted agents with demonstrated efficacy. A better selection based on biological factors of patients who are potentially responsive to such targeted agents is being actively pursued.

  12. Molecular Targeted Intervention for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Pant, Shubham; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the worst cancers, with almost uniform lethality. PC risk is associated with westernized diet, tobacco, alcohol, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, and family history of pancreatic cancer. New targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations have yet to provide adequate treatments for patients with advanced cancer. To design better preventive and/or treatment strategies against PC, knowledge of PC pathogenesis at the molecular level is vital. With the advent of genetically modified animals, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology and pathogenesis of PC. Currently, several clinical trials and preclinical evaluations are underway to investigate novel agents that target signaling defects in PC. An important consideration in evaluating novel drugs is determining whether an agent can reach the target in concentrations effective to treat the disease. Recently, we have reported evidence for chemoprevention of PC. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of current updates on molecularly targeted interventions, as well as dietary, phytochemical, immunoregulatory, and microenvironment-based approaches for the development of novel therapeutic and preventive regimens. Special attention is given to prevention and treatment in preclinical genetically engineered mouse studies and human clinical studies. PMID:26266422

  13. Systemic therapy of cholangiocarcinoma: From chemotherapy to targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, N; Vogel, A

    2015-04-01

    Cholangiocarcinomas (CCA) are rare tumors of the liver with poor prognosis. The standard of care in patients with unresectable tumors or metastatic disease is combination chemotherapy (CT) with gemcitabine and cisplatin. Targeted therapies inhibiting EGFR, VEGF, MEK and others are broadly tested in CCA but to date, the existing data from randomized and nonrandomized trials do not justify the application of small molecules outside of clinical trials. In clinical practice, many patients receive second-line CT after failure of gemcitabine/cisplatin, although there is so far no evidence to support second-line CT. This review summarizes current chemotherapy protocols and ongoing studies, including conventional chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. FGFR Signaling as a Target for Lung Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Arpita; Adjei, Alex A

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. Recently, molecular targeted therapies have shown promising results in the management of lung cancer. These therapies require a clear understanding of the relevant pathways that drive carcinogenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling axis is one such pathway that plays a central role in normal cellular function. Alterations in this pathway have been found in many cancers. In this review article, we focus on the role of this pathway in lung cancer. We present the molecular structure of FGFR, the interaction of the receptor with its ligands (the fibroblast growth factors), its downstream signaling, and aberrations in the FGFR pathway. We also discuss clinical trials involving selective and multikinase FGFR inhibitors in lung cancer treatment.

  15. Gastric cancer management: Kinases as a target therapy.

    PubMed

    Farran, Batoul; Müller, Susanne; Montenegro, Raquel C

    2017-06-01

    The molecular diagnostics revolution has reshaped the practice of oncology by facilitating the identification of genetic, epigenetic and proteomic modifications correlated with cancer, thus delineating 'oncomaps' for various cancer types. These advances have enhanced our understanding of gastric cancer, one of the most fatal diseases worldwide, and culminated in the approval of novel molecular therapies such as trastuzumab. Gastric tumours display recurrent aberrations in key kinase oncogenes such as Her2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), PI3K, mTOR or c-Met, suggesting that these receptors are amenable to inhibition using specific drug agents. In this review, we examine the mutational landscape of gastric cancer, the use of kinase inhibitors as targeted therapies in gastric tumours and the clinical trials underway for novel inhibitors, highlighting successes, failures and future directions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Liposarcoma: molecular targets and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Bill, Kate Lynn J; Casadei, Lucia; Prudner, Bethany C; Iwenofu, Hans; Strohecker, Anne M; Pollock, Raphael E

    2016-10-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma and accounts for approximately 20 % of all adult sarcomas. Current treatment modalities (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) all have limitations; therefore, molecularly driven studies are needed to improve the identification and increased understanding of genetic and epigenetic deregulations in LPS if we are to successfully target specific tumorigenic drivers. It can be anticipated that such biology-driven therapeutics will improve treatments by selectively deleting cancer cells while sparing normal tissues. This review will focus on several therapeutically actionable molecular markers identified in well-differentiated LPS and dedifferentiated LPS, highlighting their potential clinical applicability.

  17. Novel Targeted Therapies in Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Konda, Bhavana; Kirschner, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare cancer, but one that carries a poor prognosis due to its aggressive nature and unresponsiveness to conventional chemotherapeutic strategies. Over the past 12 years, there has been renewed interest in developing new therapies for this cancer, including identifying key signaling nodes responsible for cell proliferation. Recent findings Clinical trials of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as monotherapy have generally been disappointing, although the identification of exceptional responders may lead to the identification of targeted therapies that may produce responses in subsets of patients. Agents targeted to the Wnt signaling pathway, a known player in adrenal carcinogenesis, have been developed although have not yet been used specifically for adrenal cancer. There is current excitement about inhibitors of acetyl-coA cholesterol acetyl transferase 1 (ACAT1), an enzyme required for intracellular cholesterol handling, although trials are still underway. Tools to target other proteins such as SF1 and mTOR have been developed and are moving towards clinical application. Summary Progress is being made in the fight against adrenocortical carcinoma with the identification of new therapeutic targets and new means by which to attack them. Continued improvement in the prognosis for patients with adrenal cancer is expected as this research continues. PMID:27119750

  18. Alpha-particles for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, George

    2008-09-01

    Alpha-particles are helium nuclei that deposit DNA damaging energy along their track that is 100 to 1000 times greater than that of conventionally used beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted therapy; the damage caused by alpha-particles is predominately double-stranded DNA breaks severe enough so as to be almost completely irreparable. This means that a small number of tracks through a cell nucleus can sterilize a cell and that, because the damage is largely irreparable, alpha-particle radiation is not susceptible to resistance as seen with external radiotherapy (e.g., in hypoxic tissue). The ability of a single track to influence biological outcome and the stochastic nature of alpha-particle decay require statistical or microdosimetric techniques to properly reflect likely biological outcome when the biologically relevant target is small or when a low number of radionuclide decays have occurred. In therapeutic implementations, microdosimetry is typically not required and the average absorbed dose over a target volume is typically calculated. Animal and cell culture studies have shown that, per unit absorbed dose, the acute biological effects of alpha-particles are 3 to 7 times greater than the damage caused by external beam or beta-particle radiation. Over the past ten to 15 years, alpha-particle emitting radionuclides have been investigated as a possible new class of radionuclides for targeted therapy. Results from the small number of clinical trials reported to date have shown efficacy without significant toxicity.

  19. Molecular imaging with targeted contrast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Mark; Allroggen, Achim; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound uses targeted microbubbles that are retained in diseased tissue. The resonant properties of these microbubbles produce acoustic signals in an ultrasound field. The microbubbles are targeted to diseased tissue by using certain chemical constituents in the microbubble shell or by attaching disease-specific ligands such as antibodies to the microbubble. In this review, we discuss the applications of this technique to pathological states in the cerebrovascular system including atherosclerosis, tumor angiogenesis, ischemia, intravascular thrombus, and inflammation.

  20. Targeted therapies in the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ngeow, Joanne; Tan, Iain Beehuat; Choo, Su Pin

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) constitutes a major cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Recent improvements in both surgical techniques and adjuvant and neoadjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy approaches have increased the survival of patients with loco-regional disease. However most patients with GC have advanced disease either at diagnosis or at follow up. Despite recent advances in the treatment of advanced disease, these patients still have poor outcomes. An emerging understanding of the molecular pathways that characterize cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis and invasion has provided novel targets in cancer therapy. In this review we describe the current status of targeted therapies in the treatment of GC. These therapeutic strategies include epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, antiangiogenic agents, cell cycle inhibitors, apoptosis, promoters and matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Circulating biomarker panels for targeted therapy in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Codrici, Elena; Popescu, Ionela Daniela; Mihai, Simona; Enciu, Ana Maria; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Popa, Adrian Claudiu; Neagu, Ana Iulia; Necula, Laura Georgiana; Mambet, Cristina; Neagu, Monica

    2015-01-01

    An important goal of oncology is the development of cancer risk-identifier biomarkers that aid early detection and target therapy. High-throughput profiling represents a major concern for cancer research, including brain tumors. A promising approach for efficacious monitoring of disease progression and therapy could be circulating biomarker panels using molecular proteomic patterns. Tailoring treatment by targeting specific protein-protein interactions and signaling networks, microRNA and cancer stem cell signaling in accordance with tumor phenotype or patient clustering based on biomarker panels represents the future of personalized medicine for brain tumors. Gathering current data regarding biomarker candidates, we address the major challenges surrounding the biomarker field of this devastating tumor type, exploring potential perspectives for the development of more effective predictive biomarker panels.

  2. Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Renal Carcinoma: an Update

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rodrigo Donalisio; Gustafson, Diedra; Nogueira, Leticia; Werahera, Priya N.; Molina, Wilson R.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is associated with poor outcomes in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Advances in the understanding of tumor molecular biology and the implementation of new drugs that target these molecular pathways have increased the arsenal against advanced RCC and improved outcomes in these patients. Herein, we briefly describe the latest data on targeted therapies used in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Search strategy was performed according to PRISMA guidelines. Abstracts of relevant studies published in PubMed between 2000 and 2014 were analyzed by two authors. Abstracts were selected if they were published in English, data reported was of phase II or III clinical trials, and outcomes followed FDA approval. If consensus between the two authors was achieved, they were included in the review. Key words used were “target therapy” and “metastatic renal cell carcinoma”. The results of the studies analyzed in this review support the benefits of targeted therapy in metastatic RCC. These include improved progression-free survival, overall survival, and quality of life as well as reduced toxicities compared to immunotherapy. The improvement in outcomes in metastatic RCC makes these drugs a preferred option as a primary treatment for these patients.

  3. Targeted Therapies for Advanced Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yunyun; Ludwig, Joseph; Janku, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of adolescent and young adult patients battling metastatic Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumours (ESFT) remains less than 30% despite the development of systemic therapies. In the era of personalized medicine, novel molecular targets have been tested in preclinical or clinical settings in ESFT. In this review, we focus on early clinical and translational research that identified multiple molecular targets, including IGF-1R; mTOR; tyrosine kinase inhibitors; EWS-FLI1-related targets, and others. Overall, novel targeted therapies demonstrated modest efficacy; however pronounced and durable antineoplastic responses have been observed in small subsets of treated patients, for example with IGF-1R antibodies. Identifying outcome-predicting biomarkers and overcoming treatment resistance remain major challenges. Due to the rarity of ESFT, multi-institutional collaboration efforts of clinicians, basic and translational scientists are needed in order to understand biology of therapeutic response or resistance, which can lead to development of novel therapeutic methods and improved patient outcomes. PMID:25869102

  4. Molecular targets and cancer therapeutics: discovery, development and clinical validation.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A.

    2000-04-01

    The AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics held in Washington, DC on 16-19 November 1999 provided a forum for cancer research clearly showing evolution of a target and mechanism-driven science. The notion of the tumor as a tissue composed of heterogeneous populations of normal and abnormal cells as viable targets is coming to the fore with the advent of agents directed toward non-malignant cell targets. Growth control rather than eradication as a treatment strategy for malignant disease is being tested preclinically and clinically. Among targets, kinases are in the lead with nuclear, cytoplasmic and membrane kinases being selectively inhibited by small molecules and macromolecules. First generation tumor vasculature-directed agents are progressing through early clinical studies. The interest in tumor vasculature as a target has renewed interest in imaging technology to discern biological effect and in tumor hypoxia. This has resulted in elucidation of molecular responses triggered by a low oxygen environment. Challenges remain in the areas of cellular and immune therapies. Dendritic cell-based vaccines are being tested preclinically in many systems. Interleukin-12 is proceeding through clinical trials. Apoptosis-protective molecules such as bcl-2, and apoptosis-stimulating molecules such as bax, are being pursued as targets for inhibition and activation, respectively. Finally, methods and technology to aid in the identification of new targets were highlighted. This perspective, while it is by no means an exhaustive review of the presentations, brings forward some of the main topics and interests that are current in cancer research. Targets were the topic but methods of target identification and the need for increased chemical diversity to selectively focus agents to targets with small differences were also major topics of discussion. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  5. [50 years of hepatology - from therapeutic nihilism to targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Manns, Michael P

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 50 years significant progress has been made in the whole field of hepatology. Part of this is translation of basic research (biochemistry, immunology, virology, molecular biology and others) into clinical hepatology. This enabled us to understand more about the pathogenesis of liver diseases and led to the discovery of the five major hepatotropic viruses, the identification of hepatocellular autoantigens, and to the development of specific therapies for chronic hepatitis B, C and D. In addition, the molecular basis of most genetic liver diseases has been identified. Significant progress was made in the development of medical therapies for various liver diseases with different underlying etiologies. Surgery significantly contributed to the progress in the management of liver diseases; examples are laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the development of liver transplantation. A multimodal therapeutic algorithm has been established for the therapy of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC); with Sorafenib "targeted therapy" has entered the area of HCC. The progress made over the last 50 years not only led to an aetiological differentiation of acute and chronic liver diseases but also to specific therapies based on the identification and understanding of the underlying etiology. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08 mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical

  7. Targeted therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Alexey V

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most prevalent leukemia in the western world. Recent advances in understanding the biology of B-cell malignancies resulted in the development of novel agents targeting key pro-survival pathways in the neoplastic B-cell. Objective The goal of this article was to summarize current literature on the emerging therapeutic approaches in CLL and B-cell malignancies. Methods A literature review was performed, identifying pathways and key clinical trials involving novel therapies in CLL with special emphasis on B-cell receptor targeting agents. Results Understanding the biology of B-cell receptor signaling pathway led to identification of novel molecular targets. Most notably, inhibitors of Bruton tyrosine kinase and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase-δ have entered clinical trials and demonstrated high response rates in CLL, including high-risk disease. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors may evolve into an alternative therapeutic approach in CLL. New drugs which target molecules within and outside of the B-cell receptor signaling pathway show promise in pre-clinical studies. Conclusions Both pre-clinical and early clinical trial results involving novel targeted therapies suggest that the standard treatment paradigm in CLL and B-cell malignancies will soon change. Particular attention should be paid to the BCR-targeting agents, whose favorable side effect profile may improve lives of the elderly patients with CLL. PMID:24054703

  8. Targeted therapy in advanced gastric carcinoma: the future is beginning.

    PubMed

    Schinzari, G; Cassano, A; Orlandi, A; Basso, M; Barone, C

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer represents one of the most common cancer worldwide. Unfortunately, the majority of patients present in advanced stage and outcome still remains poor with high mortality rate despite decreasing incidence and new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Although utility of classical chemotherapy agents has been widely explored, advances have been slow and the efficacy of these agents has reached a plateau of median overall survival not higher than 12 months. Therefore, researchers focused their attention on better understanding molecular biology of carcinogenesis and deeper knowledge of the cancer cell phenotype, as well on development of rationally designed drugs that would target specific molecular aberrancies in signal transduction pathways. These targets include cell surface receptors, circulating growth and angiogenic factors and other molecules involved in downstream intracellular signaling pathways, including receptor tyrosine kinases. However, therapeutic advances in gastric cancer are not so encouraging when compared to other solid organ malignancies such as breast and colorectal cancer. This article reviews the role of targeted agents in gastric cancer as single-agent therapy or in combination regimens, including their rational and emerging mechanism of action, current and emerging data. We focused our attention mainly on published phase III studies, therefore cornerstone clinical trials with trastuzumab and bevacizumab have been largely discussed. Phase III studies presented in important international meetings are also reviewed as well phase II published studies and promising new therapies investigated in preclinical or phase I studies. Today, in first-line treatment only trastuzumab has shown significantly increased survival in combination with chemotherapy, whereas ramucirumab as single agent resulted effective in progressing patients, but - despite several disappointing results - these are the proof of principle that targeting the proper

  9. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge CG

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved ‘pathogen-associated molecular patterns’ of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release ‘danger-associated molecular patterns’ that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy. PMID:25620999

  10. Integrating the molecular background of targeted therapy and immunotherapy in lung cancer: a way to explore the impact of mutational landscape on tumor immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Pilotto, Sara; Molina-Vila, Miguel Angel; Karachaliou, Niki; Carbognin, Luisa; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, Maria; Bria, Emilio; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-01-01

    The results of randomized clinical trials employing immune checkpoint inhibitors for pre-treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have recently revolutionised the standard available option for this disease setting. Nevertheless, the validation of reliable predictive biomarkers, able to define that proportion of patients most likely to benefit from immunotherapy, represents a crucial and still unsolved issue. This intensive research aimed at selecting potentially predictive biomarkers for immunotherapy is developed together with a wide range of analyses investigating the molecular profiling of lung cancer, leading to the spontaneous question of how these two parallel aspects of the same disease may coexist and influence one another. The potential impact of the mutational landscape of lung cancer on tumor immunogenicity (in both oncogene-addicted and molecularly unselected disease) will be explored and discussed in this review in order to begin to answer the unsolved questions. PMID:26798581

  11. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem Cells with Alpha-Particle Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ceder, Jens; Elgqvist, Jörgen

    2017-01-01

    Modern molecular and radiopharmaceutical development has brought the promise of tumor-selective delivery of antibody–drug conjugates to tumor cells for the diagnosis and treatment of primary and disseminated tumor disease. The classical mode of discourse regarding targeted therapy has been that the antigen targeted must be highly and homogenously expressed in the tumor cell population, and at the same time exhibit low expression in healthy tissue. However, there is increasing evidence that the reason cancer patients are not cured by current protocols is that there exist subpopulations of cancer cells that are resistant to conventional therapy including radioresistance and that these cells express other target antigens than the bulk of the tumor cells. These types of cells are often referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs). The CSCs are tumorigenic and have the ability to give rise to all types of cells found in a cancerous disease through the processes of self-renewal and differentiation. If the CSCs are not eradicated, the cancer is likely to recur after therapy. Due to some of the characteristics of alpha particles, such as short path length and high density of energy depositions per distance traveled in tissue, they are especially well suited for use in targeted therapies against microscopic cancerous disease. The characteristics of alpha particles further make it possible to minimize the irradiation of non-targeted surrounding healthy tissue, but most importantly, make it possible to deliver high-absorbed doses locally and therefore eradicating small tumor cell clusters on the submillimeter level, or even single tumor cells. When alpha particles pass through a cell, they cause severe damage to the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus, including double-strand breaks of DNA that are very difficult to repair for the cell. This means that very few hits to a cell by alpha particles are needed in order to cause cell death, enabling killing of cells, such as CSCs

  12. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem Cells with Alpha-Particle Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ceder, Jens; Elgqvist, Jörgen

    2016-01-01

    Modern molecular and radiopharmaceutical development has brought the promise of tumor-selective delivery of antibody-drug conjugates to tumor cells for the diagnosis and treatment of primary and disseminated tumor disease. The classical mode of discourse regarding targeted therapy has been that the antigen targeted must be highly and homogenously expressed in the tumor cell population, and at the same time exhibit low expression in healthy tissue. However, there is increasing evidence that the reason cancer patients are not cured by current protocols is that there exist subpopulations of cancer cells that are resistant to conventional therapy including radioresistance and that these cells express other target antigens than the bulk of the tumor cells. These types of cells are often referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs). The CSCs are tumorigenic and have the ability to give rise to all types of cells found in a cancerous disease through the processes of self-renewal and differentiation. If the CSCs are not eradicated, the cancer is likely to recur after therapy. Due to some of the characteristics of alpha particles, such as short path length and high density of energy depositions per distance traveled in tissue, they are especially well suited for use in targeted therapies against microscopic cancerous disease. The characteristics of alpha particles further make it possible to minimize the irradiation of non-targeted surrounding healthy tissue, but most importantly, make it possible to deliver high-absorbed doses locally and therefore eradicating small tumor cell clusters on the submillimeter level, or even single tumor cells. When alpha particles pass through a cell, they cause severe damage to the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus, including double-strand breaks of DNA that are very difficult to repair for the cell. This means that very few hits to a cell by alpha particles are needed in order to cause cell death, enabling killing of cells, such as CSCs

  13. High efficiency diffusion molecular retention tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanyan; Yuan, Hushan; Cho, Hoonsung; Kuruppu, Darshini; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Agarwal, Aayush; Shah, Khalid; Josephson, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR) tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT) injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding) and RAD (control) probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for (111) In(3+)), a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or i.v. methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [(111)In] RGD and [(111)In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [(111)In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by i.v.). The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide), which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters) for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light.

  14. Role of targeted therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohhara, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Naoki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Honma, Rio; Shimizu, Yasushi; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a significant cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality all over the world. Improvements of cytotoxic and biologic agents have prolonged the survival in metastatic CRC (mCRC), with a median overall survival of approximately 2 years and more in the past two decades. The biologic agents that have proven clinical benefits in mCRC mainly target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In particular, bevacizumab targeting VEGF and cetuximab and panitumumab targeting EGFR have demonstrated significant survival benefits in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy in the first-line, second-line, or salvage setting. Aflibercept, ramucirumab, and regorafenib are also used in second-line or salvage therapy. Recent retrospective analyses have shown that KRAS or NRAS mutations were negative predictive markers for anti-EGFR therapy. Based on the evidence from large randomized clinical trials, personalized therapy is necessary for patients with mCRC according to their tumor biology and characteristics. The aim of this paper was to summarize the results of the major randomized clinical trials and highlight the benefits of the molecular targeted agents in patients with mCRC. PMID:27672422

  15. Targeted Cancer Therapy with Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weibo; Kerner, Zachary J.; Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a member of the TNF superfamily, was the first cytokine to be evaluated for cancer biotherapy. However, the clinical use of TNF-α is severely limited by its toxicity. Currently, TNF-α is administered only through locoregional drug delivery systems such as isolated limb perfusion and isolated hepatic perfusion. To reduce the systemic toxicity of TNF-α, various strategies have been explored over the last several decades. This review summarizes current state-of-the-art targeted cancer therapy using TNF-α. Passive targeting, cell-based therapy, gene therapy with inducible or tissue-specific promoters, targeted polymer-DNA complexes, tumor pre-targeting, antibody-TNF-α conjugate, scFv/TNF-α fusion proteins, and peptide/TNF-α fusion proteins have all been investigated to combat cancer. Many of these agents are already in advanced clinical trials. Molecular imaging, which can significantly speed up the drug development process, and nanomedicine, which can integrate both imaging and therapeutic components, has the potential to revolutionize future cancer patient management. Cooperative efforts from scientists within multiple disciplines, as well as close partnerships among many organizations/entities, are needed to quickly translate novel TNF-α-based therapeutics into clinical investigation. PMID:24115841

  16. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  17. Molecular targets in arthritis and recent trends in nanotherapy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to its severity and increasing epidemiology, arthritis needs no description. There are various forms of arthritis most of which are disabling, very painful, and common. In spite of breakthroughs in the field of drug discovery, there is no cure for arthritis that can eliminate the disease permanently and ease the pain. The present review focuses on some of the most successful drugs in arthritis therapy and their side effects. Potential new targets in arthritis therapy such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, osteopontin, and several others have been discussed here, which can lead to refinement of current therapeutic modalities. Mechanisms for different forms of arthritis have been discussed along with the molecules that act as potential biomarkers for arthritis. Due to the difficulty in monitoring the disease progression to detect the advanced manifestations of the diseases, drug-induced cytotoxicity, and problems with drug delivery; nanoparticle therapy has gained the attention of the researchers. The unique properties of nanoparticles make them highly attractive for the design of novel therapeutics or diagnostic agents for arthritis. The review also focuses on the recent trends in nanoformulation development used for arthritis therapy. This review is, therefore, important because it describes the relevance and need for more arthritis research, it brings forth a critical discussion of successful drugs in arthritis and analyses the key molecular targets. The review also identifies several knowledge gaps in the published research so far along with the proposal of new ideas and future directions in arthritis therapy.

  18. Molecular targets in arthritis and recent trends in nanotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to its severity and increasing epidemiology, arthritis needs no description. There are various forms of arthritis most of which are disabling, very painful, and common. In spite of breakthroughs in the field of drug discovery, there is no cure for arthritis that can eliminate the disease permanently and ease the pain. The present review focuses on some of the most successful drugs in arthritis therapy and their side effects. Potential new targets in arthritis therapy such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, osteopontin, and several others have been discussed here, which can lead to refinement of current therapeutic modalities. Mechanisms for different forms of arthritis have been discussed along with the molecules that act as potential biomarkers for arthritis. Due to the difficulty in monitoring the disease progression to detect the advanced manifestations of the diseases, drug-induced cytotoxicity, and problems with drug delivery; nanoparticle therapy has gained the attention of the researchers. The unique properties of nanoparticles make them highly attractive for the design of novel therapeutics or diagnostic agents for arthritis. The review also focuses on the recent trends in nanoformulation development used for arthritis therapy. This review is, therefore, important because it describes the relevance and need for more arthritis research, it brings forth a critical discussion of successful drugs in arthritis and analyses the key molecular targets. The review also identifies several knowledge gaps in the published research so far along with the proposal of new ideas and future directions in arthritis therapy. PMID:26345140

  19. Molecular Composition Analysis of Distant Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip

    2017-01-01

    This document is the Final Report for NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I Grant 15-NIAC16A-0145, titled Molecular Composition Analysis of Distant Targets. The research was focused on developing a system concept for probing the molecular composition of cold solar system targets, such as Asteroids, Comets, Planets and Moons from a distant vantage, for example from a spacecraft that is orbiting the target (Hughes et al., 2015). The orbiting spacecraft is equipped with a high-power laser, which is run by electricity from photovoltaic panels. The laser is directed at a spot on the target. Materials on the surface of the target are heated by the laser beam, and begin to melt and then evaporate, forming a plume of asteroid molecules in front of the heated spot. The heated spot glows, producing blackbody illumination that is visible from the spacecraft, via a path through the evaporated plume. As the blackbody radiation from the heated spot passes through the plume of evaporated material, molecules in the plume absorb radiation in a manner that is specific to the rotational and vibrational characteristics of the specific molecules. A spectrometer aboard the spacecraft is used to observe absorption lines in the blackbody signal. The pattern of absorption can be used to estimate the molecular composition of materials in the plume, which originated on the target. Focusing on a single spot produces a borehole, and shallow subsurface profiling of the targets bulk composition is possible. At the beginning of the Phase I research, the estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the system was TRL-1. During the Phase I research, an end-to-end theoretical model of the sensor system was developed from first principles. The model includes laser energy and optical propagation, target heating, melting and evaporation of target material, plume density, thermal radiation from the heated spot, molecular cross section of likely asteroid materials, and estimation of the

  20. New molecular targets in bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Santini, D; Galluzzo, S; Zoccoli, A; Pantano, F; Fratto, M E; Vincenzi, B; Lombardi, L; Gucciardino, C; Silvestris, N; Riva, E; Rizzo, S; Russo, A; Maiello, E; Colucci, G; Tonini, G

    2010-11-01

    Bone metastases have a major impact on morbidity and on mortality in cancer patients. Despite its clinical relevance, metastasis remains the most poorly elucidated aspect of carcinogenesis. The biological mechanisms leading to bone metastasis establishment have been referred as "vicious circle," a complex network between cancer cells and the bone microenvironment. This review is aimed to underline the new molecular targets in bone metastases management other than bisphosphonates. Different pathways or molecules such as RANK/RANKL/OPG, cathepsin K, endothelin-1, Wnt/DKK1, Src have recently emerged as potential targets and nowadays preclinical and clinical trials are underway. The results from those in the advanced clinical phases are encouraging and underlined the need to design large randomised clinical trials to validate these results in the next future. Targeting the bone by preventing skeletal related events (SREs) and bone metastases has major clinical impact in improving survival in bone metastatic patients and in preventing disease relapse in adjuvant setting.

  1. Recombinant immunotoxins in targeted cancer cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Y

    2001-01-01

    Targeted cancer therapy in general and immunotherapy in particular combines rational drug design with the progress in understanding cancer biology. This approach takes advantage of our recent knowledge of the mechanisms by which normal cells are transformed into cancer cells, thus using the special properties of cancer cells to device novel therapeutic strategies. Recombinant immunotoxins are excellent examples of such processes, combining the knowledge of antigen expression by cancer cells with the enormous developments in recombinant DNA technology and antibody engineering. Recombinant immunotoxins are composed of a very potent protein toxin fused to a targeting moiety such as a recombinant antibody fragment or growth factor. These molecules bind to surface antigens specific for cancer cells and kill the target cells by catalytic inhibition of protein synthesis. Recombinant immunotoxins are developed for solid tumors and hematological malignancies and have been characterized intensively for their biological activity in vitro on cultured tumor cell lines as well as in vivo in animal models of human tumor xenografts. The excellent in vitro and in vivo activities of recombinant immunotoxins have lead to their preclinical development and to the initiation of clinical trail protocols. Recent trail results have demonstrated potent clinical efficacy in patients with malignant diseases that are refractory to traditional modalities of cancer treatment: surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. The results demonstrate that such strategies can be developed into a separate modality of cancer treatment with the basic rationale of specifically targeting cancer cells on the basis of their unique surface markers. Efforts are now being made to improve the current molecules and to develop new agents with better clinical efficacy. This can be achieved by development of novel targeting moieties with improved specificity that will reduce toxicity to normal tissues. In this review

  2. Ewing's sarcoma cancer stem cell targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Roumiana

    2014-01-01

    Ewing`s sarcoma (ES) family of tumors (ESFTs) are round cell tumors of bone and soft tissues, afflicting children and young adults. This review summarizes the present findings about ES cancer stem cell (CSC) targeted therapy: prognostic factors, chromosomal translocations, initiation, epigenetic mechanisms, candidate cell of ES origin (Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs)). The ES CSC model, histopathogenesis, histogenesis, pathogenesis, ES mediated Hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) senescence are also discussed. ESFTs therapy is reviewed concerning CSCs, radiotherapy, risk of subsequent neoplasms, stem cell (SC) support, promising therapeutic targets for ES CSCs (CSC markers, immune targeting, RNAi phenotyping screens, proposed new drugs), candidate EWS-FLI1 target genes and further directions (including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)). Bone marrow-derived human MSCs are permissive for EWS-FLI1 expression with transition to ESFT-like cellular phenotype. ESFTs are genetically related to NCSC, permissive for EWS-FLI1 expression and susceptible to oncogene-induced immortalization. Primitive neuroectodermal features and MSC origin of ESFTs provide a basis of immune targeting. The microRNAs profile of ES CSCs is shared by ESCs and CSCs from divergent tumor types. Successful reprogramming of differentiated human somatic cells into a pluripotent state allows creation of patient- and disease-specific SCs. The functional role of endogenous EWS at stem cell level on both senescence and tumorigenesis is a link between cancer and aging. The regulatory mechanisms of oncogenic activity of EWS fusions could provide new prognostic biomarkers, therapeutic opportunities and tumor-specific anticancer agents against ESFTs.

  3. Engineering liposomal nanoparticles for targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zylberberg, C; Gaskill, K; Pasley, S; Matosevic, S

    2017-08-01

    Recent mechanistic studies have attempted to deepen our understanding of the process by which liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material occurs. Understanding the interactions between lipid nanoparticles and cells is still largely elusive. Liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material faces systemic obstacles alongside entry into the cell, endosomal escape, lysosomal degradation and nuclear uptake. Rational design approaches for targeted delivery have been developed to reduce off-target effects and enhance transfection. These strategies, which have included the modification of lipid nanoparticles with target-specific ligands to enhance intracellular uptake, have shown significant promise at the proof-of-concept stage. Control of physical and chemical specifications of liposome composition, which includes lipid-to-DNA charge, size, presence of ester bonds, chain length and nature of ligand complexation, is integral to the performance of targeted liposomes as genetic delivery agents. Clinical advances are expected to rely on such systems in the therapeutic application of liposome nanoparticle-based gene therapy. Here, we discuss the latest breakthroughs in the development of targeted liposome-based agents for the delivery of genetic material, paying particular attention to new ligand and cationic lipid design as well as recent in vivo advances.

  4. Targeting RNA splicing for disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Havens, Mallory A; Duelli, Dominik M; Hastings, Michelle L

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for the expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicing is a logical approach to therapy. Splicing is a favorable intervention point for disease therapeutics, because it is an early step in gene expression and does not alter the genome. Significant advances have been made in the development of approaches to manipulate splicing for therapy. Splicing can be manipulated with a number of tools including antisense oligonucleotides, modified small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), trans-splicing, and small molecule compounds, all of which have been used to increase specific alternatively spliced isoforms or to correct aberrant gene expression resulting from gene mutations that alter splicing. Here we describe clinically relevant splicing defects in disease states, the current tools used to target and alter splicing, specific mutations and diseases that are being targeted using splice-modulating approaches, and emerging therapeutics.

  5. Targeting RNA Splicing for Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Mallory A.; Duelli, Dominik M.

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicing is a logical approach to therapy. Splicing is a favorable intervention point for disease therapeutics, because it is an early step in gene expression and does not alter the genome. Significant advances have been made in the development of approaches to manipulate splicing for therapy. Splicing can be manipulated with a number of tools including antisense oligonucleotides, modified small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), trans-splicing, and small molecule compounds, all of which have been used to increase specific alternatively spliced isoforms or to correct aberrant gene expression resulting from gene mutations that alter splicing. Here we describe clinically relevant splicing defects in disease states, the current tools used to target and alter splicing, specific mutations and diseases that are being targeted using splice-modulating approaches, and emerging therapeutics. PMID:23512601

  6. Targeted Cancer Therapy Using Engineered Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jin Hai

    2016-01-01

    Obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Salmonella, or Escherichia coli specifically colonize and proliferate inside tumor tissues and inhibit tumor growth. Among them, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has been widely studied in animal cancer models and Phase I clinical trials in human patients. S. typhimurium genes are easily manipulated; thus diverse attenuated strains of S. typhimurium have been designed and engineered as tumor-targeting therapeutics or drug delivery vehicles that show both an excellent safety profile and therapeutic efficacy in mouse models. An attenuated strain of S. typhimurium, VNP20009, successfully targeted human metastatic melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in Phase I clinical trials; however, the efficacy requires further refinement. Along with the characteristics of self-targeting, proliferation, and deep tissue penetration, the ease of genetic manipulation allows for the production of more attenuated strains with greater safety profiles and vector systems that deliver designable cargo molecules for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy. Here, we discuss recent progress in the field of Salmonellae-mediated cancer therapy. PMID:27689027

  7. Targeted Cancer Therapy Using Engineered Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin Hai; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Salmonella, or Escherichia coli specifically colonize and proliferate inside tumor tissues and inhibit tumor growth. Among them, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has been widely studied in animal cancer models and Phase I clinical trials in human patients. S. typhimurium genes are easily manipulated; thus diverse attenuated strains of S. typhimurium have been designed and engineered as tumor-targeting therapeutics or drug delivery vehicles that show both an excellent safety profile and therapeutic efficacy in mouse models. An attenuated strain of S. typhimurium, VNP20009, successfully targeted human metastatic melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in Phase I clinical trials; however, the efficacy requires further refinement. Along with the characteristics of self-targeting, proliferation, and deep tissue penetration, the ease of genetic manipulation allows for the production of more attenuated strains with greater safety profiles and vector systems that deliver designable cargo molecules for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy. Here, we discuss recent progress in the field of Salmonellae-mediated cancer therapy.

  8. Targeted therapy against cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Rycaj, Kiera

    2015-07-01

    Research into cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and give rise to more mature (differentiated) cancer cells, and which may be the cells responsible for the overall organization of a tumor, has progressed rapidly and concomitantly with recent advances in studies of normal tissue stem cells. CSCs have been reported in a wide spectrum of human tumors. Like normal tissue stem cells, CSCs similarly exhibit significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. The ability of CSCs to self-renew results in the immortality of malignant cells at the population level, whereas the ability of CSCs to differentiate, either fully or partially, generates the cellular hierarchy and heterogeneity commonly observed in solid tumors. CSCs also appear to have maximized their pro-survival mechanisms leading to their relative resistance to anti-cancer therapies and subsequent relapse. Studies in animal models of human cancers have also provided insight into the heterogeneity and characteristics of CSCs, helping to establish a platform for the development of novel targeted therapies against specific CSCs. In the present study, we briefly review the most recent progress in dissecting CSC heterogeneity and targeting CSCs in various human tumor systems. We also highlight a few examples of CSC-targeted drug development and clinical trials, with the ultimate aim of developing more effective therapeutic regimens that are capable of preventing tumor recurrence and metastasis.

  9. The role of targeted agents in adjuvant therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen

    2005-07-01

    The recent survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage non-small cell lung cancer provides optimism for the future success of targeted therapy in this setting. It is important that we begin to explore molecularly targeted agents in the adjuvant arena, but how best to accomplish this in the face of these new findings presents a challenge. Criteria for selecting promising targeted therapies and optimal trial designs to evaluate them expeditiously in the adjuvant setting are clearly needed.

  10. Identification of disease-relevant genes for molecularly-targeted drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kauselmann, G; Dopazo, A; Link, W

    2012-01-01

    The current paradigm for cancer therapy is undergoing a change from non-specific cytotoxic agents to more specific approaches based on unique molecular features of cancer cells. The identification and validation of disease relevant targets are crucial for the development of molecularly targeted anticancer therapies. Advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer together with novel approaches to interfere with signal transduction pathways have opened new horizons for anticancer target discovery. In particular, the image-based large scale analysis of cellular phenotypes that arise from genetic or chemical perturbations paved the way for the identification and validation of disease relevant molecular targets independent of preconceived notions of mechanistic relationships. In addition, novel and sophisticated techniques of genome manipulation allow for the use of mouse models that faithfully recapitulate critical elements of human cancer for target validation in vivo. We believe that these advances will translate into more and better validated drug targets.

  11. Targeted approaches to induce immune tolerance for Pompe disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Corti, Manuela; Morel, Laurence; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme and gene replacement strategies have developed into viable therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency). Unfortunately, the introduction of GAA and viral vectors encoding the enzyme can lead to detrimental immune responses that attenuate treatment benefits and can impact patient safety. Preclinical and clinical experience in addressing humoral responses toward enzyme and gene therapy for Pompe disease have provided greater understanding of the immunological consequences of the provided therapy. B- and T-cell modulation has been shown to be effective in preventing infusion-associated reactions during enzyme replacement therapy in patients and has shown similar success in the context of gene therapy. Additional techniques to induce humoral tolerance for Pompe disease have been the targeted expression or delivery of GAA to discrete cell types or tissues such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, red blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and the liver. Research into overcoming preexisting immunity through immunomodulation and gene transfer are becoming increasingly important to achieve long-term efficacy. This review highlights the advances in therapies as well as the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the humoral immune response with emphasis on methods employed to overcome responses associated with enzyme and gene therapies for Pompe disease.

  12. Targeted approaches to induce immune tolerance for Pompe disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Corti, Manuela; Morel, Laurence; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme and gene replacement strategies have developed into viable therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency). Unfortunately, the introduction of GAA and viral vectors encoding the enzyme can lead to detrimental immune responses that attenuate treatment benefits and can impact patient safety. Preclinical and clinical experience in addressing humoral responses toward enzyme and gene therapy for Pompe disease have provided greater understanding of the immunological consequences of the provided therapy. B- and T-cell modulation has been shown to be effective in preventing infusion-associated reactions during enzyme replacement therapy in patients and has shown similar success in the context of gene therapy. Additional techniques to induce humoral tolerance for Pompe disease have been the targeted expression or delivery of GAA to discrete cell types or tissues such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, red blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and the liver. Research into overcoming preexisting immunity through immunomodulation and gene transfer are becoming increasingly important to achieve long-term efficacy. This review highlights the advances in therapies as well as the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the humoral immune response with emphasis on methods employed to overcome responses associated with enzyme and gene therapies for Pompe disease. PMID:26858964

  13. Combining chemotherapy and targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J; Zarate, R; Bandres, E; Viudez, A; Chopitea, A; García-Foncillas, J; Gil-Bazo, I

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide. During the past years, the development of new effective treatment options has led to a considerable improvement in the outcome of this disease. The advent of agents such as capecitabine, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, cetuximab and bevacizumab has translated into median survival times in the range of 2 years. Intense efforts have focused on identifying novel agents targeting specific growth factor receptors, critical signal transduction pathways or mediators of angiogenesis. In addition, several clinical trials have suggested that some of these molecularly targeted drugs can be safely and effectively used in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this article we review various treatment options combining cytotoxic and targeted therapies currently available for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:17990352

  14. Combining Immunotherapy and Targeted Therapies in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vanneman, Matthew; Dranoff, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Preface During the past two decades, the paradigm for cancer treatment has evolved from relatively non-specific cytotoxic agents to selective, mechanism-based therapeutics. Cancer chemotherapies were initially identified through screens for compounds that killed rapidly dividing cells. These drugs remain a backbone of current treatment, but are limited by a narrow therapeutic index, significant toxicities, and frequently acquired resistance. More recently, an improved understanding of cancer pathogenesis has given rise to new treatment options, including targeted agents and cancer immunotherapy. Targeted approaches aim to inhibit molecular pathways that are critical to tumor growth and maintenance, whereas immunotherapy endeavors to stimulate a host response that effectuates long-lived tumor destruction. Targeted therapies and cytotoxic agents also modulate immune responses, which raises the possibility that these treatment strategies might be effectively combined with immunotherapy to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:22437869

  15. Glutaminolysis as a target for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L; Alesi, GN; Kang, S

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells display an altered metabolic circuitry that is directly regulated by oncogenic mutations and loss of tumor suppressors. Mounting evidence indicates that altered glutamine metabolism in cancer cells has critical roles in supporting macromolecule biosynthesis, regulating signaling pathways, and maintaining redox homeostasis, all of which contribute to cancer cell proliferation and survival. Thus, intervention in these metabolic processes could provide novel approaches to improve cancer treatment. This review summarizes current findings on the role of glutaminolytic enzymes in human cancers and provides an update on the development of small molecule inhibitors to target glutaminolysis for cancer therapy. PMID:26592449

  16. Whole-exome sequencing reveals potential molecular predictors of relapse after discontinuation of the targeted therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Smirnikhina, Svetlana A; Lavrov, Alexander V; Chelysheva, Ekaterina Yu; Adilgereeva, Elmira P; Shukhov, Oleg A; Turkina, Anna; Kutsev, Sergey I

    2016-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease well treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The aim was to identify genes with a predictive value for relapse-free survival after TKI cessation in CML patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing of DNA from six CML patients in long-lasting deep molecular remission. Patients were divided into two groups with relapse (n = 3) and without relapse (n = 3) after TKI discontinuation. We found variants in genes CYP1B1, ALPK2, and IRF1 in group of patients with relapse and one variant in gene PARP9 in group of patients without relapse. We verified prognostic value of the found markers in a small group of patients with TKI discontinuation and demonstrated their high sensitivity (77%), specificity (86%), positive (85%), and negative (79%) predictive values. Thus we revealed genetic variants, which are potential markers of outcome prediction in CML patients after TKI discontinuation.

  17. Microdosimetry for Targeted Alpha Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Guatelli, Susanna; Oborn, Bradley M.; Allen, Barry J.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) has the advantage of delivering therapeutic doses to individual cancer cells while reducing the dose to normal tissues. TAT applications relate to hematologic malignancies and now extend to solid tumors. Results from several clinical trials have shown efficacy with limited toxicity. However, the dosimetry for the labeled alpha particle is challenging because of the heterogeneous antigen expression among cancer cells and the nature of short-range, high-LET alpha radiation. This paper demonstrates that it is inappropriate to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of TAT by macrodosimetry. The objective of this work is to review the microdosimetry of TAT as a function of the cell geometry, source-target configuration, cell sensitivity, and biological factors. A detailed knowledge of each of these parameters is required for accurate microdosimetric calculations. PMID:22988479

  18. Microdosimetry for targeted alpha therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Guatelli, Susanna; Oborn, Bradley M; Allen, Barry J

    2012-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) has the advantage of delivering therapeutic doses to individual cancer cells while reducing the dose to normal tissues. TAT applications relate to hematologic malignancies and now extend to solid tumors. Results from several clinical trials have shown efficacy with limited toxicity. However, the dosimetry for the labeled alpha particle is challenging because of the heterogeneous antigen expression among cancer cells and the nature of short-range, high-LET alpha radiation. This paper demonstrates that it is inappropriate to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of TAT by macrodosimetry. The objective of this work is to review the microdosimetry of TAT as a function of the cell geometry, source-target configuration, cell sensitivity, and biological factors. A detailed knowledge of each of these parameters is required for accurate microdosimetric calculations.

  19. Molecular evidence-based use of bone resorption-targeted therapy in prostate cancer patients at high risk for bone involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Karamanolakis, Dimitrios; Bogdanos, John; Sourla, Antigone; Milathianakis, Constantine; Tsintavis, Athanassios; Lembessis, Peter; Tenta, Roxane; Tiblalexi, Despina; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To improve median survival of patients with prostate cancer that has metastasized to bone, we need to better understand the early events of the metastatic process in skeleton and develop molecular tools capable of detecting the early tumor cell dissemination into bones (micrometastasis stage). However, the initial phase of tumor cell dissemination into the bone marrow is promptly followed by the migration of tumor cells into bone matrix, which is a crucial step that signals the transformation of micrometastasis to macrometastasis stage and clinically evident metastasis. The migration of cancer cells into bone matrix requires the activation of local bone resorption. Such an event contributes to tumor cell hiding/ escaping from high immunologic surveillance of bone marrow cells. Within bone matrix, tumor cells are establishing plethoric cell-cell interactions with bone marrow-residing cells, ensuring their survival and growth. Recently, RT-PCR detections of tumor marker transcripts, such as PSA and PSMA mRNA performed in RNA extracts of peripheral blood nucleated cells and bone marrow biopsy, have enabled the stratification of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer being of high risk for extraprostatic disease and bone involvement. Therefore, it is conceivable that bisphosphonate blockade of bone resorption can inhibit the migration of tumor cells into bone matrix during the early phase of disease dissemination into bone marrow (micrometastasis stage). Consequently, assessment of the efficacy and efficiency of bisphosphonates to arrest the evolution of bone lesions in this particular clinical setting of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer and positive molecular staging status (high risk for bone involvement) is warranted. PMID:12520083

  20. Targeted PRINTRTM nanoparticles for effective cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Kelly Marie

    Conventional therapeutics for the treatment of cancer are often faced with challenges such as systemic biodistribution within the body, drug degradation in vivo, low bioavailability at the site of disease, and off-target toxicity. As such, particulate drug delivery systems have been developed with the aim of minimizing these limitations of current therapies. Through the PRINTRTM (Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates) technology, hydrogel nanoparticles, prepared from biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol) and acid-sensitive silyl ether crosslinkers, were functionalized and conjugated with targeting ligands for the folate receptor (FR), HER2 receptor, and transferrin receptor (TfR). By conjugating specific ligands to nanoparticles to impart specificity, highly selective targeting and internalization (>80%) of nanoparticles were demonstrated in various cancer cell lines. The extent of cellular uptake of targeted nanoparticles was dependent on the surface characteristics of the nanoparticles, particle concentration, and kinetics. Because a negative surface charge reduces nonspecific cellular uptake, attaching monoclonal antibodies to the surface of negatively charged PRINT nanoparticles facilitated specific binding of the antibodies to cellular surface receptors that subsequently triggered receptor-mediated endocytosis. Additionally, the multivalent nature of nanoparticles influenced cellular uptake. Specifically, nanoparticles with a higher valence internalized more rapidly and efficiently than those with a lower valence. Nanoparticles that selectively target and accumulate within diseased cells have the potential of minimizing drug degradation under physiological conditions, enhancing bioavailability at the tumor, improving the efficacy of the drug, and reducing toxicity from systemic biodistribution. Drug delivery through targeted nanoparticles was achieved by loading nanoparticles with silyl ether-modified gemcitabine prodrugs. Covalently reacting the prodrug

  1. Somatostatin Analogues for Receptor Targeted Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaščáková, Slávka; Hofland, Leo J.; De Bruijn, Henriette S.; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel; van der Wansem, Katy; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; van Koetsveld, Peter M.; Brugts, Michael P.; van der Lelij, Aart-Jan; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; ten Hagen, Timo L. M.; Robinson, Dominic J.; van Hagen, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality, used mainly for anticancer therapy that relies on the interaction of photosensitizer, light and oxygen. For the treatment of pathologies in certain anatomical sites, improved targeting of the photosensitizer is necessary to prevent damage to healthy tissue. We report on a novel dual approach of targeted PDT (vascular and cellular targeting) utilizing the expression of neuropeptide somatostatin receptor (sst2) on tumor and neovascular-endothelial cells. We synthesized two conjugates containing the somatostatin analogue [Tyr3]-octreotate and Chlorin e6 (Ce6): Ce6-K3-[Tyr3]-octreotate (1) and Ce6-[Tyr3]-octreotate-K3-[Tyr3]-octreotate (2). Investigation of the uptake and photodynamic activity of conjugates in-vitro in human erythroleukemic K562 cells showed that conjugation of [Tyr3]-octreotate with Ce6 in conjugate 1 enhances uptake (by a factor 2) in cells over-expressing sst2 compared to wild-type cells. Co-treatment with excess free Octreotide abrogated the phototoxicity of conjugate 1 indicative of a specific sst2-mediated effect. In contrast conjugate 2 showed no receptor-mediated effect due to its high hydrophobicity. When compared with un-conjugated Ce6, the PDT activity of conjugate 1 was lower. However, it showed higher photostability which may compensate for its lower phototoxicity. Intra-vital fluorescence pharmacokinetic studies of conjugate 1 in rat skin-fold observation chambers transplanted with sst2+ AR42J acinar pancreas tumors showed significantly different uptake profiles compared to free Ce6. Co-treatment with free Octreotide significantly reduced conjugate uptake in tumor tissue (by a factor 4) as well as in the chamber neo-vasculature. These results show that conjugate 1 might have potential as an in-vivo sst2 targeting photosensitizer conjugate. PMID:25111655

  2. Central and Peripheral Molecular Targets for Anti-Obesity Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Michael A.; Lin, Jieru E.; Waldman, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has emerged as one of the principle worldwide health concerns of the modern era, and there exists a tremendous unmet clinical need for safe and effective therapies to combat this global pandemic. The prevalence of obesity and its associated co-morbidities, including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, has focused drug discovery and development on generating effective modalities for the treatment and prevention of obesity. Early efforts in the field of obesity pharmacotherapy centered on agents with indeterminate mechanisms of action producing treatment paradigms characterized by significant off-target effects. During the past two decades, new insights have been made into the physiologic regulation of energy balance and the subordinate central and peripheral circuits coordinating appetite, metabolism, and lipogenesis. These studies have revealed previously unrecognized molecular targets for controlling appetite and managing weight from which has emerged a new wave of targeted pharmacotherapies to prevent and control obesity. PMID:20445536

  3. Central and peripheral molecular targets for antiobesity pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Valentino, M A; Lin, J E; Waldman, S A

    2010-06-01

    Obesity has emerged as one of the principal worldwide health concerns of the modern era, and there exists a tremendous unmet clinical need for safe and effective therapies to combat this global pandemic. The prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities, including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, has focused the attention of those in drug discovery and development on generating effective modalities for the treatment and prevention of obesity. Early efforts in the field of obesity pharmacotherapy centered on the development of agents with indeterminate mechanisms of action. This led to treatment paradigms characterized by significant off-target effects. In the past two decades, new insights have been made into the physiologic regulation of energy balance and the subordinate central and peripheral circuits coordinating appetite, metabolism, and lipogenesis. These studies have revealed previously unrecognized molecular targets for controlling appetite and managing weight from which has emerged a new wave of targeted pharmacotherapies to prevent and control obesity.

  4. Molecular targeting in childhood malignancies using nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Noriko; Barisone, Gustavo; Diaz, Elva; Nitin, Nitin; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2012-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a new therapy for childhood malignancies using nanoformulated siRNA targeting Mxd3, a molecule in the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway, which we believe is important for cell survival. We plan to use cancer-specific ligands and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) to carry siRNA. This delivery system will be tested in mouse xenograft models that we developed with primary cancer tissues. Our current focus is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children. We report our progress to date.

  5. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dragu, Denisa L; Necula, Laura G; Bleotu, Coralia; Diaconu, Carmen C; Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells (CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a long-lasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of miRNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers. PMID:26516409

  6. Neuropilins: A New Target for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grandclement, Camille; Borg, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Recent investigations highlighted strong similarities between neural crest migration during embryogenesis and metastatic processes. Indeed, some families of axon guidance molecules were also reported to participate in cancer invasion: plexins/semaphorins/neuropilins, ephrins/Eph receptors, netrin/DCC/UNC5. Neuropilins (NRPs) are transmembrane non tyrosine-kinase glycoproteins first identified as receptors for class-3 semaphorins. They are particularly involved in neural crest migration and axonal growth during development of the nervous system. Since many types of tumor and endothelial cells express NRP receptors, various soluble molecules were also found to interact with these receptors to modulate cancer progression. Among them, angiogenic factors belonging to the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) family seem to be responsible for NRP-related angiogenesis. Because NRPs expression is often upregulated in cancer tissues and correlated with poor prognosis, NRPs expression might be considered as a prognostic factor. While NRP1 was intensively studied for many years and identified as an attractive angiogenesis target for cancer therapy, the NRP2 signaling pathway has just recently been studied. Although NRP genes share 44% homology, differences in their expression patterns, ligands specificities and signaling pathways were observed. Indeed, NRP2 may regulate tumor progression by several concurrent mechanisms, not only angiogenesis but lymphangiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis. In view of their multiples functions in cancer promotion, NRPs fulfill all the criteria of a therapeutic target for innovative anti-tumor therapies. This review focuses on NRP-specific roles in tumor progression. PMID:24212788

  7. Thyroid Cancer: Pathogenesis and Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liebner, David A.; Shah, Manisha H.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic options for advanced, unresectable radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancers have historically been limited. Recent progress in understanding the pathogenesis of the various subtypes of thyroid cancer has led to increased interest in the development of targeted therapies, with potential strategies including angiogenesis inhibition, inhibition of aberrant intracellular signaling in the MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways, radioimmunotherapy, and redifferentiation agents. On the basis of a recent positive phase III clinical trial, the RET, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor vandetanib has received FDA approval as of April 2011 for use in the treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer. Several other recent phase II clinical trials in advanced thyroid cancer have demonstrated significant activity, and multiple other promising therapeutic strategies are in earlier phases of clinical development. The recent progress in targeted therapy is already revolutionizing management paradigms for advanced thyroid cancer, and will likely continue to dramatically expand treatment options in the coming years. PMID:23148184

  8. Phase III Study of Molecularly Targeted Adjuvant Therapy in Locally Advanced Urothelial Cancer of the Bladder Based on p53 Status

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Walter M.; Lerner, Seth P.; Groshen, Susan; Stein, John P.; Shi, Shan-Rong; Raghavan, Derek; Esrig, David; Steinberg, Gary; Wood, David; Klotz, Laurence; Hall, Craig; Skinner, Donald G.; Cote, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Retrospective studies suggest that p53 alteration is prognostic for recurrence in patients with urothelial bladder cancer and predictive for benefit from combination methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (MVAC) adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with pT1/T2N0M0 disease whose tumors demonstrated ≥ 10% nuclear reactivity on centrally performed immunohistochemistry for p53 were offered random assignment to three cycles of adjuvant MVAC versus observation; p53-negative patients were observed. By using a log-rank test with one-sided α = .05 and β = .10, 190 p53-positive patients were planned to be randomly assigned to detect an absolute improvement in probability of recurring by 3 years from 0.50 to 0.30. Results A total of 521 patients were registered, 499 underwent p53 assessment, 272 (55%) were positive, and 114 (42%) were randomly assigned. Accrual was halted on the basis of the data and safety monitoring board review of a futility analysis. Overall 5-year probability of recurring was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.16 to 0.24) with no difference on the basis of p53 status. Only 67% of patients randomly assigned to MVAC received all three cycles with 12 patients receiving no treatment. There was no difference in recurrence in the randomly assigned patients (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.29 to 2.08; P = .62). Conclusion Neither the prognostic value of p53 nor the benefit of MVAC chemotherapy in patients with p53-positive tumors was confirmed, but the high patient refusal rate, lower than expected event rate, and failures to receive assigned therapy severely compromised study power. PMID:21810677

  9. Molecular Imaging of Immunotherapy Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.; England, Christopher G.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising alternative in the arsenal against cancer by harnessing the power of the immune system to specifically target malignant tissues. As the field of immunotherapy continues to expand, researchers will require newer methods for studying the interactions between the immune system, tumor cells, and immunotherapy agents. Recently, several noninvasive imaging strategies have been used to map the biodistribution of immune checkpoint molecules, monitor the efficacy and potential toxicities of the treatments, and identify patients who are likely to benefit from immunotherapies. In this review, we outline the current applications of noninvasive techniques for the preclinical imaging of immunotherapy targets and suggest future pathways for molecular imaging to contribute to this developing field. PMID:27469363

  10. Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Our objective is to develop an arsenic-based radiopharmaceutical platform for IGF1R-targeted imaging and therapy of PCa. The hypothesis is that...arsenic-based, IGF1R-targeted radiopharmaceuticals can allow for PET imaging, IRT, and monitoring the therapeutic response of PCa. Specific Aims: Aim 1: To...models with PET imaging. Aim 3: To monitor the efficacy of 76As-based IRT of PCa with multimodality imaging.

  11. Novel Molecular Therapies for Heritable Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Uitto, Jouni; Christiano, Angela M.; Irwin McLean, W. H.; McGrath, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in the past two decades in molecular genetics of heritable skin diseases, and pathogenic mutations have been identified in as many as 500 distinct human genes. This progress has resulted in improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, refined genetic counseling, and has formed the basis for prenatal and presymptomatic testing as well as preimplantation genetic diagnosis. However, there has been relatively little progress in developing effective and specific treatments for these often devastating diseases. Very recently, however, a number of novel molecular strategies, including gene therapy, cell-based approaches, and protein replacement therapy have been explored for treatment of these conditions. This overview will focus on the prototypic heritable blistering disorders, epidermolysis bullosa and related keratinopathies, in which significant progress has been recently made towards treatment, and illustrate how some of the translational research therapies have already entered the clinical arena. PMID:22158553

  12. Targeted Immune Therapy of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Keith L.; Karyampudi, Lavakumar; Lamichhane, Purushottam; Preston, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcomes, such as recurrence free survival and overall survival, in ovarian cancer are quite variable, independent of common characteristics such as stage, response to therapy and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration and therapeutic targeting into the interaction between the tumor and host. One compelling host characteristic that contributes both to the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer is the immune system. Hundreds of studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune regulatory cells present in the tumor microenvironment. Regulatory immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathologic network. Thus, in the future, research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will probably become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression. In this article, we summarize important immunological targets that influence ovarian cancer outcome as well as include an update on newer immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25544369

  13. Targeted immune therapy of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Keith L; Karyampudi, Lavakumar; Lamichhane, Purushottam; Preston, Claudia

    2015-03-01

    Clinical outcomes, such as recurrence-free survival and overall survival, in ovarian cancer are quite variable, independent of common characteristics such as stage, response to therapy, and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration and therapeutic targeting into the interaction between the tumor and host. One compelling host characteristic that contributes both to the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer is the immune system. Hundreds of studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune regulatory cells present in the tumor microenvironment. Regulatory immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathological network. Thus, in the future, research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will probably become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression. In this article, we summarize important immunological targets that influence ovarian cancer outcome as well as include an update on newer immunotherapeutic strategies.

  14. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Dai, Qun; Park, Dongkyoo; Deng, Xingming

    2016-01-01

    The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR) mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress. PMID:27548226

  15. Multimodality molecular imaging--from target description to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Schober, O; Rahbar, K; Riemann, B

    2009-02-01

    This highlight lecture was presented at the closing session of the Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) in Munich on 15 October 2008. The Congress was a great success: there were more than 4,000 participants, and 1,597 abstracts were submitted. Of these, 1,387 were accepted for oral or poster presentation, with a rejection rate of 14%. In this article a choice was made from 100 of the 500 lectures which received the highest scores by the scientific review panel. This article outlines the major findings and trends at the EANM 2008, and is only a brief summary of the large number of outstanding abstracts presented. Among the great number of oral and poster presentations covering nearly all fields of nuclear medicine some headlines have to be defined highlighting the development of nuclear medicine in the 21st century. This review focuses on the increasing impact of molecular and multimodality imaging in the field of nuclear medicine. In addition, the question may be asked as to whether the whole spectrum of nuclear medicine is nothing other than molecular imaging and therapy. Furthermore, molecular imaging will and has to go ahead to multimodality imaging. In view of this background the review was structured according to the single steps of molecular imaging, i.e. from target description to clinical studies. The following topics are addressed: targets, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy, devices and computer science, animals and preclinical evaluations, and patients and clinical evaluations.

  16. Denosumab for bone diseases: translating bone biology into targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsourdi, Elena; Rachner, Tilman D; Rauner, Martina; Hamann, Christine; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2011-12-01

    Signalling of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL) through RANK is a critical pathway to regulate the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts and, hence, a master regulator of bone resorption. Increased RANKL activity has been demonstrated in diseases characterised by excessive bone loss such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteolytic bone metastases. The development and approval of denosumab, a fully MAB against RANKL, has heralded a new era in the treatment of bone diseases by providing a potent, targeted and reversible inhibitor of bone resorption. This article summarises the molecular and cellular biology of the RANKL/RANK system and critically reviews preclinical and clinical studies that have established denosumab as a promising novel therapy for metabolic and malignant bone diseases. We will discuss the potential indications for denosumab along with a critical review of safety and analyse its potential within the concert of established therapies.

  17. Systemically Administered, Target Organ-Specific Therapies for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A. H.; May, Ulrike; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors and other agents that could potentially enhance tissue regeneration have been identified, but their therapeutic value in clinical medicine has been limited for reasons such as difficulty to maintain bioactivity of locally applied therapeutics in the protease-rich environment of regenerating tissues. Although human diseases are treated with systemically administered drugs in general, all current efforts aimed at enhancing tissue repair with biological drugs have been based on their local application. The systemic administration of growth factors has been ruled out due to concerns about their safety. These concerns are warranted. In addition, only a small proportion of systemically administered drugs reach their intended target. Selective delivery of the drug to the target tissue and use of functional protein domains capable of penetrating cells and tissues could alleviate these problems in certain circumstances. We will present in this review a novel approach utilizing unique molecular fingerprints (“Zip/postal codes”) in the vasculature of regenerating tissues that allows target organ-specific delivery of systemically administered therapeutic molecules by affinity-based physical targeting (using peptides or antibodies as an “address tag”) to injured tissues undergoing repair. The desired outcome of targeted therapies is increased local accumulation and lower systemic concentration of the therapeutic payload. We believe that the physical targeting of systemically administered therapeutic molecules could be rapidly adapted in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:26437400

  18. Investigational EGFR-targeted therapies in HNSCC

    PubMed Central

    Cassell, Andre; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the Field The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an established therapeutic target in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibody cetuximab (™Erbitux) was FDA-approved for use in HNSCC in 2006. The molecular basis for the efficacy of an antibody approach compared with inhibition of EGFR tyrosine kinase function using small molecule inhibitors, or downregulation of protein expression via antisense strategies remains incompletely understood. Areas covered in this review A literature search was performed to identify studies elucidating mechanisms of action of several approaches to targeting EGFR in HNSCC (monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, antisense approaches, and ligand toxin conjugates). What the reader will gain Monoclonal antibodies decrease tumor growth via receptor endocytosis and recruitment of host immune defenses. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors bind to the ATP binding pocket of the tyrosine kinase domain, inhibiting signaling. Antisense approaches decrease EGFR expression with high specificity although drug delivery remains problematic. Ligand-toxin conjugates facilitate the entry of toxin and the ADP-ribosylation of the ribosome, thereby inhibiting translation. Take home message Elucidation mechanisms by which these different strategies inhibit EGFR function may enhance the development of more effective treatments for HNSCC and enable prospective identification of individuals who will benefit from EGFR inhibition. PMID:20415598

  19. Targeted therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: novel agents on the horizon

    PubMed Central

    Cervello, Melchiorre; McCubrey, James A.; Cusimano, Antonella; Lampiasi, Nadia; Azzolina, Antonina; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common liver cancer, accounting for 90% of primary liver cancers. In the last decade it has become one of the most frequently occurring tumors worldwide and is also considered to be the most lethal of the cancer systems, accounting for approximately one third of all malignancies. Although the clinical diagnosis and management of early-stage HCC has improved significantly, HCC prognosis is still extremely poor. Furthermore, advanced HCC is a highly aggressive tumor with a poor or no response to common therapies. Therefore, new effective and well-tolerated therapy strategies are urgently needed. Targeted therapies have entered the field of anti-neoplastic treatment and are being used on their own or in combination with conventional chemotherapy drugs. Molecular-targeted therapy holds great promise in the treatment of HCC. A new therapeutic opportunity for advanced HCC is the use of sorafenib (Nexavar). On the basis of the recent large randomized phase III study, the Sorafenib HCC Assessment Randomized Protocol (SHARP), sorafenib has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of advanced HCC. Sorafenib showed to be able to significantly increase survival in patients with advanced HCC, establishing a new standard of care. Despite this promising breakthrough, patients with HCC still have a dismal prognosis, as it is currently the major cause of death in cirrhotic patients. Nevertheless, the successful results of the SHARP trial underscore the need for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this devastating disease. In this review we summarize the most important studies on the signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of HCC, as well as the newest emerging drugs and their potential use in HCC management. PMID:22470194

  20. [Combination of Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Cancer].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Norimitsu

    2015-09-01

    Targeted therapies and immunotherapies attack tumor cells through different mechanisms. In addition, these therapies exhibit quick and delayed effects, respectively, and therefore, these therapies are complementary. Furthermore, targeted therapies may enhance the function of immune cells, and therefore, both the therapies are expected to have a synergistic effect. Antitumor immune responses comprise several steps including dendritic cell activation, T cell activation, and dampening tumor-induced immunosuppression; targeted drugs that work at each step have been reported. Clinical trials of rational combinations of both therapies, while avoiding severe adverse events, will greatly advance cancer treatments in the near future.

  1. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC-paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC-PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy.

  2. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N′-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  3. Novel molecular targets for antimalarial chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jana, Snehasis; Paliwal, Jyoti

    2007-07-01

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites is a serious public health problem in the tropical world. Malaria control has relied upon the traditional quinoline, antifolate and artemisinin compounds. Very few new antimalarials were developed in the last quarter of the 20th century. An alarming increase in drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasite poses a significant problem for effective control. Recent advances in our knowledge of parasite biology as well as the availability of the genome sequence provide a wide range of novel targets for drug design. Gene products involved in controlling vital aspects of parasite metabolism and organelle function could be attractive targets. It is expected that the application of functional genomic tools in combination with modern approaches such as structure-based drug design and combinatorial chemistry will lead to the development of effective new drugs against drug-resistant malaria strains. This review discusses novel molecular targets of the malaria parasite available to the drug discovery scientist.

  4. Targeted therapy in biliary tract cancer: 2009 update.

    PubMed

    Tonini, Giuseppe; Virzì, Vladimir; Fratto, Maria Elisabetta; Vincenzi, Bruno; Santini, Daniele

    2009-12-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) include cholangiocarcinoma (intrahepatic, perihilar and extrahepatic), carcinoma of the gall bladder and ampullary carcinoma. In patients with advanced disease the prognosis is poor. There is not a consensus regarding treatment strategy. Chemotherapy has only limited efficacy. This review summarizes the new approaches for BTC patients and the rationale for targeted therapies. The prognostic factors and the molecular features of BTC are analyzed. The clinical trials evaluating the targeted agents are accurately described, especially those assessing the role of anti-EGFR and antiangiogenic drugs. The ongoing trials are also analyzed. In fact, only the results of these trials will establish which is the most effective agent or combination for this setting.

  5. Immunotherapy and targeted therapy for cervical cancer: an update.

    PubMed

    Menderes, Gulden; Black, Jonathan; Schwab, Carlton L; Santin, Alessandro D

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor with a median survival of 8-13 months. Despite the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, this treatment is rarely curative and should be considered palliative only. In the last few years, a better understanding of Human papillomavirus tumor-host immune system interactions and the development of new therapeutics targeting immune check points have renewed interest in the use of immunotherapy in cervical cancer patients. Moreover, next generation sequencing has emerged as an attractive option for the identification of actionable driver mutations and other markers. In this review, we provide background information on the molecular biology of cervical cancer and summarize immunotherapy studies, targeted therapies, including those with angiogenesis inhibitors and tyrosine kinase inhibitors recently completed or currently on-going in cervical cancer patients.

  6. Molecular pathways and targets in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Beer, Tomasz M.; Evans, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer co-opts a unique set of cellular pathways in its initiation and progression. The heterogeneity of prostate cancers is evident at earlier stages, and has led to rigorous efforts to stratify the localized prostate cancers, so that progression to advanced stages could be predicted based upon salient features of the early disease. The deregulated androgen receptor signaling is undeniably most important in the progression of the majority of prostate tumors. It is perhaps because of the primacy of the androgen receptor governed transcriptional program in prostate epithelium cells that once this program is corrupted, the consequences of the ensuing changes in activity are pleotropic and could contribute to malignancy in multiple ways. Following localized surgical and radiation therapies, 20-40% of patients will relapse and progress, and will be treated with androgen deprivation therapies. The successful development of the new agents that inhibit androgen signaling has changed the progression free survival in hormone resistant disease, but this has not changed the almost ubiquitous development of truly resistant phenotypes in advanced prostate cancer. This review summarizes the current understanding of the molecular pathways involved in localized and metastatic prostate cancer, with an emphasis on the clinical implications of the new knowledge. PMID:25277175

  7. Stem cells’ guided gene therapy of cancer: New frontier in personalized and targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mavroudi, Maria; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Lampaki, Sofia; Yarmus, Lonny; Malecki, Raf; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Malecki, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Diagnosis and therapy of cancer remain to be the greatest challenges for all physicians working in clinical oncology and molecular medicine. The statistics speak for themselves with the grim reports of 1,638,910 men and women diagnosed with cancer and nearly 577,190 patients passed away due to cancer in the USA in 2012. For practicing clinicians, who treat patients suffering from advanced cancers with contemporary systemic therapies, the main challenge is to attain therapeutic efficacy, while minimizing side effects. Unfortunately, all contemporary systemic therapies cause side effects. In treated patients, these side effects may range from nausea to damaged tissues. In cancer survivors, the iatrogenic outcomes of systemic therapies may include genomic mutations and their consequences. Therefore, there is an urgent need for personalized and targeted therapies. Recently, we reviewed the current status of suicide gene therapy for cancer. Herein, we discuss the novel strategy: genetically engineered stem cells’ guided gene therapy. Review of therapeutic strategies in preclinical and clinical trials Stem cells have the unique potential for self renewal and differentiation. This potential is the primary reason for introducing them into medicine to regenerate injured or degenerated organs, as well as to rejuvenate aging tissues. Recent advances in genetic engineering and stem cell research have created the foundations for genetic engineering of stem cells as the vectors for delivery of therapeutic transgenes. Specifically in oncology, the stem cells are genetically engineered to deliver the cell suicide inducing genes selectively to the cancer cells only. Expression of the transgenes kills the cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Herein, we present various strategies to bioengineer suicide inducing genes and stem cell vectors. Moreover, we review results of the main preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, the main risk for

  8. Stem cells' guided gene therapy of cancer: New frontier in personalized and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Mavroudi, Maria; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Lampaki, Sofia; Yarmus, Lonny; Malecki, Raf; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Malecki, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and therapy of cancer remain to be the greatest challenges for all physicians working in clinical oncology and molecular medicine. The statistics speak for themselves with the grim reports of 1,638,910 men and women diagnosed with cancer and nearly 577,190 patients passed away due to cancer in the USA in 2012. For practicing clinicians, who treat patients suffering from advanced cancers with contemporary systemic therapies, the main challenge is to attain therapeutic efficacy, while minimizing side effects. Unfortunately, all contemporary systemic therapies cause side effects. In treated patients, these side effects may range from nausea to damaged tissues. In cancer survivors, the iatrogenic outcomes of systemic therapies may include genomic mutations and their consequences. Therefore, there is an urgent need for personalized and targeted therapies. Recently, we reviewed the current status of suicide gene therapy for cancer. Herein, we discuss the novel strategy: genetically engineered stem cells' guided gene therapy. Stem cells have the unique potential for self renewal and differentiation. This potential is the primary reason for introducing them into medicine to regenerate injured or degenerated organs, as well as to rejuvenate aging tissues. Recent advances in genetic engineering and stem cell research have created the foundations for genetic engineering of stem cells as the vectors for delivery of therapeutic transgenes. Specifically in oncology, the stem cells are genetically engineered to deliver the cell suicide inducing genes selectively to the cancer cells only. Expression of the transgenes kills the cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Herein, we present various strategies to bioengineer suicide inducing genes and stem cell vectors. Moreover, we review results of the main preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, the main risk for therapeutic use of stem cells is their cancerous transformation. Therefore, we discuss

  9. Molecular Targets in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline usually beginning with impairment in the ability to form recent memories. Nonavailability of definitive therapeutic strategy urges developing pharmacological targets based on cell signaling pathways. A great revival of interest in nutraceuticals and adjuvant therapy has been put forward. Tea polyphenols for their multiple health benefits have also attracted the attention of researchers. Tea catechins showed enough potentiality to be used in future as therapeutic targets to provide neuroprotection against AD. This review attempts to present a concise map of different receptor signaling pathways associated with AD with an insight into drug designing based on the proposed signaling pathways, molecular mechanistic details of AD pathogenesis, and a scientific rationale for using tea polyphenols as proposed therapeutic agents in AD.

  10. A PSMA-targeted theranostic agent for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Chatterjee, Samit; Lisok, Ala; Minn, Il; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Wharram, Bryan; Wang, Yuchuan; Jin, Jiefu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Mease, Ronnie C; Pomper, Martin G

    2017-02-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is over-expressed in the epithelium of prostate cancer and in the neovasculature of many non-prostate solid tumors. PSMA has been increasingly used as a target for cancer imaging and therapy. Here we describe a low-molecular-weight theranostic photosensitizer, YC-9, for PSMA-targeted optical imaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT). YC-9 was synthesized by conjugating IRDye700DX N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester with a PSMA targeting Lys-Glu urea through a lysine-suberate linker in suitable yield. Optical imaging in vivo demonstrated PSMA-specific tumor uptake of YC-9 with rapid clearance from non-target tissues. PSMA-specific cell kill was demonstrated with YC-9in vitro through PDT in PSMA(+) PC3-PIP and PSMA(-) PC3-flu cells. In vivo PDT in mice bearing PSMA(+) PC3-PIP tumors at 4h post-injection of YC-9 (A total of four PDT sessions were performed, 48h apart) resulted in significant tumor growth delay, while tumors in control groups continued to grow. PDT with YC-9 significantly increased the median survival of the PSMA(+) PC3-PIP tumor mice (56.5days) compared to control groups [23.5-30.0days, including untreated, light alone, YC-9 alone (without light) and non-targeted IRDye700DX PDT treatment groups], without noticeable toxicity at the doses used. This study proves in principle that YC-9 is a promising therapeutic agent for targeted PDT of PSMA-expressing tissues, such as prostate tumors, and may also be useful against non-prostate tumors by virtue of neovascular PSMA expression.

  11. Digitalis, a targeted therapy for cancer?

    PubMed

    Khan, M Iltaf; Chesney, Jason A; Laber, Damian A; Miller, Donald M

    2009-05-01

    The clinical benefit of digitalis for patients with heart disease is well established. However, recent studies have also suggested that digitalis has antineoplastic activities at clinically relevant serum concentrations. Much of the early evidence supporting the anticancer activity of digitalis has been circumstantial. Observational studies suggest a protective benefit and improved outcomes in patients who develop cancer while they are taking digitalis. The mechanism by which digitalis selectively affects the growth of malignant cells is complex, involving several important signaling pathways. Experiments to determine its mechanism of action have demonstrated that digitalis inhibits cell growth and angiogenesis and induces apoptosis in multiple cancer cell lines. Most, if not all, of these effects are mediated through its target enzyme, sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase. This article reviews the literature, which supports the use of digitalis in patients with malignancies with a discussion of the potential mechanisms of action. We hypothesize that sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase is an important new target for cancer therapy. It is reasonable to expect that the addition of digitalis to current cancer treatments will improve the clinical outcomes.

  12. Optimizing Trial Designs for Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, Robert A.; Burman, Carl-Fredrik; König, Franz; Stallard, Nigel; Posch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    An important objective in the development of targeted therapies is to identify the populations where the treatment under consideration has positive benefit risk balance. We consider pivotal clinical trials, where the efficacy of a treatment is tested in an overall population and/or in a pre-specified subpopulation. Based on a decision theoretic framework we derive optimized trial designs by maximizing utility functions. Features to be optimized include the sample size and the population in which the trial is performed (the full population or the targeted subgroup only) as well as the underlying multiple test procedure. The approach accounts for prior knowledge of the efficacy of the drug in the considered populations using a two dimensional prior distribution. The considered utility functions account for the costs of the clinical trial as well as the expected benefit when demonstrating efficacy in the different subpopulations. We model utility functions from a sponsor’s as well as from a public health perspective, reflecting actual civil interests. Examples of optimized trial designs obtained by numerical optimization are presented for both perspectives. PMID:27684573

  13. RLIP76 Targeted Therapy for Kidney Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sharad S; Singhal, Jyotsana; Figarola, James; Horne, David; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent improvements in chemotherapeutic approaches to treating kidney cancer, this malignancy remains deadly if not found and removed at an early stage of the disease. Kidney cancer is highly drug-resistant, which may at least partially result from high expression of transporter proteins in the cell membranes of kidney cells. Although these transporter proteins can contribute to drug-resistance, targeting proteins from the ATP-binding cassette transporter family has not been effective in reversing drug-resistance in kidney cancer. Recent studies have identified RLIP76 as a key stress-defense protein that protects normal cells from damage caused by stress conditions, including heat, ultra-violet light, X-irradiation, and oxidant/electrophilic toxic chemicals, and is crucial for protecting cancer cells from apoptosis. RLIP76 is the predominant glutathione-electrophile-conjugate (GS-E) transporter in cells, and inhibiting it with antibodies or through siRNA or antisense causes apoptosis in many cancer cell types. To date, blocking of RLIP76, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, as a therapeutic strategy for kidney cancer has not yet been evaluated in human clinical trials, although there is considerable potential for RLIP76 to be developed as a therapeutic agent for kidney cancer. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying apoptosis caused by RLIP76 depletion, the role of RLIP76 in clathrin-dependent endocytosis deficiency, and the feasibility of RLIP76-targeted therapy for kidney cancer.

  14. Vascular targeting of nanoparticles for molecular imaging of diseased endothelium.

    PubMed

    Atukorale, Prabhani U; Covarrubias, Gil; Bauer, Lisa; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2016-09-15

    This review seeks to highlight the enormous potential of targeted nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications. Being the closest point-of-contact, circulating nanoparticles can gain direct access to targetable molecular markers of disease that appear on the endothelium. Further, nanoparticles are ideally suitable to vascular targeting due to geometrically enhanced multivalent attachment on the vascular target. This natural synergy between nanoparticles, vascular targeting and molecular imaging can provide new avenues for diagnosis and prognosis of disease with quantitative precision. In addition to the obvious applications of targeting molecular signatures of vascular diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis), deep-tissue diseases often manifest themselves by continuously altering and remodeling their neighboring blood vessels (e.g., cancer). Thus, the remodeled endothelium provides a wide range of targets for nanoparticles and molecular imaging. To demonstrate the potential of molecular imaging, we present a variety of nanoparticles designed for molecular imaging of cancer or atherosclerosis using different imaging modalities.

  15. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  16. Molecular therapies for inherited epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises rare genetic disorders characterized by formation of blisters and erosions of skin and mucous membranes after minor mechanical trauma. The molecular basis and the pathomechanisms of the main EB types have been largely deciphered in the past decades. The burden of the disease is high and quality of life strongly affected. The treatment is still symptomatic aiming to support wound healing and resolve complications. Numerous experimental therapeutic approaches for EB have been explored in the last years, most of them dedicated to dystrophic EB. Although gene and cell therapies have been already applied in patients, molecular therapies including gene editing and repurposing of small molecules are currently very attractive. Recent data on the effect of small molecules, like aminoglycosides and angiotensin receptor blockers in preclinical models for dystrophic EB are encouraging. The efficacy in patients remains to be proven in clinical trials. Therapeutic efficacy, as well as unexpected outcomes must be carefully monitored.

  17. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D; Iverson, Nicole M; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T; Landry, Markita P; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S

    2016-01-08

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications.

  18. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D.; Iverson, Nicole M.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T.; Landry, Markita P.; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications.

  19. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition

    PubMed Central